Santa Clara University

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Other (278)
Agence France-Presse: "All Your Twitpics Are Belong to Us" 11/10/2010 ReadWriteWeb Text View Clip
GEORGE MOELLER, A 29-YEAR-OLD FIRST YEAR MATH PROFESSOR AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY. 11/10/2010 CBS 5 Eyewitness News At 11 PM - KPIX-TV Text
Local couple awards law prize to Iranian human-rights lawyer 11/10/2010 Los Altos Town Crier Text View Clip
MEET THIS WIRING 29 YEAR-OLD FIRST-YEAR MATH PROFESSOR AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY. 11/10/2010 CBS 13 News at 10 PM - KOVR-TV Text
On Google's 10 Percent Pay Hike . . . And Antitrust Law - Law Blog - WSJ 11/10/2010 Law Blog - Wall Street Journal Blogs Text View Clip
Pizarro: Former Milpitas Mayor to lead San Jose's Veterans Day Parade 11/10/2010 SiliconValley.com Text View Clip
Pop!Tech Fellows Focus on Development Through Enterprise | Blog | NextBillion.net | Development through Enterprise 11/10/2010 Development through Enterprise Text View Clip
SCU Professor George Mohler Uses Math to Predict Crime 11/10/2010 KNTV-TV Text View Clip
SCU Professor George Mohler Uses Math to Predict Crime 11/10/2010 KPIX-TV Text
Should Google Workers Thank Justice Department for Raise? 11/10/2010 Law Blog - Wall Street Journal Blogs Text View Clip
Should Google Workers Thank Justice Department for Raise? - Digits - WSJ 11/10/2010 Digits - Wall Street Journal Blogs Text View Clip
What Martha Stewart Can Teach Us About Portfolio Arrangements 11/10/2010 Seeking Alpha Text View Clip
Commentary: Media makes politics more divisive? It's a top of debate 11/09/2010 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Commentary: Media makes politics more divisive? It's a top of debate 11/09/2010 Saratoga News Text View Clip
Gerardo Fernandez: A Positive Light for Latinos in the Media 11/09/2010 SJ Beez Text View Clip
Human-rights advocate to receive the Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize 11/09/2010 Examiner.com Text View Clip
IES Abroad Recognizes Study Abroad Professionals and Institutions at... 11/09/2010 PRWeb Text View Clip
Martha Stewart's investing adventures 11/09/2010 Canadian Business - Online Text View Clip
NY Appeals Court Reinstates Amazon Sales Tax Suit 11/09/2010 MediaPost.com Text View Clip
Pizarro: Former Milpitas Mayor to lead San Jose's Veterans Day Parade 11/09/2010 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Pizarro: Former Milpitas Mayor to lead San Jose's Veterans Day Parade 11/09/2010 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Pizarro: Former Milpitas Mayor to lead San Jose's Veterans Day Parade 11/09/2010 SiliconValley.com Text View Clip
The Israeli (And Palestinian) Tech Invasion 11/09/2010 Jewish Week - Online, The Text View Clip
But what else? We went to private Santa clara University With an acceptance rate of 58%. 11/08/2010 KWWL Today In Iowa - KWWL-TV Text
Facebook uncovers user data sales 11/08/2010 IT Web Text View Clip
Fewer U.S. Docs Accepting Perks From Industry: Survey 11/08/2010 National Women's Health Information Center Text View Clip
Fewer U.S. Docs Accepting Perks From Industry: Survey 11/08/2010 medbroadcast.com Text View Clip
Fewer U.S. Docs Accepting Perks From Industry: Survey 11/08/2010 U.S. News & World Report - Online Text View Clip
Iranian Women's Rights Advocate to Receive Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize from Santa Clara University School of Law 11/08/2010 Payvand Iran News Text View Clip
Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. 11/08/2010 News 5 Today - WLWT-TV Text
Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. 11/08/2010 News 5 Today - WLWT-TV Text
Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. 11/08/2010 News 5 Today - WLWT-TV Text
Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. 11/08/2010 News 5 Today - WLWT-TV Text
Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. 11/08/2010 News 5 Today - WLWT-TV Text
Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. 11/08/2010 News 5 Today - WLWT-TV Text
Namaste: It's not just for those from the East 11/08/2010 Psychology Today - Online Text View Clip
NY Appeals Court Reinstates Amazon Sales Tax Suit 11/08/2010 MediaPost.com Text View Clip
Queen Rania receives the 2010 James C. Morgan Global Humanitarian Award 11/08/2010 Jordan Times Text
Queen Rania receives the Global Humanitarian award 11/08/2010 Newzglobe.com Text View Clip
Studies from Santa Clara University in the area of proteomics published 11/08/2010 NewsRx.com Text
Studies from Santa Clara University in the area of proteomics published 11/08/2010 NewsRx.com Text
Business expected to drive recovery 11/07/2010 San Francisco Chronicle Text
Business, not consumers, expected to prod recovery 11/07/2010 San Francisco Chronicle - Online Text View Clip
Did Jammie Thomas case backfire on file sharers? 11/07/2010 CNET News.com Text View Clip
Did Jammie Thomas case backfire on file sharers? 11/07/2010 CNET.com - New York Bureau Text View Clip
Outfit told to stop selling class notes 11/07/2010 Sunday Gazette-Mail Text
Valley Stars 11/07/2010 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Business, not consumers, expected to prod recovery 11/06/2010 San Francisco Chronicle - Online Text View Clip
But what else? We went to private Santa clara University With an acceptance rate of 58%. 11/06/2010 Today In Iowa - WHO-TV Text
BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. 11/06/2010 Channel 4 News at 6 PM - WSMV-TV Text
BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. 11/06/2010 Channel 2 News at 10 PM - KJRH-TV Text
Channel 4 News @ 5 2010-11-06 17:25:00 11/06/2010 WSMV-TV - Online Text
Channel 4 News @ 5 2010-11-06 17:27:00 11/06/2010 WSMV-TV - Online Text
ECONOMIC CRISIS PROVIDES LESSON FOR BUSINESS SCHOOL 11/06/2010 San Jose Mercury News Text
From the Publisher: Will the winners act like leaders? 11/06/2010 Business Review - Online Text View Clip
GENTLEMAN A SOLID GPA ANDED ABOUT TEST SCORES BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. 11/06/2010 WJAR-TV Text
It's the economy, again 11/06/2010 Green Sheet - Online, The Text View Clip
Mercury News interview: S. Andrew Starbird, Dean of SCU's Leavey School of Business 11/06/2010 Los Angeles Daily News - Online Text View Clip
Poor immigrants can benefit American society 11/06/2010 Salt Lake Tribune, The Text View Clip
S/ MIKE SEXTON/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY 2:37-2:432757 FROM MOMENT CHILDREN ARE BORN WE'RE PREPARING THEM TO LEAVE US AND THE COLLEGE SEARCH PROCESS IS GOOD PRACTICEAFTER ALL, WHAT ENDS UP IN THE NEXT "FOLDER" SHOULD BE UP TO THE STUDENT. 3 11/06/2010 Channel 4 News at 6 PM - WSMV-TV Text
AND MIKE SAKSTON OF SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY SAY STUDENT WHO'S THINK THEY MIGHT BE ON THE BUBBLE SUBMIT A STATEMENT EXPLAINING THIS HARDSHIPS. 11/05/2010 KARE 11 News Sunrise - KARE-TV Text
BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. 11/05/2010 NBC 2 News at Noon - WBBH-TV Text
But what else? We went to private Santa clara University With an acceptance rate of 58%. 11/05/2010 KWQC TV6 News at Noon - KWQC-TV Text
BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. 11/05/2010 NBC13 Today at 4:30AM - WVTM-TV Text
BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. 11/05/2010 WDSU News This Morning - WDSU-TV Text
BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. 11/05/2010 11 Today at 5 AM - KKCO-TV Text
BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. 11/05/2010 2 News at 11 PM - WDTN-TV Text
BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. 11/05/2010 2 News at 11 PM - WDTN-TV Text
CSU orders NoteUtopia to cease its note-selling operation 11/05/2010 Sacramento Bee - Online, The Text View Clip
Mercury News interview: S. Andrew Starbird, Dean of SCU's Leavey School of Business 11/05/2010 SiliconValley.com Text View Clip
Mercury News interview: S. Andrew Starbird, Dean of SCU's Leavey School of Business 11/05/2010 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
MIKE SEXTON/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY "IF THEY'VE DONE TRAVEL WE DONT WANT TRAVELOGUE WE WANT TO HEAR ABOUT THE AFTERNOON THEY'RE AT WITH STUDENT IN NICARAGUA AND TALKED POLITICS. 11/05/2010 WAVY News 10 at 6 PM - WAVY-TV Text
Oracle-SAP Testimony Nears; HP CEO in Spotlight 11/05/2010 Insurance & Technology - Online Text View Clip
S/ Mike Sexton / Santa Clara University : 51-: 11/05/2010 Live 5 News This Morning - WCSH-TV Text
S/ Mike Sexton / Santa Clara University : 51-: 11/05/2010 WLBZ NewsCenter 2 Morning Report - WLBZ-TV Text
S/Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 2:37-2:43 2757 from moment children are born were preparing them to leave us and the college search process is good practice AFTER ALL, WHAT ENDS UP IN THE NEXT FOLDER SHOULD BE UP TO THE STUDENT. 11/05/2010 NBC 2 News at Noon - WBBH-TV Text
Early AM 2010-11-04 06:39:19 11/04/2010 KAIT-TV Text
Events in the San Francisco Bay area 11/04/2010 Associated Press (AP) - Sacramento Bureau Text
Help reduce maternal mortality infant mortality - GlobalGiving 11/04/2010 GlobalGiving Text View Clip
NASA To Hold Media Telecon To Discuss Upcoming Satellite Missions 11/04/2010 TheStreet.com Text View Clip
NASA To Hold Media Telecon To Discuss Upcoming Satellite Missions 11/04/2010 TheStreet.com Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO 11/04/2010 Quote.com France Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO 11/04/2010 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO 11/04/2010 Los Angeles Daily News - Online Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO 11/04/2010 San Mateo County Times Text
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO 11/04/2010 Oakland Tribune Text
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO 11/04/2010 Daily Review, The Text
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO 11/04/2010 Argus, The Text
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO 11/04/2010 Alameda Times-Star Text
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 01:26:16 EDT 11/04/2010 Quote.com India Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 01:26:16 EDT 11/04/2010 Quote.com Canada Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 01:26:16 EDT 11/04/2010 Quote.com Australia Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 01:26:16 EDT 11/04/2010 Quote.com France Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 01:26:16 EDT 11/04/2010 Quote.com Italy Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 01:26:16 EDT 11/04/2010 Quote.com Hong Kong Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 08:22:52 EDT 11/04/2010 Quote.com India Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 08:22:52 EDT 11/04/2010 Quote.com Italy Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 08:22:52 EDT 11/04/2010 Quote.com Germany Text View Clip
ORACLE STYMIED IN EFFORT TO GET HP CEO TO TESTIFY 11/04/2010 San Jose Mercury News Text
Our Doctors Need an X-Ray Machine - GlobalGiving 11/04/2010 GlobalGiving Text View Clip
SCU Conference on 11/04/2010 KLIV-AM Text View Clip
Support Afghanistan hospital - GlobalGiving 11/04/2010 GlobalGiving Text View Clip
Women's Education in Afghanistan - GlobalGiving 11/04/2010 GlobalGiving Text View Clip
Academia: The changing face of tenure 11/03/2010 Nature - Online Text View Clip
DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. 11/03/2010 WVEC-TV Text
DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. 11/03/2010 13 News at Noon - WVEC-TV Text
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO 11/03/2010 Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO 11/03/2010 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO 11/03/2010 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO 11/03/2010 SiliconValley.com Text View Clip
Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO 11/03/2010 SiliconValley.com Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP Testimony Nears; HP CEO in Spotlight 11/03/2010 Financial Technology Network Text View Clip
: Managerial Decision Making Leadership Will Improve the Quality of Your Decisions and Change the Way You Do Business 11/02/2010 M2 PressWIRE Text
An October to Remember 11/02/2010 Examiner.com Text View Clip
City blight? There's an app store for that 11/02/2010 Tri-Valley Herald Text View Clip
City blight? There's an app store for that 11/02/2010 Contra Costa Times - Online Text View Clip
DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIFIRE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. 11/02/2010 ABC 12 News at 5 PM - WJRT-TV Text
DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. 11/02/2010 Channel 3 News at 4 PM - WEAR-TV Text
Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. 11/02/2010 ABC 26 News at 5 PM - WGNO-TV Text
Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. 11/02/2010 KOLO 8 News Now at 5 PM - KOLO-TV Text
Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. 11/02/2010 ABC 27 First News at 5 PM - WTXL-TV Text
Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. 11/02/2010 Eyewitness News at 5 PM - WPTY-TV Text
DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. 11/02/2010 27 News at 5 PM - WKOW-TV Text
DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. 11/02/2010 Newswatch 16 at 5 PM - WNEP-TV Text
DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. 11/02/2010 ABC 12 News at 11 PM - WJRT-TV Text
Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. 11/02/2010 NewsChannel 9 at 5 PM - WSYR-TV Text
Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. 11/02/2010 ABC 26 News at 10 PM - WGNO-TV Text
Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School"The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. 11/02/2010 ABC6 Newscenter at 5 PM - WSYX-TV Text
Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School"The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. 11/02/2010 ABC6 Newscenter at 11 PM - WSYX-TV Text
Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School"The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. 11/02/2010 KXLY 4 News at 5 PM - KXLY-TV Text
Facebook uncovers user data sales 11/02/2010 IT Web Text View Clip
Facebook uncovers user data sales 11/02/2010 IT Web Text View Clip
Google Apps Gets the Government Shaft to Microsoft's Benefit - Google Tries to Prove the Government Is Anticompetitive 11/02/2010 NewsGang Text View Clip
Google sues U.S. government for being "restrictive of competition" 11/02/2010 MobileBurn Text View Clip
Google Sues US Government For Favouring Microsoft 11/02/2010 ITProPortal.com Text View Clip
Google Sues US Government For Favouring Microsoft 11/02/2010 ITProPortal.com Text View Clip
Google sues US government over tech contract bidding 11/02/2010 ZDNet UK Text View Clip
Google sues US govt for favouring Microsoft over Google Apps 11/02/2010 Total Telecom Text View Clip
KGO PROF. DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL 11/02/2010 WLOX 5 O'Clock Show - WLOX-TV Text
Man bites dog? Google sues the government 11/02/2010 Lucianne.com Text View Clip
Man bites dog? Google sues US govt 11/02/2010 ZDNet Asia Text View Clip
Oracle - SAP Testimony Nears; HP CEO In Spotlight 11/02/2010 New York Times - Online Text View Clip
Oracle finally gets SAP to trial, and maybe HP CEO 11/02/2010 Yahoo! India Text View Clip
Oracle Finally Gets SAP To Trial, And Maybe HP CEO 11/02/2010 Post Chronicle, The Text View Clip
Oracle, SAP testimony begins 11/02/2010 IT Web Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP battle; HP CEO in spotlight 11/02/2010 Times of India Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight 11/02/2010 Creative Mac Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight-UPDATE 2 11/02/2010 Forexyard.com - Online Text View Clip
Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School 11/02/2010 9 News at 5 PM - WCPO-TV Text
Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School 11/02/2010 9 News at 5 PM - WCPO-TV Text
Santa Clara's Team California Wins Third Place in the 2009 Solar Decathlon 11/02/2010 JesuitUSA News Text View Clip
Silicon Valley giants set to fight it out in court 11/02/2010 Qatar Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Sleeping With the Stereo On 11/02/2010 ASU Web Devil Text View Clip
Supreme Court to hear arguments on video game law 11/02/2010 ABC Local - Online Text View Clip
When faculty meets felony 11/02/2010 FT.com Text View Clip
Bailouts deserve blame for stalling market's natural selection process 11/01/2010 Centre Daily Times - Online Text View Clip
Bailouts deserve blame for stalling market's natural selection process 11/01/2010 Centre Daily Times Text
Brown's Secret Weapon: Independent Cash 11/01/2010 Bay Citizen, The Text View Clip
City blight? There s an app store for that 11/01/2010 Tri-Valley Herald Text View Clip
City blight? There s an app store for that 11/01/2010 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
COMMUNITY NEWS: NCT, Monday Nov. 1 11/01/2010 North County Times - Online Text View Clip
Editor's Note 11/01/2010 California Lawyer Text View Clip
EthicsWatch: Analysis: US alien tort law - A sword of international law blunted 11/01/2010 Ethical Corporation Online Text View Clip
Google Sues Interior Department Over Email Contract 11/01/2010 Wall Street Journal Text View Clip
Google Sues U.S. For Favoring Microsoft Over Google Apps 11/01/2010 SmartMoney - Online Text View Clip
Google Sues U.S. For Favoring Microsoft Over Google Apps 11/01/2010 NASDAQ Text View Clip
Google Sues U.S. For Favoring Microsoft Over Google Apps 11/01/2010 ADVFN India Text View Clip
Google Sues U.S. For Favoring Microsoft Over Google Apps 11/01/2010 NASDAQ Text View Clip
Google Sues U.S. For Favoring Microsoft Over Google Apps 11/01/2010 Capital.gr Text View Clip
Google Sues Uncle Sam 11/01/2010 CBSNews.com Text View Clip
Howard Charney; entrepreneur, innovator, IT pace setter 11/01/2010 Smartbiz Africa Text View Clip
Jackson learns PI lesson 11/01/2010 Morgan Hill Times Text View Clip
Man bites dog? Google sues the government 11/01/2010 CNET News.com Text View Clip
Man bites dog? Google sues the government 11/01/2010 CNET.com - New York Bureau Text View Clip
Michelle Obama: America's Got Talent 11/01/2010 Harper's Bazaar Text View Clip
Oracle finally gets SAP to trial, and maybe HP CEO 11/01/2010 International Business Times Text View Clip
Oracle Finally Gets SAP to Trial, and Maybe HP CEO 11/01/2010 Bank Systems & Technology Text View Clip
Oracle Finally Gets SAP to Trial, and Maybe HP CEO 11/01/2010 Financial Technology Network Text View Clip
Oracle finally gets SAP to trial, and maybe HP CEO 11/01/2010 Reuters - Online Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears 11/01/2010 EuroInvestor.co.uk Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears 11/01/2010 Interactive Investor Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears 11/01/2010 Yahoo! UK and Ireland Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears, HP CEO might appear 11/01/2010 Yahoo! News Australia Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears, HP CEO might appear 11/01/2010 International Business Times Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears, HP CEO might appear 11/01/2010 CNBC - Online Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears, HP CEO might appear 11/01/2010 International Business Times UK Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight 11/01/2010 Yahoo! News Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight 11/01/2010 Digital Producer Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight 11/01/2010 MSN Money (US) Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight 11/01/2010 Digital Animators Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight 11/01/2010 AnimationArtist.com Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO might appear 11/01/2010 Yahoo! India Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP exec might appear 11/01/2010 Business Spectator, The Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP exec might appear 11/01/2010 Business Spectator Text View Clip
Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP exec might appear 11/01/2010 Business Spectator Text View Clip
SAP testimony nears; HP CEO might appear - Reuters 11/01/2010 Guardian.co.uk Text View Clip
Sparks to fly in Silicon Valley's mega-trial 11/01/2010 Financial Post - Online Text View Clip
Sparks to fly in Silicon Valley's mega-trial 11/01/2010 National Post - Online Text View Clip
Supreme Court to hear arguments on video game law 11/01/2010 ABC 7 Morning News at 5 AM - KGO-TV Text View Clip
The People's Lawyers Open For Business 11/01/2010 California Lawyer Text View Clip
THIS PRO GROWERS AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL SPECIALIZES IN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. 11/01/2010 ABC 7 News at 6 PM- KGO-TV Text
THIS PRO GROWERS AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL SPECIALIZES IN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. 11/01/2010 ABC 7 News at 6 PM- KGO-TV Text
UPDATE:Google Sues US Government For Favoring Microsoft Over Google Apps 11/01/2010 SmartMoney - Online Text View Clip
UPDATE:Google Sues US Government For Favoring Microsoft Over Google Apps 11/01/2010 NASDAQ Text View Clip
UPDATE:Google Sues US Government For Favoring Microsoft Over Google Apps 11/01/2010 Capital.gr Text View Clip
City blight? There s an app store for that 10/31/2010 Tri-Valley Herald Text
City blight? There s an app store for that 10/31/2010 San Mateo County Times Text
City blight? There s an app store for that 10/31/2010 Oakland Tribune Text
City blight? There s an app store for that 10/31/2010 Daily Review, The Text
City blight? There s an app store for that 10/31/2010 Argus, The Text
City blight? There s an app store for that 10/31/2010 Alameda Times-Star Text
Halloween is great fun but what comes afterwards is where the action is for spiritual and ethical growth and development 10/31/2010 Psychology Today - Online Text View Clip
Mercury News interview: Jeffrey Pfeffer, author and Stanford management professor 10/31/2010 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Older and wiser, Brown proudly embraces his father's legacy 10/31/2010 Los Angeles Times - Online Text View Clip
The Chimera of Small Stock Outperformance: Market Anomaly or Investor Self-Deception? (36) 10/31/2010 Journal of Investing Text View Clip
Meeting Teilhard de Chardin: 10-30/31-10 10/30/2010 Kansas City Star - Online Text View Clip
Mercury News interview: Jeffrey Pfeffer, author and Stanford management professor 10/30/2010 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Mercury News interview: Jeffrey Pfeffer, author and Stanford management professor 10/30/2010 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
SAP narrows scope of trial, Oracle seeks delay 10/30/2010 Reuters India Text View Clip
Smart work 10/30/2010 The Economist - Online Text View Clip
The aftershocks of crime 10/30/2010 The Economist - Online Text View Clip
Development of Santa Clara U. Student Housing Under Way 10/29/2010 Multi-Housing News - Online Text View Clip
FOR THOSE COUNTRIES, WHEN THEY VACATION, THEY COME [INDISCERNIBLE ] THEY ARE COMING [ INDISCERNIBLE ] Reporter: SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY ORGANIZED THE SCREENING ON CAMPUS. 10/29/2010 CBS 5 Eyewitness News at 5 PM - KPIX-TV Text
FOR THOSE COUNTRIES, WHEN THEY VACATION, THEY COME [INDISCERNIBLE ] THEY ARE COMING [ INDISCERNIBLE ] Reporter: SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY ORGANIZED THE SCREENING ON CAMPUS. 10/29/2010 CBS 5 Eyewitness News at 5 PM - KPIX-TV Text
GSK Claims Largest Rooftop Solar Array in North America 10/29/2010 Environmental Leader Text View Clip
Michelle Rhee Bids Farewell to D.C. 10/29/2010 Good Magazine Text View Clip
Nevada Case Highlights Newspaper Copyright Infringement Claims 10/29/2010 Suite101.com Text View Clip
No Excuses, Mr. President 10/29/2010 Inside Higher Ed Text View Clip
Santa Clara University and Sobrato turn office site into student-housing complex 10/29/2010 Business Review - Online Text View Clip
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Agence France-Presse: "All Your Twitpics Are Belong to Us" | View Clip
11/10/2010
ReadWriteWeb

Twitter and Twitpic, a photographer has in effect granted a license to anyone who would like to use those photos.

In a court case currently before the Southern District of New York, AFP claims that Twitter's

recent clarification of its trademark rights gives anyone the right to use material that is published to the microblogging service. If the rationale sounds counter-intuitive to you, you are not alone.

Daniel Morel, a photographer who worked in Haiti, posted some of his photos to Twitter via the photo service Twitpic. Another Twitter user, Lisandro Suero, user copied the photos and offered them for use. AFP used the photos and furthermore used the photography licensing firm

Getty Images to resell them. AFP and Suero were credited for the images in use by a number of other news organizations.

According to the Eric Goldman, associate professor of law at Santa Clara University, on his

Technology and Marketing Law Blog, after Morel began sending cease-and-desist letters, AFP filed a "declaratory judgment action " against the photographer, "asserting commercial defamation and seeking a declaration of non-infringement." The basis? The Twitter terms of service give AFP the right to publish photographs it finds there! Part of this TOS says that Twitter can share material with its partners. AFP is attempting to interpret this as anyone who uses Twitter is a partner and can use the material. That does not seem to be even the spirit of the statement, much less the letter. AFP's case seems in part a misunderstanding of the notion of social media. If I retweet a photo from one Twitter user to my Twitter account, that is far from the same thing as a for-profit media company taking the photo off the ecosystem and thereupon claiming ownership of it.

Twitter's clarification as the ability of unrelated third-parties to help themselves to users' material is pretty clear.

Don't:
Use screenshots of other people's profiles or Tweets without their permission . . .
Print Tweets without permission from the author.

"No one, said Goldman, "would reasonably think that content shared within the Twitter ecosystem is fair game, particularly for use outside the Twitter ecosystem."

This act and the subsequent back-and-forth lawsuits illustrate the disconnect between social media users and their expectations with those outside of that system. The ethos and mores of teh two groups continue to clash and will for some time.

For a much more detailed discussion of the legal issues surrounding this case, see

Agence France-Presse Claims Twitter's Terms of Use Authorize Its Use of Photographs Posted to TwitPic -- Agence France-Presse v. Morel

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GEORGE MOELLER, A 29-YEAR-OLD FIRST YEAR MATH PROFESSOR AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY.
11/10/2010
CBS 5 Eyewitness News At 11 PM - KPIX-TV

POLICE OFFICERS WILL START TO USE MATH TO FIGHT CRIME. IT IS BEING TESTED FOR THE FIRST TIME RIGHT HERE IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. KIET DO INTRODUCES US TO THE TEACHER SHOWING POLICE HOW TO CATCH BAD GUYS USING NUMBERS. Reporter: IT IS ANOTHER BUSY NIGHT WHERE POLICE OFFICERS EVERYWHERE ARE DOING MORE WITH LESS. HERE IN SANTA CRUZ THE CITY'S 90 COPS HANDLE ON AVERAGE 86,000 CALLS FOR SERVICE A YEAR. BUT WITH POLICE PAY CUTS AND POSSIBLE LAYOFFS, WHAT THIS CITY NEEDS IS A NEW KIND OF CRIME FIGHTER. BY MYSELF I DON'T KNOW A LOT ABOUT FIGHTING CRIMES. Reporter: MEET DR. GEORGE MOELLER, A 29-YEAR-OLD FIRST YEAR MATH PROFESSOR AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY. HE IS A LEADING RESEARCHER OF SO-CALLED PREDICTIVE POLICING BASED ON THE BELIEF THAT CROOKS ARE JUST THAT, PREDICTABLE. WE ARE CREATURES OF HABIT AND THAT'S WHAT THE CRIME DATA SHOWS IS THAT MUCH OF CRIME CAN BE BOILED DOWN TO ROUTINE ACTIVITIES. Reporter: MOELLER DISCOVERED THE SAME ALGORITHM SEISMOLO GISTS USED. HE PLUGGED IN SEVERAL YEARS WORTH OF OLD BURGLARY DATA FROM LOS ANGELES INTO HIS COMPUTER MODEL AND COMPARED HIS CRIME PREDICTIONS TO THE CRIMES THAT ACTUALLY HAPPENED AND THE RESULTS WERE PROMISING. AND IT MATCHED UP? AND IT DOES QUITE A BIT BETTER THAN WHAT PEOPLE ARE CURRENTLY USING. Reporter: NOW WHEN A NEW BURGLARY IS REPORTED HIS MODEL DELIVERS A DAILY FORECAST OF WHEN AND WHERE A CRIME IS LIKELY TO HAPPEN, THE AREAS IN RED DOWN TO SPECIFIC NEIGHBORHOODS OR STREET CORNERS. HOPEFULLY WE CAN SAVE POLICE DEPARTMENTS MONEY AND ALSO IMPROVE THEIR EFFECTIVENESS AT PREVENTING CRIME WHICH IS OUR ULTIMATE GOAL. Reporter: THE SANTA CRUZ POLICE DEPARTMENT IS NOW GATHERING PAGES OF CRIME DATA TO RUN THROUGH THE MODEL AND WILL BE THE FIRST AT NORTHERN CALIFORNIA TO DEPLOY OFFICERS BASED ON THE FORECAST. IS THIS THE FUTURE OF POLICING? I THINK THAT THIS REALLY IS AN IMPORTANT AND ESSENTIAL WAVE OF POLICING. I CAN'T SEE A SITUATION WHERE LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY BUDGETS AND SIZE AND PERSONNEL WILL BE ABLE TO GROW IN THE NEAR FUTURE. Reporter: WILL IT WORK? WE WILL HAVE TO WAIT AND SEE. BUT IN THIS ECONOMY, IT IS ALL ABOUT CATCHING MORE BAD GUYS WITH FEWER GOOD GUYS. IN SANTA CRUZ, KIET DO, CBS5.

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Local couple awards law prize to Iranian human-rights lawyer | View Clip
11/10/2010
Los Altos Town Crier

Written by Town Crier Report

Iranian human-rights lawyer Shadi Sadr is scheduled to receive the 2010 Katherine and George Alexander Law Prize 7 p.m. Thursday in the Performing Arts Center Recital Hall at Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara.

Santa Clara University awards the annual prize, endowed by the Alexanders, longtime Los Altos Hills residents, to someone who has worked to correct injustice in a significant manner anywhere in the world.

Sadr will address the circumstances faced by women and others under the current Iranian government.

Arrested several times, beaten and imprisoned for her efforts, Sadr has risked her life to protect the human rights of women activists and journalists in Iran. She was convicted in absentia May 17 in a Tehran court for acting against national security and harming public order and was sentenced to six years in prison with 74 lashes. She currently resides in Germany.

By establishing different agencies, such as End Stoning Forever, Sadr has touched the lives of thousands. She founded the Web site Women in Iran and directed Raahi, a legal center for women.

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MEET THIS WIRING 29 YEAR-OLD FIRST-YEAR MATH PROFESSOR AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY.
11/10/2010
CBS 13 News at 10 PM - KOVR-TV

FIREFIGHTERS CREWS RESPONDED AND CAP THE LEAK. ALSO IN THE BAY AREA, HEALTH OFFICIALS HAVE DOWNGRADED A SHELTER IN PLACE WARNING FOR RESIDENTS BECAUSE OF THE AIR QUALITY BEING SO BAD EARLIER. HUGE FLAMES AND BLACK SMOKE BILLOWING FROM A BURNED AT THE REFINERY THERE. IT TURNS OUT THAT THE REFINERY ACTUALLY LOST POWER CAUSING OFFENSE TO FLARE UP MORE THAN USUAL IN COULD BE SEEN IN THE SKY FOR MILES AWAY. THAT MISSILE MYSTERY HAS BEEN SOLVED, SORT OF. BELIEVE IT OR NOT, A COMPENSATION TRAIL CAUSED BY A PLANE IS WHAT IS BEHIND THE VIDEO. A CBS PHOTOGRAPHER CAPTURED THE IMAGE SHOWING A PLUME OF SMOKE HEADING INTO SPACE. AND EXPERTS SAID THAT HE KNEW THIS WAS AN AIRPLANE IMMEDIATELY SAYING, TO BE SURE, YOU NEED TO LOOK AT THE TRAIL FROM THE SIDE, INCLUDING THE ONE THAT MADE HEADLINES ON NEW YEAR'S EVE. THE SAME TRAIL THAT LOOKS LIKE A ROCKET BUT FROM THE SIDE IT JUST LOOKS LIKE AN AIRPLANE PASSING BY. HE SAID THE MISSILE MYSTERY IS MORE THAN LIKELY IS A USAIR FLIGHT FROM HAWAII TO PHOENIX. POLICE DEPARTMENTS USE EVERY TOOL TO TRACK DOWN CRIMINALS AND ONE DAY EVERY A FORCE HAS TURNED TO HYPOTHESIS TO HELP THEM. HERE IS THE FORMULA A MATH PROFESSOR SAYS ACTUALLY WORKS. ANOTHER BUSY NIGHT WHERE POLICE OFFICERS EVERYWHERE ARE DOING MORE WITH LESS. HERE IN SANTA CRUZ AND THE CITY'S 90 OFFICERS HANDLE ON AVERAGE 86,000 CALLS FOR SERVICE PER YEAR. BUT WITH POLICE PAY CUTS AND POSSIBLE LAYOFFS, WHAT THIS CITY NEEDS IS A NEW KIND OF CRIME FIGHTER. BY MYSELF, DO NOT KNOW A WHOLE LOT ABOUT FIGHTING CRIME. MEET THIS WIRING 29 YEAR-OLD FIRST-YEAR MATH PROFESSOR AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY. HE IS A LEADING RESEARCHER OF PREDICTIVE POLICING. BASED ON THE BELIEF THAT CRIMINALS ARE JUST THAT, PREDICTABLE. WE ARE CREATURES OF HABIT AND THAT IS WHAT THE CRIME DATA SHOWS, IT SHOWS THAT MUCH OF THE CRIME CAN BE BOILED DOWN TO ROUTINE ACTIVITIES. HE DISCOVERED THE SAME ALGORITHM THAT SEISMOLOGISTS USE TO PREDICT AFTERSHOCKS OF EARTHQUAKES WORK PRETTY WELL TO PREDICT AFTERSHOCKS OF CRIME, TO TEST HIS THEORY HE PLANNED IN SEVERAL YEARS OF OLD BREWERY DATA FROM LOS ANGELES INTO HIS COMPUTER MODEL. HE THEN COMPARED HIS PREDICTIONS TO THE CRIMES THAT ACTUALLY HAPPENED AND THE RESULTS WERE PROMISING. THEY MATCHED UP? IT DOES QUITE A BIT BETTER THAN WHAT PEOPLE CURRENTLY ARE USING. NOW WHEN A NEW BURGLARY AS REPORTED, HIS MODEL DELIVERS A DAILY FORECAST OF WHEN AND WHERE A CRIME IS LIKELY TO HAPPEN. THE AREAS IN RED, DOWN TO SPECIFICS RECORDERS OR NEIGHBORHOODS. HOPEFULLY WE CAN SAVE POLICE DEPARTMENT'S MONEY AND IMPROVE THEIR EFFECTIVENESS AT PREVENTING CRIME WHICH IS THE ULTIMATE GOAL. THE SANTA CRUZ POLICE DEPARTMENT IS NOW GATHERING PAGES OF DATA TO RUN THROUGH THAT MODEL AND THEY WILL BE THE FIRST IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA TO DEPLOY OFFICERS BASED ON THAT FORECAST. IS THIS THE FUTURE OF POLICING? I THINK THAT THIS REALLY IS AN IMPORTANT AND ESSENTIAL WAY OF POLICING. I CAN SEE A SITUATION WHERE LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY BUDGETS AND SIZE AND PERSONNEL ARE GROWING IN THE NEAR FUTURE. WILL THIS WORK? WE WILL HAVE TO WAIT AND SEE, BUT IN THIS ECONOMY IT IS MORE ABOUT CATCHING MORE BAD GUYS WITH YOUR GOOD GUYS. THE SANTA CRUZ POLICE DEPARTMENT WILL START USING THAT PREDICTIVE POLICING IN JUST A FEW WEEKS. NEW INFORMATION ON THE MN BOMB PLOT THAT SHOWS ONE OF THE BONDS AND WAS INTERCEPTED IN ENGLAND LAST MONTH COULD HAVE EXPLODED OVER THE EAST COAST OF THE UNITED STATES. THE DEVICE WAS SET TO DETONATE AT 5:30 AM AND AT THAT TIME THE FLIGHT WAS ACTUALLY OVER CANADA AND DID NOT ENTER USAEROSPACE UNTIL ABOUT 6:00 A. M, AUTHORITIES HAVE SAID THAT THEY ONLY NARROWLY THWARTED THIS TERROR PLOT. NEW TONIGHT, THE TEENAGER KNOWN AS THE BAREFOOT BAND HAS BEEN INDICTED BY A FEDERAL GRAND JURY IN SEATTLE. THE US ATTORNEY'S OFFICE SAID THAT HE COMMITTED A TWO-YEAR STRING OF THEFTS FROM WASHINGTON STATE ALL THE WAY TO THE CARIBBEAN. HE WAS ARRESTED IN JULY AFTER AUTHORITIES SAY THAT HE CRASHED A SMALL PLANE THAT HE HAD STOLEN IN THE BAHAMAS. LAKE TAHOE APPEARS TO BE SEEING A TURNAROUND. SKI RESORTS SAY THAT EARLY SEASON BOOKINGS ARE SKYROCKETING, THEY SAY DECEMBER RESERVATIONS ARE UP 22% FROM LAST YEAR. HOME OF THE BUSINESSES ALSO ARE SEEING AN INCREASE IN THEIR FOCUS WHICH ARE UP 15% BUT PROFITS COULD STILL BE DOWN THIS SEASON BECAUSE OF LOWER RATES. YOU MIGHT WANT TO DUST OFF YOUR SKIS AND SNOWBOARDS BECAUSE LAKE TAHOE SKI RESORTS WILL BE UP AND RUNNING IN THE NEXT COUPLE OF WEEKS. THE KING'S HONOR THE VETERANS EARLY TONIGHT, GIVING A CAR TO A SOLDIER WHO HIT HIS FREE THROW AT HALFTIME.

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On Google's 10 Percent Pay Hike . . . And Antitrust Law - Law Blog - WSJ | View Clip
11/10/2010
Law Blog - Wall Street Journal Blogs

WASHINGTON - Just six weeks after Google and five other technology firms agreed to scrap secret no-poaching agreements to avoid a Justice Department antitrust suit, the company has given all its employees a 10% pay rise to stop them from jumping ship.

Was it a coincidence, or should Google employees be sending Attorney General Eric Holder a giant thank you card? That's the question being asked by some tech-watchers on the west coast and antitrust lawyers in D.C.

"I'm not sure about causation, but the correlation between the end of the no-poaching agreement and a large voluntary raise is striking," said Eric Goldman, director of the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University.

Google isn't saying whether its big raise was related to the end of the do-not-poach agreements. "While we don't typically comment on internal matters, we do believe that competitive compensation plans are important to the future of the company." a company spokesman said.

The answer is more than just academic. Some lawyers say it could have a major impact on any private lawsuits brought by employees of the companies that maintained the no-poach agreements: Google, Apple, Intel, Adobe Systems, Intuit and Walt Disney unit Pixar Animation.

If you buy that the two events are related, the thinking goes, then Google has effectively put a figure on the size of the damages caused by the alleged "cartel." And that's likely to be a big figure, with estimates of its cost ranging from

$1 billion a year.

It wouldn't take much for an enterprising plaintiffs lawyer to argue the pay rise represents the amount the company would have had to pay in an unrestrained market for its most valuable commodity: talent.

During the year-long investigation, Google and other technology companies argued to the Justice Department that the no-poaching agreement was necessary if companies were to be able to work together without fear of losing their best employees.

In the settlement, the Justice Department said that no-poach agreements were OK if they were confined to areas of collaboration like joint ventures. But it argued that blanket agreements putting all workers at a rival off limits to recruiters was just a way to hold down compensation.

Google said at the time: "While there's no evidence that our policy hindered hiring or affected wages, we abandoned our "no cold calling" policy in late 2009 once the Justice Department raised concerns, and are happy to continue with this approach as part of this settlement."

Of course, Google would have some strong arguments in any court case, one of the reasons why plaintiffs lawyers haven't filed suit yet. Most people saw its latest pay adjustment as coming in response to a threat from Facebook, which has been hiring away large numbers of its top executives and employees. Yet Google never maintained a no-poaching agreement with Facebook.

Plaintiffs would doubtless respond that the settlement ramps up the pressure on Google to retain its workers regardless. Whereas Google previously had to worry about Facebook, now it has to worry about five other big competitors head-hunting its software engineers and executives.

Good to know someone's doing ok in this economy.

The Wall Street Journal's Law Blog covers the notable legal cases, trends and personalities of interest to the business community. Ashby Jones is the lead writer of the blog, which includes contributions from reporters of the WSJ's Law Bureau, led by Joanna Chung. Ashby, who has covered the legal and business worlds for over a decade as a journalist, has also worked as a litigator at a law firm and clerked for a federal judge. Have a comment or tip? Write to

Also on WSJ Blogs

KOREA REAL TIME Letter of Apology: Nakayama Says 'Sorry' for Gaffe Against Women

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Pizarro: Former Milpitas Mayor to lead San Jose's Veterans Day Parade | View Clip
11/10/2010
SiliconValley.com

San Jose's 92nd annual Veterans Day parade kicks off Thursday with an 11 a.m. opening ceremony downtown at Plaza de Cesar Chavez.

The parade, which begins at noon, starts at Highway 87 and East Santa Clara Street and will wind its way south on Market Street to San Carlos Street.

This year's grand marshal is former Milpitas Mayor Denny Weisgerber. He was a staff sergeant with the U.S. Marine Corps and served in Korea, where he received the Purple Heart and the Navy Cross.

You can listen to him tell his story, "No Marine Left Behind," at Digital Clubhouse Network's "Stories of Service" site (www.digiclub.org/sofs).

Originally from Idaho, Weisgerber moved with his wife, Marianne, to California in 1957. There he had a key role to help keep Milpitas from merging with San Jose in the early 1960s.

People certainly took notice of him after that. He spent 12 years on the Milpitas City Council in the 1960s and early '70s, including a couple of stints as mayor.

GROWING TRIBUTE: Canopy, the urban forestry nonprofit group, will commemorate the holiday Thursday by planting 12 trees at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System division in Menlo Park.

Silicon Valley veterans will be helping with the planting, which will start at 2 p.m.

A big salute to Marine Corps veteran and Canopy advisory board member James F. Cook Advertisementand Canopy Executive Director Catherine Martineau for helping beautify a place where vets spend a lot of time.

HONORED: Iranian human-rights lawyer Shadi Sadr will receive the Katherine and George Alexander Law Prize from Santa Clara University on Thursday night.

"We take for granted that our legal system is designed to protect us from arbitrary, capricious or vengeful treatment at the hands of authorities," Santa Clara Law Dean Donald Polden said. "What we honor in Ms. Sadr is her ceaseless, valiant and sometimes terrifying battle to bring this sort of justice to Iranian women."

It hasn't made her popular with the government, though.

In May, she was convicted in absentia by a Tehran court for "harming public order" and sentenced to six years in prison with 74 lashes. Fortunately, she had already escaped to Germany.

Her journey to Santa Clara hasn't been easy, either. The award ceremony and lecture originally had been set for late September, but it was postponed when Sadr couldn't obtain a travel visa in time.

Got a tip? Call Sal Pizarro at 408-627-0940 or e-mail him at spizarro@mercurynews.com.

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Pop!Tech Fellows Focus on Development Through Enterprise | Blog | NextBillion.net | Development through Enterprise | View Clip
11/10/2010
Development through Enterprise

Rob Katz

September 18, 2008 - 11:36 am

Pop!Tech Fellows Focus on Development Through Enterprise

Andrew Zolli is at it again. On Tuesday, Zolli's Pop!Tech announced its inaugural class of Social Innovation Fellows . Biased as I am towards all things "base of the pyramid", I immediately browsed through the list of Fellows with my BoP filter on. By my count, 7 of the 16 fellows fall under the BoP umbrella, meaning that they use market-based approaches to solve the problems of poverty. Nice!

I have a bit of a history with Pop!Tech, having been invited by Andrew and his team to live-blog the event last year. If Pop!Tech puts even half as much effort into this Social Innovation Fellows program as it does the conference, then it's bound to succeed.

Already, the signs point to go - just look at the program's (top-notch) , design-for-the-poor guru and founder of International Development Enterprises , Director of the Global Social Benefit Incubator at Santa Clara University Clare Miller, Founder and CEO of the Nonprofit Finance Fund , Founder of Geekcorps and Global Voices and a Berkman Fellow at Harvard The list goes on...but these are the highlights in my mind. What social innovator WOULDN'T learn from this group?

Of course, the Fellows themselves are nothing to sneeze at. They include folks we've talked about here on NextBillion, like PharmaSecure, a for-profit developing a cell phone-based authentication mechanism enabling healthcare professionals and consumers to easily confirm the validity of purchased drugs; Husk Power Systems, another for-profit that has created a proprietary technology to cost-effectively convert rice husks into electricity in India; Mobile Metrix, which employs low-income demographers to collect critical market research data about the BoP. As the co-author of a market research report myself, I think this is an amazingly cool and critical project; The other Pop!Tech Fellows are doing great stuff, of course, but this is what falls into my development-through-enterprise bucket. For more about the program, check out It doesn't look like I'm going to make it to Camden this year, but if you are and would like to chime in about the conference or the Fellows program, drop me a note. And enjoy Camden! If you haven't booked a hotel yet, do check out the Camden Riverhouse - the staff is fantastic, they have great rooms with WiFi and common areas to relax in post-conference. They'll also help you find the hiking trail up
Is BOP-fatigue setting in?

Erik Hershman is a genius and certainly deserves this recognition. I have never really understood Ken Banks work though. FrontlineSMS feels like an overmarketed redundancy. Even a standard carrier-VAS platform can outpace it at a fraction of the cost. Its popularity is felt more in the elite blogs than at the grassroots. Pharmasecure feels lik an unstable hack of kezzler and mpedigree. Just hearing of Melanie Edwards and Husk Power. Poptech bests Ted and NetImpact in relevance though.

Elaboration

As a general rule, elite blogs are fond of relying too much on the testimony of people who belong to a certain 'clique' - usually from certain leafy colleges on either coast. There is little debate and a lot of back-patting and group-think. Elsewhere in the blogosphere there is a greater sense of doubt about development models of all kinds.

Please do an extensive review of Ken Banks' work. I dont doubt his intentions are genuine and that his commitment is real. But the results are thin. Its profile here:
http://event.stockholmchallenge.se/project/2008/Public-Administration/FrontlineSMS-Text-Messaging-Hub-Grassroots-NGO-Community seriously exaggerate its familiarity with practitioners in most of the countries mentioned. In Nigeria and Zimbabwe where I have some considerable exposure it is barely the tool of choice for large-scale communication work by the organisations doing the heavy lifting (neiti, ghon, era, the myriad of ethnic community based solidarity groups etc).
To add a new comment, submit or cancel your comment reply.
To add a new comment, submit or cancel your comment reply.

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SCU Professor George Mohler Uses Math to Predict Crime | View Clip
11/10/2010
KNTV-TV

Santa Clara University Mathematics and Computer Science Professor George Mohler discusses how he was able to predict when and where waves of crime take place following the initial crime, such as a burglary or gang violence.

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SCU Professor George Mohler Uses Math to Predict Crime
11/10/2010
KPIX-TV

Santa Clara University Mathematics and Computer Science Professor George Mohler discusses how he was able to predict when and where waves of crime take place following the initial crime, such as a burglary or gang violence.

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Should Google Workers Thank Justice Department for Raise? | View Clip
11/10/2010
Law Blog - Wall Street Journal Blogs

Just six weeks after Google and five other technology firms agreed to scrap secret no-poaching agreements to avoid a Justice Department antitrust suit, the company has given all its employees a 10% pay raise to stop them from jumping ship.

Was it a coincidence, or should Google employees be sending Attorney General Eric Holder a giant thank you card? That?€?s the question being asked by some tech-watchers on the West Coast and antitrust lawyers in D.C.

?€?I'm not sure about causation, but the correlation between the end of the no-poaching agreement and a large voluntary raise is striking,?€? said Eric Goldman, director of the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University.

Google isn?€?t saying whether its big raise was related to the end of the do-not-poach agreements. ?€?While we don?€?t typically comment on internal matters, we do believe that competitive compensation plans are important to the future of the company,?€? a company spokesman said.

The answer is more than just academic. Some lawyers say it could have a major impact on any private lawsuits brought by employees of the companies that maintained the no-poach agreements: Google Inc., Apple Inc., Intel Corp., Adobe Systems Inc., Intuit Inc. and Walt Disney Co. unit Pixar Animation.

If you buy that the two events are related, the thinking goes, then Google has effectively put a figure on the size of the damages caused by the alleged ?€?cartel.?€? And that?€?s likely to be a big figure, with estimates of its cost ranging from $400 million to north of $1 billion a year.

It wouldn?€?t take much for an enterprising plaintiffs lawyer to argue the pay increase represents the amount the company would have had to pay in an unrestrained market for its most valuable commodity: talent.

During the year-long investigation, Google and other technology companies argued to the Justice Department that the no-poaching agreement was necessary if companies were to be able to work together without fear of losing their best employees.

In the settlement, the Justice Department said that no-poach agreements were OK if they were confined to areas of collaboration like joint ventures. But it argued that blanket agreements putting all workers at a rival off limits to recruiters was just a way to hold down compensation.

Google said at the time: ?€?While there?€?s no evidence that our policy hindered hiring or affected wages, we abandoned our ‘no cold calling' policy in late 2009 once the Justice Department raised concerns, and are happy to continue with this approach as part of this settlement.?€?

Of course, Google would have some strong arguments in any court case, one of the reasons why plaintiffs lawyers haven?€?t filed suit yet. Most people saw its latest pay adjustment as coming in response to a threat from Facebook Inc., which has been hiring away large numbers of its top executives and employees. Yet Google never maintained a no-poaching agreement with Facebook.

Plaintiffs would doubtless respond that the settlement ramps up the pressure on Google to retain its workers regardless. Whereas Google previously had to worry about Facebook, now it has to worry about five other big competitors head-hunting its software engineers and executives.

Good to know someone?€?s doing OK in this economy.

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Should Google Workers Thank Justice Department for Raise? - Digits - WSJ | View Clip
11/10/2010
Digits - Wall Street Journal Blogs

By Thomas Catan

Just six weeks after Google and five other technology firms agreed to scrap secret

Was it a coincidence, or should Google employees be sending Attorney General Eric Holder a giant thank you card? That's the question being asked by some tech-watchers on the West Coast and antitrust lawyers in D.C.

"I'm not sure about causation, but the correlation between the end of the no-poaching agreement and a large voluntary raise is striking," said Eric Goldman, director of the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University.

Google isn't saying whether its big raise was related to the end of the do-not-poach agreements. "While we don't typically comment on internal matters, we do believe that competitive compensation plans are important to the future of the company," a company spokesman said.

