Santa Clara University

SCU in the News: January 26, 2010 to February 9, 2010

Report Overview:
Total Clips (134)
Other (134)


Headline Date Outlet Links

Other (134)
Some Question Sal DiCiccio's stake in South Mountain Freeway Plan 02/09/2010 Arizona Republic Text View Clip
iPad goes for the kill 02/09/2010 21st Century Business Herald - Washington DC Bureau Text View Clip
Church job tries to stop ‘sins of the past' 02/09/2010 Enterprise, The Text View Clip
Church job tries to stop ‘sins of the past' 02/09/2010 Patriot Ledger, The Text View Clip
Connecting Catholicism to the World 02/09/2010 Candor, The Text View Clip
Mortgage Investors Push for Principal Writedowns 02/09/2010 DS News: Default Servicing Text View Clip
The Impact of the Obama Stimulus Package on Silicon Valley 02/08/2010 KLIV-AM Text View Clip
Joy of Garbage 02/08/2010 Today Show - NBC News Network Text View Clip
campus. Reporter Santa clara University has a 02/08/2010 Channel 13 News at 12 PM - WHO-TV Text
MUCH MORE FUN STUDYING SPORTS OR COOKING OR TV, 02/08/2010 WDTN-TV Text
MUCH MORE FUN STUDYING SPORTS OR COOKING OR TV, 02/08/2010 Today Show - NBC News Network Text
Sunday's Jog for Jill Brings Awareness to Lung Cancer Battle 02/08/2010 Daily Californian, The Text View Clip
Judge at high mark in lawyers wanting her taken off cases 02/07/2010 Merced Sun-Star - Online Text View Clip
Judge at high mark in lawyers wanting her taken off cases 02/07/2010 Sacramento Bee - Online, The Text View Clip
Judge at high mark in lawyers wanting her taken off cases 02/07/2010 Modesto Bee - Online, The Text View Clip
Tenured profs on way out? 02/07/2010 Arizona Daily Sun Text View Clip
Judge at high mark in lawyers wanting her taken off cases 02/07/2010 Modesto Bee, The Text
5 Ways to Stick to Your Workout 02/07/2010 Allure - Online Text View Clip
Public shocked by parents who kill 02/06/2010 Global Lethbridge (CISA-TV) - Online Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/06/2010 Global Maritimes (CIHF-TV) - Online Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/06/2010 CHBC Television Kelowna (CHBC-TV) - Online Text View Clip
James hill III Santa clara University. 02/05/2010 KSFY Action News Live at 5 PM - KSFY-TV Text
JAMES HILL III, SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY. 02/05/2010 NBC Action News at 5 PM - KSHB-TV Text
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/05/2010 Calgary Herald - Online, The Text View Clip
Santa Clara University Student Advances to Final Round in Jeopardy! 02/05/2010 AJCU Higher Ed News Text View Clip
8 ROTC programs win MacArthur Awards 02/04/2010 Army Times - Online Text View Clip
Stanford remains top university for fundraising 02/04/2010 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Star Phoenix - Online Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Westerly News Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Global Saskatoon (CFSK-TV) - Online Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Regina Leader-Post - Online Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Global TV - Online Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Global TV - Online Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Global Lethbridge (CISA-TV) - Online Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Edmonton Journal - Online, The Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children researcher 02/04/2010 Vancouver Sun - Online, The Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Gazette (Montreal) - Online, The Text View Clip
Public shocked by parents who kill 02/04/2010 Canada.com Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Global Montreal (CKMI-TV) - Online Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Ottawa Citizen - Online, The Text View Clip
Santa Clara student competes on Jeopardy 02/04/2010 WJRT-TV - Online Text View Clip
Public shocked by parents who kill 02/04/2010 Edmonton Journal - Online, The Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Province - Online, The Text View Clip
Need tools to study for the bar exam? There’s an app for that 02/04/2010 Wichita Business Journal - Online Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Vancouver Sun - Online, The Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Windsor Star - Online, The Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Canada.com Text View Clip
Parents more likely than strangers to murder children 02/04/2010 Times Colonist - Online Text View Clip
Public shocked by parents who kill; Crime violates society's 'deepest sensibilities,' U.S. law profe 02/04/2010 Edmonton Journal, The Text
Santa Clara University Student Matches Wits on Jeopardy 02/03/2010 ABC 7 News at 11 PM - KGO-TV Text
UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A 02/03/2010 ABC 7 News at 6 PM- KGO-TV Text
UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A 02/03/2010 KDBC 4 News Saturday at 5:30 PM - KDBC-TV Text
UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A 02/03/2010 KRQE News 13 at 5:30 PM - KRQE-TV Text
UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A 02/03/2010 Fox 10 News at 5 PM - WALA-TV Text
Santa Clara University Student on Jeopardy! 02/03/2010 ABC 7 News at 5 PM- KGO-TV Text
A SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY STUDENT WITH OTHER INTELLENT COLLEGE STUDENTS TONIGHT. 02/03/2010 ABC 7 News Saturday 5 PM - KGO-TV Text
A SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY STUDENT WITH OTHER INTELLENT COLLEGE STUDENTS TONIGHT. 02/03/2010 ABC 7 News at 5 PM- KGO-TV Text
UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A 02/03/2010 Springfield 33 News at 10 PM - KSPR-TV Text
UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A 02/03/2010 WBRZ News 2 Louisiana at 4 PM - WBRZ-TV Text
SCU Freshman on Jeopardy 02/03/2010 KCBS-AM Text
SCU Freshman on Jeopardy 02/03/2010 KGO-AM Text View Clip
UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A 02/03/2010 WAFF 48 Noon News - WAFF-TV Text
Pizarro Hospice of the Valley hits grant goal 02/03/2010 SiliconValley.com Text View Clip
Does Obama GOP exchange resurrect the role of religion in politics? 02/03/2010 Examiner.com Text View Clip
Santa Clara Univ. professor outlines economic outlook 02/03/2010 WJRT-TV - Online Text View Clip
Milgram Obedience Study and Research Ethics 02/03/2010 Suite101.com Text View Clip
5 Ways to Stick to Your Workout 02/03/2010 Yahoo! Shine Text View Clip
A LOOK BACK FEB. 3, 1993 02/03/2010 San Jose Mercury News Text
Pizarro: Hospice of the Valley hits grant goal 02/02/2010 San Jose Mercury News Text View Clip
5 Ways to Stick to Your Workout 02/02/2010 Allure Text View Clip
Facebook Asks Court To Dismiss Click Fraud Cases 02/02/2010 MediaPost.com Text View Clip
Apple thrives as Sun Micro dies 02/02/2010 MarketWatch Text View Clip
Poizner Whitman consultant threatened to drive him out of governor s race 02/02/2010 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Apple thrives as Sun Micro dies 02/02/2010 MarketWatch Text
Jerry Kroth 02/02/2010 Huffington Post, The Text View Clip
Poizner Whitman consultant threatened to drive him out of governor s race 02/02/2010 Whittier Daily News Text View Clip
Poizner Whitman consultant threatened to drive him out of governor s race 02/02/2010 San Gabriel Valley Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Poizner Whitman consultant threatened to drive him out of governor s race 02/02/2010 Press-Telegram - Online Text View Clip
Financial survey Americans optimistic about personal finances 02/02/2010 KUSA-TV - Online Text View Clip
Pizarro Hospice of the Valley hits grant goal 02/02/2010 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Silicon Valley Economic Forecast 02/02/2010 KCBS-AM - Online Text View Clip
5 Ways to Stick to Your Workout 02/02/2010 Allure - Online Text View Clip
POIZNER ACCUSES RIVAL'S AIDE OF THREAT 02/02/2010 San Jose Mercury News Text
Santa Clara Univ. professor outlines economic outlook 02/02/2010 KGO-TV - Online Text View Clip
Need tools to study for the bar exam? There’s an app for that 02/01/2010 Business Review - Online Text View Clip
Couples Can Overdo Being Supportive 02/01/2010 ScienceDaily Text View Clip
Some question Sal DiCiccio's stake in South Mountain Freeway plan 01/31/2010 AZCentral.com Text View Clip
Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire 01/31/2010 TechRadar.com Text View Clip
Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire 01/31/2010 Yahoo! India Text View Clip
Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire 01/31/2010 Webindia123 Text View Clip
Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire 01/31/2010 DailyIndia.com Text View Clip
West County man recalls victory in Orange Bowl 60 years ago 01/31/2010 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire 01/31/2010 Hindustan Times Text
Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire 01/31/2010 DNA India - Online Text View Clip
Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire 01/31/2010 NetIndia123.com Text View Clip
Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire 01/31/2010 NewKerala.com Text View Clip
Supporting your lover too much backfires 01/31/2010 Times of India Text View Clip
Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire 01/31/2010 Newstrack India Text View Clip
West County man recalls victory in Orange Bowl 60 years ago 01/30/2010 El Cerrito Albany Journal Text View Clip
Pot Half Full 01/29/2010 North Bay Bohemian Text View Clip
Flash Of Criticism At FTC Privacy Roundtable 01/29/2010 MediaPost.com Text View Clip
SUPPORT YOUR SWEETHEART BUT DON'T OVERDO IT 01/29/2010 Federal News Service Text
Google Scores Partial Victory In Street View Lawsuit 01/29/2010 MediaPost.com Text View Clip
Gatherings Planned In Bay Area To Watch State Of The Union 01/28/2010 KTVU-TV - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara University students react to Obama's address 01/28/2010 El Cerrito Albany Journal Text View Clip
Santa Clara University students react to Obama's address 01/28/2010 Cupertino Courier - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara University students react to Obama's address 01/28/2010 Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online Text View Clip
STUDENTS LIKE EDUCATION PROPOSALS 01/28/2010 San Jose Mercury News Text
Least-admired companies produce highest returns, study finds 01/28/2010 National Post Text
Expectations for President Obama's First State of the Union 01/27/2010 KQED-FM Text View Clip
JONES IN OAKLAND AND SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY DUNN HALL. 01/27/2010 NBC Bay Area News at 5 AM - KNTV-TV Text
State of the Union Watch parties 01/27/2010 KNTV-TV Text
Santa Clara district attorney defends boycott of judge, while outside experts liken her move to the 01/27/2010 Oroville Mercury-Register Text View Clip
Santa Clara district attorney defends boycott of judge, while outside experts liken her move to the 01/27/2010 Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara district attorney defends boycott of judge, while outside experts liken her move to the 01/27/2010 Cupertino Courier - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara district attorney defends boycott of judge, while outside experts liken her move to the 01/27/2010 El Cerrito Albany Journal Text View Clip
A Cameo Before Showtime 01/27/2010 New York Times Text
Rambis, a ChampionWith the Lakers, Was Briefly a Knick 01/27/2010 New York Times - Online Text View Clip
Unadmired companies have better returns 01/27/2010 National Post - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara County DA defends boycott of judge; outside experts liken move to nuclear option 01/27/2010 Cupertino Courier - Online Text View Clip
'A TERRIBLE MISUSE BY THE DA,' CRITIC SAYS 01/27/2010 San Jose Mercury News Text
Gatherings Planned In Bay Area To Watch State Of The Union 01/27/2010 KTVU-TV - Online Text View Clip
Field Poll: Tea Party Off the Radar of Ethnic Caifornian Voters 01/26/2010 New America Media Text View Clip
As Priests' Numbers Fall, SR Diocese Seeks Solutions 01/26/2010 Press Democrat Text View Clip
Is the future of campus cards contactless? 01/26/2010 CR80 News Text View Clip
Is the future of campus cards contactless? 01/26/2010 ContactlessNews Text View Clip
Is the future of campus cards contactless? 01/26/2010 CR80 News Text View Clip
Professional musicians visit Fisher Middle School in Los Gatos 01/26/2010 San Jose Mercury News Text View Clip
The Taste for Civilization 01/07/2010 Afternoon Magazine - WILL-AM Text View Clip
Estate Tax 12/27/2009 KNTV-TV Text View Clip
Students shine at the Solar Decathlon 11/04/2009 SPIE Newsroom Text View Clip
Santa Clara University makes Top 20 list in green power 10/28/2009 San Jose Mercury News Text
A Discussion about Teaching Theology 10/23/2009 Church 21 at Boston College Text View Clip
Team California's Refract House 10/18/2009 Residential Architect Text View Clip


Some Question Sal DiCiccio's stake in South Mountain Freeway Plan | View Clip
02/09/2010
Arizona Republic

The proposed South Mountain Freeway has defined Sal DiCiccio's return to politics.

A year ago, the Phoenix real-estate broker filled a vacancy on the City Council, reclaiming the seat he held a decade earlier. Ever since, he's championed moving the planned Loop 202 extension south, from Ahwatukee Foothills to the Gila River Reservation.

To supporters, DiCiccio is working to find the best outcome for his Phoenix constituents. Opponents say his development deals along the freeway blur personal and public matters and represent a conflict of interest.

The Arizona Republic took a closer look at DiCiccio's possible stake in the planned 22-mile freeway, examining city financial forms and court records, plus letters, e-mails and other documents obtained under a public-records request. The picture that emerged shows that DiCiccio:

• Benefited financially from a business partner's purchase of land that was resold to the state for the proposed South Mountain Freeway. The purchase, which The Republic uncovered in records, allowed the business partner to repay a $100,000 loan from DiCiccio that the councilman says was unrelated to the freeway property.

• Was paid thousands of dollars in 2006 by an Arizona Department of Transportation consultant to persuade Gila River leaders to permit the Chandler-to-Laveen freeway to cross their reservation.

• Has investments in leases of two Gila River tribal properties, one located near the proposed Loop 202 extension route. DiCiccio won't say how much he invested or what his potential profit could be. The tribe, his development partner, stands to gain millions of dollars and wilderness land if it sells right of way to the state for the freeway.

DiCiccio was not in public office when he made the investments or worked as a consultant - a fact that he points to in denying critics' accusations that his efforts to move the freeway path pose a conflict of interest. He said he has never voted on the freeway and doesn't plan to.

But DiCiccio's dual public and private roles attracted criticism in his successful fall election campaign. Some transportation officials and ethics experts say they are troubled that DiCiccio has represented all sides of the freeway debate over the past decade, whether as a politician, a businessman or an advocate.

Few details are available in public records about DiCiccio's business dealings. Records show he owns a commercial real-estate firm and is a licensed real-estate broker.

His dual roles threaten to muddle the $1.9 billion Loop 202 project and could delay it, after 27 years of planning. Environmental work on the existing route is six months from completion and federal approval to build is expected this year.

Repayment of a loan

The most recent financial benefit that DiCiccio garnered from a project tied to the South Mountain Freeway involved property on the western end of the proposed freeway route.

In 2001, ADOT bought a field in Laveen, signaling for the first time where it planned to route the freeway in the area.

Three years later, DiCiccio's friend and business partner, Richard Kohan, bought options to buy an 84-acre gravel yard across the street, at 59th Avenue and Broadway Road. Kohan planned to resell the property to ADOT for "a sizable profit," he argued later in court. Court records show Kohan couldn't pull together the $8.44 million to make the purchase, and in 2005 turned to outside investors, including brother Ted Kohan. In 2005, DiCiccio loaned Richard Kohan's partnership $100,000, the councilman says. DiCiccio says the interest-free loan was for a real-estate deal in Buckeye, not the 59th Avenue property. He says he didn't record the loan because he trusted his friend.

"I have no interest in that property," he says. "Zero."

In December 2008, ADOT bought the gravel-yard land for $15 million. The brothers nearly doubled their investment, but then sued each other over the profits. DiCiccio intervened to recover the $100,000. Last May, a Maricopa County Superior Court judge ordered that the councilman and a handful of named investors get paid from an escrow account holding the ADOT money.

Eric Anderson, transportation director for the Maricopa Association of Governments, says Di- Ciccio never mentioned his 59th Avenue connection when he returned to public office and participated in closed-door Loop 202 negotiations.

"I think that's a problem," Anderson says. "If we had known this . . . we probably would have recommended that we not meet (with him) until we resolve the freeway issue."

Consulting fees

DiCiccio's earliest-known effort to get the South Mountain Freeway moved to tribal land was as a consultant working on behalf of the state. In 2005, the Gila River tribe's governing council passed a resolution and sent a letter to ADOT saying it had no interest in a freeway on its land. ADOT and MAG interpreted the action as closing off the last option for rerouting the freeway and moved ahead with plans to build it through Ahwatukee and a corner of South Mountain Park. But the next year, an ADOT consultant hired DiCiccio to convince Gila River leaders to reverse course.

DiCiccio says he was chosen because he'd established a rapport with the tribe during his first council stint, from 1994 to 2000. He was paid $8,318 by the consultant.

DiCiccio's negotiations centered on how the tribe could be compensated, including a land swap in the Estrella Mountains, but the effort fizzled.

The idea resurfaced last fall, days before DiCiccio's election. Tribal leaders made a surprise announcement that they would consider an ADOT proposal. Weeks later, DiCiccio was a central figure in a meeting of key officials that participants described as a breakthrough. Parties discussed a possible land swap. On Wednesday, Gila River leaders asked the state to conduct a study on moving the freeway.

Tribal agreements

In 2007, a year after consulting for ADOT, DiCiccio entered an exclusive agreement with the Gila River tribe to develop 75 acres of desert in a key location: Pecos Road and 40th Street. The property will be at a planned Loop 202 interchange, regardless of the ultimate route. Unless the freeway is scrapped, the property promises sizable profits: Any development would sit at the only northern gateway to the Wild Horse Pass Hotel and Casino. DiCiccio's deal with the tribe entitles him to 20 percent of any profits. The tribe and DiCiccio inked a similar deal in 2008 on a 75-acre parcel at the reservation's southern limit, near Maricopa. The land sits along Arizona 347, the reservation's only southern approach. The property is about 15 miles south of the proposed Loop 202.

The twin deals were the focus of criticism during last year's election. The councilman declined to discuss details of the agreements, citing ongoing negotiations with private partners. But he did say the pair of properties has strategic importance for selling to a captive market.

Conflict issue

DiCiccio is adamant he has no conflict of interest over the proposed Loop 202 extension. Twice last year, Phoenix City Attorney Gary Verburg agreed, saying the state law didn't apply to the freeway issue because it impacts 10 or more people.

Yet twice, DiCiccio declared possible conflicts on projects near Pecos Road. The first time came in 1998 when he declined to join talks about raising money for an interchange at Interstate 10 and Pecos because he lived about a mile away. Then, last month, DiCiccio recused himself from voting to improve a Pecos Road park-and-ride lot across the street from his tribal investment property.

Despite caution on those matters, DiCiccio remains active in negotiating for the freeway to be moved. He met repeatedly with ADOT, MAG, Sen. John McCain, U.S. Rep. Harry Mitchell, state land officials and Gila River tribal officials, according to public officials' calendar entries.

Some ethics experts say DiCiccio's work on the South Mountain Freeway blurs his public and private roles.

"He has involved himself not just politically, but personally and financially," says Judy Nadler, a senior fellow in government ethics at Santa Clara University's Markkula Center for Applied Ethics. "He's embroiled himself in this issue for a long time and worn many hats. It's a legitimate question to ask: Who is he really speaking for?"

But Bob Stern, who helped write California's public-ethics law, says DiCiccio's actions in office are proper.

"If he's not making any decisions, there's no problem," says Stern, president of the Center for Governmental Studies, a Los Angeles-based non-profit. "He may have an economic interest, but it's nothing to do with him being in office."

DiCiccio acknowledges his role has created a muddy impression, but says it's a price he's willing to pay to reach a compromise on the South Mountain Freeway.

"I've been the only one pushing this because I have an obligation to protect my district," he says.

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iPad goes for the kill | View Clip
02/09/2010
21st Century Business Herald - Washington DC Bureau

Santa Clara University OMIS professor Andy Tsay was interviewed by the Chinese language publication 21st Century Business Herald, the Chinese equivalent to the Wall Street Journal, about Apple's new iPad, and the battle brewing between the iPad and the
Amazon Kindle. Professor Tsay analyzes the two products' strategies for hardware design, digital content, and supply chain management.

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Church job tries to stop ‘sins of the past' | View Clip
02/09/2010
Enterprise, The

BRAINTREE —

For years, Mark Dunderdale dealt with sexual assault and other crime victims as a prosecutor in the office of the Plymouth County district attorney. Now he will use that expertise to help the Archdiocese of Boston investigate allegations of wrongdoing or impropriety by clergy or other diocesan workers.

Dunderdale, the founding director of the archdiocese's new Office of Professional Standards and Oversight, said the creation of that office is the most recent move by the archdiocese to make sure problems of the past — such as ignoring allegations of sexual abuse by priests — aren't repeated.

“The intent is to have professional investigations that are fair and professionally done so we never repeat the sins of the past,” said Dunderdale, 42, who officially started the job on Jan. 1.

The creation of the new office is part of the ongoing effort by the church to protect children and make sure clergy and other church workers are held to high standards, said the Rev. Richard M. Erikson, vicar general and moderator of the curia of the Boston archdiocese. Dunderdale will report to him.

“It is an indication of our commitment to protect people and to have all people who are ministering to the public to live by our highest and professional standards,” said Erikson, the second in command in the archdiocese. “He is building on the work that has been done already.”

The Catholic Church, nationally and in Boston, has been rocked by nearly two decades of allegations that priests accused of abusing children were moved from parish to unsuspecting parish without any public action or acknowledgement of their crimes.

Some of the former priests – including James Porter, convicted of molesting 28 children, many in the Fall River diocese – were later prosecuted and sent to prison. More than $140 million has already been spent in civil settlements in Massachusetts alone.

Erikson said hiring Dunderdale, coupled with other programs since the early 2000s, will help the church move forward. “We also count on his experience and wisdom to help better any of our policies,” he said.

The Boston archdiocese is not alone in making charges to address the clergy sex-abuse issues, said Tom Plante, editor of the book “Bless Me Father For I have Sinned: Perspectives on Sexual Abuse Committed by Roman Catholic Priests.”

Plante, a psychology professor at Santa Clara University in California, has done more than 500 evaluations for the church on people who were considering a religious vocation and said the church now is taking no chances on who gets into seminaries for training to be a priest.

“We have been hyper vigilant for any types of risk factors,” he said.

But taking steps to investigate any allegations of wrongdoing as well as setting up policies to prevent problems is also a key move, Plante said.

“We have a tremendous amount of new policies and procedures and research, all going in the right direction,” Plante said.

Erikson said Dunderdale was picked because of his legal expertise and track record.

“He is a great person, a wonderful Catholic, husband and father,” said Erikson, who first met Dunderdale last year when he interviewed for the position.

If there is an allegation of misconduct involving a child, the matter will immediately be referred to civil authorities, Erikson and Dunderdale said.

“Let's say the authorities say, ‘Yes, we are gong to act on it,' we then allow the civil course to take its course,” Erikson said. “We don't want in any way to obstruct that investigation.”

Dunderdale shared that sentiment.

“There is a very succinct policy we have — any allegations of abuse of a child, we immediately notify law enforcement. That is done right away. The first step is the notification of law enforcement,” Dunderdale said.

If civil authorities notify the church they are not pursuing the matter, either because the statute of limitations has expired or other reasons, Dunderdale would then take over the church investigation into the matter, Erikson said.

“The statute of limitations does not matter if there is a credible allegation,” Erikson said. ``We are going to have our own investigation.”

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Church job tries to stop ‘sins of the past' | View Clip
02/09/2010
Patriot Ledger, The

Local prosecutor appointed to investigate allegations of of clergy wrongdoing

For years, Mark Dunderdale dealt with sexual assault and other crime victims as a prosecutor in the office of the Plymouth County district attorney. Now he will use that expertise to help the Archdiocese of Boston investigate allegations of wrongdoing or impropriety by clergy or other diocesan workers.

Dunderdale, the founding director of the archdiocese's new Office of Professional Standards and Oversight, said the creation of that office is the most recent move by the archdiocese to make sure problems of the past — such as ignoring allegations of sexual abuse by priests — aren't repeated.

“The intent is to have professional investigations that are fair and professionally done so we never repeat the sins of the past,” said Dunderdale, 42, who officially started the job on Jan. 1.

The creation of the new office is part of the ongoing effort by the church to protect children and make sure clergy and other church workers are held to high standards, said the Rev. Richard M. Erikson, vicar general and moderator of the curia of the Boston archdiocese. Dunderdale will report to him.

“It is an indication of our commitment to protect people and to have all people who are ministering to the public to live by our highest and professional standards,” said Erikson, the second in command in the archdiocese. “He is building on the work that has been done already.”

The Catholic Church, nationally and in Boston, has been rocked by nearly two decades of allegations that priests accused of abusing children were moved from parish to unsuspecting parish without any public action or acknowledgement of their crimes.

Some of the former priests – including James Porter, convicted of molesting 28 children, many in the Fall River diocese – were later prosecuted and sent to prison. More than $140 million has already been spent in civil settlements in Massachusetts alone.

Erikson said hiring Dunderdale, coupled with other programs since the early 2000s, will help the church move forward. “We also count on his experience and wisdom to help better any of our policies,” he said.

The Boston archdiocese is not alone in making charges to address the clergy sex-abuse issues, said Tom Plante, editor of the book “Bless Me Father For I have Sinned: Perspectives on Sexual Abuse Committed by Roman Catholic Priests.”

Plante, a psychology professor at Santa Clara University in California, has done more than 500 evaluations for the church on people who were considering a religious vocation and said the church now is taking no chances on who gets into seminaries for training to be a priest.

“We have been hyper vigilant for any types of risk factors,” he said.

But taking steps to investigate any allegations of wrongdoing as well as setting up policies to prevent problems is also a key move, Plante said.

“We have a tremendous amount of new policies and procedures and research, all going in the right direction,” Plante said.

Erikson said Dunderdale was picked because of his legal expertise and track record.

“He is a great person, a wonderful Catholic, husband and father,” said Erikson, who first met Dunderdale last year when he interviewed for the position.

If there is an allegation of misconduct involving a child, the matter will immediately be referred to civil authorities, Erikson and Dunderdale said.

“Let's say the authorities say, ‘Yes, we are gong to act on it,' we then allow the civil course to take its course,” Erikson said. “We don't want in any way to obstruct that investigation.”

Dunderdale shared that sentiment.

“There is a very succinct policy we have — any allegations of abuse of a child, we immediately notify law enforcement. That is done right away. The first step is the notification of law enforcement,” Dunderdale said.

If civil authorities notify the church they are not pursuing the matter, either because the statute of limitations has expired or other reasons, Dunderdale would then take over the church investigation into the matter, Erikson said.

“The statute of limitations does not matter if there is a credible allegation,” Erikson said. ``We are going to have our own investigation.”

READ MOREabout this issue.

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Connecting Catholicism to the World | View Clip
02/09/2010
Candor, The

At Benedictine University, age old traditions are always melding with contemporary issues. BU has a strong commitment to integrating the traditions of the Benedictine heritage into the students' experience in order to honor BU's mission.

This week there will be no exception to this goal when Dr. Andre L. Delbecq, a Visiting Scholar in Catholic Thought, comes to BU to present two lectures.

Delbecq will be lecturing on two dates. On Wednesday, Feb. 10 at 7 p.m., he will be presenting the lecture "Spiritual Practices of Leaders in Turbulent Settings" in Scholl Hall Room 101. On Thursday, Feb. 11 at 12:20 p.m., he will be holding a lecture on "The Seductions of Power and Leadership Distortion" also in Scholl Hall Room 101.

The two lectures will address timely, similar, yet diverse topics. The lecture on Wednesday will be directed to leadership in tough times, and the Thursday lecture will be pertaining to distorted leadership.

Delbecq, has the honor of holding the position of the Director of the Institute for Spirituality and Organizational Leadership at the Santa Clara University .

Joining scholars and business leaders to probe into the nature of spirituality and the role it plays in organizational dynamics created this particular institute with the goal of exploring spirituality within the context of organizations.

These series of lectures are being sponsored by CMI, Center for Mission and Identity; a university administrative organization that was established to preserve the monastic tradition of connecting the values of learning to the principles of the Benedictine heritage.

This lecture program is intended to illustrate how Catholicism connects with many areas in the community.

Dr. Christine Fletcher, Assistant Professor, said, "I think it makes us aware of our intellectual traditions."

The Benedictine philosophy has strict rules about knowledge and takes seriously how we connect the mind to religion.

All lecturers are approved by the CMI who receive suggestions about scholars and review the potential speakers to make program selections that have a wide appeal and cover a variety of topics.

Fletcher states, "It shows the breadth of the Catholic intellectual tradition and its relevance to the world today."

Phillip Timco started the lecture program over 10 years ago. There is a free public outreach to make the lecture series available to the immediate surrounding area and invitations are also issued to local Catholic parishes.

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Mortgage Investors Push for Principal Writedowns | View Clip
02/09/2010
DS News: Default Servicing

Mortgage principal – to cut or not to cut – has grabbed a fair share of the media spotlight in recent weeks. A number of experts and analysts are plugging principal reduction as a practicable means of ensuring payments keep coming in and homeowners don't redefault on their modified loan.

A new study by Santa Clara University's Leavey School of Business puts the numbers and calculations to the test, and the report's author, Sanjiv R. Das, concluded that “lenders should forgive, not forsake, mortgages.”

Das' paper states that trimming the principal is “not a favored recipe” among lenders and is often prohibited by agreements with investors. But one such group of prominent mortgage loan stakeholders isn't standing in the way of principal forgiveness – in fact, they are lobbying Congress to enact legislation to address the problem of underwater mortgages by reducing the homeowner's debt.

The Mortgage Investors Coalition represents holders of some $100 billion in mortgage securities and includes such name as Fortress Investment Group, ICP Capital, and HBK Capital Management. According to a report from Reuters, the organization pitched a proposal to House Financial Services Committee Chairman Barney Frank last week that focuses on principal writedowns for second liens.

During the housing boom, when it seemed property values could only go up, homeowners enhanced their wealth (but increased their debt) by taking out secondary home equity lines of credit. These second liens are now impeding some modifications, and according to research from Amherst Securities cited by Reuters, they are attached to more than half the mortgages in private mortgage-backed securities (MBS).

Micah Green, an attorney representing the Mortgage Investors Coalition, told the news agency that the investors are prepared to consider a principal reduction plan where losses are shared, rather than completely wiped out in exchange for an incentive payment, as the Treasury has outlined in its second lien program under the Making Home Affordable plan.

As Reuters explained, under the coalition plan, investors would forgive principal to 96.5 percent of homes' value, clearing a path for borrowers to refinance into a federally backed mortgage.

Green, of the Washington law firm Patton Boggs LLP, told “Reuters that he believed this softened position on second liens could help break the impasse keeping large servicers from forgiving principal. He called the proposal “a natural evolution” for the government's Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP). Investors want it because they, like homeowners, are in bad loans, Green explained to the news service.

Recent analysis from the credit ratings agency DBRS shows that mortgage restructurings employing principal writedowns increased to 13 percent of all modifications in the third quarter of last year, up from 10 percent in the second quarter and 3 percent in the first.

But while speculation has grown that the administration may be preparing to make principal reduction a centerpiece of HAMP, officials have repeatedly stated that no such alterations to the program are in play.

“There is a growing sense of concern among policymakers that the lack of homeowner equity is really getting in the way of providing a solution to homeowners,” Green told Reuters.

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The Impact of the Obama Stimulus Package on Silicon Valley | View Clip
02/08/2010
KLIV-AM

Santa Clara University economics professors Alex Field and Mario Belotti are interviewed on KLIV on the one-year anniversary and success of the Obama stimulus package.

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Joy of Garbage | View Clip
02/08/2010
Today Show - NBC News Network

Santa Clara University's Joy of Garbage class was briefly mentioned, using video of this quarter's class, as well as file video of the campus. The class was one of many featured in a piece about unique classes on college campuses nationwide.

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campus. Reporter Santa clara University has a
02/08/2010
Channel 13 News at 12 PM - WHO-TV

Fulfill my lifelong dream. Reporter: yeah, that Simpson. Where you actually write an episode for your final exam. Uh, let's watch something else. Reporter: even yale, an ivy league school, has added a few trendy classes to their curriculum, such as the history of shopping. Sign me up. Or the culture of things. Talk about a broad topic. We caught up with yale professor Shelley kagan, who teaches one of the more popular courses on campus called death. I took both life and death. Reporter: yes, he also teaches life, just in case you were wondering. A course in death or a course in life sort of has sort of like a cache ring to it. It's not like this is an attempt to tell you here's what life is. The real idea of the class was to look at some of the decisions that people make as they go through life. Reporter: just how popular is death? I mean, the course, not the act. The "yale daily" claimed it was the third largest class last semester on campus. Reporter: Santa clara University has a class called the joy of garbage, which is more than just putting your waste in the appropriate bin. Here in New York City, barnard college students are just getting started on a new class called revenge. And I'll bet you won't find a single red sox fan in this class at rutgers University called yankee stadium. My dad asked me what I registered for and I told him my classing, writing and yankee stadium. And he looked at me and was like, are you kidding? Reporter: want to sign up for this one? You'd be 1 of 200 students vying for only 20 slots. That's called popular. It's the most popular class in the first-year seminar catalog, I've been told. Reporter: is everybody that signs up for this class a yankees fan? Absolutely. Yes. Yes, of course. I'm a huge yankee fan. I was in diapers watching the yankees. We had a Phillies fan, yes. Reporter: better than a red sox fan. Well, we haven't had a red sox fan yet. I Don't think they would come. Reporter: a class about the yankees may seem like a no-brainer if you're interested in sports management, but discussions have ranged from business to sociology to philanthropy. And, yeah, also the captain of the baseball team. If I told you that Jeter is actually here today and is going to come in and speak to you, you Don't that doesn't affect you at all because you Don't really care because you know it's just about the stadium, right? I wouldn't go that far. Reporter: they do think the class is about Derek Jeter. I scored! I got to the bottom. Tell Derek he doesn't have to come. No, they Don't care. All right, I'll admit some of these courses were offered back when I was in school, I might have actually stayed for an advanced degree. In what, I have no idea, but an advanced degree in something. What's the weirdest class that you took in school? That I took in school? I think still back when I was in class, they were fairly normal courses. Sky diving did you take a sky diving course? Bowling. I loved it it was good.