The answer is more than just academic. Some lawyers say it could have a major impact on any private lawsuits brought by employees of the companies that maintained the no-poach agreements: Google Inc., Apple Inc., Intel Corp., Adobe Systems Inc., Intuit Inc. and Walt Disney Co. unit Pixar Animation.

If you buy that the two events are related, the thinking goes, then Google has effectively put a figure on the size of the damages caused by the alleged "cartel." And that's likely to be a big figure, with estimates of its cost ranging from

$1 billion a year.

It wouldn't take much for an enterprising plaintiffs lawyer to argue the pay increase represents the amount the company would have had to pay in an unrestrained market for its most valuable commodity: talent.

During the year-long investigation, Google and other technology companies argued to the Justice Department that the no-poaching agreement was necessary if companies were to be able to work together without fear of losing their best employees.

In the settlement, the Justice Department said that no-poach agreements were OK if they were confined to areas of collaboration like joint ventures. But it argued that blanket agreements putting all workers at a rival off limits to recruiters was just a way to hold down compensation.

Google said at the time: "While there's no evidence that our policy hindered hiring or affected wages, we abandoned our 'no cold calling' policy in late 2009 once the Justice Department raised concerns, and are happy to continue with this approach as part of this settlement."

Of course, Google would have some strong arguments in any court case, one of the reasons why plaintiffs lawyers haven't filed suit yet. Most people saw its latest pay adjustment as coming in response to a threat from Facebook Inc., which has been hiring away large numbers of its top executives and employees. Yet Google never maintained a no-poaching agreement with Facebook.

Plaintiffs would doubtless respond that the settlement ramps up the pressure on Google to retain its workers regardless. Whereas Google previously had to worry about Facebook, now it has to worry about five other big competitors head-hunting its software engineers and executives.

Good to know someone's doing OK in this economy.

Also on WSJ Blogs
KOREA REAL TIME Letter of Apology: Nakayama Says 'Sorry' for Gaffe Against Women @WSJ: FCC investigating if Google's Street View broke federal laws against electronic eavesdropping SchatzWSJ (Amy Schatz)

"86.6% of readers taking a WSJ.com poll say they think the Google raises for employees was a good move for the company."

LaurenGoode (Lauren Goode)

"What does your digital camera say about you? Watch my live chat w/WSJ.com's Digits show from earlier today

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What Martha Stewart Can Teach Us About Portfolio Arrangements | View Clip
11/10/2010
Seeking Alpha

TV celebrity Martha Stewarts insider-trading trial in 2004 provides some interesting glimpses into her experiences as an investor. Meir Statman, a finance professor at Santa Clara University in California, takes a look in . Her Merrill Lynch account statement of December 20, 2001 was entered into evidence and shows 36 stocks and a money-market fund, worth $2,510,793 in total (dollar figures in U.S.). Twenty-three stocks had unrealized losses.

Portfolio loses half of value and she goes to jail

Statman traced Stewarts portfolio back to June 2000 and calculated its value at $4,530,730. Her portfolio had lost nearly half of its value over a span of about 18 months. Then, after she was convicted of insider trading, she spent several months in jail. I wouldnt be surprised if she has a rather low allocation to stocks now.

Indeed, in the days after December 20, 2001, Stewart sold off all but one of her losing stocks for tax purposes. Just took lots of huge losses to offset some gains, wrote Stewart in an e-mail to a friend. Made my stomach turn. Favoured with hot IPO stocks Stewarts losses arose even though she was on the privileged list of investors who were allocated hot IPO shares at their offering prices. IPO stocks bought included Charter Communication, Digex, Agilent, Palm, and others. Ms. Stewart would have been ahead if she had flipped her shares on their first trading day or even weeks afterward, writes Statman. But she waited and watched her gains turn into losses. For example, she bought Palm Inc. at the offering price of $38, watched it zoom to $95 on the first trading day only to sell it at $3.47 on December 21, 2001.

A most ridiculous sound like a lion roaring underwater

Martha Stewart was not kind to her brokers. An email from the brokers assistant reveals Martha yelled at me again today. In another email, he complained that she had hung up on him, adding that at one point she made the most ridiculous sound Ive heard coming from an adult in quite some time, kind of like a lion roaring underwater. Cognitive biases or lack of investment savy?

Statman describes several cognitive biases and emotions that interfered with Stewarts performance. Instead, I would see her case more as demonstrating a lack of investment knowledge.

It appears she was not very aware of the IPO cycle, as most good investment guides would have warned her about. And the ill treatment of her broker suggests she naively expected him to be a seer who could forecast market turns and get her out ahead of the downturns.

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Commentary: Media makes politics more divisive? It's a top of debate | View Clip
11/09/2010
San Jose Mercury News - Online

for Saratoga News

Updated: 11/08/2010 07:32:22 PM PST

MEDIA TO BLAME?: Whether the media has made politics more divisive was the proposition argued at the Foothill Club recently by the Santa Clara University debate team. Two students defended the statement, and two argued against it. The audience posted its opinion before and after the debate so that attitude changes could be measured.

At the beginning, 75 percent of the audience agreed and 25 percent disagreed. The judges named the con speakers the winners of the debate, calling their arguments more compelling than their opponents'. Judging the debate were lawyers Rick Pedersen and Jeff Schenk. Terri Cabrinha was chief arranger of the debate and Linda Callon, former Saratoga mayor, was moderator.

The examples the pro team used didn't carry sufficient weight, the judges said. The pros cited the story that Barack Obama was a Muslim and not a native of the U.S., rumors that didn't have the legs to support them: Most people dismissed it out of hand, Pedersen said. The pros argued that the Internet and other instant messages have reduced news to sound bites.

It all has legitimacy because it's in the airwaves. Such abbreviated information leads to snap judgments. We're moving from investigative news to opinion pieces: the news has stopped being informative and is now a political tool with extremists on either end, said the pro side.

The con team countered that response time is so fast these days that misinformation

can be refuted or amended almost immediately. The new speed can actually serve as a unifying force. The more news outlets the better, they argued. Such give and take strengthens the health of a democracy. With plenty of news sources, the result can be that we think of ourselves not as blue states or red states, but as united states.

The tallies at the conclusion of the debate showed that now 62 percent agreed and 37.5 disagreed, so more people switched to the con side than the reverse, evidently echoing the judges.

Well, that's something of a relief. Killing the messenger has never been a solution I found very comforting.

$5 MIL TO NURSING: The Valley Foundation, based in Los Gatos and dedicated to supporting health issues, has given a $5 million grant to the SJSU School of Nursing. The money will be used to create an endowment for long-term maintenance of the school and to provide a simulated nurses lab right now. Some 1,400 students are enrolled in the program, with 50 instructors.

Phillip Boyce, Valley Foundation chairman, said this gift "will impact the quality of care in doctors' offices, hospitals and health care facilities in our region and beyond." Boyce, of Saratoga, graduated from SJSU in '66 with a degree in business.

Valley Foundation was formed when Los Gatos Community Hospital was sold to become a for-profit institution. The money received from the sale created the foundation. The nursing school will be renamed Valley Foundation School of Nursing once official approval has been granted. Valley Foundation has given the school a total of $3.5 million in earlier years.

It is estimated that California will have a nursing shortage of 40,000 over the next decade.

LONGEVITY RECOGNIZED: Businesses that have served Saratoga for more than 35 years were honored at a recent city council meeting. These included Bob and Shirley Cancilleri, former owners of Saratoga Plaza Bakery; Connie Hillblom and Joan Mitchell, who have nurtured The Fat Robin for 38 years; Joseph and Michelle Masek, who have run La Mere Michelle for 37 years; and Tom Vandenhoogen of Little Amsterdam, also a 37-year owner.

MEMOIR: Los Gatan Betty Auchard will speak at the Saratoga Library Nov. 12 at 2 p.m. about her book, The Home for the Friendless: Finding Hope, Love and Family. The memoir recounts her hard-scrabble childhood, including time spent in an orphanage.

"In this poignant, humorous memoir, love conquers all and normal isn't always better," says the flier.

EARLY GIFTS: The Holiday Show at Gallery House in Palo Alto will hold a reception Nov. 19, 6-8 p.m. Theresa Robinson and Starr Davis are two Saratoga artists who show at this gallery. The exhibit runs Nov. 16-Dec. 24.

ODD COMBO: One of the more unusual pairings around is the alterations shop at the southern end of Big Basin. It's the French Tailor, and its owner is Helene Simone, who is of both French and Italian extraction. Simone does alterations and sells hot dogs. Sounds like repairs can be made and lunch consumed while you wait. Hold the mustard, though.

Got a tip for Saratoga Sampler? Send an e-mail to mac@impruve.com or call 408.540.7977.

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Commentary: Media makes politics more divisive? It's a top of debate | View Clip
11/09/2010
Saratoga News

MEDIA TO BLAME?: Whether the media has made politics more divisive was the proposition argued at the Foothill Club recently by the Santa Clara University debate team. Two students defended the statement, and two argued against it. The audience posted its opinion before and after the debate so that attitude changes could be measured.

At the beginning, 75 percent of the audience agreed and 25 percent disagreed. The judges named the con speakers the winners of the debate, calling their arguments more compelling than their opponents'. Judging the debate were lawyers Rick Pedersen and Jeff Schenk. Terri Cabrinha was chief arranger of the debate and Linda Callon, former Saratoga mayor, was moderator.

The examples the pro team used didn't carry sufficient weight, the judges said. The pros cited the story that Barack Obama was a Muslim and not a native of the U.S., rumors that didn't have the legs to support them: Most people dismissed it out of hand, Pedersen said. The pros argued that the Internet and other instant messages have reduced news to sound bites.

It all has legitimacy because it's in the airwaves. Such abbreviated information leads to snap judgments. We're moving from investigative news to opinion pieces: the news has stopped being informative and is now a political tool with extremists on either end, said the pro side.

The con team countered that response time is so fast these days that misinformation

can be refuted or amended almost immediately. The new speed can actually serve as a unifying force. The more news outlets the better, they argued. Such give and take strengthens the health of a democracy. With plenty of news sources, the result can be that we think of ourselves not as blue states or red states, but as united states.

The tallies at the conclusion of the debate showed that now 62 percent agreed and 37.5 disagreed, so more people switched to the con side than the reverse, evidently echoing the judges.

Well, that's something of a relief. Killing the messenger has never been a solution I found very comforting.

$5 MIL TO NURSING: The Valley Foundation, based in Los Gatos and dedicated to supporting health issues, has given a $5 million grant to the SJSU School of Nursing. The money will be used to create an endowment for long-term maintenance of the school and to provide a simulated nurses lab right now. Some 1,400 students are enrolled in the program, with 50 instructors.

Phillip Boyce, Valley Foundation chairman, said this gift "will impact the quality of care in doctors' offices, hospitals and health care facilities in our region and beyond." Boyce, of Saratoga, graduated from SJSU in '66 with a degree in business.

Valley Foundation was formed when Los Gatos Community Hospital was sold to become a for-profit institution. The money received from the sale created the foundation. The nursing school will be renamed Valley Foundation School of Nursing once official approval has been granted. Valley Foundation has given the school a total of $3.5 million in earlier years.

It is estimated that California will have a nursing shortage of 40,000 over the next decade.

LONGEVITY RECOGNIZED: Businesses that have served Saratoga for more than 35 years were honored at a recent city council meeting. These included Bob and Shirley Cancilleri, former owners of Saratoga Plaza Bakery; Connie Hillblom and Joan Mitchell, who have nurtured The Fat Robin for 38 years; Joseph and Michelle Masek, who have run La Mere Michelle for 37 years; and Tom Vandenhoogen of Little Amsterdam, also a 37-year owner.

MEMOIR: Los Gatan Betty Auchard will speak at the Saratoga Library Nov. 12 at 2 p.m. about her book, The Home for the Friendless: Finding Hope, Love and Family. The memoir recounts her hard-scrabble childhood, including time spent in an orphanage.

"In this poignant, humorous memoir, love conquers all and normal isn't always better," says the flier.

EARLY GIFTS: The Holiday Show at Gallery House in Palo Alto will hold a reception Nov. 19, 6-8 p.m. Theresa Robinson and Starr Davis are two Saratoga artists who show at this gallery. The exhibit runs Nov. 16-Dec. 24.

ODD COMBO: One of the more unusual pairings around is the alterations shop at the southern end of Big Basin. It's the French Tailor, and its owner is Helene Simone, who is of both French and Italian extraction. Simone does alterations and sells hot dogs. Sounds like repairs can be made and lunch consumed while you wait. Hold the mustard, though.

Got a tip for Saratoga Sampler? Send an e-mail to mac@impruve.com or call 408.540.7977.

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Gerardo Fernandez: A Positive Light for Latinos in the Media | View Clip
11/09/2010
SJ Beez

Writer Rebecca Solomon profiles Alianza News editor Gerardo Fernandez and the challenges he faces in representing the Latino community to mainstream media and culture.

At first glance, Gerardo Fernandez is fairly unassuming. Standing at an average height of 5'10” with understated boyish clothing and a sheepish grin, you wouldn't necessarily peg him as the editor-in-chief of Alianza News, one of San Jose's most prominent Latino news publications. Yet after two years of following in his father's footsteps and taking engineering classes at the University of Washington, the Mexico City native decided to switch to a career in journalism. Early success in radio with appearances on programs such as “Pajaro Latino-Americano” in San Francisco and regular pieces featured in El Tecolote eventually led to his dream job: editor-in-chief of a well-respected Latino newspaper. However, Fernandez is quick to point out that the road to his achievements was not always such an easy one.

As a Latino in a field that is dominated by Caucasian journalists covering predominately Caucasian stories, it is no wonder Fernandez felt marginalized. “Just by having a Latino last name, I am looked at in a certain way, and am automatically placed in a certain niche,” Fernandez explains. “It can be very frustrating.” And he is certainly not alone in his sentiment. Rick Sanchez, former reporter for CNN and proud Cuban-American has stated on multiple occasions that he was told he could never be an anchor because those positions were reserved for the “high profile white guys.”

The fact of the matter is that Latinos are not prominent figures in the media, and on the rare occasion they are, it is usually associated with something negative, such as illegal immigration or drug-related crime. In the spring of 2009, Sonia Sotomayor became the first Latino to be nominated for a seat on the Supreme Court of the United States. A huge milestone for the Latino/Hispanic community, Sotomayor's nomination received considerable media attention, and was the most popular Latino news story between Feb. 9th and Aug. 9th of that year, with H1N1 and Mexican Drug violence coming in a close second and third, according to a study done by the Pew Hispanic Center and the Project for Excellence in Journalism. Yet looking at the media as a whole during that six-month period, only 654 of 34, 452 articles made any reference to Latinos and only 57 actually discussed an aspect of Latino life in the United States. Furthermore, although many journalists covering the Sotomayor story did state that her ethnic background was not the most important aspect of her nomination and that her qualifications were a far more relevant topic, the fact that she was Latina was still mentioned fifty percent of the time.

For Fernandez, life as a journalist has been rewarding yet exhausting. As the only member of his family living in the United States and a successful Mexican-American journalist, he feels it is his job to counterbalance the negative image of gun-toting, tattooed criminals and uneducated, dirty families slipping past our borders with concrete stories of Latino successes and cultural celebration. Rossana Drummond, publisher of Alianza News and friend to Fernandez has seen firsthand the benefits of the work Fernandez has done for the San Jose community and the Latino/Hispanic community as a whole. “Gerardo serves a distinct purpose as the face of Alianza News. People expect him to set an example for their children and family back home in Mexico, as something they should work towards. He is something they can aspire to, and reminds them that the American dream is possible.” Upon hearing this, Fernandez simply shrugs. “I'm just doing what I feel is right. People may criticize Hispanics for a lot of things, but just read through a copy of Alianza News and they might find their perceptions may change.”

Alma Martinez, a San Jose resident of 12 years and mother of four is an avid reader of Alianza News and could not be more proud of her Oaxacan heritage. Like Fernandez, Martinez has grown weary of the negativity of the news. “I turn on the television nowadays and all I see are stories of murders and earthquakes and tragedy, and I open the San Francisco Chronicle and there is no mention of Latinos whatsoever. Gerardo Fernandez should be proud of the work he's doing. I miss my family in Mexico everyday but at least now I can tell them that I am staying culturally connected by reading a newspaper that actually cares about Latinos.”
As our global network continues to expand via social networking and online media sources, many experts have postulated that newspapers such as the Alianza News will become obsolete. It is a growing concern for even the most respected publications, and threatens to jeopardize thousands of jobs and livelihoods, especially for smaller, localized operations. Still, Fernandez remains optimistic. “It is easy to forget where we come from as immigrants in this country. The minute we find success, we forget about family back home who are struggling and we only look after ourselves. Alianza News is that connection back to an older way of life, and to our culture. It reminds us that we can be whatever we want and do whatever we want, but we will never be free from our heritage.”

Gerardo Fernandez is a writer & videographer for Alianza News, a partner of San Jose Beez.
Rebecca Solomon is a student at Santa Clara University and a contributing writer to SJ Beez.

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Human-rights advocate to receive the Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize | View Clip
11/09/2010
Examiner.com

This year's Alexander Prize is to be awarded to the prominent Iranian lawyer Shadi Sadr who for the last decade has risked her life to protect women activists and journalists. She had been arrested, beaten and imprisoned many times before her escape to Germany less than a year ago.

The following is Santa Clara Law's press release for the award ceremony scheduled for November 11, 2010.

SANTA CLARA, Calif., November 1, 2010—Last month, an Iranian woman

accused of adultery was sentenced to death by stoning. While awaiting

trial the woman, Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, was lashed 99 times for

appearing without a veil in a newspaper photo—which turned out to be a

photo of someone else.

Improving the justice system for Iranian women like Ashtiani has been

the decades-long quest of Shadi Sadr, a lawyer, journalist, and

human-rights advocate who will be receiving the Katharine and George

Alexander Law Prize from Santa Clara University School of Law on

November 11. The award event was originally scheduled for late

September, but Sadr had difficulty obtaining a travel visa in time.

Sadr has had her own life put in jeopardy for speaking out about

injustice for Iranian women. She's been arrested, beaten, and

imprisoned, and was recently convicted in absentia of national-security

violations, and sentenced to six years in prison and 74 lashes. In 2009

she escaped to Germany and established permanent residency.

“In America, we take for granted that our legal system is designed to

protect us from arbitrary, capricious, or vengeful treatment at the

hands of authorities,” said Santa Clara Law Dean Donald Polden.

“What we honor in Ms. Sadr is her ceaseless, valiant, and sometimes

terrifying battle to bring this sort of justice to Iranian women.”

Media have an opportunity to meet Ms. Sadr at various events

surrounding the Alexander Prize and during her visit to SCU, which will

begin November 8 and include events for faculty members and students.

Media are invited to attend the awards ceremony November 11 at 7 p.m. at

Santa Clara University's Performing Arts Center Recital Hall. Requests

for interviews are being handled by Deborah Lohse of SCU Media

Relations, dlohse@scu.edu or (408) 554-5121.

Ms. Sadr has touched the lives of thousands of individuals through the

entities she has established, and by her support of campaigns such as

"End Stoning Forever." She founded the website "Women in Iran" and was

the director of Raahi, a legal center for women which has since been

closed.

Sadr has been awarded numerous human-rights awards, including 2010

International Women of Courage Award, the Ida B. Wells award for bravery

in journalism, and a prize created by Polish Solidarity leader Lech

Walesa.

About the Katharine and George Alexander Prize

Katharine and George Alexander have endowed the Law Prize to be awarded

annually. The purpose of the prize is to recognize a person from

anywhere around the world who has used his or her skill, knowledge, and

abilities in the field of law to correct an injustice in a significant

manner. The hope of the donors is that the Prize will not only give the

public a higher regard for the legal profession but will also be an

inspiration within the legal profession and a recognition of the good

work of so many in the law.

About Santa Clara Law

Santa Clara University School of Law, founded in 1911 on the site of

California's oldest operating higher-education institution, is

dedicated to educating lawyers who lead with a commitment to excellence,

ethics, and social justice. One of the nation's most diverse law

schools, Santa Clara Law offers its 1,000 students an academically

rigorous program, including graduate degrees in international law and

intellectual property law; combined J.D./MBA and J.D./MSIS degrees; and

certificates in intellectual property law, international law, and public

interest and social justice law. Santa Clara Law is located in the

world-class business center of Silicon Valley, and is distinguished

nationally for its top-ranked program in intellectual property. For more

information, see law.scu.edu.

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IES Abroad Recognizes Study Abroad Professionals and Institutions at... | View Clip
11/09/2010
PRWeb

At its 2010 Annual Conference and 60th Anniversary Celebration, IES Abroad presented three leadership awards to study abroad professionals and recognized 12 original members of its academic consortium.

The IES Abroad Lifetime Achievement Award was given to Dr. Ana Maria Wiseman, Dean of International Programs and Associate Professor of Foreign Languages at Wofford College. Dr. Wiseman is a national leader in the field of education abroad serving as a professional and volunteer. For IES Abroad, she served as the chair of the General Conference 2007-2009 and as a member of its Board of Directors. She also served on the IES Abroad Curriculum Committee and Academic Council.

The IES Abroad Professional Development Award was given to Sheila Collins, director of programming for the Learning Abroad Center at the University of Minnesota. Collins has made significant contributions to the study abroad field as an educator and as a member of The Forum on Education Abroad and a former board member for the Higher Education Consortium for Urban Affairs (HECUA). She has also served on the IES Abroad Academic Council.

The IES Abroad Volunteer of the Year Award was given to Dr. Dennis Gordon, professor of political science and executive director emeritus of International Programs at Santa Clara University. Dr. Gordon has served on the Curriculum Committee and Academic Council for IES Abroad and has been a volunteer lecturer on study abroad programs. He also designed customized study abroad programs to make them accessible for students in need of financial aid. He serves on The Forum on Education Abroad's Committee on Ethical Practices and has served on the Forum's Council and Standards Committee.

Founded in 1950, IES Abroad began its formal Academic Consortium in 1963. To celebrate 60 years of offering study abroad programs to students from top-tier U.S. colleges and universities, IES Abroad recognized the 12 schools that are both inaugural and continuous members of its academic consortium. They are (with their original year of consortium membership noted):

IES Abroad Original Academic Consortium Member Schools

Santa Clara University (1963)

Hope College (1964)

University of the Pacific (1964)

The College of Wooster (1965)

Gustavus Adolphus College (1965)

Illinois Wesleyan University (1965)

Luther College (1965)

Millikin University (1965)

Morehouse College (1965)

Spelman College (1965)

Austin College (1967)

Dickinson University (1967)

Photo Caption for attached photo: IES Abroad honors original academic consortium members at a 60th anniversary celebration. Pictured are – Back Row Left to Right: Dennis Gordon, Santa Clara University; Ashlee Flinn, Austin College; Mary Dwyer, IES Abroad; Front Row Left to Right: Carmen Aravena, Millikin University; Margery Ganz, Spelman College; Amy Otis-de Grau, Hope College; Barbara Colyar, Santa Clara University; Stacey Shimizu, Illinois Wesleyan University; Kim Tunnicliff, The College of Wooster; Brian Brubaker, Dickinson University.

IES Abroad, which celebrates its 60th anniversary in 2010, is a global, not-for-profit academic consortium offering study abroad programs to more than 5,400 US college students each year who participate in 92 programs at 32 international locations. IES Abroad offers programs in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, New Zealand and South America. http://www.IESAbroad.org

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Martha Stewart's investing adventures | View Clip
11/09/2010
Canadian Business - Online

TV celebrity Martha Stewart's insider-trading trial in 2004 provides some interesting glimpses into her experiences as an investor. Meir Statman, a finance professor at Santa Clara University in California, takes a look in Martha Stewart's Lessons in Behavioral Finance .

Her Merrill Lynch account statement of December 20, 2001 was entered into evidence and shows 36 stocks and a money-market fund, worth $2,510,793 in total (dollar figures in U.S.). Twenty-three stocks had unrealized losses.

Portfolio loses half of  value and she goes to jail

Statman traced Stewart's portfolio back to June 2000 and calculated its value at $4,530,730. Her portfolio had lost nearly half of its value over a span of about 18 months. Then, after she was convicted of insider trading, she spent several months in jail. I wouldn't be surprised if she has a rather low allocation to stocks now. 

Indeed, in the days after December 20, 2001, Stewart sold off all but one of her losing stocks for tax purposes. “Just took lots of huge losses to offset some gains,” wrote Stewart in an e-mail to a friend. “Made my stomach turn….”

Favoured with hot IPO stocks

Stewart's losses arose even though she was on “the privileged list of investors who were allocated hot IPO shares at their offering prices.” IPO stocks bought included Charter Communication, Digex, Agilent, Palm, and others.

“Ms. Stewart would have been ahead if she had flipped her shares on their first trading day or even weeks afterward,” writes Statman. “But she waited and watched her gains turn into losses.” For example, she bought Palm Inc. at the offering price of $38, watched it zoom to $95 on the first trading day only to sell it at $3.47 on December 21, 2001.

A most ridiculous sound — like a lion roaring underwater

Martha Stewart was not kind to her brokers. An email from the broker's assistant reveals “Martha yelled at me again today.” In another email, he complained that she had hung up on him, adding that at one point she made the “most ridiculous sound I've heard coming from an adult in quite some time, kind of like a lion roaring underwater.”

Cognitive biases or lack of investment savy?

Statman describes several cognitive biases and emotions that interfered with Stewart's performance. Instead, I would see her case more as demonstrating a lack of investment knowledge.

It appears she was not very aware of the “ IPO cycle ,” as most good investment guides would have warned her about. And the ill treatment of her broker suggests she naively expected him to be a seer who could forecast market turns and get her out ahead of the downturns.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

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NY Appeals Court Reinstates Amazon Sales Tax Suit | View Clip
11/09/2010
MediaPost.com

In a partial victory for Amazon and Overstock, an appellate court in New York ruled that a trial judge prematurely dismissed their lawsuit challenging a law requiring some online retailers to pay sales tax on purchases by state residents.

But although the case has been reinstated, it's not clear whether Amazon and Overstock will be able to prevail in their argument that the law unconstitutionally constrains interstate commerce.

The New York law, enacted in 2008, calls for online retailers to collect sales tax from state residents if the sites use New York affiliates. Amazon, Overstock and other opponents of the measure argue that a 1992 U.S. Supreme Court decision prohibits state governments from forcing retailers to collect sales tax unless they have a physical presence in the state, like a brick-and-mortar store. The online retailers argue that affiliate marketers -- including Web publishers that garner referral fees because they have placed links to Amazon on their sites -- don't constitute a sufficient presence in New York to justify the tax.

In a decision issued last week, the New York Appellate Division ruled that whether the companies will be able to defeat the law depends on the nature of the affiliates. If they are "passive" advertisers, the law appears unconstitutional, but if the affiliates are engaged in "direct solicitation," then the sites will have to pay the tax.

The appeals court said that examples of direct solicitation could include sending emails, as well as "distributing flyers, coupons, newsletters and other printed promotional materials, or electronic equivalents."

The problem, say some observers, is that much of the activity described as direct solicitation occurs throughout the Web in all forms of advertising -- for instance, when display ads include coupons.

"It doesn't make any sense to go this route," says Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman. He adds that the court's examples of direct solicitation made more sense offline, "when people were making in-person sales or even telephone calls from boiler rooms."

Goldman adds that one result of the court's reasoning could be that Amazon and other companies will eschew cost-per-action ads and instead rely solely on cost-per-click or cost-per-thousand-impression models because publishers who accept those ads are more likely to be considered "passive."

The Performance Marketing Association, which filed a friend-of-the-court brief in the appeal, says it is worried that online retailers might decide to stop using all performance marketing affiliates that offer pay-per-action ads.

Rebecca Madigan, director of the trade organization, says she is hopeful that Amazon will be able to prove that its in-state affiliates should not be considered direct solicitors. If not, however, online retailers could well decide to avoid paying sales tax on New York consumers' purchases by terminating affiliates in the state. "My concern is that the entire industry could be wiped out, or that the compensation model will change," she says.

Since the New York law went into effect, around 200 online retailers, including Overstock and Blue Nile, stopped working with affiliates in the state. Amazon didn't drop New York affiliates, but stopped working with affiliate marketers in North Carolina and Rhode Island, which also recently passed similar laws.

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Pizarro: Former Milpitas Mayor to lead San Jose's Veterans Day Parade | View Clip
11/09/2010
San Jose Mercury News - Online

San Jose's 92nd annual Veterans Day parade kicks off Thursday with an 11 a.m. opening ceremony downtown at Plaza de Cesar Chavez.

The parade, which begins at noon, starts at Highway 87 and East Santa Clara Street and will wind its way south on Market Street to San Carlos Street.

This year's grand marshal is former Milpitas Mayor Denny Weisgerber. He was a staff sergeant with the U.S. Marine Corps and served in Korea, where he received the Purple Heart and the Navy Cross.

You can listen to him tell his story. "No Marine Left Behind," at Digital Clubhouse Network's "Stories of Service" site (www.digiclub.org/sofs).

Originally from Idaho, Weisgerber moved with his wife, Marianne, to California in 1957. There he had a key role to help keep Milpitas from merging with San Jose in the early 1960s.

People certainly took notice of him after that. He spent 12 years on the Milpitas City Council in the 1960s and early 1970s, including a couple of stints as mayor.

GROWING TRIBUTE: Canopy, the urban forestry nonprofit group, will commemorate the holiday Thursday by planting 12 trees at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System division in Menlo Park.

Silicon Valley veterans will be helping out in the planting, which'll start at 2 p.m.

A big salute to Marine Corps veteran and Canopy advisory board member James F. Cook Advertisementand Canopy Executive Director Catherine Martineau for helping beautify a place where vets spend a lot of time.

HONORED: Iranian human-rights lawyer Shadi Sadr will receive the Katherine and George Alexander Law Prize from Santa Clara University on Thursday night.

"We take for granted that our legal system is designed to protect us from arbitrary, capricious, or vengeful treatment at the hands of authorities," Santa Clara Law Dean Donald Polden said. "What we honor in Ms. Sadr is her ceaseless, valiant, and sometimes terrifying battle to bring this sort of justice to Iranian women."

It hasn't made her popular with the government, though.

In May, she was convicted in absentia by a Tehran court for "harming public order" and sentenced to six years in prison with 74 lashes. Fortunately, she had already escaped to Germany.

Her journey to Santa Clara hasn't been easy, either. The award ceremony and lecture originally had been set for late September, but it was postponed when Sadr couldn't obtain a travel visa in time.

Got a tip? Call Sal Pizarro at 408-627-0940 or e-mail him at spizarro@mercurynews.com.

Contact Sal Pizarro at spizarro@mercurynews.com or 408-627-0940.

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Pizarro: Former Milpitas Mayor to lead San Jose's Veterans Day Parade | View Clip
11/09/2010
San Jose Mercury News - Online

San Jose's 92nd annual Veterans Day parade kicks off Thursday with an 11 a.m. opening ceremony downtown at Plaza de Cesar Chavez.

The parade, which begins at noon, starts at Highway 87 and East Santa Clara Street and will wind its way south on Market Street to San Carlos Street.

This year's grand marshal is former Milpitas Mayor Denny Weisgerber. He was a staff sergeant with the U.S. Marine Corps and served in Korea, where he received the Purple Heart and the Navy Cross.

You can listen to him tell his story, "No Marine Left Behind," at Digital Clubhouse Network's "Stories of Service" site (www.digiclub.org/sofs).

Originally from Idaho, Weisgerber moved with his wife, Marianne, to California in 1957. There he had a key role to help keep Milpitas from merging with San Jose in the early 1960s.

People certainly took notice of him after that. He spent 12 years on the Milpitas City Council in the 1960s and early '70s, including a couple of stints as mayor.

GROWING TRIBUTE: Canopy, the urban forestry nonprofit group, will commemorate the holiday Thursday by planting 12 trees at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System division in Menlo Park.

Silicon Valley veterans will be helping with the planting, which will start at 2 p.m.

A big salute to Marine Corps veteran and Canopy advisory board member James F. Cook

and Canopy Executive Director Catherine Martineau for helping beautify a place where vets spend a lot of time.

HONORED: Iranian human-rights lawyer Shadi Sadr will receive the Katherine and George Alexander Law Prize from Santa Clara University on Thursday night.

"We take for granted that our legal system is designed to protect us from arbitrary, capricious or vengeful treatment at the hands of authorities," Santa Clara Law Dean Donald Polden said. "What we honor in Ms. Sadr is her ceaseless, valiant and sometimes terrifying battle to bring this sort of justice to Iranian women."

It hasn't made her popular with the government, though.

In May, she was convicted in absentia by a Tehran court for "harming public order" and sentenced to six years in prison with 74 lashes. Fortunately, she had already escaped to Germany.

Her journey to Santa Clara hasn't been easy, either. The award ceremony and lecture originally had been set for late September, but it was postponed when Sadr couldn't obtain a travel visa in time.

Got a tip? Call Sal Pizarro at 408-627-0940 or e-mail him at spizarro@mercurynews.com.

Contact Sal Pizarro at spizarro@mercurynews.com or 408-627-0940.

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Pizarro: Former Milpitas Mayor to lead San Jose's Veterans Day Parade | View Clip
11/09/2010
SiliconValley.com

San Jose's 92nd annual Veterans Day parade kicks off Thursday with an 11 a.m. opening ceremony downtown at Plaza de Cesar Chavez.

The parade, which begins at noon, starts at Highway 87 and East Santa Clara Street and will wind its way south on Market Street to San Carlos Street.

This year's grand marshal is former Milpitas Mayor Denny Weisgerber. He was a staff sergeant with the U.S. Marine Corps and served in Korea, where he received the Purple Heart and the Navy Cross.

You can listen to him tell his story, "No Marine Left Behind," at Digital Clubhouse Network's "Stories of Service" site (www.digiclub.org/sofs).

Originally from Idaho, Weisgerber moved with his wife, Marianne, to California in 1957. There he had a key role to help keep Milpitas from merging with San Jose in the early 1960s.

People certainly took notice of him after that. He spent 12 years on the Milpitas City Council in the 1960s and early '70s, including a couple of stints as mayor.

GROWING TRIBUTE: Canopy, the urban forestry nonprofit group, will commemorate the holiday Thursday by planting 12 trees at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System division in Menlo Park.

Silicon Valley veterans will be helping with the planting, which will start at 2 p.m.

A big salute to Marine Corps veteran and Canopy advisory board member James F. Cook

and Canopy Executive Director Catherine Martineau for helping beautify a place where vets spend a lot of time.

HONORED: Iranian human-rights lawyer Shadi Sadr will receive the Katherine and George Alexander Law Prize from Santa Clara University on Thursday night.

"We take for granted that our legal system is designed to protect us from arbitrary, capricious or vengeful treatment at the hands of authorities," Santa Clara Law Dean Donald Polden said. "What we honor in Ms. Sadr is her ceaseless, valiant and sometimes terrifying battle to bring this sort of justice to Iranian women."

It hasn't made her popular with the government, though.

In May, she was convicted in absentia by a Tehran court for "harming public order" and sentenced to six years in prison with 74 lashes. Fortunately, she had already escaped to Germany.

Her journey to Santa Clara hasn't been easy, either. The award ceremony and lecture originally had been set for late September, but it was postponed when Sadr couldn't obtain a travel visa in time.

Got a tip? Call Sal Pizarro at 408-627-0940 or e-mail him at spizarro@mercurynews.com.

Contact Sal Pizarro at spizarro@mercurynews.com or 408-627-0940.

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The Israeli (And Palestinian) Tech Invasion | View Clip
11/09/2010
Jewish Week - Online, The

First-ever Tel Aviv Tech Tour enables 11 startups —

10 Israeli, one Palestinian — to promote their

innovations to American students.

Amit Lubovsky has developed software (tawkon.com) that alerts you when your cell phone's radiation exceeds a certain threshold. Eran Galperin's company, binpress.com, is a one-stop market for open-source code for Web and mobile developers. And Ido Gaver (loyalblocks.com) wants to turn your mobile phone into a store loyalty card; when you walk into a store, you'll receive targeted coupons and special offers right on your device.

The three Israelis arrived in New York on Sunday as part of the first-ever Tel Aviv Tech Tour, in which 10 Israeli startups and one Palestinian startup will visit nearly a dozen college campuses in a span of two weeks. Their goal is to put Middle Eastern politics aside and introduce their mobile apps and other innovations directly to their target audience — young, technologically savvy college students.

The group met at GarageGeeks, a monthly gathering of tech types that takes place in a real garage near Tel Aviv. It is presided over by venture capitalist Yossi Vardi, who is famous for being a “godfather” to more than 40 startups, and was an original investor in ICQ, one of the first instant-messaging platforms. “We celebrate innovation, talk about technology and drink beer,” says Yosi Taguri, co-founder of fiddme (fiddme.com), an iPad app that helps people locate new restaurants by viewing photos of favorite dishes at nearby eateries that other users have uploaded.

The idea for the Tech Tour was born out of a common frustration among entrepreneurs in the Middle East: the difficulty of creating a loyal American following from thousands of miles away.

And so, within a span of four weeks, Taguri mobilized his techie friends and planned this trip in which the Israeli and Palestinian startups would hop from campus to campus, and meet with potential investors in between.

“It's our first chance to really present our products to real people, face-to-face and get their take,” says Nir Ofir, founder of ChatSq (chatsq.com), a mobile app that enables people to instantly connect and communicate with people around them in real time. “For some of us, students are our potential users. We'd like them to spread the word.”

After a morning breakfast at David Sable's office at communications firm Wunderman on Monday in New York, the group took the train to Washington, D.C., where they met with students at the University of Maryland. They ended the evening with a gathering at law firm Nixon Peabody, where Scott Deutchman, President Barack Obama's deputy chief technology officer, was in attendance. On Tuesday, the Tech Tour made stops at George Washington University and New York University. The itinerary includes campus stops at MIT, Harvard, Santa Clara University, and University of California, Berkeley, as well as a visit to Googleplex in Mountain View, Calif., and AOL's headquarters.

While the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs paid for the group's airfare, members of the tech tour were quick to say that the purpose of the trip wasn't to defend Israel.

“We're not professional diplomats,” says Taguri. “We're not here to make any political statements; that's bad for business. We'll show our technology and innovation and talk about entrepreneurship on both the Israeli and Palestinian side.”

So far, the trip is shaping up to be a lesson in coexistence — thanks to the low-budget decision to sleep five to a room.

“I feel like I know all of the guys already,” says Fuad Hawit, the lone Palestinian entrepreneur in the group. Hawitt, of Ramallah, is the founder of GSoft Tech and creator of the free iPhone app called Monica (mymonica.com), a virtual assistant that reads you your e-mails, Facebook feed and voicemail messages on the go. “While driving to your office, you can navigate all five of your e-mail accounts safely, without even touching your phone,” he says.

Technology really brings people together, Hawit says. “Technology doesn't have borders. It's not something you have to send through a checkpoint that could get stopped.”

E-mail: tamar@jewishweek.org

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But what else? We went to private Santa clara University With an acceptance rate of 58%.
11/08/2010
KWWL Today In Iowa - KWWL-TV

What does it take for your child to get into college? It's a question on the minds of countless parents. Vicky Nguyen found some inside information from the "people who decide" college acceptance could help. This is what four years of high here The elements that make you a yes Or a no. "Its very stressful its on my mind 24/7. " "Three's so many little bits and you're not quite sure is 3.8. " A solid gpa and good test scores Everyone knows you start there. But what else? We went to private Santa clara University With an acceptance rate of 58%. "We read every single essay the students submit. " And public California state University east bay Acceptance rate 31%. "They have a perfect gpa. " To find out How you avoid ending up here. S/ Mike sexton/Santa clara University : 51-: 57 "all of our faculty want students who can write whether you're engineering or business or english. " Santa clara's Mike sexton says showcase your ability to write. Write about something personal And specific. S/ Mike sexton/Santa clara University 1:13 "if they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. " "Not all 4.0'S are created equal . " What he means is: each application goes through a system that looks beyond grades At things like "course rigor" "how challenging was course work. " "We know some schools will be more challenging than others. " And "senior load" that means, no slacking off before graduation. Take a look at the application of a student who got in last year: a full load of tough classes, varsity sports, drama, and summer jobs. When it comes to activities, better to be a leader in a few clubs Than a member of many. "About 5000 end up here in denied files? " "That's correct. " Across the bay at csu east bay "We had record number of applications. " Greg Smith says essays, recommendation letters, and activities Are not part of the admissions process! Test scores and a minimum 2.0 Gpa are all that count. S/ Dave Vasquez/csu east bay 1:57-2:06 "whether it be b- or a b+its a 3.0 It doesn't matter what High School its from. " Here A committee reviews the 'maybes' "they're denied but that we will look further into it and see if we can admit them as an exception" students who think they might be on the bubble Should submit a statement to explain any hardships. S/ Greg Smith/csu east bay 2:15-2:25 "they're first generation to college coming from esl background coming from schools parents fit in? "Its daunting support her as far as whatever University 2:43 2757 from moment children are born we're Should be up to the student.

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Facebook uncovers user data sales | View Clip
11/08/2010
IT Web

Facebook has taken action against developers it caught selling user names and contact lists, says the BBC.

The sales were uncovered as Facebook investigated a Web browser bug that let user IDs be shared inadvertently.

The user details were sold to data brokers who used the information to target adverts more precisely. The developers have been banned for six months from connecting to Facebook and must be audited to check they comply with the social network's policies.

Google and the US government are headed for a legal showdown, but on different sides of the courtroom than one might expect, according to CNet.

Eric Goldman, a law professor with Santa Clara University who closely follows the tech industry, spotted a lawsuit filed by Google against the federal government claiming the US Department of the Interior did not properly evaluate Google Apps when choosing a new Web-based document system.

Google alleges that because the interior department specified that the system needed to be part of Microsoft's Business Productivity Online Suite, Google Apps never had a chance despite repeated attempts by Google to explain the product.

Microsoft is facing a wave of disbelief and anger from Windows programmers after saying it is demoting the would-be Flash-killer Silverlight for HTML5, reports the .

Server and tools president Bob Muglia apologised for any “controversy and confusion” caused by comments in an interview last week, when he said Microsoft has shifted its strategy of using Silverlight to deliver a cross-platform runtime.

In a refreshing twist for a corporate president, Muglia said the interview in which he made the comments, with All-about-Microsoft's Mary-Jo Foley, was accurate.

YouTube co-founder Chad Hurley is stepping down as chief executive of the online video-sharing Web site, states the BBC.

Google bought the YouTube Web site in 2006 for $1.65 billion and since then has been asserting more control over the popular site.

In a statement, Hurley said Google's Salar Kamangar had led YouTube's daily operations for the past two years, while he had worked in an advisory role.

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Fewer U.S. Docs Accepting Perks From Industry: Survey | View Clip
11/08/2010
National Women's Health Information Center

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. physicians' links with drug makers, medical device manufacturers and other health-related companies have decreased since 2004, but many doctors still have ties to these businesses, new research shows.

A 2004 survey found that about four out of five doctors accepted gifts of food and beverages from industry in their workplaces and more than 75 percent were given drug samples. In addition, more than one-third accepted reimbursement from companies for professional meetings or continued medical education, and more than one-quarter accepted payment for consulting, speaking or clinical trials.

The new 2009 survey of 1,891 primary care physicians and specialists found that nearly 84 percent reported some type of relationship with industry in the previous year. Nearly two-thirds (63.8 percent) accepted drug samples, about 70 percent received food and beverages, 18 percent received reimbursements, and 14 percent were paid for professional services.

The findings are published in the Nov. 8 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

"On every measure, the percentage of physicians with industry relationships was significantly lower in 2009 than in 2004," Eric G. Campbell, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues wrote in a news release from the journal's publisher.

Certain types of specialists were more likely to have industry ties. For example, these connections were more common among cardiologists (92.8 percent) than psychiatrists (79.8 percent). The type of practice also made a difference.

"Physicians in solo or two-person practices and group practices were significantly more likely than those in hospital and medical school settings to receive samples, reimbursements and gifts. However, physicians in medical schools were most likely to receive payments from industry," the researchers wrote.

"These data clearly show that physician behavior, at least with respect to managing conflicts of interest, is mutable in a relatively short period," the study authors concluded. "However, given that 83.8 percent of physicians have physician-industry relationships, it is clear that industry still has substantial financial links with the nation's physicians. These findings support the ongoing need for a national system of disclosure of physician-industry relationships."

The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University has more about .

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Fewer U.S. Docs Accepting Perks From Industry: Survey | View Clip
11/08/2010
medbroadcast.com

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. physicians' links with drug makers, medical device manufacturers and other health-related companies have decreased since 2004, but many doctors still have ties to these businesses, new research shows.

A 2004 survey found that about four out of five doctors accepted gifts of food and beverages from industry in their workplaces and more than 75 percent were given drug samples. In addition, more than one-third accepted reimbursement from companies for professional meetings or continued medical education, and more than one-quarter accepted payment for consulting, speaking or clinical trials.

The new 2009 survey of 1,891 primary care physicians and specialists found that nearly 84 percent reported some type of relationship with industry in the previous year. Nearly two-thirds (63.8 percent) accepted drug samples, about 70 percent received food and beverages, 18 percent received reimbursements, and 14 percent were paid for professional services.

The findings are published in the Nov. 8 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

"On every measure, the percentage of physicians with industry relationships was significantly lower in 2009 than in 2004," Eric G. Campbell, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues wrote in a news release from the journal's publisher.

Certain types of specialists were more likely to have industry ties. For example, these connections were more common among cardiologists (92.8 percent) than psychiatrists (79.8 percent). The type of practice also made a difference.

"Physicians in solo or two-person practices and group practices were significantly more likely than those in hospital and medical school settings to receive samples, reimbursements and gifts. However, physicians in medical schools were most likely to receive payments from industry," the researchers wrote.

"These data clearly show that physician behavior, at least with respect to managing conflicts of interest, is mutable in a relatively short period," the study authors concluded. "However, given that 83.8 percent of physicians have physician-industry relationships, it is clear that industry still has substantial financial links with the nation's physicians. These findings support the ongoing need for a national system of disclosure of physician-industry relationships."

More information

The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University has more about doctors and drug companies.

SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Nov. 8, 2010

Last Updated: November 8, 2010

Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Fewer U.S. Docs Accepting Perks From Industry: Survey | View Clip
11/08/2010
U.S. News & World Report - Online

Home > Health > Family Health > Fewer U.S. Docs Accepting Perks From Industry: Survey

But nearly 84% still report some relationship with industry, results show

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. physicians' links with drug makers, medical device manufacturers and other health-related companies have decreased since 2004, but many doctors still have ties to these businesses, new research shows.

A 2004 survey found that about four out of five doctors accepted gifts of food and beverages from industry in their workplaces and more than 75 percent were given drug samples. In addition, more than one-third accepted reimbursement from companies for professional meetings or continued medical education, and more than one-quarter accepted payment for consulting, speaking or clinical trials.

The new 2009 survey of 1,891 primary care physicians and specialists found that nearly 84 percent reported some type of relationship with industry in the previous year. Nearly two-thirds (63.8 percent) accepted drug samples, about 70 percent received food and beverages, 18 percent received reimbursements, and 14 percent were paid for professional services.

The findings are published in the Nov. 8 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

"On every measure, the percentage of physicians with industry relationships was significantly lower in 2009 than in 2004," Eric G. Campbell, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues wrote in a news release from the journal's publisher.

Certain types of specialists were more likely to have industry ties. For example, these connections were more common among cardiologists (92.8 percent) than psychiatrists (79.8 percent). The type of practice also made a difference.

"Physicians in solo or two-person practices and group practices were significantly more likely than those in hospital and medical school settings to receive samples, reimbursements and gifts. However, physicians in medical schools were most likely to receive payments from industry," the researchers wrote.

"These data clearly show that physician behavior, at least with respect to managing conflicts of interest, is mutable in a relatively short period," the study authors concluded. "However, given that 83.8 percent of physicians have physician-industry relationships, it is clear that industry still has substantial financial links with the nation's physicians. These findings support the ongoing need for a national system of disclosure of physician-industry relationships."

More information

The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University has more about doctors and drug companies.

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Iranian Women's Rights Advocate to Receive Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize from Santa Clara University School of Law | View Clip
11/08/2010
Payvand Iran News

Source: Shadi Sadr

Last month, an Iranian woman accused of adultery was sentenced to death by stoning. While awaiting trial the woman, Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, was lashed 99 times for appearing without a veil in a newspaper photo-which turned out to be a photo of someone else.

Improving the justice system for Iranian women like Ashtiani has been the decades-long quest of Shadi Sadr, a lawyer, journalist, and human-rights advocate who will be receiving the Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize from on November 11. The award event was originally scheduled for late September, but Sadr had difficulty obtaining a travel visa in time.

Sadr has had her own life put in jeopardy for speaking out about injustice for Iranian women. She's been arrested, beaten, and imprisoned, and was recently convicted in absentia of national-security violations, and sentenced to six years in prison and 74 lashes. In 2009 she escaped to Germany and established permanent residency.

"In America, we take for granted that our legal system is designed to protect us from arbitrary, capricious, or vengeful treatment at the hands of authorities," said Santa Clara Law Dean Donald Polden. "What we honor in Ms. Sadr is her ceaseless, valiant, and sometimes terrifying battle to bring this sort of justice to Iranian women."

Media have an opportunity to meet Ms. Sadr at various events surrounding the Alexander Prize and during her visit to SCU, which will begin November 8 and include events for faculty members and students. Media are invited to attend the awards ceremony November 11 at 7 p.m. at Santa Clara University's Performing Arts Center Recital Hall.

Ms. Sadr has touched the lives of thousands of individuals through the entities she has established, and by her support of campaigns such as "End Stoning Forever." She founded the website "Women in Iran" and was the director of Raahi, a legal center for women which has since been closed.

Sadr has been awarded numerous human-rights awards, including 2010 International Women of Courage Award, the Ida B. Wells award for bravery in journalism, and a prize created by Polish Solidarity leader Lech Walesa.