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MUCH MORE FUN STUDYING SPORTS OR COOKING OR TV,
02/08/2010
WDTN-TV

YOU KNOW, HIGHER EDUCATION HAS COME A LONG WAY FROM THE THREE Rs. TODAY COLLEGES ARE OFFERING ALL KINDS OF CLASSES, MANY YOU PROBABLY WON'T BELIEVE. "TODAY" NATIONAL CORRESPONDENT JENNA WOLFE IS HERE TO EXPLAIN THAT. JENNA, HOW BAD ARE THESE? IT'S NOT BAD, IT'S GOOD. OKAY. IT DEPENDS HOW MUCH YOU'RE INTO EDUCATION. WHEN I THINK BACK TO COLLEGE, I REMEMBER TAKING PSYCH 101, ENGLISH LIT, MAYBE BIOLOGY. AND WHILE UNIVERSITIES STILL REQUIRE THOSE CORE CLASSES, WHAT WE USED TO COME TO KNOW AS LIBERAL ARTS NOW HAS A MUCH WIDER DEFINITION. I WISHED THERE WAS SOME WAY THAT WE COULD GET OUT OF SCHOOL TODAY. ME, TOO. ME, TOO, NEITHER. Reporter: DO YOU REMEMBER TAKING ALGEBRA BACK IN SCHOOL AND WONDERING WHEN AM I EVER GOING TO USE THIS IN REAL LIFE? WOULDN'T IT HAVE BEEN MUCH MORE FUN STUDYING SPORTS OR COOKING OR TV, LIKE "FAMILY TIES"? WELL, NOW YOU CAN, AS UNIVERSITIES ACROSS THE COUNTRY HAVE BEGUN OFFERING PRACTICAL COURSES. KEY WORD THERE BEING PRACTICAL. AT CENTER COLLEGE IN KENTUCKY, THEY OFFER A COURSE CALLED THE ART OF WALKING, WHERE STUDENTS LEARN ABOUT NATURE WHILE BURNING OFF A FEW CALORIES AT THE SAME TIME. YOU LIKE TV? WELL, AT CAL BERKELEY THE SIMPSONS THEY'VE GOT A SEMINAR CALLED SIMPSONS AND PHILOSOPHY. THIS IS A CHANCE FOR ME TO FULFILL MY LIFELONG DREAM. Reporter: YEAH, THAT SIMPSON. WHERE YOU ACTUALLY WRITE AN EPISODE FOR YOUR FINAL EXAM. UH, LET'S WATCH SOMETHING ELSE. Reporter: EVEN YALE, AN IVY LEAGUE SCHOOL, HAS ADDED A FEW TRENDY CLASSES TO THEIR CURRICULUM, SUCH AS THE HISTORY OF SHOPPING. SIGN ME UP. OR THE CULTURE OF THINGS. TALK ABOUT A BROAD TOPIC. WE CAUGHT UP WITH YALE PROFESSOR SHELLEY KAGAN, WHO TEACHES ONE OF THE MORE POPULAR COURSES ON CAMPUS CALLED DEATH. I TOOK BOTH LIFE AND DEATH. Reporter: YES, HE ALSO TEACHES LIFE, JUST IN CASE YOU WERE WONDERING. A COURSE IN DEATH OR A COURSE IN LIFE SORT OF HAS SORT OF LIKE A CACHE RING TO IT. IT'S NOT LIKE THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO TELL YOU HERE'S WHAT LIFE IS. THE REAL IDEA OF THELASS WAS TO LOOK AT SOME OF THE DECISIONS THAT PEOPLE MAKE AS TY GO THROUGH LIFE. Reporter: JUST HOW POPULAR IS DEATH? I MEAN, THE COURSE, NOT THE ACT. THE "YALE DAILY" CLAIMED IT WAS THE THIRD LARGEST CLASS LAST SEMESTER ON CAMPUS. Reporter: SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY HAS A CLASS CALLED THE JOY OF GARBAGE, WHICH IS MORE THAN JUST PUTTING YOUR WASTE IN THE APPROPRIATE BIN. HERE IN NEW YORK CITY, BARNARD COLLEGE STUDENTS ARE JUST GETTING STARTED ON A NEW CLASS CALLED REVENGE. AND I'LL BET YOU WON'T FIND A SINGLE RED SOX FAN IN THIS CLASS AT RUTGERS UNIVERSITY CALLED YANKEE STADIUM. MY DAD ASKED ME WHAT I REGISTERED FOR AND I TOLD HIM MY CLASSING, WRITING AND YANKEE STADIUM. AND HE LOOKED AT ME AND WAS LIKE, ARE YOU KIDDING? Reporter: WANT TO SIGN UP FOR THIS ONE? YOU'D BE 1 OF 200 STUDENTS VYING FOR ONLY 20 SLOTS. THAT'S CALLED POPULAR. IT'S THE MOST POPULAR CLASS IN THE FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR

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MUCH MORE FUN STUDYING SPORTS OR COOKING OR TV,
02/08/2010
Today Show - NBC News Network

YOU KNOW, HIGHER EDUCATION HAS COME A LONG WAY FROM THE THREE Rs. TODAY COLLEGES ARE OFFERING ALL KINDS OF CLASSES, MANY YOU PROBABLY WON'T BELIEVE. "TODAY" NATIONAL CORRESPONDENT JENNA WOLFE IS HERE TO EXPLAIN THAT. JENNA, HOW BAD ARE THESE? IT'S NOT BAD, IT'S GOOD. OKAY. IT DEPENDS HOW MUCH YOU'RE INTO EDUCATION. WHEN I THINK BACK TO COLLEGE, I REMEMBER TAKING PSYCH 101, ENGLISH LIT, MAYBE BIOLOGY. AND WHILE UNIVERSITIES STILL REQUIRE THOSE CORE CLASSES, WHAT WE USED TO COME TO KNOW AS LIBERAL ARTS NOW HAS A MUCH WIDER DEFINITION. I WISHED THERE WAS SOME WAY THAT WE COULD GET OUT OF SCHOOL TODAY. ME, TOO. ME, TOO, NEITHER. Reporter: DO YOU REMEMBER TAKING ALGEBRA BACK IN SCHOOL AND WONDERING WHEN AM I EVER GOING TO USE THIS IN REAL LIFE? WOULDN'T IT HAVE BEEN MUCH MORE FUN STUDYING SPORTS OR COOKING OR TV, LIKE "FAMILY TIES"? WELL, NOW YOU CAN, AS UNIVERSITIES ACROSS THE COUNTRY HAVE BEGUN OFFERING PRACTICAL COURSES. KEY WORD THERE BEING PRACTICAL. AT CENTER COLLEGE IN KENTUCKY, THEY OFFER A COURSE CALLED THE ART OF WALKING, WHERE STUDENTS LEARN ABOUT NATURE WHILE BURNING OFF A FEW CALORIES AT THE SAME TIME. YOU LIKE TV? WELL, AT CAL BERKELEY THE SIMPSONS THEY'VE GOT A SEMINAR CALLED SIMPSONS AND PHILOSOPHY. THIS IS A CHANCE FOR ME TO FULFILL MY LIFELONG DREAM. Reporter: YEAH, THAT SIMPSON. WHERE YOU ACTUALLY WRITE AN EPISODE FOR YOUR FINAL EXAM. UH, LET'S WATCH SOMETHING ELSE. Reporter: EVEN YALE, AN IVY LEAGUE SCHOOL, HAS ADDED A FEW TRENDY CLASSES TO THEIR CURRICULUM, SUCH AS THE HISTORY OF SHOPPING. SIGN ME UP. OR THE CULTURE OF THINGS. TALK ABOUT A BROAD TOPIC. WE CAUGHT UP WITH YALE PROFESSOR SHELLEY KAGAN, WHO TEACHES ONE OF THE MORE POPULAR COURSES ON CAMPUS CALLED DEATH. I TOOK BOTH LIFE AND DEATH. Reporter: YES, HE ALSO TEACHES LIFE, JUST IN CASE YOU WERE WONDERING. A COURSE IN DEATH OR A COURSE IN LIFE SORT OF HAS SORT OF LIKE A CACHE RING TO IT. IT'S NOT LIKE THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO TELL YOU HERE'S WHAT LIFE IS. THE REAL IDEA OF THE CLASS WAS TO LOOK AT SOME OF THE DECISIONS THAT PEOPLE MAKE AS THEY GO THROUGH LIFE. Reporter: JUST HOW POPULAR IS DEATH? I MEAN, THE COURSE, NOT THE ACT. THE "YALE DAILY" CLAIMED IT WAS THE THIRD LARGEST CLASS LAST SEMESTER ON CAMPUS. Reporter: SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY HAS A CLASS CALLED THE JOY OF GARBAGE, WHICH IS MORE THAN JUST PUTTING YOUR WASTE IN THE APPROPRIATE BIN. HERE IN NEW YORK CITY, BARNARD COLLEGE STUDENTS ARE JUST GETTING STARTED ON A NEW CLASS CALLED REVENGE. AND I'LL BET YOU WON'T FIND A SINGLE RED SOX FAN IN THIS CLASS AT RUTGERS UNIVERSITY CALLED YANKEE STADIUM. MY DAD ASKED ME WHAT I REGISTERED FOR AND I TOLD HIM MY CLASSING, WRITING AND YANKEE STADIUM. AND HE LOOKED AT ME AND WAS LIKE, ARE YOU KIDDING? Reporter: WANT TO SIGN UP FOR THIS ONE? YOU'D BE 1 OF 200 STUDENTS VYING FOR ONLY 20 SLOTS. THAT'S CALLED POPULAR. IT'S THE MOST POPULAR CLASS IN THE FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR CATALOG, I'VE BEEN TOLD. Reporter: IS EVERYBODY THAT SIGNS UP FOR THIS CLASS A YANKEES FAN? ABSOLUTELY. YES. YES, OF COURSE. I'M A HUGE YANKEE FAN. I WAS IN DIAPERS WATCHING THE YANKEES. WE HAD A PHILLIES FAN, YES. Reporter: BETTER THAN A RED SOX FAN. WELL, WE HAVEN'T HAD A RED SOX FAN YET. I DON'T THINK THEY WOULD COME. Reporter: A CLASS ABOUT THE YANKEES MAY SEEM LIKE A NO-BRAINER IF YOU'RE INTERESTED IN SPORTS MANAGEMENT, BUT DISCUSSIONS HAVE RANGED FROM BUSINESS TO SOCIOLOGY TO PHILANTHROPY. AND, YEAH, ALSO THE CAPTAIN OF THE BASEBALL TEAM. IF I TOLD YOU THAT JETER IS ACTUALLY HERE TODAY AND IS GOING TO COME IN AND SPEAK TO YOU, YOU DON'T THAT DOESN'T AFFECT YOU AT ALL BECAUSE YOU DON'T REALLY CARE BECAUSE YOU KNOW IT'S JUST ABOUT THE STADIUM, RIGHT? I WOULDN'T GO THAT FAR. Reporter: THEY DO THINK THE CLASS IS ABOUT DEREK JETER. I SCORED! I GOT TO THE BOTTOM. TELL DEREK HE DOESN'T HAVE TO COME. NO, THEY DON'T CARE. ALL RIGHT, I'LL ADMIT SOME OF THESE COURSES WERE OFFERED BACK WHEN I WAS IN SCHOOL, I MIGHT HAVE ACTUALLY STAYED FOR AN ADVANCED DEGREE. IN WHAT, I HAVE NO IDEA, BUT AN ADVANCED DEGREE IN SOMETHING. WHAT'S THE WEIRDEST CLASS THAT YOU TOOK IN SCHOOL? THAT I TOOK IN SCHOOL? I THINK STILL BACK WHEN I WAS IN CLASS, THEY WERE FAIRLY NORMAL COURSES. SKY DIVING DID YOU TAKE A SKY DIVING COURSE? BOWLING. I LOVED IT IT WAS GOOD. GOOD MORNING. IT'S 8:56 .CHECKING ON THE DRIVE IN, LET'S CHECK OUT THE CAM NETWORK, THE 2008 DISAPPEARANCE OF A SOUTHEAST NEBRASKA WOMAN HAS BECOME A HOMICIDE INVESTIGATION.

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Sunday's Jog for Jill Brings Awareness to Lung Cancer Battle | View Clip
02/08/2010
Daily Californian, The

Senior Jill Costello, second from left, a member of the Cal women's crew team, was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer in June. Jog for Jill, a campus charity run, took place Sunday to raise awareness and funds for cancer research.

Video »

Jogging for Cancer

Two speakers give thanks for those who participated in a running event for lung cancer.

Contributing Writer

Category: News > University > Student Life

Hundreds of people participated in a campus charity event Sunday, inspired by UC Berkeley Senior Jill Costello, a member of the women's crew team who was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer last year.

Jog for Jill was organized by Costello's campus chapter of the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority and raised more than $37,000 for the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation. Many in attendance said the event served a dual purpose.

"Definitely it reminds me of all the people that are standing behind me ... physically and emotionally," Costello said. "And it's cool to see people come out for a cause that is not only under the radar and stigmatized ... people aren't even aware of the effects on the age group like mine."

Sheila Von Driska, executive director of the foundation, said the organization has raised about $4 million in the past four years for lung cancer research.

Costello, a member of the women's crew team majoring in political economy, said she was first diagnosed with stage IV cancer following her return from the NCAA championships last June when she suffered from persistent stomach pains.

She said over the next week, she went through a battery of tests including CT scans, X-rays, ultrasounds and further blood tests.

"That's when they found the mass in my lung," she said.

Costello said she was surprised by the outpouring of donations from the community since her diagnosis and throughout her current struggle with the most advanced stage of lung cancer, which has already spread to other parts of her body.

"It's amazing," she said. "I couldn't believe how much people gave."

Through a partner organization, the Addario Lung Cancer Medical Institute, the foundation, which was established in 2006, two years after foundation founder Bonnie Addario had undergone treatment for lung cancer herself, has worked with seven medical research universities across the world, including UCSF, USC and the University of Barcelona, to create a virtual specimen depository, she said.

This database would collect data on tissue samples from the various institutions and be made available to all lung cancer researchers, Von Driska said.

According to Darby Anderson, Costello's friend and fellow sorority member, Anderson suggested to the foundation the idea of holding a fundraising run at UC Berkeley after she and Costello helped bring about 100 people to another foundation charity run in Golden Gate Park last year.

The fundraising run drew supporters through her crew team and sorority connections throughout the Bay Area.

Sorority members from the Santa Clara University chapter of Costello's sorority came from San Jose to attend.

Also, about a dozen members of the women's crew team from campus rival Stanford University turned out in support of Costello's cause.

"We can be rivals on the water but we can be friends off," said Cardinal sophomore and 2008 U.S. Olympic team member Lindsay Meyer.

BONNIE J. ADDARIO LUNG CANCER FOUNDATION, KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA, UC BERKELEY CREW

Contact George Ashworth at gashworth@dailycal.org.

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Judge at high mark in lawyers wanting her taken off cases | View Clip
02/07/2010
Merced Sun-Star - Online

Several attorneys from the Stanislaus County public defender's office moved to disqualify a local judge from more than two dozen cases last month, saying she would not give their clients a fair trial.

Court records show some deputy public defenders have steered their cases away from Judge Linda McFadden, who moved to Criminal Court from Juvenile Court in January.

McFadden was elected a Superior Court judge in 2002. Before that, she worked as a prosecutor for the district attorney's office for 13 years, heading the unit that tried child sexual assault and abuse cases.

Alison Yin

Modesto Bee - ALISON YIN/ayin@modbee.com Juvenile Judge Linda McFadden meets with the Modesto Kiwanis Club to thank them for their efforts in furnishing and decorating a children's waiting room in the Stanislaus Superior Court in Modesto, Calif., Wednesday, May 27, 2009. The room provides and safe and friendly environment for children to wait for dependency hearings.

In that time, she tried more than 200 cases before juries. One of her high-profile cases took place in 2002, when she helped to secure a life sentence for Josephine Origel, who killed 5-year-old Megan Lynn Mendez in 1998. The girl had been left in Origel's care by her heroin-addicted mother.

McFadden and her competitor in the election, now-Chief Deputy District Attorney Alan Cassidy, ran for the judgeship with a tough-on-crime platform. Each secured endorsements from a mix of law enforcement leaders and unions.

Until the election, Cassidy had worked most of his career as a defense attorney, a background that persuaded some that McFadden would be less lenient with criminals.

State law gives defense attorneys and prosecutors the right to file one affidavit per case claiming prejudice by a judge, and they don't have to give a reason.

The tactic, known as "papering" in courtroom slang, is capable of getting a judge reassigned if enough attorneys file them en masse.

"It's their right, so I would never take that personally," McFadden said Thursday. "We understand there may be reasons and those reasons are not required to be disclosed. So I never inquire about the reasons."

On average, eight such declarations were filed against the county's 18 judges during 2009, compared with 25 last month for McFadden. No judge was papered more than 30 times in all of last year.

Nearly all the affidavits against McFadden were filed by the public defender's office.

Public Defender Tim Bazar said the challenges filed against McFadden do not amount to a boycott from his office.

"We are not doing that," Bazar said. "We have not done that in the 14 years that I've been here."

But, he added, papering "is not a right we have to be reluctant to exercise. We pride ourselves in vigorously representing anyone who we're appointed to represent."

Some deputy public defenders could not be reached or declined to speak publicly about the issue.

Prosecutor background cited

Among the high-profile cases on which McFadden has been disqualified is that of Jessica Mae Betts, who is accused of murder. Authorities say she dumped her newborn daughter in a Turlock trash bin.

One prosecutor said she expected McFadden to be challenged on many such cases because of her background as a crimes-against-children prosecutor before she was elected to the bench.

Defense attorneys certainly aren't the only ones to exercise their right to paper judges in Stanislaus County.

In recent years, Judge Roger Beauchesne was transferred to a civil post after being heavily papered by local prosecutors, court officials said.

The same practice made headlines last month in Santa Clara County, where the district attorney took the rare step of publicly rebuking a sitting judge and instructing her staff to stop bringing cases in front of her.

Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University law professor and former dean, said if done in a large number of cases, papering can have a chilling effect on judges.

"I think that has potential for a lot of mischief," Uelmen said. "It sends a bad message to the public."

Stanislaus County Superior Court Executive Officer Mike Tozzi said the number of challenges filed against McFadden was not unusual, given her recent transfer to the downtown court after a more than four-year stint at Juvenile Hall.

"Was it expected? Yes. Will it go away? You hope so," Tozzi said.

Tozzi said he was not aware of any adverse effects to the court backlog by pulling McFadden off the cases last month. She handled about 185 cases in January, Tozzi said. He did not have a comparison available, but said that number of cases is standard for the county's judges.

"Any form of papering by lawyers of a judge has to affect the other judges because the case has to be transferred to another judge," he said. "It's a normal process that occurs daily in every courtroom around the state."

Bee staff writer Merrill Balassone can be reached at mbalassone@modbee.com or 578-2337.

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Judge at high mark in lawyers wanting her taken off cases | View Clip
02/07/2010
Sacramento Bee - Online, The

Several attorneys from the Stanislaus County public defender's office moved to disqualify a local judge from more than two dozen cases last month, saying she would not give their clients a fair trial.

Court records show some deputy public defenders have steered their cases away from Judge Linda McFadden, who moved to Criminal Court from Juvenile Court in January.

McFadden was elected a Superior Court judge in 2002. Before that, she worked as a prosecutor for the district attorney's office for 13 years, heading the unit that tried child sexual assault and abuse cases.

In that time, she tried more than 200 cases before juries. One of her high-profile cases took place in 2002, when she helped to secure a life sentence for Josephine Origel, who killed 5-year-old Megan Lynn Mendez in 1998. The girl had been left in Origel's care by her heroin-addicted mother.

McFadden and her competitor in the election, now-Chief Deputy District Attorney Alan Cassidy, ran for the judgeship with a tough-on-crime platform. Each secured endorsements from a mix of law enforcement leaders and unions.

Until the election, Cassidy had worked most of his career as a defense attorney, a background that persuaded some that McFadden would be less lenient with criminals.

State law gives defense attorneys and prosecutors the right to file one affidavit per case claiming prejudice by a judge, and they don't have to give a reason.

The tactic, known as "papering" in courtroom slang, is capable of getting a judge reassigned if enough attorneys file them en masse.

"It's their right, so I would never take that personally," McFadden said Thursday. "We understand there may be reasons and those reasons are not required to be disclosed. So I never inquire about the reasons."

On average, eight such declarations were filed against the county's 18 judges during 2009, compared with 25 last month for McFadden. No judge was papered more than 30 times in all of last year.

Nearly all the affidavits against McFadden were filed by the public defender's office.

Public Defender Tim Bazar said the challenges filed against McFadden do not amount to a boycott from his office.

"We are not doing that," Bazar said. "We have not done that in the 14 years that I've been here."

But, he added, papering "is not a right we have to be reluctant to exercise. We pride ourselves in vigorously representing anyone who we're appointed to represent."

Some deputy public defenders could not be reached or declined to speak publicly about the issue.

Prosecutor background cited

Among the high-profile cases on which McFadden has been disqualified is that of Jessica Mae Betts, who is accused of murder. Authorities say she dumped her newborn daughter in a Turlock trash bin.

One prosecutor said she expected McFadden to be challenged on many such cases because of her background as a crimes-against-children prosecutor before she was elected to the bench.

Defense attorneys certainly aren't the only ones to exercise their right to paper judges in Stanislaus County.

In recent years, Judge Roger Beauchesne was transferred to a civil post after being heavily papered by local prosecutors, court officials said.

The same practice made headlines last month in Santa Clara County, where the district attorney took the rare step of publicly rebuking a sitting judge and instructing her staff to stop bringing cases in front of her.

Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University law professor and former dean, said if done in a large number of cases, papering can have a chilling effect on judges.

"I think that has potential for a lot of mischief," Uelmen said. "It sends a bad message to the public."

Stanislaus County Superior Court Executive Officer Mike Tozzi said the number of challenges filed against McFadden was not unusual, given her recent transfer to the downtown court after a more than four-year stint at Juvenile Hall.

"Was it expected? Yes. Will it go away? You hope so," Tozzi said.

Tozzi said he was not aware of any adverse effects to the court backlog by pulling McFadden off the cases last month. She handled about 185 cases in January, Tozzi said. He did not have a comparison available, but said that number of cases is standard for the county's judges.

"Any form of papering by lawyers of a judge has to affect the other judges because the case has to be transferred to another judge," he said. "It's a normal process that occurs daily in every courtroom around the state."

Bee staff writer Merrill Balassone can be reached at mbalassone@modbee.com or 578-2337.

Return to Top



Judge at high mark in lawyers wanting her taken off cases | View Clip
02/07/2010
Modesto Bee - Online, The

Several attorneys from the Stanislaus County public defender's office moved to disqualify a local judge from more than two dozen cases last month, saying she would not give their clients a fair trial.

Court records show some deputy public defenders have steered their cases away from Judge Linda McFadden, who moved to Criminal Court from Juvenile Court in January.

McFadden was elected a Superior Court judge in 2002. Before that, she worked as a prosecutor for the district attorney's office for 13 years, heading the unit that tried child sexual assault and abuse cases.

Modesto Bee - ALISON YIN/ayin@modbee.com Juvenile Judge Linda McFadden meets with the Modesto Kiwanis Club to thank them for their efforts in furnishing and decorating a children's waiting room in the Stanislaus Superior Court in Modesto, Calif., Wednesday, May 27, 2009. The room provides and safe and friendly environment for children to wait for dependency hearings.

In that time, she tried more than 200 cases before juries. One of her high-profile cases took place in 2002, when she helped to secure a life sentence for Josephine Origel, who killed 5-year-old Megan Lynn Mendez in 1998. The girl had been left in Origel's care by her heroin-addicted mother.

McFadden and her competitor in the election, now-Chief Deputy District Attorney Alan Cassidy, ran for the judgeship with a tough-on-crime platform. Each secured endorsements from a mix of law enforcement leaders and unions.

Until the election, Cassidy had worked most of his career as a defense attorney, a background that persuaded some that McFadden would be less lenient with criminals.

State law gives defense attorneys and prosecutors the right to file one affidavit per case claiming prejudice by a judge, and they don't have to give a reason.

The tactic, known as "papering" in courtroom slang, is capable of getting a judge reassigned if enough attorneys file them en masse.

"It's their right, so I would never take that personally," McFadden said Thursday. "We understand there may be reasons and those reasons are not required to be disclosed. So I never inquire about the reasons."

On average, eight such declarations were filed against the county's 18 judges during 2009, compared with 25 last month for McFadden. No judge was papered more than 30 times in all of last year.

Nearly all the affidavits against McFadden were filed by the public defender's office.

Public Defender Tim Bazar said the challenges filed against McFadden do not amount to a boycott from his office.

"We are not doing that," Bazar said. "We have not done that in the 14 years that I've been here."

But, he added, papering "is not a right we have to be reluctant to exercise. We pride ourselves in vigorously representing anyone who we're appointed to represent."

Some deputy public defenders could not be reached or declined to speak publicly about the issue.

Prosecutor background cited

Among the high-profile cases on which McFadden has been disqualified is that of Jessica Mae Betts, who is accused of murder. Authorities say she dumped her newborn daughter in a Turlock trash bin.

One prosecutor said she expected McFadden to be challenged on many such cases because of her background as a crimes-against-children prosecutor before she was elected to the bench.

Defense attorneys certainly aren't the only ones to exercise their right to paper judges in Stanislaus County.

In recent years, Judge Roger Beauchesne was transferred to a civil post after being heavily papered by local prosecutors, court officials said.

The same practice made headlines last month in Santa Clara County, where the district attorney took the rare step of publicly rebuking a sitting judge and instructing her staff to stop bringing cases in front of her.

Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University law professor and former dean, said if done in a large number of cases, papering can have a chilling effect on judges.

"I think that has potential for a lot of mischief," Uelmen said. "It sends a bad message to the public."

Stanislaus County Superior Court Executive Officer Mike Tozzi said the number of challenges filed against McFadden was not unusual, given her recent transfer to the downtown court after a more than four-year stint at Juvenile Hall.

"Was it expected? Yes. Will it go away? You hope so," Tozzi said.

Tozzi said he was not aware of any adverse effects to the court backlog by pulling McFadden off the cases last month. She handled about 185 cases in January, Tozzi said. He did not have a comparison available, but said that number of cases is standard for the county's judges.

"Any form of papering by lawyers of a judge has to affect the other judges because the case has to be transferred to another judge," he said. "It's a normal process that occurs daily in every courtroom around the state."

Bee staff writer Merrill Balassone can be reached at mbalassone@modbee.com or 578-2337.

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Tenured profs on way out? | View Clip
02/07/2010
Arizona Daily Sun

Mark Montoya earned his doctorate from Northern Arizona University last fall, then landed a job on the Mountain Campus.

But although it's one he likes, it's not well-paid and the job only goes from one year to the next. Technically, Montoya is an "instructor" in the political science department, meaning he gets benefits -- but no tenure, the job stability afforded to university "professors."

And it wasn't particularly unusual when he taught a class on Latin American politics last semester, replacing a recently departed tenure-track professor with the specialty at a much cheaper rate.

Academics say there's a widespread trend toward putting less-expensive, temporary or non-tenure-eligible faculty in place when and if they replace retiring or resigning professors.

With the impending buyouts -- incentivized retirement -- of more than 40 senior NAU faculty at the end of this school year, Marcus Ford, humanities professor and chair of the sustainable communities program, sees the shift continuing.

"It's going to hit big time next year and the year after that," Ford said. "We're just at the tip."

WELL-ROUNDED PROFS

Fred Solop, the chair of NAU's political science and international affairs department, said it's definitely happening now. In his department, where Montoya currently teaches classes on the federal and state constitutions and race and politics, he's down four tenure-track lines over the last three years.

"If available, we're getting one-year instructor positions," Solop said. "We're getting consideration of lecturer lines -- and last year there were no tenure-track positions that were available. There were tenure-track searches that were stopped and filled with one-year hires."

Solop said it's a valid argument that the best faculty are well-rounded. Tenured professors become vested in their universities, advising students, researching and having a say in the future of the departments.

"The students ultimately suffer because you're losing the commitment to building the program over a long time," he said.

ANXIETY OF THE UNKNOWN

The conversation about the shrinking tenure pool came to the forefront at NAU last week when Marc Bousquet, a professor at Santa Clara University, gave a campus talk about the shift toward non-tenure-eligible faculty ranks growing at universities across the country.

Ford and Solop both say it's an existing issue that has been accelerated lately by financial crises.

Susanna Maxwell, NAU's vice provost for academic personnel, would say it's more a feeling of the unknown.

"I've been a chair. I've been a dean. I feel these changes very deeply," she said. "I feel the anxiety and I think a lot of the anxiety is actually about the unknown because we don't know where we're headed. We don't know -- will we reach a tipping point where we really do have a higher-than-healthy percentage of faculty who are not in the tenure stream?"

Maxwell said the university is studying the classroom impact of the departure of the 43 professors taking buyouts. Administrators will use their findings to determine what they can and cannot live without, and what they can redistribute with remaining faculty.

She said non-tenure-track faculty could just be a temporary fix until there's more knowledge on where the state economy and university budget are headed. Maxwell said NAU values both tenured and non-tenure-track faculty, though, and there can be a place for both depending on the program.

"We just don't know what that overall balance is going to look like a year from now, five years from now," she said. "It really is driven by budget issues, it's driven by rapid change, it's driven by a lot of factors."

WHAT THEY WANT

A full-time NAU instructor with a Ph.D. starts at about $41,000 per year, but Montoya is half-time. He adds to his income as an adjunct in NAU's ethnic studies department, but that only chips in about $4,000 per semester. Even though he is only contracted to teach, he volunteers to advise a couple of student groups and sits on a committee.

He calls his wife the breadwinner. They do not have children to support.

Montoya has been with the political science department as a student or professional for nearly 10 years, and he doesn't think he's elite because of his Ph.D.

"At the same time, I think it means something to have that degree," he said.

More than money, he wants stability, and for an academic that comes with tenure-eligible professorship. He recently applied for a job at a school in Colorado.

"It's just quite difficult to be living on a yearly basis and not knowing if there's going to be money for another position, unlike a tenure-track when you have that stability to know you have at least six years to make tenure," he said.

Solop said he expects his funding to stay stable enough that he can keep his instructor positions next year. He can ask for tenure-eligible positions, though it is up to the President's Office and he isn't sure if his requests -- he has a couple moving forward this year -- will be supported.

"I'd be very lucky if I can get one tenured position this year out of that," he said.

He said it's possible that some faculty could prefer short-term contracts, although academics generally prefer to build their careers in tenure-eligible positions.

Ford agreed, saying there's an interplay of some envy with sympathy between non-tenured and tenured faculty.

"Quite often people spin it and say, 'Oh, these people are happy and they're not into money and they like the flexibility,'" he said. "Point of fact: There's nothing more they'd like than job security and a decent wage."

Hillary Davis can be reached at hdavis@azdailysun.com or 556-2261.

Posted in Education on Sunday, February 7, 2010 5:00 am Updated: 11:18 pm.

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Judge at high mark in lawyers wanting her taken off cases
02/07/2010
Modesto Bee, The

Several attorneys from the Stanislaus County public defender's office moved to disqualify a local judge from more than two dozen cases last month, saying she would not give their clients a fair trial.

Court records show some deputy public defenders have steered their cases away from Judge Linda McFadden , who moved to Criminal Court from Juvenile Court in January.

McFadden was elected a Superior Court judge in 2002. Before that, she worked as a prosecutor for the district attorney's office for 13 years, heading the unit that tried child sexual assault and abuse cases.

In that time, she tried more than 200 cases before juries. One of her high-profile cases took place in 2002, when she helped to secure a life sentence for Josephine Origel, who killed 5-year-old Megan Lynn Mendez in 1998. The girl had been left in Origel's care by her heroin-addicted mother.

McFadden and her competitor in the election, now-Chief Deputy District Attorney Alan Cassidy , ran for the judgeship with a tough-on-crime platform. Each secured endorsements from a mix of law enforcement leaders and unions.

Until the election, Cassidy had worked most of his career as a defense attorney, a background that persuaded some that McFadden would be less lenient with criminals.

State law gives defense attorneys and prosecutors the right to file one affidavit per case claiming prejudice by a judge, and they don't have to give a reason.

The tactic, known as "papering" in courtroom slang, is capable of getting a judge reassigned if enough attorneys file them en masse.

"It's their right, so I would never take that personally," McFadden said Thursday. "We understand there may be reasons and those reasons are not required to be disclosed. So I never inquire about the reasons."

On average, eight such declarations were filed against the county's 18 judges during 2009, compared with 25 last month for McFadden. No judge was papered more than 30 times in all of last year.

Nearly all the affidavits against McFadden were filed by the public defender's office.

Public Defender Tim Bazar said the challenges filed against McFadden do not amount to a boycott from his office.

"We are not doing that," Bazar said. "We have not done that in the 14 years that I've been here."

But, he added, papering "is not a right we have to be reluctant to exercise. We pride ourselves in vigorously representing anyone who we're appointed to represent."

Some deputy public defenders could not be reached or declined to speak publicly about the issue. Prosecutor background cited

Among the high-profile cases on which McFadden has been disqualified is that of Jessica Mae Betts , who is accused of murder. Authorities say she dumped her newborn daughter in a Turlock trash bin.

One prosecutor said she expected McFadden to be challenged on many such cases because of her background as a crimes-against-children prosecutor before she was elected to the bench.

Defense attorneys certainly aren't the only ones to exercise their right to paper judges in Stanislaus County.

In recent years, Judge Roger Beauchesne was transferred to a civil post after being heavily papered by local prosecutors, court officials said.

The same practice made headlines last month in Santa Clara County, where the district attorney took the rare step of publicly rebuking a sitting judge and instructing her staff to stop bringing cases in front of her.

Gerald F. Uelmen , a Santa Clara University law professor and former dean, said if done in a large number of cases, papering can have a chilling effect on judges.

"I think that has potential for a lot of mischief," Uelmen said. "It sends a bad message to the public."

Stanislaus County Superior Court Executive Officer Mike Tozzi said the number of challenges filed against McFadden was not unusual, given her recent transfer to the downtown court after a more than four-year stint at Juvenile Hall.

"Was it expected? Yes. Will it go away? You hope so," Tozzi said.

Tozzi said he was not aware of any adverse effects to the court backlog by pulling McFadden off the cases last month. She handled about 185 cases in January, Tozzi said. He did not have a comparison available, but said that number of cases is standard for the county's judges.

"Any form of papering by lawyers of a judge has to affect the other judges because the case has to be transferred to another judge," he said. "It's a normal process that occurs daily in every courtroom around the state."

Bee staff writer Merrill Balassone can be reached at or 578-2337.

Copyright © 2010 McClatchy-Tribune Information Services

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5 Ways to Stick to Your Workout | View Clip
02/07/2010
Allure - Online

Why is it so hard to stick to a workout routine? Because we're not working out for the right reasons, say researchers. Scientists at London Metropolitan University found that people stopped going to the gym after three to six monthsif they were doing it to lose weight or look better. Those who stuck with it: They had internal motivations, like less stress or liking the buzz they got from a cardio routine. Some other things to consider:

Find your favorites. Exercise is a lot less tedious if you actually like what you're doing. And you can further stack the deck in your favor by choosing a routine that enhances your overall sense of well-being. So figure out what makes you zen, and do that.

Double date. Team up with another person for at least one workout per week, says Thomas Plante, chair of the psychology department at Santa Clara University. His study found that people who exercised with a partner were calmer and had more energy than those who went it alone.

Get a trainer (aka a cheerleader). Ok, this one can be expensive. But it's worth considering at least splitting one with a friend. Not only will the encouragement from a pro help you feel more confident, people who workout with a trainer tent to try harder, persist longer, and stick to their program better, says Kathleen Martin Ginis, a professor of health and exercise at McMaster University in Ontario.

Change your view. Anytime you start to feel bored, switch up your routine: go to a different gym location, try a new class, switch from one cardio machine to another (like from a bike to an elliptical trainer). It doesn't take much to spice things up.

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Public shocked by parents who kill | View Clip
02/06/2010
Global Lethbridge (CISA-TV) - Online

Crime violates society's 'deepest sensibilities,' U.S. law professor says

Although uncommon, a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

Resnick has studied filicide -- the murder of children by parents -- for more than 40 years. In Canada, 90 per cent of children murdered between 1977 and 2006 were killed by family members. In 2006, 36 of the 60 children who were murdered died at the hands of family members.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys Monday in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father, Curtis McConnell, discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that the mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows that parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has coauthored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she says. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last-breath, only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that, in most cases, they try to kill themselves after killing their children.

"It's a very difficult thing to treat these women, because making them sane again involves making them aware of having committed the most horrible of crimes," Oberman says.

The world has been shocked by a number of high-profile filicide cases in the United States, including the case of Susan Smith of South Carolina, who was sent to prison for life for drowning her two young sons. She initially told police she had been carjacked, but later admitted she had driven her car with the boys inside into a lake. Smith, who is eligible for parole in 2024, has never revealed a motive.

Her case spawned several songs and a TV episode of Law & Order.

In another high-profile case, Andrea Yates was sent to prison for life in Texas for drowning her five children in a bathtub, but upon appeal in 2006 was found not guilty by reason of insanity and sent to a state mental hospital.

There have been several recent cases much closer to home. Last May, a Devon woman was charged with killing her nine-year-old son and stabbing and wounding her three-year-old daughter.

That same month, a Grande Cache man diagnosed with cancer killed his wife and teenage daughter and then shot himself to death. In August, a grandfather in Smith shot his nine-year-old granddaughter, daughter and wife.

In November, a Calgary man was charged with killing his two children and attempting to kill his wife.

dhenton@thejournal.canwest.com

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Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/06/2010
Global Maritimes (CIHF-TV) - Online

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

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Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/06/2010
CHBC Television Kelowna (CHBC-TV) - Online

Darcy Henton, Edmonton Journal: Wednesday, February 3, 2010

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Photo Credit: Candace Elliott/Canwest News Service; Facebook,

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

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James hill III Santa clara University.
02/05/2010
KSFY Action News Live at 5 PM - KSFY-TV

Let's come to Lindsay ean now. "Da vinci code"? Yes. Wager, enough, $7,500. You fish with $22,100. You're gonna be a semi-finalist. Come on over here. Congratulatis, young lady. And now the four other winners of quarter-final games. Ryan stoffers, UCLAAshley Walker, dartmouth colle. James hill III Santa clara University. Nick yozamp, Washington univedyity in St. Louis. And now there arfour high scorers among nonwinners. Here they are. Surya sabhapathy, University of Michigan. Dy Hc je new ld bd opardy anti-itch lo hc show# 5850 hc lasting relief. Jeopar dyhc hc hjeop ardy Dan ond loonshow# 5850 jeopardy @x for almost every itch. Hc hcjeopardy hc jeopardy hc and there is one more. S~jeopardyhc this young lady from yale, leah Anthony libresco. Come on over here, leah. We're looking forward to an exciting semi-finals and finals competition next week. We'll see you then. So long. Promotional consideration provid by O a 3-month-old baby girl who was thrown from this van during a rollover crash on Interstate 29 has en released from a hospital in sioux city, Iowa. The baby was secured in a baby seat But the entire seat with adrnna still in it was ejected from the van after it went out of control on ice and crashed about miles North of vermillion Wednesday afternoon.

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JAMES HILL III, SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY.
02/05/2010
NBC Action News at 5 PM - KSHB-TV

ALL RIGHT, WE'LL WORK OUR WAY UP. WE'LL START WITH YOU, PRASHANT. YOU WERE AT $9,400, AND YOU WROTE DOWN, "WHAT IS 'ANGELS AND DEMONS'? " YOU HAVE THE RIGHT AUTHOR, BUT THE WRONG BOOK. IT IS NOT THAT, AND IT WILL COST YOU $4,000. DROPPING YOU TO $5,400. LET'S GO TO THE MIDDLE NOW TO LEAH ANTHONY. SHE CAME UP WITH $12,000, AND HAD "THE DA VINCI CODE. " SHE'S RIGHT. YES! HER WAGER, $9,000. THAT TAKES HER UP TO $21,000. LET'S COME TO LINDSAY EANET NOW. "DA VINCI CODE"? YES. WAGER, ENOUGH, $7,500. YOU FINISH WITH $22,100. YOU'RE GONNA BE A SEMI-FINALIST. COME ON OVER HERE. CONGRATULATIONS, YOUNG LADY. AND NOW THE FOUR OTHER WINNERS OF QUARTER-FINAL GAMES. RYAN STOFFERS, UCLAASHLEY WALKER, DARTMOUTH COLLEGE. JAMES HILL III, SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY. NICK YOZAMP, WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS. AND NOW THERE ARE FOUR HIGH SCORERS AMONG NONWINNERS. HERE THEY ARE. SURYA SABHAPATHY, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. SAMIRA MISSAGHI, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA. DAN D'ADDARIO, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. AND THERE IS ONE MORE. THIS YOUNG LADY FROM YALE, LEAH ANTHONY LIBRESCO. COME ON OVER HERE, LEAH. WE'RE LOOKING FORWARD TO AN EXCITING SEMI-FINALS AND FINALS COMPETITION NEXT WEEK. WE'LL SEE YOU THEN. SO LONG. PROMOTIONAL CONSIDERATION PROVIDED BY, HCjeopardy NEW LD BD show ANTI-ITCH LOTION #5850NFF@HC jeopardy HCNFF@LASTING RELIEF. jeop ardyHC NF F@H HCjeop ardy OND LOON sh ow# 5850 @X FOR ALMOST EVERY ITCH. NFF@HC jeopardy HCNF HC NFF@ HCjeopardy show# 5850 50NFF@HC jeopardy HCNFF@ je 3 TUNING OUT THE SNOW. THE NOVELTY OF THE SEASON WEARS THIN AS WINTER BEARS DOWN AGAIN. "If they're subsidizing the games, I think everybody ought to have a fair chance of seeing the game. " NO SHOW NO DOUGH. THE CONTROVERSIAL BILL THAT WOULD PUNISH THE CHIEFS IF FANS DON'T FILL ARROWHEAD. MISSING BABY. THE VERY LATEST ON THE DESPERATE SEARCH FOR THIS LITTLE BOY. 3 (ELIZABETH)GARY'S HERE WITH TONIGHT'S FIRST CAST. 3 3 JEFF)3 (ELIZABETH)3 THE SLIPPERY ROADS MAY HAVE CAUSED TWO BUSES TO CRASH IN RAYMORE THIS AFTERNOON.

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Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/05/2010
Calgary Herald - Online, The

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

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Santa Clara University Student Advances to Final Round in Jeopardy! | View Clip
02/05/2010
AJCU Higher Ed News

Santa Clara University student James Hill III's win and advancement to a semi-final round on Jeopardy! was featured in AJCU Higher Ed News weekly newsletter to Jesuit colleges and universities.

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8 ROTC programs win MacArthur Awards | View Clip
02/04/2010
Army Times - Online

Eight Army ROTC programs have been honored as the top units in the nation by being named winners of the 2010 MacArthur Awards. The winners were announced Tuesday at the annual Cadet Command Winter Commander's Conference. The MacArthur Awards recognize unit performance based on the ideals of Gen. Douglas MacArthur. This year's winners are:

• 1st Brigade, North Georgia College and State University, Dahlonega, Ga.

• 2nd Brigade, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, N.Y.

• 3rd Brigade, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, N.D.

• 4th Brigade, Campbell University, Buies Creek, N.C.

• 5th Brigade, Cameron University, Lawton, Okla.

• 6th Brigade, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Ga.

• 7th Brigade, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio.

• 8th Brigade, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, Calif.

The MacArthur Awards have been presented by Cadet Command and the General Douglas MacArthur Foundation since 1989.

“The awards recognize the individual units within the Army ROTC program that have achieved the standards that best represent the ideals of the watch words of ‘duty, honor, country,' as practiced by General MacArthur,” said retired Marine Col. William Davis, executive director of the foundation. It means a lot to the colleges and universities to receive the award, Maj. Gen. Arthur Bartell, commanding general of Cadet Command said.

“It is the pinnacle for the brigade leadership represented here today,” Bartell said during the awards presentation.

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Stanford remains top university for fundraising | View Clip
02/04/2010
San Jose Mercury News - Online

Hoover Tower is seen through the arches of Memorial Square at Stanford University.

Stanford University garnered the largest total of private donations of any American college or university last year, for the fifth consecutive year, even while charitable support for higher education dropped about 12 percent nationwide because of the recession, according to a new survey.

Stanford in 2009 took in a whopping $640.1 million in donations, down about 18 percent from the previous year but still big enough again to again beat Harvard University, which received $601.6 million, the report by the Council for Aid to Education showed. The next top fundraisers were Cornell University, the University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins University.

The CAE, a New York based nonprofit organization, estimated that U.S. colleges and universities raised about $27.8 billion in all, with alumni and foundations as the biggest donors. The 12 percent decline was the steepest percentage drop since the survey began 40 years ago, survey director Ann E. Kaplan said. Along with a decline in endowments' values and income, that made fiscal 2009 a tough time for most campuses, she said. "It had an impact," she said, referring to the budget cutbacks many colleges faced last year.

Martin Shell, Stanford's vice president for development, said the school was gratified to remain No. 1 in fundraising at a time when many donors faced financial problems and his own department reduced its staff. "The fact that our donors responded with this level of support is a

real testament to the generosity of our alumni, parents and friends," he said.

Some of the income counted in the survey included payments on pledges made in prior years, he said. And Stanford has collected what he described as a significant portion of $100 million pledged last January by several donors to establish a research institute focusing on energy issues; the largest gift toward that institute was $50 million from energy executive and Stanford alumnus Jay Precourt, after whom it was named.

In the top 20 for fundraising were No. 15 University of California, San Francisco, $300.4 million, and No. 19 UC Berkeley, $255 million.

The report also gave these 2009 totals for South Bay and Peninsula schools:

Santa Clara University, $36.7 million

Menlo College, $22.4 million

San Jose State, $10.65 million

Notre Dame de Namur, $2.3 million

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Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Star Phoenix - Online

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

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Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Westerly News

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

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Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Global Saskatoon (CFSK-TV) - Online

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

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Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Regina Leader-Post - Online

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Photograph by: Candace Elliott/Canwest News Service; Facebook,

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

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Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Global TV - Online

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

Return to Top



Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Global TV - Online

Darcy Henton, Edmonton Journal: Wednesday, February 3, 2010 11:02 PM

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Photo Credit: Candace Elliott/Canwest News Service; Facebook,

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

Return to Top



Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Global Lethbridge (CISA-TV) - Online

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

Return to Top



Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Edmonton Journal - Online, The

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Photograph by: Candace Elliott/Canwest News Service; Facebook,

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

Vancouver Sun

Queensland Courier-Mail, Australia

domesticsecuritypolicyinfo.com

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

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Parents more likely than strangers to murder children researcher | View Clip
02/04/2010
Vancouver Sun - Online, The

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Photograph by: Candace Elliott/Canwest News Service; Facebook,

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

Edmonton Journal

Vancouver Sun

domesticsecuritypolicyinfo.com

Queensland Courier-Mail, Australia

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Return to Top



Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Gazette (Montreal) - Online, The

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Photograph by: Candace Elliott/Canwest News Service; Facebook,

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

uspoliticsinfo.com

IOL, South Africa

Sydney Morning Herald

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

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Public shocked by parents who kill | View Clip
02/04/2010
Canada.com

Although uncommon, a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

Resnick has studied filicide -- the murder of children by parents -- for more than 40 years. In Canada, 90 per cent of children murdered between 1977 and 2006 were killed by family members. In 2006, 36 of the 60 children who were murdered died at the hands of family members.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys Monday in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father, Curtis McConnell, discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that the mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows that parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has coauthored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she says. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last-breath, only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that, in most cases, they try to kill themselves after killing their children.

"It's a very difficult thing to treat these women, because making them sane again involves making them aware of having committed the most horrible of crimes," Oberman says.

The world has been shocked by a number of high-profile filicide cases in the United States, including the case of Susan Smith of South Carolina, who was sent to prison for life for drowning her two young sons. She initially told police she had been carjacked, but later admitted she had driven her car with the boys inside into a lake. Smith, who is eligible for parole in 2024, has never revealed a motive.

Her case spawned several songs and a TV episode of Law & Order.

In another high-profile case, Andrea Yates was sent to prison for life in Texas for drowning her five children in a bathtub, but upon appeal in 2006 was found not guilty by reason of insanity and sent to a state mental hospital.

There have been several recent cases much closer to home. Last May, a Devon woman was charged with killing her nine-year-old son and stabbing and wounding her three-year-old daughter.

That same month, a Grande Cache man diagnosed with cancer killed his wife and teenage daughter and then shot himself to death. In August, a grandfather in Smith shot his nine-year-old granddaughter, daughter and wife.

In November, a Calgary man was charged with killing his two children and attempting to kill his wife.

dhenton@thejournal.canwest.com

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Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Global Montreal (CKMI-TV) - Online

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Photo Credit: Candace Elliott/Canwest News Service; Facebook,

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

Return to Top



Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Ottawa Citizen - Online, The

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Photograph by: Candace Elliott/Canwest News Service; Facebook,

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

Wausau Daily Herald, Wisconsin

ABC 13 Bowling Green (WBKO)

FROMTHEWESTWING.com

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

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Santa Clara student competes on Jeopardy | View Clip
02/04/2010
WJRT-TV - Online

SANTA CLARA, CA (KGO) -- A Santa Clara University student matched wits with some other very intelligent college students Wednesday; James Hill III is competing in the Jeopardy College Tournament.

Hill is only 17; his family says he started reading at the age of two and skipped kindergarten.

Hill prepared for Jeopardy by reading books, magazines and surfing the Web.

Hill won Wednesday's contest by being the only person to correctly answer the final Jeopardy clue.

(Copyright ©2010 KGO-TV/DT. All Rights Reserved.)

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Public shocked by parents who kill | View Clip
02/04/2010
Edmonton Journal - Online, The

Crime violates society's 'deepest sensibilities,' U.S. law professor says

Although uncommon, a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

Resnick has studied filicide -- the murder of children by parents -- for more than 40 years. In Canada, 90 per cent of children murdered between 1977 and 2006 were killed by family members. In 2006, 36 of the 60 children who were murdered died at the hands of family members.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys Monday in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father, Curtis McConnell, discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that the mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows that parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has coauthored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she says. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last-breath, only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that, in most cases, they try to kill themselves after killing their children.

"It's a very difficult thing to treat these women, because making them sane again involves making them aware of having committed the most horrible of crimes," Oberman says.

The world has been shocked by a number of high-profile filicide cases in the United States, including the case of Susan Smith of South Carolina, who was sent to prison for life for drowning her two young sons. She initially told police she had been carjacked, but later admitted she had driven her car with the boys inside into a lake. Smith, who is eligible for parole in 2024, has never revealed a motive.

Her case spawned several songs and a TV episode of Law & Order.

In another high-profile case, Andrea Yates was sent to prison for life in Texas for drowning her five children in a bathtub, but upon appeal in 2006 was found not guilty by reason of insanity and sent to a state mental hospital.

There have been several recent cases much closer to home. Last May, a Devon woman was charged with killing her nine-year-old son and stabbing and wounding her three-year-old daughter.

That same month, a Grande Cache man diagnosed with cancer killed his wife and teenage daughter and then shot himself to death. In August, a grandfather in Smith shot his nine-year-old granddaughter, daughter and wife.

In November, a Calgary man was charged with killing his two children and attempting to kill his wife.

dhenton@thejournal.canwest.com

Return to Top



Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Province - Online, The

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Photograph by: Candace Elliott/Canwest News Service; Facebook,

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Return to Top



Need tools to study for the bar exam? There’s an app for that | View Clip
02/04/2010
Wichita Business Journal - Online

Vicki Thompson

Mike Ghaffary is the creator of BarMax, a new app available to study for the California bar exam. It costs $999.99, the most expensive iPhone app out there. Ghaffary said it's still cheaper than a traditional course.

A new iPhone app hopes to raise the bar on what developers can get for their software by helping users pass the bar exam in California.

BarMax LLC has created an app that offers law students a $999.99 product — the maximum price Apple Inc. allows — that lets them download what they need to take the test. Developers are hoping the convenience of not lugging around piles of papers and books in the legal profession will justify the cost.

The question remains whether app buyers would invest in high-priced apps like BarMax.

“When it comes to the super price category, it's an experiment and I'm not sure it's going to work in the end,” said Michael Morgan, mobile devices analyst of ABI Research.

BarMax's creator, Mike Ghaffary, with a dual business and law degree from Harvard University, came up with the idea while studying for the bar while working a full-time job.

Ghaffary points out that the price for the app is significantly lower compared with a BarBri law review course that comes with books, online features and in-class study. The traditional method can cost more than $2,500.

BarMax's package includes lectures, flashcards and questions from previous bar exams. The materials are also in Microsoft Word format for customers who prefer viewing options outside of their mobile device.

Ken Dulaney of Gartner Research believes “multi-channel apps” that work on a number of devices, including a home TV, may command higher prices.

“Those apps are emerging pretty strongly,” he said. “There are things you want to do at different times. When you're out and about they can work in different places — at the office, at home or on the road.”

But Morgan is skeptical of apps that try to duplicate a traditional computer application onto a mobile device because of a phone's computing power and smaller screen.

“When it comes to actually being productive, it doesn't really happen on the phone,” Morgan said. “You don't edit spreadsheets on your phone, even though you can. It's about access to the information and leveraging a device's portability.”

Morgan said he's watched higher-priced legal apps in BlackBerry's app store achieve limited success.

“When it comes to the pricing, I think these high-priced apps may have a small niche,” Morgan said. “But the mass market is not going to own as much. It's not going to be people buying $500 apps, and not necessarily $100 apps either.”

Marina Hsieh, assistant dean of academic and professional development at Santa Clara University School of Law, does think Ghaffary's law bar exam app will be a useful tool.

She said that most of her students have technology so ingrained in their lives that moving more to applications on mobile devices like BarMax is a natural step.

“Will our students use it? Probably,” Hsieh said. “Our students love this kind of stuff. I posted my course material on iTunes, and I was surprised on how many people downloaded the material.”

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Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Vancouver Sun - Online, The

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Photograph by: Candace Elliott/Canwest News Service; Facebook,

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

politicalscandalnews.com

FOX 8 New Orleans (WVUE)

Queensland Courier-Mail, Australia

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Return to Top



Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Windsor Star - Online, The

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Photograph by: Candace Elliott/Canwest News Service; Facebook,

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

NBC 6 Pocatello (KPVI)

Inform Technologies

Toronto Sun

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

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Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Canada.com

EDMONTON - Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

Return to Top



Parents more likely than strangers to murder children | View Clip
02/04/2010
Times Colonist - Online

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Photograph by: Candace Elliott/Canwest News Service; Facebook,

EDMONTON — Children are more at risk of being murdered by family than they are by strangers, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

"It's not common, but a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else," says Resnick.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada report, the majority of children and youth homicides are committed by members of their own family.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, Monday were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father Curtis McConnell discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that their mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has co-authored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life," she explains. "The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last breath only bastion of true unconditional love."

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize," says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness."

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that in most cases they also try to kill themselves after killing their children.

Edmonton Sun, Canada

Inform Technologies

NBC 3 Sacramento (KCRA)

A makeshift memorial outside the McConnell home in Millet, Alta. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 11-month-old Jayden McConnell were found in the home on Monday.

Return to Top



Public shocked by parents who kill; Crime violates society's 'deepest sensibilities,' U.S. law profe
02/04/2010
Edmonton Journal, The

Although uncommon, a child is much more likely to be killed by his or her parents than anyone else, says a prominent U.S. researcher.

Phillip Resnick, who heads forensic psychiatry at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University, says an estimated 400 children are killed in the United States annually by one of their parents.

Resnick has studied filicide -- the murder of children by parents -- for more than 40 years. In Canada, 90 per cent of children murdered between 1977 and 2006 were killed by family members. In 2006, 36 of the 60 children who were murdered died at the hands of family members.

Police have determined the deaths of two young boys Monday in a home in Millet, south of Edmonton, were homicides, but they haven't charged anyone. Neighbours say the father, Curtis McConnell, discovered his sons, Connor, 2, and Jayden, 10 months, dead in a bathtub and that the mother, Allyson McConnell, tried to kill herself by jumping off a city bridge.

Resnick says the murders of children by family members fall into five classes, but the most common reason is altruistic. He says most often a mother wants to kill herself and doesn't want to leave her children motherless in a cruel world.

His research shows that parents with psychotic disorders are the second most common killers of their children. Kids are also slain because they are unwanted or they die as a result of physical abuse.

A much smaller percentage of parents, usually fathers, kill their children in acts of revenge against spouses who are leaving them or threatening to take the children away from them, he says.

Michelle Oberman, who has coauthored two books about mothers who kill their own children, says the murder of children by their mothers is not rare, but it shocks the public.

"When a mother kills her child, it conflicts with our deepest sensibilities about what is sacred in life,' she says. 'The mother-child relationship is widely considered to be last-breath, only bastion of true unconditional love.'

She says the crime is much more complicated than other homicides.

"Conventional homicides evoke emotions that we're comfortable penalizing, like greed or vengeance or gang warfare or power, and we, as a society, have no problem saying that is something that we need to penalize,' says Oberman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University law faculty in California.

"The cases involving mothers killing their children tend to involve much more complicated emotional underpinnings. You will see despair, isolation and mental illness.'

A recent Quebec study by Myriam Dube, a researcher at the University of Montreal, looked at the murders of 131 children by their parents in Quebec between 1986 and 2000.

Dube reported that mothers who kill their children often do it to protect them from what they see as a bleak future. She noted that, in most cases, they try to kill themselves after killing their children.

"It's a very difficult thing to treat these women, because making them sane again involves making them aware of having committed the most horrible of crimes,' Oberman says.

The world has been shocked by a number of high-profile filicide cases in the United States, including the case of Susan Smith of South Carolina, who was sent to prison for life for drowning her two young sons. She initially told police she had been carjacked, but later admitted she had driven her car with the boys inside into a lake. Smith, who is eligible for parole in 2024, has never revealed a motive.

Her case spawned several songs and a TV episode of Law & Order.

In another high-profile case, Andrea Yates was sent to prison for life in Texas for drowning her five children in a bathtub, but upon appeal in 2006 was found not guilty by reason of insanity and sent to a state mental hospital.

There have been several recent cases much closer to home. Last May, a Devon woman was charged with killing her nine-year-old son and stabbing and wounding her three-year-old daughter.

That same month, a Grande Cache man diagnosed with cancer killed his wife and teenage daughter and then shot himself to death. In August, a grandfather in Smith shot his nine-year-old granddaughter, daughter and wife.

In November, a Calgary man was charged with killing his two children and attempting to kill his wife.

dhenton@thejournal.canwest.com

Photo: Rick Macwiliam, The Journal / A Mountie removes police tape from the McConnell home in Millet on Wednesday afternoon. The bodies of two-year-old Connor and 10-month-old Jayden McConnell were found inside on Monday.

Copyright © 2010 Edmonton Journal

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Santa Clara University Student Matches Wits on Jeopardy
02/03/2010
ABC 7 News at 11 PM - KGO-TV

Santa Clara University student James Hill III's appearance and win on Jeopardy was featured on the evening newscast on ABC 7.

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UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A
02/03/2010
ABC 7 News at 6 PM- KGO-TV

(woman) THESE ARE MY MOM'S SHOES. I WALKED IN HER SHOES ALL 60 MILES. WHEN THEY FIRST TOLD US SHE HAD BREAST CANCER, I WAS SCARED TO DEATH. I THOUGHT THAT I WAS GONNA LOSE MY BEST FRIEND. (woman) THE 3-DAY WALK IS, IS A LIFE-CHANGING EXPERIENCE. IT'S SO FILLED WITH HOPE, WITH LOVE AND SUPPORT. I DON'T WANT MY DAUGHTER TO HAVE TO GO THROUGH WHAT SHE WENT THROUGH. I HAVE TO WALK. I WILL WALK. REGISTER TODAY FOR THE SUSAN G. KOMEN 3-DAY FOR THE CURE. VISIT The3Day. org TO REQUEST YOUR INFORMATIONAL DVD AND RECEIVE A FREE PROMISE RING. (woman) I NEVER REALLY GOT TO HAVE A SAY IN WHETHER OR NOT I WANTED TO LOSE MY MOM. AND I FEEL LIKE HAVING DONE THIS WALK AND HAVING HAD THIS EXPERIENCE, I FEEL LIKE I HAVE FINALLY HAD MY SAY. SUSAN G. KOMEN FOR THE CURE, THE GLOBAL LEADER OF THE BREAST CANCER MOVEMENT. REGISTER TODAY FOR THE KOMEN 3-DAY FOR THE CURE, BECAUSE EVERYONE DESERVES A LIFETIME. THIS IS THE "JEOPARDY! " COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP. HERE ARE TODAY'S CONTESTANTS, A FRESHMAN FROM BROWN UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A FRESHMAN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, AND NOW HERE IS THE HOST OF "JEOPARDY! ", ALEX TREBEK! THANK YOU, JOHNNY. HI, EVERYONE, AND WELCOME TO THE THIRD OF OUR QUARTER-FINAL GAMES IN THIS YEAR'S COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP. TODAY, OBVIOUSLY, YOUTH WILL BE SERVED. THESE THREE ARE YOUNGER THAN MOST OF THE OTHER PARTICIPANTS IN OUR TOURNAMENT THIS YEAR. IN FACT, ONE OF THEM HAS NOT YET REACHED THE AGE OF 18. BUT KEEP IN MIND THEY WOULDN'T BE HERE IF THEY HADN'T PASSED OUR TEST. ROBBIE, JAMES, REBECCA, GOOD LUCK. HERE WE GO. JEOPARDY! ROUND AND THESE CATEGORIES, EACH CORRECT RESPONSE WILL BE MADE UP OF THE LETTERS FROM THE WORD "FEBRUARY. " ROBBIE, START US. LET'S START WITH CAPITAL CITIES FOR $200. WHAT IS TOKYO? CAPITAL CITIES FOR $400. WHAT IS MOSCOW? CAPITAL CITIES, $600. WHAT IS BAGHDAD? CAPITAL CITIES, $800. AND AN OPPORTUNITY FOR YOU TO DOUBLE THE $1,000 THAT YOU HAVE ACCUMULATED TO THIS POINT OR YOU CAN RISK LESS. IT'S UP TO YOU. LET'S DO A TRUE DAILY DOUBLE. ALL RIGHT, HERE WE GO, HCHCHCHCHCHC WHAT IS BRASILIA? NO. WHAT IS LIMA? LIMA, PERU. LIMA. SO YOU ARE NOW TIED WITH REBECCA AGAIN. GO AGAIN. CAPITAL CITIES, $1,000. WHAT IS OTTAWA? MOVIE OBJECTS FOR $200.

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UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A
02/03/2010
KDBC 4 News Saturday at 5:30 PM - KDBC-TV

Hey Hi Could you take all of these in for me please? All of them? Well, it's the Boston cr me pies and the apple turnovers, oh, and the white chocolate strawberries, and the key lime pies So you need them let out? No, no, no - in Out Uh, in Out No, in [ Female Announcer ] Yoplait Light, with 28 delicious flavors at about 100 calories, it only tastes fattening Out OK, I was just outside and then I came in -so if you could, THIS IS THE "JEOPARDY! " COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP. HERE ARE TODAY'S CONTESTANTS, A FRESHMAN FROM BROWN UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A FRESHMAN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, AND NOW HERE IS THE HOST OF "JEOPARDY! ", ALEX TREBEK! THANK YOU, JOHNNY. HI, EVERYONE, AND WELCOME TO THE THIRD OF OUR QUARTER-FINAL GAMES IN THIS YEAR'S COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP. TODAY, OBVIOUSLY, YOUTH WILL BE SERVED. THESE THREE ARE YOUNGER THAN MOST OF THE OTHER PARTICIPANTS IN OUR TOURNAMENT THIS YEAR. IN FACT, ONE OF THEM HAS NOT YET REACHED THE AGE OF 18. BUT KEEP IN MIND THEY WOULDN'T BE HERE IF THEY HADN'T PASSED OUR TEST. ROBBIE, JAMES, REBECCA, GOOD LUCK. HERE WE GO. JEOPARDY! ROUND AND THESE CATEGORIES, EACH CORRECT RESPONSE WILL BE MADE UP OF THE LETTERS FROM THE WORD "FEBRUARY. " ROBBIE, START US. LET'S START WITH CAPITAL CITIES FOR $200. WHAT IS TOKYO? CAPITAL CITIES FOR $400. WHAT IS MOSCOW? CAPITAL CITIES, $600. Ao8 HCje `w`w`wAoAoAoAoAoAoAoAoAoAoAoHC WHAT IS BAGHDAD? oAo jeop CAPITAL CITIES, $800. Aw `wHC AND AN OPPORTUNITY 88 8 jeopardyHC HCjeopardy TO DOUBLE THE $1,000 THAT YOU w`wAoAo #o# HC #o# HC #5848 ##jeopar ALL RIGHT, HERE WE GO, WHAT IS BRASILIA? NO. WHAT IS LIMA? LIMA, PERU. LIMA. SO YOU ARE NOW TIED WITH REBECCA AGAIN. GO AGAIN. CAPITAL CITIES, $1,000. WHAT IS OTTAWA? MOVIE OBJECTS FOR $200. WHAT ARE SLIPPERS? BE MORE SPECIFIC. RUBY SLIPPERS? MOVIE OBJECTS, $400. WHAT IS "A CHRISTMAS STORY"? MOVIE OBJECTS, $600. THEY ARE AIRPLANES. BACK TO YOU, JAMES. LET'S DO WORDS IN FEBRUARY FOR $200. WHAT IS FARE? WORDS IN FEBRUARY, $400. WHAT IS RARE? LET'S TAKE FEBRUARY FOR $600. WHAT IS BAR? FOR $600. $800, FEBRUARY, PLEASE. WHAT IS RYE? FEBRUARY FOR $1,000. WHAT IS A DAY? NO. REBECCA. WHAT IS A YEAR? MOVIE OBJECTS, $800, PLEASE. WHAT IS "THE GOLDEN COMPASS"? $1,000, MOVIE OBJECTS, PLEASE. FINDS THE FLOWER PETALS. ALL RIGHT, REBECCA ENJOYING THE LEAD BY A MARGIN OF $1,000 OVER ROBBIE AT THE MOMENT. YOU CAN PUT THE SIGNALING DEVICES DOWN. WE'LL TAKE A BREAK. WE'LL COME BACK TO CHAT WITH YOU FOLLOWING THIS.

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UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A
02/03/2010
KRQE News 13 at 5:30 PM - KRQE-TV

" COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP. HERE ARE TODAY'S CONTESTANTS, A FRESHMAN FROM BROWN UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A FRESHMAN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, AND NOW HERE IS THE HOST OF "JEOPARDY! ", ALEX TREBEK! THANK YOU, JOHNNY. HI, EVERYONE, AND WELCOME TO THE THIRD OF OUR QUARTER-FINAL GAMES IN THIS YEAR'S COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP. TODAY, OBVIOUSLY, YOUTH WILL BE SERVED. THESE THREE ARE YOUNGER THAN MOST OF THE OTHER PARTICIPANTS IN OUR TOURNAMENT THIS YEAR. IN FACT, ONE OF THEM HAS NOT YET REACHED THE AGE OF 18.

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UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A
02/03/2010
Fox 10 News at 5 PM - WALA-TV

MUCH MORE ON THE SAINTS TONIGHT, DREW BREES TALKS ABOUT HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH PEYTON MANNING. PRETTY INTERESTING STUFF. AND OF COURSE MUCH MORE KIT RO 5 oowy cy, night: A 50 percent chance of showers, mainly after 9pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 44. East wind between 5 and 10 mph. Thursday: Showers and possibly a thunderstorm. High near 56. Breezy, with a east wind between 10 and 20 h, s phuweanowh 2 wcoanf ipnt s. tlou aylytw5 sh baty ou mp and mppes. 7. th My: an h 6A er chow Mdy. er A FRESHMAN FROM BROWN UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A FRESHMAN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, AND NOW HERE IS THE HOST OF "JEOPARDY! ", ALEX TREBEK! THANK YOU, JOHNNY. HI, EVERYONE, AND WELCOME TO THE THIRD OF OUR QUARTER-FINAL GAMES IN THIS YEAR'S COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP. TODAY, OBVIOUSLY, YOUTH WILL BE SERVED. THESE THREE ARE YOUNGER THAN MOST OF THE OTHER PARTICIPANTS IN OUR TOURNAMENT THIS YEAR. IN FACT, ONE OF THEM HAS NOT YET REACHED THE AGE OF 18. BUT KEEP IN MIND THHADN'T PASSED OUR TEST. ROBBIE, JAMES, REBECCA, GOOD LUCK. HERE WE GO. JEOPARDY! ROUND AND THESE CATEGORIES,

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Santa Clara University Student on Jeopardy!
02/03/2010
ABC 7 News at 5 PM- KGO-TV

Santa Clara University student James Hill III appearance on Jeopardy! was featured on the evening news on ABC7.

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A SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY STUDENT WITH OTHER INTELLENT COLLEGE STUDENTS TONIGHT.
02/03/2010
ABC 7 News Saturday 5 PM - KGO-TV

A SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY STUDENT WITH OTHER INTELLENT COLLEGE STUDENTS TONIGHT. JAMES HILL THE THIRD IS TAKING PART IN THE TOURNAMENT. HE'S 17. HIS FAMILY SAYS HE STARTED READ AGENT TWO AND SKIPPED KINDERGARTEN HE PREPARED BY READING TONS OF BOOKS AND BY SURFING THE WEB. YOU CAN SEE HOW JAMES DOES ON JEOPARDY'S NIGHT AT 7:00 HERE AN OBC 7. THAT IS IT FOR US. FROM ALL OF US, THANKS FOR WATCHING. WE'LL SEE YOU AGAIN AT

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A SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY STUDENT WITH OTHER INTELLENT COLLEGE STUDENTS TONIGHT.
02/03/2010
ABC 7 News at 5 PM- KGO-TV

A SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY STUDENT WITH OTHER INTELLENT COLLEGE STUDENTS TONIGHT. JAMES HILL THE THIRD IS TAKING PART IN THE TOURNAMENT. HE'S 17. HIS FAMILY SAYS HE STARTED READ AGENT TWO AND SKIPPED KINDERGARTEN HE PREPARED BY READING TONS OF BOOKS AND BY SURFING THE WEB. YOU CAN SEE HOW JAMES DOES ON JEOPARDY'S NIGHT AT 7:00 HERE AN OBC 7. THAT IS IT FOR US. FROM ALL OF US, THANKS FOR WATCHING. WE'LL SEE YOU AGAIN AT

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UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A
02/03/2010
Springfield 33 News at 10 PM - KSPR-TV

THIS IS THE "JEOPARDY! " COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP. HERE ARE TODAY'S CONTESTANTS, A FRESHMAN FROM BROWN UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A FRESHMAN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, AND NOW HERE IS THE HOST OF "JEOPARDY! ", ALEX TREBEK! THANK YOU, JOHNNY. HI, EVERYONE, AND WELCOME TO THE THIRD OF OUR QUARTER-FINAL GAMES IN THIS YEAR'S COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP. TODAY, OBVIOUSLY, YOUTH WILL BE SERVED. THESE THREE ARE YOUNGER THAN MOST OF THE OTHER PARTICIPANTS IN OUR TOURNAMENT THIS YEAR. IN FACT, ONE OF THEM HAS NOT YET REACHED THE AGE OF 18. BUT KEEP IN MIND THEY WOULDN'T BE HERE IF THEY HADN'T PASSED OUR TEST. ROBBIE, JAMES, REBECCA, GOOD LUCK. HERE WE GO. JEOPARDY! ROUND AND THESE CATEGORIES, EACH CORRECT RESPONSE WILL BE MADE UP OF THE LETTERS FROM THE WORD "FEBRUARY. " ROBBIE, START US. LET'S START WITH CAPITAL CITIES FOR $200. WHAT IS TOKYO? CAPITAL CITIES FOR $400. WHAT IS MOSCOW? CAPITAL CITIES, $600. WHAT IS BAGHDAD? CAPITAL CITIES, $800. AND AN OPPORTUNITY FOR YOU TO DOUBLE THE $1,000 THAT YOU HAVE ACCUMULATED TO THIS POINT OR YOU CAN RISK LESS. IT'S UP TO YOU. LET'S DO A TRUE DAILY DOUBLE. ALL RIGHT, HERE WE GO, WHAT IS BRASILIA? NO. WHAT IS LIMA? LIMA, PERU. LIMA. SO YOU ARE NOW TIED WITH REBECCA AGAIN. GO AGAIN. CAPITAL CITIES, $1,000. WHAT IS OTTAWA? MOVIE OBJECTS FOR $200. WHAT ARE SLIPPERS? BE MORE SPECIFIC. RUBY SLIPPERS? MOVIE OBJECTS, $400. WHAT IS "A CHRISTMAS STORY"? MOVIE OBJECTS, $600. THEY ARE AIRPLANES. BACK TO YOU, JAMES. LET'S DO WORDS IN FEBRUARY FOR $200. WHAT IS FARE? WORDS IN FEBRUARY, $400. WHAT IS RARE? LET'S TAKE FEBRUARY FOR $600. WHAT IS BAR? FOR $600. $800, FEBRUARY, PLEASE. WHAT IS RYE? FEBRUARY FOR $1,000. WHAT IS A DAY? NO. REBECCA. WHAT IS A YEAR? MOVIE OBJECTS, $800, PLEASE. WHAT IS "THE GOLDEN COMPASS"? $1,000, MOVIE OBJECTS, PLEASE. FINDS THE FLOWER PETALS. ALL RIGHT, REBECCA ENJOYING THE LEAD BY A MARGIN OF $1,000 OVER ROBBIE AT THE MOMENT. YOU CAN PUT THE SIGNALING DEVICES DOWN. WE'LL TAKE A BREAK. WE'LL COME BACK TO CHAT WITH YOU FOLLOWING THIS.

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UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A
02/03/2010
WBRZ News 2 Louisiana at 4 PM - WBRZ-TV

NEW AT FIVE, THERE'S STILL NO FINAL ANSWER ON THE WAY MERIT RAISES WILL BE GIVEN TO THOUSANDS OF STATE EMPLOYEES. HOW A FEW WORDS ARE CAUSING THE DELAY. PLUS, HOW A COMMON PAIN KILLER, MAY HELP PROTECT YOUR KIDNEYS AFTER THEY'VE BEEN DAMAGED. THAT'S TODAY AT FIVE. FINALLY AT FOUR SHOPPERS IN THE NATION'S CAPITAL ARE ADJUSTING TO A NEW TAX ON GROCERY BAGS. FOR EACH DISPOSABLE GROCERY BAG YOU NEED, YOU HAVE TO PAY FIVE CENTS. ONE CENT OF THAT GOES BACK TO THE RETAILER, AND THE OTHER FOUR CENTS, GOES TO CLEANING UP A RIVER IN THE AREA. THE TAX SEEMS TO BE WORKING, OFFICIALS ESTIMATE IT'S CUT THE NUMBER OF BAGS USED BY MORE THAN HALF. THANKS FOR WATCHING WBRZ, WHERE WE ARE COMMITTED TO REPORTING BALANCED AND FAIR NEWS IN EVERY NEWSCAST. IF YOU HAVE ANY FEEDBACK ABOUT TODAY'S NEWS, WE'D LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU. PLEASE CONTACT US AT BALANCED NEWS AT WBRZ DOT COM THIS IS THE "JEOPARDY! " COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP. HERE ARE TODAY'S CONTESTANTS, A FRESHMAN FROM BROWN UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A FRESHMAN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, AND NOW HERE IS THE HOST OF "JEOPARDY! ", ALEX TREBEK! THANK YOU, JOHNNY. HI, EVERYONE, AND WELCOME TO THE THIRD OF OUR QUARTER-FINAL GAMES IN THIS YEAR'S COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP. TODAY, OBVIOUSLY, YOUTH WILL BE SERVED. THESE THREE ARE YOUNGER THAN MOST OF THE OTHER PARTICIPANTS IN OUR TOURNAMENT THIS YEAR. IN FACT, ONE OF THEM HAS NOT YET REACHED THE AGE OF 18. BUT KEEP IN MIND THEY WOULDN'T BE HERE IF THEY HADN'T PASSED OUR T

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SCU Freshman on Jeopardy
02/03/2010
KCBS-AM

SCU freshman James Hill was interviewed about his appearance on Jeopardy's College Championship. KCBS Radio's Matt Bigler reports. Clip is N/A.

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SCU Freshman on Jeopardy | View Clip
02/03/2010
KGO-AM

SCU freshman James Hill was interviewed about his appearance on Jeopardy! College Championship. KGO Radio's Jennifer Hodges reports.

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UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A
02/03/2010
WAFF 48 Noon News - WAFF-TV

THIS IS THE "JEOPARDY! "COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP. HERE ARE TODAY'S CONTESTANTS, A FRESHMAN FROM BROWN UNIVERSITY, A FRESHMAN FROM SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, AND A FRESHMAN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, AND NOW HERE IS THE HOST OF "JEOPARDY! ", ALEX TREBEK! THANK YOU, JOHNNY. HI, EVERYONE, AND WELCOME TO THE THIRD OF OUR QUARTER-FINAL GAMES IN THIS YEAR'S COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP. TODAY, OBVIOUSLY, YOUTH WILL BE SERVED. THESE THREE ARE YOUNGER THAN MOST OF THE OTHER PARTICIPANTS IN OUR TOURNAMENT THIS YEAR. IN FACT, ONE OF THEM HAS NOT YET REACHED THE AGE OF 18. BUT KEEP IN MIND THEY WOULDN'T BE HERE IF THEY HADN'T PASSED OUR TEST. ROBBIE, JAMES, REBECCA, GOOD LUCK. HERE WE GO. JEOPARDY! ROUND AND THESE CATEGORIES, EACH CORRECT RESPONSE WILL BE MADE UP OF THE LETTERS FROM THE WORD "FEBRUARY. "ROBBIE, START US. LET'S START WITH CAPITAL CITIES FOR $200. WHAT IS TOKYO? CAPITAL CITIES FOR $400. WHAT IS MOSCOW? CAPITAL CITIES, $600. Ao8 HCje `w`w`wAoAoAoAoAoAoAoAoAoAoAoHC o WHAT IS BAGHDAD? oAo jeop CAPITAL CITIES, $800. Aw `wHC AND AN OPPORTUNITY 88 8 jeopardyHC HCjeopardy HC TO DOUBLE THE $1,000 THAT Y w`wAoAoAo #o# HC #o# HC #5848 ALL RIGHT, HERE WE GO, WHAT IS BRASILIA? NO. WHAT IS LIMA? LIMA, PERU. LIMA. SO YOU ARE NOW TIED WITH REBECCA AGAIN. GO AGAIN. CAPITAL CITIES, $1,000. WHAT IS OTTAWA? MOVIE OBJECTS FOR $200. WHAT ARE SLIPPERS? BE MORE SPECIFIC. RUBY SLIPPERS? MOVIE OBJECTS, $400. WHAT IS "A CHRISTMAS STORY"? MOVIE OBJECTS, $600. THEY ARE AIRPLANES. BACK TO YOU, JAMES. LET'S DO WORDS IN FEBRUARY FOR $200. WHAT IS FARE? WORDS IN FEBRUARY, $400. WHAT IS RARE? LET'S TAKE FEBRUARY FOR $600. WHAT IS BAR? FOR $600. $800, FEBRUARY, PLEASE. WHAT IS RYE? FEBRUARY FOR $1,000. WHAT IS A DAY? NO. REBECCA. WHAT IS A YEAR? MOVIE OBJECTS, $800, PLEASE. WHAT IS "THE GOLDEN COMPASS"? $1,000, MOVIE OBJECTS, PLEASE. FINDS THE FLOWER PETALS. ALL RIGHT, REBECCA ENJOYING THE LEAD BY A MARGIN OF $1,000 OVER ROBBIE AT THE MOMENT. YOU CAN PUT THE SIGNALING DEVICES DOWN. WE'LL TAKE A BREAK. WE'LL COME BACK TO CHAT WITH YOU FOLLOWING THIS.