About the Katharine and George Alexander Prize. Katharine and George Alexander have endowed the Law Prize to be awarded annually. The purpose of the prize is to recognize a person from anywhere around the world who has used his or her skill, knowledge, and abilities in the field of law to correct an injustice in a significant manner. The hope of the donors is that the Prize will not only give the public a higher regard for the legal profession but will also be an inspiration within the legal profession and a recognition of the good work of so many in the law.

About Santa Clara Law , founded in 1911 on the site of California's oldest operating higher-education institution, is dedicated to educating lawyers who lead with a commitment to excellence, ethics, and social justice. One of the nation's most diverse law schools, Santa Clara Law offers its 1,000 students an academically rigorous program, including graduate degrees in international law and intellectual property law; combined J.D./MBA and J.D./MSIS degrees; and certificates in intellectual property law, international law, and public interest and social justice law. Santa Clara Law is located in the world-class business center of Silicon Valley, and is distinguished nationally for its top-ranked program in intellectual property. For more information, see law.scu.edu. Media Contact:

Deborah Lohse

Asst. Media Relations Director

Santa Clara University

(408) 554-5121

dlohse@scu.edu

... Payvand News - 11/08/10 ... --

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Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics.
11/08/2010
News 5 Today - WLWT-TV

GOOD MORNING, I'M POWER OF 5 RICO, BRINGING YOU WEATHER EVERY FIVE MINUTES. WE WANT TO REMIND YOU ABOUT OUR FIVE CARES COAT DRIVE. SO FAR, WE'VE COLLECTED MORE THAN 12-HUNDRED COATS. THE GOAL IS 4-THOUSAND. IF YOU'D LIKE TO DONATE A NEW OR GENTLY USED COAT, STOP BY ANY GOLD STAR CHILI, LOCAL FIREHOUSES AND KEMBA CREDIT UNION BRANCHES. A LIST OF DROP-OFF LOCATIONS, CAN BE FOUND IN THE HOT TOPICS SECTION ON WLWT. COM. NOW, TO OUR PROJECT ECONOMY COVERAGE ON THIS MONDAY MORNING. THE NEW WORK WEEK IS OFF TO A ROCKY START FOR INVESTORS. MOST ASIAN STOCKS WERE MIXED OVERNIGHT, DESPITE LAST WEEK'S US JOBS REPORT THAT SHOWED EMPLOYERS ADDED 151-THOUSAND JOBS IN OCTOBER, A LOT MORE THAN MOST ANALYSTS EXPECTED. THE JOBS DATA ALSO SHOWED DEMAND FOR CRUDE WILL LIKELY IMPROVE -BUMPING UP OIL PRICES TO 87 DOLLARS A BARREL IN ASIA. THAT COULD BE THE REASON WE'RE SEEING HIGHER GAS PRICES, THE NATIONAL AVERAGE IS 2-83, BUT HERE IN THE TRI STATE THEY ARE EVEN HIGHER, THE CHEAPEST GAS IN KENTUCKY ON AVERAGE IS 8 CENTS CHEAPER THAN IN OHIO. YOU CAN TRACK THE LATEST GAS PRICES ON OUR WEBSITE, JUST CLICK ON THE PROJECT ECONOMY SECTION IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF MANY PARENTS. WHAT ARE COLLEGE ADMISSIONS OFFICERS REALLY LOOKING FOR? EVERYONE KNOWS A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, IS A GOOD PLACE TO START. BUT EXPERTS ALSO SAY REGARDLESS OF THE MAJOR YOU GO AFTER, YOU NEED TO SHOW YOU CAN WRITE A SOLID ESSAY. ALSO WHEN CHOOSING A TOPIC, WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13> "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. " ALSO IF YOUR KIDS WANT TO GET INTO TOUGHER SCHOOLS THEN THAT MEANS THEY BETTER GET OUT AND PARTICIPATE, CLUBS, SPORTS AND SUMMER JOBS ARE A MUST AND EXPERTS SAY IT IS BETTER TO BE A LEADER OF A FEW CLUBS THAN JUST A MEMBER OF MANY. APPLE IS LOOKING TO EXPAND THEIR LINE OF APPS FOR MAC COMPUTERS, THE COMPANY'S CEO STEVE JOBS SAYS HE WANTS TO BRING THE SIMPLICITY AND RESOURCES OF APPS TO THE MAC EXPERIENCE. THE PROGRAMS WILL GO ON SALE IN A MAC APP STORE IN A FEW MONTHS. YOU TUBE WILL BE A BIG PART OF ROCK MELT, AND RIGHT NOW WE HAVE THE TEN MOST POPULAR YOU TUBE VIDEOS OF ALL TIME. JUST HEAD TO OUR WEBSITE AND LOOK IN THE TOP STORIES SECTION. THE TIME IS NOW ITS BEEN LESS THAN 4 WEEKS SINCE HE'S BEING RESCUED, STRAIGHT AHEAD, HOW A CHILEAN MINER TAKES STEPS, ONCE AGAIN TO SHOW THE WORLD HOW TO NEVER GIVE UP, "cincinnati 34 to 21, cincinnati. " PLUS, BENGALS FANS PUTTING PRESSURE ON THEIR TEAM TO PERFORM BUT THEIR NOT THE ONLY ONES, HOW THE CITY IS PREP-ING FOR MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL.

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Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics.
11/08/2010
News 5 Today - WLWT-TV

GOOD MORNING, I'M POWER OF 5 RICO, BRINGING YOU WEATHER EVERY FIVE MINUTES. WE WANT TO REMIND YOU ABOUT OUR FIVE CARES COAT DRIVE. SO FAR, WE'VE COLLECTED MORE THAN 12-HUNDRED COATS. THE GOAL IS 4-THOUSAND. IF YOU'D LIKE TO DONATE A NEW OR GENTLY USED COAT, STOP BY ANY GOLD STAR CHILI, LOCAL FIREHOUSES AND KEMBA CREDIT UNION BRANCHES. A LIST OF DROP-OFF LOCATIONS, CAN BE FOUND IN THE HOT TOPICS SECTION ON WLWT. COM. NOW, TO OUR PROJECT ECONOMY COVERAGE ON THIS MONDAY MORNING. THE NEW WORK WEEK IS OFF TO A ROCKY START FOR INVESTORS. MOST ASIAN STOCKS WERE MIXED OVERNIGHT, DESPITE LAST WEEK'S US JOBS REPORT THAT SHOWED EMPLOYERS ADDED 151-THOUSAND JOBS IN OCTOBER, A LOT MORE THAN MOST ANALYSTS EXPECTED. THE JOBS DATA ALSO SHOWED DEMAND FOR CRUDE WILL LIKELY IMPROVE -BUMPING UP OIL PRICES TO 87 DOLLARS A BARREL IN ASIA. THAT COULD BE THE REASON WE'RE SEEING HIGHER GAS PRICES, THE NATIONAL AVERAGE IS 2-83, BUT HERE IN THE TRI STATE THEY ARE EVEN HIGHER, THE CHEAPEST GAS IN KENTUCKY ON AVERAGE IS 8 CENTS CHEAPER THAN IN OHIO. YOU CAN TRACK THE LATEST GAS PRICES ON OUR WEBSITE, JUST CLICK ON THE PROJECT ECONOMY SECTION IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF MANY PARENTS. WHAT ARE COLLEGE ADMISSIONS OFFICERS REALLY LOOKING FOR? EVERYONE KNOWS A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, IS A GOOD PLACE TO START. BUT EXPERTS ALSO SAY REGARDLESS OF THE MAJOR YOU GO AFTER, YOU NEED TO SHOW YOU CAN WRITE A SOLID ESSAY. ALSO WHEN CHOOSING A TOPIC, WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13> "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. " ALSO IF YOUR KIDS WANT TO GET INTO TOUGHER SCHOOLS THEN THAT MEANS THEY BETTER GET OUT AND PARTICIPATE, CLUBS, SPORTS AND SUMMER JOBS ARE A MUST AND EXPERTS SAY IT IS BETTER TO BE A LEADER OF A FEW CLUBS THAN JUST A MEMBER OF MANY. APPLE IS LOOKING TO EXPAND THEIR LINE OF APPS FOR MAC COMPUTERS, THE COMPANY'S CEO STEVE JOBS SAYS HE WANTS TO BRING THE SIMPLICITY AND RESOURCES OF APPS TO THE MAC EXPERIENCE. THE PROGRAMS WILL GO ON SALE IN A MAC APP STORE IN A FEW MONTHS. YOU TUBE WILL BE A BIG PART OF ROCK MELT, AND RIGHT NOW WE HAVE THE TEN MOST POPULAR YOU TUBE VIDEOS OF ALL TIME. JUST HEAD TO OUR WEBSITE AND LOOK IN THE TOP STORIES SECTION. THE TIME IS NOW ITS BEEN LESS THAN 4 WEEKS SINCE HE'S BEING RESCUED, STRAIGHT AHEAD, HOW A CHILEAN MINER TAKES STEPS, ONCE AGAIN TO SHOW THE WORLD HOW TO NEVER GIVE UP, "cincinnati 34 to 21, cincinnati. " PLUS, BENGALS FANS PUTTING PRESSURE ON THEIR TEAM TO PERFORM BUT THEIR NOT THE ONLY ONES, HOW THE CITY IS PREP-ING FOR MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL.

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Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics.
11/08/2010
News 5 Today - WLWT-TV

THE WORK WEEK GETTING OFF TO A ROCKY START FOR INVESTORS, MOST ASIAN STOCKS WERE MIXED OVERNIGHT DESPITE LAST WEEK'S US JOBS REPORT THAT SHOWED EMPLOYERS ADDED 151-THOUSAND JOBS IN OCTOBER. THE FIRST GAIN SINCE MAY. THE JOBS DATA ALSO SHOWED DEMAND FOR CRUDE COULD IMPROVE, BUMPING UP OIL PRICES TO 87 DOLLARS A BARREL IN ASIA. THAT COULD BE THE REASON WE'RE SEEING HIGHER GAS PRICES, THE NATIONAL AVERAGE IS 2-83, BUT HERE IN THE TRI STATE GAS PRICES ARE HIGHER. THE CHEAPEST GAS WE FOUND IS IN NORTHERN KENTUCKY. PRICES THERE ARE -ON AVERAGE - 8 CENTS CHEAPER THAN IN OHIO. TRACK THE LATEST GAS PRICES ON OUR WEBSITE BY CLICKING ON THE PROJECT ECONOMY SECTION. IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF MANY PARENTS. WHAT ARE COLLEGE ADMISSIONS OFFICERS REALLY LOOKING FOR? EVERYONE KNOWS A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, IS A GOOD PLACE TO START. BUT EXPERTS ALSO SAY REGARDLESS OF THE MAJOR YOU GO AFTER, YOU NEED TO SHOW YOU CAN WRITE A SOLID ESSAY. ALSO WHEN CHOOSING A TOPIC, WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13> "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. " ALSO IF YOUR KIDS WANT TO GET INTO TOUGHER SCHOOLS THEN THAT MEANS THEY BETTER GET OUT AND PARTICIPATE, CLUBS, SPORTS AND SUMMER JOBS ARE A MUST AND EXPERTS SAY IT IS BETTER TO BE A LEADER OF A FEW CLUBS THAN JUST A MEMBER OF MANY. APPLE IS LOOKING TO EXPAND THEIR LINE OF APPS FOR MAC COMPUTERS, THE COMPANY'S CEO STEVE JOBS SAYS HE WANTS TO BRING THE SIMPLICITY AND RESOURCES OF APPS TO THE MAC EXPERIENCE. THE PROGRAMS WILL GO ON SALE IN A MAC APP STORE IN A FEW MONTHS. THERE WILL SOON BE A NEW WAY TO SURF THE WEB, IT'S CALLED ROCK MELT AND WILL BE ONLINE TODAY. THE SEARCH ENGINE INCORPORATES SOCIAL NETWORKING INTO EVERYTHING YOU DO ONLINE, THE DEVELOPERS BEHIND NETSCAPE BUILT THE SYSTEM, EXPERTS EXPECT THE ROCK MELT TO BE HUGE, EVEN COMPETING WITH GOOGLE. YOU TUBE WILL BE A BIG PART OF ROCK MELT, AND RIGHT NOW WE HAVE THE TEN MOST POPULAR YOU TUBE VIDEOS OF ALL TIME. JUST HEAD TO OUR WEBSITE AND LOOK IN THE TOP STORIES SECTION. THE TIME IS NOW ITS BEEN LESS THAN 4 WEEKS SINCE HE'S BEEN RESCUED, STRAIGHT AHEAD, HOW A CHILEAN MINER TAKES STEPS, ONCE AGAIN TO SHOW THE WORLD HOW TO NEVER GIVE UP, GOOD MORNING, THE TIME IS NOW METEOROLOGIST RANDI RICO HAS A LOOK AT YOUR POWER OF FIVE FORECAST THIS MORNING.

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Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics.
11/08/2010
News 5 Today - WLWT-TV

THE WORK WEEK GETTING OFF TO A ROCKY START FOR INVESTORS, MOST ASIAN STOCKS WERE MIXED OVERNIGHT DESPITE LAST WEEK'S US JOBS REPORT THAT SHOWED EMPLOYERS ADDED 151-THOUSAND JOBS IN OCTOBER. THE FIRST GAIN SINCE MAY. THE JOBS DATA ALSO SHOWED DEMAND FOR CRUDE COULD IMPROVE, BUMPING UP OIL PRICES TO 87 DOLLARS A BARREL IN ASIA. THAT COULD BE THE REASON WE'RE SEEING HIGHER GAS PRICES, THE NATIONAL AVERAGE IS 2-83, BUT HERE IN THE TRI STATE GAS PRICES ARE HIGHER. THE CHEAPEST GAS WE FOUND IS IN NORTHERN KENTUCKY. PRICES THERE ARE -ON AVERAGE - 8 CENTS CHEAPER THAN IN OHIO. TRACK THE LATEST GAS PRICES ON OUR WEBSITE BY CLICKING ON THE PROJECT ECONOMY SECTION. IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF MANY PARENTS. WHAT ARE COLLEGE ADMISSIONS OFFICERS REALLY LOOKING FOR? EVERYONE KNOWS A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, IS A GOOD PLACE TO START. BUT EXPERTS ALSO SAY REGARDLESS OF THE MAJOR YOU GO AFTER, YOU NEED TO SHOW YOU CAN WRITE A SOLID ESSAY. ALSO WHEN CHOOSING A TOPIC, WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13> "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. " ALSO IF YOUR KIDS WANT TO GET INTO TOUGHER SCHOOLS THEN THAT MEANS THEY BETTER GET OUT AND PARTICIPATE, CLUBS, SPORTS AND SUMMER JOBS ARE A MUST AND EXPERTS SAY IT IS BETTER TO BE A LEADER OF A FEW CLUBS THAN JUST A MEMBER OF MANY. APPLE IS LOOKING TO EXPAND THEIR LINE OF APPS FOR MAC COMPUTERS, THE COMPANY'S CEO STEVE JOBS SAYS HE WANTS TO BRING THE SIMPLICITY AND RESOURCES OF APPS TO THE MAC EXPERIENCE. THE PROGRAMS WILL GO ON SALE IN A MAC APP STORE IN A FEW MONTHS. THERE WILL SOON BE A NEW WAY TO SURF THE WEB, IT'S CALLED ROCK MELT AND WILL BE ONLINE TODAY. THE SEARCH ENGINE INCORPORATES SOCIAL NETWORKING INTO EVERYTHING YOU DO ONLINE, THE DEVELOPERS BEHIND NETSCAPE BUILT THE SYSTEM, EXPERTS EXPECT THE ROCK MELT TO BE HUGE, EVEN COMPETING WITH GOOGLE. YOU TUBE WILL BE A BIG PART OF ROCK MELT, AND RIGHT NOW WE HAVE THE TEN MOST POPULAR YOU TUBE VIDEOS OF ALL TIME. JUST HEAD TO OUR WEBSITE AND LOOK IN THE TOP STORIES SECTION. THE TIME IS NOW ITS BEEN LESS THAN 4 WEEKS SINCE HE'S BEEN RESCUED, STRAIGHT AHEAD, HOW A CHILEAN MINER TAKES STEPS, ONCE AGAIN TO SHOW THE WORLD HOW TO NEVER GIVE UP, GOOD MORNING, THE TIME IS NOW METEOROLOGIST RANDI RICO HAS A LOOK AT YOUR POWER OF FIVE FORECAST THIS MORNING. AFTER THE FIRST FLAKES FELL LAST WEEK WE ARE LOOKING AT A WARM UP THIS WEEK.

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Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics.
11/08/2010
News 5 Today - WLWT-TV

GAS PRICES ARE STILL INCREDIBLY HIGH WITH A NATIONAL AVERAGE OF 2-83, BUT HERE IN THE TRI STATE THEY ARE EVEN HIGHER, THE CHEAPEST GAS IS IN KENTUCKY ON AVERAGE, 8 CENTS CHEAPER THAN HERE IN OHIO. YOU CAN TRACK THE LATEST GAS PRICES ON OUR WEBSITE, JUST CLICK ON THE PROJECT ECONOMY SECTION MORE CREDIT CARD FEES COULD BE COMING YOUR WAY, AND THAT TOPS OUR CONSUMER HEADLINES THIS MORNING. LENDERS ARE LOOKING AT ADDING FEES TO CREDIT CARDS. SOME ARE RAISING MINIMUM PAYMENTS ON SOME CUSTOMERS'ACCOUNTS. OTHERS ARE CHARGING CUSTOMERS FOR CREDIT PROTECTION INSURANCE PROGRAMS, WITH OR WITHOUT THEIR PERMISSION. ALWAYS CHECK YOU BILL FOR ANY EXTRA CHARGES YOU DIDN'T SIGN UP FOR YOU CAN PROTEST THEM. APPLE IS LOOKING TO EXPAND THEIR LINE OF APPS FOR MAC COMPUTERS, THE COMPANY'S CEO STEVE JOBS SAYS HE WANTS TO BRING THE SIMPLICITY AND RESOURCES OF APPS TO THE MAC EXPERIENCE. THE PROGRAMS WILL GO ON SALE IN A MAC APP STORE IN A FEW MONTHS. WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR YOUR CHILD TO GET INTO COLLEGE? IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF MANY PARENTS. A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, EVERYONE KNOWS YOU START THERE. BUT WHAT ELSE? EXPERTS SAY REGARDLESS OF WHAT MAJOR YOU WANT TO PERSUE, YOU NEED TO SHOW YOU CAN WRITE A SOLID ESSAY. ALSO WHEN CHOOSING A TOPIC, WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. ">ALSO IF YOUR KIDS WANT TO GET INTO TOUGHER SCHOOLS THEN THAT MEANS THEY BETTER GET OUT AND PARTICIPATE, CLUBS, SPORTS AND SUMMER JOBS ARE A MUST AND EXPERTS SAY IT IS BETTER TO BE A LEADER OF A FEW CLUBS THAN JUST A MEMBER OF MANY. ARE LOOKING TO MAKE A FEW IMPROVEMENTS ON YOUR HOME BUT AREN'T SURE WHERE TO START? WELL COMING UP ON THE TODAY SHOW FIND OUT THE BEST UPGRADES FOR YOUR HOME THAT WILL TAKE THE LEAST AMOUNT OF TIME AND MONEY. POWER OF 5 METEOROLOGIST RANDI RICO IS HERE WITH WHAT'S AHEAD, (ad lib 30 second weather)ONE OF THE TRI-STATE'S BUSIEST BRIDGES, COULD BECOME A ONE OF THE TRI-STATE'S BUSIEST BRIDGES, COULD BECOME A PARKING LOT TONIGHT! WHEN YOU SHOULD AVOID THE BRENT SPENCE BRIDGE. PLUS SOME FANS SAY THEY DON'T CARE ABOUT ANY OTHER GAME THIS SEASON, TONIGHT THE BENGALS TAKE ON THE STEELERS AND FIND OUT WHAT BIG WIG IS COMING TO TAILGATE WITH FANS. PLUS THEY ALLEGEDLY OPENED FIRE ON A POLICE OFFICER WITH ASSAULT RIFLES! AFTER MONTHS OF INVESTIGATING WE WILL SHOW YOU THE TWO MEN, NOW SITTING IN JAIL. PLUS THAT AND MORE OF YOUR TOP FIVE STORIES, AND ANOTHER CHECK OF YOUR TRAFFIC. IT'S ALL RIGHT AFTER THE BREAK. YOU'RE WATCHING WLWT NEWS 5 TODAY.

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Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics.
11/08/2010
News 5 Today - WLWT-TV

GAS PRICES ARE STILL INCREDIBLY HIGH WITH A NATIONAL AVERAGE OF 2-83, BUT HERE IN THE TRI STATE THEY ARE EVEN HIGHER, THE CHEAPEST GAS IS IN KENTUCKY ON AVERAGE, 8 CENTS CHEAPER THAN HERE IN OHIO. YOU CAN TRACK THE LATEST GAS PRICES ON OUR WEBSITE, JUST CLICK ON THE PROJECT ECONOMY SECTION MORE CREDIT CARD FEES COULD BE COMING YOUR WAY, AND THAT TOPS OUR CONSUMER HEADLINES THIS MORNING. LENDERS ARE LOOKING AT ADDING FEES TO CREDIT CARDS. SOME ARE RAISING MINIMUM PAYMENTS ON SOME CUSTOMERS'ACCOUNTS. OTHERS ARE CHARGING CUSTOMERS FOR CREDIT PROTECTION INSURANCE PROGRAMS, WITH OR WITHOUT THEIR PERMISSION. ALWAYS CHECK YOU BILL FOR ANY EXTRA CHARGES YOU DIDN'T SIGN UP FOR YOU CAN PROTEST THEM. APPLE IS LOOKING TO EXPAND THEIR LINE OF APPS FOR MAC COMPUTERS, THE COMPANY'S CEO STEVE JOBS SAYS HE WANTS TO BRING THE SIMPLICITY AND RESOURCES OF APPS TO THE MAC EXPERIENCE. THE PROGRAMS WILL GO ON SALE IN A MAC APP STORE IN A FEW MONTHS. WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR YOUR CHILD TO GET INTO COLLEGE? IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF MANY PARENTS. A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, EVERYONE KNOWS YOU START THERE. BUT WHAT ELSE? EXPERTS SAY REGARDLESS OF WHAT MAJOR YOU WANT TO PERSUE, YOU NEED TO SHOW YOU CAN WRITE A SOLID ESSAY. ALSO WHEN CHOOSING A TOPIC, WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. ">ALSO IF YOUR KIDS WANT TO GET INTO TOUGHER SCHOOLS THEN THAT MEANS THEY BETTER GET OUT AND PARTICIPATE, CLUBS, SPORTS AND SUMMER JOBS ARE A MUST AND EXPERTS SAY IT IS BETTER TO BE A LEADER OF A FEW CLUBS THAN JUST A MEMBER OF MANY. ARE LOOKING TO MAKE A FEW IMPROVEMENTS ON YOUR HOME BUT AREN'T SURE WHERE TO START? WELL COMING UP ON THE TODAY SHOW FIND OUT THE BEST UPGRADES FOR YOUR HOME THAT WILL TAKE THE LEAST AMOUNT OF TIME AND MONEY. POWER OF 5 METEOROLOGIST RANDI RICO IS HERE WITH WHAT'S AHEAD, (ad lib 30 second weather)ONE OF THE TRI-STATE'S BUSIEST BRIDGES, COULD BECOME A ONE OF THE TRI-STATE'S BUSIEST BRIDGES, COULD BECOME A PARKING LOT TONIGHT! WHEN YOU SHOULD AVOID THE BRENT SPENCE BRIDGE. PLUS SOME FANS SAY THEY DON'T CARE ABOUT ANY OTHER GAME THIS SEASON, TONIGHT THE BENGALS TAKE ON THE STEELERS AND FIND OUT WHAT BIG WIG IS COMING TO TAILGATE WITH FANS. PLUS THEY ALLEGEDLY OPENED FIRE ON A POLICE OFFICER WITH ASSAULT RIFLES! AFTER MONTHS OF INVESTIGATING WE WILL SHOW YOU THE TWO MEN, NOW SITTING IN JAIL. PLUS THAT AND MORE OF YOUR TOP FIVE STORIES, AND ANOTHER CHECK OF YOUR TRAFFIC. IT'S ALL RIGHT AFTER THE BREAK. YOU'RE WATCHING WLWT NEWS 5 TODAY.

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Namaste: It's not just for those from the East | View Clip
11/08/2010
Psychology Today - Online

You treat people better if you see the divine within them

You likely have heard people use the word "Namaste" as a greeting often with their hands held together and with a slight bow. Usually is it associated with the eastern religious traditions such as Hinduism and Buddhism. Loosely translated from the Sanskrit it means "The God in me recognizes the God in you" or "The Divinity within me perceives and adores the Divinity within you."

The more I think about it and reflect on this greeting, the more I like it. If we interact with others basically stating that I honor, recognize, and appreciate the divine within you how could you not treat others ethically and with loving kindness? Some of the western religious traditions use shalom (Jewish) or salaam (Muslim) as a greeting meaning peace. Secular greetings such as Hi, Hello, How's it going, and so forth are okay but don't really communicate much. A friendly greeting of any kind and one of peace is certainly good but I have come to be especially fond of the namaste greeting given what the word actually means. Namaste offers a more enriching and important message. Maybe we all should embrace it regardless of our spiritual or religious tradition.

Doing the right thing for oursleves and others means finding a way to see the sacred, the divine, within all. Namaste is a constant reminder to do this. If you see the sacred in all, then you are likely to treat them with compassion, care, and respect too.

What do you think?

Namaste

Halloween is great fun but what comes afterwards is where the action is for spiritual and ethical growth and development

Thomas Plante, PhD., ABPP is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Spirituality and Health Institute at Santa Clara University.

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NY Appeals Court Reinstates Amazon Sales Tax Suit | View Clip
11/08/2010
MediaPost.com

But although the case has been reinstated, it's not clear whether Amazon and Overstock will be able to prevail in their argument that the law unconstitutionally constrains interstate commerce.

The New York law, enacted in 2008, calls for online retailers to collect sales tax from state residents if the sites use New York affiliates. Amazon, Overstock and other opponents of the measure argue that a 1992 U.S. Supreme Court decision prohibits state governments from forcing retailers to collect sales tax unless they have a physical presence in the state, like a brick-and-mortar store. The online retailers argue that affiliate marketers -- including Web publishers that garner referral fees because they have placed links to Amazon on their sites -- don't constitute a sufficient presence in New York to justify the tax.

In a decision issued last week, the New York Appellate Division ruled that whether the companies will be able to defeat the law depends on the nature of the affiliates. If they are "passive" advertisers, the law appears unconstitutional, but if the affiliates are engaged in "direct solicitation," then the sites will have to pay the tax.

The appeals court said that examples of direct solicitation could include sending emails, as well as "distributing flyers, coupons, newsletters and other printed promotional materials, or electronic equivalents."

The problem, say some observers, is that much of the activity described as direct solicitation occurs throughout the Web in all forms of advertising -- for instance, when display ads include coupons.

"It doesn't make any sense to go this route," says Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman. He adds that the court's examples of direct solicitation made more sense offline, "when people were making in-person sales or even telephone calls from boiler rooms."

Goldman adds that one result of the court's reasoning could be that Amazon and other companies will eschew cost-per-action ads and instead rely solely on cost-per-click or cost-per-thousand-impression models because publishers who accept those ads are more likely to be considered "passive."

The Performance Marketing Association, which filed a friend-of-the-court brief in the appeal, says it is worried that online retailers might decide to stop using all performance marketing affiliates that offer pay-per-action ads.

Rebecca Madigan, director of the trade organization, says she is hopeful that Amazon will be able to prove that its in-state affiliates should not be considered direct solicitors. If not, however, online retailers could well decide to avoid paying sales tax on New York consumers' purchases by terminating affiliates in the state. "My concern is that the entire industry could be wiped out, or that the compensation model will change," she says.

Since the New York law went into effect, around 200 online retailers, including Overstock and Blue Nile, stopped working with affiliates in the state. Amazon didn't drop New York affiliates, but stopped working with affiliate marketers in North Carolina and Rhode Island, which also recently passed similar laws.

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Queen Rania receives the 2010 James C. Morgan Global Humanitarian Award
11/08/2010
Jordan Times

AMMAN (JT) - Her Majesty Queen Rania on Saturday received the 2010 James C. Morgan Global Humanitarian Award for "her leadership, efforts in protecting human rights around the world and relentless campaigning for broader access to schools and higher quality education for children".

Given by The Tech Museum as part of its international programme - The Tech Awards - the award was inspired by company chairman Emeritus James Morgan's belief that technology can be a tool to turn ideas into solutions for a better world.

Presented by Applied Materials, in association with Santa Clara University, The Tech Awards celebrate the power of technology to address global challenges in environment, economic development, education, equality and health, according to a statement from the organisers.

The Global Humanitarian Award, also sponsored by Applied Materials, honours individuals whose broad vision and leadership help build an equitable, sustainable world.

"This year's laureates alone prove that creativity overcomes challenges," Queen Rania said.

"They've shown us that in health, needles are now needless for life-saving injections. And that in education, cell phones can sell English lessons that are affordable. But more can be done. The best part of mining our creativity, as Maya Angelou put it, is that you can't use it up. 'The more you use, the more you have."'

During the formal gala at the Santa Clara Convention Centre in San Jose, Silicon Valley, California, 15 innovators from around the world were also recognised for applying technology in practical ways to resolve some of the world's most challenging issues.

Five were awarded $50,000 cash prizes during the ceremony before a capacity crowd of more than 1,500 people, including Silicon Valley industry giants, philanthropists and political leaders, the statement said.

"The women and men we honour tonight, the people behind the pioneering innovations that continue to improve our world, have shown us how to touch millions of lives in meaningful, life-changing ways," Peter Friess, president of The Tech Museum, said.

"In the work of the laureates, we see the potential and promise of technology to tackle global problems while lifting the lives of the world's most vulnerable people."

"Since The Tech Awards was founded a decade ago, we have celebrated the awardees' extraordinary inventions and brought increased visibility to their efforts. The renowned programme brought the museum, Applied Materials and Santa Clara University together in 2001 with the hope of unleashing the potential of technological innovation into concrete solutions for a better world," the statement said.

"The Tech Awards celebrates the amazing accomplishments of visionaries from around the world who are using technology to address our planet's greatest challenges. The laureates honoured during the last 10 years of the programme demonstrate the power of applying creativity and innovation to improve the way people live," said Mike Splinter, chairman and CEO of Applied Materials.

The Tech Awards laureates 2010 represent regions as diverse as the Netherlands, Brazil, India, the UK, Philippines and the US and their work impacts people in many more countries worldwide, the statement said.

This year, The Tech Awards attracted more than 1,000 nominations. Laureate projects impact nearly every country on the planet. The Centre for Science, Technology, and Society at Santa Clara University manages the independent judging and application process for The Tech Awards, using its global network in science, technology and social entrepreneurship to expand the reach of the programme and encourage diversity in applicants.

The Tech Awards 2010

cash prize recipients:

Intel Environment Award: Peer Water Exchange, a project of Blue Planet Network

BD Biosciences Economic Development Award: Alexis T. Belonio, Centre for Rice Husk Energy Technology

Microsoft Education Award: BBC World Service Trust, BBC Janala

The Katherine M. Swanson Equality Award: A Single Drop for Safe Water

Nokia Health Award: Venkatesh Mannar, Micronutrient Initiative

Source: The Tech Museum

Copyright The Jordan Times. All rights reserved. Provided by an company

Copyright © 2010 The Jordan Times. All rights reserved.

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Queen Rania receives the Global Humanitarian award | View Clip
11/08/2010
Newzglobe.com

Queen Rania Al Abdullah of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan today received the 2010 James C. Morgan Global Humanitarian Award given by The Tech Museum as part of its international program, The Tech Awards, presented by Applied Materials, in association with Santa Clara University. The Tech Awards Honors 15 International Innovators Who Apply Technology to Benefit Humanity

The Global Humanitarian Award, also sponsored by Applied Materials, honors individuals whose broad vision and leadership help to build an equitable, sustainable world. Queen Rania was selected for her leadership, efforts in protecting human rights around the world and relentless campaigning for broader access to schools and higher quality education for children.

"This year's laureates alone prove that creativity overcomes challenges," Queen Rania said.

"The women and men we honor tonight, the people behind the pioneering innovations that continue to improve our world, have shown us how to touch millions of lives in meaningful, life-changing ways," Peter Friess, president of The Tech Museum, said.

The Tech Awards laureates 2010 represent regions as diverse as the Netherlands, Brazil, India, United Kingdom, Philippines and the United States. Their work impacts people in many more countries worldwide. This year, The Tech Awards attracted more than 1,000 nominations. Laureate projects impact nearly every country on the planet. The Center for Science, Technology, and Society at Santa Clara University manages the independent judging and application process for The Tech Awards, using its global network in science, technology and social entrepreneurship to expand the reach of the program and encourage diversity in applicants.

Content by MarketWire

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Studies from Santa Clara University in the area of proteomics published
11/08/2010
NewsRx.com

Current study results from the report, 'Capillary electrophoretic development of aptamers for a glycosylated VEGF peptide fragment,' have been published. "The emergence of functional genomics and proteomics has added to the growing need for improved analysis methods that can detect and distinguish between protein variants resulting from allelic variation, mutation, or post-translational modification. Aptamers, single-stranded DNA or RNA molecules that fold into three-dimensional structures conducive to binding targets, have become an attractive alternative to antibodies for this type of analysis," scientists writing in the journal Analyst report (see also ).

"Although aptamers have been developed for a wide range of target species, very few sequences have been identified that bind selectively to proteins with specific post-translational modifications. Using capillary electrophoresis-based selection, we have developed DNA aptamer sequences that selectively bind an N-glycosylated peptide fragment of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The selection method incorporates alternating positive-and counter-selection steps in free solution in order to obtain aptamers with both high affinity toward the glycosylated target and high selectivity versus a non-glycosylated variant. Affinity capillary electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance binding assays indicate these sequences have low-M dissociation constants and preferentially bind the glycosylated peptide with as much as 50-fold specificity," wrote C.M. Rose and colleagues, Santa Clara University.

The researchers concluded: "Such aptamers could serve as tools for rapid and simple monitoring of disease-linked functional changes in proteins, with potential applications in drug screening and disease diagnosis."

Rose and colleagues published their study in Analyst (Capillary electrophoretic development of aptamers for a glycosylated VEGF peptide fragment. Analyst, 2010;135(11):2945-51).

Additional information can be obtained by contacting C.M. Rose, Santa Clara University, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Santa Clara, CA USA.

Copyright © 2010 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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Studies from Santa Clara University in the area of proteomics published
11/08/2010
NewsRx.com

2010 NOV 8 - () -- Current study results from the report, 'Capillary electrophoretic development of aptamers for a glycosylated VEGF peptide fragment,' have been published (see also ). "The emergence of functional genomics and proteomics has added to the growing need for improved analysis methods that can detect and distinguish between protein variants resulting from allelic variation, mutation, or post-translational modification. Aptamers, single-stranded DNA or RNA molecules that fold into three-dimensional structures conducive to binding targets, have become an attractive alternative to antibodies for this type of analysis," scientists writing in the journal Analyst report.

"Although aptamers have been developed for a wide range of target species, very few sequences have been identified that bind selectively to proteins with specific post-translational modifications. Using capillary electrophoresis-based selection, we have developed DNA aptamer sequences that selectively bind an N-glycosylated peptide fragment of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The selection method incorporates alternating positive-and counter-selection steps in free solution in order to obtain aptamers with both high affinity toward the glycosylated target and high selectivity versus a non-glycosylated variant. Affinity capillary electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance binding assays indicate these sequences have low-M dissociation constants and preferentially bind the glycosylated peptide with as much as 50-fold specificity," wrote C.M. Rose and colleagues, Santa Clara University.

The researchers concluded: "Such aptamers could serve as tools for rapid and simple monitoring of disease-linked functional changes in proteins, with potential applications in drug screening and disease diagnosis."

Rose and colleagues published their study in Analyst (Capillary electrophoretic development of aptamers for a glycosylated VEGF peptide fragment. Analyst, 2010;135(11):2945-51).

Additional information can be obtained by contacting C.M. Rose, Santa Clara University, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Santa Clara, CA USA.

Copyright © 2010 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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Business expected to drive recovery
11/07/2010
San Francisco Chronicle

Recovery: "moderate." Unemployment: likely to remain high for a while longer. As is a "high level of uncertainty."

Those are some of the forecasts about the U.S. and world economy that Bay Area clients such as Chevron, Visa, Intel and Seagate Technology are hearing from British global consultancy Oxford Economics.

But recovery depends on corporations investing the hoards of cash they've been sitting on, the firm's CEO, Adrian Cooper, told a small gathering of local executives from, among others, Visa, Wells Fargo and Macy's in San Francisco on Friday.

"Consumers won't drive it - they're still fixing their own balance sheets." The U.S. government, like others, "can't do much. It will have to cut back fiscally. How the corporate sector responds will determine the shape of the recovery," he said at a breakfast meeting hosted by the San Francisco Center for Economic Development.

Given the aforementioned uncertainty - plus continuing excess capacity, debt levels and "very weak" corporate lending by "weak banks" - the desired response is no sure thing, he added.

Best case: Cooper, a former British Treasury official, was in town to mark the opening of the firm's San Francisco office. "It's an international-looking business city, and it's a great place from which to support our West Coast clients," which include Microsoft and Boeing ( www.oef.com).

For the United States, best-case scenario, according to one of Cooper's slides, is "a gradual rise in business confidence," which hopefully will encourage increased investment, resulting in a modest 2.5 percent increase in gross domestic product next year and 3.5 percent in 2012.

The slide was titled "Outlook still highly uncertain."

Compare that with the "emerging economies" beyond the United States and most of Europe, where the recovery has been so much stronger and closer to double-digit growth seems more assured. "Increasingly, businesses here need to pay attention to these markets," he said.

As for California, struggling to recover from the collapse in real estate, construction and retail: Cooper believes the private sector, led by high tech - including clean tech, in which he sees "huge opportunities"- will soon "outstrip" growth in the rest of the nation.

We trust he wasn't being extra nice on account of where he was.

What uncertainty? Sales of small and midsize businesses in California are on the upswing, and that's a good thing.

According to Dublin's BizBen.com, which tracks monthly sales statewide, there were 1,384 completed transactions in October, the highest all year.

CEO Peter Siegel put the numbers down to the "greater certainty on the part of entrepreneurs - largely because we're starting to see lenders making funds available to complete deals."

San Francisco registered 84 transactions, a 38 percent increase over September, according to BizBen's count.

Siegel said backing from the U.S. Small Business Administration has a lot to do with it.

After the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act became law in September, there were calls from lenders ready to do business, and individuals wanting access to borrowed funds and asking how to get their SBA loan applications together.

Acting globally: A program developed by Redwood City's nonprofit Blue Planet Network was one of Saturday night's honorees, and recipient of a $50,000 prize, for "technology and innovation benefiting humanity."

The awards were presented by the San Jose's Tech Museum and the Center for Science, Technology and Society at Santa Clara University.

The project, called Peer Water Exchange, is a Web-based platform connecting agencies, developers and funders involved in small-scale water and sanitation projects ( www.peerwater.org).

Four other "laureates" receiving $50,000 at the Tech Museum ceremony were:

-- A Single Drop for Safe Water, a Philippine social enterprise organization focusing on community organizing, education and project implementation involving access to clean water ( www.asdforsafewater.org).

-- Alexis Belonio, an agricultural engineering professor at Central Philippines University, for developing a process of releasing gas from rice husks to power electricity generators (sfgate.com/ZKNZ).

-- BBC World Service Trust, which transmits audio and SMS English lessons to mobile phone users in Bangladesh for less than 1.5 cents per minute (sfgate.com/ZKNY).

-- Venkatesh Mannar, president of Ottawa's Micronutrient Initiative, for his role in developing salt iodization to bolster supplements, like vitamin A and zinc, to combat "micronutrient deficiencies" (also known as "hidden hunger") that afflict millions in the developing world (sfgate.com/ZKOA).

More on the awards, and other laureates, at www.techawards.org.

Copyright © 2010 San Francisco Chronicle

Return to Top



Business, not consumers, expected to prod recovery | View Clip
11/07/2010
San Francisco Chronicle - Online

Recovery: "moderate." Unemployment: likely to remain high for a while longer. As is a "high level of uncertainty."

Those are some of the forecasts about the U.S. and world economy that Bay Area clients such as Chevron, Visa, Intel and Seagate Technology are hearing from British global consultancy Oxford Economics.

But recovery depends on corporations investing the hoards of cash they've been sitting on, the firm's CEO, Adrian Cooper, told a small gathering of local executives from, among others, Visa, Wells Fargo and Macy's in San Francisco on Friday.

"Consumers won't drive it - they're still fixing their own balance sheets." The U.S. government, like others, "can't do much. It will have to cut back fiscally. How the corporate sector responds will determine the shape of the recovery," he said at a breakfast meeting hosted by the San Francisco Center for Economic Development.

Given the aforementioned uncertainty - plus continuing excess capacity, debt levels and "very weak" corporate lending by "weak banks" - the desired response is no sure thing, he added.

Best case: Cooper, a former British Treasury official, was in town to mark the opening of the firm's San Francisco office. "It's an international-looking business city, and it's a great place from which to support our West Coast clients," which include Microsoft and Boeing ( www.oef.com).

For the United States, best-case scenario, according to one of Cooper's slides, is "a gradual rise in business confidence," which hopefully will encourage increased investment, resulting in a modest 2.5 percent increase in gross domestic product next year and 3.5 percent in 2012.

The slide was titled "Outlook still highly uncertain."

Compare that with the "emerging economies" beyond the United States and most of Europe, where the recovery has been so much stronger and closer to double-digit growth seems more assured. "Increasingly, businesses here need to pay attention to these markets," he said.

As for California, struggling to recover from the collapse in real estate, construction and retail: Cooper believes the private sector, led by high tech - including clean tech, in which he sees "huge opportunities"- will soon "outstrip" growth in the rest of the nation.

We trust he wasn't being extra nice on account of where he was.

What uncertainty? Sales of small and midsize businesses in California are on the upswing, and that's a good thing.

According to Dublin's BizBen.com, which tracks monthly sales statewide, there were 1,384 completed transactions in October, the highest all year.

CEO Peter Siegel put the numbers down to the "greater certainty on the part of entrepreneurs - largely because we're starting to see lenders making funds available to complete deals."

San Francisco registered 84 transactions, a 38 percent increase over September, according to BizBen's count.

Siegel said backing from the U.S. Small Business Administration has a lot to do with it.

After the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act became law in September, there were calls from lenders ready to do business, and individuals wanting access to borrowed funds and asking how to get their SBA loan applications together.

Acting globally: A program developed by Redwood City's nonprofit Blue Planet Network was one of Saturday night's honorees, and recipient of a $50,000 prize, for "technology and innovation benefiting humanity."

The awards were presented by the San Jose's Tech Museum and the Center for Science, Technology and Society at Santa Clara University.

The project, called Peer Water Exchange, is a Web-based platform connecting agencies, developers and funders involved in small-scale water and sanitation projects ( www.peerwater.org).

Four other "laureates" receiving $50,000 at the Tech Museum ceremony were:

-- A Single Drop for Safe Water, a Philippine social enterprise organization focusing on community organizing, education and project implementation involving access to clean water ( www.asdforsafewater.org).

-- Alexis Belonio, an agricultural engineering professor at Central Philippines University, for developing a process of releasing gas from rice husks to power electricity generators (sfgate.com/ZKNZ).

-- BBC World Service Trust, which transmits audio and SMS English lessons to mobile phone users in Bangladesh for less than 1.5 cents per minute (sfgate.com/ZKNY).

-- Venkatesh Mannar, president of Ottawa's Micronutrient Initiative, for his role in developing salt iodization to bolster supplements, like vitamin A and zinc, to combat "micronutrient deficiencies" (also known as "hidden hunger") that afflict millions in the developing world (sfgate.com/ZKOA).

More on the awards, and other laureates, at www.techawards.org.

This article appeared on page D - 1 of the San Francisco Chronicle

Return to Top



Did Jammie Thomas case backfire on file sharers? | View Clip
11/07/2010
CNET News.com

Jammie Thomas-Rasset was supposed to lead the major labels into a trap.

Proponents of less restrictive copyright laws predicted that the decision by the four biggest record labels to drag a single mother of modest means into court for allegedly sharing music over the Web would lead them into a legal, political, and public relations killing field.

Since 2006, when Thomas-Rasset first refused to settle the copyright complaint brought against her by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the labels' trade group, her supporters said her case would illustrate how impossible it was to definitively prove who was sitting at a computer when music files were illegally distributed over file-sharing networks. If she somehow lost her case, then it would cast a bright light on the unfairness of assessing huge damage awards on people who download music for their own use.

Many predicted the court fight would prove the futility of filing these kinds of lawsuits and discourage others from filing them.

But on Wednesday, Thomas-Rasset saw the third jury of her peers vote against her. This time, since the Minnesota native had already been found liable of copyright infringement, the jury was tasked only with determining what she should pay in damages. They came down hard, assessing an amount of $62,500 for each of the 24 songs she was accused of illegally sharing. The total she owes is now $1.5 million.

This fight is a long way from being over. Thomas-Rasset's attorneys have vowed to continue to fight. They will likely argue that these types of damage awards for copyright infringement are unconstitutional. The case is likely headed to the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals or maybe even the Supreme Court. But all of that is still a ways off. In the meantime, her losses are arming copyright owners with valuable credibility and precedents. After four years of legal maneuvering and three separate trials, the evidence suggests that Thomas-Rasset's case was the wrong one to challenge the nation's copyright laws.

The RIAA can now point to three separate juries that believed a fair damages amount for Thomas-Rasset to pay was respectively: $222,000, $1.9 million, and $1.5 million. The range for statutory damages for each instance of copyright infringement is between $750 and $150,000. Instead, the juries in the Thomas-Rasset trials chose $9,250, $80,000, and $62,500.

Jammie Thomas-Rasset

(Credit: Jammie Thomas-Rasset)

In the first trial, the judge tossed the award because he said he erred in instructing the jury. In the second trial, the judge reduced the $1.9 million amount to $54,000 and the RIAA appealed, which is how we ended up with this third trial. Should the judge consider reducing the $1.5 million amount, the RIAA can now point to three jury verdicts and argue that he is the one out of step.

Jennifer Pariser, the RIAA's senior vice president of legal affairs and litigation, said in an interview with CNET on Thursday that plenty of opponents have argued that Congress set the range for statutory damages on copyright infringement before the digital age and did so to discourage the commercial pirating of music and films. The amounts were not meant for individual users who just want to hear some tunes.

Pariser rejects the notion that the range doesn't apply in the file-sharing era or that lawmakers would necessarily reduce them now. She said the decisions by the juries in the Thomas-Rasset trials support that argument. "Ordinary Americans could have chosen figures at the lowest range of the statutory guidelines [for a total amount of $18,000] but went much higher."

When it came to proving that it was Thomas-Rasset who shared the songs, the RIAA won the first trial by showing that the 24 songs in question were shared on the Kazaa file-sharing network from Thomas-Rasset's Internet protocol address and using her Kazaa username. The jury made up its mind to rule against her in the first five minutes of deliberation, one member Wired.com.

Juries don't seem to like or believe Thomas-Rasset, another one of the liabilities in her case. On the stand, she was at times combative and even suggested that her own children or boyfriend may have downloaded the music.

As for the music industry's image, there's no question it took a beating with music fans as a result of the trials. The PR hits, however, have been mitigated by the benefits of winning three high-profile jury decisions, complete with wince-inducing damage awards. The shock-and-awe factor of those awards is sure to provide copyright owners with a powerful cautionary tale.

Jennifer Pariser, the RIAA's senior vice president of legal affairs.

(Credit: RIAA)

The music industry may have given up on suing people for illegal file sharing two years ago, but the Thomas-Rasset case has thus far failed to deter other copyright owners from taking up where the RIAA left off. A growing number of independent film studios and adult-film makers this year began suing suspected illegal file sharers at a far faster rate than the RIAA ever did. This week, Kenneth Ford, one of the lawyers representing several adult-film makers, filed a lawsuit against a total of nearly 10,000 alleged illegal file sharers. In just the past two weeks, Ford has filed against nearly 17,000 people.

Lawyers representing those filmmakers can now carry the damages amount against Thomas-Rassets into the negotiations with suspected film pirates. The copyright owners can use her to illustrate that refusing to settle is risky. The lawyers could lay it out like this: The decision should rest on simple arithmetic. Thomas-Rasset could have settled with the RIAA for about $3,000. Instead, she fought--and the least amount she's been on the hook for since is $54,000.

For copyright owners, that's a big stick to wield. The vast majority of people accused by the RIAA during its five-year litigation campaign decided to settle for a few thousand dollars. The same goes for the copyright cases brought by indie film studios, according to the lawyers representing the defendants.

Tyler Ochoa, a law professor at Santa Clara University, said that the big problem isn't Thomas-Rasset's case.

"The law is on [the copyright owners'] side right now," Ochoa said. "The notion that there is a personal use exception to copyright has pretty much disappeared in recent years."

The good news for the file-sharing crowd is that there are other potential challenges to copyright law rising out of the suits filed by indie film studios. Some of the attorneys representing those accused by the filmmakers say there's a growing number of people who say they are innocent and are determined not to settle. Robert Talbot, a law professor at the University of San Francisco, represents 23 defendants.

"I have a couple of cases that would be good to take all the way."

Return to Top



Did Jammie Thomas case backfire on file sharers? | View Clip
11/07/2010
CNET.com - New York Bureau

Jammie Thomas-Rasset was supposed to lead the major labels into a trap.

Proponents of less restrictive copyright laws predicted that the decision by the four biggest record labels to drag a single mother of modest means into court for allegedly sharing music over the Web would lead them into a legal, political, and public relations killing field.

"Ordinary Americans could have chosen figures at the lowest range of the statutory guidelines but went much higher."

--RIAA attorney

Since 2006, when Thomas-Rasset first refused to settle the copyright complaint brought against her by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the labels' trade group, her supporters said her case would illustrate how impossible it was to definitively prove who was sitting at a computer when music files were illegally distributed over file-sharing networks. If she somehow lost her case, then it would cast a bright light on the unfairness of assessing huge damage awards on people who download music for their own use.

Many predicted the court fight would prove the futility of filing these kinds of lawsuits and discourage others from filing them.

But on Wednesday, Thomas-Rasset saw the third jury of her peers vote against her. This time, since the Minnesota native had already been found liable of copyright infringement, the jury was tasked only with determining what she should pay in damages. They came down hard, assessing an amount of $62,500 for each of the 24 songs she was accused of illegally sharing. The total she owes is now $1.5 million.

This fight is a long way from being over. Thomas-Rasset's attorneys have vowed to continue to fight. They will likely argue that these types of damage awards for copyright infringement are unconstitutional. The case is likely headed to the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals or maybe even the Supreme Court. But all of that is still a ways off. In the meantime, her losses are arming copyright owners with valuable credibility and precedents. After four years of legal maneuvering and three separate trials, the evidence suggests that Thomas-Rasset's case was the wrong one to challenge the nation's copyright laws.

The RIAA can now point to three separate juries that believed a fair damages amount for Thomas-Rasset to pay was respectively: $222,000, $1.9 million, and $1.5 million. The range for statutory damages for each instance of copyright infringement is between $750 and $150,000. Instead, the juries in the Thomas-Rasset trials chose $9,250, $80,000, and $62,500.

Jammie Thomas-Rasset

In the first trial, the judge tossed the award because he said he erred in instructing the jury. In the second trial, the judge reduced the $1.9 million amount to $54,000 and the RIAA appealed, which is how we ended up with this third trial. Should the judge consider reducing the $1.5 million amount, the RIAA can now point to three jury verdicts and argue that he is the one out of step.

Jennifer Pariser, the RIAA's senior vice president of legal affairs and litigation, said in an interview with CNET on Thursday that plenty of opponents have argued that Congress set the range for statutory damages on copyright infringement before the digital age and did so to discourage the commercial pirating of music and films. The amounts were not meant for individual users who just want to hear some tunes.

Pariser rejects the notion that the range doesn't apply in the file-sharing era or that lawmakers would necessarily reduce them now. She said the decisions by the juries in the Thomas-Rasset trials support that argument. "Ordinary Americans could have chosen figures at the lowest range of the statutory guidelines [for a total amount of $18,000] but went much higher."

When it came to proving that it was Thomas-Rasset who shared the songs, the RIAA won the first trial by showing that the 24 songs in question were shared on the Kazaa file-sharing network from Thomas-Rasset's Internet protocol address and using her Kazaa username. The jury made up its mind to rule against her in the first five minutes of deliberation, one member Wired.com.

Juries don't seem to like or believe Thomas-Rasset, another one of the liabilities in her case. On the stand, she was at times

combative and even suggested that her own children or boyfriend may have downloaded the music.

As for the music industry's image, there's no question it took a beating with music fans as a result of the trials. The PR hits, however, have been mitigated by the benefits of winning three high-profile jury decisions, complete with wince-inducing damage awards. The shock-and-awe factor of those awards is sure to provide copyright owners with a powerful cautionary tale.

Jennifer Pariser, the RIAA's senior vice president of legal affairs.

The music industry may have given up on suing people for illegal file sharing two years ago, but the Thomas-Rasset case has thus far failed to deter other copyright owners from taking up where the RIAA left off. A growing number of independent film studios and adult-film makers this year began suing suspected illegal file sharers at a far faster rate than the RIAA ever did. This week, Kenneth Ford, one of the lawyers representing several adult-film makers, filed a lawsuit against a total of nearly 10,000 alleged illegal file sharers. In just the past two weeks, Ford has filed against nearly 17,000 people.

Lawyers representing those filmmakers can now carry the damages amount against Thomas-Rassets into the negotiations with suspected film pirates. The copyright owners can use her to illustrate that refusing to settle is risky. The lawyers could lay it out like this: The decision should rest on simple arithmetic. Thomas-Rasset could have settled with the RIAA for about $3,000. Instead, she fought--and the least amount she's been on the hook for since is $54,000.

For copyright owners, that's a big stick to wield. The vast majority of people accused by the RIAA during its five-year litigation campaign decided to settle for a few thousand dollars. The same goes for the copyright cases brought by indie film studios, according to the lawyers representing the defendants.

Tyler Ochoa, a law professor at Santa Clara University, said that the big problem isn't Thomas-Rasset's case.

"The law is on [the copyright owners'] side right now," Ochoa said. "The notion that there is a personal use exception to copyright has pretty much disappeared in recent years."

The good news for the file-sharing crowd is that there are other potential challenges to copyright law rising out of the suits filed by indie film studios. Some of the attorneys representing those accused by the filmmakers say there's a growing number of people who say they are innocent and are determined not to settle. Robert Talbot, a law professor at the University of San Francisco, represents 23 defendants.

"I have a couple of cases that would be good to take all the way."

E-mail Greg Sandoval

If you have a question or comment for Greg Sandoval, you can submit it here. However, because our editors and writers receive hundreds of requests, we cannot tell you when you may receive a response.

Greg Sandoval covers media and digital entertainment for CNET News. He is a former reporter for The Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times. , or follow him on Twitter at @sandoCNET.

Return to Top



Outfit told to stop selling class notes
11/07/2010
Sunday Gazette-Mail

NoteUtopia, a startup company for college students founded by a young Sacramento State graduate, has been ordered to "cease and desist" by the California State University system chancellor's office, which said the company is violating state education codes that prohibit students from selling their class notes.

The ban came just weeks after Ryan Stevens launched his company sort of an eBay for college students to buy and sell their study materials with back-to-school booths in September at CSU Sacramento, Chico and East Bay.

The 10-year-old law that prompted the ban is so obscure that it caught NoteUtopia's founder, campus officials and Internet law experts by surprise.

Eric Goldman, director of the High-Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University Law School and a professor of Internet law, said "many people had no idea it's on the books."

But while the law may be a sleeper, the issue of what students can do with material taken from class lectures "comes up with some regularity," Goldman noted. It's at the heart of an academic and legal debate on intellectual property rights involving how classroom content is shared among students.

Stevens, a June graduate who launched the idea in a California State University-Sacramento, business entrepreneurship class, said he was "shocked" by the ban, especially since he was granted permits and paid daily fees as high as $500 a day at CSUS to pass out NoteUtopia fliers and marketing materials at three state college campuses.

In a Sept. 21 letter, CSU University Counsel Gale Baker told Stevens that NoteUtopia violates a state education code section that prohibits anyone from selling or disseminating "academic presentations" for commercial purposes, including handwritten class notes.

"This means that any CSU student posting class notes for sale on your website is subject to discipline, up through and including expulsion from the university," Baker wrote.

Stevens was directed to immediately cease selling class notes in California, to stop marketing NoteUtopia to students at all 23 CSU campuses and place a prominent notice on the website that such sales are prohibited.

In a subsequent e-mail to CSUS students, Lori Varlotta, the campus's vice president for student affairs, repeated the warning that students buying or selling class notes risk penalties, including possible expulsion. Other campuses issued similar warnings.

The warnings prompted about 15 students to cancel their NoteUtopia accounts, said Stevens, 22, who declined to give the total number of members.

Stevens isn't backing down. He said he's complied with the CSU counsel's requests, but he's also contacted an attorney and Internet law experts about fighting the statute in court.

"If students are writing their own notes on what a teacher is saying, we don't see why the state can tell them what they can do or cannot do with that material. It's a violation of students' rights."

Further, Stevens says CSU officials are harming his fledgling company's reputation. "They're leaving the impression that we're an illegal website. And that's not true."

The website offers a number of other services that apparently aren't prohibited by California law. Students can still upload for free or for sale other class-related items such as exam study guides, chapter outlines and released quizzes and exams.

NoteUtopia touts itself as a way for "well-performing" students to earn some cash by uploading their class notes and other study guides, at suggested rates of $1 to $3. Students who've had to miss class or whose own notes may be "incomplete or not as comprehensive" can purchase what they need. NoteUtopia collects a few cents from every transaction.

"What I'm doing is truly a good thing," said Stevens, a San Francisco resident. "I'm not giving them answers to a test under the table. It's students helping other students do better in school. What else could a professor want?"

Whether NoteUtopia can survive without the ability of California students to buy or sell class notes is unclear. Stevens said he's had students join since the controversy erupted.

"You could take one piece away from one state [California] and the business could still flourish," said Goldman.

But if NoteUtopia intends to challenge California's statute, the legal battle could be so costly it would "dwarf the business," said Goldman. "The real tragedy for small businesses is that it's very expensive to be an entrepreneur in our society today. If [NoteUtopia] can't afford to wade into these cloudy legal areas," it may not survive.

MCT photo

Ryan Stevens, who founded NoteUtopia.com, set up a booth on the Sacramento State University campus in Sacramento, Calif., Sept. 13. NoteUtopia.com allowed students buy and sell their college notes and study guides.

Copyright © 2010 Charleston Newspapers

Return to Top



Valley Stars | View Clip
11/07/2010
InsideBayArea.com

Contra Costa Times

Adam Nunez was named to the spring dean's list at Azusa Pacific University. He is a 2007 graduate of Granada High School in Livermore.

Accomplishments

St. Isidore School in Danville placed third in the Book of World Records for summer reading with a total of 822,459 minutes. Top readers by grade were: kindergarten, Cole Deviney, 4,391 minutes; first grade, Lily Bowes, 5,258; second grade, Emmy Dunn, 11,324; third grade, Emily Wolfert, 7,014; fourth grade, Cole Leone, 8,300; fifth grade, Amelia Clute, 8,078; sixth grade, Christine DeMartini, 15,426; seventh grade, Tanya Yakoubovsky, 6,028; and eighth grade, Jessie Stauber, 7,290.

Da Eun Kim on violin and Anna Lorenz on harp were the winners of the Competition for Young Musicians, sponsored by the Livermore-Amador Symphony Association. Da Eun is a sophomore at Amador Valley High School in Pleasanton. Anna is a junior who is home-schooled. They will perform as soloists with the symphony at its Feb. 12 concert.

Army Pvt. Nathan B. Hewitt has graduated from Basic Combat Training at Fort Sill in Lawton, Okla. He is the son of Beth and Darrel Hewitt, of Livermore, and a 2006 graduate of Ceila Christian Academy in Livermore.

Isaias P. Lopez has graduated from the Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps Leader's Training Course

at Fort Knox, Ky. He is the son Vicente Lopez, of Lathrop. He is a 2006 graduate of Sierra High School in Manteca and currently attends Santa Clara University.

Jeremiah S. Boehner graduated from the Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps Leader's Development and Assessment Course, at Fort Lewis in Tacoma, Wash. He is the son of Heather and William Boehner, of Pleasanton. He is a 2003 graduate of Amador Valley High School in Pleasanton and currently attends the University of San Francisco.

Army Reserve Spec. Suzanne R. Dodge has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson in Columbia, S.C. She is the daughter of Rhonda Dodge, of Castro Valley. She is a 2001 graduate of Castro Valley High School and a 2005 graduate of UC Berkeley.

Navy Seaman Recruit Kelli M. Davis recently completed Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill. She is the daughter of Karen and stepdaughter of Steven Powell, of Livermore, and a 2003 graduate of Livermore High School.

Air Force Airman 1st Class Mark Anthony M. Gamba graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio. He is the son of Catherine Valerio and a 2010 graduate of Merrill F. West High School in Tracy.

Air Force Airman 1st Class Michael J. Acosta-Fay graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio. He is the son of Luz Acosta and a 2009 graduate of Merrill F. West High School in Tracy.

Navy Seaman Michael W. Luke recently completed Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill. He is a 2001 graduate of Venture High School in San Ramon.

Valley Stars is written by Louise Hartman. Contact her at 925-847-2111, by e-mail at vtletters@bayareanewsgroup.com or send a fax to 925-847-2189.

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Business, not consumers, expected to prod recovery | View Clip
11/06/2010
San Francisco Chronicle - Online

Recovery: "moderate." Unemployment: likely to remain high for a while longer. As is a "high level of uncertainty."

Those are some of the forecasts about the U.S. and world economy that Bay Area clients such as Chevron, Visa, Intel and Seagate Technology are hearing from British global consultancy Oxford Economics.

But recovery depends on corporations investing the hoards of cash they've been sitting on, the firm's CEO, Adrian Cooper, told a small gathering of local executives from, among others, Visa, Wells Fargo and Macy's in San Francisco on Friday.

"Consumers won't drive it - they're still fixing their own balance sheets." The U.S. government, like others, "can't do much. It will have to cut back fiscally. How the corporate sector responds will determine the shape of the recovery," he said at a breakfast meeting hosted by the San Francisco Center for Economic Development.

Given the aforementioned uncertainty - plus continuing excess capacity, debt levels and "very weak" corporate lending by "weak banks" - the desired response is no sure thing, he added.

Best case: Cooper, a former British Treasury official, was in town to mark the opening of the firm's San Francisco office. "It's an international-looking business city, and it's a great place from which to support our West Coast clients," which include Microsoft and Boeing ( www.oef.com

For the United States, best-case scenario, according to one of Cooper's slides, is "a gradual rise in business confidence," which hopefully will encourage increased investment, resulting in a modest 2.5 percent increase in next year and 3.5 percent in 2012.

The slide was titled "Outlook still highly uncertain."

Compare that with the "emerging economies" beyond the United States and most of Europe, where the recovery has been so much stronger and closer to double-digit growth seems more assured. "Increasingly, businesses here need to pay attention to these markets," he said.

As for California, struggling to recover from the collapse in real estate, construction and retail: Cooper believes the private sector, led by high tech - including clean tech, in which he sees "huge opportunities"- will soon "outstrip" growth in the rest of the nation.

We trust he wasn't being extra nice on account of where he was.

What uncertainty? Sales of small and midsize businesses in California are on the upswing, and that's a good thing.

According to Dublin's BizBen.com, which tracks monthly sales statewide, there were 1,384 completed transactions in October, the highest all year.

CEO Peter Siegel put the numbers down to the "greater certainty on the part of entrepreneurs - largely because we're starting to see lenders making funds available to complete deals."

San Francisco registered 84 transactions, a 38 percent increase over September, according to BizBen's count.

Siegel said backing from the U.S. has a lot to do with it.

After the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act became law in September, there were calls from lenders ready to do business, and individuals wanting access to borrowed funds and asking how to get their SBA loan applications together.

Acting globally: A program developed by Redwood City's nonprofit Blue Planet Network was one of Saturday night's honorees, and recipient of a $50,000 prize, for "technology and innovation benefiting humanity."

The awards were presented by the San Jose's Tech Museum and the Center for Science, Technology and Society at Santa Clara University.

The project, called Peer Water Exchange, is a Web-based platform connecting agencies, developers and funders involved in small-scale water and sanitation projects ( www.peerwater.org

Four other "laureates" receiving $50,000 at the Tech Museum ceremony were:

-- A Single Drop for Safe Water, a Philippine social enterprise organization focusing on community organizing, education and project implementation involving access to clean water ( www.asdforsafewater.org

-- Alexis Belonio, an agricultural engineering professor at Central Philippines University, for developing a process of releasing gas from rice husks to power electricity generators (sfgate.com/ZKNZ). -- Trust, which transmits audio and SMS English lessons to mobile phone users in Bangladesh for less than 1.5 cents per minute (sfgate.com/ZKNY).

-- Venkatesh Mannar, president of Ottawa's Micronutrient Initiative, for his role in developing salt iodization to bolster supplements, like vitamin A and zinc, to combat "micronutrient deficiencies" (also known as "hidden hunger") that afflict millions in the developing world (sfgate.com/ZKOA).

More on the awards, and other laureates, at www.techawards.org

Blogging at sfgate.com/columns/bottomline. Facebook page: sfg.ly/doACKM. Tweeting: @andrewsross. E-mail: bottomline@sfchronicle.com.

This article appeared on page D - 1 of the

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But what else? We went to private Santa clara University With an acceptance rate of 58%.
11/06/2010
Today In Iowa - WHO-TV

Vicky Nguyen reports. admission "" this is what four years of High School looks like to an admissions officer. A single folder And an online application Somewhere in here The elements that make you a yes Or a no. "Its very stressful its on my mind 24/7. " "Three's so many little bits and you're not quite sure what every college is looking at. " "I pack my schedule pretty full cum gpa unweighted is 3.8. " A solid gpa and good test scores Everyone knows you start there. But what else? We went to private Santa clara University With an acceptance rate of 58%. "We read every single essay the students submit. " And public California state University east bay Acceptance rate 31%. "They have a perfect gpa. " To find out How you avoid ending up here. S/ Mike sexton/Santa clara University : 51-: 57 "all of our faculty want students who can write whether you're engineering or business or english. " Santa clara's Mike sexton says showcase your ability to write. Write about something personal And specific. S/ Mike sexton/Santa clara University 1:04-1:13 "if they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. " "Not all 4.0'S are created equal . " What he means is: each application goes through a system that looks beyond grades At things like "course rigor" "how challenging was course work. " "We know some schools will be more challenging than others. " And "senior load" that means, no slacking off before graduation. Take a look at the application of a student who got in last year: a full load of tough classes, varsity sports, drama, and summer jobs. When it comes to activities, better to be a drama, and summer jobs. When it comes to activities, better to be a leader in a few clubs Than a member of many. "About 5000 end up here in denied files? " "That's correct. " Across the bay at csu east bay "We had record number of applications. " Greg Smith says essays, recommendation letters, and activities Are not part of the admissions process! Test scores and a minimum 2.0 Gpa are all that count. S/ Dave Vasquez/ csu east bay 1:57-2:06 "whether it be b- or a b+ its a 3.0 It doesn't matter what High School its from. " Here A committee reviews the 'maybes' "they're denied but that we will look further into it and see if we can admit them as an exception" students who think they might be on the bubble Should submit a statement to explain any hardships. S/ Greg Smith/csu east bay 2:15-2:25 "they're first generation to college coming from esl background coming from schools not as well resourced we take that into account when they're applying. " "My freshman I was really nervous. " So where do parents fit in? "Its daunting its taking all three of our organizational skills " "dates and deadlines keeping it all straight " "we're here to support her as far as whatever decision she makes" the answer is all of the above And back off. S/ Mike sexton/Santa clara University 2:37-2:43 2757 from moment children are born we're preparing them to leave us and the college search process is good practice after all What ends up in the next "folder" Should be up to the student. So how many colleges should students apply to? Experts say one isn't enough and more than ten is too many. They say it's better to apply to a few schools that really interest you. [D04]late night fsx2 [e01]server we asked our number crunchers here to find a way to get you the consistently fast fiber-optic heavy duty Internet at an affordable price. So, here it is. Choose any connection speed up to 40 megs for just $19.99 A month. Seriously Any speed Any speed up to 40 megs. What can you do with that kind of power How about downloading movies without interruption Or sharing your uncle's rad ukulele video in seconds Is that a ferret wearing a top hat Hysterical Chat, video chat, blog, video blog. Not your thing Fight zombies nonstop for hours, days, weeks on end. And you can do it all wirelessly like this guy. Does that feel like $19.99 Internet to you No, sir You got that right. Choose any connection speed up to 40 megs of the seriously powerful heavy duty Internet for just $19.99 A month. Seriously.

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BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%.
11/06/2010
Channel 4 News at 6 PM - WSMV-TV

TT'S STRAIGHT AHEAON CHAEL 4 NEWS 3 3 Woman on TV ] IF YOU WON'T LET ME IN, YOU CAN'T REALLY LOVE ME. I KNOW ABOUT GAYLE. I DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU'RE TALKING ABOUT. IF YOU JUST TELL ME WHAT HAPPENED, [ ding ] [ Man ] 35TH AND ARCHER. NEXT STOP HAMILTON. [ brakes hiss ] [ Male Announcer ] NOW YOU CAN WATCH HIT TV SHOWS ON YOUR SMARTPHONE WHEN YOU GET AT&T U-VERSE TV. CALL, VISIT OR CLICK TODAY. AT&T. RETHINK POSSIBLE. 3 WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR YOUR CHILD TO GET INTO COLLEGE? IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF COUNTLESS PARENTS. SOME INSIDE INFORMATION FROM THE "PEOPLE WHO DECIDE" COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE COULD HELP. HERE'S VICKY NGUYEN WITH THE DETAILS, 3 THIS IS WHAT FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LOOKS LIKE TO AN ADMISSIONS OFFICER. A SINGLE FOLDER, AND AN ONLINE APPLICATION, SOMEWHERE IN HERE, THE ELEMENTS THAT MAKE YOU A YES, OR A NO. "ITS VERY STRESSFUL ITS ON MY MIND 24/7. " "THREE'S SO MANY LITTLE BITS AND YOU'RE NOT QUITE SURE WHAT EVERY COLLEGE IS LOOKING AT. " "I PACK MY SCHEDULE PRETTY FULL CUM GPA UNWEIGHTED IS 3.8. "A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, EVERYONE KNOWS YOU START THERE. BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. "WE READ EVERY SINGLE ESSAY THE STUDENTS SUBMIT. "AND PUBLIC CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EAST BAY, ACCEPTANCE RATE 31%. "THEY HAVE A PERFECT GPA. "TO FIND OUT, HOW YOU AVOID ENDING UP HERE. S/ MIKE SEXTON/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY : 51-: 57"ALL OF OUR FACULTY WANT STUDENTS WHO CAN WRITE WHETHER YOU'RE ENGINEERING OR BUSINESS OR ENGLISH. "SANTA CLARA'S MIKE SEXTON SAYS SHOWCASE YOUR ABILITY TO WRITE. WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. S/ MIKE SEXTON/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY 1:04-1:13"IF THEY'VE DONE TRAVEL WE DONT WANT TRAVELOGUE WE WANT TO HEAR ABOUT THE AFTERNOON THEY'RE AT WITH STUDENT IN NICARAGUA AND TALKED POLITICS. ""NOT ALL 4.0'S ARE CREATED EQUAL . "WHAT HE MEANS IS: EACH APPLICATION GOES THROUGH A SYSTEM THAT LOOKS BEYOND GRADES, AT THINGS LIKE "COURSE RIGOR""HOW CHALLENGING WAS COURSE WORK. " SCHOOL STRENGTH "WE KNOW SOME SCHOOLS WILL BE MORE CHALLENGING THAN OTHERS. "AND "SENIOR LOAD"THAT MEANS, NO SLACKING OFF BEFORE GRADUATION. TAKE A LOOK AT THE APPLICATION OF A STUDENT WHO GOT IN LAST YEAR: A FULL LOAD OF TOUGH CLASSES, VARSITY SPORTS, DRAMA, AND SUMMER JOBS. WHEN IT COMES TO ACTIVITIES, BETTER TO BE A LEADER IN A FEW CLUBS, THAN A MEMBER OF MANY. "ABOUT 5000 END UP HERE IN DENIED FILES? ""THAT'S CORRECT. " ACROSS THE BAY AT CSU EAST BAY, "WE HAD RECORD NUMBER OF APPLICATIONS. "GREG SMITH SAYS ESSAYS, RECOMMENDATION LETTERS, AND ACTIVITIES, ARE NOT PART OF THE ADMISSIONS PROCESS! TEST SCORES AND A MINIMUM 2.0 GPA ARE ALL THAT COUNT. S/ DAVE VASQUEZ/ CSU EAST BAY IT BE B- OR A B+ ITS A 3.0 IT DOESN'T MATTER WHAT HIGH SCHOOL ITS FROM.

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BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%.
11/06/2010
Channel 2 News at 10 PM - KJRH-TV

THE DRY WEATHER HAS CREATED A HAVEN FOR GRASS FIRES OVER THE PAST THREE DAYS, THIS IS VIDEO OF ONE NEAR SPERRY ON THURSDAY. MEANWHILE TODAY IN CREEK COUNTY MORE FIRES SPARKED UP. AUTHORITIES SAY A TEENAGER SUSTAINED MINOR INJURIES AND THREE MOBILE HOMES WERE DAMAGED. OFFICIALS SAY THE 17-YEAR-OLD HAD A FEW CUTS AND BRUISES AND MINOR SMOKE INHALATION BUT IS EXPECTED TO BE OKAY. CREWS WORKED ANOTHER GRASS FIRE BY INTERSTATE-44 NEAR OKLAHOMA CITY. IT FORCED TRAFFIC TO BE RE-ROUTED. A GREEN COUNTRY TEENAGER IS DEAD AND ANOTHER MAN IN THE HOSPITAL, FOLLOWING A HEAD-ON COLLISION. THE HIGHWAY PATROL SAY A MAN WAS DRIVING THE WRONG WAY ON ROUTE 66 IN ROGERS COUNTY WHEN HE HIT ANOTHER CAR LAST NIGHT. A 16-YEAR OLD FROM CLAREMORE WAS DRIVING THAT CAR AND DIED AT THE SCENE. THE OTHER DRIVER IS IN CRITICAL CONDITION. TROOPERS SAY HE HAD BEEN DRINKING. TONIGHT A FATHER WHO LOST HIS 11 YEAR OLD SON TO SUICIDE HERE IN OKLAHOMA SPEAKS OUT. HE'S FIGHTING TO STOP BULLYING. TY SMALLEY SHOT HIMSELF AFTER HE STOOD UP TO A BULLY AT SCHOOL, AND GOT SUSPENDED. HIS FATHER KIRK SPOKE AT A BULLYING PREVENTION CONFERENCE IN TULSA TODAY. HE HOPES HIS FAMILY'S STORY INSPIRES CHANGE. 24:50-11 I don't have those answers, if I did my boy would still be here. If you're not getting responses from the schools and if they're not doing anything for you, if there's a bullying issue, you need to push it up the ladder to whoever it takes to get a response. THE FREE WORKSHOP OFFERED PARENTS AND STUDENTS TECHNIQUES TO FIGHT BULLYING. OKLAHOMA GOVERNOR-ELECT MARY FALLIN PLANS TO REVIEW A PENDING ENVIRONMENTAL LAWSUIT FILED AGAINST SEVERAL ARKANSAS POULTRY COMPANIES. REPORTS SHOW THAT FALLIN IS WILLING TO TALK WITH POULTRY FARMERS AND REVIEW THE CASE WITH INCOMING ATTORNEY GENERAL SCOTT PRUITT. POULTRY FARMERS ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THE FAIRNESS OF THE CASE. CAMPAIGN FINANCE RECORDS SHOW EMPLOYEES FROM SOME OF THE COMPANIES NAMED IN THE LAWSUIT CONTRIBUTED MONEY TO PRUITT'S CAMPAIGN. WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR YOUR CHILD TO GET INTO COLLEGE? IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF COUNTLESS PARENTS. SOME INSIDE INFORMATION FROM THE PEOPLE WHO DECIDE COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE COULD HELP. VICKY NGUYEN REPORTS. THIS IS WHAT FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LOOKS LIKE TO AN ADMISSIONS OFFICER. A SINGLE FOLDER, AND AN ONLINE APPLICATION, SOMEWHERE IN HERE, THE ELEMENTS THAT MAKE YOU A YES, OR A NO. "its very stressful its on my mind 24/7. " "three's so many little bits and you're not quite sure what every college is looking at. " "i pack my schedule pretty full cum gpa unweighted is 3.8. " A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, EVERYONE KNOWS YOU START THERE. BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. "We read every single essay the students submit. " AND PUBLIC CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EAST BAY, ACCEPTANCE RATE 31%. "They have a perfect GPA. " TO FIND OUT, HOW YOU AVOID ENDING UP HERE. S/Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University : 51-: 57 "All of our faculty want students who can write whether you're engineering or business or english. " SANTA CLARA'S MIKE XTON SAYS SHOWCASE YOUR ILITY TO WRITE. WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. S/Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. " "not all 4.0's are created equal . " WHAT HE MEANS IS: EACH APPLICATION GOES THROUGH A SYSTEM THAT LOOKS BEYOND GRADES, AT THINGS LIKE "COURSE RIGOR" "how challenging was course work. " "We know some schools will be more challenging than others. " AND "SENIOR LOAD" THAT MEANS, NO SLACKING OFF BEFORE GRADUATION. TAKE A LOOK AT THE APPLICATION OF A STUDENT WHO GOT IN LAST YEAR: A FULL LOAD OF TOUGH CLASSES, VARSITY SPORTS, DRAMA, AND SUMMER JOBS. WHEN IT COMES TO ACTIVITIES, BETTER TO BE A LEADER IN A FEW CLUBS, THAN A MEMBER OF MANY. A NEW TYPE OF LED LIGHTBULB CLAIMS IT WILL SAVE YOU MONEY. CONSUMER REPORTS PUTS THEM TO THE TEST TO SEE IF THEIR CLAIMS ADD UP. CRIMINALS USE CROWBARS FOR A SMH AND GRAB. THE UNUSUAL ITEM FOR SALE IN THE GLASS CASE. THEY ARE FULL OF HOT AIR AND READY TO TAKE FLIGHT. NEXT A LOOK AT THE TEST RUN FOR THE NEWEST BALLOONS FOR THE MACY'S THANKSGIVING DAY PARADE. IN TONIGHT'S 2VIEW ON AMERICA- A STRANGE SCENE [guitar blues music] Hey it's a free country, we can do pretty much whatever we want, as long as it doesn't hurt other people.

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Channel 4 News @ 5 2010-11-06 17:25:00
11/06/2010
WSMV-TV - Online

Nashville, TN

NBC

4 WSMV

Channel 4 News @ 5

2010-11-06

17:25:00

What does it take for your child to get into college? It's a question on the minds of countless parents. Some inside information from the 'people who decide' college acceptance could help. Here's Vicky nguyen with the details 3 This is what four years of High School looks like to an admissions officer. A single folder And an online application Somewhere in here The elements that make you a yes Or a no.'Its very stressful its on my mind 24/7.' 'Three's so many little bits and you're not quite sure what every college is looking at.' 'I pack my schedule pretty full cum gpa unweighted is 3.8.'A solid gpa and good test scores Everyone knows you start there.But what else?We went to private Santa clara University With an acceptance rate of 58%.'We read every single essay the students submit.'And public California state University east bay Acceptance rate 31%. 'They have a perfect gpa.'To find out How you avoid ending up here. S/ Mike sexton/Santa clara University :51-:57'all of our faculty want students who can write whether you're engineering or business or English.'Santa clara's Mike sexton says showcase your ability to write. Write about something personal And specific.S/ Mike sexton/Santa clara University 1:04-1:13'if they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in Nicaragua and talked politics.''Not all 4.0'S are created equal .'What he means is: each application goes through a system that looks beyond grades At things like 'course rigor''how challenging was course work.' School strength 'we know some schools will be more challenging than others.'And 'senior load'that means--no slacking off before graduation. Take a look at the application of a student who got in last year:a full load of tough classes, varsity sports, drama, and summer jobs.When it comes to activities--better to be a leader in a few clubs Than a member of many. 'About 5000 end up here in denied files?''That's correct.' Across the bay at csu east bay 'We had record number of

Copyright © 2010 inewsnetwork Inc.

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Channel 4 News @ 5 2010-11-06 17:27:00
11/06/2010
WSMV-TV - Online

Nashville, TN

NBC

4 WSMV

Channel 4 News @ 5

2010-11-06

17:27:00

applications.'Greg Smith says essays, recommendation letters, and activities Are not part of the admissions process!Test scores and a minimum 2.0 Gpa are all that count.S/ Dave Vasquez/ csu east bay 1:57-2:06'whether it be b- or a b+ its a 3.0 It doesn't matter what High School its fr committee reviews the 'maybes' 'they're denied but that we will look further into it and see if we can admit them as an exception'students who think they might be on the bubble Should ssbmit a statement to explain any hardships.S/ Greg Smith/csu east bay 2:15-2:25'they're first generation to college coming from esl background coming from schools not as well resourced we take that into account when they're applying.''My freshman I was really nervous.'So where do parents fit in?'Its daunting its taking all three of our organizational skills ''dates and deadlines keeping it all straight ''we're here to support her as far as whatever decision she makes'the answer is all of the above And back off.S/ Mike sexton/Santa clara University 2:37-2:432757 from moment children are born we're preparing them to leave us and the college search process is good practiceafter all What ends up in the next 'folder' Should be up to the student. 3 That was Vicky nguyen reporting 3 3 The president is in India this weekend --- talking about creating more jobs here in the states. But some in India are sending the president a different message That's straight ahead on Channel 4 News. 3

Copyright © 2010 inewsnetwork Inc.

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ECONOMIC CRISIS PROVIDES LESSON FOR BUSINESS SCHOOL
11/06/2010
San Jose Mercury News

For S. Andrew Starbird, dean of Santa Clara University's Leavey School of Business, the fiscal crisis is a teachable moment for the nation's business schools and their students.

Starbird was named dean of the school in July. He's been a professor there for 23 years.

His research specializes in food safety, operations analysis and management, quality control, statistical analysis, modeling, inspection and the economics of information, which studies how information -- or the lack of it -- affects economic decision-making.

In an interview with the Mercury News, Starbird reflected on the recession and the mission of business schools in an era of growing mistrust about financial institutions and government.

The interview has been edited for length.

Q You research the economics of information and teach about complex decision-making. It seems like the financial industry could use a refresher course. Is the recent crash a teachable moment? And if so, in what way?

A (laughs) I'm not sure you can take contracting in food safety (one of Starbird's research areas) and apply it to the mortgage crisis. However, the problems that the economy and this county have faced over the last couple years have led a number of business schools to think hard about their role in the community and their role in the crisis. One of the things we're doing at Santa Clara is retooling our programs to reflect the new realities of what business education means in the 21st century.

Q What conclusions do you draw about how business schools have to change?

A We need to understand, and to teach students and ourselves, that business decision-making impacts clients, customers, the environment and our neighborhoods. And they (the students) need to take those things into account when they make those decisions. We also need to understand that business schools have a broader role than they have had in the past. Our role is not just to teach people to maximize their personal wealth but also to promote the economic health of the community.

Q That's a challenge for the young student just two or three years into the corporate world. How do you equip them for this?

A When they have a good grounding in applied ethics, they understand that the decisions they are going to make are going to have ethical dimensions to them and that they will have to do the hard work of discerning right and wrong, and act on understanding that difference.

Q Are students more interested in this subject now?

A I think everyone's more interested now. The crisis we are facing is partly an ethical crisis, so schools and companies need to take into account the ethical dimensions of their decision-making . That's something Santa Clara has a long history of making people do. It's part of the Jesuit education tradition.

Q Getting back to the subject of the economics of information, wasn't a lack of information partly to blame for the economic collapse of Wall Street -- these securitized slices of mortgages that were sold and resold, when nobody knew what they were worth?

A It certainly is a case of imperfect, or hidden, information. When you have imperfect information in any transaction, you have to rely on trust as a substitute for information. I think part of the problem we're facing now in the United States, in terms of the recovery being very slow, is there's a lack of trust in the financial system and indeed, in our political leadership, in addressing those problems that led to the crisis. Until consumers and businesses have regained that trust in the system, we're not going to see the growth that we need to have to make a dent in unemployment.

Q Are you hearing from alumni hit by the economic downturn?

A It's a great challenge for our current students and for our alumni. But I went to a networking event a couple of weeks ago with some of our current MBA students, and they seem to feel things are looking up compared to what they were a year ago. Recovery is going to come first to Silicon Valley. Folks are starting to see things breaking loose.

Q Is the business school doing anything to promote recovery?

A Yes. The California Program for Entrepreneurship brought 20 students here last spring. These are people who have a good idea, who are emerging entrepreneurs, but who are not quite sure how to commercialize those ideas. We put them through a series of educational programs and hooked them up with mentors and venture capitalists, all with a goal of starting a business in California and alleviating unemployment in California. The first class will graduate Nov. 14. They're a fantastic group.

Q Are there any other ways you are integrating the business school into Silicon Valley?

A Yes. For example, we have a new Leavey School of Business Case Study Program in which we send professors and students into Silicon Valley firms to write a case study on what made those companies successful, how they did it and the history of their growth. Those cases will be distributed through Harvard Business School, with a Santa Clara imprint, when they are done.

Q Anything else?

A We are expanding professional and continuing education opportunities. We have a lot of programs for Silicon Valley executives and managers, if they want to come back to school. We have, for example, a program in advanced accounting proficiency that prepares people for the CPA exam. We have a Certified Professional Equity Institute, that certifies people in equity compensation. Equity compensation is extremely important in Silicon Valley.

We work with local nonprofits to help the community in a number of ways. One way is the Hunger Index, a joint research project between the business school and Second Harvest Food Bank to come up with strategies for addressing the hunger problem. It's all part of a Jesuit tradition at Santa Clara of engaging with the community and working for the common good.

Contact Pete Carey at 408-920-5419.

Copyright © 2010 San Jose Mercury News

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From the Publisher: Will the winners act like leaders? | View Clip
11/06/2010
Business Review - Online

Date: Friday, November 5, 2010, 10:04am MST - Last Modified: Friday, November 5, 2010, 1:02pm MST

Henninger

I don't know about you, but I am relieved Election Day is over.

Reports say this has been the nastiest campaign season ever. If you don't already know that by seeing all the ads over the past few weeks, then consider this: Data analyzed by the Wesleyan Media Project, a national academic group, says 2010 turned out to be “the most negative campaign in recent history by both sides,” with a marked increase in negativity as we wound down to Election Day.

Whatever happened to the notion that if you can't say something good about somebody — even your most challenging competitor — then you simply say nothing at all and instead focus on your own strengths?

Regardless of whether your candidate won in whatever races you deemed important, we can agree on one thing: We need leadership. Perhaps as never before. We've elected men and women to start solving our problems. Now they need to start acting and performing like leaders.

What's a good leader look like? Here are some traits compiled by the Santa Clara University and the Tom Peters Group that will give youan idea:

• Honest: Display sincerity, integrity and candor in all your actions. Deceptive behavior will not inspire trust.

• Competent: Base your actions on reason and moral principles. Do not make decisions based on childlike emotional desires or feelings.

• Forward-looking: Set goals and have a vision of the future. Effective leaders envision what they want and how to get it. They habitually pick priorities stemming from their basic values.

• Inspiring: Display confidence in all that you do. By showing endurance in mental, physical and spiritual stamina, you will inspire others to reach for new heights.

• Intelligent: Read, study and seek challenging assignments and solutions to our problems.

• Fair-minded: Show fair treatment to all people. Prejudice is the enemy of justice. Display empathy by being sensitive to the feelings, values, interests and well-being of others.

• Broad-minded: Seek out diversity.

• Courageous: Have the perseverance to accomplish a goal, regardless of the seemingly insurmountable obstacles. Display a confident calmness when under stress.

• Straightforward: Use sound judgment to make good decisions at the right time.

• Imaginative: Make timely and appropriate changes in your thinking, plans and methods. Show creativity by thinking of new and better goals, ideas and solutions to problems.

• Be innovative. In business, we expect nothing less from each other.

Enough of the rhetoric and negativity. Now's the time to act like leaders.

Don Henninger can be reached at dhenninger@bizjournals.com.

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GENTLEMAN A SOLID GPA ANDED ABOUT TEST SCORES BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%.
11/06/2010
WJAR-TV

HOW TO GET YOUR KID INTO A GOOD COLLEGE. THE QUESTION ON THE MIND OF ANY PARENT, WE HAVE THE INSIDE SCOOP FROM THE PEOPLE WHO SEND OUT THE ACCEPTANCE LETTERS. Reporter: THIS IS WHAT FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LOOKS LIKE TO AN ADMISSIONS OFFICER A SINGLE FOLDER AND AN ON-LINE APPLICATION! SOMEWHERE IN HERE THE ELEMENTS THAT MAKE YOU A YES OR NO. VERY SPECIAL, ON MY MIND 24-7. SO MANY THINGS THAT YOU ARE NOT QUITE SURE WHAT EACH COLLEGE IS LOOKING FOR. I PACK MY SCHEDULE FULL, SO CUMULATIVE GPA, ABOUT 3.8. GENTLEMAN A SOLID GPA ANDED ABOUT TEST SCORES BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. WE READ EVERY SINGLE ESSAY. Reporter: AND PUBLIC CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EAST BAY, ACCEPTANCE RATE 31%. A PERFECT GPA, Reporter: TO FIND OUT HOW YOU AVOID ENDING UP HERE. WE ALL WANT STUDENTS THAT CAN WRITE. Reporter: SANTA CLARA'S MIKE SEXTON SAYS SHOWCASE YOUR ABILITY TO WRITE. WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL AND SPECIFIC. WE DON'T WANT A TRAVEL LOG BUT ABOUT THE AFTERNOON SHE SAT DOWN AND TALKED WITH ANOTHER TEENAGENER NICARAGUA ABOUT POLITICS. EACH APPLICATION GOES THROUGH A SYSTEM THAT LOOKS BEYOND GRADES AT THINGS LIKE COURSE RIGOR. HOW CHALLENGING WAS THE COURSE WORK. Reporter: SCHOOL STRENGTH. WE KNOW SOME SCHOOLS WILL BE MORE CHALLENGING. Reporter: AND SENIOR LOAD.

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It's the economy, again | View Clip
11/06/2010
Green Sheet - Online, The

ast night I dreamed it was still the 1990s. Life was good. The economy was booming. I was thinner. My colleague in the next cubicle quit her job to work in the stock market and do day-trading, whatever that was.

The biggest question in Washington was how to spend the federal budget surplus. I was about to call "WaMu" or "Indy Mac" for one of those liar-loan, no-doc, home equity refis so I could do just one more cash-out and buy another car.

But then I woke up, and I could tell I was living in the present. All that stuff from the 1990s was gone - the unbridled optimism, the budget surplus, my 401k, the equity in the house, my line of credit - well, you get the picture. And I had put on a few pounds.

Today, the biggest question in Washington is, when is the economy going to come back? The tech bubble morphed into the real estate bubble, and now potential bubbles exist in fixed income, commodities and emerging markets.

The long road to recovery

As the analyst Bob Prechter said, "We've had a whole decade of investment insanity, and in the last decade people fell in love with buying." For ISOs, this is a particularly important issue, because you get paid on the clicks that happen when somebody buys something from one of your merchants. If consumers aren't buying, you don't get paid. But you knew that already.

So, if you are an ISO or merchant level salesperson, what are the implications for your future revenues? Some people, like investment manager Ken Fisher, are optimistic.

He said, "The next 10 years are going to be just as good as the 1990s. The problems in this environment we think are so different and so new and so unique ... it's the same, stupid, old normal we've always had. We've got a great future."

Fisher feels that skepticism and pessimism are normal sentiments for investors 18 months after the bottom of a bear market. In the 1990s, the Standard & Poor's 500 Index climbed for eight of the 10 years, including five consecutive annual gains of at least 19.5 percent.

Unfortunately, the reality is that we're in a cycle. Here is a succinct explanation from writer William Galston: "As the value of assets used as collateral collapses, so does borrowing. This depresses consumption, and the real economy dips, making it harder for businesses and households to service the debts incurred during boom times.

"Consumption remains sluggish until debt is reduced to a level that can comfortably be serviced out of current income, a process that cannot proceed without an increase in the household savings rate. The larger the debt overhang, the longer it will take to work off the excess."

Some economists estimate this could take 10 years. Democrats believe the economy needs more stimulus; Republicans feel it needs lower taxes and less regulation. Meanwhile, consumers are not buying.

They are so spooked by the current unpleasantness that they have curtailed credit card usage, substituting debit for credit and paying down credit card debt with a vengeance.

This will take a big bite out of the card issuer's profits. Moreover, the economy needs 100,000 new jobs a month just to absorb entrants to the labor force. With more than 15 million people out of work, even a strong recovery will leave a large number of people on the sidelines for years. And no one can predict what job growth will be over the short term.

International pressures

Traditionally, three sectors create economic expansion: automotive, construction and financial. As a car collector, I follow what goes on in Detroit. And what has happened in the auto industry is especially pernicious.

I am reading a book called The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations? The author, Ian Bremmer, documents the rise of state capitalism and its threats to the global economy. Nowhere is this more in evidence than in Japan's approach to the American automobile market.

Guided by the official policy of full employment for all Japanese workers, the Japanese government manipulated the value of the yen and encouraged manufacturers to dump cars in the United States for most of the 1960s and 1970s at prices cheaper than they sold for at home - until they could build a dealer network and get market share here.

Recently, states lacking strong unions threw in billions of dollars worth of concessions (free land, utilities, tax abatements, etc.) so Japanese companies could build local plants in the United States and avoid tariffs. However, manufacturing comprises less than 20 percent of the price of a car; meanwhile, the profits are all repatriated to Japan.

Of course, this example is mild compared to today's state-owned companies (in China, Russia and the Arab monarchies, for example) that control the markets for oil, aviation, shipping, power generation, arms production, telecoms and more.

These governments own enormous investment funds, which are now important sources of capital and threaten American economic stability. This does not bode well for the auto industry and for U.S. industry in general.

The plugged money supply

Home building will not recover until the inventory of short sales and foreclosures is worked off - probably at least three years away. And many borrowers, including small business owners and investors, who should be able to refinance or buy homes can't do so.

Either they cannot meet new, onerous underwriting rules or they are impeded by rate penalties for non-FHA or VA loans. Conventional lenders are dependent on Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to sell their mortgages. As a result there are now just three main lenders: Wells Fargo & Co., Bank of America Corp. and JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Banks have the money to lend; they have sharply curtained the supply of money to new ventures and small businesses. Corporate cash in the bank is at an all-time high of around $2 trillion, but businesses are loading up on cash and not spending it. This is not a virtuous cycle.

For the economy to grow, productivity needs to grow. That is what boosts economic growth and living standards. The big increase in productivity began in the mid-1990s, when productivity growth (the growth in goods and services for a given level of input) rose at 2.8 percent a year - double the rate during the preceding 22 years.

While economists disagree on why this happened, a consensus is that it was due to the increased use of information technology (IT) capital, and the rate of improvement in the efficiency with which our economy produces IT capital. I have a hunch that some of the current innovations we see in the IT sector will boost productivity again.

I see new products in the payments space that, I believe, will bring big changes in payments soon, and they will benefit both merchants and consumers.

New perspectives

Sonoma County writer Michael E. Duffy said that in the midst of all our technical innovations in the payment system, "it's easy to forget that there's no economy without people. The trading of goods and services has a purpose that sometimes seems overlooked as we envision our brave new world.

"Quite simply, we need to feed, house and clothe ourselves, and to do that, we perform work in exchange for money. ... What worries me most about the future is that work is disappearing. There are only so many jobs for people without advanced training and stellar talent."

By now, you might be asking when economists became sociologists. For perspective, keep in mind that in 1979, right at the beginning of the 18-year run of bull markets, Business Week ran a cover story called "The Death of Equities," predicting a long-term bear market. It's hard to take Business Week seriously after that.

Things are not always what they seem. There are silver linings, even in a recession. For instance, here in Wine Country, we say, "With money tight, and French oak at $1,100 a barrel, we're gonna get a lot less oaky wine - and that's a good thing." So it's not all bad. Stay tuned.

Brandes Elitch, Director of Partner Acquisition for CrossCheck Inc., has been a cash management practitioner for several Fortune 500 companies, sold cash management services for major banks and served as a consultant to bankcard acquirers. A Certified Cash Manager and Accredited ACH Professional, Brandes has a Master's in Business Administration from New York University and a Juris Doctor from Santa Clara University. He can be reached at brandese@cross-check.com.

Notice to readers: These are archived articles. Contact names or information may be out of date. We regret any inconvenience.

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Mercury News interview: S. Andrew Starbird, Dean of SCU's Leavey School of Business | View Clip
11/06/2010
Los Angeles Daily News - Online

For S. Andrew Starbird, dean of Santa Clara University's Leavey School of Business, the fiscal crisis is a teachable moment for the nation's business schools and their students.

Starbird was named dean of the school in July. He's been a professor there for 23 years.

His research specializes in food safety, operations analysis and management, quality control, statistical analysis, modeling, inspection and the economics of information, which studies how information -- or the lack of it -- affects economic decision-making.

In an interview with the Mercury News, Starbird reflected on the recession and the mission of business schools in an era of growing mistrust about financial institutions and government.

The interview has been edited for length.

Q You research the economics of information and teach about complex decision-making. It seems like the financial industry could use a refresher course. Is the recent crash a teachable moment? And if so, in what way?

A (laughs) I'm not sure you can take contracting in food safety (one of Starbird's research areas) and apply it to the mortgage crisis. However, the problems that the economy and this county have faced over the last couple years have led a number of business schools to think hard about their role in the community and their role in the crisis. One of the things we're doing at Santa Clara is retooling our programs to reflect the new realities of what business

education means in the 21st century.

Q What conclusions do you draw about how business schools have to change?

A We need to understand, and to teach students and ourselves, that business decision-making impacts clients, customers, the environment and our neighborhoods. And they (the students) need to take those things into account when they make those decisions. We also need to understand that business schools have a broader role than they have had in the past. Our role is not just to teach people to maximize their personal wealth but also to promote the economic health of the community.

Q That's a challenge for the young student just two or three years into the corporate world. How do you equip them for this?

A When they have a good grounding in applied ethics, they understand that the decisions they are going to make are going to have ethical dimensions to them and that they will have to do the hard work of discerning right and wrong, and act on understanding that difference.

Q Are students more interested in this subject now?

A I think everyone's more interested now. The crisis we are facing is partly an ethical crisis, so schools and companies need to take into account the ethical dimensions of their decision-making. That's something Santa Clara has a long history of making people do. It's part of the Jesuit education tradition.

Q Getting back to the subject of the economics of information, wasn't a lack of information partly to blame for the economic collapse of Wall Street -- these securitized slices of mortgages that were sold and resold, when nobody knew what they were worth?