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Pizarro Hospice of the Valley hits grant goal | View Clip
02/03/2010
SiliconValley.com

There's been good news lately from Hospice of the Valley, the nonprofit organization that helps ensure the comfort of those near the ends of their lives.

The group announced it's met a 2-for-1 matching grant goal set by the Sobrato Family Foundation. Hospice received a first installment of $80,000 a year ago and has since raised more than that amount in new funds to qualify for a second-year grant.

"This is a gratifying achievement — it speaks to our mission and the invaluable service that our organization provides in Santa Clara County," said Chris Worrall, chairman of Hospice's board of directors.

Back in November, the San Jose-based nonprofit also received a $75,000 grant from the The Sovereign Order of St. John of Jerusalem during an open house for its Community Grief and Counseling Center. The open house highlighted Hospice's inaugural "Journey of Hope" exhibit, featuring artwork that reflects the path of grief, loss and healing.

MUST-SEE TV: Santa Clara University freshman James Hill, who graduated from San Jose's Bellarmine College Prep, will be matching wits on Jeopardy's "College Championship" starting today. It airs on KGO-TV Channel 7 at 7 p.m.

You should also tune in to the Food Network on Feb. 22, when San Jose's Naglee Park Garage is featured on "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives."

The guys behind the neighborhood bistro — Chris Esparza, Brendan

Rawson and chef Louis Silva — are planning to bring back some menu items featured on the show.

COMEDY SPOTLIGHT: Comic Bobby Slayton has been followed around lately by a documentary crew, and he asked them to come to Sunnyvale tonight for his show at Rooster T. Feathers.

He has a long history with the club, and it's one of the first places he worked before hitting it big. I'm told that the club's original owner, Tony Modica, will be on hand as well, so it should be a heck of an evening.

SUNDANCING: Santana Row's Flying Lizard Design was one of the boutiques invited to be in the "Swag Room," where celebs picked out free stuff at last week's Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

Flying Lizard owner Vallora Sabourin reports, "Paris" — need we say Hilton? — "loved our stuff. She got six pieces and wore our opal necklace with her outfit all day. Samuel L. Jackson got earrings for his daughter, and he couldn't decide between three pairs so we were all trying to help him out. We were very popular!"

Contact Sal Pizarro at spizarro@mercurynews.com or 408-627-0940.

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Does Obama GOP exchange resurrect the role of religion in politics? | View Clip
02/03/2010
Examiner.com

After the feisty historical exchange between Obama and the GOP perhaps the world is wondering, "is the glass half empty or is it half full". Could religious conscience bring down the barriers of seeming impasse? Leaders and laymen alike in America, have sustained that religion and politics should not mix. For generations, that belief has held ground as the fundamental position of the nation with varying degrees of separation, while zealous opposition continues. 'The Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life' is a "nonpartisan, non-advocacy organization that does not take positions on policy debate". TheForum surveys:

The Pew Forum is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trust. The Forum conducted a phone survey from a nationwide sampling of adults 18 years and older, the majority of whom were registered voters.

They reported that in 1996, 43% of Americans surveryed believe churches should keep out of social and political matters. This opinion increased to 52% in 2008. The study, it appears, was limited to churches (as no mention was made of synagogues, mosques, temples) but will suffice for this article.

On the other side of the coin, reports The Pew Foundation "since the Bush administration first established a White House office to expand the role of religious organizations in providing social services, support has declined between 2001 and 2008 from 75% to 67%, respectively, colored by opposition to Muslim mosques". Opinions vary among American according to ethnicities, churches, synagogues, Catholicism, Protestanism, Republicans, Democrats, as to the value gained by providing federally funded social services. Eastern religious organizations who provide charity, aid in disaster efforts and social services were overlooked in this study. According to a survey done by Trinity College, reported in US News by Dan Gilgoff, "15 percent of Americans today report having 'no religion". "This number is expected to rise to 25% in twenty years, says Gilgoff, and "those surveyed were reported to be religious skeptics rather than atheists".

From an international perspective, Santa Clara University has analyzed "Religion Ethics and Politics by Country and Region" a significant book by Eric O. Hanson who studied the impact of religion on politics in thirty-five countries. "Religions of the Book (Judaism, Christianity, Islam), Meditative Experience (Hinduism, Buddhism), and Public Life (Confucianism, Maoist Marxism)." Gilgoff found that:

Dominant religions can offer a “Sacred Canopy” legitimizing state power;

State and religious organizations can battle for expressive and instrumental power within the nation;

Religions can compete for national power;

Religious groups can seek to control the national culture.

To echo Gilgoff, internationally, there are numerous historical scenarios of religion and politics ranging from domination in a country by a single religion to battles akin to power struggles during elections between warring sects or denominations. It is no secret, sadly, that many wars in the past, present and future are/were grounded in religious differences. Worthy of mention is the page on this site listing "Organizations and Events that have Promoted Interfaith Dialogue"

With all of this said, the question remains on the table, "Should religion play a role in politics?" Somehow the whole issue of separating religion and politics suggests that individuals should make decisions in worldly affairs without fully involving deeply personal religious, moral or ethical values. On the other hand, for centuries, the influence of religious belief has been used as a tool of persuasion. Perhaps there lies the danger... or the delivery from evil. The author does not propose to have answers that academicians, religious leaders and politicians have struggled with for generations. While pondering these matters, in all circumstances, there remains one eternal truth which is applicable to all including world events, national events, the delivery of social services and the initiatives to have successful bipartisan dialogue in American politics:

"It is the heart alone, that really matters"

Nichiren Daishonin

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Santa Clara Univ. professor outlines economic outlook | View Clip
02/03/2010
WJRT-TV - Online

SANTA CLARA, CA -- Longtime Santa Clara University economics professor Mario Belotti said today the U.S. economy could experience growth of up to 4 percent this year, but it might take another year to see an improvement in California's economy.

Speaking at his annual "State of the Economy" assessment at Santa Clara University this morning, Belotti painted an optimistic economic picture for the upcoming year.

"Despite what you've read in The New York Times, things are much better," Belotti said, citing improvements in the index of leading economic indicators over the last nine months.

Belotti said the numbers in the industrial and manufacturing sectors are especially encouraging, because they have risen in the last six months across much of the industrialized world. The economic stimulus package passed last year will make a greater impact this year with increased expenditures on projects, Belotti said.

Belotti said a combination of government and business spending, a change in the foreign sector and increases in inventories will boost the economy by 3.5 to 4 percent this year.

Contrary to what some may believe, Belotti said one of the leading causes of the recession was a decrease in business spending rather than consumer spending. In 2009, business spending, which includes spending on residential and non-residential construction, machinery, software and inventory, was down by 12.5 percent.

"The decline is over. This year, I expect business spending to turn around," Belotti said, adding that businesses are preparing for a six-month cycle of growth and innovation.

Belotti predicted that government spending on goods and services will also contribute to the gross domestic product by 0.8 percent.

Another indicator of economic growth is the rate of U.S. export, which at 18 percent is increasing at a faster rate than the 12 percent rate of imports, leading to an increase in the GDP.

Belotti's outlook on unemployment, currently at 10 percent, wasn't as optimistic, at least in the first half of the year. He said the rate of unemployment might even increase to 10.2 percent before declining again by the end of the year.

Belotti said the Silicon Valley economy correlates with the U.S. economy insofar "as the U.S. economy grows, we grow faster. When things go down, we go down, too."

At a U.S. Department of Labor briefing this morning, Amar Mann, a regional economist for the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, announced that the Silicon Valley has done well relative to rest of the country.

Mann and a fellow economist, Tian Luo, released a report last month on the Silicon Valley high-tech industry.

The report, titled "Crash and reboot: Silicon Valley high-tech employment and wages, 2000-08," shows a sharp decline in employment and wages from 2000 to 2004, followed by a gradual increase from 2004 to 2008. The growth is fueled by continued growth in the pharmaceutical industry, biotechnology and green technology, Mann said.

(Copyright 2010 by Bay City News, Inc. Republication, re-transmission or reuse without the express written consent of Bay City News, Inc. Is prohibited.)

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Milgram Obedience Study and Research Ethics | View Clip
02/03/2010
Suite101.com

In 1961, Nazis were on trial for World War II war crimes. They maintained that they were only doing what they were told to do, and that they held no responsibility for their actions. This was the premise for a study done by Professor Stanley Milgram of Yale University, who was Jewish. He recruited volunteers for a "punishment and learning" study to determine if people were more likely to obey orders against their moral judgment.

The Milgram Experiment-A Study of Milgram repeated his study about twenty times. Two volunteers would arrive for the study and draw their positions out of a hat. One would be the teacher and the other the learner. The teacher would sit in a room with the experimenter, who was an authority figure in a white lab coat, and the learner would sit in a room by himself. The teacher would give the learner shocks in increasing voltages. At first, the learner would react with verbal protests, then yelling, and then pounding on the wall. With the higher voltages, the learner would beg to be released from the experiment.

The learner would actually be an actor. Both of the experiment positions in the hat were marked "teacher," but the actor would say that he had the role of learner each time. This way, the volunteer would always be the teacher, and the actor the learner. The learner did not really receive shocks, but followed scripted reactions to each shock cue.

As the shock voltages increased, the teacher would reach a point where he would demonstrate discomfort and hesitate to continue with the experiment. At first, the experimenter would simply tell the teacher to continue, and he would.

According to the 2005 book Expanding Horizons in Bioethics, by Arthur William Galston and Christiana Z. Peppard, 65 percent of obedient participants administered the maximum of 450 volts. Many argue that people are different, today, and that a repeat study would not yield the same results.

ABC News' Primetime Replicated the Milgram Obedience Study

The ABC News show, Primetime, replicated the Milgram obedience experiment with Santa Clara University. They consulted with the American Psychological Association regarding their protocol so as to adhere to ethical standards.

Primetime selected 70 people to participate in "a learning and memory study." These participants were given $50 and were told that they could keep the money even if they did not complete the experiment.

Prior to the experiment, the learner would tell the teacher that he had heart trouble. They would then sit in their respective rooms and begin the experiment. The teacher would teach word pairs to the learner. When the learner got a word pair wrong, the teacher would shock the learner, starting with the lowest voltage.

According to the January 3, 2007 Primetime article, "," by Caroline Borge, the learner's actions were predetermined and she described the interactions of a particular teacher and learner pair.

At 75 volts, the learner would begin shouting in pain and the teacher would become uncomfortable. This continued until 150 volts when the learner would plead, "Get me out of here. I told you I had heart trouble. My heart's starting to bother me." At this point, the teacher would look at the experimenter who would tell him to continue. He continued.

Primetime found that the typical response was the look to the experimenter for direction when the learner protested. After all, the experimenter was an authority figure and expert. They found that women were more likely to continue following orders than men. Seventy-three percent of women chose to continue administering shocks compared with only 63 percent of men. Eight-three percent of the participants were college-educated ranging from some college experience to master's degrees.

Upon completion of the experiment, the teacher said that he was not comfortable administering the shocks and should have stopped. According to Borge, when the teacher was asked why he didn't stop administering the shocks, he said, "I was doing what I was supposed to do, and I'm there to help conduct an experiment." The Stanley Milgram Experiment and Research Ethics

According to the 2008 Experiment Resources article, "," by Martyn Shuttleworth, "Modern ethical standards assert that participants in any experiment must not be deceived, and that they must be made aware of any consequences." The reason is to protect the participants from "severe emotional distress." Other studies, such as the Stanford Prison Experiment, have "caused measurable psychological distress to the participantsfor several months or years." Fortunately, this was not the case with the Milgram experiment.

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5 Ways to Stick to Your Workout | View Clip
02/03/2010
Yahoo! Shine

Why is it so hard to stick to a workout routine? Because we're not working out for the right reasons, say researchers. Scientists at London Metropolitan University found that people stopped going to the gym after three to six months if they were doing it to lose weight or look better. Those who stuck with it: They had internal motivations, like less stress or liking the buzz they got from a cardio routine. Some other things to consider:

Find your favorites. Exercise is a lot less tedious if you actually like what you're doing. And you can further stack the deck in your favor by choosing a routine that enhances your overall sense of well-being. So figure out what makes you zen, and do that.

Related: 3 Recessionista Workout Moves!

Double date. Team up with another person for at least one workout per week, says Thomas Plante, chair of the psychology department at Santa Clara University. His study found that people who exercised with a partner were calmer and had more energy than those who went it alone.

See our tips: The Seven Diet Secrets of Skinny Women!

Get a trainer (aka a cheerleader). Ok, this one can be expensive. But it's worth considering at least splitting one with a friend. Not only will the encouragement from a pro help you feel more confident, people who workout with a trainer tent to try harder, persist longer, and stick to their program better, says Kathleen Martin Ginis, a professor of health and exercise at McMaster University in Ontario.

Change your view. Anytime you start to feel bored, switch up your routine: go to a different gym location, try a new class, switch from one cardio machine to another (like from a bike to an elliptical trainer). It doesn't take much to spice things up.

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A LOOK BACK FEB. 3, 1993
02/03/2010
San Jose Mercury News

California's oldest university will need a three-year forced diet of tuition increases, fundraisers and budget cuts -- including killing the school's 90-year football tradition -- if it is to survive, Santa Clara University President Paul Locatelli warned about 300 students and faculty members. Locatelli said the 143-year-old Jesuit university agonized over ending the football program each of the past four years as mounting budget woes forced it to ignore aging facilities and outdated technology. At the same time, the university has been searching for funds to replace disappearing state and federal grant money that helps students cope with tuition, which rose an average of 10 percent a year during the 1980s.

Copyright © 2010 San Jose Mercury News

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Pizarro: Hospice of the Valley hits grant goal | View Clip
02/02/2010
San Jose Mercury News

MUST-SEE TV: Santa Clara University freshman James Hill, who graduated from San Jose's Bellarmine College Prep, will be matching wits on Jeopardy's "College Championship" starting Wednesday. It airs on KGO-TV Channel 7 at 7 p.m.

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5 Ways to Stick to Your Workout | View Clip
02/02/2010
Allure

Why is it so hard to stick to a workout routine? Because we're not working out for the right reasons, say researchers. Scientists at London Metropolitan University found that people stopped going to the gym after three to six months if they were doing it to lose weight or look better. Those who stuck with it: They had internal motivations, like less stress or liking the buzz they got from a cardio routine. Some other things to consider:

Find your favorites. Exercise is a lot less tedious if you actually like what you're doing. And you can further stack the deck in your favor by choosing a routine that enhances your overall sense of well-being. So figure out what makes you zen, and do that.


Double date. Team up with another person for at least one workout per week, says Thomas Plante, chair of the psychology department at Santa Clara University. His study found that people who exercised with a partner were calmer and had more energy than those who went it alone.


Get a trainer (aka a cheerleader). Ok, this one can be expensive. But it's worth considering at least splitting one with a friend. Not only will the encouragement from a pro help you feel more confident, people who workout with a trainer tent to try harder, persist longer, and stick to their program better, says Kathleen Martin Ginis, a professor of health and exercise at McMaster University in Ontario.


Change your view. Anytime you start to feel bored, switch up your routine: go to a different gym location, try a new class, switch from one cardio machine to another (like from a bike to an elliptical trainer). It doesn't take much to spice things up.

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Facebook Asks Court To Dismiss Click Fraud Cases | View Clip
02/02/2010
MediaPost.com

Several marketers sued Facebook for click fraud this summer, shortly after a flurry of complaints about the issue surfaced online. Now, Facebook is arguing that the litigation should be dismissed because its contract with marketers provides that they must pay for all clicks, regardless of their validity.

"Contrary to plaintiffs' allegations, the contract does not require Facebook to police its website for all instances of click fraud nor does it limit Facebook's ability to collect fees generated by clicks on plaintiffs' advertisements," Facebook alleges in a recent motion to dismiss the cases.

The litigation grows out of complaints filed by sports site

RootZoo and several other online marketers. They filed suit shortly after TechCrunch reported on an influx of complaints by marketers about perceived click fraud on Facebook. The cases were consolidated into one litigation, currently pending in front of U.S. District court Judge Jeremy Fogel in the northern district of California.

Facebook alleges in its motion papers that all cost-per-click advertisers were required to check a box stating that they agreed to the company's terms and conditions, which allegedly included the following language: "I understand that third parties may generate impressions, clicks, or other actions affecting the cost of the advertising for fraudulent or improper purposes, and I accept the risk of any such impressions, clicks, or other actions."

Late last week, the marketers filed a response denying that the disclaimer was part of their contracts. They also said that the disclaimer is "ambiguous" and "strikingly inconsistent" with Facebook's advertising policies and statements. For instance, they argue, Facebook posts a glossary that

says: "We have a variety of measures in place to ensure that we only report and charge advertisers for legitimate clicks, and not clicks that come from automated programs, or clicks that may be repetitive, abusive, or otherwise inauthentic."

While Facebook clearly has a motive to draft terms and conditions that aim to avoid liability, the strategy also seems likely to pose a public relations problem, says online marketing consultant Greg Sterling. "They're in a difficult spot," he says. "They have to say, 'We will fight click fraud,' but they don't want to make themselves vulnerable to damage claims -- which could be quite substantial."

Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman says that Facebook's agreement with marketers appears to be clear, but adds that courts "often will consider additional documentation outside the 'four corners' of the contract." Facebook declined to comment for this article.

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Apple thrives as Sun Micro dies | View Clip
02/02/2010
MarketWatch

SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) -- Last week, many on Wall Street and the business and tech press were obsessively focused on the launch of Apple Inc.'s new tablet.

While crowds of Apple /quotes/comstock/15*!aapl/quotes/nls/aapl (AAPL 194.73, +2.67, +1.39%) fanboys, pundits, and reporters (myself included) gathered for the media frenzy at the Yerba Buena Center in San Francisco, another event was going on simultaneously. It was basically the handover of the once-iconic Sun Microsystems Inc. to Oracle Corp. /quotes/comstock/15*!orcl/quotes/nls/orcl (ORCL 23.22, +0.16, +0.69%) , its new owner.

Reuters

Sun co-founder Scott McNealy and Apple CEO Steve Jobs.

A poignant swan song last week written by one of my former colleagues at the San Jose Mercury News reminded me how Sun was once one of the biggest swashbucklers in Silicon Valley. The systems and software company epitomized everything that is good and bad about the Valley: serious innovation, wacky genius and arrogance of the place that still thinks of itself as the epicenter of the tech world.

And then I remembered. Sun once was in serious talks to buy Apple.

Talk about reversal of fortune.

It was January of 1996. Apple was on the ropes, losing money and laying people off. Co-founder Steve Jobs had been kicked out years earlier and was struggling with his NeXT Computer. Michael Spindler was running the show, but not very well. Sun -- led by co-founder and then-CEO Scott McNealy -- swooped in, seeking to buy the struggling but much-loved company at a bargain sale price, with its stock trading below $10 per share on a split-adjusted basis.

The price was the sticking point, and Sun walked after Apple swatted it away. Instead of coming back with a higher offer, Sun also realized it was probably not a good fit, with its focus on corporate customers, and Apple's emphasis on the consumer market.

"I didn't think it was a good idea," said Kevin Walsh, now a professor of management at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University. Walsh was then a high-ranking Sun executive and vocalized his opposition to such a deal.

It's probably a good thing for Apple that it fought off Sun's unwanted advances.

"They were not a good cultural fit," Walsh said.

The difference in the outcomes of these two iconic Valley companies is especially interesting because both developed their own proprietary technologies.

Sun, after rising to great heights during the dot-com boom of 1999-2000, ultimately lost its way after the bubble burst. In the economic fallout that ensued, the company lost many customers, which were putting its pricey servers up on the auction block. During the downturn, cheaper commodity servers running Linux and other open-source software became the trend among penny-pinching corporations.

Walsh believes Sun did not move fast enough to embrace the trend to lower-cost servers, while its rivals Hewlett-Packard Co. /quotes/comstock/13*!hpq/quotes/nls/hpq (HPQ 47.83, +0.76, +1.61%) and IBM Corp. /quotes/comstock/13*!ibm/quotes/nls/ibm (IBM 124.67, +2.28, +1.86%) did. It got caught in a classic "Innovator's Dilemma," as described in the 1997 book by Clayton Christensen when he describes how lower-cost technologies can disrupt a market simply by being "good enough" to answer the needs of some customers in certain markets.

Sun, the developer of a low-cost workstation that turned that market on its head in the early 1980s was later one-upped by the similar forces in the computer server market.

While Sun's struggle began in the post-bubble era, Apple started on its roll. Jobs came back, cleaned house and streamlined its messy product lineup. He rallied the troops around simplicity, ease of use and sleek design. One of the first hits upon his return was the iMac. Then, in October, 2001, a month after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Apple launched its iPod digital music player, its first in a string of products that ultimately shook up the music business. That same month, Sun reported its second loss in its history and the beginning of staff layoffs.

Both McNealy and Sun's last CEO, Jonathan Schwartz, have already written their own goodbyes. In McNealy's email to staffers, he admitted "this is not a note this founder wants to write." Sun, he said, "should have been the great and surviving consolidator."

Rob Enderle, an analyst with the Enderle Group, believes that many of Sun's problems stemmed from McNealy's obsessive focus on Microsoft Corp. /quotes/comstock/15*!msft/quotes/nls/msft (MSFT 28.40, +0.22, +0.78%) .

"Scott McNealy focused like a laser on Microsoft, and Microsoft was never their competitor," Enderle said. "He wasn't set up to compete with a software company. Then Jonathan Schwartz tried to turn Sun into a software company ... They were neither fish nor fowl and then they lost their way. The company was the strategy of the month."

Under Oracle, Sun will be a shadow of its former self. Oracle chief executive Larry Ellison and Co. plan to focus the company on developing servers optimized to run Oracle's database software. See Oracle news here.

Sun's demise as an independent company will probably be fodder for many a business school study. It is now up to Ellison to save what is left of it.

Therese Poletti is a senior columnist for MarketWatch in San Francisco.

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Poizner Whitman consultant threatened to drive him out of governor s race | View Clip
02/02/2010
San Jose Mercury News - Online

The Republican gubernatorial primary took a turn for the bizarre Monday, with one candidate's campaign comparing a rival to Tony Soprano, another staffer questioning a candidate's sanity and an ethics expert likening both hopefuls to children on a playground.

The day began with Steve Poizner summoning reporters to a Sacramento news conference in which he charged that Mike Murphy, a top adviser to former eBay chief Meg Whitman's campaign, had threatened to drive him out of the GOP race.

"We can spend $40M+ tearing up Steve if we must," read an e-mail Murphy sent last week to a Poizner staffer, which also asked if Poizner would "reconsider this race."

Poizner, the state's insurance commissioner, contended that Murphy had crossed an ethical line, and he claimed Whitman's staffers have been calling his staff in an attempt to pressure him to step aside.

"They're trying to cancel the election, effectively," said Poizner, who has accused the billionaire Whitman of seeking to buy the election as she avoids debates and hard questions from the press.

Murphy, a prominent GOP consultant known for his razor-like wit, issued a statement denying he was threatening anyone.

"After reading the ridiculous charges made by Steve Poizner during today's strange press conference, all I can say is that I'm starting to worry about the commissioner's mental condition,'' said Murphy, who earlier in the campaign advised Poizner but went to work for

Whitman instead.

Murphy's e-mail included a suggestion that the Republican Party unite behind Whitman and support a Poizner bid for U.S. Senate in 2012. Murphy noted that Sen. Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat, would be "78 or 79 years old" by then.

Poizner sent a copy of Murphy's e-mail to the FBI, state Attorney General's office, U.S. Attorney's Office and the California Secretary of State. In yet another bizarre wrinkle to the political soap opera, California Attorney General Jerry Brown is the presumed Democratic candidate for governor in this fall's election.

Brown spokeswoman Christine Gasparac said Monday her office has "received the letter and are reviewing it."

Both Whitman and Poizner, a former Silicon Valley entrepreneur, have contributed millions to their campaigns. But while Whitman has blanketed the airwaves with radio ads, Poizner has so far not launched a statewide advertising push — a strategy many political observers have found puzzling.

A poll released last week by the Public Policy Institute of California showed Whitman ahead by nearly 4 to 1.

Murphy acknowledged he has been trying to find a way to avoid "a costly and unnecessary Republican primary'' so the party can have the best shot at defeating Brown in November.

"It is also true that I am not the only one with this view,'' he said.

Murphy said he only contacted Poizner's staffers after hearing that one of them, a longtime friend, had been expressing "grave doubts'' about the viability of Poizner's campaign.

Democratic Party strategists seemed delighted with Poizner's press conference. Political consultant Steve Maviglio said it had done "more for the Brown campaign than Brown did for the last five months."

Maviglio predicted "this will all get lost in an endless series of charges and counter-charges, unless there's some legal basis for these claims."

Roman Porter, executive director of the state's Fair Political Practices Commission, said after reviewing Poizner's letter, "It appears there are no alleged violations of the Political Reform Act. However, if Mr. Poizner or a member of his staff would like to file a sworn complaint, as with every sworn complaint, we'll look at it and determine whether an investigation is warranted."

Judy Nadler, senior fellow at Santa Clara University's Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, described the message from Whitman's campaign as "not good campaign ethics," even if it's not against the law.

"Something can be perfectly legal and not be ethical," she said. "You can pretty much tell how someone will act in office by the way they act in their campaigns."

Nadler also said the flap reflects poorly on both candidates: "It is like kids on the playground. I would hate to have this gubernatorial race, at a time when California is in such critical condition, be sidetracked by issues like this."

Steven Harmon of Bay Area News Group's Sacramento Bureau contributed to this report. Contact Ken McLaughlin at kmclaughlin@mercurynews.com or (408) 920-5552.

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Apple thrives as Sun Micro dies
02/02/2010
MarketWatch

SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) -- Last week, many on Wall Street and the business and tech press were obsessively focused on the launch of Apple Inc.'s new tablet.

While crowds of Apple AAPL fanboys, pundits, and reporters (myself included) gathered for the media frenzy at the Yerba Buena Center in San Francisco, another event was going on simultaneously. It was basically the handover of the once-iconic Sun Microsystems Inc. to Oracle Corp. ORCL, its new owner.

A poignant swan song last week written by one of my former colleagues at the San Jose Mercury News reminded me how Sun was once one of the biggest swashbucklers in Silicon Valley. The systems and software company epitomized everything that is good and bad about the Valley: serious innovation, wacky genius and arrogance of the place that still thinks of itself as the epicenter of the tech world.

And then I remembered. Sun once was in serious talks to buy Apple.

Talk about reversal of fortune.

It was January of 1996. Apple was on the ropes, losing money and laying people off. Co-founder Steve Jobs had been kicked out years earlier and was struggling with his NeXT Computer. Michael Spindler was running the show, but not very well. Sun -- led by co-founder and then-CEO Scott McNealy -- swooped in, seeking to buy the struggling but much-loved company at a bargain sale price, with its stock trading below $10 per share on a split-adjusted basis.

The price was the sticking point, and Sun walked after Apple swatted it away. Instead of coming back with a higher offer, Sun also realized it was probably not a good fit, with its focus on corporate customers, and Apple's emphasis on the consumer market.

"I didn't think it was a good idea," said Kevin Walsh, now a professor of management at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University. Walsh was then a high-ranking Sun executive and vocalized his opposition to such a deal.

It's probably a good thing for Apple that it fought off Sun's unwanted advances.

"They were not a good cultural fit," Walsh said.

The difference in the outcomes of these two iconic Valley companies is especially interesting because both developed their own proprietary technologies.

Sun, after rising to great heights during the dot-com boom of 1999-2000, ultimately lost its way after the bubble burst. In the economic fallout that ensued, the company lost many customers, which were putting its pricey servers up on the auction block. During the downturn, cheaper commodity servers running Linux and other open-source software became the trend among penny-pinching corporations.

Walsh believes Sun did not move fast enough to embrace the trend to lower-cost servers, while its rivals Hewlett-Packard Co. HPQ and IBM Corp. IBM did. It got caught in a classic "Innovator's Dilemma," as described in the 1997 book by Clayton Christensen when he describes how lower-cost technologies can disrupt a market simply by being "good enough" to answer the needs of some customers in certain markets.

Sun, the developer of a low-cost workstation that turned that market on its head in the early 1980s was later one-upped by the similar forces in the computer server market.

While Sun's struggle began in the post-bubble era, Apple started on its roll. Jobs came back, cleaned house and streamlined its messy product lineup. He rallied the troops around simplicity, ease of use and sleek design. One of the first hits upon his return was the iMac. Then, in October, 2001, a month after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Apple launched its iPod digital music player, its first in a string of products that ultimately shook up the music business. That same month, Sun reported its second loss in its history and the beginning of staff layoffs.

Both McNealy and Sun's last CEO, Jonathan Schwartz, have already written their own goodbyes. In McNealy's email to staffers, he admitted "this is not a note this founder wants to write." Sun, he said, "should have been the great and surviving consolidator."

Rob Enderle, an analyst with the Enderle Group, believes that many of Sun's problems stemmed from McNealy's obsessive focus on Microsoft Corp. MSFT.

"Scott McNealy focused like a laser on Microsoft, and Microsoft was never their competitor," Enderle said. "He wasn't set up to compete with a software company. Then Jonathan Schwartz tried to turn Sun into a software company ... They were neither fish nor fowl and then they lost their way. The company was the strategy of the month."

Under Oracle, Sun will be a shadow of its former self. Oracle chief executive Larry Ellison and Co. plan to focus the company on developing servers optimized to run Oracle's database software. See Oracle news here.

Sun's demise as an independent company will probably be fodder for many a business school study. It is now up to Ellison to save what is left of it.

Copyright © 2010 MarketWatch.com

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Jerry Kroth | View Clip
02/02/2010
Huffington Post, The

Jerry Kroth, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the graduate counseling psychology program at Santa Clara University. He teaches psychotherapy and personality theory, dreamwork, and research methods. He has an abiding therapeutic interest in working with dreams, personal oracles, and the applications of dream theory to psychohistory. Dr. Kroth has been a member of the International Psychohistorical Association since 1983.

Dr. Kroth's eight prior books were in the areas of counseling psychology, child sexual abuse, learning disorders, metapsychology, and research methodology. In addition, he has written and presented over seventy papers on anxiety, child development, mass

psychology, synchronicity, the dream process, psychohistory and collective psychology. His most recent work is Conspiracy in Camelot: The Complete History of the Assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy (New York: Algora, 2003). Dr. Kroth has two daughters and lives in California. (Complete c.v. available on request.)

Everyday the President of Pakistan, Asif Ali Zardari, reportedly likes to sacrifice a black goat "to ward off the evil eye." Sounds okay, I guess, but it kind of makes you wonder just how rapidly the $13 billion we gave to Pakistan since 2002 is really helping them...

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Poizner Whitman consultant threatened to drive him out of governor s race | View Clip
02/02/2010
Whittier Daily News

Governor's race

Politics page

The Republican gubernatorial primary took a turn for the bizarre Monday, with one candidate's campaign comparing a rival to Tony Soprano, another staffer questioning a candidate's sanity and an ethics expert likening both hopefuls to children on a playground.

The day began with Steve Poizner summoning reporters to a Sacramento news conference in which he charged that Mike Murphy, a top adviser to former eBay chief Meg Whitman's campaign, had threatened to drive him out of the GOP race.

"We can spend $40M+ tearing up Steve if we must," read an e-mail Murphy sent last week to a Poizner staffer. Murphy also asked if Poizner would "reconsider this race."

Poizner, the state's insurance commissioner, contended that Murphy had crossed an ethical line, and he claimed Whitman's staffers have been calling his staff in an attempt to pressure him to step aside.

"This pattern of intimidation has unfolded like an episode from 'The Sopranos,' " said Poizner's communications director Jarrod Agen.

Murphy, a prominent GOP consultant known for his razorlike wit, issued a statement denying he was threatening anyone.

"After reading the ridiculous charges made by Steve Poizner during today's strange news conference, all I can say is that I'm starting to worry about the commissioner's mental condition,'' said Murphy, who earlier in the campaign advised Poizner but went to work for Whitman instead.

Murphy's e-mail included a suggestion that

the Republican Party unite behind Whitman and support a Poizner bid for U.S. Senate in 2012. Murphy noted that Sen. Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat, would be "78 or 79 years old" by then.

Poizner sent a copy of Murphy's e-mail to the FBI, state attorney general's office, U.S. attorney's office and the California secretary of state. In yet another bizarre wrinkle to the political soap opera, California Attorney General Jerry Brown is the presumed Democratic candidate for governor in this fall's election.

Brown spokeswoman Christine Gasparac said Monday her office has "received the letter and are reviewing it."

Both Whitman and Poizner, a former Silicon Valley entrepreneur, have contributed millions to their campaigns. But while Whitman has blanketed the airwaves with radio ads, Poizner has so far not launched a statewide advertising push — a strategy many political observers have found puzzling.

A poll released last week by the Public Policy Institute of California showed Whitman ahead by nearly 4-1.

Murphy acknowledged he has been trying to find a way to avoid "a costly and unnecessary Republican primary" so the party can have the best shot at defeating Brown in November.

"It is also true that I am not the only one with this view," he said.

Murphy said he contacted Poizner's staffers only after hearing that one of them, a longtime friend, had been expressing "grave doubts" about the viability of Poizner's campaign.

Democratic Party strategists seemed delighted with Poizner's news conference. Political consultant Steve Maviglio said it had done "more for the Brown campaign than Brown did for the last five months."

Maviglio predicted "this will all get lost in an endless series of charges and countercharges, unless there's some legal basis for these claims."

Roman Porter, executive director of the state's Fair Political Practices Commission, said after reviewing Poizner's letter, "It appears there are no alleged violations of the Political Reform Act. However, if Mr. Poizner or a member of his staff would like to file a sworn complaint, as with every sworn complaint, we'll look at it and determine whether an investigation is warranted."

Judy Nadler, senior fellow at Santa Clara University's Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, described the message from Whitman's campaign as "not good campaign ethics," even if it's not against the law.

"Something can be perfectly legal and not be ethical," she said. "You can pretty much tell how someone will act in office by the way they act in their campaigns."

Nadler also said the flap reflects poorly on both candidates: "It is like kids on the playground. I would hate to have this gubernatorial race, at a time when California is in such critical condition, be sidetracked by issues like this."

Steven Harmon of Bay Area News Group's Sacramento Bureau contributed to this report. Contact Ken McLaughlin at kmclaughlin@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5552.

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Poizner Whitman consultant threatened to drive him out of governor s race | View Clip
02/02/2010
San Gabriel Valley Tribune - Online

Governor's race

Politics page

The Republican gubernatorial primary took a turn for the bizarre Monday, with one candidate's campaign comparing a rival to Tony Soprano, another staffer questioning a candidate's sanity and an ethics expert likening both hopefuls to children on a playground.

The day began with Steve Poizner summoning reporters to a Sacramento news conference in which he charged that Mike Murphy, a top adviser to former eBay chief Meg Whitman's campaign, had threatened to drive him out of the GOP race.

"We can spend $40M+ tearing up Steve if we must," read an e-mail Murphy sent last week to a Poizner staffer. Murphy also asked if Poizner would "reconsider this race."

Poizner, the state's insurance commissioner, contended that Murphy had crossed an ethical line, and he claimed Whitman's staffers have been calling his staff in an attempt to pressure him to step aside.

"This pattern of intimidation has unfolded like an episode from 'The Sopranos,' " said Poizner's communications director Jarrod Agen.

Murphy, a prominent GOP consultant known for his razorlike wit, issued a statement denying he was threatening anyone.

"After reading the ridiculous charges made by Steve Poizner during today's strange news conference, all I can say is that I'm starting to worry about the commissioner's mental condition,'' said Murphy, who earlier in the campaign advised Poizner but went to work for Whitman instead.

Murphy's e-mail included a suggestion that

the Republican Party unite behind Whitman and support a Poizner bid for U.S. Senate in 2012. Murphy noted that Sen. Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat, would be "78 or 79 years old" by then.

Poizner sent a copy of Murphy's e-mail to the FBI, state attorney general's office, U.S. attorney's office and the California secretary of state. In yet another bizarre wrinkle to the political soap opera, California Attorney General Jerry Brown is the presumed Democratic candidate for governor in this fall's election.

Brown spokeswoman Christine Gasparac said Monday her office has "received the letter and are reviewing it."

Both Whitman and Poizner, a former Silicon Valley entrepreneur, have contributed millions to their campaigns. But while Whitman has blanketed the airwaves with radio ads, Poizner has so far not launched a statewide advertising push — a strategy many political observers have found puzzling.

A poll released last week by the Public Policy Institute of California showed Whitman ahead by nearly 4-1.

Murphy acknowledged he has been trying to find a way to avoid "a costly and unnecessary Republican primary" so the party can have the best shot at defeating Brown in November.

"It is also true that I am not the only one with this view," he said.