A It certainly is a case of imperfect, or hidden, information. When you have imperfect information in any transaction, you have to rely on trust as a substitute for information. I think part of the problem we're facing now in the United States, in terms of the recovery being very slow, is there's a lack of trust in the financial system and indeed, in our political leadership, in addressing those problems that led to the crisis. Until consumers and businesses have regained that trust in the system, we're not going to see the growth that we need to have to make a dent in unemployment.

Q Are you hearing from alumni hit by the economic downturn?

A It's a great challenge for our current students and for our alumni. But I went to a networking event a couple of weeks ago with some of our current MBA students, and they seem to feel things are looking up compared to what they were a year ago. Recovery is going to come first to Silicon Valley. Folks are starting to see things breaking loose.

Q Is the business school doing anything to promote recovery?

A Yes. The California Program for Entrepreneurship brought 20 students here last spring. These are people who have a good idea, who are emerging entrepreneurs, but who are not quite sure how to commercialize those ideas. We put them through a series of educational programs and hooked them up with mentors and venture capitalists, all with a goal of starting a business in California and alleviating unemployment in California. The first class will graduate Nov. 14. They're a fantastic group.

Q Are there any other ways you are integrating the business school into Silicon Valley?

A Yes. For example, we have a new Leavey School of Business Case Study Program in which we send professors and students into Silicon Valley firms to write a case study on what made those companies successful, how they did it and the history of their growth. Those cases will be distributed through Harvard Business School, with a Santa Clara imprint, when they are done.

Q Anything else?

A We are expanding professional and continuing education opportunities. We have a lot of programs for Silicon Valley executives and managers, if they want to come back to school. We have, for example, a program in advanced accounting proficiency that prepares people for the CPA exam. We have a Certified Professional Equity Institute, that certifies people in equity compensation. Equity compensation is extremely important in Silicon Valley.

We work with local nonprofits to help the community in a number of ways. One way is the Hunger Index, a joint research project between the business school and Second Harvest Food Bank to come up with strategies for addressing the hunger problem. It's all part of a Jesuit tradition at Santa Clara of engaging with the community and working for the common good.

Contact Pete Carey at 408-920-5419.

Five things about drew starbird

1. He's a fifth-generation San Josean from a family that goes back to the Gold Rush.

2. His grandfather was mayor of San Jose, his father served on the city planning commission and there's a Starbird Park named after his family.

3. He has a black belt in judo.

4. He rode a bull at the UC-Davis Rodeo to impress a girl. Thrown from the bull, he got the girl -- his wife of 28 years.

5. His family had a business in downtown San Jose for 110 years -- Hall & Rambo commercial insurance.

S. andrew starbird

Age: 49

Born: San Jose

Education: Bachelor's degree, UC-Davis; MBA, Santa Clara University; doctorate, Cornell University

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Poor immigrants can benefit American society | View Clip
11/06/2010
Salt Lake Tribune, The

The political atmosphere this year seems somber if not hopeless as the hopes and dreams of Latinos for humane immigration reform slip further away.

First, there was Arizona and all the copycats that have since taken pursuit; then there was the infamous “list,” the failed passage of the Dream Act, and threats to the 14th Amendment.

In the aftermath of last week's election, it's clear that Latinos in this country are facing even tougher times.

So with all the dismal news, it's ironic, if not insulting, that none of the major media outlets covered or reported on the ray of sunshine that illuminated the dark skies over Utah last weekend.

Dr. Francisco Jimenez brought that sunshine when he visited Utah for the Intermountain Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages Conference at Weber State University.

He came, he spoke, he inspired ... and very few people heard him.

A renowned linguistics professor and winner of the 2002 U.S. Professor of the Year award from the Carnegie Foundation, Jimenez, is among the “best and brightest” of immigrants in America.

Of course, to read George Chapman's op-ed (“The best and brightest immigrants in America,” Opinion, Oct. 24), one would think that the economic success and greatness of this nation depend solely on the intellectual and well-educated immigrants.

Chapman makes an impassioned argument for relaxing visa limits to allow more engineers and scientists to immigrate so they would help our economy. But the Dr. Jimenezes of this country are the real heroes, having arrived here dirt poor and with little or no education.

Not only was Jimenez a poor son of Mexican migrant farm workers, he was an undocumented immigrant (to start with).

After being deported, the family was lucky enough to secure a sponsor to help them return to California, where Jimenez, despite the instability of his transient childhood, struggled to get an education.

In fact, he said that learning and knowledge were sources of stability for him, because they were the only things he could take with him. During his conference address, he said that his mother once told him, “If you lose hope and faith, what do you have left — a TV?”

Even when Jimenez felt discouraged and considered dropping out of school to help his family, they encouraged him to continue studying.

We do not need more foreign-born engineers and scientists, as Chapman seems to be arguing; what we need, especially in the Latino community, is educational opportunities to help highly motivated people lift themselves out of poverty.

The failure to pass the Dream Act is discouraging, but a highly motivated young boy named Francisco Jimenez became a successful and highly productive citizen of this country without political advantages.

Utah's own economic bright spot is, in fact, found in the working-class Latino community, with dozens of new taqerias, mercados, etc., owned by ordinary people.

The political demagogues who had been discouraging Latinos from voting are the very people who voted against the Latino community, electing those with harsh anti-immigrant agendas.

Now who will inspire the Latino community to continue fighting and not lose hope?

In his closing comments, Jimenez voiced support for the Dream Act as well as immigration reform.

More important, he left us with his own legacy in his novels, The Circuit (Cajas de Carton) and Breaking Through (Senderos Fronterizos). He even read excerpts from the third installment in this autobiographical series, but again, very few people were there to hear it.

All Americans, especially Latinos, should read these books, acknowledging that all immigrants have something valuable to contribute to this country's greatness.

Teresa A. Swenson of Taylorsville is an adjunct professor of English as a second language at Salt Lake Community College and a member of Intermountain Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages.

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S/ MIKE SEXTON/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY 2:37-2:432757 FROM MOMENT CHILDREN ARE BORN WE'RE PREPARING THEM TO LEAVE US AND THE COLLEGE SEARCH PROCESS IS GOOD PRACTICEAFTER ALL, WHAT ENDS UP IN THE NEXT "FOLDER" SHOULD BE UP TO THE STUDENT. 3
11/06/2010
Channel 4 News at 6 PM - WSMV-TV

"HERE, A COMMITTEE REVIEWS THE DENIED BUT THAT WE WILL LOOK FURTHER INTO IT AND SEE IF WE CAN ADMIT THEM AS AN EXCEPTION"STUDENTS WHO THINK THEY MIGHT BE ON THE BUBBLE, SHOULD SSBMIT A STATEMENT TO EXPLAIN ANY HARDSHIPS. S/ GREG SMITH/CSU EAST BAY FIRST GENERATION TO COLLEGE COMING FROM ESL BACKGROUND COMING FROM SCHOOLS NOT AS WELL RESOURCED WE TAKE THAT INTO ACCOUNT WHEN THEY'RE APPLYING. ""MY FRESHMAN I WAS REALLY NERVOUS. "SO WHERE DO PARENTS FIT IN? "ITS DAUNTING ITS TAKING ALL THREE OF OUR ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS ""DATES AND DEADLINES KEEPING IT ALL STRAIGHT HERE TO SUPPORT HER AS FAR AS WHATEVER DECISION SHE MAKES"THE ANSWER IS ALL OF THE ABOVE, AND BACK OFF. S/ MIKE SEXTON/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY 2:37-2:432757 FROM MOMENT CHILDREN ARE BORN WE'RE PREPARING THEM TO LEAVE US AND THE COLLEGE SEARCH PROCESS IS GOOD PRACTICEAFTER ALL, WHAT ENDS UP IN THE NEXT "FOLDER" SHOULD BE UP TO THE STUDENT. 3 THAT WAS VICKY NGUYEN REPORTING, 3 3 THE PRESIDENT IS IN INDIA THIS WEEKEND TALKING ABOUT CREATING MORE JOBS HERE IN THE STATES. BUT SOME IN INDIA ARE SENDING THE PRESIDENT A DIFFERENT MESSAGE, THAT'S STRAIGHT AHEAD ON CHANNEL 4 NEWS.

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AND MIKE SAKSTON OF SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY SAY STUDENT WHO'S THINK THEY MIGHT BE ON THE BUBBLE SUBMIT A STATEMENT EXPLAINING THIS HARDSHIPS.
11/05/2010
KARE 11 News Sunrise - KARE-TV

DO YOU EVER WONDER TIME IS 6:22. TAKING A LIKE LIVE IN DOWNTOWN MINNEAPOLIS. SOME OF THE SUBURBS WITH DOWN IN LOWER 20s. THIS AFTERNOON WITH SUNSHINE WE'LL SEE HIGHS CLIMBING BACK UP INTO THE MID-40s. IT WILL BE A NICE DAY AND WINDS WILL BE LIGHTER. IT WARMS UP OVER THE WEEKEND. WE'RE AT 56 ON SATURDAY AND WE'RE UP TO 60 ON SUNDAY. KIM AND TIM, THE THREE DAY FORECAST FOR VARIOUS MINNESOTA AND WISCONSIN CITIES ARE THERE. MEDIUM PIMA IN MINNEAPOLIS WHO ARE NOT AT ALL HAPPY ABOUT THE CLOSURE FOR IN R NORTH HIGH SCHOOL ARE POSSIBLY MAKING HEADWAY. THE MINNEAPOLIS SUPERINTENDENT STILL WANTS TO CLOSE BUT IS OFFERING COMPROMISE. SAYS NORTH WILL CLOSE BUT THE DISTRICT WILL CREATE A NEW NORTH HIGH PROGRAM EXPECTED TO LAUNCH IN THE FALL OF 2012 BUT NOT NECESSARILY BE HOUSED AT THE CURRENT HIGH SCHOOL. IT WILL NOT BE EASY. WE WILL NEED PEOPLE TO MAINTAIN THEIR CURRENT PASSION FOR NORTH, THE MOST DIFFICULT WORK BEGINS NOW. THE NEW NORTH WILL BE DESIGNED BY SCHOOL AND CITY OFFICIALS AS WELL AS COMMUNITY MEMBERS AND STUDENTS THEMSELVES. THE SCHOOL BOARD IS EXPECTED TO VOTE ON THE RECOMMENDATION ON TUESDAY. A LOT OF PARENTS WONDER ABOUT THIS. WHAT'S IT GOING TO TAKE FOR YOUR KID TO GET INTO COLLEGE? COLLEGE GPA, GOOD TEST SCORES, YOU KNOW THAT. IS THERE ANYTHING ELSE? YES, MANY COLLEGES LOOK AT THE WORKHORSE LOAD, HOW CHALLENGING IT WAS. GPA. SENIOR LOAD, WHICH MEANS NO SLACKING OFF BEFORE GRADUATION AND ADMISSIONS EXPERTS SAY SHOWCASE YOUR ABILITY TO WRITE AND FOR THAT ESSAY WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL AND SPECIFIC. WE DON'T WANT THE TRAVEL LOG. WE WANT TO HEAR ABOUT THE AFTERNOON THEY SAT DOWN AND TALKED WITH ANOTHER TEENAGER IN NICARAGUA ABOUT POLITICS. AND MIKE SAKSTON OF SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY SAY STUDENT WHO'S THINK THEY MIGHT BE ON THE BUBBLE SUBMIT A STATEMENT EXPLAINING THIS HARDSHIPS. 2-5 MINNESOTA VIKINGS WANT TO SAVE THEIR SEASON FROM PLUMMETING ANY FURTHER AS THEY TAKE ON THE CARDINALS. BEFORE THEY GO HEAD TO HEAD WITH THE CARDS, VIKINGS, MIDDLE LINEBACKER EJHENDERSON GIVES US OUR ANSWER TO THIS WEEK'S GRIDIRON GEOGRAPHY QUESTION. VIKINGS WITH A WEEK NINE HOME GAME ARIZONA CARDINALS. STATE OF ARIZONA IS THE HOME OF ONE OF THIS COUNTRY'S NATURAL WONDERS. WHAT NATURAL TREASURE CAN BE FOUND IN ARIZONA. IS IT NIAGARA FALLS. MOUNT RUSHMORE, LAKE SUPERIOR OR THE GRAND CANYON. THE CORRECT ANSWER IS THE GRAND CANYON. CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL OF YOU WHO GOT THAT QUESTION CORRECT. AT THE END OF THE SEASON CLASSROOM WHO'S ANSWERED IT CORRECTLY WILL BE ENTERED TO WIN $1,100 FROM THE MINNESOTA VIKINGS CHILDREN'S FUN. WE STILL HAVE HALF AN HOUR OF NEWS COMING UP INCLUDING WHAT OFFICIAL IN YEMEN ARE DOING TO STEP UP SECURITY. WE ALREADY KNOW UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS WENT UP BY 25,000 LAST WEEK. HOW IS THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE FARING. HEAR WHAT ANALYSTS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT THE OCTOBER JOBLESS NUMBERS.

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BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%.
11/05/2010
NBC 2 News at Noon - WBBH-TV

WE EXPECT HIGH TEMPERATURES TO ONLY AROUND 70 OR 71 DEGREES BY MID-AFTERNOON ALONG THE COAST. MANY OTHER AREAS WILL ONLY REACH THE UPPER 60S. WINDS WILL BE VERY GUSTY OUT OF THE NORTH FROM 15-25MPH. THIS EVENING, IT WILL REMAIN BREEZY AT TIMES AS SKIES GO COMPLETELY CLEAR. OVERNIGHT LOWS WILL BE THE COLDEST SINCE MARCH AS WE FALL INTO THE UPPER 40S IN THE METRO CORRIDOR AND ALONG THE COAST WHILE INLAND LOCATIONS WILL BE IN THE LOWER 40S. ON SATURDAY, IT WONT BE AS WINDY, BUT STILL BREEZY AT TIMES. DESPITE WALL-TO- WALL SUNSHINE, TEMPERATURES WILL STRUGGLE TO GET OUT OF THE 60S. SUNDAY MORNING WILL BE THE COLDEST MORNING OF THE WEEKEND AS NEAR-RECORD LOWS ARE EXPECTED. WINDS WILL DIE DOWN, AND WITH CLEAR SKIES, WELL SEE MID 40S IN THE URBAN CORRIDOR AND ALONG THE COAST WITH NEAR 40 IN MANY INLAND AREAS. A FEW OF THE COLDEST INLAND SPOTS COULD SEE A LOW IN THE UPPER 30S. FROST IS NOT EXPECTED. SUNDAY WILL BE DELIGHTFUL WITH LIGHTER WINDS. STILL, IT WILL BE JACKET WEATHER WITH A HIGH ONLY REACHING THE LOWER 70S. A WARM UP IS FORECAST FOR NEXT WEEK WITH HIGHS BACK IN THE LOWER 80S BY WEDNESDAY. NO CHANCE OF RAIN IS IN SIGHT. WHAT IS BEING SAID, BUT IS THE FORECAST FOR OUR AREA. MUCH COLDER AIR IS FLOWING THROUGH SOUTHWEST FLORIDA BEHIND THIS MORNINGS COLD FRONT. WE EXPECT HIGH TEMPERATURES TO ONLY AROUND 70 OR 71 DEGREES BY MID-AFTERNOON ALONG THE COAST. MANY OTHER AREAS WILL ONLY REACH THE UPPER 60S. WINDS WILL BE VERY GUSTY OUT OF THE NORTH FROM 15-25MPH. THIS EVENING, IT WILL REMAIN BREEZY AT TIMES AS SKIES GO COMPLETELY CLEAR. OVERNIGHT LOWS WILL BE THE COLDEST SINCE MARCH AS WE FALL INTO THE UPPER 40S IN THE METRO CORRIDOR AND ALONG THE COAST WHILE INLAND LOCATIONS WILL BE IN THE LOWER 40S. ON SATURDAY, IT WONT BE AS WINDY, BUT STILL BREEZY AT TIMES. DESPITE WALL-TO- WALL SUNSHINE, TEMPERATURES WILL STRUGGLE TO GET OUT OF THE 60S. SUNDAY MORNING WILL BE THE COLDEST MORNING OF THE WEEKEND AS NEAR-RECORD LOWS ARE EXPECTED. WINDS WILL DIE DOWN, AND WITH CLEAR SKIES, WELL SEE MID 40S IN THE URBAN CORRIDOR AND ALONG THE COAST WITH NEAR 40 IN MANY INLAND AREAS. A FEW OF THE COLDEST INLAND SPOTS COULD SEE A LOW IN THE UPPER 30S. FROST IS NOT EXPECTED. SUNDAY WILL BE DELIGHTFUL WITH LIGHTER WINDS. STILL, IT WILL BE JACKET WEATHER WITH A HIGH ONLY REACHING THE LOWER 70S. A WARM UP IS FORECAST FOR NEXT WEEK WITH HIGHS BACK IN THE LOWER 80S BY WEDNESDAY. NO CHANCE OF RAIN IS IN SIGHT. WHAT IS BEING SAID, BUT IS THE FORECAST FOR OUR AREA. MUCH COLDER AIR IS FLOWING THROUGH SOUTHWEST FLORIDA BEHIND THIS MORNINGS COLD FRONT. WE EXPECT HIGH TEMPERATURES TO ONLY AROUND 70 OR 71 DEGREES BY MID-AFTERNOON ALONG THE COAST. MANY OTHER AREAS WILL ONLY REACH THE UPPER 60S. WINDS WILL BE VERY GUSTY OUT OF THE NORTH FROM 15-25MPH. THIS EVENING, IT WILL REMAIN BREEZY AT TIMES AS SKIES GO COMPLETELY CLEAR. START TALKING ABOUT GETTING INTO COLLEGE. VICKY NGUYEN HAS THE SCOOP FROM ADMISSIONS INSIDERS ON WHAT IT REALLY TAKES TO GET INTO THE FIRST CHOICE UNIVERSITY. THIS IS WHAT FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LOOKS LIKE TO AN ADMISSIONS OFFICER. A SINGLE FOLDER, AND AN ONLINE APPLICATION, SOMEWHERE IN HERE, THE ELEMENTS THAT MAKE YOU A YES, OR A NO. its very stressful its on my mind 24/7. threes so many little bits and youre not quite sure what every y schedule pretty full cum gpa unweighted is 3.8. A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, EVERYON E KNOWS YOU START THERE. BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. We read every single essay the students submit. AND PUBLIC CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EAST BAY, ACCEPTANCE RATE 31%. They have a perfect GPA. TO FIND OUT, HOW YOU AVOID ENDING UP HERE. S/ Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University : 51-: 57 All of our faculty want students who can write whether youre engineering or business or english. SANTA CLARAS MIKE SEXTON SAYS SHOWCASE YOUR ABILITY TO WRITE. WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. S/ Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 If theyve done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon theyre at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. not all 4.0s are created equal . WHAT HE MEANS IS: EACH APPLICATION GOES THROUGH A SYSTEM THAT LOOKS BEYOND GRADES, AT THINGS LIKE COURSE RIGOR how challenging was course work. We know some schools will be more challenging than others. AND SENIOR LOAD THAT MEANS, NO SLACKING OFF BEFORE GRADUATION. TAKE A LOOK AT THE APPLICATION OF A STUDENT WHO GOT IN LAST YEAR: A FULL LOAD OF TOUGH CLASSES, VARSITY SPORTS, DRAMA, AND SUMMER JOBS.

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But what else? We went to private Santa clara University With an acceptance rate of 58%.
11/05/2010
KWQC TV6 News at Noon - KWQC-TV

What does it take for your child to get into college? It's a question on the minds of countless parents. Some inside information from the "people who decide" college acceptance could help. Vicky Nguyen reports. This is what four years of High School looks like to an admissions officer. A single folder And an online application Somewhere in here The elements that make you a yes Or a no. "Its very stressful its on my mind 24/7. " "Three's so many little bits and you're not quite sure what every college is looking at. " "I pack my schedule pretty full cum gpa unweighted is 3.8. " A solid gpa and good test scores Everyone knows you start there. But what else? We went to private Santa clara University With an acceptance rate of 58%. "We read every single essay the students submit. " And public California state University east bay Acceptance rate 31%. "They have a perfect gpa. " To find out How you avoid ending up here. S/ Mike sexton/Santa clara University : 51-: 57 "all of our faculty want students who can write whether you're engineering or business or english. " Santa clara's Mike sexton says showcase your ability to write. Write about something personal And specific. S/ Mike sexton/Santa clara University 1:04-1:13 "if they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. " "Not all 4.0'S are created equal . " What he means is: each application goes through a system that looks beyond grades At things like "course rigor" "how challenging was course work. " "We know some schools will be more challenging than others. " And "senior load" that means, no slacking off before graduation. Take a look at the application of a student who got in last year: a full load of tough classes, varsity sports, drama, and summer jobs. When it comes to activities, better to be a leader in a few clubs Than a member of many. "About 5000 end up here in denied files? " "That's correct. " Across the bay at csu east bay "We had record number of applications. " Greg Smith says essays, recommendation letters, and activities Are not part of the admissions process! Test scores and a minimum 2.0 Gpa are all that count. S/ Dave Vasquez/ csu east bay 1:57-2:06 "whether it be b- or a b+ its a 3.0 It doesn't matter what High School its from. " Here A committee reviews the denied but that we will look further into it and see if we can admit them as an exception" students who think they might be on the bubble Should submit a statement to explain any hardships. S/ Greg Smith/csu east bay 2:15-2:25 "they're first generation to college coming from esl background coming from schools not as well resourced we take that into account when they're applying. " "My freshman I was really nervous. " So where do parents fit in? "Its daunting its taking all three of our organizational skills " "dates and deadlines keeping it all straight " "we're here to support her as far as whatever decision she makes" the answer is all of the above And back off. S/ Mike sexton/Santa clara University 2:37-2:43 2757 from moment children are born we're preparing them to leave us and the college search process is good practice after all What ends up in the next "folder" Should be up to the student. High School seniors all over the country are filling out applications this time of year with some school deadlines as early as November. And, Don't forget, your chance to win a thousand dollars, just by watching quad cities today. All you have to do is watch for the special "keyword" Every day on "quad cities today. " At the end of the week, enter in all five keywords for the week on our website, and you're eligible to win. So be sure to watch every day, for your chance to win. There's some good news today -the latest outlook on jobs doesn't appear to be as bad as first thought. We'll get an up close look at those numbers and whether or not it will make an impact on the economy in your next half hour of news. [E0]break four lockdown-rdr police say a lockdown at a NASA research facility in Cleveland was a false alarm.

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BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%.
11/05/2010
NBC13 Today at 4:30AM - WVTM-TV

IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF COUNTLESS PARENTS. SOME INSIDE INFORMATION FROM THE "PEOPLE WHO DECIDE" COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE COULD HELP. VICKY NGUYEN REPORTS. THIS IS WHAT FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LOOKS LIKE TO AN ADMISSIONS OFFICER. A SINGLE FOLDER, AND AN ONLINE APPLICATION, SOMEWHERE IN HERE, THE ELEMENTS THAT MAKE YOU A YES, OR A NO. "ITS VERY STRESSFUL ITS ON MY MIND 24/7. SO MANY LITTLE BITS AND YOU'RE NOT QUITE SURE WHAT EVERY COLLEGE IS LOOKING AT. ""I PACK MY SCHEDULE PRETTY FULL CUM GPA UNWEIGHTED IS 3. "A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, EVERYO NE KNOWS YOU START THERE. BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. "WE READ EVERY SINGLE ESSAY THE STUDENTS SUBMIT. "AND PUBLIC CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EAST BAY, ACCEPTANCE RATE 31%. "THEY HAVE A PERFECT GPA. "TO FIND OUT, HOW YOU AVOID ENDING UP HERE. S/ MIKE SEXTON/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY : 51-: 57 "ALL OF OUR FACULTY WANT STUDENTS WHO CAN WRITE WHETHER YOU'RE ENGINEERING OR BUSINESS OR ENGLISH. "SANTA CLARA'S MIKE SEXTON SAYS SHOWCASE YOUR ABILITY TO WRITE. WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. S/ MIKE SEXTON/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY 1:04-1:13 "IF THEY'VE DONE TRAVEL WDONT WAABOUT THE ENT IN NICARAGUA AN"NOT ALL 4. 0'S ARE CREATED EQUAL HE MEANS IS: EACPPLICATION GD GRADES, AT THING WAS COURSE WORK. "RE CHALIOR LOA BEFORE GRADUACATION OF A STUD OF TOUGHAMA, AND SUITIES, BETTE R THAN A MEERE IN DENIECROSS THE BAY AMBER OF ORES AND A/ DAVE VASQUEZ/CSU B-OR A B+ ITS SCHOOL ITS FR FROM. "HERE, A COMMITTEE REVIEWS THE DENIED BUT THAT WE WILL LOOK FURTHER INTO IT AND SEE IF WE CAN ADMIT THEM AS AN EXCEPTION"STUDENTS WHO THINK THEY MIGHT BE ON THE BUBBLE, SHOULD SUBMIT A STATEMENT TO EXPLAIN ANY HARDSHIPS. S/ GREG SMITH/CSU EAST BAY 2:15-2:25 "THEY'RE FIRST GENERATION TO COLLEGE COMING FROM ESL BACKGROUND COMING FROM SCHOOLS NOTHAT INTO ACG. ""MY FRESHMAN I WAS REALLY NERVOUS. "E OF OUR ORGANIS KEEPIE HERE TO SSION SHE MA MIKE 2757 FRN WE'RE PR THE COLLEGICE AFTER AER" SHO FINALLY THIS H A SOUNDPROOF EN THERE ARE LOIONS OF PET OWNERS ROM FIREWORKLIS SAYS SH CUTS 85 PES WALLS ARE SOUOM TRIPLE GLAZEDG TRIGGERS E PRICE IS ANYTOVER TO BIRADED

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BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%.
11/05/2010
WDSU News This Morning - WDSU-TV

TO THE EDUCATION BEAT WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR YOUR CHILD TO GET INTO COLLEGE? IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF COUNTLESS PARENTS. SOME INSIDE INFORMATION FROM THE "PEOPLE WHO DECIDE" COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE COULD HELP. VICKY NGUYEN IS ON YOUR SIDE WITH SOME TIPS. PKG)THIS IS WHAT FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LOOKS LIKE TO AN ADMISSIONS OFFICER. A SINGLE FOLDER, AND AN ONLINE APPLICATION, SOMEWHERE IN HERE, THE ELEMENTS THAT MAKE YOU A YES, OR A NO. "its very stressful its on my mind 24/7. " "three's so many little bits and you're not quite sure what every college is looking at. " "i pack my schedule pretty full cum gpa unweighted is 3.8. " A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, EVERYONE KNOWS YOU START THERE. BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. "We read every single essay the students submit. " AND PUBLIC CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EAST BAY, ACCEPTANCE RATE 31%. "They have a perfect GPA. " TO FIND OUT, HOW YOU AVOID ENDING UP HERE. S/ Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University : 51-: 57 "All of our faculty want students who can write whether you're engineering or business or english. " SANTA CLARA'S MIKE SEXTON SAYS SHOWCASE YOUR ABILITY TO WRITE. WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. S/ Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. " "not all 4.0's are created equal . " WHAT HE MEANS IS: EACH APPLICATION GOES THROUGH A SYSTEM THAT LOOKS BEYOND GRADES, AT THINGS LIKE "COURSE RIGOR" "how challenging was course work. " "We know some schools will be more challenging than others. " AND "SENIOR LOAD" THAT MEANS, NO SLACKING OFF BEFORE GRADUATION. TAKE A LOOK AT THE APPLICATION OF A STUDENT WHO GOT IN LAST YEAR: A FULL LOAD OF TOUGH CLASSES, VARSITY SPORTS, DRAMA, AND SUMMER JOBS. WHEN IT COMES TO ACTIVITIES, BETTER TO BE A LEADER IN A FEW CLUBS, THAN A MEMBER OF MANY. "About 5000 end up here in denied files? " "That's correct. " ACROSS THE BAY AT CSU EAST BAY, "We had record number of applications. " GREG SMITH SAYS ESSAYS, RECOMMENDATION LETTERS, AND ACTIVITIES, ARE NOT PART OF THE ADMISSIONS PROCESS! TEST SCORES AND A MINIMUM 2.0 GPA ARE ALL THAT COUNT. S/ Dave Vasquez/ CSU East Bay 1:57-2:06 "whether it be b- or a b+ its a 3.0 it doesn't matter what high school its from. " HERE, A COMMITTEE REVIEWS THE denied but that we will look further into it and see if we can admit them as an exception" STUDENTS WHO THINK THEY MIGHT BE ON THE BUBBLE, SHOULD SUBMIT A STATEMENT TO EXPLAIN ANY HARDSHIPS. S/ Greg Smith/CSU East Bay 2:15-2:25 "they're first generation to college coming from esl background coming from schools not as well resourced we take that into account when they're applying. " "my freshman i was really nervous. " SO WHERE DO PARENTS FIT IN? "its daunting its taking all three of our organizational skills " "dates and deadlines keeping it all straight " "we're here to support her as far as whatever decision shehe makes" THE ANSWER IS ALL OF THE ABOVE, AND BACK OFF. S/ Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 2:37-2:43 2757 from moment children are born we're preparing them to leave us and the college search process is good practice AFTER ALL, WHAT ENDS UP IN THE NEXT "FOLDER" SHOULD BE UP TO THE STUDENT. STILL AHEAD AN UPDATE ON THE CITY'S AMBITIOUS PLAN TO FIGHT BLIGHT, PLUS, I'M TARA MERGENER IN WASHINGTON. THE LATEST UNEMPLOYMENT NUMBERS ARE DUE OUT TODAY. BUT WILL THERE BE ANY IMPROVEMENT? THE LATEST COMING UP. [ Female Announcer ] DRY, CRACKED HANDS? GOLD BOND ULTIMATE CONCENTRATED CREAM HEALS AND PROTECTS LIKE LOTION CAN'T. GOLD BOND CONCENTRATED THERAPY. REAL MEDICINE, ULTIMATE HEALING.

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BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%.
11/05/2010
11 Today at 5 AM - KKCO-TV

BERNIE IF YOU'VE SHOPPED AT A COSTCO IN COLORADO LATELY, AND YOU BOUGHT BRAVO FARMS DUTCH STYLE RAW MILK GOUDA CHEESE, DON'T EAT IT. IT'S BEEN RECALLED IN 5 STATES BETWEEN OCTOBER 5 AND NOVEMBER 1, INCLUDING HERE IN COLORADO. THE WASHINGTON BASED COMPANY SAYS THE CHEESE HAS BEEN LINKED TO 25 CASES OF PEOPLE SICKENED BY E. COLI. TAKE IT BACK FOR A FULL REFUND. BERNIE IT'S NOW TIME ON THIS FRIDAY MORNING. NEXT ON 11 NEWS LIVE TODAY, THERE HAS BEEN A RASH OF STUDENTS GETTING HIT ON THEIR WAY TO SCHOOL IN MESA COUNTY. A REMINDER THAT WHILE IT'S STILL DARK, THEY NEED TO TAKE THEIR OWN SAFETY SERIOUSLY. AND FOR THE HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR IN YOUR FAMILY, WE HEAR FROM COLLEGE ADMISSIONS OFFICIALS, TO FIND OUT HOW TO MAKE YOUR STUDENT'S APPLICATION STAND OUT IN THE PILE. BERNIE WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR YOUR CHILD TO GET INTO COLLEGE? IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF COUNTLESS PARENTS. SOME INSIDE INFORMATION FROM THE "PEOPLE WHO DECIDE" COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE COULD HELP. NBC'S VICKY NGUYEN REPORTS. THIS IS WHAT FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LOOKS LIKE TO AN ADMISSIONS OFFICER. A SINGLE FOLDER, AND AN ONLINE APPLICATION, SOMEWHERE IN HERE, THE ELEMENTS THAT MAKE YOU A YES, OR A NO. "its very stressful its on my mind 24/7. " "three's so many little bits and you're not quite sure what every college is looking at. " "i pack my schedule pretty full cum gpa unweighted is 3.8. " A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, EVERYONE KNOWS YOU START THERE. BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. "We read every single essay the students submit. " AND PUBLIC CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EAST BAY, ACCEPTANCE RATE 31%. "They have a perfect GPA. " TO FIND OUT, HOW YOU AVOID ENDING UP HERE. S/ Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University : 51-: 57 "All of our faculty want students who can write whether you're engineering or business or english. " SANTA CLARA'S MIKE SEXTON SAYS SHOWCASE YOUR ABILITY TO WRITE. WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. S/ Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13 "If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. " "not all 4.0's are created equal . " WHAT HE MEANS IS: EACH APPLICATION GOES THROUGH A SYSTEM THAT LOOKS BEYOND GRADES, AT THINGS LIKE "COURSE RIGOR" "how challenging was course work. " "We know some schools will be more challenging than others. " AND "SENIOR LOAD" THAT MEANS, NO SLACKING OFF BEFORE GRADUATION. TAKE A LOOK AT THE APPLICATION OF A STUDENT WHO GOT IN LAST YEAR: A FULL LOAD OF TOUGH CLASSES, VARSITY SPORTS, DRAMA, AND SUMMER JOBS. WHEN IT COMES TO ACTIVITIES, BETTER TO BE A LEADER IN A FEW CLUBS, THAN A MEMBER OF MANY. "About 5000 end up here in denied files? " "That's correct. " ACROSS THE BAY AT CSU EAST BAY, "We had record number of applications.

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BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%.
11/05/2010
2 News at 11 PM - WDTN-TV

WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR YOUR CHILD TO GET INTO COLLEGE? IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF COUNTLESS PARENTS. SOME INSIDE THE "PEOPLE WHO DECIDE"COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE COULD HELP. VICKY NGUYEN REPORTS. THIS IS WHAT FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LOOKS LIKE TO AN ADMISSIONS OFFICER. A SINGLE FOLDER, AND AN ONLINE APPLICATION, SOMEWHERE IN HERE, THE ELEMENTS THAT MAKE YOU A YES, OR A NO. A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, EVERYONE KNOWS YOU START THERE. BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. READ EVERY SINGLE ESSAY THE STUDENTS SUBMIT. PUBLIC CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EAST BAY, ACCEPTANCE RATE 31%. HAVE A PERFECT GPA. FIND OUT, HOW YOU AVOID ENDING UP HERE. OF OUR FACULTY WANT STUDENTS WHO CAN WRITE WHETHER YOU'RE ENGINEERING OR BUSINESS OR ENGLISH. CLARA'S MIKE SEXTON SAYS SHOWCASE YOUR ABILITY TO WRITE. WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. THEY'VE DONE TRAVEL WE DONT WANT TRAVELOGUE WE WANT TO HEAR ABOUT THE AFTERNOON THEY'RE AT WITH STUDENT IN NICARAGUA AND TALKED POLITICS. ALL 4. 0'S ARE CREATED EQUAL "SENIOR LOAD"THAT MEANS, NO SLACKING OFF BEFORE GRADUATION. TAKE A LOOK AT THE APPLICATION OF A STUDENT WHO GOT IN LAST YEAR: A FULL LOAD OF TOUGH CLASSES, VARSITY SPORTS, DRAMA, AND SUMMER JOBS. WHEN IT COMES TO ACTIVITIES, BETTER TO BE A LEADER IN A FEW CLUBS, THAN A MEMBER OF MANY. GREG SMITH SAYS ESSAYS, RECOMMENDATION LETTERS, AND ACTIVITIES, ARE NOT PART OF THE ADMISSIONS PROCESS! TEST SCOR GPA ARE ALL THAT COUNT. (CC>"WHETHER IT BE B- OR A B+ITS A 3. 0 IT DOESN'T MATTER WHAT HIGH SCHOOL ITS FROM. WHO THINK THEY MIGHT BE ON THE BUBBLE, SHOULD SUBMIT A STATEMENT TO EXPLAIN ANY HARDSHIPS. FIRST GENERATION TO COLLEGE COMING FROM ESL BACKGROUND COMING FROM SCHOOLS NOT AS WELL RESOURCED WE TAKE THAT INTO ACCOUNT WHEN THEY'RE APPLYING. WHERE DO PARENTS FIT IN? DAUNTING ITS TAKING ALL THREE OF OUR ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS AND DEADLINES KEEPING IT ALL STRAIGHT HERE TO SUPPORT HER AS FAR AS WHATEVER DECISION SHE ANSWER IS ALL OF THE ABOVE, BACK OFF. (CC>2757 FROM MOMENT CHILDREN ARE BORN WE'RE PREPARING THEM TO LEAVE US AND THE COLLEGE SEARCH PROCESS IS GOOD ALL, WHAT ENDS UP IN THE NEXT SHOULD BE UP TO THE STUDENT. COMING UP A SPECIAL PLAYOFF EDITION OF OPERATION FOOTBALL (CC>SORRY, THIS PORTION IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR CLOSED CAPTIONING. (/CC>THANKS FOR JOINING US TONIGHT JACK AND HUTCH ARE UP NEXT WITH A SPECIAL PLAYOFF EDITION OF OPERATION FOOTBALL.

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BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%.
11/05/2010
2 News at 11 PM - WDTN-TV

WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR YOUR CHILD TO GET INTO COLLEGE? IT'S A ESTION ON THE MINDS OF COUNTLESS PARENTS. SOME SIDE THE "PEOPLE WHO DECIDE" COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE COULD HELP. VICKY NGUYEN REPORTS. THIS IS WHAT FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LOOKS LIKE TO AN ADMISSIONS OFFICER. A SINGLE FOLDER, AND AN ONLINE APPLICATION, SOMEWHERE IN HERE, THE ELEMENTS THAT MAKE YOU A YES, OR A NO. A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, EVERYONE KNOWS YOU START THERE. BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. READ EVERY SINGLE ESSAY THE STUDENTS SUBMIT. PUBLIC CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EAST BAY, ACCEPTANCE RATE 31%. (CC>"THEY HAVE A PERFECT GPA. FIND OUT, HOW YOU AVOID ENDING UP HERE. (CC>"ALL OF OUR FACULTY WANT STUDENTS WHO CAN WRITE WHETHER YOU'RE ENGINEERING OR NESS OR ENGLISH. "(/CC>SANTA CLARA'S MIKE SEXTON SAYS SHOWCASE YOUR ABILITY TO WRITE. WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. THEY'VE DONE TRAVEL WE DONT WANT TRAVELOGUE WE WANT TO HEAR ABOUT THE AFTERNOON THEY'RE AT WITH STUDENT IN NICARAGUA AND TALKED POLITICS. ALL 4.0'S ARE CREATED EQUAL "SENIOR LOAD" THAT MEANS, NO SLACKING OFF BEFORE GRADUATN. TAKE A LOOK AT THE APPLICATION OF A STUDENT WHO GOT IN LAST YEAR: A FULL LOAOF TOUGH CLASSES, VARSITY SPORTS, DRAMA, AND SUMMER JS. WHEN IT COMES TO ACTIVITIES, BETTER TO BE A LEER IN A FEW CLUBS, AN A MEMBER OF MANY. GREG STH SAYS ESSAYS, RECOENDATION LETTERS, AND ACTIVITIES, ARE NOT PART OF THE ADMISSIONSROCESS! TEST SCOR GPA ARE ALL THAT COU. (CCWHETHER IT BE OR A B+ITS A 3.0 IT DOES MATTER WHAT HIGH SCHOOL ITS OM. WHO THINK THEY MIGHT BE OTHE BUBBLE, SHOULD SUIT A STATENT TO EXPLAIN ANY RDSHIPS. (C"THEY'RE FIRST GENERATION TO COLLEGE MING FROM ESL CKGROUND CONG FROM SCOLS NOT AS ELL RESOURCED TAKEHAT INTO ACCOUNT WHEN THEY RE APPLYING. WHERE DO PARENTS F IN? (C"ITS DAUNTING ITS TAKING L THREE OF OUR ORGANIZATIAL SKILLS AND DEADLIN KEEPG IT ALL STRAIGHT HERTO SUPPORT HER AS FAR AS WHEVER DECISION SHE MES"(C>THE ANER IALL OF THE ABOVE, BACK OFF (CC>2757 FROM MOME CHILDREN ARE BO WE'PREPARING THEM TO LEA US AND THE COLLEGE SEARCHPROCESSS GOOD PRACCE(/CC>AFTER ALL, WHAT ENDS UP INHE NE "FOLDE SHOULD E UP THE STUDENT. COMING UP A SPECIAL PLOFF EDITN OF OPERATION FOOTBALL (CC>SORRY, THIS PORTION NOT AILAE FOR CLED CAPTIONING.

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CSU orders NoteUtopia to cease its note-selling operation | View Clip
11/05/2010
Sacramento Bee - Online, The

NoteUtopia, a startup company for college students founded by a young Sacramento State graduate, has been ordered to "cease and desist" by the CSU chancellor's office, which said the company is violating state education codes that prohibit students from selling their class notes.

The ban came just weeks after Ryan Stevens launched his company sort of an eBay for college students to buy and sell their study materials with back-to-school booths in September at CSU Sacramento, Chico and East Bay.

The 10-year-old law that prompted the ban is so obscure that it caught NoteUtopia's founder, campus officials and Internet law experts by surprise.

Eric Goldman, director of the High-Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University Law School and a professor of Internet law, said "many people had no idea it's on the books."

But while the law may be a sleeper, the issue of what students can do with material taken from class lectures "comes up with some regularity," Goldman noted. It's at the heart of an academic and legal debate on intellectual property rights involving how classroom content is shared among students.

Stevens, a June graduate who launched the idea in a California State University, Sacramento, business entrepreneurship class, said he was "shocked" by the ban, especially since he was granted permits and paid daily fees as high as $500 a day at CSUS to pass out NoteUtopia fliers and marketing materials at three state college campuses.

In a Sept. 21 letter, CSU University Counsel Gale Baker told Stevens that NoteUtopia violates a state education code section that prohibits anyone from selling or disseminating "academic presentations" for commercial purposes, including handwritten class notes.

"This means that any CSU student posting class notes for sale on your website is subject to discipline, up through and including expulsion from the university," Baker wrote.

Stevens was directed to immediately cease selling class notes in California, to stop marketing NoteUtopia to students at all 23 CSU campuses and place a prominent notice on the website that such sales are prohibited.

In a subsequent e-mail to CSUS students, Lori Varlotta, the campus's vice president for student affairs, repeated the warning that students buying or selling class notes risk penalties, including possible expulsion. Other campuses issued similar warnings.

The warnings prompted about 15 students to cancel their NoteUtopia accounts, said Stevens, 22, who declined to give the total number of members.

Stevens isn't backing down. He said he's complied with the CSU counsel's requests, but he's also contacted an attorney and Internet law experts about fighting the statute in court.

"If students are writing their own notes on what a teacher is saying, we don't see why the state can tell them what they can do or cannot do with that material. It's a violation of students' rights."

Further, Stevens says CSU officials are harming his fledgling company's reputation. "They're leaving the impression that we're an illegal website. And that's not true."

The website offers a number of other services that apparently aren't prohibited by California law. Students can still upload for free or for sale other class-related items such as exam study guides, chapter outlines and released quizzes and exams.

NoteUtopia touts itself as a way for "well-performing" students to earn some cash by uploading their class notes and other study guides, at suggested rates of $1 to $3. Students who've had to miss class or whose own notes may be "incomplete or not as comprehensive" can purchase what they need. NoteUtopia collects a few cents from every transaction.

"What I'm doing is truly a good thing," said Stevens, a San Francisco resident. "I'm not giving them answers to a test under the table. It's students helping other students do better in school. What else could a professor want?"

Whether NoteUtopia can survive without the ability of California students to buy or sell class notes is unclear. Stevens said he's had students join since the controversy erupted.

"You could take one piece away from one state (California) and the business could still flourish," said Goldman.

But if NoteUtopia intends to challenge California's statute, the legal battle could be so costly it would "dwarf the business," said Goldman. "The real tragedy for small businesses is that it's very expensive to be an entrepreneur in our society today. If (Note-Utopia) can't afford to wade into these cloudy legal areas," it may not survive.

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Mercury News interview: S. Andrew Starbird, Dean of SCU's Leavey School of Business | View Clip
11/05/2010
SiliconValley.com

For S. Andrew Starbird, dean of Santa Clara University's Leavey School of Business, the fiscal crisis is a teachable moment for the nation's business schools and their students.

Starbird was named dean of the school in July. He's been a professor there for 23 years.

His research specializes in food safety, operations analysis and management, quality control, statistical analysis, modeling, inspection and the economics of information, which studies how information -- or the lack of it -- affects economic decision making.

In an interview with the Mercury News, Starbird reflected on the recession and the mission of business schools in an era of growing mistrust about financial institutions and government.

The interview has been edited for length.

Q You research the economics of information and teach about complex decision making. It seems like the financial industry could use a refresher course. Is the recent crash a teachable moment? And if so, in what way?

A (laughs) I'm not sure you can take contracting in food safety (one of Starbird's research areas) and apply it to the mortgage crisis. However, the problems that the economy and this county have faced over the last couple years have led a number of business schools to think hard about their role in the community and their role in the crisis.

One of things we're doing at Santa Clara is retooling our programs to reflect the new realities of what business education means in the 21st century.

Q What conclusions do you draw about how business schools have to change?

A We need to understand, and to teach students and ourselves, that business decision-making impacts clients, customers, the environment and our neighborhoods. And they (the students) need to take those things into account when they make those decisions. We also need to understand that business schools have a broader role than they have had in the past. Our role is not just to teach people to maximize their personal wealth, but also to promote the economic health of the community.

Q That's a challenge for the young student just two or three years into the corporate world. How do you equip them for this?

A When they have a good grounding in applied ethics, they understand that the decisions they are going to make are going to have ethical dimensions to them, and that they will have to do the hard work of discerning right and wrong, and act on understanding that difference.

Q Are students more interested in this subject now ?

A I think everyone's more interested now. The crisis we are facing is partly an ethical crisis, so schools and companies need to take into account the ethical dimensions of their decision making. That's something Santa Clara has a long history of making people do. It's part of the Jesuit education tradition.

Q Getting back to the subject of the economics of information, wasn't a lack of information partly to blame for the economic collapse of Wall Street -- these securitized slices of mortgages that were sold and resold, when nobody knew what they were worth?

A It certainly is a case of imperfect, or hidden information. When you have imperfect information in any transaction, you have to rely on trust as a substitute for information. I think part of the problem we're facing now in the United States, in terms of the recovery being very slow, is there's a lack of trust in the financial system and indeed, in our political leadership, in addressing those problems that led to the crisis. Until consumers and businesses have regained that trust in the system, we're not going to see the growth that we need to have to make a dent in unemployment.

Q Are you hearing from alumni hit by the economic downturn?

A It's a great challenge for our current students and for our alumni. But I went to a networking event a couple of weeks ago with some of our current MBA students, and they seem to feel things are looking up compared to what they were a year ago. Recovery is going to come first to Silicon Valley. Folks are starting to see things breaking loose.

Q Is the business school doing anything to promote recovery?

A Yes. The California Program for Entrepreneurship brought 20 students here last spring. These are people who have a good idea, who are emerging entrepreneurs, but who are not quite sure how to commercialize those ideas. We put them through a series of educational programs and hooked them up with mentors and venture capitalists, all with a goal of starting a business in California and alleviating unemployment in California. The first class will graduate Nov. 14. They're a fantastic group.

Q Are there any other ways you are integrating the business school into Silicon Valley?

A Yes. For example, we have a new Leavey School of Business Case Study Program in which we send professors and students into Silicon Valley firms to write a case study on what made those companies successful, how they did it, and the history of their growth. Those cases will be distributed through Harvard Business School, with a Santa Clara imprint, when they are done.

Q Anything else?

A We are expanding professional and continuing education opportunities. We have a lot of programs for Silicon Valley executives and managers, if they want to come back to school. We have, for example, a program in advanced accounting proficiency that prepares people for the CPA exam. We have a Certified Professional Equity Institute, that certifies people in equity compensation. Equity compensation is extremely important in Silicon Valley.

We work with local non-profits to help the community in a number of ways. One way is the Hunger Index, a joint research project between the business school and Second Harvest Food Bank to come up with strategies for addressing the hunger problem. It's all part of a Jesuit tradition at Santa Clara of engaging with the community and working for the common good.

Contact Pete Carey at 408-920-5419.

Five things you didn't know about drew starbird

He's a fifth generation San Josean from a family that goes back to the Gold Rush.

His grandfather was mayor of San Jose, his father served on the city planning commission, and there's a Starbird Park named after his family.

He has a black belt in judo.

He rode a bull at the UC Davis Rodeo to impress a girl. Thrown from the bull, he got the girl -- his wife of 28 years.

He collects San Jose memorabilia -- old business certificates, maps and photographs.

His family had a business in downtown San Jose for 110 years -- Hall & Rambo commercial insurance.

andrew starbird

Age: 49

Born: San Jose

Education: B.S., University of California, Davis; MBA, Santa Clara University; Ph.D, Cornell University.

Home: San Jose

Family: Married, 3 sons.

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Mercury News interview: S. Andrew Starbird, Dean of SCU's Leavey School of Business | View Clip
11/05/2010
San Jose Mercury News - Online

For S. Andrew Starbird, dean of Santa Clara University's Leavey School of Business, the fiscal crisis is a teachable moment for the nation's business schools and their students.

Starbird was named dean of the school in July. He's been a professor there for 23 years.

His research specializes in food safety, operations analysis and management, quality control, statistical analysis, modeling, inspection and the economics of information, which studies how information -- or the lack of it -- affects economic decision-making.

In an interview with the Mercury News, Starbird reflected on the recession and the mission of business schools in an era of growing mistrust about financial institutions and government.

The interview has been edited for length.

Q You research the economics of information and teach about complex decision-making. It seems like the financial industry could use a refresher course. Is the recent crash a teachable moment? And if so, in what way?

A (laughs) I'm not sure you can take contracting in food safety (one of Starbird's research areas) and apply it to the mortgage crisis. However, the problems that the economy and this county have faced over the last couple years have led a number of business schools to think hard about their role in the community and their role in the crisis. One of the things we're doing at Santa Clara is retooling our programs to reflect the new realities of what business

education means in the 21st century.

Q What conclusions do you draw about how business schools have to change?