Murphy said he contacted Poizner's staffers only after hearing that one of them, a longtime friend, had been expressing "grave doubts" about the viability of Poizner's campaign.

Democratic Party strategists seemed delighted with Poizner's news conference. Political consultant Steve Maviglio said it had done "more for the Brown campaign than Brown did for the last five months."

Maviglio predicted "this will all get lost in an endless series of charges and countercharges, unless there's some legal basis for these claims."

Roman Porter, executive director of the state's Fair Political Practices Commission, said after reviewing Poizner's letter, "It appears there are no alleged violations of the Political Reform Act. However, if Mr. Poizner or a member of his staff would like to file a sworn complaint, as with every sworn complaint, we'll look at it and determine whether an investigation is warranted."

Judy Nadler, senior fellow at Santa Clara University's Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, described the message from Whitman's campaign as "not good campaign ethics," even if it's not against the law.

"Something can be perfectly legal and not be ethical," she said. "You can pretty much tell how someone will act in office by the way they act in their campaigns."

Nadler also said the flap reflects poorly on both candidates: "It is like kids on the playground. I would hate to have this gubernatorial race, at a time when California is in such critical condition, be sidetracked by issues like this."

Steven Harmon of Bay Area News Group's Sacramento Bureau contributed to this report. Contact Ken McLaughlin at kmclaughlin@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5552.

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Poizner Whitman consultant threatened to drive him out of governor s race | View Clip
02/02/2010
Press-Telegram - Online

Governor's race

Politics page

The Republican gubernatorial primary took a turn for the bizarre Monday, with one candidate's campaign comparing a rival to Tony Soprano, another staffer questioning a candidate's sanity and an ethics expert likening both hopefuls to children on a playground.

The day began with Steve Poizner summoning reporters to a Sacramento news conference in which he charged that Mike Murphy, a top adviser to former eBay chief Meg Whitman's campaign, had threatened to drive him out of the GOP race.

"We can spend $40M+ tearing up Steve if we must," read an e-mail Murphy sent last week to a Poizner staffer. Murphy also asked if Poizner would "reconsider this race."

Poizner, the state's insurance commissioner, contended that Murphy had crossed an ethical line, and he claimed Whitman's staffers have been calling his staff in an attempt to pressure him to step aside.

"This pattern of intimidation has unfolded like an episode from 'The Sopranos,' " said Poizner's communications director Jarrod Agen.

Murphy, a prominent GOP consultant known for his razorlike wit, issued a statement denying he was threatening anyone.

"After reading the ridiculous charges made by Steve Poizner during today's strange news conference, all I can say is that I'm starting to worry about the commissioner's mental condition,'' said Murphy, who earlier in the campaign advised Poizner but went to work for Whitman instead.

Murphy's e-mail included a suggestion that

the Republican Party unite behind Whitman and support a Poizner bid for U.S. Senate in 2012. Murphy noted that Sen. Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat, would be "78 or 79 years old" by then.

Poizner sent a copy of Murphy's e-mail to the FBI, state attorney general's office, U.S. attorney's office and the California secretary of state. In yet another bizarre wrinkle to the political soap opera, California Attorney General Jerry Brown is the presumed Democratic candidate for governor in this fall's election.

Brown spokeswoman Christine Gasparac said Monday her office has "received the letter and are reviewing it."

Both Whitman and Poizner, a former Silicon Valley entrepreneur, have contributed millions to their campaigns. But while Whitman has blanketed the airwaves with radio ads, Poizner has so far not launched a statewide advertising push — a strategy many political observers have found puzzling.

A poll released last week by the Public Policy Institute of California showed Whitman ahead by nearly 4-1.

Murphy acknowledged he has been trying to find a way to avoid "a costly and unnecessary Republican primary" so the party can have the best shot at defeating Brown in November.

"It is also true that I am not the only one with this view," he said.

Murphy said he contacted Poizner's staffers only after hearing that one of them, a longtime friend, had been expressing "grave doubts" about the viability of Poizner's campaign.

Democratic Party strategists seemed delighted with Poizner's news conference. Political consultant Steve Maviglio said it had done "more for the Brown campaign than Brown did for the last five months."

Maviglio predicted "this will all get lost in an endless series of charges and countercharges, unless there's some legal basis for these claims."

Roman Porter, executive director of the state's Fair Political Practices Commission, said after reviewing Poizner's letter, "It appears there are no alleged violations of the Political Reform Act. However, if Mr. Poizner or a member of his staff would like to file a sworn complaint, as with every sworn complaint, we'll look at it and determine whether an investigation is warranted."

Judy Nadler, senior fellow at Santa Clara University's Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, described the message from Whitman's campaign as "not good campaign ethics," even if it's not against the law.

"Something can be perfectly legal and not be ethical," she said. "You can pretty much tell how someone will act in office by the way they act in their campaigns."

Nadler also said the flap reflects poorly on both candidates: "It is like kids on the playground. I would hate to have this gubernatorial race, at a time when California is in such critical condition, be sidetracked by issues like this."

Steven Harmon of Bay Area News Group's Sacramento Bureau contributed to this report. Contact Ken McLaughlin at kmclaughlin@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5552.

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Financial survey Americans optimistic about personal finances | View Clip
02/02/2010
KUSA-TV - Online

DENVER - A new financial survey shows although many people do not believe the U.S. economy is improving, their hope for their personal finances is.

The Chase survey polled 1,000 consumers and found that 72 percent trust themselves to manage their personal finances and 57 percent believe their situation is getting better.

But even though many were optimistic about improvement, 68 percent said they would still benefit from better ways to manage their personal finances with 52 percent saying they do not feel in complete control.

Dr. Hersh Shefrin is a professor of Behavioral Finance at Santa Clara University and the author of "Beyond Greed and Fear: Understanding Behavioral Finance and the Psychology of Investing." He says that is actually not the worst problem to have.

"That's incredibly important because there are so many things that people can do to actually manage their finances better," Shefrin said.

The survey also found some people are not sticking to their New Year's resolutions when it comes to finances with 10 percent saying they broke their resolution within the first 10 days of 2010.

"It's human nature. Hope springs eternal. People really do set high expectations but change is difficult," Shefrin said.

He says even though people have fallen short of their goals, they can start over. Seeking advice, according to Shefrin, is the best way to get back on track.

"I think for most people, online resources or telephone resources will get them going and will get them in the right direction. Long journeys begin with first steps and that will help them take the first few steps to get them going," Shefrin said.

He recommends counseling or professional help for those who have a serious habit and continue to fall into debt.

"Number one is self awareness, know thyself. Understand what your financial style is. For example, know whether you're a deliberate spender or a spontaneous spender," Shefrin said.

He also recommends making a financial plan that works for your lifestyle, finding tools to help you and controlling everyday spending.

For those people in a relationship who have joint finances, Shefrin says you can not only avoid a lot of fights but you can help reign in your own finances when you communicate with your significant other.

"It's important to know for example whether you and your spouse have the same financial style. If you have the same financial style, that will lead to one form of communication but if you have different financial styles, that means there are going to be issues to work out. Knowing what your styles are is an incredible first step to take in terms of having that dialogue," he said.

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Pizarro Hospice of the Valley hits grant goal | View Clip
02/02/2010
San Jose Mercury News - Online

There's been good news lately from Hospice of the Valley, the nonprofit organization that helps ensure the comfort of those near the ends of their lives.

The group announced it's met a 2-for-1 matching grant goal set by the Sobrato Family Foundation. Hospice received a first installment of $80,000 a year ago and has since raised more than that amount in new funds to qualify for a second-year grant.

"This is a gratifying achievement — it speaks to our mission and the invaluable service that our organization provides in Santa Clara County," said Chris Worrall, chairman of Hospice's board of directors.

Back in November, the San Jose-based nonprofit also received a $75,000 grant from the The Sovereign Order of St. John of Jerusalem during an open house for its Community Grief and Counseling Center. The open house highlighted Hospice's inaugural "Journey of Hope" exhibit, featuring artwork that reflects the path of grief, loss and healing.

MUST-SEE TV: Santa Clara University freshman James Hill, who graduated from San Jose's Bellarmine College Prep, will be matching wits on Jeopardy's "College Championship" starting Wednesday. It airs on KGO-TV Channel 7 at 7 p.m.

You should also tune in to the Food Network on Feb. 22, when San Jose's Naglee Park Garage is featured on "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives."

The guys behind the neighborhood bistro — Chris Esparza,

Brendan Rawson and chef Louis Silva — are planning to bring back some menu items featured on the show.

COMEDY SPOTLIGHT: Comic Bobby Slayton has been followed around lately by a documentary crew, and he asked them to come to Sunnyvale on Wednesday for his show at Rooster T. Feathers.

He has a long history with the club, and it's one of the first places he worked before hitting it big. I'm told that the club's original owner, Tony Modica, will be on hand as well, so it should be a heck of an evening.

SUNDANCING: Santana Row's Flying Lizard Design was one of the boutiques invited to be in the "Swag Room," where celebs picked out free stuff at last week's Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

Flying Lizard owner Vallora Sabourin reports, "Paris" — need we say Hilton? — "loved our stuff. She got six pieces and wore our opal necklace with her outfit all day. Samuel L. Jackson got earrings for his daughter, and he couldn't decide between three pairs so we were all trying to help him out. We were very popular!"

Contact Sal Pizarro at spizarro@mercurynews.com or 408-627-0940.

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Silicon Valley Economic Forecast | View Clip
02/02/2010
KCBS-AM - Online

SAN JOSE, Calif. (KCBS) -- The latest economic forecast out of Silicon Valley paints a brighter picture for the local and national economy.

The US economy has pulled out of the downturn and will not experience a so-called double-dip recession, that according to Santa Clara University Economics Professor Mario Belotti.

He said the economy should grow 3.5 to 4 percent this year.

"It's not a very vigorous way to grow. We had, after the recession of '81-82 and the recession of '74-75, it's not as vigorous as that. But, it's going to be good," Belotti said.

However, Belotti said unemployment numbers will take a while to rebound.

Meanwhile, the Bureau of Labor Statistics is out with a new survey on the Silicon Valley economy. Economist Amar Mann said the Valley finally started to lose jobs in early 2009.

"The reason I say it finally started to show some decline is because in 2008, Silcon Valley hi-tech employment actually grew. In fact, not until the last quarter of 2008 did hi-tech in Silicon Valley really slow down," Mann said.

He said the good news is the national hi-tech jobs picture is improving, and hopefully Silicon Valley will follow suit.

(kmi)

Copyright 2010, KCBS. All Rights Reserved.

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5 Ways to Stick to Your Workout | View Clip
02/02/2010
Allure - Online

Why is it so hard to stick to a workout routine? Because we're not working out for the right reasons, say researchers. Scientists at London Metropolitan University found that people stopped going to the gym after three to six monthsif they were doing it to lose weight or look better. Those who stuck with it: They had internal motivations, like less stress or liking the buzz they got from a cardio routine. Some other things to consider:

Find your favorites. Exercise is a lot less tedious if you actually like what you're doing. And you can further stack the deck in your favor by choosing a routine that enhances your overall sense of well-being. So figure out what makes you zen, and do that.

Double date. Team up with another person for at least one workout per week, says Thomas Plante, chair of the psychology department at Santa Clara University. His study found that people who exercised with a partner were calmer and had more energy than those who went it alone.

Get a trainer (aka a cheerleader). Ok, this one can be expensive. But it's worth considering at least splitting one with a friend. Not only will the encouragement from a pro help you feel more confident, people who workout with a trainer tent to try harder, persist longer, and stick to their program better, says Kathleen Martin Ginis, a professor of health and exercise at McMaster University in Ontario.

Change your view. Anytime you start to feel bored, switch up your routine: go to a different gym location, try a new class, switch from one cardio machine to another (like from a bike to an elliptical trainer). It doesn't take much to spice things up.

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POIZNER ACCUSES RIVAL'S AIDE OF THREAT
02/02/2010
San Jose Mercury News

The Republican gubernatorial primary took a turn for the bizarre Monday, with one candidate's campaign comparing a rival to Tony Soprano, another staffer questioning a candidate's sanity and an ethics expert likening both hopefuls to children on a playground.

The day began with Steve Poizner summoning reporters to a Sacramento news conference in which he charged that Mike Murphy, a top adviser to former eBay chief Meg Whitman's campaign, had threatened to drive him out of the GOP race.

"We can spend $40M+ tearing up Steve if we must," read an e-mail Murphy sent last week to a Poizner staffer. Murphy also asked if Poizner would "reconsider this race."

Poizner, the state's insurance commissioner, contended that Murphy had crossed an ethical line, and he claimed Whitman's staffers have been calling his staff in an attempt to pressure him to step aside.

"This pattern of intimidation has unfolded like an episode from 'The Sopranos,'" said Poizner's communications director Jarrod Agen.

Murphy, a prominent GOP consultant known for his razorlike wit, issued a statement denying he was threatening anyone.

"After reading the ridiculous charges made by Steve Poizner during today's strange news conference, all I can say is that I'm starting to worry about the commissioner's mental condition," said Murphy, who earlier in the campaign advised Poizner but went to work for Whitman instead.

Murphy's e-mail included a suggestion that the Republican Party unite behind Whitman and support a Poizner bid for U.S. Senate in 2012. Murphy noted that Sen. Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat, would be "78 or 79 years old" by then.

Poizner sent a copy of Murphy's e-mail to the FBI, state attorney general's office, U.S. attorney's office and the California secretary of state. In yet another bizarre wrinkle to the political soap opera, California Attorney General Jerry Brown is the presumed Democratic candidate for governor in this fall's election.

Brown spokeswoman Christine Gasparac said Monday her office has "received the letter and are reviewing it."

Both Whitman and Poizner, a former Silicon Valley entrepreneur, have contributed millions to their campaigns. But while Whitman has blanketed the airwaves with radio ads, Poizner has so far not launched a statewide advertising push -- a strategy many political observers have found puzzling.

A poll released last week by the Public Policy Institute of California showed Whitman ahead by nearly 4-1.

Murphy acknowledged he has been trying to find a way to avoid "a costly and unnecessary Republican primary" so the party can have the best shot at defeating Brown in November.

"It is also true that I am not the only one with this view," he said.

Murphy said he contacted Poizner's staffers only after hearing that one of them, a longtime friend, had been expressing "grave doubts" about the viability of Poizner's campaign.

Democratic Party strategists seemed delighted with Poizner's news conference. Political consultant Steve Maviglio said it had done "more for the Brown campaign than Brown did for the last five months."

Maviglio predicted "this will all get lost in an endless series of charges and countercharges, unless there's some legal basis for these claims."

Roman Porter, executive director of the state's Fair Political Practices Commission, said after reviewing Poizner's letter, "It appears there are no alleged violations of the Political Reform Act. However, if Mr. Poizner or a member of his staff would like to file a sworn complaint, as with every sworn complaint, we'll look at it and determine whether an investigation is warranted."

Judy Nadler, senior fellow at Santa Clara University's Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, described the message from Whitman's campaign as "not good campaign ethics," even if it's not against the law.

"Something can be perfectly legal and not be ethical," she said. "You can pretty much tell how someone will act in office by the way they act in their campaigns."

Nadler also said the flap reflects poorly on both candidates: "It is like kids on the playground. I would hate to have this gubernatorial race, at a time when California is in such critical condition, be sidetracked by issues like this."

Contact Ken McLaughlin at kmclaughlin@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5552.

Copyright © 2010 San Jose Mercury News

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Santa Clara Univ. professor outlines economic outlook | View Clip
02/02/2010
KGO-TV - Online

SANTA CLARA, CA -- Longtime Santa Clara University economics professor Mario Belotti said today the U.S. economy could experience growth of up to 4 percent this year, but it might take another year to see an improvement in California's economy.

Speaking at his annual "State of the Economy" assessment at Santa Clara University this morning, Belotti painted an optimistic economic picture for the upcoming year.

"Despite what you've read in The New York Times, things are much better," Belotti said, citing improvements in the index of leading economic indicators over the last nine months.

Belotti said the numbers in the industrial and manufacturing sectors are especially encouraging, because they have risen in the last six months across much of the industrialized world. The economic stimulus package passed last year will make a greater impact this year with increased expenditures on projects, Belotti said.

Belotti said a combination of government and business spending, a change in the foreign sector and increases in inventories will boost the economy by 3.5 to 4 percent this year.

Contrary to what some may believe, Belotti said one of the leading causes of the recession was a decrease in business spending rather than consumer spending. In 2009, business spending, which includes spending on residential and non-residential construction, machinery, software and inventory, was down by 12.5 percent.

"The decline is over. This year, I expect business spending to turn around," Belotti said, adding that businesses are preparing for a six-month cycle of growth and innovation.

Belotti predicted that government spending on goods and services will also contribute to the gross domestic product by 0.8 percent.

Another indicator of economic growth is the rate of U.S. export, which at 18 percent is increasing at a faster rate than the 12 percent rate of imports, leading to an increase in the GDP.

Belotti's outlook on unemployment, currently at 10 percent, wasn't as optimistic, at least in the first half of the year. He said the rate of unemployment might even increase to 10.2 percent before declining again by the end of the year.

Belotti said the Silicon Valley economy correlates with the U.S. economy insofar "as the U.S. economy grows, we grow faster. When things go down, we go down, too."

At a U.S. Department of Labor briefing this morning, Amar Mann, a regional economist for the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, announced that the Silicon Valley has done well relative to rest of the country.

Mann and a fellow economist, Tian Luo, released a report last month on the Silicon Valley high-tech industry.

The report, titled "Crash and reboot: Silicon Valley high-tech employment and wages, 2000-08," shows a sharp decline in employment and wages from 2000 to 2004, followed by a gradual increase from 2004 to 2008. The growth is fueled by continued growth in the pharmaceutical industry, biotechnology and green technology, Mann said.
(Copyright 2010 by Bay City News, Inc. Republication, re-transmission or reuse without the express written consent of Bay City News, Inc. Is prohibited.)

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Need tools to study for the bar exam? There’s an app for that | View Clip
02/01/2010
Business Review - Online

Vicki Thompson

Mike Ghaffary is the creator of BarMax, a new app available to study for the California bar exam. It costs $999.99, the most expensive iPhone app out there. Ghaffary said it's still cheaper than a traditional course.

A new iPhone app hopes to raise the bar on what developers can get for their software by helping users pass the bar exam in California.

BarMax LLC has created an app that offers law students a $999.99 product — the maximum price Apple Inc. allows — that lets them download what they need to take the test. Developers are hoping the convenience of not lugging around piles of papers and books in the legal profession will justify the cost.

The question remains whether app buyers would invest in high-priced apps like BarMax.

“When it comes to the super price category, it's an experiment and I'm not sure it's going to work in the end,” said Michael Morgan, mobile devices analyst of ABI Research.

BarMax's creator, Mike Ghaffary, with a dual business and law degree from Harvard University, came up with the idea while studying for the bar while working a full-time job.

Ghaffary points out that the price for the app is significantly lower compared with a BarBri law review course that comes with books, online features and in-class study. The traditional method can cost more than $2,500.

BarMax's package includes lectures, flashcards and questions from previous bar exams. The materials are also in Microsoft Word format for customers who prefer viewing options outside of their mobile device.

Ken Dulaney of Gartner Research believes “multi-channel apps” that work on a number of devices, including a home TV, may command higher prices.

“Those apps are emerging pretty strongly,” he said. “There are things you want to do at different times. When you're out and about they can work in different places — at the office, at home or on the road.”

But Morgan is skeptical of apps that try to duplicate a traditional computer application onto a mobile device because of a phone's computing power and smaller screen.

“When it comes to actually being productive, it doesn't really happen on the phone,” Morgan said. “You don't edit spreadsheets on your phone, even though you can. It's about access to the information and leveraging a device's portability.”

Morgan said he's watched higher-priced legal apps in BlackBerry's app store achieve limited success.

“When it comes to the pricing, I think these high-priced apps may have a small niche,” Morgan said. “But the mass market is not going to own as much. It's not going to be people buying $500 apps, and not necessarily $100 apps either.”

Marina Hsieh, assistant dean of academic and professional development at Santa Clara University School of Law, does think Ghaffary's law bar exam app will be a useful tool.

She said that most of her students have technology so ingrained in their lives that moving more to applications on mobile devices like BarMax is a natural step.

“Will our students use it? Probably,” Hsieh said. “Our students love this kind of stuff. I posted my course material on iTunes, and I was surprised on how many people downloaded the material.”

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Couples Can Overdo Being Supportive | View Clip
02/01/2010
ScienceDaily

ScienceDaily (Jan. 31, 2010) — Couples having problems are often advised to be more supportive of each other, but a series of University of Iowa studies shows that too much support -- or the wrong kind of support -- may actually do more harm than good.

In recent studies of heterosexual couples in their first few years of marriage, researchers learned that too much support is harder on a marriage than not enough. When it comes to marital satisfaction, both partners are happier if husbands receive the right type of support, and if wives ask for support when they need it.

The findings illustrate the need for couples to understand the various ways they can be supportive, and the importance of communicating what they need and when, said Erika Lawrence, associate professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

"The idea that simply being more supportive is better for your marriage is a myth," Lawrence said. "Often husbands and wives think, 'If my partner really knows me and loves me, he or she will know I'm upset and will know how to help me.' However, that's not the best way to approach your marriage. Your partner shouldn't have to be a mind reader. Couples will be happier if they learn how to say, 'This is how I'm feeling, and this is how you can help me.'"

Too much of a good thing

In one study, Lawrence and colleagues discovered that receiving more support than desired is a greater risk factor for marital decline than not being there for a spouse.

"If you don't get enough support, you can make up for that with family and friends -- especially women, who tend to have multiple sources of support," she said. "When you receive too much support, there's no way to adjust for that."

The study involved 103 husbands and wives who completed surveys five times over their first five years of marriage. The questionnaires looked at how support was provided and measured marital satisfaction.

Four kinds of support were identified in the study: physical comfort and emotional support (listening and empathizing, taking your spouse's hand, giving your spouse a hug), esteem support (expressing confidence in your partner, providing encouragement), informational support (giving advice, gathering information), and tangible support (taking on responsibilities so your spouse can deal with a problem, helping to brainstorm solutions to a problem).

Results showed that too much informational support -- usually in the form of unwanted advice-giving -- is the most detrimental. In contrast, you can never go wrong providing esteem support, assuming it's genuine.

Too little support was more common than too much. Receiving less support than desired was a complaint of about two-thirds of men and at least 80 percent of women. Only about one-third of men and women reported receiving more support than they wanted.

The paper, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, was co-authored by Rebecca L. Brock, a UI graduate student in psychology.

Support isn't one-size-fits-all

A related study showed that for men, it's important that their wives provide the right kind of support, offering emotional, informational, tangible or esteem support as needed. For wives, it's more important that their husbands try to be supportive -- even if what they do doesn't quite hit the mark.

"Both parties are more satisfied if the husband gets the right kind of support, and if the wife feels like she's supported," Lawrence said. "Husbands shouldn't throw their hands up if they're not sure what to do. They need to stay in there and keep trying, because we found that women appreciate the effort."

Lawrence said dialog is key. If you need support, request it; if you're providing support, ask how you can help -- don't assume you know what to do. Afterward, talk about what worked and what didn't, and adjust accordingly.

"The assumption is that men just want to be left alone and women want to be held and listened to," Lawrence said. "In reality, different men want different kinds of support, and different women want different kinds of support."

For this study, 275 newlyweds completed questionnaires about marital satisfaction, the type of support they received, and whether it was sufficient. Twice during the study, 235 couples visited the lab to discuss how they would approach a goal such as stress management, a career change, improving family relationships or being more assertive. Researchers shot video of the 10-minute conversations and observed how couples asked for, provided and accepted support.

The paper was published in the journal Personal Relationships. Lawrence was the lead author, with co-authors from the University of Iowa, CIGNA Health Solutions, Santa Clara University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Both studies were supported by grants from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institute for Child and Human Development, and the UI.

Adapted from materials provided by University of Iowa, via Newswise.

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Some question Sal DiCiccio's stake in South Mountain Freeway plan | View Clip
01/31/2010
AZCentral.com

The proposed South Mountain Freeway has defined Sal DiCiccio's return to politics.

A year ago, the Phoenix real-estate broker filled a vacancy on the City Council, reclaiming the seat he held a decade earlier. Ever since, he's championed moving the planned Loop 202 extension south, from Ahwatukee Foothills to the Gila River Reservation.

To supporters, DiCiccio is working to find the best outcome for his Phoenix constituents. Opponents say his development deals along the freeway blur personal and public matters and represent a conflict of interest.

The Arizona Republic took a closer look at DiCiccio's possible stake in the planned 22-mile freeway, examining city financial forms and court records, plus letters, e-mails and other documents obtained under a public-records request. The picture that emerged shows that DiCiccio:

• Benefited financially from a business partner's purchase of land that was resold to the state for the proposed South Mountain Freeway. The purchase, which The Republic uncovered in records, allowed the business partner to repay a $100,000 loan from DiCiccio that the councilman says was unrelated to the freeway property.

• Was paid thousands of dollars in 2006 by an Arizona Department of Transportation consultant to persuade Gila River leaders to permit the Chandler-to-Laveen freeway to cross their reservation.

• Has investments in leases of two Gila River tribal properties, one located near the proposed Loop 202 extension route. DiCiccio won't say how much he invested or what his potential profit could be. The tribe, his development partner, stands to gain millions of dollars and wilderness land if it sells right of way to the state for the freeway.

DiCiccio was not in public office when he made the investments or worked as a consultant - a fact that he points to in denying critics' accusations that his efforts to move the freeway path pose a conflict of interest. He said he has never voted on the freeway and doesn't plan to.

But DiCiccio's dual public and private roles attracted criticism in his successful fall election campaign. Some transportation officials and ethics experts say they are troubled that DiCiccio has represented all sides of the freeway debate over the past decade, whether as a politician, a businessman or an advocate.

Few details are available in public records about DiCiccio's business dealings. Records show he owns a commercial real-estate firm and is a licensed real-estate broker.

His dual roles threaten to muddle the $1.9 billion Loop 202 project and could delay it, after 27 years of planning. Environmental work on the existing route is six months from completion and federal approval to build is expected this year.

Repayment of a loan

The most recent financial benefit that DiCiccio garnered from a project tied to the South Mountain Freeway involved property on the western end of the proposed freeway route.

In 2001, ADOT bought a field in Laveen, signaling for the first time where it planned to route the freeway in the area.

Three years later, DiCiccio's friend and business partner, Richard Kohan, bought options to buy an 84-acre gravel yard across the street, at 59th Avenue and Broadway Road. Kohan planned to resell the property to ADOT for "a sizable profit," he argued later in court. Court records show Kohan couldn't pull together the $8.44 million to make the purchase, and in 2005 turned to outside investors, including brother Ted Kohan. In 2005, DiCiccio loaned Richard Kohan's partnership $100,000, the councilman says. DiCiccio says the interest-free loan was for a real-estate deal in Buckeye, not the 59th Avenue property. He says he didn't record the loan because he trusted his friend.

"I have no interest in that property," he says. "Zero."

In December 2008, ADOT bought the gravel-yard land for $15 million. The brothers nearly doubled their investment, but then sued each other over the profits. DiCiccio intervened to recover the $100,000. Last May, a Maricopa County Superior Court judge ordered that the councilman and a handful of named investors get paid from an escrow account holding the ADOT money.

Eric Anderson, transportation director for the Maricopa Association of Governments, says Di- Ciccio never mentioned his 59th Avenue connection when he returned to public office and participated in closed-door Loop 202 negotiations.

"I think that's a problem," Anderson says. "If we had known this . . . we probably would have recommended that we not meet (with him) until we resolve the freeway issue."

Consulting fees

DiCiccio's earliest-known effort to get the South Mountain Freeway moved to tribal land was as a consultant working on behalf of the state. In 2005, the Gila River tribe's governing council passed a resolution and sent a letter to ADOT saying it had no interest in a freeway on its land. ADOT and MAG interpreted the action as closing off the last option for rerouting the freeway and moved ahead with plans to build it through Ahwatukee and a corner of South Mountain Park. But the next year, an ADOT consultant hired DiCiccio to convince Gila River leaders to reverse course.

DiCiccio says he was chosen because he'd established a rapport with the tribe during his first council stint, from 1994 to 2000. He was paid $8,318 by the consultant.

DiCiccio's negotiations centered on how the tribe could be compensated, including a land swap in the Estrella Mountains, but the effort fizzled.

The idea resurfaced last fall, days before DiCiccio's election. Tribal leaders made a surprise announcement that they would consider an ADOT proposal. Weeks later, DiCiccio was a central figure in a meeting of key officials that participants described as a breakthrough. Parties discussed a possible land swap. On Wednesday, Gila River leaders asked the state to conduct a study on moving the freeway.

Tribal agreements

In 2007, a year after consulting for ADOT, DiCiccio entered an exclusive agreement with the Gila River tribe to develop 75 acres of desert in a key location: Pecos Road and 40th Street. The property will be at a planned Loop 202 interchange, regardless of the ultimate route. Unless the freeway is scrapped, the property promises sizable profits: Any development would sit at the only northern gateway to the Wild Horse Pass Hotel and Casino. DiCiccio's deal with the tribe entitles him to 20 percent of any profits. The tribe and DiCiccio inked a similar deal in 2008 on a 75-acre parcel at the reservation's southern limit, near Maricopa. The land sits along Arizona 347, the reservation's only southern approach. The property is about 15 miles south of the proposed Loop 202.

The twin deals were the focus of criticism during last year's election. The councilman declined to discuss details of the agreements, citing ongoing negotiations with private partners. But he did say the pair of properties has strategic importance for selling to a captive market.

Conflict issue

DiCiccio is adamant he has no conflict of interest over the proposed Loop 202 extension. Twice last year, Phoenix City Attorney Gary Verburg agreed, saying the state law didn't apply to the freeway issue because it impacts 10 or more people.

Yet twice, DiCiccio declared possible conflicts on projects near Pecos Road. The first time came in 1998 when he declined to join talks about raising money for an interchange at Interstate 10 and Pecos because he lived about a mile away. Then, last month, DiCiccio recused himself from voting to improve a Pecos Road park-and-ride lot across the street from his tribal investment property.

Despite caution on those matters, DiCiccio remains active in negotiating for the freeway to be moved. He met repeatedly with ADOT, MAG, Sen. John McCain, U.S. Rep. Harry Mitchell, state land officials and Gila River tribal officials, according to public officials' calendar entries.

Some ethics experts say DiCiccio's work on the South Mountain Freeway blurs his public and private roles.

"He has involved himself not just politically, but personally and financially," says Judy Nadler, a senior fellow in government ethics at Santa Clara University's Markkula Center for Applied Ethics. "He's embroiled himself in this issue for a long time and worn many hats. It's a legitimate question to ask: Who is he really speaking for?"

But Bob Stern, who helped write California's public-ethics law, says DiCiccio's actions in office are proper.

"If he's not making any decisions, there's no problem," says Stern, president of the Center for Governmental Studies, a Los Angeles-based non-profit. "He may have an economic interest, but it's nothing to do with him being in office."

DiCiccio acknowledges his role has created a muddy impression, but says it's a price he's willing to pay to reach a compromise on the South Mountain Freeway.

"I've been the only one pushing this because I have an obligation to protect my district," he says.

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Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire | View Clip
01/31/2010
TechRadar.com

Washington, January 31 (ANI): Researchers have busted the myth that too much support is good for a relationship.

Experts at University of Iowa found that being extra supportive or giving the wrong kind of support may actually backfire.

Erika Lawrence, associate professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said: ‘The idea that simply being more supportive is better for your marriage is a myth. Often husbands and wives think, ‘If my partner really knows me and loves me, he or she will know I'm upset and will know how to help me.'

‘However, that's not the best way to approach your marriage. Your partner shouldn't have to be a mind reader. Couples will be happier if they learn how to say, ‘This is how I'm feeling, and this is how you can help me.'

Lawrence and colleagues found that receiving more support than desired posed a greater risk factor for marital decline.

She said: ‘If you don't get enough support, you can make up for that with family and friends — especially women, who tend to have multiple sources of support. When you receive too much support, there's no way to adjust for that.'

The paper, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, was co-authored by Rebecca L. Brock, a UI graduate student in psychology.

A related study showed that it was important for men that their wives provide the right kind of support, emotional, informational, tangible or esteem as needed while wives considered their husbands efforts to be supportive more significant.

Lawrence said: ‘The assumption is that men just want to be left alone and women want to be held and listened to. In reality, different men want different kinds of support, and different women want different kinds of support.'

The paper was published in the journal Personal Relationships. Lawrence was the lead author, with co-authors from the University of Iowa, CIGNA Health Solutions, Santa Clara University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (ANI)

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Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire | View Clip
01/31/2010
Yahoo! India

ANISun, Jan 31 04:50 PM

Washington, January 31 (ANI): Researchers have busted the myth that too much support is good for a relationship.

Experts at University of Iowa found that being extra supportive or giving the wrong kind of support may actually backfire.

Erika Lawrence, associate professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said: "The idea that simply being more supportive is better for your marriage is a myth. Often husbands and wives think, 'If my partner really knows me and loves me, he or she will know I'm upset and will know how to help me.'

"However, that's not the best way to approach your marriage. Your partner shouldn't have to be a mind reader. Couples will be happier if they learn how to say, 'This is how I'm feeling, and this is how you can help me.'"

Lawrence and colleagues found that receiving more support than desired posed a greater risk factor for marital decline.

She said: "If you don't get enough support, you can make up for that with family and friends-especially women, who tend to have multiple sources of support. When you receive too much support, there's no way to adjust for that."

The paper, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, was co-authored by Rebecca L. Brock, a UI graduate student in psychology.

A related study showed that it was important for men that their wives provide the right kind of support, emotional, informational, tangible or esteem as needed while wives considered their husbands efforts to be supportive more significant.

Lawrence said: "The assumption is that men just want to be left alone and women want to be held and listened to. In reality, different men want different kinds of support, and different women want different kinds of support."

The paper was published in the journal Personal Relationships. Lawrence was the lead author, with co-authors from the University of Iowa, CIGNA Health Solutions, Santa Clara University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (ANI)

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Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire | View Clip
01/31/2010
Webindia123

Washington | January 31, 2010 4:09:30 PM IST

Researchers have busted the myth that too much support is good for a relationship.

Experts at University of Iowa found that being extra supportive or giving the wrong kind of support may actually backfire.

Erika Lawrence, associate professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said: "The idea that simply being more supportive is better for your marriage is a myth. Often husbands and wives think, 'If my partner really knows me and loves me, he or she will know I'm upset and will know how to help me.'

"However, that's not the best way to approach your marriage. Your partner shouldn't have to be a mind reader. Couples will be happier if they learn how to say, 'This is how I'm feeling, and this is how you can help me.'"

Lawrence and colleagues found that receiving more support than desired posed a greater risk factor for marital decline.

She said: "If you don't get enough support, you can make up for that with family and friends-especially women, who tend to have multiple sources of support. When you receive too much support, there's no way to adjust for that."

The paper, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, was co-authored by Rebecca L. Brock, a UI graduate student in psychology.

A related study showed that it was important for men that their wives provide the right kind of support, emotional, informational, tangible or esteem as needed while wives considered their husbands efforts to be supportive more significant.

Lawrence said: "The assumption is that men just want to be left alone and women want to be held and listened to. In reality, different men want different kinds of support, and different women want different kinds of support."

The paper was published in the journal Personal Relationships. Lawrence was the lead author, with co-authors from the University of Iowa, CIGNA Health Solutions, Santa Clara University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (ANI)

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Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire | View Clip
01/31/2010
DailyIndia.com

From ANI

Washington, January 31: Researchers have busted the myth that too much support is good for a relationship.

Experts at University of Iowa found that being extra supportive or giving the wrong kind of support may actually backfire.

Erika Lawrence, associate professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said: "The idea that simply being more supportive is better for your marriage is a myth. Often husbands and wives think, 'If my partner really knows me and loves me, he or she will know I'm upset and will know how to help me.'

"However, that's not the best way to approach your marriage. Your partner shouldn't have to be a mind reader. Couples will be happier if they learn how to say, 'This is how I'm feeling, and this is how you can help me.'"

Lawrence and colleagues found that receiving more support than desired posed a greater risk factor for marital decline.

She said: "If you don't get enough support, you can make up for that with family and friends-especially women, who tend to have multiple sources of support. When you receive too much support, there's no way to adjust for that."

The paper, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, was co-authored by Rebecca L. Brock, a UI graduate student in psychology.

A related study showed that it was important for men that their wives provide the right kind of support, emotional, informational, tangible or esteem as needed while wives considered their husbands efforts to be supportive more significant.

Lawrence said: "The assumption is that men just want to be left alone and women want to be held and listened to. In reality, different men want different kinds of support, and different women want different kinds of support."

The paper was published in the journal Personal Relationships. Lawrence was the lead author, with co-authors from the University of Iowa, CIGNA Health Solutions, Santa Clara University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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West County man recalls victory in Orange Bowl 60 years ago | View Clip
01/31/2010
InsideBayArea.com

Paul "Bear" Bryant may have been a legendary football coach, but he could be a poor sport. Or at least he was Jan. 2, 1950, after his favored Kentucky Wildcats lost to the Santa Clara Broncos.

San Pablo native Joe Vargas, the place-kicker on the No. 15 Broncos team that upset No. 11 Kentucky 21-13 in Miami, remembers that a frustrated Bryant refused to shake the hand of winning coach Len Casanova after the game. Vargas kicked three successful conversions in the contest, including the game's final point after a Santa Clara touchdown with less than a minute to play.

Vargas, 90, who lives with his wife, Emily, in the Tara Hills Mobile Manor in unincorporated West Contra Costa County, will revisit that memorable game with other members of the 1949 Broncos at a 60th anniversary celebration on the Santa Clara University campus today.

Vargas may have been the most unlikely player on the field at the Orange Bowl that day, even though he had been such a standout prep football and baseball player that he earned a scholarship to Santa Clara after he graduated from Richmond High School in 1938.

By January 1950, he was 30 years old, married with children and a veteran of World War II. But there was no doubt in his mind about returning to Santa Clara, where he played halfback in 1940 before he was drafted.

"Football was always on my mind," he said.

He had worked two years as a postal carrier after the war but was allowed to resume his

studies at Santa Clara on his original scholarship in 1948 and join the Broncos.

"They were happy to have me," he said.

As a member of the 1940 team, Vargas was an up-and-coming running back playing under head coach Buck Shaw, a legend among Bay Area college coaches. Santa Clara was a football power before the war, winning the Sugar Bowl in 1937 and '38. By the time Vargas returned to the team in 1948, Shaw had been gone two years after becoming the first head coach of the San Francisco 49ers.

As for his new teammates, "They were a lot younger," said Vargas, known then as "Joe the Toe."

Having played before large crowds at Memorial Stadium in Berkeley, Stanford Stadium and Kezar Stadium, Vargas said he didn't feel any added pressure kicking in front of almost 65,000 fans in the Orange Bowl.

"You just don't think of anything but what you have to do," he said.

Fans today might not understand how much college football has changed since 1950, when leather helmets and minimal padding were the norm, players doubled at both offensive and defensive positions, and games were more likely to be heard on radio rather than seen on television.

The Broncos' trek from Santa Clara to Miami took five days by train; the team made stops in Texas and Louisiana to practice, recalled Emily Vargas. She and the wives of four other married players were brought on the private train by a Santa Clara alumni group.

Joe and Emily Vargas grew up just a couple blocks away from each other in San Pablo and were sweethearts at Richmond High School, where Joe was a 5-foot-7, 160-pound all-star running back for the Oilers and had the nickname "the Portuguese flier."

"A lot of people would come to the games," Emily Vargas said, displaying large scrapbooks of game accounts and programs.

He also played baseball for the Oilers.

The couple married in 1941, just before Joe was inducted into the military and shipped to Australia for two years. He later served in Europe after a truncated stint in Army Air Corps flight school, where a classmate was future pro football coach Hank Stram.

After graduating from Santa Clara he returned to West Contra Costa and began a long career teaching and coaching football and baseball at Richmond, El Cerrito and Pinole Valley high schools. During the summers he worked at the Felice and Perrelli Canning Co. and played on the cannery softball team.

After retirement Vargas organized and played men's senior softball.

"I had a very, very good experience with sports," he said, but nothing could top that trip to Miami in 1950.

Contact Chris Treadway at 510-262-2784.

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Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire
01/31/2010
Hindustan Times

Washington, January. 31 -- Researchers have busted the myth that too much support is good for a relationship.

Experts at University of Iowa found that being extra supportive or giving the wrong kind of support may actually backfire.

Erika Lawrence, associate professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said: "The idea that simply being more supportive is better for your marriage is a myth. Often husbands and wives think, 'If my partner really knows me and loves me, he or she will know I'm upset and will know how to help me.'

"However, that's not the best way to approach your marriage. Your partner shouldn't have to be a mind reader. Couples will be happier if they learn how to say, 'This is how I'm feeling, and this is how you can help me.'"

Lawrence and colleagues found that receiving more support than desired posed a greater risk factor for marital decline.

She said: "If you don't get enough support, you can make up for that with family and friends -- especially women, who tend to have multiple sources of support. When you receive too much support, there's no way to adjust for that."

The paper, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, was co-authored by Rebecca L. Brock, a UI graduate student in psychology.

A related study showed that it was important for men that their wives provide the right kind of support, emotional, informational, tangible or esteem as needed while wives considered their husbands efforts to be supportive more significant.

Lawrence said: "The assumption is that men just want to be left alone and women want to be held and listened to. In reality, different men want different kinds of support, and different women want different kinds of support."

The paper was published in the journal Personal Relationships. Lawrence was the lead author, with co-authors from the University of Iowa, CIGNA Health Solutions, Santa Clara University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Published by HT Syndication with permission from Asian News International. For more information on news feed please contact Sarabjit Jagirdar at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2010 Hindustan Times

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Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire | View Clip
01/31/2010
DNA India - Online

Washington DC: Researchers have busted the myth that too much support is good for a relationship.

Experts at University of Iowa found that being extra supportive or giving the wrong kind of support may actually backfire.

Erika Lawrence, associate professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said: "The idea that simply being more supportive is better for your marriage is a myth. Often husbands and wives think, 'If my partner really knows me and loves me, he or she will know I'm upset and will know how to help me.'

"However, that's not the best way to approach your marriage. Your partner shouldn't have to be a mind reader. Couples will be happier if they learn how to say, 'This is how I'm feeling, and this is how you can help me.'"

Lawrence and colleagues found that receiving more support than desired posed a greater risk factor for marital decline.

She said: "If you don't get enough support, you can make up for that with family and friends -- especially women, who tend to have multiple sources of support. When you receive too much support, there's no way to adjust for that."

The paper, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, was co-authored by Rebecca L Brock, a UI graduate student in psychology.

A related study showed that it was important for men that their wives provide the right kind of support, emotional, informational, tangible or esteem as needed while wives considered their husbands efforts to be supportive more significant.

Lawrence said: "The assumption is that men just want to be left alone and women want to be held and listened to. In reality, different men want different kinds of support, and different women want different kinds of support."

The paper was published in the journal Personal Relationships.

Lawrence was the lead author, with co-authors from the University of Iowa, CIGNA Health Solutions, Santa Clara University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

This in turn could affect the consumption of fossil fuels, which generate many of the greenhouse gases responsible for Earth's warming.

'Multimedia' children spend seven hours a day glued to electronic gadgets

UK school spends £6,000 on 'chill-out' room for pupils, teachers and parents

For Australian students, oral sex 'has become the new kissing

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Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire | View Clip
01/31/2010
NetIndia123.com

Researchers have busted the myth that too much support is good for a relationship.

Experts at University of Iowa found that being extra supportive or giving the wrong kind of support may actually backfire.

Erika Lawrence, associate professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said: "The idea that simply being more supportive is better for your marriage is a myth. Often husbands and wives think, 'If my partner really knows me and loves me, he or she will know I'm upset and will know how to help me.'

"However, that's not the best way to approach your marriage. Your partner shouldn't have to be a mind reader. Couples will be happier if they learn how to say, 'This is how I'm feeling, and this is how you can help me.'"

Lawrence and colleagues found that receiving more support than desired posed a greater risk factor for marital decline.

She said: "If you don't get enough support, you can make up for that with family and friends-especially women, who tend to have multiple sources of support. When you receive too much support, there's no way to adjust for that."

The paper, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, was co-authored by Rebecca L. Brock, a UI graduate student in psychology.

A related study showed that it was important for men that their wives provide the right kind of support, emotional, informational, tangible or esteem as needed while wives considered their husbands efforts to be supportive more significant.

Lawrence said: "The assumption is that men just want to be left alone and women want to be held and listened to. In reality, different men want different kinds of support, and different women want different kinds of support."

The paper was published in the journal Personal Relationships. Lawrence was the lead author, with co-authors from the University of Iowa, CIGNA Health Solutions, Santa Clara University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (ANI)

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Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire | View Clip
01/31/2010
NewKerala.com

Washington, January 31 : Researchers have busted the myth that too much support is good for a relationship.

Experts at University of Iowa found that being extra supportive or giving the wrong kind of support may actually backfire.

Erika Lawrence, associate professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said: "The idea that simply being more supportive is better for your marriage is a myth. Often husbands and wives think, 'If my partner really knows me and loves me, he or she will know I'm upset and will know how to help me.'

"However, that's not the best way to approach your marriage. Your partner shouldn't have to be a mind reader. Couples will be happier if they learn how to say, 'This is how I'm feeling, and this is how you can help me.'"

Lawrence and colleagues found that receiving more support than desired posed a greater risk factor for marital decline.

She said: "If you don't get enough support, you can make up for that with family and friends -- especially women, who tend to have multiple sources of support. When you receive too much support, there's no way to adjust for that."

The paper, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, was co-authored by Rebecca L. Brock, a UI graduate student in psychology.

A related study showed that it was important for men that their wives provide the right kind of support, emotional, informational, tangible or esteem as needed while wives considered their husbands efforts to be supportive more significant.

Lawrence said: "The assumption is that men just want to be left alone and women want to be held and listened to. In reality, different men want different kinds of support, and different women want different kinds of support."

The paper was published in the journal Personal Relationships. Lawrence was the lead author, with co-authors from the University of Iowa, CIGNA Health Solutions, Santa Clara University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Supporting your lover too much backfires | View Clip
01/31/2010
Times of India

Researchers have busted the myth that too much support is good for a relationship.

Experts at University of Iowa found that being extra supportive or giving the wrong kind of support may actually backfire.

Erika Lawrence, associate professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said, "The idea that simply being more supportive is better for your marriage is a myth. Often husbands and wives think, ''If my partner really knows me and loves me, he or she will know I'm upset and will know how to help me.''

"However, that's not the best way to approach your marriage. Your partner shouldn't have to be a mind reader. Couples will be happier if they learn how to say, “This is how I'm feeling, and this is how you can help me.''

Lawrence and colleagues found that receiving more support than desired posed a greater risk factor for marital decline.

She said, “If you don't get enough support, you can make up for that with family and friends -- especially women, who tend to have multiple sources of support. When you receive too much support, there's no way to adjust for that."

The paper, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, was co-authored by Rebecca L. Brock, a UI graduate student in psychology.

A related study showed that it was important for men that their wives provide the right kind of support, emotional, informational, tangible or esteem as needed while wives considered their husbands efforts to be supportive more significant.

Lawrence said, "The assumption is that men just want to be left alone and women want to be held and listened to. In reality, different men want different kinds of support, and different women want different kinds of support."

The paper was published in the journal Personal Relationships. Lawrence was the lead author, with co-authors from the University of Iowa, CIGNA Health Solutions, Santa Clara University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Supporting your sweetheart too much may backfire | View Clip
01/31/2010
Newstrack India

Washington, January 31 (ANI): Researchers have busted the myth that too much support is good for a relationship.

Experts at University of Iowa found that being extra supportive or giving the wrong kind of support may actually backfire.

Erika Lawrence, associate professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, said: "The idea that simply being more supportive is better for your marriage is a myth.

Often husbands and wives think, 'If my partner really knows me and loves me, he or she will know I'm upset and will know how to help me.'

"However, that's not the best way to approach your marriage. Your partner shouldn't have to be a mind reader. Couples will be happier if they learn how to say, 'This is how I'm feeling, and this is how you can help me.'"

Lawrence and colleagues found that receiving more support than desired posed a greater risk factor for marital decline.

She said: "If you don't get enough support, you can make up for that with family and friends-especially women, who tend to have multiple sources of support. When you receive too much support, there's no way to adjust for that."

The paper, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, was co-authored by Rebecca L. Brock, a UI graduate student in psychology.

A related study showed that it was important for men that their wives provide the right kind of support, emotional, informational, tangible or esteem as needed while wives considered their husbands efforts to be supportive more significant.

Lawrence said: "The assumption is that men just want to be left alone and women want to be held and listened to. In reality, different men want different kinds of support, and different women want different kinds of support."

The paper was published in the journal Personal Relationships. Lawrence was the lead author, with co-authors from the University of Iowa, CIGNA Health Solutions, Santa Clara University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (ANI)

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West County man recalls victory in Orange Bowl 60 years ago | View Clip
01/30/2010
El Cerrito Albany Journal

Paul "Bear" Bryant may have been a legendary football coach, but he could be a poor sport. Or at least he was Jan. 2, 1950, after his favored Kentucky Wildcats lost to the Santa Clara Broncos.

San Pablo native Joe Vargas, the place-kicker on the No. 15 Broncos team that upset No. 11 Kentucky 21-13 in Miami, remembers that a frustrated Bryant refused to shake the hand of winning coach Len Casanova after the game. Vargas kicked three successful conversions in the contest, including the game's final point after a Santa Clara touchdown with less than a minute to play.

Vargas, 90, who lives with his wife, Emily, in the Tara Hills Mobile Manor in unincorporated West County, will revisit that memorable game with other members of the 1949 Broncos at a 60th anniversary celebration on the Santa Clara University campus today.

Vargas may have been the most unlikely player on the field at the Orange Bowl that day, even though he had been such a standout prep football and baseball player that he earned a scholarship to Santa Clara after he graduated from Richmond High School in 1938.

By January 1950, he was 30 years old, married with children and a veteran of World War II. But there was no doubt in his mind about returning to Santa Clara, where he played halfback in 1940 before he was drafted.

"Football was always on my mind," he said.

He had worked two years as a postal carrier after the war but was allowed to resume his studies at Santa

Clara on his original scholarship in 1948 and join the Broncos.

"They were happy to have me," he said.

As a member of the 1940 team, Vargas was an up-and-coming running back playing under head coach Buck Shaw, a legend among Bay Area college coaches. Santa Clara was a football power before the war, winning the Sugar Bowl in 1937 and '38. By the time Vargas returned to the team in 1948, Shaw had been gone two years after becoming the first head coach of the San Francisco 49ers.

As for his new teammates, "They were a lot younger," said Vargas, known then as "Joe the Toe."

Having played before large crowds at Memorial Stadium in Berkeley, Stanford Stadium and Kezar Stadium, Vargas said he didn't feel any added pressure kicking in front of almost 65,000 fans in the Orange Bowl.

"You just don't think of anything but what you have to do," he said.

Fans today might not understand how much college football has changed since 1950, when leather helmets and minimal padding were the norm, players doubled at both offensive and defensive positions, and games were more likely to be heard on radio rather than seen on television.

The Broncos' trek from Santa Clara to Miami took five days by train; the team made stops in Texas and Louisiana to practice, recalled Emily Vargas. She and the wives of four other married players were brought on the private train by a Santa Clara alumni group.

Joe and Emily Vargas grew up just a couple blocks away from each other in San Pablo and were sweethearts at Richmond High School, where Joe was a 5-foot-7, 160-pound all-star running back for the Oilers and had the nickname "the Portuguese flier."

"A lot of people would come to the games," Emily Vargas said, displaying large scrapbooks of game accounts and programs.

He also played baseball for the Oilers.

The couple married in 1941, just before Joe was inducted into the military and shipped to Australia for two years. He later served in Europe after a truncated stint in Army Air Corps flight school, where a classmate was future pro football coach Hank Stram.

After graduating from Santa Clara he returned to West Contra Costa and began a long career teaching and coaching football and baseball at Richmond, El Cerrito and Pinole Valley high schools. During the summers he worked at the Felice and Perrelli Canning Co. and played on the cannery softball team.

After retirement Vargas organized and played men's senior softball.

"I had a very, very good experience with sports," he said, but nothing could top that trip to Miami in 1950.

Contact Chris Treadway at 510-262-2784.

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Pot Half Full | View Clip
01/29/2010
North Bay Bohemian

For WAMM, last week's dismissal of an 8-year-old lawsuit was a draw. For medical marijuana, though, it's a clear victory

THE MORNING of Friday, Jan. 22, was a long time coming for Michael Corral. As he walked up to the doors of the federal courthouse in downtown San Jose, members of the Wo/Men's Alliance for Medical Marijuana, the collective he helped found in Santa Cruz in 1996, were slowly gathering outside the glass doors. Some leaned on canes and walkers. One member had a seeing-eye dog, another a wheelchair.

"It's a draw. They didn't win, we didn't win," Corral said. "This has gone on so long, it was time for it to end."

The group moved slowly through the metal detectors and into the elevators taking them up to Judge Jeremy Fogel's U.S. District courtroom on the fifth floor. As the doors closed behind them, a security guard joked, "Toke up party afterwards!"

After the eight years it took to get to this point, the hearing was very brief, just minutes long. Judge Fogel looked out over the assembled group of about 30 WAMM patients and supporters and commented on the attendance. "It's rare that dismissed-case management draws this big a crowd," he remarked.

But this was no ordinary case dismissal. Not only was the federal government standing down from its defense of a 2002 raid on WAMM property by DEA agents, the settlement was also a formal recognition of Attorney General Eric Holder's October 2009 memorandum titled "Medical Marijuana Guidance" and the sea change in federal policy that it represents.

"Based on that new philosophy, if you will, by Eric Holder, [Judge Fogel] has urged us to resolve the case," says Santa Cruz attorney Ben Rice, who has represented WAMM for the last 15 years. "It's a terrific win for WAMM as well as the people of this community."

Despite the perceived protection extended to WAMM by the state's legalization of medical marijuana and local deprioritization ordinances, the Bush administration was hardly on board. In the early morning hours of Sept. 17, 2002, 30 federal DEA agents drove up to the Corrals' property in the Santa Cruz Mountains and arrested them both at gunpoint before chopping down 167 marijuana plants. At the time, the garden provided for the 250 ill and indigent WAMM members who received a weekly allotment of the drug for free. Although the Santa Cruz community rallied behind the Corrals, the raid decimated the collective's membership numbers and donations.

Attorney Rice, along with Santa Clara University law professor Gerald Uelmen and, eventually, the American Civil Liberties Union Drug Law Reform Project, put together the lawsuit against then–Attorney General John Ashcroft and the DEA. The city and county of Santa Cruz later joined the lawsuit, siding with WAMM.

"The argument is that while the federal government is free to enforce their laws in our state, they can't force our state to change our laws by selectively enforcing the federal laws. It makes it impossible for the state to distinguish between legal and illegal marijuana use, and that's a violation of the 10th amendment," says Rice.

While the Bush administration fought to have the lawsuit tossed out, the entrance of the Obama administration marked a dramatic attitude shift that came into clearer focus with the release of the October 2009 memorandum to U.S. attorneys. It stated: "As a general matter, pursuit of (illegal drug manufacturing and trafficking networks) should not focus federal resources in your States on individuals whose actions are in clear and unambiguous compliance with existing state laws providing for the medical use of marijuana." According to both a representative for the U.S. Department of Justice and the ACLU attorney representing WAMM, this memorandum set the stage for the settlement. "It was pretty clear to everyone, including the judge, that the change in policy meant it was time to talk about settling the case," says ACLU lawyer Allen Hopper.

Dreams of Genies

The settlement says, in essence, that the government agrees to leave WAMM alone as long as it abides by state laws. It also agrees that should the feds renege on their promise, the lawsuit can pop right back up in Judge Fogel's courtroom and proceed. Although Uelmen acknowledges that the settlement does not establish precedent, the decision is an important milestone. "It's a level of commitment," he says. Hopper adds, "All these decisions have been reviewed at the highest level in the Justice Department."

The WAMM members themselves were less effusive in their reactions. Valerie Corral called it a "wink" from the government. "This isn't a huge personal victory for Michael and I," she said in the hallway outside the courtroom. "But we've done two things: we've helped take medical marijuana mainstream, and we've kept the case open. If they break their promise—" "We can spank them," interrupted Michael, smiling wryly.

Medical marijuana is most definitely mainstream these days. Fourteen states now have medical marijuana legalization laws, and a dozen more are heading in that direction. California is ahead of the pack, of course, and District 13 Assemblymember Tom Ammiano has taken it a step further by getting a marijuana legalization bill, A.B. 390, through committee for the first time in U.S. history. Although time ran out before it could make it on to the Assembly floor, the San Francisco representative plans to reintroduce A.B. 390 in early February.

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The bill is of interest to District 27 Assemblymember Bill Monning, though not of course without some caveats. "I favor decriminalization, but with strict controls. My concern on legalization is that it perhaps sends the wrong message to young people and families," he says. Nevertheless, he does take into consideration the potential boost to state coffers that marijuana taxation could provide. "If you remove it from the criminal justice system, you also save money on prosecutions, in courts, jails, prisons. I think one of the strong arguments in favor of the Ammiano bill is if you remove it from the criminal underground, the related violence and felony activity goes along with it. That's a savings that needs to be better understood."

As for the WAMM decision itself, the lawyers involved concede that it's a commitment from Obama and Holder, that's all—nothing enforceable. But when asked whether a change in administration could yank that commitment, Hopper says he doubts it. "By then we'll have had these years where states have set up these procedures, the sky didn't fall nd] there will have been additional tax revenue to local governments. It's going to be very difficult for a future administration to say, 'Whoa, stop.' It's kind of hard to put the genie back in the bottle."

Read more news at www.santacruz.com/news.

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Flash Of Criticism At FTC Privacy Roundtable | View Clip
01/29/2010
MediaPost.com

Home > Daily Online Examiner

Behavioral targeting companies had better call their lawyers. Federal Trade Commission consumer protection head David Vladeck warned this morning that the commission is getting ready to go after online ad companies that try to get around consumers' decisions to avoid online ad targeting.

"We are currently examining practices that undermine the tools that consumers can use to opt out of behavioral advertising," Vladeck said this morning at the FTC's roundtable on privacy. "We hope to announce law enforcement actions later this year," he added.

Vladeck didn't elaborate, so it's not yet clear which companies are in the FTC's crosshairs. But one possibility is that he was referring to companies that use Flash cookies to circumvent users' wishes -- something that Vladeck and Commissioner Pamela Jones Harbour have previously

criticized.

In fact, Flash was a big focus at the first FTC panel discussion this morning. Berkeley Law's Chris Hoofnagle mentioned that some companies had boasted that Flash cookies can be used for behavioral targeting because most consumers don't know enough to delete such cookies -- stored in a different place than traditional HTTP cookies.

Eric Goldman, director of the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University, pointed out that companies' use of Flash illustrates a longstanding pattern in which technology evolves faster than consumers' knowledge. The result, he says is a "gap created between what technology can do and what consumers want."

At another panel today at the FTC, Chris Conley, technology & civil liberties fellow at the ACLU of Northern California, gave a vivid example of the real-world consequences of Facebook's new privacy settings. Conley reported that two closeted students complained to his organization that they were outed by Facebook's new privacy settings. The students had previously signed up as fans of the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) page on Facebook. But the site now classifies all pages people are fans of as "publicly available information" -- which gets published on their profile pages.

Facebook's Tim Sparapani, director of public policy, offered the disingenuous response that the information was always public because the LGBT's page posted the names of fans. That may be true, but there's a big difference between being named on a fan site that also lists 19,000 other Facebook members, and having the information appear on users' own profile pages.

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SUPPORT YOUR SWEETHEART BUT DON'T OVERDO IT
01/29/2010
Federal News Service

IOWA CITY, Iowa, Jan. 28 -- The University of Iowa's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Department issued the following news release:

Couples having problems are often advised to be more supportive of each other, but a series of University of Iowa studies shows that too much support - or the wrong kind of support - may actually do more harm than good.

In recent studies of heterosexual couples in their first few years of marriage, researchers learned that too much support is harder on a marriage than not enough. When it comes to marital satisfaction, both partners are happier if husbands receive the right type of support, and if wives ask for support when they need it.

The findings illustrate the need for couples to understand the various ways they can be supportive, and the importance of communicating what they need and when, said Erika Lawrence, associate professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

"The idea that simply being more supportive is better for your marriage is a myth," Lawrence said. "Often husbands and wives think, 'If my partner really knows me and loves me, he or she will know I'm upset and will know how to help me.' However, that's not the best way to approach your marriage. Your partner shouldn't have to be a mind reader. Couples will be happier if they learn how to say, 'This is how I'm feeling, and this is how you can help me.'"

Too much of a good thing

In one study, Lawrence and colleagues discovered that receiving more support than desired is a greater risk factor for marital decline than not being there for a spouse.

"If you don't get enough support, you can make up for that with family and friends - especially women, who tend to have multiple sources of support," she said. "When you receive too much support, there's no way to adjust for that."

The study involved 103 husbands and wives who completed surveys five times over their first five years of marriage. The questionnaires looked at how support was provided and measured marital satisfaction.

Four kinds of support were identified in the study: physical comfort and emotional support (listening and empathizing, taking your spouse's hand, giving your spouse a hug), esteem support (expressing confidence in your partner, providing encouragement), informational support (giving advice, gathering information), and tangible support (taking on responsibilities so your spouse can deal with a problem, helping to brainstorm solutions to a problem).

Results showed that too much informational support - usually in the form of unwanted advice-giving - is the most detrimental. In contrast, you can never go wrong providing esteem support, assuming it's genuine.

Too little support was more common than too much. Receiving less support than desired was a complaint of about two-thirds of men and at least 80 percent of women. Only about one-third of men and women reported receiving more support than they wanted.

The paper, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, was co-authored by Rebecca L. Brock, a UI graduate student in psychology.

Support isn't one-size-fits-all

A related study showed that for men, it's important that their wives provide the right kind of support, offering emotional, informational, tangible or esteem support as needed. For wives, it's more important that their husbands try to be supportive - even if what they do doesn't quite hit the mark.

"Both parties are more satisfied if the husband gets the right kind of support, and if the wife feels like she's supported," Lawrence said. "Husbands shouldn't throw their hands up if they're not sure what to do. They need to stay in there and keep trying, because we found that women appreciate the effort."

Lawrence said dialog is key. If you need support, request it; if you're providing support, ask how you can help - don't assume you know what to do. Afterward, talk about what worked and what didn't, and adjust accordingly.

"The assumption is that men just want to be left alone and women want to be held and listened to," Lawrence said. "In reality, different men want different kinds of support, and different women want different kinds of support."

For this study, 275 newlyweds completed questionnaires about marital satisfaction, the type of support they received, and whether it was sufficient. Twice during the study, 235 couples visited the lab to discuss how they would approach a goal such as stress management, a career change, improving family relationships or being more assertive. Researchers shot video of the 10-minute conversations and observed how couples asked for, provided and accepted support.

The paper was published in the journal Personal Relationships. Lawrence was the lead author, with co-authors from the University of Iowa, CIGNA Health Solutions, Santa Clara University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Both studies were supported by grants from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institute for Child and Human Development, and the UI.For more information please contact: Sarabjit Jagirdar, Email:- htsyndication@hindustantimes.com.

Copyright © 2010 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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Google Scores Partial Victory In Street View Lawsuit | View Clip
01/29/2010
MediaPost.com

An appellate court gave its blessing to Google's Street View this week, ruling that the feature did not violate the privacy of a married couple in Pittsburgh by displaying a photo of their home and pool.

"No person of ordinary sensibilities would be shamed, humiliated, or have suffered mentally as a result of a vehicle entering into his or her ungated driveway and photographing the view from there," the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals wrote in a decision issued this week.

But the ruling wasn't a complete victory for Google, because the court also said the couple, Aaron and Christine Boring, can pursue a trespass claim against the company. They alleged that a Google van drove on a private road, ignoring a no-trespassing sign, to photograph their home. "If proven, that is a trespass, pure and simple," the court said.

At the same time, the appellate judges acknowledged that any damage award in the case might prove to be very small. "Of course, it may well be that, when it comes to proving damages from the alleged trespass, the Borings are left to collect one dollar and whatever sense of vindication that may bring, but that is for another day," the court wrote.

Google said in a statement that it still believes the lawsuit is without merit. "Since the ruling upheld the dismissal of everything but the trespass claim, we're pleased with the court's decision," the company said.

The appellate court said in its ruling that people can only sue for invasion of privacy for actions that would be "highly offensive to a reasonable person" -- and that photographing the outside of a home doesn't meet that standard.

Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman says the appellate judges indicated they thought the Borings overreacted by filing a privacy lawsuit in the case. "The legal system isn't going to tolerate their overreaction," he adds.

Cyberlawyer Venkat Balasubramani of Seattle adds that courts might view the situation differently if companies use a high-powered zoom lens to photograph the inside of homes rather than simply shot the exterior.

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Gatherings Planned In Bay Area To Watch State Of The Union | View Clip
01/28/2010
KTVU-TV - Online

BAY AREA, Calif. -- Liberals and conservatives alike will be gathering throughout the Bay Area Wednesday evening to watch and discuss President Obama's State of the Union address, which is expected to focus primarily on domestic issues such as job creation and health care reform.

The speech comes as the nation continues to deal with 10 percent unemployment and as Congress struggles to pass a health care reform bill.

Organizing for America, a group of volunteers working to promote the goals of the Democratic National Committee, is organizing viewing parties in San Francisco and Oakland tonight.

"We're looking for him to kind of frame all the hard work we've done, and continue the process of change that we're looking to work on over the next couple years," said Marlene Madell, a community organizer for the group.

The debate in Congress over the details of the health care reform bill has lasted for most of Obama's first year in office, and Madell said she's hoping the president will "reassure the American people and communicate that it's still something we're going to get done this year."

Karl Kenner, another community organizer for the group, said Obama should encourage Democrats, who have majorities in both houses of Congress, to push through their agenda without the help of Republicans.

"We've tried bipartisanship, but reaching across the aisle only gets us lots of bites on the hand," Kenner said. "It's time to go to work."

While health care reform remains a big issue in Washington, the economy is at the front of most Americans minds, and Kenner said he expects it to play a big role in Obama's speech.

"The primary focus is going to be on the economy and on jobs," he said. "Obviously, we need to get a whole lot more Americans back to work."

Bill Whalen, a research fellow at Stanford University's conservative-leaning Hoover Institute, agreed that the speech will be about jobs.

"The speech is about jobs, mainly the president's job," Whalen said, pointing to Obama's job approval ratings, which have dropped significantly since he came into office.

"The public was behind him when he was elected, but is undecided about him now," he said.

Whalen said he believes Obama will use the speech to pivot away from grander ideas and focus on smaller ideas meant to shore up support with the average voter.

"I think it'll be in the classic Silicon Valley tradition, when a program isn't working, you reboot," he said. "It's time for Obama 2.0."

The speech will likely focus on these domestic issues, rather than on foreign policy concerns such as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Whalen said.

"The president was very prominent on foreign policy when he first came into office, but that's off the table now," he said. "If he wants to regain his posture and standing, it starts with the economy."

Conservatives have also planned gatherings to watch Wednesday night's speech, including the San Francisco Republican Party, which will meet at The Republic, a bar in the city's Marina District.

Students at Santa Clara University are holding a viewing on campus. A group of political science students are organizing the event, which will include a discussion with three of the university's political science professors after the speech, university spokeswoman Connie Kim Coutain said.

Several campus organizations, including the College Democrats and College Republicans, have been invited to join the discussion, which will focus on "what young voters think about Obama and where he's leading the country," Coutain said.

The event will be held in the basement of Dunne Hall on campus.

One local college student has been invited to watch the speech in person.

Gabriela Farfan, a freshman geology student at Stanford University, was invited by First Lady Michelle Obama.

Farfan, a 19-year-old Wisconsin native, won a scholarship through the Intel Science Talent Search for her research describing why certain gemstones appear to change color when viewed from different angles.

Wednesday night's speech is scheduled for 6 p.m. PST in the chambers of the House of Representatives.

Copyright 2010 by Bay City News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Santa Clara University students react to Obama's address | View Clip
01/28/2010
El Cerrito Albany Journal

At several points during the State of the Union address, Santa Clara University students punctured their silence with cheers.

They cheered when President Barack Obama spoke of his disdain for the bank bailout, his promise to repeal the ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the military, and his proposals for clean energy.

But the remarks that struck deepest centered on education, drawing the loudest applause from among the 100 students who viewed the telecast on a giant screen at Dunn Hall.

Obama called on Congress to finish work on a measure to revitalize community colleges. And he called for a $10,000 tax credit to families for four years of college and an increase in Pell Grants.

He also said college students should only have to devote 10 percent of their post-college income to repaying student loans.

"Being a college student, I really liked what he said about college loans," said Tim Butler, 21, co-president of the university's College Democrats.

Still, many questioned whether any of it would come to pass.

"He threw out a lot of great ideas...I like what he said about student loans, but I have to wonder how we are going to achieve these objectives," said Blake Harris, 19, a Republican.

Megan Kollar, 21, a Democrat, was surprised that Obama spoke at length on health reform. "Not too much was a shocker. But I was a little surprised that he struck strong on health care reform, considering the discontent

being voiced about it."

Several said they found his barbs at the Republican Party jarring and more politics as usual.

"He talked about the issues people wanted to hear," said Todd Lane, 20, a sophomore who considers himself a conservative. "But I still saw him playing into party politics. To me, Americans are tired of that."

Contact Sandra Gonzales at 408-920-5778.

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Santa Clara University students react to Obama's address | View Clip
01/28/2010
Cupertino Courier - Online

At several points during the State of the Union address, Santa Clara University students punctured their silence with cheers.

They cheered when President Barack Obama spoke of his disdain for the bank bailout, his promise to repeal the ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the military, and his proposals for clean energy.

But the remarks that struck deepest centered on education, drawing the loudest applause from among the 100 students who viewed the telecast on a giant screen at Dunn Hall.

Obama called on Congress to finish work on a measure to revitalize community colleges. And he called for a $10,000 tax credit to families for four years of college and an increase in Pell Grants.

He also said college students should only have to devote 10 percent of their post-college income to repaying student loans.

"Being a college student, I really liked what he said about college loans," said Tim Butler, 21, co-president of the university's College Democrats.

Still, many questioned whether any of it would come to pass.

"He threw out a lot of great ideas...I like what he said about student loans, but I have to wonder how we are going to achieve these objectives," said Blake Harris, 19, a Republican.

Megan Kollar, 21, a Democrat, was surprised that Obama spoke at length on health reform. "Not too much was a shocker. But I was a little surprised that he struck strong on health care reform, considering the discontent

being voiced about it."

Several said they found his barbs at the Republican Party jarring and more politics as usual.

"He talked about the issues people wanted to hear," said Todd Lane, 20, a sophomore who considers himself a conservative. "But I still saw him playing into party politics. To me, Americans are tired of that."

Contact Sandra Gonzales at 408-920-5778.

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Santa Clara University students react to Obama's address | View Clip
01/28/2010
Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online

At several points during the State of the Union address, Santa Clara University students punctured their silence with cheers.

They cheered when President Barack Obama spoke of his disdain for the bank bailout, his promise to repeal the ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the military, and his proposals for clean energy.

But the remarks that struck deepest centered on education, drawing the loudest applause from among the 100 students who viewed the telecast on a giant screen at Dunn Hall.

Obama called on Congress to finish work on a measure to revitalize community colleges. And he called for a $10,000 tax credit to families for four years of college and an increase in Pell Grants.

He also said college students should only have to devote 10 percent of their post-college income to repaying student loans.

"Being a college student, I really liked what he said about college loans," said Tim Butler, 21, co-president of the university's College Democrats.

Still, many questioned whether any of it would come to pass.

"He threw out a lot of great ideas...I like what he said about student loans, but I have to wonder how we are going to achieve these objectives," said Blake Harris, 19, a Republican.

Megan Kollar, 21, a Democrat, was surprised that Obama spoke at length on health reform. "Not too much was a shocker. But I was a little surprised that he struck strong on health care reform, considering the discontent

being voiced about it."

Several said they found his barbs at the Republican Party jarring and more politics as usual.

"He talked about the issues people wanted to hear," said Todd Lane, 20, a sophomore who considers himself a conservative. "But I still saw him playing into party politics. To me, Americans are tired of that."

Contact Sandra Gonzales at 408-920-5778.

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STUDENTS LIKE EDUCATION PROPOSALS
01/28/2010
San Jose Mercury News

At several points during the State of the Union address, Santa Clara University students punctured their silence with cheers.

They cheered when President Barack Obama spoke of his disdain for the bank bailout, his promise to repeal the ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the military, and his proposals for clean energy.

But the remarks that struck deepest centered on education, drawing the loudest applause from among the 100 students who viewed the telecast on a giant screen at Dunn Hall.

Obama called on Congress to finish work on a measure to revitalize community colleges. And he called for a $10,000 tax credit to families for four years of college and an increase in Pell Grants.

He also said college students should only have to devote 10 percent of their post-college income to repaying student loans.

"Being a college student, I really liked what he said about college loans," said Tim Butler, 21, co-president of the university's College Democrats.

Still, many questioned whether any of it would come to pass.

"He threw out a lot of great ideas...I like what he said about student loans, but I have to wonder how we are going to achieve these objectives," said Blake Harris, 19, a Republican.

Megan Kollar, 21, a Democrat, was surprised that Obama spoke at length on health reform. "Not too much was a shocker. But I was a little surprised that he struck strong on health care reform, considering the discontent being voiced about it."

Several said they found his barbs at the Republican Party jarring and more politics as usual.

"He talked about the issues people wanted to hear," said Todd Lane, 20, a sophomore who considers himself a conservative. "But I still saw him playing into party politics. To me, Americans are tired of that."

Contact Sandra Gonzales at 408-920-5778.

Copyright © 2010 San Jose Mercury News

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Least-admired companies produce highest returns, study finds
01/28/2010
National Post

Peter Lynch, the famous fund manager, always used to tell people to buy the stocks of companies they admired. That might not be the best advice according to a new study from Meir Statman of Santa Clara University and Deniz Anginer of the University of Michigan.

The two researchers looked at Fortune magazine's annual list of America's Most Admired Companies and compared the returns of two portfolios -- one composed of admired companies and one of unadmired companies.

They found that unadmired companies produced better returns for investors than the admired ones. Between 1983 and 2007, the unadmired companies generated average annual investor returns of 18.3% compared to 16.3% for the admired firms.

Fortune bases its most-admired list on surveys of executives, directors and securities analysts, so the findings suggest that even expert opinion can be seriously mistaken. In fact, the study suggests that an increase in admiration usually signals lower future returns.

We can't wait for some smart investor-relations person to fasten on these results: 'Of course, we're a good investment. Everyone hates us!'

---

- Freelance business journalist Ian McGugan blogs for the Financial Post

Copyright © 2010 Financial Post

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Expectations for President Obama's First State of the Union | View Clip
01/27/2010
KQED-FM

Californians are gathering to listen to President Obama's first State of the Union address this evening. They're eager to hear his plan for managing two wars, staggering unemployment rates, a huge budget deficit, and his ambitious health care and climate change agenda. To hear what they're expecting from the president, we checked in with Tom Del Baccaro, vice chair of the California Republican Party; Jeffrey Harry, a Democrat and regional field director for Organizing for America; and Megan Kollar, a political science major at Santa Clara University who organized a speech-watching party.