A We need to understand, and to teach students and ourselves, that business decision-making impacts clients, customers, the environment and our neighborhoods. And they (the students) need to take those things into account when they make those decisions. We also need to understand that business schools have a broader role than they have had in the past. Our role is not just to teach people to maximize their personal wealth but also to promote the economic health of the community.

Q That's a challenge for the young student just two or three years into the corporate world. How do you equip them for this?

A When they have a good grounding in applied ethics, they understand that the decisions they are going to make are going to have ethical dimensions to them and that they will have to do the hard work of discerning right and wrong, and act on understanding that difference.

Q Are students more interested in this subject now?

A I think everyone's more interested now. The crisis we are facing is partly an ethical crisis, so schools and companies need to take into account the ethical dimensions of their decision-making. That's something Santa Clara has a long history of making people do. It's part of the Jesuit education tradition.

Q Getting back to the subject of the economics of information, wasn't a lack of information partly to blame for the economic collapse of Wall Street -- these securitized slices of mortgages that were sold and resold, when nobody knew what they were worth?

A It certainly is a case of imperfect, or hidden, information. When you have imperfect information in any transaction, you have to rely on trust as a substitute for information. I think part of the problem we're facing now in the United States, in terms of the recovery being very slow, is there's a lack of trust in the financial system and indeed, in our political leadership, in addressing those problems that led to the crisis. Until consumers and businesses have regained that trust in the system, we're not going to see the growth that we need to have to make a dent in unemployment.

Q Are you hearing from alumni hit by the economic downturn?

A It's a great challenge for our current students and for our alumni. But I went to a networking event a couple of weeks ago with some of our current MBA students, and they seem to feel things are looking up compared to what they were a year ago. Recovery is going to come first to Silicon Valley. Folks are starting to see things breaking loose.

Q Is the business school doing anything to promote recovery?

A Yes. The California Program for Entrepreneurship brought 20 students here last spring. These are people who have a good idea, who are emerging entrepreneurs, but who are not quite sure how to commercialize those ideas. We put them through a series of educational programs and hooked them up with mentors and venture capitalists, all with a goal of starting a business in California and alleviating unemployment in California. The first class will graduate Nov. 14. They're a fantastic group.

Q Are there any other ways you are integrating the business school into Silicon Valley?

A Yes. For example, we have a new Leavey School of Business Case Study Program in which we send professors and students into Silicon Valley firms to write a case study on what made those companies successful, how they did it and the history of their growth. Those cases will be distributed through Harvard Business School, with a Santa Clara imprint, when they are done.

Q Anything else?

A We are expanding professional and continuing education opportunities. We have a lot of programs for Silicon Valley executives and managers, if they want to come back to school. We have, for example, a program in advanced accounting proficiency that prepares people for the CPA exam. We have a Certified Professional Equity Institute, that certifies people in equity compensation. Equity compensation is extremely important in Silicon Valley.

We work with local nonprofits to help the community in a number of ways. One way is the Hunger Index, a joint research project between the business school and Second Harvest Food Bank to come up with strategies for addressing the hunger problem. It's all part of a Jesuit tradition at Santa Clara of engaging with the community and working for the common good.

Contact Pete Carey at 408-920-5419.

Five things about drew starbird

1. He's a fifth-generation San Josean from a family that goes back to the Gold Rush.

2. His grandfather was mayor of San Jose, his father served on the city planning commission and there's a Starbird Park named after his family.

3. He has a black belt in judo.

4. He rode a bull at the UC-Davis Rodeo to impress a girl. Thrown from the bull, he got the girl -- his wife of 28 years.

5. His family had a business in downtown San Jose for 110 years -- Hall & Rambo commercial insurance.

S. andrew starbird

Age: 49

Born: San Jose

Education: Bachelor's degree, UC-Davis; MBA, Santa Clara University; doctorate, Cornell University

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MIKE SEXTON/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY "IF THEY'VE DONE TRAVEL WE DONT WANT TRAVELOGUE WE WANT TO HEAR ABOUT THE AFTERNOON THEY'RE AT WITH STUDENT IN NICARAGUA AND TALKED POLITICS.
11/05/2010
WAVY News 10 at 6 PM - WAVY-TV

COLLEGE. BUT ADMISSIONS EXPERTS SAY THEY ALSO LOOK BEYOND GRADES. ADMISSION OFFICERS ALSO PAY ATTENTION TO THE CLASSES AND WHETHER THE WORK WAS CHALLENGING. AN IMPORTANT PIECE OF ADVICE: NO SLACKING OFF BEFORE GRADUATION. WHEN IT COMES TO ACTIVITIES, IT'S BETTER TO BE A LEADER IN A FEW CLUBS THAN A MEMBER OF MANY. ONE WAY TO STAND OUT IS SHOWCASING WRITING ABILITIES ON THE APPLICATION. THEY NEED TO WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL AND SPECIFIC. MIKE SEXTON/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY "IF THEY'VE DONE TRAVEL WE DONT WANT TRAVELOGUE WE WANT TO HEAR ABOUT THE AFTERNOON THEY'RE AT WITH STUDENT IN NICARAGUA AND TALKED POLITICS. " STUDENTS WHO THINK THEY MIGHT BE ON THE BUBBLE SHOULD SUBMIT A STATEMENT TO EXPLAIN ANY HARDSHIPS, LIKE YOU'RE THE FIRST IN YOUR FAMILY TO TRY AND GO TO COLLEGE. MAKE YOUR LIST- AND CHECK IT TWICE. BLACK FRIDAY IS THREE WEEKS AWAY. 10 IS ON YOUR SIDE WITH WHERE YOU CAN GO TO FIND HOLIDAY SHOPPING DEALS- BEFORE EVERYONE ELSE! CLIP 4 7:41-7:58 "I JUST FELT IT WAS, I'LL HAVE THAT STORY COMING UP. " HAND THESE DAYS AND IT'S USUALLY TOO LATE BEFORE THEY REALIZE EVERY DECISION THEY MAKE IS LIFE CHANGING. KEEPING TEENS ON THE RIGHT PATH CAN BE A TOUGH JOB, SO WHAT CAN PARENTS DO? JOIN US AS WE EXPLORE SOME SOLUTIONS WITH A NEWPORT NEWS CITY OFFICIALS, TWO LOCAL AGENCIES THAT SUPPORT SENIORS AND FAMILIES, AND A MOTIVATIONAL SPEAKER, MINISTER AND AUTHOR THAT HAS SOME UNIQUE ADVICE FOR A COMMON PROBLEM, ON THE BOTTOM LINE SUNDAY MORNING, 530 WAVY 10 AND ON WAVY-DOT-COM.

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Oracle-SAP Testimony Nears; HP CEO in Spotlight | View Clip
11/05/2010
Insurance & Technology - Online

A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the world's most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear Tuesday as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG.

* Oracle gets day in court after 2-1/2 years

* SAP admits to wrongdoing, at issue are damages

* Battle also may bring HP CEO Apotheker into court

(Adds paragraph about jury selection, background)

OAKLAND, Calif. - A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the world's most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear Tuesday as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG .

Attorneys from Oracle and SAP spent nearly seven hours Monday selecting jurors and hammering out procedural rules for the five week trial. They are due to present opening arguments Tuesday.

Larry Ellison, Oracle's co-founder and CEO, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring SAP to court on accusations that SAP's TomorrowNow subsidiary stole its software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices -- which SAP has admitted.

At issue is not whether SAP or now-defunct TomorrowNow is at fault. SAP has admitted to wrongdoing, accepted liability and shut down TomorrowNow. The two sides are fighting over the damages SAP will have to pay, anywhere from tens of millions to billions of dollars.

Also at stake is the credibility of former SAP CEO and now top Hewlett-Packard executive Leo Apotheker. SAP says Apotheker did not know of any wrongdoing initially and moved to shut TomorrowNow after he found out.

Ellison, however, has stated he has evidence Apotheker was complicit in the SAP's improper downloading of the software.

Oracle has attacked HP for naming Apotheker CEO in September. Ellison charges the German executive -- who spent just seven months as sole SAP CEO before leaving amid public criticism -- played a key role in the case. Europe's biggest software maker and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became foes following a series of executive shuffles that began in August.

HP's CEO, Mark Hurd, a close friend of Ellison left HP after accusations of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. And HP hired Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management said last week.

AND WE'RE UNDERWAY

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California Monday. Oracle's President Safra Catz, who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as the two sides selected eight jurors out of a pool of 27.

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing it believes damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While both sides will spend the next five weeks arguing over money, several analysts said the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, since they each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money," Anderson said.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed details about the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said Sunday that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who began his new job with HP Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say Monday night whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said other potential witnesses include former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann and current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658. (Editing by Derek Caney, Matthew Lewis, Edwin Chan and Carol Bishopric)

Copyright 2010 by Reuters. All rights reserved.

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S/ Mike Sexton / Santa Clara University : 51-:
11/05/2010
Live 5 News This Morning - WCSH-TV

THOUSANDS OF DEMONSTRATORS GATHERED IN BARCELONA AHEAD OF POPE BENEDICT'S VISIT TO THE CITY. A GROUP CALLED THE SECURITY AND PROGRESSIVE MOMENT IN CATALONIA WAS JOINED BY ATHEISTS, GAY RIGHTS GROUPS AND HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGNERS. THEY SAY THEY ARE NOT AGAINST THE VISIT OF THE POPE BUT THE OFFICIAL NATURE OF THE EVENT. HOWEVER, MANY OF THE DEMONSTRATORS ARE OPPOSED TO THE VATICAN'S STANCE ON ABORTION, GAY RIGHTS AND BIRTH CONTROL. THE POPE ARRIVES IN SPAIN SATURDAY AND WILL BE IN BARCELONA ON SUNDAY. WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR YOUR CHILD TO GET INTO COLLEGE? IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF COUNTLESS PARENTS. SOME INSIDE INFORMATION FROM THE "PEOPLE WHO DECIDE" COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE COULD HELP. VICKY NGUYEN REPORTS. SUPERS: S/ Mike Sexton / Santa Clara University : 51-: 57S/ Dave Vasquez/ CSU East Bay 1:57-2:05 S/ Greg Smith/CSU East Bay 2:15-2:25S/ Vicky Nguyen Reporting(, ANCHOR LEAD, PKG )THIS IS WHAT FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LOOKS LIKE TO AN ADMISSIONS OFFICER. A SINGLE FOLDER, AND AN ONLINE APPLICATION, SOMEWHERE IN HERE, THE ELEMENTS THAT MAKE YOU A YES, OR A NO. "its very stressful its on my mind 24/7. " "three's so many little bits and you're not quite sure what every college is looking at. " "i pack my schedule pretty full cum gpa unweighted is 3.8. "A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, EVERYONE KNOWS YOU START THERE. BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. "We read every single essay the students submit. "AND PUBLIC CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EAST BAY, ACCEPTANCE RATE 31%. "They have a perfect GPA. "TO FIND OUT, HOW YOU AVOID ENDING UP HERE. S/ Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University : 51-: 57"All of our faculty want students who can write whether you're engineering or business or english. "SANTA CLARA'S MIKE SEXTON SAYS SHOWCASE YOUR ABILITY TO WRITE. WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. S/ Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13"If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. ""not all 4.0's are created equal . "WHAT HE MEANS IS: EACH APPLICATION GOES THROUGH A SYSTEM THAT LOOKS BEYOND GRADES, AT THINGS LIKE "COURSE RIGOR""how challenging was course work. " "We know some schools will be more challenging than others. " AND "SENIOR LOAD"THAT MEANS, NO SLACKING OFF BEFORE GRADUATION. TAKE A LOOK AT THE APPLICATION OF A STUDENT WHO GOT IN LAST YEAR: A FULL LOAD OF TOUGH CLASSES, VARSITY SPORTS, DRAMA, AND SUMMER JOBS. WHEN IT COMES TO ACTIVITIES, BETTER TO BE A LEADER IN A FEW CLUBS, THAN A MEMBER OF MANY. "About 5000 end up here in denied files? ""That's correct. " ACROSS THE BAY AT CSU EAST BAY, "We had record number of applications. "GREG SMITH SAYS ESSAYS, RECOMMENDATION LETTERS, AND ACTIVITIES, ARE NOT PART OF THE ADMISSIONS PROCESS! TEST SCORES AND A MINIMUM 2.0 GPA ARE ALL THAT COUNT. S/ Dave Vasquez/ CSU East Bay it be b- or a b+ its a 3.0 it doesn't matter what high school its from. "HERE, A COMMITTEE REVIEWS THE denied but that we will look further into it and see if we can admit them as an exception"STUDENTS WHO THINK THEY MIGHT BE ON THE BUBBLE, SHOULD SUBMIT A STATEMENT TO EXPLAIN ANY HARDSHIPS. S/ Greg Smith/CSU East Bay first generation to college coming from esl background coming from schools not as well resourced we take that into account when they're applying. ""my freshman i was really nervous. "SO WHERE DO PARENTS FIT IN? "its daunting its taking all three of our organizational skills ""dates and deadlines keeping it all straight here to support her as far as whatever decision she makes"THE ANSWER IS ALL OF THE ABOVE, AND BACK OFF. S/ Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 2:37-2:432757 from moment children are born we're preparing them to leave us and the college search process is good practiceAFTER ALL, WHAT ENDS UP IN THE NEXT "FOLDER" SHOULD BE UP TO THE STUDENT. THAT WAS VICKY NGUYEN REPORTING. COMING UP AFTER THE BREAK, WE'LL HAVE MELISSA KIM WITH SPORTS AND WE'LL SEE HOW THE U-MAINE BLACK BEARS ARE DOING.

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S/ Mike Sexton / Santa Clara University : 51-:
11/05/2010
WLBZ NewsCenter 2 Morning Report - WLBZ-TV

THOUSANDS OF DEMONSTRATORS GATHERED IN BARCELONA AHEAD OF POPE BENEDICT'S VISIT TO THE CITY. A GROUP CALLED THE SECURITY AND PROGRESSIVE MOMENT IN CATALONIA WAS JOINED BY ATHEISTS, GAY RIGHTS GROUPS AND HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGNERS. THEY SAY THEY ARE NOT AGAINST THE VISIT OF THE POPE BUT THE OFFICIAL NATURE OF THE EVENT. HOWEVER, MANY OF THE DEMONSTRATORS ARE OPPOSED TO THE VATICAN'S STANCE ON ABORTION, GAY RIGHTS AND BIRTH CONTROL. THE POPE ARRIVES IN SPAIN SATURDAY AND WILL BE IN BARCELONA ON SUNDAY. WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR YOUR CHILD TO GET INTO COLLEGE? IT'S A QUESTION ON THE MINDS OF COUNTLESS PARENTS. SOME INSIDE INFORMATION FROM THE "PEOPLE WHO DECIDE" COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE COULD HELP. VICKY NGUYEN REPORTS. SUPERS: S/ Mike Sexton / Santa Clara University : 51-: 57S/ Dave Vasquez/ CSU East Bay 1:57-2:05 S/ Greg Smith/CSU East Bay 2:15-2:25S/ Vicky Nguyen Reporting(, ANCHOR LEAD, PKG )THIS IS WHAT FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LOOKS LIKE TO AN ADMISSIONS OFFICER. A SINGLE FOLDER, AND AN ONLINE APPLICATION, SOMEWHERE IN HERE, THE ELEMENTS THAT MAKE YOU A YES, OR A NO. "its very stressful its on my mind 24/7. " "three's so many little bits and you're not quite sure what every college is looking at. " "i pack my schedule pretty full cum gpa unweighted is 3.8. "A SOLID GPA AND GOOD TEST SCORES, EVERYONE KNOWS YOU START THERE. BUT WHAT ELSE? WE WENT TO PRIVATE SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, WITH AN ACCEPTANCE RATE OF 58%. "We read every single essay the students submit. "AND PUBLIC CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EAST BAY, ACCEPTANCE RATE 31%. "They have a perfect GPA. "TO FIND OUT, HOW YOU AVOID ENDING UP HERE. S/ Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University : 51-: 57"All of our faculty want students who can write whether you're engineering or business or english. "SANTA CLARA'S MIKE SEXTON SAYS SHOWCASE YOUR ABILITY TO WRITE. WRITE ABOUT SOMETHING PERSONAL, AND SPECIFIC. S/ Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 1:04-1:13"If they've done travel we dont want travelogue we want to hear about the afternoon they're at with student in nicaragua and talked politics. ""not all 4.0's are created equal . "WHAT HE MEANS IS: EACH APPLICATION GOES THROUGH A SYSTEM THAT LOOKS BEYOND GRADES, AT THINGS LIKE "COURSE RIGOR""how challenging was course work. " "We know some schools will be more challenging than others. " AND "SENIOR LOAD"THAT MEANS, NO SLACKING OFF BEFORE GRADUATION. TAKE A LOOK AT THE APPLICATION OF A STUDENT WHO GOT IN LAST YEAR: A FULL LOAD OF TOUGH CLASSES, VARSITY SPORTS, DRAMA, AND SUMMER JOBS. WHEN IT COMES TO ACTIVITIES, BETTER TO BE A LEADER IN A FEW CLUBS, THAN A MEMBER OF MANY. "About 5000 end up here in denied files? ""That's correct. " ACROSS THE BAY AT CSU EAST BAY, "We had record number of applications. "GREG SMITH SAYS ESSAYS, RECOMMENDATION LETTERS, AND ACTIVITIES, ARE NOT PART OF THE ADMISSIONS PROCESS! TEST SCORES AND A MINIMUM 2.0 GPA ARE ALL THAT COUNT. S/ Dave Vasquez/ CSU East Bay it be b- or a b+ its a 3.0 it doesn't matter what high school its from. "HERE, A COMMITTEE REVIEWS THE denied but that we will look further into it and see if we can admit them as an exception"STUDENTS WHO THINK THEY MIGHT BE ON THE BUBBLE, SHOULD SUBMIT A STATEMENT TO EXPLAIN ANY HARDSHIPS. S/ Greg Smith/CSU East Bay first generation to college coming from esl background coming from schools not as well resourced we take that into account when they're applying. ""my freshman i was really nervous. "SO WHERE DO PARENTS FIT IN? "its daunting its taking all three of our organizational skills ""dates and deadlines keeping it all straight here to support her as far as whatever decision she makes"THE ANSWER IS ALL OF THE ABOVE, AND BACK OFF. S/ Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 2:37-2:432757 from moment children are born we're preparing them to leave us and the college search process is good practiceAFTER ALL, WHAT ENDS UP IN THE NEXT "FOLDER" SHOULD BE UP TO THE STUDENT. THAT WAS VICKY NGUYEN REPORTING. COMING UP AFTER THE BREAK, WE'LL HAVE MELISSA KIM WITH SPORTS AND WE'LL SEE HOW THE U-MAINE BLACK BEARS ARE DOING.

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S/Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 2:37-2:43 2757 from moment children are born were preparing them to leave us and the college search process is good practice AFTER ALL, WHAT ENDS UP IN THE NEXT FOLDER SHOULD BE UP TO THE STUDENT.
11/05/2010
NBC 2 News at Noon - WBBH-TV

WHEN IT COMES TO ACTIVITIES, BETT ER TO BE A LEADER IN A FEW CLUBS, THAN A MEMBER OF MANY. About 5000 end up here in denied files? Thats correct. ACROSS THE BAY AT CSU EAST BAY, We had record number of applications. GREG SMITH SAYS ESSAYS, RECOMMENDATION LETTERS, AND ACTIVITIES, ARE NOT PART OF THE ADMISSIONS PROCESS! TEST SCORES AND A MINIMUM 2.0 GPA ARE ALL THAT COUNT. S/ Dave Vasquez/ CSU East Bay 2:06 whether it be b- or a b+ its a 3.0 it doesnt matter what high school its from. HERE, A COMMITTEE REVIEWS THE MAYBES theyre denied but that we will look further into it and see if we can admit them as an exception STUDENTS WHO THINK THEY MIGHT BE ON THE BUBBLE, SHOULD SUBMIT A STATEMENT TO EXPLAIN ANY HARDSHIPS. S/ Greg Smith/CSU East Bay 2:25 theyre first generation to college coming from esl background coming from schools not as well resourced we take that into account when theyre applying. my freshman i was really nervous. SO WHERE DO PARENTS FIT IN? its daunting its taking all three of our organizational skills dates and deadlines keeping it all straight were here to support her as far as whatever decision she makes THE ANSWER IS ALL OF THE ABOVE, AND BACK OFF. S/Mike Sexton/Santa Clara University 2:37-2:43 2757 from moment children are born were preparing them to leave us and the college search process is good practice AFTER ALL, WHAT ENDS UP IN THE NEXT FOLDER SHOULD BE UP TO THE STUDENT. ITS NOT JUST FRIDAY HERE ON NBC2. ITS FUGITIVE FRIDAY! WHEN WE COME BACK WELL TELL YOU WHICH ONE OF THIS WEEKS FUGITIVES IS WANTED FOR ROBBERY AS PART OF THE GANG PINE ISLAND WRECKING CREW. ITS FUGITIVE FRIDAY HERE ON TTE. TRISH WHO DO WE HAVE ON THE WANTED LIST IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA THIS WEEK. STARTING OFF OUR LIST IS A FUGITIVE WHO SOME OF YOU FELLAS OUT THERE MAY RECOGNIZE AS AN EXOTIC DANCER AT A LOCAL GENTLEMANS CLUB. BRITTANEY GARMAN IS ON THE RUN IN LEE COUNTY, WANTED ON FOUR FELONY WARRANTS FOR VIOLATING PROBATION AND FAILING TO SHOW UP IN COURT, FOLLOWING ARRESTS FOR BURGLARY, GRAND THEFT AND POSSESSION OF A CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE WITHOUT A PRESCRIPTION. GARMAN IS A REGISTERED CONVICTED FELON, WITH SEVEN PREVIOUS BOOKINGS AT THE LEE COUNTY JAIL. AMONG HER PREVIOUS CHARGES ARE FRAUD, GRAND THEFT AUTO, POSSESSION OF COCAINE AND SMUGGLING CONTRABAND INTO THE JAIL.

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Early AM 2010-11-04 06:39:19
11/04/2010
KAIT-TV

Jonesboro, AR

ABC

8 KAIT

Early AM

2010-11-04

06:39:19

RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMER USING ONE-THOUSAND KILOWATT HOURS A MONTH WOULD SAVE A DOLLAR FORTY A MONTH. BUT YOU CAN DO OTHER THINGS TO SAVE ON THAT ELECTRIC BILL. They can pay attention to their unit and service it. They can check their attic insulation. They can check duct work in their attic. BURNETT SAYS HE EXPECTS ENTERGY'S RATES TO REMAIN THE SAME THROUGH MOST OF NEXT YEAR, BUT THAT WOULD DEPEND ON FUEL PRICES. AND DUE TO LOWER NATURAL GAS PRICES, WINTER BILLS ARE EXPECTED TO BE ABOUT NINE PERCENT LOWER THAN LAST YEAR. BUT THAT DEPENDS ON HOW MUCH EACH CUSTOMER IS USING. JUST HOW VIOLENT IS TOO VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO CHILDREN AND VIDEO GAMES? THE U-S SUPREME COURT MUST DECIDE WHETHER THESE GAMES PRESENT ENOUGH OF A THREAT THAT THEIR SALE SHOULD BE BANNED TO MINORS. DIANA ALVEAR REPORTS. nats of video games) DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN.. OR VIOLATE FREEDOM OF SPEECH? THAT'S THE QUESTION BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT THESE KINDS OF GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY THESE GAMES COULD CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM... AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. SO FAR, IT'S BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. KGO Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School 'The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. And I think the court in prior cases has signaled that it really would not like to be in that position.' TUESDAY.. SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN SCOPE. . NOTING THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. THE GAMING INDUSTRY HAS MADE THE SAME ARGUMENT FOR YEARS. Rich Taylor/Entertainment Software Association 11 58 59 'Parents are the better judge of whether it's appropriate for their homes, not the government.' STILL, OTHERS, INCLUDING CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS, POINTED OUT THAT SOME OF THESE GAMES ALLOW

Copyright © 2010 inewsnetwork Inc.

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Events in the San Francisco Bay area
11/04/2010
Associated Press (AP) - Sacramento Bureau

Associated Press Northern California Daybook for Thursday, Nov. 4.

7:30 a.m. HOUSING ENDOWMENT AND REGIONAL TRUST (HEART) BREAKFAST and tour of the heart-funded Trestle Glen affordable rental housing for working families.

370 F St., Colma

Contact: Paula Stinson (650) 872-4444, Ext. 4

8:30 a.m., MOUNTAIN VIEW'S 15TH ANNUAL MAYOR'S YOUTH CONFERENCE

City Hall, 500 Castro St., Mountain View

Contact: Kimberly Thomas (650) 903-6301

8:30 - 10:30 a.m. HOW DID LIFE ON EARTH BEGIN? Includes an exclusive press preview of "Life: A Cosmic Story," narrated by two-time Academy Award winner Jodie Foster, Life is the second all-digital planetarium show produced by the California Academy of Sciences.

Press preview schedule: 8:30 am: Coffee and pastries served in the planetarium

9:00 am: Screening of Life: A Cosmic Story

9:30 am: Panel Q&A with representatives from the planetarium's production team, visualization partners, and science advisors

10:00 am: Opportunity for one-on-one interviews

California Academy of Sciences 55 Music Concourse Drive, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco.

Contact: Jordana Frishman 415-561-0888 RSVP to press(at)calacademy.org

9 a.m. "TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS FOR SOCIAL IMPACT: TAKING INNOVATIONS TO SCALE," A SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY conference highlighting a new collaboration between Nethope, major tech companies and the social entrepreneur network of SCU's Center for Science, Technology and Society.

Locatelli Center, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara

Contact: Deborah Lohse (408) 554-5121 or (408) 768-6898, Cell

9:30 a.m. ASSOCIATION OF BAY AREA GOVERNMENTS TRANSIT SUSTAINABILITY FOCUS FORUM.

Auditorium, Metrocenter, 101 Eighth St., Oakland

Contact: Joanna Bullock (510) 464-7968

10 a.m. CALTRAIN'S PENINSULA CORRIDOR JOINT POWERS BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING.

Bacciocco Auditorium, Second Floor, 1250 San Carlos Ave., San Carlos

Contact: (650) 508-6242

10 a.m. CALIFORNIA HIGH SPEED RAIL AUTHORITY MEETING. AGENDA INCLUDES DISCUSSION OF SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN JOSE ALTERNATIVES.

Room 447, State Capitol, Sacramento

Contact: (916) 324-1541

10 a.m. START OF THE CHARLES SCHWAB CUP GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP. (Through Sunday).

Harding Park Golf Course, 99 Harding Road, San Francisco

Contact: Maureen Radzavicz (904) 273-3301 or (607) 624-5200, Cell

10 a.m. MEDIA TOUR OF NEW PATIENT CARE TOWER AT JOHN MUIR MEDICAL CENTER IN CONCORD, A $212 MILLION EXPANSION AND RENOVATION PROJECT.

Reporters should meet at the new emergency department entrance, John Muir Health, 2540 East T., Concord

Contact: Ben Drew (925) 947-5387 or (925) 360-3873, Cell

Noon MEMBERS OF THE HEALTH RIGHTS ORGANIZING PROJECT WILL ERECT A "LANGUAGE BARRIER," a block-long banner with the words language barrier translated into different languages, outside a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services meeting to call on HHS to require health insurance companies to provide interpretation and translation services for limited english speaking enrollees.

The Stanford Renaissance Hotel, 905 California St., San Francisco

Contact: Jill Reese (206) 890-2062

1 p.m. BAY CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION MEETING. Agenda includes a continued public hearing on a proposed climate change amendment to the Bay Plan.

Board Room, Port of San Francisco, Ferry Building, Market Street and the Embarcadero, San Francisco

Contact: (415) 352-3600

4 p.m. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY EAST BAY AND THE CITY OF HAYWARD DEDICATION CEREMONY CELEBRATING THE FIRST OF 23 REHABILITATED FORECLOSED HOMES IN THE CITY. Hayward Mayor Michael Sweeney, members of the City Council and others to attend.

27689 Pompano Ave., Hayward

Contact: Omar Cortez (510) 583-4246 or Jo Ann Driscoll (510) 665-5592 or (510) 459-8144, Cell

The AP-San Francisco

Copyright © 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Help reduce maternal mortality infant mortality - GlobalGiving | View Clip
11/04/2010
GlobalGiving

Health > Help Afghan Women Deliver Healthy Babies Safely (#1142) Update
By Toc Dunlap - Executive Director

The following story illustrates how AIL empowers Afghan women through encouraging them to share what they have learned with others:

"We had a neighbor who was pregnant all the time. She was worried about these pregnancies. She went to the AIL reproductive health workshop and she learned about guidance before a delivery and other issues that were discussed and taught in the workshop. Fortunately, she shared these issues with her friends when she gave a mini workshop to the others. This is a successful example in our society how these workshops help the development in Afghanistan."

Summer Update 2010
By Sondra Johnson - Project Administrator

Health education is critical for the health of a mother and baby before, during and after a birth. Afghanistan has one of the world's highest infant and mother mortality rates. AIL is passionate about giving women the information they need to increase their chances of a successful birth.

In 2010 through June, AIL taught 13 Health and Reproductive Health workshops to 413 women.

At a recent Reproductive Health workshop, one woman shared the following: "All of the time my babies were premature and I didn't take care about proper eating of food and vegetables and family planning. When I came here I learned how to take care of my babies. I believe AIL is like an experienced mother in our society who is here to get more information to the women of Afghanistan."

Sakena Yacoobi honored for her work in health By Toc Dunlap - Project Leader

"Reach out to others and give a gift to yourself."

Sakena Yacoobi, founder and executive director of the Afghan Institute of Learning, urged the advanced degree graduates of Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California to "reach out to others and give a gift to yourself" in the process in her 2010 Commencement speech. She has been a model of such action since 1995. Under her leadership, the Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) has delivered education and health services to over 7.1 million Afghan women, children and men. In appreciation of her work, SCU honored her with an honorary Doctor of Education Honoris Causa degree.

"Health and literacy are keys to human rights, empowerment and self sufficiency," says Dr Yacoobi, Mann Award winner.

Summer Update from the Afghan Institute of Learning Spring Update
By Sondra Johnson - Project Administrator
An invitation to read our newsletter
By Sondra Johnson - Working Together...

Afghanistan is in the news a lot these days. As a donor to a project in Afghanistan, you may be wondering if change is happening, and if your donation really makes any difference. Following is a message from Dr. Sakena Yacoobi that answers your questions. It's part of our annual newsletter, where we also share progress reports from several areas, and the impact AIL's work is having in Afghan lives. This newsletter is below in a PDF format; we invite you to click on it and read ALL the details……

By Sondra Johnson - Afghan Mothers and Babies Thank You

Thank you for your support. Your desire to make a difference in this world has made a difference, and we are so thankful that Afghan people have had their lives changed with your help.

We wanted to share with you a very special opportunity to give more than 100% from November 10 through December 1st. Please share this with those you know who care. During this time, we are privileged to receive additional matching funds from your donation through Global Giving of at least 30%. The need is still great. Afghanistan struggles to become a country of strength and stability.

Sakena Wishes to Thank Her Supporters
By Sondra Johnson - Dr. Yacoobi Featured in Best-Selling Book

There's a new focus on women worldwide. The New York Times magazine dedicated their entire issue one week in August on women in the developing world. Of particular focus was a newly launched book written by the well-known Pulitzer winning couple Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl DuWunn titled: "Half The Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunity for Women Worldwide". The press focus on this timely book is significant- from reviews in Harvard and People magazine, to upcoming segments on shows like "The Today Show", the time has come for women and their issues worldwide to be in the spotlight.

August 2009 Update
By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant

Recently, AIL was asked by the Afghan Ministry of Women's Affairs to report on the impact AIL's programs have had. We were amazed by our findings. Since beginning in 1996 through May 2009, AIL has supported 13 clinics serving 998,088 patients and providing health education to 1,520,374 women and children. 220,970 Afghans have been educated and received skills training in AIL schools, centers and post-secondary programs. 27, 619 Afghans (more than 70% female) have received teacher training or capacity-building training. Overall 6,778,026 Afghan lives have been directly impacted by AIL programs.

Afghanistan has the third highest infant mortality rate in the world (151.95 deaths/1000 births or 15% or births). AIL is proud that the infant mortality rate in our clinics is about 2%. During the first 6 months of 2009 AIL helped to deliver 136 babies, of which 133 were happy and healthy.

May 2009 Update
By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant

Recently, a very nervous man came to one of AIL's clinics saying that his wife was dying. He said she was in her last month of her pregnancy. Her labor pains had started hours earlier, but she had not yet delivered the baby. The head of the clinic quickly sent an ambulance to bring her to the clinic. After she arrived she was taken to the midwives. They did a physical exam, and everything was normal, the baby was still alive. The woman told the midwives that her husband's first wife had died during delivery. The midwives calmed the woman, telling her that she would deliver the baby safely. Soon, the woman delivered a healthy baby girl. The woman and man were very thankful for the well trained staff at AIL's clinic.

2008 Year End Wrap Up
By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant
Stories to Share
By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant

We would like to share a report from one of AIL's Outreach Vaccinators in Herat, Afghanistan.

Snapshot (2008) of the Reproductive Health Project By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant

Between January and June 2008, doctors in the Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) clinics in Afghanistan have treated 9,347 women for reproductive health issues. Health education directly related to reproductive health issues (breast feeding, family planning, nutrition, vaccinations, and sexually transmitted diseases) is chosen by about 25% of the women who receive health education at the clinics. AIL has also held four-day reproductive health workshops for 247 women. So far in 2008 the AIL clinics have delivered 43 healthy babies.

The impact on those served is great. Following are just a few comments of women who have been helped:

Snapshot (2008) of the Reproductive Health Project By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant

Between January and June 2008, doctors in the Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) clinics in Afghanistan have treated 9,347 women for reproductive health issues. Health education directly related to reproductive health issues (breast feeding, family planning, nutrition, vaccinations, and sexually transmitted diseases) is chosen by about 25% of the women who receive health education at the clinics. AIL has also held four-day reproductive health workshops for 247 women. So far in 2008 the AIL clinics have delivered 43 healthy babies.

The impact on those served is great. Following are just a few comments of women who have been helped:

Video from Afghanistan
By Afghan Institute of Learning - Project organization
Mid-Year Report
By Afghan Institute of Learning - AIL

Creating Hope International shares this mid-year report from the Afghan Institute of Learning, highlighting some of AIL's recent successes!

Comments (0)

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

$25 20 women will have improved quality of life through reproductive healthcare and education $50 40 women will have healthier babies because of reproductive healthcare and education $85 One woman will be trained as a community health worker and will assist 9,000 women annually

GlobalGiving
1023 15th Street, NW, 12th Floor, Washington, DC 20005

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NASA To Hold Media Telecon To Discuss Upcoming Satellite Missions | View Clip
11/04/2010
TheStreet.com

GREENBELT, Md. -- NASA will hold a media teleconference at 1:45 p.m. EST on Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2010 to discuss the Organism/Organic Exposure to Orbital Stresses, O/OREOS and Fast, Affordable, Science and Technology Satellite, or FASTSAT -- scheduled to launch Nov. 19, 2010 on a Minotaur IV launch vehicle from the Alaska Aerospace Corporation's Kodiak Launch Complex on Kodiak Island, Alaska.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO)

(Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO)

FASTSAT is NASA's first microsatellite that supports the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle Secondary Payload Adaptor, or ESPA -- an adapter ring developed by the U.S. Department of Defense specifically to accommodate secondary spacecraft launch opportunities. FASTSAT will demonstrate the capability to build, design and test a spacecraft platform to enable governmental, academic and industry researchers to conduct low-cost scientific and technology experiments on an autonomous satellite in space.

The goal of the O/OREOS mission is to demonstrate the capability to conduct low-cost astrobiology science experiments on autonomous nanosatellites in space. Scientists will apply the knowledge they gain from O/OREOS to plan future experiments in the space environment to study how exposure to space changes organic molecules and biology. These experiments will help answer astrobiology's fundamental questions about the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the universe.

The Small Spacecraft Division at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., manages the O/OREOS payload and mission operations supported by staff and students from Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, Calif.

Teleconference panelists are:

-- Mark Boudreaux, FASTSAT project manager at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

-- Joseph "Joe" Casas, FASTSAT science operations director at Marshall

-- Dean Alhorn, NanoSail-D principal investigator at Marshall

-- John Sigwarth, Thermospheric Temperature Imager principal investigator at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

-- Pascale Ehrenfreund, O/OREOS project scientist, Space Policy Institute at George Washington University in Washington

Supporting experts will be online to answer questions about the experiments on FASTSAT and O/OREOS.

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NASA To Hold Media Telecon To Discuss Upcoming Satellite Missions | View Clip
11/04/2010
TheStreet.com

GREENBELT, Md. -- NASA will hold a media teleconference at 1:45 p.m. EST on Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2010 to discuss the Organism/Organic Exposure to Orbital Stresses, O/OREOS and Fast, Affordable, Science and Technology Satellite, or FASTSAT -- scheduled to launch Nov. 19, 2010 on a Minotaur IV launch vehicle from the Alaska Aerospace Corporation's Kodiak Launch Complex on Kodiak Island, Alaska.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO)

(Logo:

http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO)

FASTSAT is NASA's first microsatellite that supports the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle Secondary Payload Adaptor, or ESPA -- an adapter ring developed by the U.S. Department of Defense specifically to accommodate secondary spacecraft launch opportunities. FASTSAT will demonstrate the capability to build, design and test a spacecraft platform to enable governmental, academic and industry researchers to conduct low-cost scientific and technology experiments on an autonomous satellite in space.

The goal of the O/OREOS mission is to demonstrate the capability to conduct low-cost astrobiology science experiments on autonomous nanosatellites in space. Scientists will apply the knowledge they gain from O/OREOS to plan future experiments in the space environment to study how exposure to space changes organic molecules and biology. These experiments will help answer astrobiology's fundamental questions about the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the universe.

The Small Spacecraft Division at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., manages the O/OREOS payload and mission operations supported by staff and students from

Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, Calif.

Teleconference panelists are:

Mark Boudreaux, FASTSAT project manager at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

-- Joseph "Joe" Casas, FASTSAT science operations director at Marshall

Dean Alhorn, NanoSail-D principal investigator at Marshall

John Sigwarth, Thermospheric Temperature Imager principal investigator at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Pascale Ehrenfreund, O/OREOS project scientist, Space Policy Institute at George Washington University in Washington

Supporting experts will be online to answer questions about the experiments on FASTSAT and O/OREOS.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO | View Clip
11/04/2010
Quote.com France

(San Jose Mercury News - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX News Network) --

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Leo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Leo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO | View Clip
11/04/2010
InsideBayArea.com

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Léo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Léo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

The offer to pay Oracle's legal fees was outlined in a court document that Judge Phyllis Hamilton ordered sealed Tuesday morning. Its existence was first reported by IDG News Service, which follows the tech industry. Other sources confirmed the agreement to the Mercury News.

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at Twitter.com/BrandonBailey.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO | View Clip
11/04/2010
Los Angeles Daily News - Online

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Léo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Léo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

The offer to pay Oracle's legal fees was outlined in a court document that Judge Phyllis Hamilton ordered sealed Tuesday morning. Its existence was first reported by IDG News Service, which follows the tech industry. Other sources confirmed the agreement to the Mercury News.

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at Twitter.com/BrandonBailey.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO
11/04/2010
San Mateo County Times

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Léo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr. Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Léo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

The offer to pay Oracle's legal fees was outlined in a court document that Judge Phyllis Hamilton ordered sealed Tuesday morning. Its existence was first reported by IDG News Service, which follows the tech industry. Other sources confirmed the agreement to the Mercury News.

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at .

Copyright © 2010 San Mateo County Times. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO
11/04/2010
Oakland Tribune

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Léo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr. Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Léo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

The offer to pay Oracle's legal fees was outlined in a court document that Judge Phyllis Hamilton ordered sealed Tuesday morning. Its existence was first reported by IDG News Service, which follows the tech industry. Other sources confirmed the agreement to the Mercury News.

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at .

Copyright © 2010 The Oakland Tribune. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO
11/04/2010
Daily Review, The

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Léo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr. Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Léo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

The offer to pay Oracle's legal fees was outlined in a court document that Judge Phyllis Hamilton ordered sealed Tuesday morning. Its existence was first reported by IDG News Service, which follows the tech industry. Other sources confirmed the agreement to the Mercury News.

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at .

Copyright © 2010 The Daily Review. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO
11/04/2010
Argus, The

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Léo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr. Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Léo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

The offer to pay Oracle's legal fees was outlined in a court document that Judge Phyllis Hamilton ordered sealed Tuesday morning. Its existence was first reported by IDG News Service, which follows the tech industry. Other sources confirmed the agreement to the Mercury News.

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at .

Copyright © 2010 The Argus. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO
11/04/2010
Alameda Times-Star

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Léo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr. Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Léo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

The offer to pay Oracle's legal fees was outlined in a court document that Judge Phyllis Hamilton ordered sealed Tuesday morning. Its existence was first reported by IDG News Service, which follows the tech industry. Other sources confirmed the agreement to the Mercury News.

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at .

Copyright © 2010 Alameda Times-Star. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 01:26:16 EDT | View Clip
11/04/2010
Quote.com India

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Leo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Leo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 01:26:16 EDT | View Clip
11/04/2010
Quote.com Canada

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Leo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Leo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 01:26:16 EDT | View Clip
11/04/2010
Quote.com Australia

Nov 03, 2010 (San Jose Mercury News - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX News Network) --

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Leo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Leo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

43.81

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 01:26:16 EDT | View Clip
11/04/2010
Quote.com France

Nov 03, 2010 (San Jose Mercury News - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX News Network) --

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Leo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Leo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 01:26:16 EDT | View Clip
11/04/2010
Quote.com Italy

Nov 03, 2010 (San Jose Mercury News - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX News Network) --

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Leo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Leo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

43.81

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 01:26:16 EDT | View Clip
11/04/2010
Quote.com Hong Kong

Nov 03, 2010 (San Jose Mercury News - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX News Network) --

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Leo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Leo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

43.81

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 08:22:52 EDT | View Clip
11/04/2010
Quote.com India

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Leo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Leo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 08:22:52 EDT | View Clip
11/04/2010
Quote.com Italy

Nov 04, 2010 (San Jose Mercury News - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX News Network) --

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Leo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Leo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

43.9737

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO Thursday November 04, 2010 08:22:52 EDT | View Clip
11/04/2010
Quote.com Germany

Nov 04, 2010 (San Jose Mercury News - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX News Network) --

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Leo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Leo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

43.92

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO

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ORACLE STYMIED IN EFFORT TO GET HP CEO TO TESTIFY
11/04/2010
San Jose Mercury News

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Léo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr. Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Léo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

The offer to pay Oracle's legal fees was outlined in a court document that Judge Phyllis Hamilton ordered sealed Tuesday morning. Its existence was first reported by IDG News Service, which follows the tech industry. Other sources confirmed the agreement to the Mercury News.

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at Twitter.com/BrandonBailey.

Copyright © 2010 San Jose Mercury News

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Our Doctors Need an X-Ray Machine - GlobalGiving | View Clip
11/04/2010
GlobalGiving

Health > Our Doctors Need an X-Ray Machine (#4388) Update
By Toc Dunlap - Executive Director

Construction of the Herat Private Hospital was completed and clinic operations were begun in early 2010. The Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) waited to begin surgeries until all permissions were obtained from the Afghan government. The final signature was finally received in late October. The hospital is now in full operation and has begun doing surgeries. Thank you to everybody who has donated to help purchase an X-Ray machine. The hospital is still very much in need of an x-ray machine; please continue to donate so that the hospital can have the equipment it needs.

Summer Update 2010
By Sondra Johnson - Project Administrator

The Gynecological/Surgical Hospital in Herat, Afghanistan is now open. We still have an urgent need for a digital x-ray machine. This machine allows for a proper diagnosis with interaction with medical specialists from around the world for women and infants. Proper treatment will reduce the number of unnecessary deaths of new mothers and their babies.

Sakena Yacoobi honored for her work in health By Toc Dunlap - Project Leader

"Reach out to others and give a gift to yourself."

Sakena Yacoobi, founder and executive director of the Afghan Institute of Learning, urged the advanced degree graduates of Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California to "reach out to others and give a gift to yourself" in the process in her 2010 Commencement speech. She has been a model of such action since 1995. Under her leadership, the Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) has delivered education and health services to over 7.1 million Afghan women, children and men. In appreciation of her work, SCU honored her with an honorary Doctor of Education Honoris Causa degree.

"Health and literacy are keys to human rights, empowerment and self sufficiency," says Dr Yacoobi, Mann Award winner.

Summer Update from the Afghan Institute of Learnin Spring Update
By Sondra Johnson - Project Administrator

In 2010, the Afghan Institute of Learning will formally open the country's first teaching Gynecological/Surgical Hospital in Herat, Afghanistan. An urgent need for proper maternal medical care is a digital x-ray machine. Once purchases, this machine will allow for proper diagnosis and medical consultations from around the world for 100,000 women and infants. With access to high quality healthcare, the rate of death among pregnant women and infants will be reduced Other AIL Accomplishments in 2009 included: • AIL trained over 1,800 Afghan teachers in pedagogy subjects, leadership, human rights, and school health. These teachers went to their classes and directly impacted over 500,000 students teaching these important subjects. • Nearly 23,000 students (primarily women and children) attended classes at AIL educational learning centers. • Over 362,000 Afghans received medical treatment and health education from AIL's 6 health clinics and community health worker program. • In January...

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

$10 helps fund a digital X-ray machine that allows doctors worldwide to confer and diagnose $25 helps fund this machine that saves money because there are no film costs $50 15 surgeries will have a more accurate diagnosis $100 30 deliveries will be more successful with reduced complications

GlobalGiving
1023 15th Street, NW, 12th Floor, Washington, DC 20005

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SCU Conference on | View Clip
11/04/2010
KLIV-AM

A conference about using technology to accelerate the impact of humanitarian groups and social entrepreneurs, hosted by Santa Clara University's Center for Science, Technology, and Society was featured in a story on KLIV radio.

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Support Afghanistan hospital - GlobalGiving | View Clip
11/04/2010
GlobalGiving

Children > Save Rural Afghan Women & Children With Healthcare (#1073) Update
By Toc Dunlap - Executive Director

Following is a story about how the pharmacist at AIL's Maladan Clinic in Herat helped a boy and his mother:

Farhad is 7 years old and he lives in Maladan. One day he was very sick and his mother carried Farhad to the clinic with a bad condition. Farhad had a very Acute Enteritis and he had a rapid pulse, dry mouth and very dangerous vomiting and diarrhea so he was almost unconscious. Farhad's Mother was crying and asked me "why is my son dying? Why? Why? Why?" I said "don't cry-- we will help him and if God wants he will become healthy." I rapidly transfused him with Ringer Fluid Serum; after one hour Farhad opened his eyes and said "I am thirsty give me water water water." We gave Pedialyte Solution to his mother to give for Farhad .

Save Rural Afghan Women & Children with Healthcare By Toc Dunlap - Executive Director Creating Hope International

Dear Supporters, We greatly appreciate your continued support for Save Rural Afghan Women and Children with Health care! We have been given a wonderful opportunity with The Safer World Fund!! For a limited time, any donation to this project will be matched 100% by The Safer World Matching Fund! Please help us take advantage of this amazing offer to give health care to even more women and children.

Summer Update 2010
By Sondra Johnson - Project Administrator

The Afghanistan Institute of Learning provides health services through its six health clinics in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Education about health topics are also offered at these clinics as well as through the Community Health Worker programs. In the first six months in 2010, AIL treated 101,821 patients and gave health education to 104,906 individuals.

At a recent Reproductive Health workshop, one woman shared the following: "All of the time my babies were premature and I didn't take care about proper eating of food and vegetables and family planning. When I came here I learned how to take care of my babies. I believe AIL is like an experienced mother in our society who is here to get more information to the women of Afghanistan."

Summer Update 2010
By Sondra Johnson - Project Administrator

The Afghanistan Institute of Learning provides health services through its six health clinics in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Education about health topics are also offered at these clinics as well as through the Community Health Worker programs. In the first six months in 2010, AIL treated 101,821 patients and gave health education to 104,906 individuals.

At a recent Reproductive Health workshop, one woman shared the following: "All of the time my babies were premature and I didn't take care about proper eating of food and vegetables and family planning. When I came here I learned how to take care of my babies. I believe AIL is like an experienced mother in our society who is here to get more information to the women of Afghanistan."

Sakena Yacoobi honored for her work in health By Toc Dunlap - Project Leader

"Reach out to others and give a gift to yourself."

Sakena Yacoobi, founder and executive director of the Afghan Institute of Learning, urged the advanced degree graduates of Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California to "reach out to others and give a gift to yourself" in the process in her 2010 Commencement speech. She has been a model of such action since 1995. Under her leadership, the Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) has delivered education and health services to over 7.1 million Afghan women, children and men. In appreciation of her work, SCU honored her with an honorary Doctor of Education Honoris Causa degree.

"Health and literacy are keys to human rights, empowerment and self sufficiency," says Dr Yacoobi, Mann Award winner.

Summer Update from the Afghan Institute of Learning Spring Update
By Sondra Johnson - Project Administrator
An invitation to read our newsletter
By Sondra Johnson - Working Together...

Afghanistan is in the news a lot these days. As a donor to a project in Afghanistan, you may be wondering if change is happening, and if your donation really makes any difference. Following is a message from Dr. Sakena Yacoobi that answers your questions. It's part of our annual newsletter, where we also share progress reports from several areas, and the impact AIL's work is having in Afghan lives. This newsletter is below in a PDF format; we invite you to click on it and read ALL the details……

By Sondra Johnson - Rural Afghan Women and Children Thank You

Thank you for your support. Your desire to make a difference in this world has made a difference, and we are so thankful that Afghan people have had their lives changed with your help.

We wanted to share with you a very special opportunity to give more than 100% from November 10 through December 1st. Please share this with those you know who care. During this time, we are privileged to receive additional matching funds from your donation through Global Giving of at least 30%. The need is still great. Afghanistan struggles to become a country of strength and stability.