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JONES IN OAKLAND AND SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY DUNN HALL.
01/27/2010
NBC Bay Area News at 5 AM - KNTV-TV

A YEAR AFTER BECOMING COMMANDER IN CHIEF PRESIDENT OBAMA WILL HAVE TO TELL HIS IDEAS ONCE MORE IN THE STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS. A POLL SHOWS 58% OF PEOPLE BELIEVE THE COUNTRY IS ON THE WRONG TRACK. THAT'S THE HIGHEST NUMBER SINCE PRESIDENT OBSERVE TOOK OFFICE. ROBERT GIBBS TALKED ABOUT WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT THE OPPORTUNITY SAY. WILL HE STRIKE A NOTE OF CONTRITION FOR MISTAKES BECAUSE EVERY PRESIDENT MAKES MISTAKES. EVERY PRESIDENT MAKES MISTAKES INCLUDING BARACK OBAMA. HE'S NOT BEEN SHY ABOUT ADMITTING THAT. WE MADE MISTAKES HERE. I THINK WHAT YOU'LL HEAR THE PRESIDENT FOCUS MOST ON TONIGHT ARE PLANS TO CUT TAXES FOR SMALL BUSINESSES THAT HIRE WORKER, HOW DO WE GET CREDITING FLOWING FROM COMMUNITY BANKS THE TO SMALL BUSINESSES. ELIMINATING CAPITAL GAINS FOR INVESTMENT IN SMALL BUSINESSES. CHANGING THE WAY WASHINGTON WORKS, CUTTING SPENDING HERE IN THIS TOWN TO GET US BACK ON A PATH TOWARD FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY. STATE OF THE UNION WATCH PARTIES WILL BE HELD ON COLUMBUS AVENUE IN SAN FRAEN, EVERETT AND JONES IN OAKLAND AND SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY DUNN HALL. YOU CAN SEE THE STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS AT 6:00 HERE ON NBC BAY AREA. WE'LL ALSO STREAM IT ONLINE AT NBCBAYAREA. COM.

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State of the Union Watch parties
01/27/2010
KNTV-TV

Santa Clara University's student State of the Union watch party was referenced in the morning NBC Bay Area show.

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Santa Clara district attorney defends boycott of judge, while outside experts liken her move to the | View Clip
01/27/2010
Oroville Mercury-Register

Santa Clara County District Attorney Dolores Carr speaks with the media about Jae Williams and Randy Thompson who were charged with murder (but not arraigned) in San Jose, Calif. on Tuesday, November 17, 2009. (Nhat V. Meyer/Mercury News)

Santa Clara County District Attorney Dolores Carr on Tuesday offered her most vigorous defense to date of her office's boycott of Superior Court Judge Andrea Bryan, even as criticism mounted in the legal community of what some are likening to a retaliatory nuclear strike.

In an e-mail to the newspaper, Carr called it "not unheard of" for prosecutors to disqualify a judge from all criminal cases, citing actions by prosecutors in San Diego, Ventura and Mendocino counties, as well as efforts by public defenders to boycott judges in Santa Clara, Napa and San Bernardino counties.

But experts in criminal law and ethics said the blanket boycott that Carr initiated last week is an abusive tactic that can damage the court system. "Most DAs realize it's like the atomic bomb," said Laurie L. Levenson, who teaches criminal law and ethics at Loyola Law School.

"Inappropriate" and "a threat to judicial independence" were the terms used by Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University law professor and former dean.

Carr instructed her staff Friday to stop bringing all criminal cases before Bryan, who recently angered prosecutors by finding that a trial prosecutor in her office committed numerous acts of misconduct, including giving false testimony. Carr, who is running for re-election and facing stiff criticism for the boycott, insisted in an e-mail that her decision was based on a pattern of rulings by Bryan. She declined to elaborate further in

response to questions by the Mercury News.

If it holds, the boycott could effectively end Bryan's career in criminal courts, forcing her to hear only civil cases, as well as have a chilling effect on judicial oversight of overzealous prosecution, outside experts noted. Bryan has declined to comment.

"I think the boycott is intended to send a message to every judge in Santa Clara County," Uelmen said. "The message is, 'Especially when it comes to prosecutorial misconduct, be careful or this could happen to you.' " Levenson noted the tactic, which is explicitly permitted under California law, is not permitted in federal court.

Sources in the criminal justice system say Carr issued the directive only after court officials failed to act on her request that Bryan be transferred from her current assignment as the primary judge ruling on motions in felony cases. That assignment often involves evaluating pretrial motions brought by defense attorneys who argue that prosecution evidence was improperly gathered or should be excluded from the case. Though Carr would not comment on that transfer request, sources cited two rulings — one in 2007, and one in 2008 — in which Bryan ruled that evidence helpful to the prosecution should be suppressed, rulings that later were overturned by the appellate court.

Bryan is also the judge who issued a declaration finding Jeffrey Rodriguez factually innocent of a 2001 robbery, an unusual declaration that was opposed by prosecutors. Rodriguez' robbery conviction had been overturned when evidence emerged post-conviction undercutting the crime lab examiner's findings in the case.

But Bryan, a former prosecutor appointed by Republican Gov. Pete Wilson, has also issued rulings that favored prosecutors and angered defense attorneys. In one instance, she refused to grant a new trial in a molestation case, despite evidence that Deputy District Attorney Jaime Stringfield had failed to timely turn over evidence that the defense contended contradicted prosecution witnesses.

Carr's directive to boycott Bryan came two weeks and two days after Bryan barred the retrial of Augustin Uribe, who had been sentenced to 38 years to life on child molestation charges. An appellate court had earlier overturned Uribe's conviction on charges he assaulted a young relative based on prosecutorial misconduct. Bryan found the trial prosecutor, Deputy District Attorney Troy Benson, had "woven a tangled web of deceit," including testifying falsely in her court about his knowledge of videotaped evidence that was only belatedly turned over to the defense.

Carr declined to explain why she did not issue a peremptory challenge of Bryan in spring 2009 before the Uribe hearings began. In her e-mail, Carr said "lawyers do not expect to win every hearing," but do expect "to have a fair hearing that will be decided on its merits."

State statutes in 19 states — including California's 1957 rule — permit any party in a legal action who believes that a specific judge would not be fair to object to one judge per case, without explaining why. Carr said the challenge is intended to be used "in exceptional cases, where a lawyer has lost faith in the ability of a particular judge to rule impartially." In 24 years as a practicing lawyer, Carr herself only challenged a judge once, she noted.

But retired San Diego County Judge Edward Huntington said the Legislature didn't intend for challenges to be used to blackball or boycott a judge. In San Diego County, a judge was the target of a similar boycott until last week, when the district attorney there lifted its boycott after four months, without any explanation.

Carr's decision to boycott Bryan means that any time a criminal case is assigned to Bryan's courtroom, all 165 prosecutors must abide by her orders to issue a peremptory challenge and get the case assigned to another judge.

"It's a terrible misuse by the DA," retired judge Huntington said. "A blanket challenge is purely a political message to the whole system."

Contact Tracey Kaplan at 408-278-3482.

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Santa Clara district attorney defends boycott of judge, while outside experts liken her move to the | View Clip
01/27/2010
Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online

Santa Clara County District Attorney Dolores Carr speaks with the media about Jae Williams and Randy Thompson who were charged with murder (but not arraigned) in San Jose, Calif. on Tuesday, November 17, 2009. (Nhat V. Meyer/Mercury News)

Santa Clara County District Attorney Dolores Carr on Tuesday offered her most vigorous defense to date of her office's boycott of Superior Court Judge Andrea Bryan, even as criticism mounted in the legal community of what some are likening to a retaliatory nuclear strike.

In an e-mail to the newspaper, Carr called it "not unheard of" for prosecutors to disqualify a judge from all criminal cases, citing actions by prosecutors in San Diego, Ventura and Mendocino counties, as well as efforts by public defenders to boycott judges in Santa Clara, Napa and San Bernardino counties.

But experts in criminal law and ethics said the blanket boycott that Carr initiated last week is an abusive tactic that can damage the court system. "Most DAs realize it's like the atomic bomb," said Laurie L. Levenson, who teaches criminal law and ethics at Loyola Law School.

"Inappropriate" and "a threat to judicial independence" were the terms used by Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University law professor and former dean.

Carr instructed her staff Friday to stop bringing all criminal cases before Bryan, who recently angered prosecutors by finding that a trial prosecutor in her office committed numerous acts of misconduct, including giving false testimony. Carr, who is running for re-election and facing stiff criticism for the boycott, insisted in an e-mail that her decision was based on a pattern of rulings by Bryan. She declined to elaborate further in

response to questions by the Mercury News.

If it holds, the boycott could effectively end Bryan's career in criminal courts, forcing her to hear only civil cases, as well as have a chilling effect on judicial oversight of overzealous prosecution, outside experts noted. Bryan has declined to comment.

"I think the boycott is intended to send a message to every judge in Santa Clara County," Uelmen said. "The message is, 'Especially when it comes to prosecutorial misconduct, be careful or this could happen to you.' " Levenson noted the tactic, which is explicitly permitted under California law, is not permitted in federal court.

Sources in the criminal justice system say Carr issued the directive only after court officials failed to act on her request that Bryan be transferred from her current assignment as the primary judge ruling on motions in felony cases. That assignment often involves evaluating pretrial motions brought by defense attorneys who argue that prosecution evidence was improperly gathered or should be excluded from the case. Though Carr would not comment on that transfer request, sources cited two rulings — one in 2007, and one in 2008 — in which Bryan ruled that evidence helpful to the prosecution should be suppressed, rulings that later were overturned by the appellate court.

Bryan is also the judge who issued a declaration finding Jeffrey Rodriguez factually innocent of a 2001 robbery, an unusual declaration that was opposed by prosecutors. Rodriguez' robbery conviction had been overturned when evidence emerged post-conviction undercutting the crime lab examiner's findings in the case.

But Bryan, a former prosecutor appointed by Republican Gov. Pete Wilson, has also issued rulings that favored prosecutors and angered defense attorneys. In one instance, she refused to grant a new trial in a molestation case, despite evidence that Deputy District Attorney Jaime Stringfield had failed to timely turn over evidence that the defense contended contradicted prosecution witnesses.

Carr's directive to boycott Bryan came two weeks and two days after Bryan barred the retrial of Augustin Uribe, who had been sentenced to 38 years to life on child molestation charges. An appellate court had earlier overturned Uribe's conviction on charges he assaulted a young relative based on prosecutorial misconduct. Bryan found the trial prosecutor, Deputy District Attorney Troy Benson, had "woven a tangled web of deceit," including testifying falsely in her court about his knowledge of videotaped evidence that was only belatedly turned over to the defense.

Carr declined to explain why she did not issue a peremptory challenge of Bryan in spring 2009 before the Uribe hearings began. In her e-mail, Carr said "lawyers do not expect to win every hearing," but do expect "to have a fair hearing that will be decided on its merits."

State statutes in 19 states — including California's 1957 rule — permit any party in a legal action who believes that a specific judge would not be fair to object to one judge per case, without explaining why. Carr said the challenge is intended to be used "in exceptional cases, where a lawyer has lost faith in the ability of a particular judge to rule impartially." In 24 years as a practicing lawyer, Carr herself only challenged a judge once, she noted.

But retired San Diego County Judge Edward Huntington said the Legislature didn't intend for challenges to be used to blackball or boycott a judge. In San Diego County, a judge was the target of a similar boycott until last week, when the district attorney there lifted its boycott after four months, without any explanation.

Carr's decision to boycott Bryan means that any time a criminal case is assigned to Bryan's courtroom, all 165 prosecutors must abide by her orders to issue a peremptory challenge and get the case assigned to another judge.

"It's a terrible misuse by the DA," retired judge Huntington said. "A blanket challenge is purely a political message to the whole system."

Contact Tracey Kaplan at 408-278-3482.

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Santa Clara district attorney defends boycott of judge, while outside experts liken her move to the | View Clip
01/27/2010
Cupertino Courier - Online

Santa Clara County District Attorney Dolores Carr speaks with the media about Jae Williams and Randy Thompson who were charged with murder (but not arraigned) in San Jose, Calif. on Tuesday, November 17, 2009. (Nhat V. Meyer/Mercury News)

Santa Clara County District Attorney Dolores Carr on Tuesday offered her most vigorous defense to date of her office's boycott of Superior Court Judge Andrea Bryan, even as criticism mounted in the legal community of what some are likening to a retaliatory nuclear strike.

In an e-mail to the newspaper, Carr called it "not unheard of" for prosecutors to disqualify a judge from all criminal cases, citing actions by prosecutors in San Diego, Ventura and Mendocino counties, as well as efforts by public defenders to boycott judges in Santa Clara, Napa and San Bernardino counties.

But experts in criminal law and ethics said the blanket boycott that Carr initiated last week is an abusive tactic that can damage the court system. "Most DAs realize it's like the atomic bomb," said Laurie L. Levenson, who teaches criminal law and ethics at Loyola Law School.

"Inappropriate" and "a threat to judicial independence" were the terms used by Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University law professor and former dean.

Carr instructed her staff Friday to stop bringing all criminal cases before Bryan, who recently angered prosecutors by finding that a trial prosecutor in her office committed numerous acts of misconduct, including giving false testimony. Carr, who is running for re-election and facing stiff criticism for the boycott, insisted in an e-mail that her decision was based on a pattern of rulings by Bryan. She declined to elaborate further in

response to questions by the Mercury News.

If it holds, the boycott could effectively end Bryan's career in criminal courts, forcing her to hear only civil cases, as well as have a chilling effect on judicial oversight of overzealous prosecution, outside experts noted. Bryan has declined to comment.

"I think the boycott is intended to send a message to every judge in Santa Clara County," Uelmen said. "The message is, 'Especially when it comes to prosecutorial misconduct, be careful or this could happen to you.' " Levenson noted the tactic, which is explicitly permitted under California law, is not permitted in federal court.

Sources in the criminal justice system say Carr issued the directive only after court officials failed to act on her request that Bryan be transferred from her current assignment as the primary judge ruling on motions in felony cases. That assignment often involves evaluating pretrial motions brought by defense attorneys who argue that prosecution evidence was improperly gathered or should be excluded from the case. Though Carr would not comment on that transfer request, sources cited two rulings — one in 2007, and one in 2008 — in which Bryan ruled that evidence helpful to the prosecution should be suppressed, rulings that later were overturned by the appellate court.

Bryan is also the judge who issued a declaration finding Jeffrey Rodriguez factually innocent of a 2001 robbery, an unusual declaration that was opposed by prosecutors. Rodriguez' robbery conviction had been overturned when evidence emerged post-conviction undercutting the crime lab examiner's findings in the case.

But Bryan, a former prosecutor appointed by Republican Gov. Pete Wilson, has also issued rulings that favored prosecutors and angered defense attorneys. In one instance, she refused to grant a new trial in a molestation case, despite evidence that Deputy District Attorney Jaime Stringfield had failed to timely turn over evidence that the defense contended contradicted prosecution witnesses.

Carr's directive to boycott Bryan came two weeks and two days after Bryan barred the retrial of Augustin Uribe, who had been sentenced to 38 years to life on child molestation charges. An appellate court had earlier overturned Uribe's conviction on charges he assaulted a young relative based on prosecutorial misconduct. Bryan found the trial prosecutor, Deputy District Attorney Troy Benson, had "woven a tangled web of deceit," including testifying falsely in her court about his knowledge of videotaped evidence that was only belatedly turned over to the defense.

Carr declined to explain why she did not issue a peremptory challenge of Bryan in spring 2009 before the Uribe hearings began. In her e-mail, Carr said "lawyers do not expect to win every hearing," but do expect "to have a fair hearing that will be decided on its merits."

State statutes in 19 states — including California's 1957 rule — permit any party in a legal action who believes that a specific judge would not be fair to object to one judge per case, without explaining why. Carr said the challenge is intended to be used "in exceptional cases, where a lawyer has lost faith in the ability of a particular judge to rule impartially." In 24 years as a practicing lawyer, Carr herself only challenged a judge once, she noted.

But retired San Diego County Judge Edward Huntington said the Legislature didn't intend for challenges to be used to blackball or boycott a judge. In San Diego County, a judge was the target of a similar boycott until last week, when the district attorney there lifted its boycott after four months, without any explanation.

Carr's decision to boycott Bryan means that any time a criminal case is assigned to Bryan's courtroom, all 165 prosecutors must abide by her orders to issue a peremptory challenge and get the case assigned to another judge.

"It's a terrible misuse by the DA," retired judge Huntington said. "A blanket challenge is purely a political message to the whole system."

Contact Tracey Kaplan at 408-278-3482.

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Santa Clara district attorney defends boycott of judge, while outside experts liken her move to the | View Clip
01/27/2010
El Cerrito Albany Journal

Santa Clara County District Attorney Dolores Carr speaks with the media about Jae Williams and Randy Thompson who were charged with murder (but not arraigned) in San Jose, Calif. on Tuesday, November 17, 2009. (Nhat V. Meyer/Mercury News)

Santa Clara County District Attorney Dolores Carr on Tuesday offered her most vigorous defense to date of her office's boycott of Superior Court Judge Andrea Bryan, even as criticism mounted in the legal community of what some are likening to a retaliatory nuclear strike.

In an e-mail to the newspaper, Carr called it "not unheard of" for prosecutors to disqualify a judge from all criminal cases, citing actions by prosecutors in San Diego, Ventura and Mendocino counties, as well as efforts by public defenders to boycott judges in Santa Clara, Napa and San Bernardino counties.

But experts in criminal law and ethics said the blanket boycott that Carr initiated last week is an abusive tactic that can damage the court system. "Most DAs realize it's like the atomic bomb," said Laurie L. Levenson, who teaches criminal law and ethics at Loyola Law School.

"Inappropriate" and "a threat to judicial independence" were the terms used by Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University law professor and former dean.

Carr instructed her staff Friday to stop bringing all criminal cases before Bryan, who recently angered prosecutors by finding that a trial prosecutor in her office committed numerous acts of misconduct, including giving false testimony. Carr, who is running for re-election and facing stiff criticism for the boycott, insisted in an e-mail that her decision was based on a pattern of rulings by Bryan. She declined to elaborate further in

response to questions by the Mercury News.

If it holds, the boycott could effectively end Bryan's career in criminal courts, forcing her to hear only civil cases, as well as have a chilling effect on judicial oversight of overzealous prosecution, outside experts noted. Bryan has declined to comment.

"I think the boycott is intended to send a message to every judge in Santa Clara County," Uelmen said. "The message is, 'Especially when it comes to prosecutorial misconduct, be careful or this could happen to you.' " Levenson noted the tactic, which is explicitly permitted under California law, is not permitted in federal court.

Sources in the criminal justice system say Carr issued the directive only after court officials failed to act on her request that Bryan be transferred from her current assignment as the primary judge ruling on motions in felony cases. That assignment often involves evaluating pretrial motions brought by defense attorneys who argue that prosecution evidence was improperly gathered or should be excluded from the case. Though Carr would not comment on that transfer request, sources cited two rulings — one in 2007, and one in 2008 — in which Bryan ruled that evidence helpful to the prosecution should be suppressed, rulings that later were overturned by the appellate court.

Bryan is also the judge who issued a declaration finding Jeffrey Rodriguez factually innocent of a 2001 robbery, an unusual declaration that was opposed by prosecutors. Rodriguez' robbery conviction had been overturned when evidence emerged post-conviction undercutting the crime lab examiner's findings in the case.

But Bryan, a former prosecutor appointed by Republican Gov. Pete Wilson, has also issued rulings that favored prosecutors and angered defense attorneys. In one instance, she refused to grant a new trial in a molestation case, despite evidence that Deputy District Attorney Jaime Stringfield had failed to timely turn over evidence that the defense contended contradicted prosecution witnesses.

Carr's directive to boycott Bryan came two weeks and two days after Bryan barred the retrial of Augustin Uribe, who had been sentenced to 38 years to life on child molestation charges. An appellate court had earlier overturned Uribe's conviction on charges he assaulted a young relative based on prosecutorial misconduct. Bryan found the trial prosecutor, Deputy District Attorney Troy Benson, had "woven a tangled web of deceit," including testifying falsely in her court about his knowledge of videotaped evidence that was only belatedly turned over to the defense.

Carr declined to explain why she did not issue a peremptory challenge of Bryan in spring 2009 before the Uribe hearings began. In her e-mail, Carr said "lawyers do not expect to win every hearing," but do expect "to have a fair hearing that will be decided on its merits."

State statutes in 19 states — including California's 1957 rule — permit any party in a legal action who believes that a specific judge would not be fair to object to one judge per case, without explaining why. Carr said the challenge is intended to be used "in exceptional cases, where a lawyer has lost faith in the ability of a particular judge to rule impartially." In 24 years as a practicing lawyer, Carr herself only challenged a judge once, she noted.

But retired San Diego County Judge Edward Huntington said the Legislature didn't intend for challenges to be used to blackball or boycott a judge. In San Diego County, a judge was the target of a similar boycott until last week, when the district attorney there lifted its boycott after four months, without any explanation.

Carr's decision to boycott Bryan means that any time a criminal case is assigned to Bryan's courtroom, all 165 prosecutors must abide by her orders to issue a peremptory challenge and get the case assigned to another judge.

"It's a terrible misuse by the DA," retired judge Huntington said. "A blanket challenge is purely a political message to the whole system."

Contact Tracey Kaplan at 408-278-3482.

Return to Top



A Cameo Before Showtime
01/27/2010
New York Times

The image resonates instantly with anyone who watched the N.B.A. in the 1980s. The blond, surfer-dude hair, parted in the middle and curling toward the shoulders. The long torso and the calf-high tube socks. The glasses. Of course, the glasses.

Kurt Rambis is on one knee, his left arm resting on his left leg, his right hand resting on a basketball, in the classic yearbook pose. He is 22 and smiling and about to embark on a storied career as one of the most popular role players in N.B.A. history.

Only the jersey seems out of place: a large No. 4, over letters spelling out, in all capitals, ''KNICKS.''

At a glance, the photograph appears digitally altered. It is, in fact, a remnant of a mostly forgotten piece of Knickerbockers history and a tiny footnote in Rambis lore.

Rambis was the Knicks' third-round pick in 1980, the 58th selection over all. He was in New York just long enough to have his picture taken.

He was cut in training camp, setting in motion the events that pushed him to Los Angeles, where he found modest fame and fortune with the Showtime Lakers.

The anomalous photograph resides on Page 132 of the Knicks' media guide, on the team page for the Minnesota Timberwolves, who are coached by Rambis. He laughed when he heard about it, then requested a copy.

''I don't remember even taking that photo,'' Rambis said with a chuckle Tuesday before the Timberwolves played the Knicks at Madison Square Garden. ''I don't even remember wearing No. 4.''

He does, however, remember the feelings he had when the Knicks drafted him nearly 30 years ago. He was nervous. Rambis had grown up in Cupertino, Calif., a suburb of San Jose, and attended nearby Santa Clara University, where he averaged 16 points and 9.6 rebounds in a four-year career.

Rambis recalled being ''extremely excited'' about playing in the N.B.A. but apprehensive about playing in New York -- ''the other side of the world by my standards.''

As it turned out, Rambis had to go to another part of the world to start his career.

The Knicks were overstocked in the frontcourt that season and had drafted another power forward, DeWayne Scales of Louisiana State, in the first round. They also had Bill Cartwright, Campy Russell, Marvin Webster and Sly Williams in the frontcourt. Rambis said he played well in camp, even better than Scales, but Scales had the greater talent and the greater potential.

Rosters were only 11 deep in those days.

''I counted 13 guaranteed contracts, and mine wasn't one of them,'' Rambis said.

One morning during training camp, Rambis approached Coach Red Holzman and asked him about his chances. Rambis had an offer from a team in Greece and was wondering whether to take it. Holzman encouraged him to stick around. A few hours later, Holzman approached him before the evening practice session.

''He said, 'Kurt, we've decided to let you pursue this opportunity in Greece,''' Rambis recalled.

Then Holzman asked him to stick around for the evening practice. Rambis did, then boarded a flight for Greece, where he helped the team AEK win a championship.

The Knicks brought back Rambis in January 1981 on a 10-day contract, after losing Williams to an injury. Rambis jumped at the opportunity.

''I made like $2,500, which was like hitting the lottery for me at that point in time,'' Rambis said.

He also received a nice welcoming gift from Pony, the shoe company, which had a partnership with the Knicks.

''They gave me a big bag of shoes and shirts and warm-ups,'' he said. ''I thought I'd died and gone to heaven.''

There was only one hitch. Rambis was still under contract in Greece, and there was a vague threat of losing his eligibility if he played for the Knicks. He told Holzman he could play if needed, but preferred to sit on the bench as an emergency player.

The opportunity never arose, and when the Knicks went to Oakland, on the ninth day of his 10-day deal, Rambis stayed home. His Knicks career was over.

In the Knicks' record books, Rambis is a virtual Moonlight Graham. He is listed on Page 289 of the media guide, along with 16 other would-be Knicks, as ''Players on a regular-season roster who did not appear in a game.''

Of course, his story has a much more gratifying ending. After playing well in a summer league at Cal State-Dominguez Hills, Rambis got a call from Lakers Coach Paul Westhead. He needed a rugged rebounder and hustle player to help spark his run-and-gun offense and to get the ball upcourt to Magic Johnson. Rambis was the perfect fit.

He helped the Lakers win four championships that decade, and returned to win four more rings in the 2000s as a member of Coach Phil Jackson's staff.

Along the way, he met his wife, Linda -- a Lakers employee and a close friend of Jeanie Buss, the owner's daughter -- became a cult hero for his Clark Kent glasses and made cameo appearances in several films and television shows.

Career rejection rarely turns out that well.

''Just being in the right place at the right time -- the right system, the right situation, the right coach,'' Rambis said. ''A lot of things had to align for players like myself.''

PHOTOS: Kurt Rambis, a thirdround draft pick of the Knicks in 1980, doesn't remember wearing No. 4 or having this photo taken.(PHOTOGRAPH BY GEORGE KALINSKY/MADISON SQUARE GARDEN)(B11); Kurt Rambis won four championships as a scrappy Los Angeles Lakers player and four more as an assistant.(PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDREW D. BERNSTEIN/GETTY IMAGES)(B15)

Copyright © 2010 The New York Times Company

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Rambis, a ChampionWith the Lakers, Was Briefly a Knick | View Clip
01/27/2010
New York Times - Online

The image resonates instantly with anyone who watched the N.B.A. in the 1980s. The blond, surfer-dude hair, parted in the middle and curling toward the shoulders. The long torso and the calf-high tube socks. The glasses. Of course, the glasses.

Kurt Rambis is on one knee, his left arm resting on his left leg, his right hand resting on a basketball, in the classic yearbook pose. He is 22 and smiling and about to embark on a storied career as one of the most popular role players in N.B.A. history.

Only the jersey seems out of place: a large No. 4, over letters spelling out, in all capitals, “KNICKS.”

At a glance, the photograph appears digitally altered. It is, in fact, a remnant of a mostly forgotten piece of Knickerbockers history and a tiny footnote in Rambis lore.

Rambis was the Knicks' third-round pick in 1980, the 58th selection over all. He was in New York just long enough to have his picture taken.

He was cut in training camp, setting in motion the events that pushed him to Los Angeles, where he found modest fame and fortune with the Showtime Lakers.

The anomalous photograph resides on Page 132 of the Knicks' media guide, on the team page for the Minnesota Timberwolves, who are coached by Rambis. He laughed when he heard about it, then requested a copy.

“I don't remember even taking that photo,” Rambis said with a chuckle Tuesday before the Timberwolves played the Knicks at Madison Square Garden. “I don't even remember wearing No. 4.”

He does, however, remember the feelings he had when the Knicks drafted him nearly 30 years ago. He was nervous. Rambis had grown up in Cupertino, Calif., a suburb of San Jose, and attended nearby Santa Clara University, where he averaged 16 points and 9.6 rebounds in a four-year career.

Rambis recalled being “extremely excited” about playing in the N.B.A. but apprehensive about playing in New York — “the other side of the world by my standards.”

As it turned out, Rambis had to go to another part of the world to start his career.

The Knicks were overstocked in the frontcourt that season and had drafted another power forward, DeWayne Scales of Louisiana State, in the first round. They also had Bill Cartwright, Campy Russell, Marvin Webster and Sly Williams in the frontcourt. Rambis said he played well in camp, even better than Scales, but Scales had the greater talent and the greater potential.

Rosters were only 11 deep in those days.

“I counted 13 guaranteed contracts, and mine wasn't one of them,” Rambis said.

One morning during training camp, Rambis approached Coach Red Holzman and asked him about his chances. Rambis had an offer from a team in Greece and was wondering whether to take it. Holzman encouraged him to stick around. A few hours later, Holzman approached him before the evening practice session.

“He said, ‘Kurt, we've decided to let you pursue this opportunity in Greece,'” Rambis recalled.

Then Holzman asked him to stick around for the evening practice. Rambis did, then boarded a flight for Greece, where he helped the team AEK win a championship.

The Knicks brought back Rambis in January 1981 on a 10-day contract, after losing Williams to an injury. Rambis jumped at the opportunity.

“I made like $2,500, which was like hitting the lottery for me at that point in time,” Rambis said.

He also received a nice welcoming gift from Pony, the shoe company, which had a partnership with the Knicks.

“They gave me a big bag of shoes and shirts and warm-ups,” he said. “I thought I'd died and gone to heaven.”

There was only one hitch. Rambis was still under contract in Greece, and there was a vague threat of losing his eligibility if he played for the Knicks. He told Holzman he could play if needed, but preferred to sit on the bench as an emergency player.

The opportunity never arose, and when the Knicks went to Oakland, on the ninth day of his 10-day deal, Rambis stayed home. His Knicks career was over.

In the Knicks' record books, Rambis is a virtual Moonlight Graham. He is listed on Page 289 of the media guide, along with 16 other would-be Knicks, as “Players on a regular-season roster who did not appear in a game.”

Of course, his story has a much more gratifying ending. After playing well in a summer league at Cal State-Dominguez Hills, Rambis got a call from Lakers Coach Paul Westhead. He needed a rugged rebounder and hustle player to help spark his run-and-gun offense and to get the ball upcourt to Magic Johnson. Rambis was the perfect fit.

He helped the Lakers win four championships that decade, and returned to win four more rings in the 2000s as a member of Coach Phil Jackson's staff.

Along the way, he met his wife, Linda — a Lakers employee and a close friend of Jeanie Buss, the owner's daughter — became a cult hero for his Clark Kent glasses and made cameo appearances in several films and television shows.

Career rejection rarely turns out that well.

“Just being in the right place at the right time — the right system, the right situation, the right coach,” Rambis said. “A lot of things had to align for players like myself.”

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Unadmired companies have better returns | View Clip
01/27/2010
National Post - Online

Peter Lynch, the famous fund manager, always used to tell people to buy the stocks of companies they admired. That might not be the best advice according to a new study from Meir Statman of Santa Clara University and Deniz Anginer of the University of Michigan.

The two researchers looked at Fortune magazine's annual list of America's Most Admired Companies and compared the returns of two portfolios—one composed of admired companies and one of unadmired companies.

They found that unadmired companies produced better returns for investors than the admired ones. Between 1983 and 2007, the unadmired companies generated average annual investor returns of 18.3% compared to 16.3% for the admired firms.

Fortune bases its most-admired list on surveys of executives, directors and securities analysts, so the findings suggest that even expert opinion can be seriously mistaken. In fact, the study suggests that an increase in admiration usually signals lower future returns.

We can't wait for some smart investor-relations person to fasten on these results: “Of course, we're a good investment. Everyone hates us!”

Freelance business journalist Ian McGugan blogs for the Financial Post

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Santa Clara County DA defends boycott of judge; outside experts liken move to nuclear option | View Clip
01/27/2010
Cupertino Courier - Online

Santa Clara County District Attorney Dolores Carr speaks with the media about Jae Williams and Randy Thompson who were charged with murder (but not arraigned) in San Jose, Calif. on Tuesday, November 17, 2009. (Nhat V. Meyer/Mercury News)

Santa Clara County District Attorney Dolores Carr on Tuesday offered her most vigorous defense to date of her office's boycott of Superior Court Judge Andrea Bryan, even as criticism mounted in the legal community of what some are likening to a retaliatory nuclear strike.

In an e-mail to the newspaper, Carr called it "not unheard of" for prosecutors to disqualify a judge from all criminal cases, citing actions by prosecutors in San Diego, Ventura and Mendocino counties, as well as efforts by public defenders to boycott judges in Santa Clara, Napa and San Bernardino counties.

But experts in criminal law and ethics said the blanket boycott that Carr initiated last week is an abusive tactic that can damage the court system. "Most DAs realize it's like the atomic bomb," said Laurie L. Levenson, who teaches criminal law and ethics at Loyola Law School.

"Inappropriate" and "a threat to judicial independence" were the terms used by Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University law professor and former dean.

Carr instructed her staff Friday to stop bringing all criminal cases before Bryan, who recently angered prosecutors by finding that a trial prosecutor in her office committed numerous acts of misconduct, including giving false testimony. Carr, who is running for re-election and facing stiff criticism for the boycott, insisted in an e-mail that her decision was based on a pattern of rulings by Bryan. She declined to elaborate further in

response to questions by the Mercury News.

If it holds, the boycott could effectively end Bryan's career in criminal courts, forcing her to hear only civil cases, as well as have a chilling effect on judicial oversight of overzealous prosecution, outside experts noted. Bryan has declined to comment.

"I think the boycott is intended to send a message to every judge in Santa Clara County," Uelmen said. "The message is, 'Especially when it comes to prosecutorial misconduct, be careful or this could happen to you.' " Levenson noted the tactic, which is explicitly permitted under California law, is not permitted in federal court.

Sources in the criminal justice system say Carr issued the directive only after court officials failed to act on her request that Bryan be transferred from her current assignment as the primary judge ruling on motions in felony cases. That assignment often involves evaluating pretrial motions brought by defense attorneys who argue that prosecution evidence was improperly gathered or should be excluded from the case. Though Carr would not comment on that transfer request, sources cited two rulings — one in 2007, and one in 2008 — in which Bryan ruled that evidence helpful to the prosecution should be suppressed, rulings that later were overturned by the appellate court.

Bryan is also the judge who issued a declaration finding Jeffrey Rodriguez factually innocent of a 2001 robbery, an unusual declaration that was opposed by prosecutors. Rodriguez' robbery conviction had been overturned when evidence emerged post-conviction undercutting the crime lab examiner's findings in the case.

But Bryan, a former prosecutor appointed by Republican Gov. Pete Wilson, has also issued rulings that favored prosecutors and angered defense attorneys. In one instance, she refused to grant a new trial in a molestation case, despite evidence that Deputy District Attorney Jaime Stringfield had failed to timely turn over evidence that the defense contended contradicted prosecution witnesses.

Carr's directive to boycott Bryan came two weeks and two days after Bryan barred the retrial of Augustin Uribe, who had been sentenced to 38 years to life on child molestation charges. An appellate court had earlier overturned Uribe's conviction on charges he assaulted a young relative based on prosecutorial misconduct. Bryan found the trial prosecutor, Deputy District Attorney Troy Benson, had "woven a tangled web of deceit," including testifying falsely in her court about his knowledge of videotaped evidence that was only belatedly turned over to the defense.

Carr declined to explain why she did not issue a peremptory challenge of Bryan in spring 2009 before the Uribe hearings began. In her e-mail, Carr said "lawyers do not expect to win every hearing," but do expect "to have a fair hearing that will be decided on its merits."

State statutes in 19 states — including California's 1957 rule — permit any party in a legal action who believes that a specific judge would not be fair to object to one judge per case, without explaining why. Carr said the challenge is intended to be used "in exceptional cases, where a lawyer has lost faith in the ability of a particular judge to rule impartially." In 24 years as a practicing lawyer, Carr herself only challenged a judge once, she noted.

But retired San Diego County Judge Edward Huntington said the Legislature didn't intend for challenges to be used to blackball or boycott a judge. In San Diego County, a judge was the target of a similar boycott until last week, when the district attorney there lifted its boycott after four months, without any explanation.

Carr's decision to boycott Bryan means that any time a criminal case is assigned to Bryan's courtroom, all 165 prosecutors must abide by her orders to issue a peremptory challenge and get the case assigned to another judge.

"It's a terrible misuse by the DA," retired judge Huntington said. "A blanket challenge is purely a political message to the whole system."

Contact Tracey Kaplan at 408-278-3482.

Return to Top



'A TERRIBLE MISUSE BY THE DA,' CRITIC SAYS
01/27/2010
San Jose Mercury News

Santa Clara County District Attorney Dolores Carr on Tuesday offered her most vigorous defense to date of her office's boycott of Superior Court Judge Andrea Bryan, even as criticism mounted in the legal community of what some are likening to a retaliatory nuclear strike.

In an e-mail to the newspaper, Carr called it "not unheard of" for prosecutors to disqualify a judge from all criminal cases, citing actions by prosecutors in San Diego, Ventura and Mendocino counties, as well as efforts by public defenders to boycott judges in Santa Clara, Napa and San Bernardino counties.

But experts in criminal law and ethics said the blanket boycott that Carr initiated last week is an abusive tactic that can damage the court system. "Most DAs realize it's like the atomic bomb," said Laurie L. Levenson, who teaches criminal law and ethics at Loyola Law School.

"Inappropriate" and "a threat to judicial independence" were the terms used by Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University law professor and former dean.

Carr instructed her staff Friday to stop bringing all criminal cases before Bryan, who recently angered prosecutors by finding that a trial prosecutor in her office committed numerous acts of misconduct, including giving false testimony. Carr, who is running for re-election and facing stiff criticism for the boycott, insisted in an e-mail that her decision was based on a pattern of rulings by Bryan. She declined to elaborate further in response to questions by the Mercury News.