Sakena Wishes to Thank Her Supporters
By Sondra Johnson - Dr. Yacoobi Featured in Best-Selling Book

There's a new focus on women worldwide. The New York Times magazine dedicated their entire issue one week in August on women in the developing world. Of particular focus was a newly launched book written by the well-known Pulitzer winning couple Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl DuWunn titled: "Half The Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunity for Women Worldwide". The press focus on this timely book is significant- from reviews in Harvard and People magazine, to upcoming segments on shows like "The Today Show", the time has come for women and their issues worldwide to be in the spotlight.

August 2009 Update
By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant

Recently, AIL was asked by the Afghan Ministry of Women's Affairs to report on the impact AIL's programs have had. We were amazed by our findings. Since beginning in 1996 through May 2009, 220,970 Afghans have been educated and received skills training in AIL schools, centers and post-secondary programs. 27, 619 Afghans (more than 70% female) have received teacher training or capacity-building training. AIL has supported 13 clinics serving 998,088 patients and providing health education to 1,520,374 women and children. Overall 6,778,026 Afghan lives have been directly impacted by AIL programs.

During 2008 AIL's four clinics treated a total of 147,889 patients and provided health education to 84,614 Afghans. In addition, the Community Health Worker program in Herat reached out to 76,345 families.

May 2009 Update
By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant

AIL has recently held several health education workshops and we'd like to share some comments made by participants after the workshops.

"From this workshop I have learned many new things and plan to implement them in my life. I have learned that it is important for a mother to try and prevent herself from getting sick since prevention is better than curing a sickness. I plan to implement the preventions I've learned in my life and teach it to my children."

"I did not vaccinate my child because I did not think it was important, but now I will do it as soon as I leave the workshop. Now I understand how important it is for my child's health."

2008 Year End Wrap Up
By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant
Stories to Share
By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant

Following is a story as reported by a female nurse at one of AIL's clinics about a woman that came to the clinic for treatment after being injured while working with her husband on their house.

Snapshot (2008) of the Rural Health Care Project By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant

Creating Hope International's partner, the Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL), has 3 rural health clinics-Imam Shish Nur and Jagartan Clinics in Herat Province and Mir Bacha Kot Clinic in Kabul Province. From January through June 2008, AIL's three clinics:

- treated 63,345 total patients - treated 9,347 reproductive health patients - vaccinated 17,977 women and children - gave health education lessons to 31,563 women and children - treated 182 children for malnutrition - held reproductive health and women's health workshops for 697 women

Nearly all of the patients treated at AIL's 3 rural clinics are women and children. In the first 6 months of 2008, the rural clinics treated 12,258 more patients than in the same time period during 2007.

Snapshot of project January-June 2007
By Toc Dunlap - Executive Director

The Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) has 3 rural health clinics-Imam Shish Nur and Jagartan Clinics in Herat Province and Mir Bacha Kot Clinic in Kabul Province. From January through June 2007, AIL's three clinics:

• treated 51,087 total patients • treated 8,039 reproductive health patients • vaccinated 24,717 women and children • gave health education lessons to 41,534 women and children • treated 184 children for malnutrition • held reproductive health and women's health workshops for 812 women

In Herat, a new, larger clinic building was constructed to replace the old existing building in Jagartan and a new wall was built around the clinic in Imam Shish Nur.

Because of the emphasis that AIL places on health education, there has been a significant decrease (50%) in the number of children being treated for malnutrition.

Video from Afghanistan
By Afghan Institute of Learning - Project Organization
By Afghan Institute of Learning - AIL

The Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) has 3 rural health clinics-two in Herat Province and one in Kabul Province. From November 2005 through August 2006, AIL's three clinics did the following:

-treated 86750 total patients -treated 16108 reproductive health patients -vaccinated 75704 women and children -gave health education lessons to 75704 women and children -treated 295 children for malnutrition -held four-day reproductive health workshops for 352 women and 5 men

Mid-Year Report
By Afghan Institute of Learning - AIL

Creating Hope International shares this mid-year report from the Afghan Institute of Learning, highlighting some of AIL's recent successes!

Comments (1)

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

$25 208 patients receive medicine. $75 42 women receive basic healthcare and health education.

GlobalGiving
1023 15th Street, NW, 12th Floor, Washington, DC 20005

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Women's Education in Afghanistan - GlobalGiving | View Clip
11/04/2010
GlobalGiving

Women and Girls > Afghan Institute of Learning Empowers Afghan Women (#921) Update
By Toc Dunlap - Executive Director

Zahra, a literacy student in one of AIL's women's learning centers, explains how the center has empowered and helped her:

"I have two children and came from an uneducated family. Before coming to Herat province, I had full information about AIL actually I knew about AIL and AIL services When we came to Herat province, our relatives introduced me to the Afghan Institute of Learning. Now I am a student in this center for literacy class I am very happy I can read the newspaper and books. Now I can help my children who are in the first position in their classes. I am thankful for the professor Sakena Yacoobi that helps the penurious people of Afghanistan.

Summer Update 2010
By Sondra Johnson - Project Administrator
Sakena Yacoobi honored for her work in health By Toc Dunlap - Project Leader

"Reach out to others and give a gift to yourself."

Sakena Yacoobi, founder and executive director of the Afghan Institute of Learning, urged the advanced degree graduates of Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California to "reach out to others and give a gift to yourself" in the process in her 2010 Commencement speech. She has been a model of such action since 1995. Under her leadership, the Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) has delivered education and health services to over 7.1 million Afghan women, children and men. In appreciation of her work, SCU honored her with an honorary Doctor of Education Honoris Causa degree.

"Health and literacy are keys to human rights, empowerment and self sufficiency," says Dr Yacoobi, Mann Award winner.

Summer Update from the Afghan Institute of Learning Spring Update
By Sondra Johnson - Project Administrator

Dear donors to the 'Afghan Institute of Learning Empowers Afghan Women':

We want to sincerely thank you for your many donations to this important project in Afghanistan. Our original goal was to reach $100,000.00, and we are nearly at that goal. However, due to the ongoing needs in Afghanistan, there is a still critical demand to offer education and health choices for Afghan women. Giving these women the opportunity to become literate, remain healthy, get an education and learn skills to make a living is essential for a strong family and community.

An invitation to read our newsletter
By Sondra Johnson - Working Together...

Afghanistan is in the news a lot these days. As a donor to a project in Afghanistan, you may be wondering if change is happening, and if your donation really makes any difference. Following is a message from Dr. Sakena Yacoobi that answers your questions. It's part of our annual newsletter, where we also share progress reports from several areas, and the impact AIL's work is having in Afghan lives. This newsletter is below in a PDF format; we invite you to click on it and read ALL the details……

By Sondra Johnson - Afghan Women Thank You

Thank you for your support. Your desire to make a difference in this world has made a difference, and we are so thankful that Afghan people have had their lives changed with your help.

We wanted to share with you a very special opportunity to give more than 100% from November 10 through December 1st. Please share this with those you know who care. During this time, we are privileged to receive additional matching funds from your donation through Global Giving of at least 30%. The need is still great. Afghanistan struggles to become a country of strength and stability.

Here are 3 stories of women who have found the power within their lives:

Sakena Wishes to Thank Her Supporters
By Sondra Johnson - Dr. Yacoobi Featured in Best-Selling Book

There's a new focus on women worldwide. The New York Times magazine dedicated their entire issue one week in August on women in the developing world. Of particular focus was a newly launched book written by the well-known Pulitzer winning couple Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl DuWunn titled: "Half The Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunity for Women Worldwide". The press focus on this timely book is significant- from reviews in Harvard and People magazine, to upcoming segments on shows like "The Today Show", the time has come for women and their issues worldwide to be in the spotlight.

Recent updates and details
By Sondra Johnson - Project Update for AIL Empowers Afghan Women

Recently, AIL was asked by the Afghan Ministry of Women's Affairs to report on the impact AIL's programs have had. We were amazed by our findings. Since beginning in 1996 through May 2009, 220,970 Afghans have been educated and received skills training in AIL schools, centers and post-secondary programs. 27, 619 Afghans (more than 70% female) have received teacher training or capacity-building training. AIL has supported 13 clinics serving 998,088 patients and providing health education to 1,520,374 women and children. Overall 6,778,026 Afghan lives have been directly impacted by AIL programs.

With the help of your donations, during the first 6 months of 2009, AIL has been able to:

--Provide education to 7,864 women and girls. --Provide educational workshops to 1,343 women and girls. --Provided healthcare to 44,838 women and girls at AIL clinics.

May 2009 Update
By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant
Update on AIL, and a Story to Share
By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant

In 2008 the Afghan Institute of Learning supported 46 learning centers in Herat, Mazar, Bamiyan and Kabul, Afghanistan and in Peshawar, Pakistan. These centers served a total of 23,750 Afghan women, men and children in classes ranging from pre-school to university students. These centers have had a huge impact on the lives of the students since the students have no other alternatives for receiving a quality education.

Stories to Share
By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant

Since the establishment of the Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) the goal has been to help women improve their situation in life. Following is a story from one of AIL's Women's Learning Centers (WLC) that exemplifies the changes that AIL can make in Afghan women's lives.

When AIL student Rizagul was a young girl, her father was put in prison by the Taliban regime where he was tortured and eventually died leaving behind Rizagul as well as her young brother and her unwell, elderly mother.

2008 Snapshot of AIL's Women's Programs By Alison Hendry - Administrative Assistant

From January to June of 2008 the Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) has supported 37 Educational Learning Centers (ELC's) and Women's Learning Center's (WLC's) in 5 provinces of Afghanistan and in Peshawar, Pakistan serving 11,530 Afghan men, women and children. 65% of those served were female. The level of class run by the center varies from pre-school to university students.

AIL has also supported 3 health clinics in Herat and Kabul, Afghanistan. These three clinics have seen 63,345 patients during the first 6 months of 2008, the majority of whom are women and children. 9,347 of those seen were reproductive health patients. The clinic vaccinated 17,977 women and children during the first 6 months of 2008. The clinics also provide health education seminars and workshops to women. From January to June 2008 31,563 women have taken part in health education workshops.

Update on AIL's Educational Learning Centers By Toc Dunlap - Executive Director

The mission of the Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) is to empower all Afghans who are vulnerable and in need by expanding their education and health opportunities and by fostering self-reliance and community participation. AIL takes a holistic approach to its work with the goal of developing the overall health and education capacity of Afghan individuals and communities.

Because of the years of war, the educational system in Afghanistan has greatly deteriorated. The literacy rate is one of the lowest in the world with an estimated 31% of Afghan males and 15% of Afghan females literate. The situation is particularly acute for women and girls because of the banning of public education for females under the Taliban. Many teenage girls and boys and women were either not allowed to attend schools or had no opportunity to attend schools because of the fighting in Afghanistan. Many of the boys who went to school had a very poor education.

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

$25 15 women will learn to read. $75 44 girls will learn computer skills. $500 35 teachers upgrade skills in one-day workshop $1,000 pays for 33 teachers salaries for one month $5,000 supports a WLC for 250 students for one year

GlobalGiving
1023 15th Street, NW, 12th Floor, Washington, DC 20005

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Academia: The changing face of tenure | View Clip
11/03/2010
Nature - Online

Journal name: Nature Volume: 468 , Pages: 123–125 Year published: (2010) DOI: doi:10.1038/nj7320-123a Published online 03 November 2010 This article was originally published in the journal Nature

Although still highly desirable, tenure is not as prevalent as it was in some places — and that may not be a bad thing.

Biologist Rafael Carazo Salas doesn't have tenure — nor is he expecting to pursue the tenure-track system any time soon. As a faculty member at a UK institution, he doesn't have that option — academic tenure per se in the United Kingdom was abolished more than 20 years ago.

But Carazo Salas, a group leader at the University of Cambridge, UK, isn't lying awake at night trying to dream up ways to manoeuvre himself into a tenured or tenure-track research position. Funded by a portable five-year grant from the European Research Council, he is pleased with what he calls a high level of scientific independence conferred by the grant, even though he's well aware that he has no guarantee of a continuing position at Cambridge at the end of the next four years.

IMAGES.COM/CORBIS

“Everyone would like to have job security,” says Carazo Salas, who moved this year from ETH Zurich in Switzerland after his partner secured a Cambridge post. But Carazo Salas is fine with his current position. He may not have job security in perpetuity, but he has autonomy, few administrative duties, and no teaching obligations. “If I secure funds to continue paying my own salary, I can conceivably stay here as long as I want,” he says.

Although most academics strive for tenure, experiences such as Carazo Salas's suggest that it is not the only satisfying career course. Early-career academic researchers in the United States, the European Union (EU) and elsewhere are wrestling with major shifts in tenure's definition, availability and value. Seen for decades as the only route to long-term job security and academic freedom, its long-standing symbol as the ultimate prize for academic researchers has been eroding on many fronts. Tenured and tenure-track positions, already hard to secure, have become rarer in some areas because of budget concerns. Other regions are seeing increased interest, as governments and institutions try to attract top talent. Tenure is no longer what it once was, and young scientists might want to survey the features of a changing landscape.

Tenure's decline

At most North American institutions, tenure is typical for senior faculty appointments such as professors and associate professors. Achieving tenure generally requires a strong record of published research and administrative work including committee membership (see 'How to get tenure'). Most tenure systems allow junior tenure-track faculty members a period of several years to establish such a record. In addition to job security, academic tenure aims to protect academic freedom; faculty members can disagree with popular opinion, express negative views about their institution, or research unpopular topics.

Box 1: Tips from academics: How to get tenure

Develop a strong, clear research profile. Link your name to your specific research focus by publishing often, attending conferences and speaking about your work, giving talks, creating poster presentations and providing synopses and discussion on your website. Also, line up two or three senior collaborators who can help to broadcast your work. Don't always collaborate with one particular person, as that may create the impression that you can't do the work on your own.

Be a good citizen in your department. Portray yourself as a department member who gets along with all colleagues, who will advocate for other department members and make sure that things get done. Name a senior department member as a co-author on your papers if you're in Europe.

Network. Contact several colleagues — whom you might have met at conferences or elsewhere — who are experts on your research topic. Develop a continuing exchange with them about your work. Such contacts may help to write letters to the tenure-review committee about your research.

Develop two mentors. One, more senior than you, will help you to build your research programme and prioritize your work in accordance with your institution's tenure criteria. The other, more junior than the first mentor, can work with you 'on the ground' and help you to understand your institution's tenure requirements and expectations. For example, if you're in the fourth year of your tenure clock, you can't go back to teach a second undergraduate class if you thought you had to teach only one. This younger mentor can help you to keep these requirements straight.

Teach. Yes, it takes away from your time at the bench. But in the United Kingdom, there are only two paths to positions that resemble tenure, and one requires teaching. In the United States, if you're not on the tenure track but want to be, teaching duties will help.

Maintain confidence. Trust that you're going to make it. Keep focused on your research and don't lose sleep worrying. Anxiety and sleepless nights will do little but make you work less effectively. K.K.

Nevertheless, tenure is receding in the United States, where tight budgets have prompted universities to hire more adjunct faculty members. In 1970, roughly three-quarters of all faculty members were in the tenure stream in the United States, according to figures amassed by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP). By 1975, that number had dropped to 56%, and it continued to fall. Only 42% received tenure in 1995, and this had dropped to 30% by 2007. In the EU, tenure's availability varies widely depending on the state and institution, and it doesn't always confer the same benefits on scientists that it does in the United States.

Given the odds, is tenure still worth the struggle in today's competitive academic environment? It depends on what the researcher wants, says Marc Bousquet, an associate professor at Santa Clara University in California and a member of the executive council of the AAUP. “A lot of people think that tenure is the gold standard for job security, and it's often defined as lifetime job security,” says Bousquet. “But tenure is a status marker,” he says. “What the tenure system offers is a guarantee that the people doing the work are doing it at the highest possible level.”

Tenure-track and tenured faculty members often become part of departmental governance and activities. They receive start-up packages, office space and financial support from the university; for example, they often get a bridge grant to tide them over until their first external funding award. Non-tenure-track faculty members in the United States and in Europe are generally ineligible for such grants from their institution and have to seek 'soft' money from individual research grants instead.

"If I secure funds to continue paying my own salary, I can conceivably stay here as long as I want." - Rafael Carazo Salas

Critics of tenure in the United States and Europe say that it effectively bars junior faculty members from getting hired at institutions filled with senior tenured faculty members, and allows senior faculty members to become unproductive and complacent. Contingent faculty members — contract employees usually lacking benefits — lament the lack of financial and peer support and interaction typically associated with non-tenure-track positions. A May 2010 report on contingent faculty members by the Center for the Education of Women (CEW) at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor found that many feel shunned by their tenured colleagues, often working in isolation and barred from departmental activities and governance. “They don't get the chance to see other research faculty,” says Jean Waltman, senior associate at the CEW and lead author of the study, adding that there is often no institutionalized way to bring together contingent faculty members.

Contingents in the CEW study also reported that they were at the mercy of their department chair. Those with good chair relationships found that they could function in much the same way as a tenure-track faculty member — attending and speaking at department meetings, voting on governance issues and contributing to the university's science community. Poor chair relationships, however, meant that the non-tenure-track researcher was apt to flounder and more likely to be told that his or her contract would not be renewed — whether there was financial cause or not.

At European institutions, academic researchers who work under fixed-term contracts face many of these same problems, says Marja Makarow, chief executive at the European Science Foundation (ESF), headquartered in Strasbourg, France. “We really lack clear career pathways in Europe for young investigators,” says Makarow, who is a former vice-rector for research at the University of Helsinki. “Universities need to create attractive positions for this generation and assure them that there are viable career possibilities for them in the academic environment.”

UNIV. HELSINKI

"We really lack clear career pathways in Europe for young investigators." - Marja Makarow

Tenure does not, however, provide a respite from the rigours of a researcher's duties — in some ways, it heightens them. “The pressure isn't over,” says Matthew Ames, chair of the department of molecular pharmacology and experimental therapeutics at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “Having tenure has never made me sleep better at night.” Non-tenure-track research faculty members who participated in the CEW study said that their tenured colleagues often face significant administrative pressures and obligations that stymie their research. “They are so down in the trenches, researching the nitty, nitty, nitty, nitty gritty,” reported one respondent. “I don't have so many strings, and I'm not tied up in meetings and all those other obligations, so I have the time to think more creatively and to step back and take some risks.”

An academic and economic elite

Tenure is also, in a sense, very expensive. In the United States, the increasingly lengthy time to tenure, during which scientists earn relatively low wages as graduate students and postdocs, means that tenure often becomes the province of the financially privileged, according to Bousquet. “The tenured have always been an academic elite, but they have not always been drawn only from our economic elite,” he says. “For many decades, we made it possible for persons of middle, lower-middle and lower-class backgrounds to find their way into the professoriate.”

But it is not clear whether the other options are any better. Most alternative proposals call for some variation of the mid- to long-term contracts already in place at non-university institutions such as the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Farm Research Campus in Ashburn, Virginia. Picking up on this trend, several universities have created similar arrangements, adopting provisions for improved job security or inclusion in governance. The California State University system, for example, offers fixed-term contracts to adjuncts and requires exploring alternatives to layoffs. The City University of New York offers eligibility for 'continuous employment' to contingent faculty members who have completed six years of service.

Some suggest that a contract system is better than existing European-style tenure. Natalie Sebanz, a tenured associate professor at Radboud University in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, says that earning tenure in the EU is often not transparent or straightforward, even for tenure-track faculty members who have done all the requisite work. “The decision is not always fully based on scientific merit,” says Sebanz. “You need to know the right people and say particular things and not say other things. It has a lot to do with the old existing network.” Nor does tenure in the EU always offer the same advantages that US researchers take for granted, such as scientific independence and autonomy. Junior faculty members at some institutions, even if they're on the tenure track, often have to defer to the department chair or a more senior faculty member for approval of their research topic or for the right to be an adviser to PhD students.

For those seeking autonomy and independence, a contract post is the way to go, agrees Moritz Daum, head of a research group on infant cognition at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, Germany. Daum has a six-year contract, which is standard at Planck institutes, none of which offers tenure to researchers. As a contract scientist, Daum says he defers to no one. “You don't have a director or professor telling you what to do,” he says.

"Having tenure has never made me sleep better at night." - Matthew Ames

Still, for many young scientists in any location, autonomy and independence can trump job security for only so long. The ESF report found that the missing combination of job security, good pay and mobility is a major reason for Europe's dwindling academic research workforce. To boost recruiting efforts, some universities in the EU — including the ETH, the University of Helsinki, and Aalto University in Helsinki and Espoo, Finland — are piloting the tenure-track concept. Despite the criticisms levelled against it, many consider US-style tenure to be superior to tenure and tenure track at most European institutions, if only because of its transparency, says Makarow. The motivation to make European institutions more attractive to researchers is more than just a general aspiration. It is, in part, an outgrowth of the European Commission's plan to boost the EU's investment in research and development to 3% of its annual gross domestic product by 2020 as part of an economic-growth strategy. To achieve that target, the commission has estimated an additional 1 million researchers would be needed in the next ten years — no paltry number.

It is not clear whether the EU will offer new models of tenure or whether the United States will produce acceptable, viable alternatives. But researchers can take heart from the fact that global change is afoot, slow though it may seem, says Beate Scholz, former chair of the European Science Foundation's member organization forum on research careers and lead author of the January 2010 report Research Careers in Europe: Landscape and Horizons. “This,” says Scholz, “is a system in transformation.”

Scholz says tenure may gradually appear more consistently throughout the EU within the next decade or so. Like Makarow, she also believes that the creation of transparent tenure-track and tenured positions at universities would be an effective recruitment tool, and calls for them in the ESF report. “A research career in Europe is very insecure. Researchers are not able to tell what the next step is, whether their contract will be renewed,” says Scholz. “Many people would rather drop out.”

Reports of tenure's demise — at least in some regions — may turn out to be greatly exaggerated. “What else besides extraordinary job security is going to attract someone willing to put in more than ten years of postgraduate study?” asks Bousquet. Despite tenure's drawbacks, Ames says that it has allowed him to conduct better research because he knows his job is secure. “I could have a vision and long-range plan, and build my research programme based on my understanding that I would be here the following year and the year after that and the year after that,” he says. “Research, to me, is not a one- to two-year cycle. It requires stability and continuity.”

Karen Kaplan is the assistant Careers editor at Nature.

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DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION.
11/03/2010
WVEC-TV

WILLIAMSBURG IS THE PLACE TO BE FOR JOB HUNTERS THIS HOLIDAY SEASON. WILLIAMSBURG IS THE PLACE TO BE FOR JOB HUNTERS THIS HOLIDAY WILLIAMSBURG IS THE PLACE TO BE FOR JOB HUNTERS THIS HOLIDAY SEASON. THE WILLIAMSBURG WORKFORCE CENTER IS HOSTING A SEASONAL JOB FAIR NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER NINTH. MORE THAN 20 COMPANIES WILL BE TAKING APPLICATIONS AND INTERVIEWING. THEY'RE HIRING EVERYTHING FROM HOTEL STAFF TO NURSING AIDES. THE FAIR IS FROM NINE TO ONE AT THE THOMAS NELSON DISCOVERY CENTER IN "NEW TOWN. " ANY QUESTIONS, CALL 757-253-4738. HOW VIOLENT IS "TOO" VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO CHILDREN AND VIDEO HOW VIOLENT IS "TOO" VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO CHILDREN AND VIDEO GAMES? AND WHOSE JOB IS IT TO DECIDE? THE US SUPREME COURT MUST DECIDE WHETHER SOME GAMES ARE ENOUGH OF A THREAT, THAT THEY SHOULD BE BANNED TO MINORS. DIANA ALVEAR HAS MORE. (NATS OF VIDEO GAMES)DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN, OR VIOLATE FREEDOM OF SPEECH? THAT'S THE QUESTION BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT THESE KINDS OF GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY THESE GAMES COULD CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM, AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. SO FAR, IT'S BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. KGO PROF. DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. AND I THINK THE COURT IN PRIOR CASES HAS SIGNALED THAT IT REALLY WOULD NOT LIKE TO BE IN THAT POSITION. " TUESDAY, SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN SCOPE. NOTING THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. THE GAMING INDUSTRY HAS MADE THE SAME ARGUMENT FOR YEARS. RICH TAYLOR/ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION 11 58 59 "PARENTS ARE THE BETTER JUDGE OF WHETHER IT'S APPROPRIATE FOR THEIR HOMES, NOT THE GOVERNMENT. " STILL, OTHERS, INCLUDING CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS, POINTED OUT THAT SOME OF THESE GAMES ALLOW PARTICIPANTS TO DISMEMBER, SEXUALLY ASSAULT AND EVEN URINATE ON OTHER CHARACTERS, DEVIANT ACTS FROM WHICH THEY SAID CHILDREN DESERVED TO BE PROTECTED. [ON CAM TAG] THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY IF THE COURT RULES AGAINST THEM, THEY'LL TRY TO REWRITE THE LAW TO MAKE IT MORE NARROW IN SCOPE. THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN THE CASE IN JUNE. DIANA ALVEAR, ABC NEWS, LOS ANGELES. BACK IN HAMPTON ROADS MORE CONCERNS ABOUT CRIME NEAR ODU. POLICE HAVE INCREASED SECURITY AROUND CAMPUS. BUT STILL, THERE HAVE BEEN EIGHT ROBBERIES IN THE LAST TWO MONTHS ALONE. FIVE OF THEM WERE JUST OFF CAMPUS. POLICE SAY IN MANY CASES, WEAPONS WERE USED. NOW, STUDENTS ARE LOOKING FOR WAYS TO KEEP THEMSELVES SAFE. AMONG THE OPTIONS INCREASED POLICE PATROLS, AND TEXT ALERTS THAT CAN BE SET UP THROUGH THE ODU WEBSITE. "FOR AS LONG AS I'VE STAYED HERE ACTUALLY, IT'S BEEN GOING ON FOR AS LONG AS I CAN REMEMBER. FOR THE LAST YEAR. ON AND OFF. BUT IT'S BEEN RECURRING MORE OFTEN LATELY" DESPITE THE ROBBERIES OVER THE PAST TWO MONTHS, POLICE SAY OVERALL CRIME NUMBERS ARE DOWN. STILL AHEAD ON 13 NEWS AT NOON, RESIDENTS IN A TROUBLED SECTION OF NEWPORT NEWS ARE BRANCHING-OUT. OUR GUEST HAS DETAILS ON WEED AND SEED A GREAT PROGRAM THAT'S ALL ABOUT GETTING RID OF CRIME AND SPRUCING UP THE COMMUNITY. THEY'RE WEEDING OUT THE BAD, AND MAKING ROOM FOR THE GOOD TO GROW.

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DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION.
11/03/2010
13 News at Noon - WVEC-TV

WILLIAMSBURG IS THE PLACE TO BE FOR JOB HUNTERS THIS HOLIDAY SEASON. WILLIAMSBURG IS THE PLACE TO BE FOR JOB HUNTERS THIS HOLIDAY WILLIAMSBURG IS THE PLACE TO BE FOR JOB HUNTERS THIS HOLIDAY SEASON. THE WILLIAMSBURG WORKFORCE CENTER IS HOSTING A SEASONAL JOB FAIR NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER NINTH. MORE THAN 20 COMPANIES WILL BE TAKING APPLICATIONS AND INTERVIEWING. THEY'RE HIRING EVERYTHING FROM HOTEL STAFF TO NURSING AIDES. THE FAIR IS FROM NINE TO ONE AT THE THOMAS NELSON DISCOVERY CENTER IN "NEW TOWN. " ANY QUESTIONS, CALL 757-253-4738. HOW VIOLENT IS "TOO" VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO CHILDREN AND VIDEO HOW VIOLENT IS "TOO" VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO CHILDREN AND VIDEO GAMES? AND WHOSE JOB IS IT TO DECIDE? THE US SUPREME COURT MUST DECIDE WHETHER SOME GAMES ARE ENOUGH OF A THREAT, THAT THEY SHOULD BE BANNED TO MINORS. DIANA ALVEAR HAS MORE. (NATS OF VIDEO GAMES)DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN, OR VIOLATE FREEDOM OF SPEECH? THAT'S THE QUESTION BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT THESE KINDS OF GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY THESE GAMES COULD CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM, AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. SO FAR, IT'S BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. KGO PROF. DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. AND I THINK THE COURT IN PRIOR CASES HAS SIGNALED THAT IT REALLY WOULD NOT LIKE TO BE IN THAT POSITION. " TUESDAY, SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN SCOPE. NOTING THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. THE GAMING INDUSTRY HAS MADE THE SAME ARGUMENT FOR YEARS. RICH TAYLOR/ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION 11 58 59 "PARENTS ARE THE BETTER JUDGE OF WHETHER IT'S APPROPRIATE FOR THEIR HOMES, NOT THE GOVERNMENT. " STILL, OTHERS, INCLUDING CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS, POINTED OUT THAT SOME OF THESE GAMES ALLOW PARTICIPANTS TO DISMEMBER, SEXUALLY ASSAULT AND EVEN URINATE ON OTHER CHARACTERS, DEVIANT ACTS FROM WHICH THEY SAID CHILDREN DESERVED TO BE PROTECTED. [ON CAM TAG] THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY IF THE COURT RULES AGAINST THEM, THEY'LL TRY TO REWRITE THE LAW TO MAKE IT MORE NARROW IN SCOPE. THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN THE CASE IN JUNE. DIANA ALVEAR, ABC NEWS, LOS ANGELES. BACK IN HAMPTON ROADS MORE CONCERNS ABOUT CRIME NEAR ODU. POLICE HAVE INCREASED SECURITY AROUND CAMPUS. BUT STILL, THERE HAVE BEEN EIGHT ROBBERIES IN THE LAST TWO MONTHS ALONE. FIVE OF THEM WERE JUST OFF CAMPUS. POLICE SAY IN MANY CASES, WEAPONS WERE USED. NOW, STUDENTS ARE LOOKING FOR WAYS TO KEEP THEMSELVES SAFE. AMONG THE OPTIONS INCREASED POLICE PATROLS, AND TEXT ALERTS THAT CAN BE SET UP THROUGH THE ODU WEBSITE. "FOR AS LONG AS I'VE STAYED HERE ACTUALLY, IT'S BEEN GOING ON FOR AS LONG AS I CAN REMEMBER. FOR THE LAST YEAR. ON AND OFF. BUT IT'S BEEN RECURRING MORE OFTEN LATELY" DESPITE THE ROBBERIES OVER THE PAST TWO MONTHS, POLICE SAY OVERALL CRIME NUMBERS ARE DOWN. STILL AHEAD ON 13 NEWS AT NOON, RESIDENTS IN A TROUBLED SECTION OF NEWPORT NEWS ARE BRANCHING-OUT. OUR GUEST HAS DETAILS ON WEED AND SEED A GREAT PROGRAM THAT'S ALL ABOUT GETTING RID OF CRIME AND SPRUCING UP THE COMMUNITY. THEY'RE WEEDING OUT THE BAD, AND MAKING ROOM FOR THE GOOD TO GROW.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO | View Clip
11/03/2010
Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Léo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction between them as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked

for SAP.

"Mr. Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Léo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP said in a statement.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarassing testimony.

The offer to pay Oracle's legal fees was outlined in a court document that Judge Phyllis Hamilton ordered sealed Tuesday morning. Its existence was first reported by IDG News Service, which follows the tech industry. Other sources confirmed the agreement to the Mercury News.

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at Twitter.com/BrandonBailey.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO | View Clip
11/03/2010
San Jose Mercury News - Online

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Léo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction between them as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked

for SAP.

"Mr. Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Léo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP said in a statement.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarassing testimony.

The offer to pay Oracle's legal fees was outlined in a court document that Judge Phyllis Hamilton ordered sealed Tuesday morning. Its existence was first reported by IDG News Service, which follows the tech industry. Other sources confirmed the agreement to the Mercury News.

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at Twitter.com/BrandonBailey.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO | View Clip
11/03/2010
San Jose Mercury News - Online

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Léo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Léo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

The offer to pay Oracle's legal fees was outlined in a court document that Judge Phyllis Hamilton ordered sealed Tuesday morning. Its existence was first reported by IDG News Service, which follows the tech industry. Other sources confirmed the agreement to the Mercury News.

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at Twitter.com/BrandonBailey.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO | View Clip
11/03/2010
SiliconValley.com

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing.

HP chief Léo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP.

"Mr.

Apotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case.

"Given Léo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

The offer to pay Oracle's legal fees was outlined in a court document that Judge Phyllis Hamilton ordered sealed Tuesday morning. Its existence was first reported by IDG News Service, which follows the tech industry. Other sources confirmed the agreement to the Mercury News.

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at Twitter.com/BrandonBailey.

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Oracle says HP won't accept subpoena for its CEO | View Clip
11/03/2010
SiliconValley.com

Oracle said Wednesday that Hewlett-Packard is refusing to accept a subpoena for its new chief executive to testify in the trial of Oracle's lawsuit against rival software maker SAP, in a case that has Silicon Valley buzzing. HP chief Léo Apotheker was a longtime SAP executive until earlier this year, and Oracle wants him to testify about his actions relating to an SAP subsidiary that carried out an extensive scheme to pirate Oracle's software.

In a separate development, SAP has agreed to pay $120 million to Oracle for its legal costs in the case, provided Oracle doesn't pursue punitive damages in the trial that started this week in Oakland's U.S. District Court.

The agreement, which is pending a judge's approval, represents a significant concession by SAP. But it does not end the case, in which Oracle is still seeking more than $2 billion in compensation for copyright infringement.

HP, meanwhile, has accused Oracle of harassing its new CEO. While the two companies have worked closely together in the past, there has been growing friction as they increasingly compete in the same tech markets.

Legal experts said HP has no obligation to accept a subpoena since it's not a party in the case. But the situation is potentially awkward: Palo Alto-based HP, the world's largest tech company, has refused in recent days to say whether its new CEO is currently in the United States. Apotheker lived in France when he worked for SAP. "Mr. AdvertisementApotheker started work for HP on Monday, but it now appears that the HP board of directors has decided to keep him away from HP's headquarters and outside the court's jurisdiction," Redwood City-based Oracle said Wednesday.

An HP spokeswoman declined to comment. In a statement last week, after Oracle CEO Larry Ellison first accused HP of trying to help Apotheker avoid a potentially embarrassing court appearance, HP noted that Apotheker gave a videotaped deposition in an earlier stage of the case. "Given Léo's limited knowledge of and role in the matter, Oracle's last-minute effort to require him to appear live at trial is no more than an effort to harass him and interfere with his duties and responsibilities as HP's CEO," HP's statement said.

SAP has accepted liability for the software abuses and has admitted that it failed to properly oversee its subsidiary. But Oracle contends that Apotheker and other top SAP officials played an active role, by approving and encouraging the violations, in a scheme to woo customers from Oracle.

While SAP contends it should only pay about $40 million in damages, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the German company may have decided it was worth paying more for Oracle's legal costs, if SAP thought Oracle's agreement to forgo punitive damages would prevent the need for potentially embarrassing testimony.

The offer to pay Oracle's legal fees was outlined in a court document that Judge Phyllis Hamilton ordered sealed Tuesday morning. Its existence was first reported by IDG News Service, which follows the tech industry. Other sources confirmed the agreement to the Mercury News.

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at Twitter.com/BrandonBailey.

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Oracle-SAP Testimony Nears; HP CEO in Spotlight | View Clip
11/03/2010
Financial Technology Network

A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the worlds most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear Tuesday as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG. By Reuters November 02, 2010 November 2, 2010 * Oracle gets day in court after 2-1/2 years

* SAP admits to wrongdoing, at issue are damages

* Battle also may bring HP CEO Apotheker into court

(Adds paragraph about jury selection, background)

OAKLAND, Calif. - A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the world's most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear Tuesday as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG .

Attorneys from Oracle and SAP spent nearly seven hours Monday selecting jurors and hammering out procedural rules for the five week trial. They are due to present opening arguments Tuesday.

Larry Ellison, Oracle's co-founder and CEO, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring SAP to court on accusations that SAP's TomorrowNow subsidiary stole its software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices -- which SAP has admitted.

At issue is not whether SAP or now-defunct TomorrowNow is at fault. SAP has admitted to wrongdoing, accepted liability and shut down TomorrowNow. The two sides are fighting over the damages SAP will have to pay, anywhere from tens of millions to billions of dollars.

Also at stake is the credibility of former SAP CEO and now top Hewlett-Packard executive Leo Apotheker. SAP says Apotheker did not know of any wrongdoing initially and moved to shut TomorrowNow after he found out.

Ellison, however, has stated he has evidence Apotheker was complicit in the SAP's improper downloading of the software.

Oracle has attacked HP for naming Apotheker CEO in September. Ellison charges the German executive -- who spent just seven months as sole SAP CEO before leaving amid public criticism -- played a key role in the case. Europe's biggest software maker and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became foes following a series of executive shuffles that began in August.

HP's CEO, Mark Hurd, a close friend of Ellison left HP after accusations of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. And HP hired Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management said last week.

AND WE'RE UNDERWAY

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California Monday. Oracle's President Safra Catz, who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as the two sides selected eight jurors out of a pool of 27.

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing it believes damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While both sides will spend the next five weeks arguing over money, several analysts said the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, since they each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money," Anderson said.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed details about the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said Sunday that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who began his new job with HP Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say Monday night whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said other potential witnesses include former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann and current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658. (Editing by Derek Caney, Matthew Lewis, Edwin Chan and Carol Bishopric)

Copyright 2010 by Reuters. All rights reserved.

digg_skin = 'compact'; digg_topic = 'business_finance'; digg_title = ' '; digg_bodytext = 'A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the worlds most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear Tuesday as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG.'; Past IssuesSubscribe Past IssuesSubscribe Past IssuesSubscribe

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: Managerial Decision Making Leadership Will Improve the Quality of Your Decisions and Change the Way You Do Business
11/02/2010
M2 PressWIRE

RDATE:02112010

Dublin - Research and Markets

(http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/6ef7b5/managerial_decisio) has announced the addition of John Wiley and Sons Ltd's new book "Managerial Decision Making Leadership" to their offering.

The modern manager faces a bewildering range of challenges every single day. Their ability to make critical decisions, often under pressure, can directly determine the future success of the company and their career. It is therefore surprising that so few managers take the time to learn the art of decision making. In this groundbreaking book from Caroline Wang, readers will learn that quality decision making is a competence that can be acquired according to a simple framework. The framework is practical and easy-to-remember, consisting of two acronyms: GPA and IPO.

GPA for decision content quality (Goal, Priority, Alternatives); and IPO for decision process quality (Information, People, Objective reasoning). The book places emphasis on leading a team to make decisions, even though the framework can be used for personal and individual decisions.

By using this common decision-making framework, managers and leaders will gain credibility and team support for the decision, will confidently articulate, promote, and defend the decision, and will have made the necessary preparations for successful implementation when the decision-making process is complete.

This proven framework from one of Asia's most dynamic leadership experts will improve the quality of your decisions and change the way you do business.

Reviews:

This book responds to today's cries for greater transparency about how decisions are going to be made and provides a template-backed up by rich personal experiences and common sense-that ensures that the right content and processes are brought into play in making high-quality decisions.

-- Barry Z. Posner, PhD

Professor of Leadership, Santa Clara University

Co-author, The Leadership Challenge and The Truth About Leadership

Managerial Decision Making and Leadership offers management insights and a practical framework for all managers to effectively lead the team to make quality business decisions. An essential pocket book to carry.

-- Sophia Tong

CEO, Testrite Group

Managerial Decision Making and Leadership offers a balance of real world experience and sound conceptual theory. It explains in practical terms how to lead a team to make quality decisions. It offers the balance of empowerment and accountability. A must read for all managers.

-- Dr. John C. M. Lee

Chairman and CEO, Asia Vision Technology

Managerial Decision Making and Leadership outlines a decision-making framework that can help managers in all cultures to effectively lead their team to make quality decisions to achieve organizational goals.

-- Ruimin Zhang

Chairman and CEO, Haier Group

The decision-making framework described in this book is simple yet comprehensive and can be used by all managers in cross-cultural environments to enhance decision transparency and team involvement.

-- Yukako Uchinaga

Director and Executive Vice President, Benesse Holdings, Inc. and

Chairman of the Board, CEO and President, Berlitz International, Inc.

Key Topics Covered:

Preface.

Introduction.

1 Decisions and Decision Making.

2 Decision-Making Traps.

3 GPA: G for Goal.

4 GPA: P for Priorities.

5 GPA: A for Alternatives.

6 IPO: O for Objective Reasoning.

7 IPO: I for Information.

8 IPO: P for People.

9 Conclusion.

Bibliography.

Index.

Author:

Caroline Wang is an Adjunct Professor at the School of Business and Management, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST). She teaches the MBA and Executive MBA programs, with course topics covering Managerial Decision Making and Leadership, Managerial Communication, Leading Across Diversity, and Business Leadership. In addition, she is also visiting Professor at Peking University, Tsinghua University, and National University of Singapore for their executive programs.

Caroline was formerly Vice President and highest ranking Asian female executive for IBM globally with over 25 years of working experience in the United States and across Asia Pacific. During her stint in IBM her responsibilities spanned 12 functional areas and her roles included Chief Marketing Officer and Chief Information Officer.

Caroline currently serves as Board Director for three multinational companies in China.

For more information visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/6ef7b5/managerial_decisio

((M2 Communications disclaims all liability for information provided within M2 PressWIRE. Data supplied by named party/parties. Further information on M2 PressWIRE can be obtained at http://www.presswire.net on the world wide web. Inquiries to info@m2.com)). .PUB 430 .DATE November 2, 2010 .TITLE M2 PRESSWIRE .PRICEDATE NOT APPLICABLE .DAY

Copyright © 2010 M2 Communications Ltd.

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An October to Remember | View Clip
11/02/2010
Examiner.com

This October has been so full of opportunities for interreligious enounter, dialogue, and activity that there has not been time to post about it all. As the month comes to an end with the celebration of Halloween- a holiday that in itself combines the traditions and customs of many different religious traditions and cultures- I will note a few of the events that have taken place. I hope to be able to share in greater depth about many of these occasions.

The month began with a ceremony at the Sunnyvale Zen Center, occasioned by the visit of the Chung Tai Monastery's Grand Master and Founder Ven. Master Wei Chueh on October 1. He presided over a ceremony of welcome for new Buddhists, and gave a Dharma teaching. Attending that evening were representatives of several local religious communities, as well as government officials.

The next day saw hundreds gathered for the Carry the Vision Non-Violence conference, hosted at Santa Clara University. The keynote speakers for the day included Fr. John Dear, a Jesuit peacemaker and Rev. Bernard Lafayette, co-founder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and a longtime advocate of peace and nonviolence. A number of panels on issues of nonviolent changemaking were also offered.

On October 3, the Interfaith Center at the Presidio held its annual "Gathering of Blessings" gathering to commemorate the Center's founding in 1995. The focus for this year's assembly was "Reclaiming the First Amendment," with speakers from some fourteen different religious groups taking part. The keynote address was given by Dr. Kathleen Hurty, who has worked with Church Women United, the National Council of Churches and the Parliament of the World's Religions.

The next week, as many of you will know, the Dalai Lama came to our area. On Tuesday, October 12, he gave a dharma teaching on "Eight Verses for Training the Mind." 50 religious leaders of other traditions were invited to be seated on the stage together with members of the Buddhist community. Following that session, over 600 people gathered to hear from Prof. Huston Smith, Rev. Matthew Fox, Rabbi Michael Lerner and several other distinguished speakers their responses to the Dalai Lama's talk. Later in the week, the Dalai Lama spoke several times at Stanford University, in conjunction with a conference on compassion.

Wednesday of that week, October 13, was the annual Religious Leaders Appreciation Breakfast sponsored by the Mayor of San Jose to thank the relgious communities of San Jose for their work on behalf of the whole community, and to invite participation in such city-wide programs as gang prevention.

Working groups for the new Silicon Valley Interreligious Council continued their efforts to prepare for bringing new possibilities for cooperation in the Valley.

The Pacifica Institute held its Annual Dialog Friendship dinner, featuring guest speaker Jannah Scott, Deputy Director of the Center for Faith-based and Community Initiatives, speaking about the Obama administration's interreligious partnerships that seek to bring people together for the benefit of their communities.

Truly a month to remember!

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City blight? There's an app store for that | View Clip
11/02/2010
Tri-Valley Herald

These are tough times for local governments.

Maybe you've heard. Cities, counties, schools are all scrambling to pay to bring you the services you expect. Mass transit is massively underfunded. Parks are going to seed. Buildings, bridges and roads are crumbling. Budgets are in worse shape than the infrastructure.

But there is hope. And it's called Apple.

Did you hear that the Cupertino maker of all-things-hip opened a new store in Chicago on Oct. 23? And yeah, the store is gorgeous, because Apple is into gorgeous, but what is even more beautiful is the transformation of the subway station that leads to the Apple store's door.

The station was remade from a horrendous dump to a lovely public space on Apple's dime. Well, Apple's 40 million dimes. The company put up $4 million, give or take, to fix up the train stop and to build a comfy plaza (with wireless) out front where happy Apple customers and others can sit and contemplate a gurgling fountain.

Look, if Google can blow $2 billion to buy one of New York City's biggest buildings (as the New York Post reported it might), surely Apple, which is sitting on $51 billion in cash, can drop $4 million in the Second City to fix up the transit gateway to its newest store.

And you know what this means, don't you? Now everyone is going to want an Apple store. Yes, please, absolutely in my backyard.

Think of the subway rehab as part of Steve Jobs' own Works Progress Administration, the Depression-era program that created jobs through government spending on public works. He found a shovel-ready project and started shoveling money at it. The guy has been a one-man stimulus plan.

Forget big government. This is Big Apple, which built a lovely plaza, with tables and such, in front of its Manhattan store in the Other Big Apple. It kicked in for a public plaza outside its new Shanghai store and it has preserved pieces of historic buildings in France and England as it opened stores there.

Apple is not talking about the Chicago station rehab, but the move is not exactly retail rocket science. This is not a company that leaves much to chance and there was no way the sales gurus in Cupertino were going to let a dungeonlike transit stop present the first impression of their sleek and glassy store.

Remember, Apple sells an experience as much as it sells products.

"The public might not think of it this way, but the retail experience doesn't start exactly in your store. It starts when they approach your store," says Kirthi Kalyanam, a professor with the Retail Management Institute at Santa Clara University's Leavey School of Business.

Based on accounts from Chicagoans on blogs and in the local press, the investment is already paying off. The station, which once consisted of a weary brick entrance building sporting peeling paint and the distinctive odor of urine, now boasts clean bricks, big windows and a thoroughly scrubbed interior that has been painted and plastered with ads for all things Apple.

This is how Chicago, "the city that works," works. But why not make it work for the Bay Area, too? How about BART to downtown San Jose. You say it will never happen? Why not an Apple store at either end of the Fremont-to-downtown route, with Apple picking up the construction tab? Worried about the deferred maintenance at your kids' school? How does Apple Academy -- complete with Apple store -- sound? And why close state parks when you can simply replace those gift shops -- with their trail guides and DEET -- with Apple stores packed with iPhones (think GPS) and iPads (good alternative to singing around the campfire)?

OK, maybe the state park store is a little out there. But remember this: With Apple, and a little dough, all things are possible.

Contact Mike Cassidy at mcassidy@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5536. Follow him at Twitter.com/mikecassidy.

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City blight? There's an app store for that | View Clip
11/02/2010
Contra Costa Times - Online

These are tough times for local governments.

Maybe you've heard. Cities, counties, schools are all scrambling to pay to bring you the services you expect. Mass transit is massively underfunded. Parks are going to seed. Buildings, bridges and roads are crumbling. Budgets are in worse shape than the infrastructure.

But there is hope. And it's called Apple.

Did you hear that the Cupertino maker of all-things-hip opened a new store in Chicago on Oct. 23? And yeah, the store is gorgeous, because Apple is into gorgeous, but what is even more beautiful is the transformation of the subway station that leads to the Apple store's door.

The station was remade from a horrendous dump to a lovely public space on Apple's dime. Well, Apple's 40 million dimes. The company put up $4 million, give or take, to fix up the train stop and to build a comfy plaza (with wireless) out front where happy Apple customers and others can sit and contemplate a gurgling fountain.

Look, if Google can blow $2 billion to buy one of New York City's biggest buildings (as the New York Post reported it might), surely Apple, which is sitting on $51 billion in cash, can drop $4 million in the Second City to fix up the transit gateway to its newest store.

And you know what this means, don't you? Now everyone is going to want an Apple store. Yes, please, absolutely in my backyard.

Think of the subway rehab as part of Steve Jobs' own Works Progress Administration,yld_mgr.place_ad_here("adPosBox"); the Depression-era program that created jobs through government spending on public works. He found a shovel-ready project and started shoveling money at it. The guy has been a one-man stimulus plan.

Forget big government. This is Big Apple, which built a lovely plaza, with tables and such, in front of its Manhattan store in the Other Big Apple. It kicked in for a public plaza outside its new Shanghai store and it has preserved pieces of historic buildings in France and England as it opened stores there.

Apple is not talking about the Chicago station rehab, but the move is not exactly retail rocket science. This is not a company that leaves much to chance and there was no way the sales gurus in Cupertino were going to let a dungeonlike transit stop present the first impression of their sleek and glassy store.

Remember, Apple sells an experience as much as it sells products.

"The public might not think of it this way, but the retail experience doesn't start exactly in your store. It starts when they approach your store," says Kirthi Kalyanam, a professor with the Retail Management Institute at Santa Clara University's Leavey School of Business.

Based on accounts from Chicagoans on blogs and in the local press, the investment is already paying off. The station, which once consisted of a weary brick entrance building sporting peeling paint and the distinctive odor of urine, now boasts clean bricks, big windows and a thoroughly scrubbed interior that has been painted and plastered with ads for all things Apple.