If it holds, the boycott could effectively end Bryan's career in criminal courts, forcing her to hear only civil cases, as well as have a chilling effect on judicial oversight of overzealous prosecution, outside experts noted. Bryan has declined to comment.

"I think the boycott is intended to send a message to every judge in Santa Clara County," Uelmen said. "The message is, 'Especially when it comes to prosecutorial misconduct, be careful or this could happen to you.'"?" Levenson noted the tactic, which is explicitly permitted under California law, is not permitted in federal court.

Sources in the criminal justice system say Carr issued the directive only after court officials failed to act on her request that Bryan be transferred from her current assignment as the primary judge ruling on motions in felony cases. That assignment often involves evaluating pretrial motions brought by defense attorneys who argue that prosecution evidence was improperly gathered or should be excluded from the case. Though Carr would not comment on that transfer request, sources cited two rulings -- one in 2007, and one in 2008 -- in which Bryan ruled that evidence helpful to the prosecution should be suppressed, rulings that later were overturned by the appellate court.

Bryan is also the judge who issued a declaration finding Jeffrey Rodriguez factually innocent of a 2001 robbery, an unusual declaration that was opposed by prosecutors. Rodriguez' robbery conviction had been overturned when evidence emerged post-conviction undercutting the crime lab examiner's findings in the case.

But Bryan, a former prosecutor appointed by Republican Gov. Pete Wilson, has also issued rulings that favored prosecutors and angered defense attorneys. In one instance, she refused to grant a new trial in a molestation case, despite evidence that Deputy District Attorney Jaime Stringfield had failed to timely turn over evidence that the defense contended contradicted prosecution witnesses.

Carr's directive to boycott Bryan came two weeks and two days after Bryan barred the retrial of Augustin Uribe, who had been sentenced to 38 years to life on child molestation charges. An appellate court had earlier overturned Uribe's conviction on charges he assaulted a young relative based on prosecutorial misconduct. Bryan found the trial prosecutor, Deputy District Attorney Troy Benson, had "woven a tangled web of deceit," including testifying falsely in her court about his knowledge of videotaped evidence that was only belatedly turned over to the defense.

Carr declined to explain why she did not issue a peremptory challenge of Bryan in spring 2009 before the Uribe hearings began. In her e-mail, Carr said "lawyers do not expect to win every hearing," but do expect "to have a fair hearing that will be decided on its merits."

State statutes in 19 states -- including California's 1957 rule -- permit any party in a legal action who believes that a specific judge would not be fair to object to one judge per case, without explaining why. Carr said the challenge is intended to be used "in exceptional cases, where a lawyer has lost faith in the ability of a particular judge to rule impartially." In 24 years as a practicing lawyer, Carr herself only challenged a judge once, she noted.

But retired San Diego County Judge Edward Huntington said the Legislature didn't intend for challenges to be used to blackball or boycott a judge. In San Diego County, a judge was the target of a similar boycott until last week, when the district attorney there lifted its boycott after four months, without any explanation.

Carr's decision to boycott Bryan means that any time a criminal case is assigned to Bryan's courtroom, all 165 prosecutors must abide by her orders to issue a peremptory challenge and get the case assigned to another judge.

"It's a terrible misuse by the DA," retired judge Huntington said. "A blanket challenge is purely a political message to the whole system."

Contact Tracey Kaplan at 408-278-3482.

Copyright © 2010 San Jose Mercury News

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Gatherings Planned In Bay Area To Watch State Of The Union | View Clip
01/27/2010
KTVU-TV - Online

Bay City News Service's story mentioning Santa Clara University student plans to host a State of the Union Watch party was posted on KTVU's website:


BAY AREA, Calif. -- Liberals and conservatives alike will be gathering throughout the Bay Area Wednesday evening to watch and discuss President Obama's State of the Union address, which is expected to focus primarily on domestic issues such as job creation and health care reform.

The speech comes as the nation continues to deal with 10 percent unemployment and as Congress struggles to pass a health care reform bill.

Organizing for America, a group of volunteers working to promote the goals of the Democratic National Committee, is organizing viewing parties in San Francisco and Oakland tonight.

"We're looking for him to kind of frame all the hard work we've done, and continue the process of change that we're looking to work on over the next couple years," said Marlene Madell, a community organizer for the group.

The debate in Congress over the details of the health care reform bill has lasted for most of Obama's first year in office, and Madell said she's hoping the president will "reassure the American people and communicate that it's still something we're going to get done this year."

Karl Kenner, another community organizer for the group, said Obama should encourage Democrats, who have majorities in both houses of Congress, to push through their agenda without the help of Republicans.

"We've tried bipartisanship, but reaching across the aisle only gets us lots of bites on the hand," Kenner said. "It's time to go to work."

While health care reform remains a big issue in Washington, the economy is at the front of most Americans minds, and Kenner said he expects it to play a big role in Obama's speech.

"The primary focus is going to be on the economy and on jobs," he said. "Obviously, we need to get a whole lot more Americans back to work."

Bill Whalen, a research fellow at Stanford University's conservative-leaning Hoover Institute, agreed that the speech will be about jobs.

"The speech is about jobs, mainly the president's job," Whalen said, pointing to Obama's job approval ratings, which have dropped significantly since he came into office.

"The public was behind him when he was elected, but is undecided about him now," he said.

Whalen said he believes Obama will use the speech to pivot away from grander ideas and focus on smaller ideas meant to shore up support with the average voter.

"I think it'll be in the classic Silicon Valley tradition, when a program isn't working, you reboot," he said. "It's time for Obama 2.0."

The speech will likely focus on these domestic issues, rather than on foreign policy concerns such as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Whalen said.

"The president was very prominent on foreign policy when he first came into office, but that's off the table now," he said. "If he wants to regain his posture and standing, it starts with the economy."

Conservatives have also planned gatherings to watch Wednesday night's speech, including the San Francisco Republican Party, which will meet at The Republic, a bar in the city's Marina District.

Students at Santa Clara University are holding a viewing on campus. A group of political science students are organizing the event, which will include a discussion with three of the university's political science professors after the speech, university spokeswoman Connie Kim Coutain said.

Several campus organizations, including the College Democrats and College Republicans, have been invited to join the discussion, which will focus on "what young voters think about Obama and where he's leading the country," Coutain said.

The event will be held in the basement of Dunne Hall on campus.

One local college student has been invited to watch the speech in person.

Gabriela Farfan, a freshman geology student at Stanford University, was invited by First Lady Michelle Obama.

Farfan, a 19-year-old Wisconsin native, won a scholarship through the Intel Science Talent Search for her research describing why certain gemstones appear to change color when viewed from different angles.

Wednesday night's speech is scheduled for 6 p.m. PST in the chambers of the House of Representatives.

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Field Poll: Tea Party Off the Radar of Ethnic Caifornian Voters | View Clip
01/26/2010
New America Media

While nearly three-quarters of white Californians have heard of the conservative, Republican Tea Party movement, more than half of the state's ethnic voters say they are unaware of it, according to The Field Poll's latest survey findings.

The racial divide over the Tea Party, which has garnered headlines since last summer's boisterous protests against health care reform, is clear for each group polled but most dramatic for Asian Americans. In almost a mirror image of white voter responses, 77 percent of Korean Americans and Vietnamese Americans said they had not heard or seen anything about the Tea Party protests over the past year.

Among Chinese Americans surveyed, 67 percent were unaware; more Latinos and African Americans had heard about it, with 59 percent and 53 percent respectively saying they never heard of the protests.

But even awareness of the Tea Party did not translate into much support among any group of voters. Although 72 percent of non-Hispanic whites were aware of it, 33 percent of whites said they did not identify at all with it, while just 17 percent said they identified a lot and 18 percent said they identified somewhat with the protest movement.

Among ethnic voters who had heard of the Tea Party, identification with it was even lower. Five percent of Latinos and Vietnamese voters, 3 percent of African Americans and 2 percent of Chinese Americans said they identified a lot with the movement. No Korean Americans surveyed did.

The Tea Party movement, which has organizations in states around the country, has been credited for helping Massachusetts senator-elect Scott Brown, a Republican, beat Democratic candidate Martha Coakley for the seat held by the late Sen. Ted Kennedy for 47 years. Nationally, political observers have pondered whether the Tea Party's clout could translate into Republican victories in the Golden State.

The Field Poll findings should temper expectations for any electoral earthquakes for conservatives in the majority-minority state.

“The predominant view has been that this is largely a movement coming out of the conservative side of American politics, and most have identified the Tea Party largely as a white, non-Hispanic phenomenon,” said Mark DiCamillo, vice president of The Field Poll. “It's not surprising that ethnic voters are less aware of it.”

DeCamillo said voter responses about the Tea Party provide a baseline of attitudes that can be tracked as the gubernatorial and senate elections this fall approach. “We would like to revisit this question as we get closer to the November election. We want to know if awareness grows and if it does, which segments of voting population will be joining the Tea Party advocates. If this movement is to generate greater support you would expect it to expand beyond the traditional Republican base.”

James Lai, professor of political science, Santa Clara University, said The Field Poll results made sense given the nature of California's diverse electorate. “It is a social movement, but for many minorities, it is a movement they are not part of,” Lai said. “The Tea Party issues speak to a particular class and they don't speak to minority voters, as clearly. It would explain the racial disparities in terms of identifying with the movement a lot.”

Lai said the challenge for the upstart movement is to diversify its base. “If the Tea Party wants to be more inclusive and stronger in California, they are going to have to do more outreach,” he said. “But it's worth it because California is a majority-minority state.”

The Field Poll survey interviewed 1,232 registered voters by telephone from January 4-17. It was conducted in English and five languages–Vietnamese, Spanish, Korean, Mandarin and Cantonese--for the first time in the organization's nearly five-decade history. The survey was done in partnership with New America Media, which provided supplemental funding through grants from the James Irvine Foundation, the PG&E Foundation, the Blue Shield of California Foundation and the San Francisco Foundation.

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As Priests' Numbers Fall, SR Diocese Seeks Solutions | View Clip
01/26/2010
Press Democrat

Santa Clara University Professor Paul Crowley, S.J. is quoted in a story about the impact of declining numbers of priests on Santa Rosa diocese.

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Is the future of campus cards contactless? | View Clip
01/26/2010
CR80 News

New programs are expanding its use beyond access into the full array of campus card functions

By Zack Martin, Editor, Avisian Publications

As campuses switch to contactless smart cards for student IDs and move more applications to the chip are the mag stripes' days numbered? Greater security, increased convenience and reduced wear and tear on cards and readers are just a few of the reasons leading some campuses to make the switch to contactless technology.

In the next ten years the time will come when there's no need for a card at all, says Nirmal Palliyaguru, director ACCESS and conferences at Santa Clara University in California. “The next time we re-card there won't be a card,” he says. “It might be on your cell pone, we'll have a docking station, and people will upload the card to their cell phone or PDA.”

Santa Clara is deploying Blackboard's contactless smart card offering for a range of applications on campus. Blackboard partnered with Sony to bring the electronics industry giant's FeliCa contactless technology to the U.S. market. FeliCa is widely deployed in Japan and other Asian countries with more than 350 million cards and readers used for payment, access and transit solutions, says Jeff Staples, vice president of marketing and business development at Blackboard.

Morehead State University in Kentucky also has fully embraced contactless technology with the help of its campus card vendor, the CBORD Group. Morehead's new EagleCards include HID Global's iCLASS contactless technology and enable access, payment and privilege control applications.

According to Mark Doi, director of education market strategies at HID, the drive for increased functionality is encouraging campuses to look at contactless. “We are seeing campuses migrate away from legacy technologies and upgrade their infrastructure over time (with contactless technology), because of the ability to add more applications beyond just opening the door.”

“The education market as a whole has embraced iCLASS as they see the value in comparison to older technologies such as proximity and mag stripe,” adds Doi. In Fall 2008, Doi told CR80News that more than 100 campuses were using or were in the process of migrating to iCLASS.

Clearly contactless has emerged as the premier technology of access control but as Santa Clara and Morehead are proving, it can also benefit other applications as well. Both universities are in the process of implementing the cards not only for physical access but for payments and more.

Time to re-card

It had been ten years since Santa Clara had refreshed its campus card system, Palliyaguru says. The institution was in the process of getting rid of Social Security numbers associated with student IDs and started looking at different technologies that could better protect the information on the card.

In his travels around Southeast Asia, Palliyaguru saw the FeliCa technology in use and he remembered a presentation Blackboard had given on the technology during a NACCU Conference. “This is clearly the next generation and I thought this was the route for us to go,” he says.

Santa Clara is doing a slow rollout of the contactless cards on campus. Incoming freshman and first year law students received the cards first, Palliyaguru says. Anyone needing a replacement card is also receiving one.

Contactless readers from Blackboard are being deployed around campus and will be used at the various points-of sale, as well as vending, laundry and copier locations. The physical access readers are also being converted to accept contactless. The card still has a mag stripe, adds Palliyaguru, so it can be used where the new readers have not yet been deployed.

One of the biggest advantages of contactless on campus is its ability to facilitate transactions, Staples says. “For us the biggest difference is going to be in the high volume, high access areas like dining point-of-sales, door access and other areas,” he says. “We're able to offer speed, security, and high performance readers that will ultimately impact customer satisfaction. We're focused on the user experience and want it to be faster.”

It will likely be summer 2010 before the system is completely implemented at Santa Clara, Palliyaguru says. Eventually the campus will issue around 10,000 new cards. Administrators are taking it slow to make sure to troubleshoot any problems as they arise. “The technology hasn't been used in this field before,” Palliyaguru says. “We don't know what pitfalls we'll find.”

While Santa Clara is taking time and care to deploy the new system, Palliyaguru is also focused on the future. He sees a wide range of other applications the card will enable, suggesting that they will “increase the touch points … ticketing, events, fundraising, anything can be done.”

Full deployment at Morehead

Morehead State is moving all of its campus card applications to contactless with the help of system provider CBORD and HID Global's iCLASS contactless technology. It also has a mag stripe that is used for banking functions and for some of the remaining doors that haven't switched to contactless, says Doug Snedegar, Morehead's EagleCard coordinator.

The iCLASS cards are being used with Morehead's existing Odyssey PCS campus card system from CBORD. To date Morehead has issued 13,500 contactless cards to students and employees, Snedegar says.

The university is no stranger to smart card technology. Since 2001 the Morehead ID has used a contact smart card for beverage, snack, laundry and copiers purchases while the mag stripe was used for physical access.

Payments first

Traditionally when an institution decides to switch to contactless, the first application on the list is physical access. Morehead took a different route rolling out payments first, Snedegar says. The university has 220 contactless readers deployed across campus, but only a handful of these are being used for physical access. The rest are used for dining services, snack/beverage vending, copying and printing and laundry payment.

The contactless readers have proven to be revenue drivers. Vending sales, previously managed with a contact smart chip in the EagleCard, required students to maintain separate accounts for vending purchases. With contactless readers managing purchases across campus, the university now offers students a multi-use account known as BeakerBucks, making it easy to spend and manage EagleCard funds. EagleCard-based vending sales have increased nearly 10% since the change was made, Snedegar says.

Switching to the contactless readers has been a relatively painless process and not too expensive, Snedegar says. The readers deployed at the bookstore, print station and dining services cost less than $250 each.

Deploying contactless at Morehead has given the university unlimited potential for the card, Snedegar says. There are plans underway to extend the contactless infrastructure to Morehead's regional campuses in Ashland, Prestonburg, West Liberty, Jackson and Mount Sterling. The university is also exploring the use of the card for logical access.

“The sky is the limit,” Snedegar says. “It's a work in process and our goal is to eventually be contactless everywhere on campus.”

Is this the end of the mag stripe?

At Morehead we discussed whether the stripe would be a thing of the past, Snedegar says. But since the card can be connected to a U.S. Bank account, the mag stripe was necessary for debit purchases and ATM transactions.

Campus card business consultant Bob Huber agrees noting that mag stripes won't be going away anytime soon. “I think they'll be around for another 20 years,” he says. “You need to have a mag stripe on the card for merchant acceptance.”

But Huber says contactless on campus may see significant increases in the coming years. Wear and tear on readers and cards is less with contactless than mag stripe and campuses can see a significant cost reduction on that alone, Huber says.

Traditional magnetic stripe readers should have a life of five to eight years, while contactless readers should have an expected life of 15 years or more. Add in the cost of labor for trouble-shooting and service fees for maintenance and repair and contactless provides a total cost of ownership half that of magnetic stripe readers, says Huber.

The reliability of contactless is also on par with mag stripe, suggests Huber adding, “the problem with defective cards is about the same as with mag stripe.”

Read Winkelman, vice president of sales for colleges and universities at CBORD, says interest in contactless on campus is growing. The interest started out of the convenience factor but is growing because of the better security. “As security concerns in general increase, campuses are looking for anything that is more secure, that's part of what's driving the interest in contactless,” Winkelman says.

Return to Top



Is the future of campus cards contactless? | View Clip
01/26/2010
ContactlessNews

New programs are expanding its use beyond access into the full array of campus card functions

As campuses switch to contactless smart cards for student IDs and move more applications to the chip are the mag stripes' days numbered? Greater security, increased convenience and reduced wear and tear on cards and readers are just a few of the reasons leading some campuses to make the switch to contactless technology.

In the next ten years the time will come when there's no need for a card at all, says Nirmal Palliyaguru, director ACCESS and conferences at Santa Clara University in California. “The next time we re-card there won't be a card,” he says. “It might be on your cell pone, we'll have a docking station, and people will upload the card to their cell phone or PDA.”

Santa Clara is deploying Blackboard's contactless smart card offering for a range of applications on campus. Blackboard partnered with Sony to bring the electronics industry giant's FeliCa contactless technology to the U.S. market. FeliCa is widely deployed in Japan and other Asian countries with more than 350 million cards and readers used for payment, access and transit solutions, says Jeff Staples, vice president of marketing and business development at Blackboard.

Morehead State University in Kentucky also has fully embraced contactless technology with the help of its campus card vendor, the CBORD Group. Morehead's new EagleCards include HID Global's iCLASS contactless technology and enable access, payment and privilege control applications.

According to Mark Doi, director of education market strategies at HID, the drive for increased functionality is encouraging campuses to look at contactless. “We are seeing campuses migrate away from legacy technologies and upgrade their infrastructure over time (with contactless technology), because of the ability to add more applications beyond just opening the door.”

“The education market as a whole has embraced iCLASS as they see the value in comparison to older technologies such as proximity and mag stripe,” adds Doi. In Fall 2008, Doi told CR80News that more than 100 campuses were using or were in the process of migrating to iCLASS.

Clearly contactless has emerged as the premier technology of access control but as Santa Clara and Morehead are proving, it can also benefit other applications as well. Both universities are in the process of implementing the cards not only for physical access but for payments and more.

Time to re-card

It had been ten years since Santa Clara had refreshed its campus card system, Palliyaguru says. The institution was in the process of getting rid of Social Security numbers associated with student IDs and started looking at different technologies that could better protect the information on the card.

In his travels around Southeast Asia, Palliyaguru saw the FeliCa technology in use and he remembered a presentation Blackboard had given on the technology during a NACCU Conference. “This is clearly the next generation and I thought this was the route for us to go,” he says.

Santa Clara is doing a slow rollout of the contactless cards on campus. Incoming freshman and first year law students received the cards first, Palliyaguru says. Anyone needing a replacement card is also receiving one.

Contactless readers from Blackboard are being deployed around campus and will be used at the various points-of sale, as well as vending, laundry and copier locations. The physical access readers are also being converted to accept contactless. The card still has a mag stripe, adds Palliyaguru, so it can be used where the new readers have not yet been deployed.

One of the biggest advantages of contactless on campus is its ability to facilitate transactions, Staples says. “For us the biggest difference is going to be in the high volume, high access areas like dining point-of-sales, door access and other areas,” he says. “We're able to offer speed, security, and high performance readers that will ultimately impact customer satisfaction. We're focused on the user experience and want it to be faster.”

It will likely be summer 2010 before the system is completely implemented at Santa Clara, Palliyaguru says. Eventually the campus will issue around 10,000 new cards. Administrators are taking it slow to make sure to troubleshoot any problems as they arise. “The technology hasn't been used in this field before,” Palliyaguru says. “We don't know what pitfalls we'll find.”

While Santa Clara is taking time and care to deploy the new system, Palliyaguru is also focused on the future. He sees a wide range of other applications the card will enable, suggesting that they will “increase the touch points … ticketing, events, fundraising, anything can be done.”

Full deployment at Morehead

Morehead State is moving all of its campus card applications to contactless with the help of system provider CBORD and HID Global's iCLASS contactless technology. It also has a mag stripe that is used for banking functions and for some of the remaining doors that haven't switched to contactless, says Doug Snedegar, Morehead's EagleCard coordinator.

The iCLASS cards are being used with Morehead's existing Odyssey PCS campus card system from CBORD. To date Morehead has issued 13,500 contactless cards to students and employees, Snedegar says.

The university is no stranger to smart card technology. Since 2001 the Morehead ID has used a contact smart card for beverage, snack, laundry and copiers purchases while the mag stripe was used for physical access.

Payments first

Traditionally when an institution decides to switch to contactless, the first application on the list is physical access. Morehead took a different route rolling out payments first, Snedegar says. The university has 220 contactless readers deployed across campus, but only a handful of these are being used for physical access. The rest are used for dining services, snack/beverage vending, copying and printing and laundry payment.

The contactless readers have proven to be revenue drivers. Vending sales, previously managed with a contact smart chip in the EagleCard, required students to maintain separate accounts for vending purchases. With contactless readers managing purchases across campus, the university now offers students a multi-use account known as BeakerBucks, making it easy to spend and manage EagleCard funds. EagleCard-based vending sales have increased nearly 10% since the change was made, Snedegar says.

Switching to the contactless readers has been a relatively painless process and not too expensive, Snedegar says. The readers deployed at the bookstore, print station and dining services cost less than $250 each.

Deploying contactless at Morehead has given the university unlimited potential for the card, Snedegar says. There are plans underway to extend the contactless infrastructure to Morehead's regional campuses in Ashland, Prestonburg, West Liberty, Jackson and Mount Sterling. The university is also exploring the use of the card for logical access.

“The sky is the limit,” Snedegar says. “It's a work in process and our goal is to eventually be contactless everywhere on campus.”

Is this the end of the mag stripe?

At Morehead we discussed whether the stripe would be a thing of the past, Snedegar says. But since the card can be connected to a U.S. Bank account, the mag stripe was necessary for debit purchases and ATM transactions.

Campus card business consultant Bob Huber agrees noting that mag stripes won't be going away anytime soon. “I think they'll be around for another 20 years,” he says. “You need to have a mag stripe on the card for merchant acceptance.”

But Huber says contactless on campus may see significant increases in the coming years. Wear and tear on readers and cards is less with contactless than mag stripe and campuses can see a significant cost reduction on that alone, Huber says.

Traditional magnetic stripe readers should have a life of five to eight years, while contactless readers should have an expected life of 15 years or more. Add in the cost of labor for trouble-shooting and service fees for maintenance and repair and contactless provides a total cost of ownership half that of magnetic stripe readers, says Huber.

The reliability of contactless is also on par with mag stripe, suggests Huber adding, “the problem with defective cards is about the same as with mag stripe.”

Read Winkelman, vice president of sales for colleges and universities at CBORD, says interest in contactless on campus is growing. The interest started out of the convenience factor but is growing because of the better security. “As security concerns in general increase, campuses are looking for anything that is more secure, that's part of what's driving the interest in contactless,” Winkelman says.

Listen to the latest re:ID Podcast

The weekly podcast covers relevant issues and breaking news from AVISIAN's suite of ID technology publications.

Return to Top



Is the future of campus cards contactless? | View Clip
01/26/2010
CR80 News

New programs are expanding its use beyond access into the full array of campus card functions

As campuses switch to contactless smart cards for student IDs and move more applications to the chip are the mag stripes' days numbered? Greater security, increased convenience and reduced wear and tear on cards and readers are just a few of the reasons leading some campuses to make the switch to contactless technology.

In the next ten years the time will come when there's no need for a card at all, says Nirmal Palliyaguru, director ACCESS and conferences at Santa Clara University in California. “The next time we re-card there won't be a card,” he says. “It might be on your cell pone, we'll have a docking station, and people will upload the card to their cell phone or PDA.”

Santa Clara is deploying Blackboard's contactless smart card offering for a range of applications on campus. Blackboard partnered with Sony to bring the electronics industry giant's FeliCa contactless technology to the U.S. market. FeliCa is widely deployed in Japan and other Asian countries with more than 350 million cards and readers used for payment, access and transit solutions, says Jeff Staples, vice president of marketing and business development at Blackboard.

Morehead State University in Kentucky also has fully embraced contactless technology with the help of its campus card vendor, the CBORD Group. Morehead's new EagleCards include HID Global's iCLASS contactless technology and enable access, payment and privilege control applications.

According to Mark Doi, director of education market strategies at HID, the drive for increased functionality is encouraging campuses to look at contactless. “We are seeing campuses migrate away from legacy technologies and upgrade their infrastructure over time (with contactless technology), because of the ability to add more applications beyond just opening the door.”

“The education market as a whole has embraced iCLASS as they see the value in comparison to older technologies such as proximity and mag stripe,” adds Doi. In Fall 2008, Doi told CR80News that more than 100 campuses were using or were in the process of migrating to iCLASS.

Clearly contactless has emerged as the premier technology of access control but as Santa Clara and Morehead are proving, it can also benefit other applications as well. Both universities are in the process of implementing the cards not only for physical access but for payments and more.

Time to re-card

It had been ten years since Santa Clara had refreshed its campus card system, Palliyaguru says. The institution was in the process of getting rid of Social Security numbers associated with student IDs and started looking at different technologies that could better protect the information on the card.

In his travels around Southeast Asia, Palliyaguru saw the FeliCa technology in use and he remembered a presentation Blackboard had given on the technology during a NACCU Conference. “This is clearly the next generation and I thought this was the route for us to go,” he says.

Santa Clara is doing a slow rollout of the contactless cards on campus. Incoming freshman and first year law students received the cards first, Palliyaguru says. Anyone needing a replacement card is also receiving one.

Contactless readers from Blackboard are being deployed around campus and will be used at the various points-of sale, as well as vending, laundry and copier locations. The physical access readers are also being converted to accept contactless. The card still has a mag stripe, adds Palliyaguru, so it can be used where the new readers have not yet been deployed.

One of the biggest advantages of contactless on campus is its ability to facilitate transactions, Staples says. “For us the biggest difference is going to be in the high volume, high access areas like dining point-of-sales, door access and other areas,” he says. “We're able to offer speed, security, and high performance readers that will ultimately impact customer satisfaction. We're focused on the user experience and want it to be faster.”

It will likely be summer 2010 before the system is completely implemented at Santa Clara, Palliyaguru says. Eventually the campus will issue around 10,000 new cards. Administrators are taking it slow to make sure to troubleshoot any problems as they arise. “The technology hasn't been used in this field before,” Palliyaguru says. “We don't know what pitfalls we'll find.”

While Santa Clara is taking time and care to deploy the new system, Palliyaguru is also focused on the future. He sees a wide range of other applications the card will enable, suggesting that they will “increase the touch points … ticketing, events, fundraising, anything can be done.”

Full deployment at Morehead

Morehead State is moving all of its campus card applications to contactless with the help of system provider CBORD and HID Global's iCLASS contactless technology. It also has a mag stripe that is used for banking functions and for some of the remaining doors that haven't switched to contactless, says Doug Snedegar, Morehead's EagleCard coordinator.

The iCLASS cards are being used with Morehead's existing Odyssey PCS campus card system from CBORD. To date Morehead has issued 13,500 contactless cards to students and employees, Snedegar says.

The university is no stranger to smart card technology. Since 2001 the Morehead ID has used a contact smart card for beverage, snack, laundry and copiers purchases while the mag stripe was used for physical access.

Payments first

Traditionally when an institution decides to switch to contactless, the first application on the list is physical access. Morehead took a different route rolling out payments first, Snedegar says. The university has 220 contactless readers deployed across campus, but only a handful of these are being used for physical access. The rest are used for dining services, snack/beverage vending, copying and printing and laundry payment.

The contactless readers have proven to be revenue drivers. Vending sales, previously managed with a contact smart chip in the EagleCard, required students to maintain separate accounts for vending purchases. With contactless readers managing purchases across campus, the university now offers students a multi-use account known as BeakerBucks, making it easy to spend and manage EagleCard funds. EagleCard-based vending sales have increased nearly 10% since the change was made, Snedegar says.

Switching to the contactless readers has been a relatively painless process and not too expensive, Snedegar says. The readers deployed at the bookstore, print station and dining services cost less than $250 each.

Deploying contactless at Morehead has given the university unlimited potential for the card, Snedegar says. There are plans underway to extend the contactless infrastructure to Morehead's regional campuses in Ashland, Prestonburg, West Liberty, Jackson and Mount Sterling. The university is also exploring the use of the card for logical access.

“The sky is the limit,” Snedegar says. “It's a work in process and our goal is to eventually be contactless everywhere on campus.”

Is this the end of the mag stripe?

At Morehead we discussed whether the stripe would be a thing of the past, Snedegar says. But since the card can be connected to a U.S. Bank account, the mag stripe was necessary for debit purchases and ATM transactions.

Campus card business consultant Bob Huber agrees noting that mag stripes won't be going away anytime soon. “I think they'll be around for another 20 years,” he says. “You need to have a mag stripe on the card for merchant acceptance.”

But Huber says contactless on campus may see significant increases in the coming years. Wear and tear on readers and cards is less with contactless than mag stripe and campuses can see a significant cost reduction on that alone, Huber says.

Traditional magnetic stripe readers should have a life of five to eight years, while contactless readers should have an expected life of 15 years or more. Add in the cost of labor for trouble-shooting and service fees for maintenance and repair and contactless provides a total cost of ownership half that of magnetic stripe readers, says Huber.

The reliability of contactless is also on par with mag stripe, suggests Huber adding, “the problem with defective cards is about the same as with mag stripe.”

Read Winkelman, vice president of sales for colleges and universities at CBORD, says interest in contactless on campus is growing. The interest started out of the convenience factor but is growing because of the better security. “As security concerns in general increase, campuses are looking for anything that is more secure, that's part of what's driving the interest in contactless,” Winkelman says.

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Professional musicians visit Fisher Middle School in Los Gatos | View Clip
01/26/2010
San Jose Mercury News

Not being a music aficionado, I'd never heard of a vibraphone before Fisher Middle School's Music Boosters brought a professional percussionist to town last week to play for students.

So here's the first hint — Webster's Dictionary describes a vibraphone as an instrument that resembles a marimba, only it has metal bars and rotating disks in the resonators to make a vibrato.

Still confused? Think of the three tones that the NBC television network uses for station identification and branding. That is the sound a vibraphone makes.

"It used to be a sound effect instrument in the early days of TV," vibraphonist Christian Tamburr said. He was one of three panelists who spoke to Fisher students and parents about what it's like to be a professional musician.

What the speakers had to say resonated with Cody, a Fisher eighth-grader who plays flute with the school's symphonic band and saxophone with the jazz band.

"I think it sounds really fun," Cody said. "I learned more about what it's like to be a professional musician."

She has already decided that is the career path she wants to follow, but she doesn't yet know what her instrument of choice will be.

"I like them both differently, but not one over the other," she said. The flute, however, is her main instrument. Cody has been playing flute since fifth-grade.

Students also heard from professional French horn player Scott Hartman, who has played with Luciano
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Pavarotti, Placido Domingo, the Three Irish Tenors and the Moody Blues.

Hartman offered an interesting tidbit about playing with orchestras, saying members applaud good performances by tapping their feet. There are signals for a bad performance, too, with all of this going on during the performance itself. So even though musicians are busy playing, they still find ways to communicate among themselves.

The ultimate communicator, though, is the conductor. The director of choral programs at Santa Clara University, Ryan Brandau, discussed the intricacies of that job.

"What you have to learn to become a conductor is you have to learn about a lot of different instruments," Brandau said.

But at its basic level, conductors are like a traffic cop he says.

"You cue people when to get going," Brandau said. "You show them how fast to go and when to stop. In between, it's up to you to listen and say, 'The trumpet is too loud, the flute needs to be louder.' The beauty of live music is you don't do everything the same way twice."

Brandau conducted loud and soft versions of Row, row, row your boat to show how musicians (in this case the audience) respond to a conductor's loud and soft hand signals.

Tamburr also performed, playing a Latin-inspired piece he wrote for his quartet. It involved simultaneously using four mallets to hit the keys on his vibraphone.

His career has been interesting, too. He has composed for the Cirque du Soleil troupe and recently finished a world tour with renowned singer Julio Iglesias. Tamburr got that gig by e-mailing Iglesias and offering his services.

"We meet people all the time," he said. "You have to be a good business person" and follow-up.

Although the Iglesias tour took him to many countries where people spoke languages other than English, Tamburr said, "Music is truly an international language. Everyone can read the dots on the page."

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The Taste for Civilization | View Clip
01/07/2010
Afternoon Magazine - WILL-AM

The Taste for Civilization: Food, Politics, and Civil Society, a new book by Janet A. Flammang, Ph.D., Professor and Chair of Political Science, Santa Clara University, was discussed on this Illinois public radio station.

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Estate Tax | View Clip
12/27/2009
KNTV-TV

Santa Clara University Finance Prof. Atulya Sarin discusses the complications surrounding the abolition and reinstatement of the federal estate tax in coming years with NBC Bay Area.

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Students shine at the Solar Decathlon | View Clip
11/04/2009
SPIE Newsroom

Students are the engine that makes the Solar Decathlon run, and their nearly boundless energy kept spirits high during the final rainy days of the event in October 2009 in Washington, DC.

SPIE visited the event and compiled this composite "tour" highlighting the different components of a typical house, as told by student tour guides at several houses.

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Santa Clara University makes Top 20 list in green power
10/28/2009
San Jose Mercury News

Santa Clara University has made the list of the nation's Top 20 colleges and universities in purchasing green power, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced.

The university doubled its previous usage of green power, to nearly 23 million kilowatt-hours annually, thus meeting about three-fourths of its electricity needs with green power. That, in turn, avoids carbon dioxide emissions equivalent to almost 3,000 passenger vehicles per year.

The university placed 16th on the list.

Green power is generated from renewable resources such as solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, biogas and low-impact hydropower.

To see the list of top 20 universities, school districts, and other organizations, go to www.epa.gov/greenpower/toplists

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A Discussion about Teaching Theology | View Clip
10/23/2009
Church 21 at Boston College

A discussion between Santa Clara University Mike Buckley, S.J., Boston College's Michael Himes and Nicholas Lash of Cambridge about teaching theology was featured on the website of Church 21 at Boston College. The interview was held during the conference held in Fr. Buckley's honor at Boston College last October.

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Team California's Refract House | View Clip
10/18/2009
Residential Architect

Before the Solar Decathlon competition had even closed, Team California was raking in recognition, including a first place finish in the Architectural Design and Communications (such as education and branding) categories, a third-place finish in Market Viability, and a never-ceasing line of eager spectators waiting to get in.

"It's just now sinking in," says Kyle Belcher, an architecture student who graduated in May from the California College of the Arts. Belcher and his fellow architecture, art, and design students worked on the house for two years along with fellow team members from the University of Santa Clara, which focuses on engineering and business.

The Refract House, named for its bent form and its ability to control light, is part of the bi-annual Solar Decathlon competition, which features 20 student-designed-and-built dwellings on display on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., through Oct. 18.

While Team California won third place overall in the 2007 Solar Decathlon competition, it did not fare well in the design segment, ranking 18th out of 20 teams.

"The whole design phase was revamped," says Mike Sizemore, a Santa Clara student who worked on the technology, engineering, and construction applications. For the 2009 event, the Team California home has a traditional look, but with a modern twist.

One of the most prominent parts of the project, which features 630 square feet of conditioned space and 170 square feet of unconditioned space, is its arrangement: The house curls around a courtyard, which helps control the amount of light that enters the house and centers the structure around the deck, connecting it to each room.

"We were trying to talk about the California climate," says Annessa Mattson, a graduate architecture student from the College of the Arts and the architectural lead, "and the idea of living in your landscape."

To address another major California initiative—conserving water—downspouts on top of the house direct rainwater to a harvesting pool. "What's different about the way we collect water is we have a beautiful container for it; it's a reflecting pool," Mattson notes.

The rainwater is used to irrigate plants, and is passively filtered by natural materials, such as native plants and gravel.

The pool matches the activity of California's wetlands so that it's more sustainable. In the summer, it dries out to become a rock garden. In the winter, it fills up into a rain garden.

Water conservation continues inside the home, including Uponor's recirculation pump, which drains lukewarm water in the hot water line and replaces it with hot water. The product has a motion sensor that activates it when someone walks into the bathroom, so the pump runs only when necessary.

An electronic monitoring system tracks the use of water and controls other systems, such as lighting. The system was designed with help from members of Santa Clara's 2007 Solar Decathlon team, who formed the company Valence Energy, the team's Web site states.

The system includes a weather monitoring mode that calculates rainfall, decides when to water plants, and keeps track of how much water is in the reflecting pool. The device also informs homeowners of how much money the radiant heating and cooling system is saving them, compared with conventional methods. And, it breaks down where the most energy is being consumed so homeowners can change their behavior to conserve more.

This data can be accessed on a screen in the house, from a remote computer via the Internet, or through an iPhone.

Among the home's other interesting products are recycled vinyl billboards used for waterproofing and Sealection Agribalance spray-foam insulation made of vegetable oil. Other details include SunPower 225 solar panels, reclaimed redwood siding, and reclaimed elm flooring.

But it's the overall ambiance the student-builders appreciate most.

"All of us wish we could take the house with us. It's made for entertaining," Belcher states. "It's made for you to have a nice glass of wine and share the deck outside with friends."

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