This is how Chicago, "the city that works," works. But why not make it work for the Bay Area, too? How about BART to downtown San Jose. You say it will never happen? Why not an Apple store at either end of the Fremont-to-downtown route, with Apple picking up the construction tab? Worried about the deferred maintenance at your kids' school? How does Apple Academy -- complete with Apple store -- sound? And why close state parks when you can simply replace those gift shops -- with their trail guides and DEET -- with Apple stores packed with iPhones (think GPS) and iPads (good alternative to singing around the campfire)?

OK, maybe the state park store is a little out there. But remember this: With Apple, and a little dough, all things are possible.

Contact Mike Cassidy at mcassidy@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5536. Follow him at Twitter.com/mikecassidy.

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DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIFIRE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION.
11/02/2010
ABC 12 News at 5 PM - WJRT-TV

VOTING RUNS UNTIL 8 TONIGHT. TO VOTE - LOG ONTO ABC12 DOT COM -THERE'S A LINK IN THE "SEE IT ON TV" SECTION, (WEATHER TEASE)ANGIE BEFORE THE FORECAST - ON ABC 12 NEWS AT 5 -BILL SHOULD YOUR CHILD BE BANNED FROM BUYING VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES? THE LATEST ON THE SUPREME COURT HEARING - FOCUSING ON JUST THAT - NEXT. BREAK 5 STOCK BUMPER BREAK 5 CONTINUES AND VIDEO GAMES? THE US SUPREME COURT MUST DECIDE E WHETHER THESE GAMES PRESENT ENOUGH OF A THREAT - THAT THEIR SALE SHOULD BE BANNED TO MINORS. ABC'S DIANA ALVEAR HAS BOTH SIDES OF THE ISSUE FROM LOS ANGELES. (PKG)DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN, OR VIOLATE FREEDOM OF SPEECH? THAT'S THE QUESTION BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING THE CONSTITUTIO NALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT THESE KIKIDS OF GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY THESE GAMES COULD CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM, AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. SO FAR, IT'S BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. KGO PROF. DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIFIRE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. AND I THINK THE COURT IN PRIOR CASES HAS SIGNALED THAT IT REALLY WOULD NOT LIKE TO BE IN THAT POSITION. " TUESDAY, SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN OPE. NOTING THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINM ENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. THE GAMING INDUSTRY HAS MADADTHE SAME ARGUMENT FOR YEARS, SAYING PARENTS SHOULD BE THE ONES TO DECIDE WHAT'S TOO VIOLENT. TED PRICE/CEO, INSOMNIAC GAMES "I THINK WE HAVE THE CONSTITUTION ON OUR SIDE. GAMES HAVE THE SAME RIGHTS AS FILMS, TELEVISION AND OTHER FORMS OF MEDIA WHEN IT COMES TO FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION, AND I'D BE REALLY SURPRISED IF THE SUPREME COURT DIDN'T REALIZE THAT. " STILL, OTHERS, INCLUDING CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS, POINTED OUT THAT SOME OF THESE GAMES ALLOW PARTICIPANTS TO DISMEMBER, SEXUALLY ASSAULT AND EVEN URINATE ON OTHER CHARACTERS, DEVIANT ACTS FROM WHICH THEY SAID CHILDREN DESERVED TO BE PROTECTED. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY IF THE COURT RULES AGAINST THEM, THEY'LL TRY TO REWRITE THE LAW TO MAKE IT MORE NARROW IN SCOPE. THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN THE CASE IN JUNE. DIANA ALVEAR, ABC NEWS, LOS ANGELES. (WEATHER FORECAST) [F3]WEATHER CHAT OUT 2 LESLIE IT'S TIME TO PICTURE YOUR WEATHER! TODAY'S DRAWING COMES FROM LYDIA FROM CENTRAL ELEMENTARY IN DAVISON.

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DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION.
11/02/2010
Channel 3 News at 4 PM - WEAR-TV

NATS PLANE FOR YEMENI TROOPS? THIS LATEST MISSION BY THE YEMENI MILITARY MAY BE AN EFFORT TO PROVE TO AMERICA, UNMANNED DRONE STRIKES AREN'T NECESSARY. SOT FUAD AKRAM, MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT, MEMBER OF YEMEN'S RULING PARTY THE YEMENI PEOPLE AND THE PRESIDENT AND THE POLITICAL LEADERSHIP ALL VERY CLEARLY AND TOTALLY REJECT ANY MILITARY INTERVENTION IN YEMEN, AMERICAN OR OTHERWISE. STANDUP WINICK US MILITARY AID TO YEMEN HAS RECENTLY BEEN HIKED UP TO 150 MILLION DOLLARS A YEAR. IT'S BELIEVED AL QAEDA CURRENTLY HAS 300 CORE MEMBERS IN YEMEN. TJ WINICK, ABC NEWS, NEW YORK. 3 SHOTS WERE FIRED AT ANOTHER MILITARY LOCATION TODAY, 3 THIS TIME A COAST GUARD RECRUITING CENTER IN WOODBRIDGE, VIRGINIA WAS THE TARGET. ONCE AGAIN, THE SHOOTING HAPPENED OVERNIGHT. NO ONE WAS HURT, BUT A BULLET DID HIT A WINDOW. THE INCIDENT COMES AS INVESTIGATORS LOOK INTO A SERIES OF OVERNIGHT SHOOTINGS INVOLVING MILITARY BUILDINGS OR OFFICES, INCLUDING THE PENTAGON, A VACANT MARINE CORPS RECRUITING STATION AND THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE MARINE CORPS. 3 HOW VIOLENT IS TOO VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO VIDEO GAMES? 3 THAT'S JUST ONE OF THE QUESTIONS FACING THE SUPREME COURT TODAY. JUSTICES ARE HEARING ARGUMENTS OVER THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT BANNED THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES TO MINORS. SUPPORTERS SAY CHILDREN FACE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM FROM THESE GAMES, BUT THE GAMING INDUSTRY SAYS ANY BAN POSES A THREAT TO FREE SPEECH. SO FAR, THE LAW HAS BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. 3 3 [TAKE SOT] KGO PROF. DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. AND I THINK THE COURT IN PRIOR CASES HAS SIGNALED THAT IT LIKE TO BE IN THAT POSITION. " 3 DURING ORAL ARGUMENTS, SOME JUSTICES WERE CONCERNED THAT THE LAW IS TOO BROAD, AND POINTED OUT THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT LIKE BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. OTHERS SAY CHILDREN DESERVE PROTECTION FROM THE MOST VIOLENT GAMES, THOSE THAT ALLOW PARTICIPANTS TO DISMEMBER AND EVEN SEXUALLY ASSAULT OTHER CHARACTERS THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE A RULING IN JUNE. 3 3 COMING UP, IT'S YOUR TURN TO TALK, TALK, DO YOU SUPPORT OR OPPOSE THE USE OF 'FULL BODY'PAT DOWNS AT THE AIRPORT? WE WANT "YOUR THREE CENTS", CENTS", 3 3 3 3 3 3 CE ON EVERY PIZZA ON THE MENU. WE MADE EVERYTHING SIMPLER AND EASY TO UNDERSTAND. [ Employee ] A LARGE PIZZA WITH UP TO THREE TOPPINGS IS JUST TEN BUCKS EVERY DAY. WHAT YOU DO WITH ALL YOUR COUPONS IS UP TO YOU. I MADE A SEAL. [ seal sound, laughter ] [ Male Announcer ] INTRODUCING THE BIG ITALY PIZZA FROM PIZZA HUT! IT'S A BIG PIZZA THAT'S BIG ON FLAVOR. BIGGER THAN TWO MEDIUMS, WITH A HAND-STRETCHED CRUST THAT'S SEASONED WITH ITALIAN SPICES, AND LOADED WITH YOUR FAVORITE TOPPING. THE BIG ITALY STARTS AT ONLY TWELVE DOLLARS, AND IT'S ONLY AT YOUR PIZZA HUT. 3 3 3 3 EVERY DAY ON FIRST AT FOUR, WE LIKE TO START A CONVERSATION ON ONE OF THE HOT TOPICS OF THE DAY, AND GET YOUR OPINION ON IT.

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Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression.
11/02/2010
ABC 26 News at 5 PM - WGNO-TV

GLYNN THE CITY IS CRACKING DOWN ON BLIGHTED PROPERTIES, AND MAKING ITS CODE ENFORCEMENT DEPARTMENT MORE EFFICIENT, A MOVE MAYOR MITCH LANDRIEU HOPES WILL CLEAN-UP NEW ORLEANS. ABC26 NEWS REPORTER VANESSA BOLANO HAS MORE. TAKE PKG SOT FULL nats. IT'S THE FIRST PROPERTY DEMOLISHED UNDER MAYOR MITCH LANDRIEU'S REVAMPED CODE ENFORCEMENT EFFORTS. TODAY THE MAYOR, COUNCIL MEMBERS AND ABOUT 20 CODE ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS BEGAN CLEANING UP BLIGHTED PROPERTIES IN THE NINTH WARD. SOT FULL MAYOR: we asked the public point blank, when is the day when we have to begin to really aggressively address the issue of blight. THE ANSWER WAS RIGHT NOW, AND TODAY IS THE START OF A BLIGHT INSPECTION SWEEP TARGETING THE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS. SOT FULL cynthia hedge-morrell: they overwhelmingly said we want blight gone, we've come back, we've invested, we want our neighborhoods back . OFFICERS WILL CANVASS NEIGHBORHOODS, CITING PROPERTIES NOT IN COMPLIANCE, WHICH INCLUDES OVERGROWN GRASS. SOT FULL mayor: we are going to sweep this neighborhood, we are going to identify properties, we are going to identify commercial properties, and properties owned by the city, and properties owned residentially and we are going to get in the business of cleaning the city back up. ONCE YOU RECEIVE A CITATION, YOU HAVE A CHANCE TO RESOLVE THE ISSUE, IF THE ISSUE ISN'T RESOLVED, THE CITY PUTS A LEIN ON YOUR PROPERTY. AND IF THE STRUCTURE IS NOT SAFE DOWN IT GOES. SOT FULL vanessa: the mayor estimates 50 to 60,000 commercial and residential properties in new orleans are blighted, and that many of them are a haven for crime. SOT FULL cynthia: if you think back a week ago we had a rape of a child pulled into a blighted house, and so if in the communities you have these houses, you have crimes of opportunity. TO REPORT A BLIGHTED PROPERTY IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD CALL 3-1-1. IN THE 9TH WARD, VANESSA BOLANO, ABC26 NEWS. LANDRIEU BLIGHT ENFORCEMENT VANESSA-TAG GLYNN MON MAYOR LANDRIEU'S GOAL IS TO INSPECT OVER 1600 PROPERTIES A MONTH. BP BACK IN THE BLACK-TOP VO JESSICA TOP VO BP IS BACK IN THE BLACK. 6 MONTHS AFTER THE WORST OIL SPILL IN US HISTORY, THE OIL COMPANY IS PROFITABLE AGAIN. BP HAS POSTED TODAY A 1.8 BILLION-DOLLAR 3RD QUARTER PROFIT. THAT FOLLOWS A 17-BILLION-DOLLAR LOSS IN THE SECOND QUARTER. TO GIVE YOU SOME PERSPECTIVE, BP MADE A PROFIT OF 5-BILLION-DOLLARS IN THE 3RD QUARTER OF 2009. THE OIL GIANT SAYS, IT STILL CAN'T ESTIMATE THE FULL COST OF THE DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL DISASTER. TERROR PACKAGES LATEST-TOP-VO GLYNN TOP VO THE SEARCH CONTINUES FOR THOSE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE CARGO PACKAGE BOMB PLOT UNCOVERED LAST WEEK. US AUTHORITIES SAY THE PLOT WASN'T A COMPLETE SURPRISE. THE YEMENI GOVERNMENT HAS LAUNCHED A MAJOR COUNTER-TERRORISM OPERATION. IT'S A MANHUNT FOCUSED ON TWO AL QAEDA OPERATIVES: IT'S BELIEVED TERRORISTS TRIED A DRY RUN FOR AN AIR CARGO BOMB ATTACK BACK IN EARLY SEPTEMBER. THAT'S WHEN US INTELLIGENCE INTERCEPTED PACKAGES BEING SHIPPED FROM YEMEN TO CHICAGO, BY FEDEX AND UPS, AFTER RECIEVING A TIP. TERROR PACKAGES LATEST-SOT-VO SOT FULL "They wanted to follow the packages using the tracking system to know exactly when they got to a point, how long the timer had to be set for, so the bomb would go off at the right point. " BUTT TO "Nine years after September 11th, al Qaeda is still obsessed with blowing up airplanes coming into the United States of America. " GLYNN VO CONTINUES MEANTIME, USAUTHORITIES ARE TAKING ANOTHER LOOK AT THE UPS PLANE THAT CRASHED IN DUBAI IN EARLY SEPTEMBER, A WEEK BEFORE THE APPARENT DRY RUN TO CHICAGO. JESSICA TWO SHOT JUST HOW VIOLENT IS TOO VIOLENT, WHEN IT COMES TO CHILDREN AND VIDEO GAMES? GLYNN THE US SUPREME COURT MUST DECIDE IF THESE GAMES PRESENT ENOUGH OF A THREAT THAT THEIR SALE SHOULD BE BANNED TO MINORS. JESSICA ABC'S DIANA ALVEAR HAS BOTH SIDES OF THE ISSUE. TAKE PKG DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN, OR VIOLATE FREEDOM OF SPEECH? THAT'S THE QUESTION BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT THESE KINDS OF GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY THESE GAMES COULD CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM, AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. SO FAR, IT'S BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. KGO Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. And I think the court in prior cases has signaled that it really would not like to be in that position. " TUESDAY, SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN SCOPE. NOTING THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. THE GAMING INDUSTRY HAS MADE THE SAME ARGUMENT FOR YEARS, SAYING PARENTS SHOULD BE THE ONES TO DECIDE WHAT'S TOO VIOLENT. Ted Price/CEO, Insomniac Games "I think we have the Constitution on our side. Games have the same rights as films, television and other forms of media when it comes to freedom of expression, and I'd be really surprised if the Supreme Court didn't realize that. " STILL, OTHERS, INCLUDING CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS, POINTED OUT THAT SOME OF THESE GAMES ALLOW PARTICIPANTS TO DISMEMBER, SEXUALLY ASSAULT AND EVEN URINATE ON OTHER CHARACTERS, DEVIANT ACTS FROM WHICH THEY SAID CHILDREN DESERVED TO BE PROTECTED. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY IF THE COURT RULES AGAINST THEM, THEY'LL TRY TO REWRITE THE LAW TO MAKE IT MORE NARROW IN SCOPE. THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN THE CASE IN JUNE. DIANA ALVEAR, HE'S SINGLE, HE'S GREAT LOOKING AND I'M GOING TO INTRODUCE YOU IN TWO WEEKS.

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Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression.
11/02/2010
KOLO 8 News Now at 5 PM - KOLO-TV

THE US SUPREME COURT IS DECIDING WHETHER MINORS SHOULD BE BANNED FROM BUYING CERTAIN GAMES. SOME SAY THEY POSE A REAL THREAT, WHILE OTHERS SAY BANNING SALES VIOLATES THE CONSTITUTION. DIANA ALVEAR TAKES A LOOK AT BOTH SIDES OF THE ISSUE. nats of video games)DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN, OR VIOLATE FREEDOM OF SPEECH? THAT'S THE QUESTION BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT THESE KINDS OF GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY THESE GAMES COULD CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM, AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. SO FAR, IT'S BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. KGO Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. And I think the court in prior cases has signaled that it really would not like to be in that position. " TUESDAY, SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN SCOPE. NOTING THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. THE GAMING INDUSTRY HAS MADE THE SAME ARGUMENT FOR YEARS. Rich Taylor/Entertainment Software Association 11 58 59 "Parents are the better judge of whether it's appropriate for their homes, not the government. " STILL, OTHERS, INCLUDING CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS, POINTED OUT THAT SOME OF THESE GAMES ALLOW PARTICIPANTS TO DISMEMBER, SEXUALLY ASSAULT AND EVEN URINATE ON OTHER CHARACTERS, DEVIANT ACTS FROM WHICH THEY SAID CHILDREN DESERVED TO BE PROTECTED. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY IF THE COURT RULES AGAINST THEM, THEY'LL TRY TO REWRITE THE LAW TO MAKE IT MORE NARROW IN SCOPE. THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN THE CASE IN JUNE. DIANA ALVEAR, ABC NEWS, LOS ANGELES. THE HIGH COURT HAS BEEN RELUCTANT TO MAKE EXCEPTIONS TO THE FIRST AMENDMENT, STRIKING DOWN A BAN ON VIDEOS SHOWING GRAPHIC VIOLENCE TO ANIMALS EARLIER THIS YEAR. THE WORLD'S MOST POPULAR SOCIAL NETWORKING SITE IS HAVING EVEN MORE PRIVACY PROBLEMS. IT TURNS OUT, SEVERAL APP DEVELOPERS SOLD PEOPLE'S INFORMATION TO DATA BROKERS. THAT MEANS, SOME APPS ON FACEBOOK WERE SENDING USERS' ID NUMBERS TO THIRD PARTY DATA FIRMS. NO PRIVATE INFORMATION WAS SOLD, BUT WITH THE USER INFO DATA BROKERS CAN SIMPLY LOOK THAT UP, AND THEN USE IT TO BUILD PROFILES BY TRACKING YOUR ONLINE ACTIVITY. FACEBOOK ISN'T NAMING THOSE DEVELOPERS, BUT SAYS THERE ARE ABOUT A DOZEN OF THEM. MANY HAVE BEEN SUSPENDED FROM THE SITE. OTHERS, HAVE AGREED TO DELETE THE USER I-D'S THEY HAVE. WE TURN NOW TO OUTRAGE IN TEXAS, WHERE AN UNARMED MAN WAS KILLED, AND AN 11-YEAR-OLD BOY SHOT BY A MAN SWORN TO PROTECT THEM. "It hurts. It hurts real, real bad. " "Before I could even get to the door, he was back inside with blood everywhere. I just started screaming and hollering, like, Who shot my son? Who shot him? " IT WAS FRIDAY NIGHT WHEN POLICE OFFICERS SWARMED THIS DALLAS APARTMENT COMPLEX. THEY SAW 25-YEAR-OLD TOBIAS MACKEY WALKING AROUND WITH HIS HANDS IN HIS PANT'S POCKETS. OFFICERS SAY THEY THOUGHT HE HAD A GUN AND ONE OF THEM STARTED FIRING. MACKEY, WHO DIDN'T HAVE A WEAPON, WAS KILLED. XAVION COLLINS, JUST IN THE FIFTH GRADE, HIT BY ONE OF THE STRAY BULLETS. CG HERE "All I seen was blood gushing out of my arm. Then there was blood on the wall and floors and stuff. " " They are supposed to be here to protect and serve, not to harm the children. " THE OFFICER THAT FIRED HIS GUN IS ON PAID ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVE. AS FOR THE MACKEYS AND COLLINS, NEITHER FAMILY HAS DECIDED IF THEY WILL SUE. ""I just heard the big boom and the whom the accerleration and it was just a big impact so everybody came out. " IN LOS ANGELES, A MAN IS ACCUSED OF DRIVING HIS TRUCK INTO HIS EX-GIRLFRIEND'S HOME, KILLING HER AND THEIR NEWBORN DAUGHTER. POLICE SAY 21-YEAR-OLD EDUARDO VILLAREAL GOT INTO A FIGHT WITH HIS 19-YEAR-OLD EX, OVER THE CUSTODY OF THEIR 10-DAY-OLD BABY. VILLAREAL SAYS HE GOT UPSET, AND WHEN HE SMASHED HIS ESCALADE INTO THE HOUSE, HE WAS TRYING TO KILL HIMSELF NOT HURT ANYONE ELSE. HE HAS BEEN TREATED FOR MINOR INJURIES AND IS BEING HELD ON A MILLION DOLLARS BAIL. PROSECUTORS ARE STILL TRYING TO DECIDE WHAT TO CHARGE HIM WITH. NOW TO AN AMAZING STORY OF SURVIVAL OUT OF FRANCE. AN 18-MONTH-OLD BOY IS JUST FINE AFTER FALLING FROM AN EIGHTH-FLOOR WINDOW. APPARENTLY, HE BOUNCED OFF AN AWNING AND INTO THE ARMS OF A PASSERBY. POLICE SAY THE LITTLE BOY WAS LEFT ALONE WITH HIS THREE-YEAR-OLD SISTER AND SIMPLY CRAWLED OUT THE WINDOW. NO WORD ON IF THEY WILL BE CHARGED WITH ANYTHING. HAVE YOU RECENTLY BOUGHT A SMALL FREEZER FROM WALMART? YOU NEED TO UNPLUG IT BEFORE IT CATCHES YOUR HOUSE ON FIRE. ABOUT THOUSAND OF THESE BLACK AND DECKER CHEST FREEZERS AREA BEING RECALLED, AFTER STARTING AT LEAST FOUR FIRES. THEY'VE BEEN SOLD EXCLUSIVELY AT WALMART STORES ACROSS THE COUNTRY SINCE JANUARY. IF YOU HAVE ONE, YOU NEED TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT FOR A FREE REPAIR. WE'VE POSTED INFORMATION ON HOW TO SET AN APPOINTMENT UP, ON OUR WEBCHANNEL, KOLO-TV-DOT-COM. YOU'LL FIND IT UNDER HOT TOPICS. THE HOLIDAYS MAY SEEM FAR AWAY, BUT EXPERTS SAY, TO MAKE SURE YOU DON'T BREAK THE BANK, YOU NEED TO START BUDGETING NOW.

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Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression.
11/02/2010
ABC 27 First News at 5 PM - WTXL-TV

TJ Winick, ABC News, New York. RUSSELL)JUST HOW VIOLENT IS TOO VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO CHILDREN AND VIDEO GAMES? THE US SUPREME COURT MUST DECIDE WHETHER THESE GAMES PRESENT +ENOUGH OF A THREAT, THAT ITS SALE SHOULD BE BANNED TO MINORS. ABC'S DIANA ALVEAR HAS BOTH SIDES OF THE ISSUE FROM LOS ANGELES. (nats of video games) DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN, OR VIOLATE FREEDOM OF SPEECH? THAT'S THE QUESTION BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT THESE KINDS OF GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY THESE GAMES COULD CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM, AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. SO FAR, IT'S BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. KGO Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. And I think the court in prior cases has signaled that it really would not like to be in that position. " TUESDAY, SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN SCOPE. NOTING THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. THE GAMING INDUSTRY HAS MADE THE SAME ARGUMENT FOR YEARS, SAYING PARENTS SHOULD BE THE ONES TO DECIDE WHAT'S TOO VIOLENT. Ted Price/CEO, Insomniac Games "I think we have the Constitution on our side. Games have the same rights as films, television and other forms of media when it comes to freedom of expression, and I'd be really surprised if the Supreme Court didn't realize that. " STILL, OTHERS, INCLUDING CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS, POINTED OUT THAT SOME OF THESE GAMES ALLOW PARTICIPANTS TO DISMEMBER, SEXUALLY ASSAULT AND EVEN URINATE ON OTHER CHARACTERS, DEVIANT ACTS FROM WHICH THEY SAID CHILDREN DESERVED TO BE PROTECTED. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY IF THE COURT RULES AGAINST THEM, THEY'LL TRY TO REWRITE THE LAW TO MAKE IT MORE NARROW IN SCOPE. THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN THE CASE IN JUNE. DIANA ALVEAR, ABC NEWS, LOS ANGELES. ANNE)THIS YEAR'S POLITICAL CAMPAIGN TACTICS AND ADS HAVE ANYTHING BUT USUAL. RUSSELL)AHEAD ON ABC 27 NEWS AT 5 WE TAKE A LIGHT-HEARTED LOOK AT SOME OF THE UNSUAL THINGS THAT HAVE CAUGHT OUR ATTENTION LEADING UP TO ELECTIONS.

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Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression.
11/02/2010
Eyewitness News at 5 PM - WPTY-TV

I MADE A SEAL. [ seal sound, laughter ] [ Male Announcer ] INTRODUCING THE BIG ITALY PIZZA FROM PIZZA HUT! IT'S A BIG PIZZA THAT'S BIG ON FLAVOR. BIGGER THAN TWO MEDIUMS, WITH A HAND-STRETCHED CRUST THAT'S SEASONED WITH ITALIAN SPICES, AND LOADED WITH YOUR FAVORITE TOPPING. THE BIG ITALY STARTS AT ONLY TWELVE DOLLARS, AND IT'S ONLY AT YOUR PIZZA HUT. NEW AT FIVE, HOW VIOLENT IS TOO VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO VIDEO GAMES FOR KIDS? THE US SUPREME COURT IS DECIDING WHETHER THOSE GAMES ARE SUCH A THREAT, THAT THEIR SALE TO MINORS SHOULD BE MADE ILLEGAL. DIANA ALVEAR HAS BOTH SIDES OF THE ISSUE. nats of video games DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN, OR VIOLATE FREEDOM OF SPEECH? THAT'S THE QUESTION BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT THESE KINDS OF GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY THESE GAMES COULD CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM, AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. SO FAR, IT'S BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. And I think the court in prior cases has signaledhat it really would not like to be in that position. " TUESDAY, SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN SCOPE, NOTING THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. THE GAMING INDUSTRY HAS MADE THE SAME ARGUMENT FOR YEARS. Rich Taylor/Entertainment Software Association "Parents are the better judge of whether it's appropriate for their homes, not the government. " STILL, OTHERS, INCLUDING CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS, POINTED OUT THAT SOME OF THESE GAMES ALLOW PARTICIPANTS TO DISMEMBER, SEXUALLY ASSAULT AND EVEN URINATE ON OTHER CHARACTERS, DEVIANT ACTS FROM WHICH THEY SAID CHILDREN DESERVED TO BE PROTECTED. "THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY IF THE COURT RULES AGAINST THEM, THEY'LL TRY TO REWRITE THE LAW TO MAKE IT MORE NARROW IN SCOPE. THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN THE CASE IN JUNE. DIANA ALVEAR, ABC NEWS, LOS ANGELES. " UNDER CALIFORNIA'S LAW, VIOLATORS WHO SELL BANNED GAMES TO MINORS COULD BE FINED ONE-THOUSAND DOLLARS FOR EACH INCIDENT. IF THE SUPREME COURT BACKS THE CALIFORNIA LAW, IT COULD PAVE THE WAY FOR SIMILAR LAWS IN OTHER STATES. IT'S BEEN A RAINY DAY AT THE POLLS. MARK LETS US KNOW WHAT'S IN STORE FOR THE REST OF THE WEEK, NEXT.

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DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION.
11/02/2010
27 News at 5 PM - WKOW-TV

DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN, OR VIOLATE FREEDOM OF SPEECH? THAT'S THE QUESTION BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT THESE KINDS OF GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY THESE GAMES COULD CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM, AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. SO FAR, IT'S BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. KGO PROF. DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. AND I THINK THE COURT IN PRIOR CASES HAS SIGNALED THAT IT REALLY WOULD NOT LIKE TO BE IN THAT POSITION. "TODAY, SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN SCOPE, NOTING THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. STILL, OTHERS, INCLUDING CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS, POINTED OUT THAT SOME OF THESE GAMES ALLOW PARTICIPANTS TO DISMEMBER, SEXUALLY ASSAULT AND EVEN URINATE ON OTHER CHARACTERS, DEVIANT ACTS FROM WHICH THEY SAID CHILDREN DESERVED TO BE PROTECTED. THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN THE CASE IN JUNE. THE SEARCH CONTINUES FOR THOSE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE CARGO PACKAGE BOMB PLOT LAST WEEK. BUT US AUTHORITIES SAY IT WASNT A COMPLETE SURPRISE AS THEY SUSPECTED THIS WOULD HAPPEN MONTHS AGO. ITS BELIEVED TERRORISTS TRIED A DRY RUN FOR AN AIR CARGO BOMB ATTACK BACK IN SEPTEMBER. US INTELLIGENCE INTERCEPTED PACKAGES BEING SHIPPED FROM YEMEN TO CHICAGO BY FEDEX AND UPS AFTER RECIEVING A TIP. INSIDE THOSE PACKAGES RELIGIOUS BROCHURES. OFFICIALS SAY THEY USED THAT SHIPMENT TO FOLLOW THE TRACKING PROCESS OF HOW LONG IT TOOK TO GET TO ITS DESTINATION. THE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY HAS BEEN DELAYED AGAIN BECAUSE OF AN ELECTRICAL ISSUE. NASA IS CELEBRATING 10 YEARS OF HUMAN PRESENCE AT THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION, TODAY BACK IN 2000 THREE MEN MOVED INTO THE STATION. DISCOVERY WILL BRING IN THIS TRIP SIX VISITORS AS WELL AS SUPPLIES AND A ROBOT. THIS WILL BE THE SHUTTLES 39TH AND FINAL JOURNEY WHEN IT DOES LAUNCH WHICH COULD BE AS EARLY AS THURSDAY NOW, A FINAL CHECK OF WEATHER NEXT. COMING UP TONIGHT ON FOX 47 NEWS AT NINE, PRIMARY ELECTION RESULTS, THE LATEST NUMBERS - AND LIVE REACTION - IN THE RACE FOR GOVERNOR, US SENATE, AND STATE ATTORNEY GENERAL -PLUS - LOCAL ELECTION RESULTS, THAT'S TONIGHT ON FOX 47 NEWS AT NINE.

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DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION.
11/02/2010
Newswatch 16 at 5 PM - WNEP-TV

WE'LL BE LIVE ON THE AIR ON WNEP- 2, AS SOON AS THE POLLS CLOSE, AT 8 P-M. TWO HOURS OF COVERAGE LEADS INTO NEWSWATCH 16 AT TEN ON WNEP-2. AND WE'LL HAVE A COMPLETE WRAP UP ON NEWSWATCH 16 AT 11 ON WNEP-TV. STATE TROOPERS WERE BUSY THIS MORNING IN LACKAWANNA COUNTY GIVING OUT CITATIONS AND WARNINGS TODAY. NE 16'S TRISH HARTMAN SHOWS US WHY THEY'RE ENFORCING THE STEER-CLEAR LAW. TRISH: DO YOU KNOW WHAT THE STEER CLEAR LAW IS? KING: NO ACTUALLY, I HAVEN'T HEARD OF IT. NICHOLAS: THE STEER CLEAR LAW? I'M SORRY, I DON'T. THAT'S WHY STATE TROOPERS WERE OUT IN FULL FORCE HERE ON THE CASEY HIGHWAY AND ON INTERSTATE 81 IN LACKAWANNA COUNTY. THEY'RE TRYING TO TEACH PEOPLE ABOUT PENNSYLVANIA'S STEER CLEAR LAW. SATKOWSKI: WE'RE TRYING TO ENFORCE THE LAW AS WELL AS EDUCATE PEOPLE THAT WHEN THEY SEE AN EMERGENCY VEHICLE ON THE SIDE OF THE ROAD, THEY HAVE TO AT LEAST SLOW DOWN AND PREFERABLY GET IN THE OTHER LANE. ONCE TROOPERS PULLED SOMEONE OVER, OTHER TROOPERS WAITED FOR DRIVERS WHO DIDN'T GET OUT OF THE WAY. THIS SURGE OF ENFORCEMENT COMES AFTER A TROOPER WAS HIT BY A CAR SIX WEEKS AGO WHILE RESPONDING TO AN ACCIDENT. WHILE THE TROOPER WAS NOT SERIOUSLY HURT, STATE POLICE DON'T WANT IT TO HAPPEN AGAIN. STANDUP: TROOPERS SAY IF YOU DON'T MOVE OVER OR SLOW DOWN, YOU COULD PAY A FINE OF UP TO $250. IF YOU HURT SOMEONE BECAUSE YOU DON'T MOVE OVER OR SLOW DOWN, YOU COULD LOSE YOUR LICENSE FOR UP TO 90 DAYS. WHILE OUR DRIVERS WEREN'T FAMILIAR WITH THE STEER CLEAR LAW - THEY UNDERSTAND THE IMPORTANCE OF GETTING OUT OF THE WAY. KING: I DEFINITELY SLOW DOWN. YOU JUST GOTTA BE CAUTIOUS, I DON'T WANT TO HIT ANYBODY, I DON'T WANT ANYONE ELSE TO GET HURT. JUST MOVE OVER, YOU KNOW - IT'S NOT THAT HARD. NICHOLAS: YES, I UNDERSTAND THAT - TO MAKE IT SAFETY ALL THE WAY AROUND. TRISH HARTMAN, NEWSWATCH 16, LACKAWANNA COUNTY. PENNSYLVANIA'S LIQUOR CONTROL BOARD WANTS TO LIMIT ACCESS TO ALCOHOLIC ENERGY DRINKS LIKE "FOUR LOCO", PLCB OFFICIALS SENT LETTERS OUT LAST WEEK, ASKING BEVERAGE DISTRIBUTORS TO STOP CARRYING SUGARY, CAFFEINATED MALT LIQUOR DRINKS, UNTIL THE FDA FINISHES A SAFETY REVIEW, FOUR LOKO GAINED NATIONAL ATTENTION LAST MONTH WHEN NINE COLLEGE STUDENTS FROM WASHINGTON STATE GOT SICK AFTER DRINKING THE ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE. JUST HOW VIOLENT IS TOO VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO CHILDREN AND VIDEO GAMES? THE US SUPREME COURT MUST DECIDE WHETHER THESE GAMES PRESENT ENOUGH OF A BE BANNED TO MINORS, ABC'S DIANA ALVEAR HAS BOTH SIDES OF THE ISSUE, DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN, OR VIOLATE FREEDOM OF SPEECH? THAT'S THE QUESTION BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT THESE KINDS OF GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY THESE GAMES COULD CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM, AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. SO FAR, IT'S BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. KGO PROF. DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. AND I THINK THE COURT IN PRIOR CASES HAS SIGNALED THAT IT REALLY WOULD NOT LIKE TO BE IN THAT POSITION. " TUESDAY, SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN SCOPE. NOTING THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. THE GAMING INDUSTRY HAS MADE THE SAME ARGUMENT FOR YEARS, SAYING PARENTS SHOULD BE THE ONES TO DECIDE WHAT'S TOO VIOLENT. TED PRICE/CEO, INSOMNIAC GAMES "I THINK WE HAVE THE CONSTITUTION ON OUR SIDE. GAMES HAVE THE SAME RIGHTS AS FILMS, TELEVISION AND OTHER FORMS OF MEDIA WHEN IT COMES TO FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION, AND I'D BE REALLY SURPRISED IF THE SUPREME COURT DIDN'T REALIZE THAT. " STILL, OTHERS, INCLUDING CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS, POINTED OUT THAT SOME OF THESE GAMES ALLOW PARTICIPANTS TO DISMEMBER, SEXUALLY ASSAULT AND EVEN URINATE ON OTHER CHARACTERS, DEVIANT ACTS FROM WHICH THEY SAID CHILDREN DESERVED TO BE PROTECTED. 1/8ON CAM TAG 3/8 THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY IF THE COURT RULES AGAINST THEM, THEY'L LAW TO MAKE IT MORE NARROW IN SCOPE. THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN THE CASE IN JUNE. DIANA ALVEAR, ABC NEWS, LOS ANGELES. GREAT PITCHING DOMINATED THE WORLD SERIES, AND THE GIANTS DOMINATED THE RANGERS, JIM!

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DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION.
11/02/2010
ABC 12 News at 11 PM - WJRT-TV

ABC'S DIANA ALVEAR HAS BOTH SIDES OF THE ISSUE FROM LOS ANGELES. (PKG)DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN, OR VIOLATE FREEDOM OF SPEECH? THAT'S THE QUESTION BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING THE CONSTITUTIO NALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT THESE KINDS OF GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY THESE GAMES COULD CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM, AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. SO FAR, IT'S BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. KGO PROF. DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION. AND I THINK THE COURT IN PRIOR CASES HAS SIGNALED THAT IT REALLY WOULD NOT LIKE TO BE IN THAT POSITION. " TUESDAY, SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN SCOPE. NOTING THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINM ENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. THE GAMING INDUSTRY HAS MADE THE SAME ARGUMENT FOR YEARS, SAYING PARENTS SHOULD BE THE ONES TO DECIDE WHAT'S TOO VIOLENT. TED PRICE/CEO, INSOMNIAC GAMES "I THINK WE HAVE THE CONSTITUTION ON OUR SIDE. GAMES HAVE THE SAME RIGHTS AS FILMS, TELEVISION AND OTHER FORMS OF MEDIA WHEN IT COMES TO FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION, AND I'D BE REALLY SURPRISED IF THE SUPREME COURT DIDN'T REALIZE THAT. " STILL, OTHERS, INCLUDING CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS, POINTED OUT THAT SOME OF THESE GAMES ALLOW PARTICIPANTS TO DISMEMBER, SEXUALLY ASSAULT AND EVEN URINATE ON OTHER CHARACTERS, DEVIANT ACTS FROM WHICH THEY SAID CHILDREN DESERVED TO BE PROTECTED. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY IF THE COURT RULES AGAINST THEM, THEY'LL TRY TO REWRITE THE LAW TO MAKE IT MORE NARROW IN SCOPE. THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN THE CASE IN JUNE. DIANA ALVEAR, ABC NEWS, LOS ANGELES. (WEATHER FORECAST) [F3]WEATHER CHAT OUT 2 LESLIE IT'S TIME TO PICTURE YOUR WEATHER!

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Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression.
11/02/2010
NewsChannel 9 at 5 PM - WSYR-TV

SESSION WITH GREEN ARROWS FOR ALL THREE MAJOR AVERAGES. FOR DETAILS ON WHAT FUELED THE WINNING SESSION, AND THE LATEST DEVELOPMENTS FOR TOYOTA, LET'S HEAD TO COURTNEY DONOHOE AT THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE WITH THE BLOOMBERG AFTER THE BELL REPORT Investors playing a waiting game, Lots of focus on what the Federal Reserve will say tomorrow about its intentions to boost the economy. Investors also keeping tabs on election results that's expected to reshape Congress. Stocks fishing the day higher The dow finishing up 64 points. Elsewhere the US government may soon own a smaller stake in General Motors-GM may raise 10.6 billion dollars in an initial public offering. That would trim the Treasury's 61-percent stake, according to people familiar with the matter. GM's working on returning the $50 billion it received in a taxpayer bailout last year, Meantime Toyota Telling a court that 400 claims of acceleration defects that caused economic damages should be thrown out. That's because plaintiffs have FAILED to identify an actual defect. Staying with automakers, Tomorrow, we get the latest sales data. October sales may run at the fastest pace in 14 months with about 12-million vehicles bought industry-wide. AT THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE, I'M COURTNEY DONOHOE, WITH THE BLOOMBERG AFTER THE BELL REPORT. COVERING AMERICA TONIGHT, THE SUPREME COURT HEARD ARGUMENTS TODAY OVER REINSTATING A BAN ON SELLING VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES TO CHILDREN UNDER 18. UNDER THE BAN STORES IN CALIFORNIA THAT SELL THESE GAMES TO MINORS COULD FACE SUBSTANTIAL FINES. Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. And I think the court in prior cases has signaled that it really would not like to be in that position. " VIDEO GAME COMPANIES SAY THE BAN VIOLATES THE FIRST AMENDMENT. THEY ALSO ARGUE CALIFORNIA LOWER COURTS FOUND THERE WAS NOT ENOUGH PROOF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM IN MINORS. DURING ORAL ARGUMENTS, SOME JUSTICES POINTED OUT THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES CONTAIN VIOLENCE. IN AN ELECTION CYCLE THAT WAS FULL OF TWISTS AND TURNS, ELECTION DAY HAS FINALLY ARRIVED AND NOW IT'S TIME FOR THE VOTERS TO HAVE THIER SAY. ABC'S KAREN TRAVERS IS IN WASHINGTON WITH THE LATEST. AFTER MONTHS OF FUNDRAISING, CAMPAIGNING, AND DEBATING, IT'S FINALLY TIME FOR VOTING. AMERICANS BEGAN CASTING THEIR BALLOTS EARLY THIS MORNING. Broll Blumenthal voting, McMahon voting, Marco Rubin voting, maybe DE? AND SO DID THE CANDIDATES, INCLU DING REPUBLICAN MARCO RUBIO IN FLORIDA, God willing tonight i will have the opportunity to serve in the United States senate, AND ONE OF HIS OPPONENTS IN THE THREE-WAY BATTLE, INDEPENDENT CHARLIE CRIST Charlie Crist NNS-Sen-FL : Crist Votes I'm the only one who can beat Marco & I hope that people don't waste their vote today. Get out, they cast their ballot for commonsense. Today's the day to get it done and I'm going to go cast mine now. " ALL SIGNS ARE POINTING TO A BIG NIGHT FOR REPUBLICANS, WHO NEED TO PICK UP 39 SEATS TO REGAIN CONTROL OF THE HOUSE. REPUBLICANS HAVE A TOUGHER CLIMB IN THE SENATE -NEEDING 10 SEATS TO TAKE BACK THE MAJORITY. ACROSS THE NATION LAST NIGHT, ONE FINAL PLEA FROM BOTH SIDES. PAMichelle Obama: Michelle Obama : "We need you to get fired up, we don't have more time" SOT John Boehner "Here we come Ohio! Look out! " Bill Clinton: "You better vote for Kendrick Meek for United States senator. " Biden - DE rally BC-ABCN1:wsDEBidenRal ly Folks, these are a different breed of cat, this is not your father's Republican Party, to say it again. " PRESIDENT OBAMA WILL SPEND ELECTION DAY BEHIND CLOSED DOORS AT THE WHITE HOUSE BUT WILL CONTINUE HIS LAST MINUTE GET OUT THE VOTE PUSH BY CALLING INTO RADIO STATIONS IN FOUR CRITICAL STATES CALIFORNIA, ILLINOIS, FLORIDA AND NEVADA. THE PRESIDENT EVEN MADE AN APPEAL TO A GROUP THAT IS MORE FAMILIAR WITH VOTING FOR SINGYOU CAN TUNE IN TO NEWSCHANNEL NINE FOR FULL COVERAGE OF ALL THE RACES IN CENTRAL NEW YORK. THERE WILL ALSO BE CONTINOUS UPDATES ALL NIGHT, AT 9 WSYR DOT COM. COMING UP IN THE FAMILY HEALTHCAST, HOW DIABETES DRUGS MAY HAVE ABLE TO HELP CONTROL LUNG CANCER, A NEW STUDY ON FISH OIL AS A WAY TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE YIELDS SOME DISAPPOINTING RESULTS. JAMES LIVE TEASE KEITH LIVE TEASE I AM AN ACTUAL VAMPIRE HUNTER.

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Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression.
11/02/2010
ABC 26 News at 10 PM - WGNO-TV

CURT VITTER WAS AHEAD IN PRE-ELECTION POLLS BUT CALLING THIS RACE SO EARLY MAY HAVE COME AS A SURPRISE TO SOME, WHO THOUGHT DEMOCRAT CHARLIE MELANCON, MAY GIVE HIM A RUN. ESS / JESS IN THE RACE FOR THE STATE'S SECOND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT INCUMBANT JOSEPH CAO HAS APPARENTLY LOST THE RACE, DEMOCRATIC STATE LAWMAKER CEDRIC RICHMOND WAS THE EARLY FAVORITE FOR THIS RACE IN THE HEAVILY DEMOCRATIC DISTRICT, AND HAS BEEN NAMED THE WINNER, RIGHT NOW WITH, [C4]10 SCALISE RECAP-TOP ESS ESS / CURT NO SURPRISE, IN LOUISIANA'S FIRST CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT. EARLY NUMBERS SHOW REPUBLICAN STEVE SCALISE WILL EASILY BEAT HIS TWO OPPONENTS TO WIN RE-ELECTION. SCALISE WAS CHALLENGED BY DEMOCRAT MYRON KATZ AND INDEPENDENT ARDEN WELLS. [C5]10 DISTRICT 3 RECAP-TOP ESS ESS / JESS IN THE RACE FOR CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 3, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS IS CALLING JEFF LANDRY THE WINNER, OVER RAVI SANGISETTY. NEITHER CANDIDATE HAS HELD A PUBLIC OFFICE. LANDRY LOST A BID FOR A STATE SENATE SEAT, 3 YEARS AGO. [C6]10 LT GOV RECAP-TOP ESS ESS / CURT AND, SECRETARY OF STATE JAY DARDENNE BEATS DEMOCRAT CAROLINE FAYARD, IN THE RACE FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR. THIS WAS FAYARD'S FIRST RUN FOR PUBLIC OFFICE. WEB / JESS FOR COMPLETE ELECTION RESULTS, GO TO ABC 26 DOT COM. WE'LL BE UPDATING THE WEB SITE WITH THE LATEST NUMBERS, THROUGHOUT THE NIGHT. 2SHOT / CURT REPUBLICANS HAVE CAPTURED NINE SEATS PREVIOUSLY HELD BY DEMOCRATS AND THEY'RE LEADING IN MORE THAN TWO DOZEN RACES. JESS THEY NEED 40, TO RECLAIM CONTROL OF THE HOUSE. ABC'S JOHN HENDREN HAS THE LATEST ON THE RESULTS AROUND THE COUNTRY. PKG JESS CTR THIS MORNING MAYOR MITCH LANDRIEU AND ABOUT 20 CODE ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS WALKED THE STREETS OF THE 9TH WARD, TO START WHAT HE'S CALLING A MORE AGGRESSIVE PLAN TO FIGHT BLIGHT. VO 16-MILLION DOLLARS HAS BEEN SET ASIDE TO FIGHT BLIGHT IN 20-11. THERE ARE BETWEEN 50 AND 60-THOUSAND BLIGHTED PROPERTIES IN NEW ORLEANS. TO REPORT A BLIGHTED PROPERTY, CALL 3-1-1. [C11]10 BP PROFIT-INTRO VO CURT CTR BP SAYS IT TURNED A PROFIT, IN THE THIRD QUARTER. VO THE COMPANY SAYS, IN MADE 1.79 BILLION DOLLARS. BUT, THAT'S WELL BELOW THE FIVE-BILLION MADE MADE THE PREVIOUS YEAR. BP SAYS, THE COST OF THE OIL DISASTER IN THE GULF HAS GROWN, TO 40-BILLION DOLLARS. ANIM VO / JESS THE YEMENI GOVERNMENT SAYS IT'S HUNTING DOWN THE PEOPLE RESPONSIBLE, FOR THE FOILED CARGO BOMB PLOT. OFFICIALS THERE, HAVE CHARGED AMERICAN BORN CLERIC ANWAR AL AWLAK, WITH TRYING TO KILL FOREIGNERS, EVEN THOUGH HE'S ON THE RUN. THE YEMENI GOVERNMENT ALSO SAYS IT HAS LAUNCHED A MANHUNT, FOR THE PERSON WHO BUILT THE CARGO PLANE PACKAGE BOMBS. IT'S LIKELY THE US HAS TALKED WITH YEMEN, ABOUT THE POSSIBILITY OF USING UNMANNED DRONE STRIKES. ONE MEMBER OF YEMEN'S PARLIAMENT, SAID POLITICAL LEADERS REJECT MILITARY INTERVENTION, IN THEIR COUNTRY. VO / CURT THE US SUPREME COURT WILL DECIDE WETHER SOME VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES SHOULD BE BANNED FOR MINORS. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING A LAW, THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT VIOLENT GAMES TO TO MINORS. SUPPORTERS OF THE LAW SAY, THE GAMES CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM, AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. OTHERS SAY, THE LAW VIOLATES FREE SPEECH. TWO LOWER COURTS STRUCK DOWN THE LAW. SOT Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. And I think the court in prior cases has signaled that it really would not like to be in that position.

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Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School"The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression.
11/02/2010
ABC6 Newscenter at 5 PM - WSYX-TV

NO ONE WAS INJURED IN THE SHOOTING. INVESTIGATORS ARE LOOKING INTO A SERIES OF SHOOTINGS AT OTHER MILITARY BUILDINGS IN THE AREA INCLUDING THE PENTAGON, A VACANT MARINE CORPS RECRUITING STATION AND THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE MARINE CORPS. 3 JUST HOW VIOLENT IS *TOO VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO CHILDREN AND VIDEO GAMES? THE US SUPREME COURT MUJST DECIDE WHETHER THE SALE OF THESE GAMES SHOULD BE BANNED TO MINORS. ABC'S DIANA ALVEAR HAS BOTH SIDES OF THE ISSUE FROM LOS ANGELES. 3 SCRIPT: (nats of video games)DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN, OR VIOLATEFREEDOM OF SPEECH? THAT'S THE QUESTION BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT THESE KINDS OF GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY THESE GAMES COULD CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM, AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. SO FAR, IT'S BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. KGOProf. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School"The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. And I think the court in prior cases has signaled thatit really would not like to be in that position. "TUESDAY, SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN SCOPE, NOTING THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSOVIOLENT. THE GAMING INDUSTRY HAS MADE THE SAME ARGUMENT FOR YEARS. Rich Taylor/Entertainment Software Association11 58 59"Parents are the better judge of whether it's appropriate for their homes, not the government. "STILL, OTHERS, INCLUDING CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS, POINTED OUT THAT SOME OF THESE GAMES ALLOW PARTICIPANTS TO DISMEMBER, SEXUALLY ASSAULT AND EVEN URINATE ON OTHER CHARACTERS, DEVIANT ACTS FROM WHICH THEY SAID CHILDREN DESERVED TO BE PROTECTED. 1/8ON CAM TAG 3/8 THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY IF THE COURT RULES AGAINST THEM, THEY'LL TRY TOREWRITE THE LAW TO MAKE IT MORE NARROW IN SCOPE. THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN THE CASE IN JUNE. DIANA ALVEAR, ABC NEWS, LOS ANGELES. 3 BP IS BACK IN THE BLACK. SIX MONTHS AFTER THE WORST OIL SPILL IN US HISTORY, THE OIL COMPANY IS PROFITABLE AGAIN. AGAIN. BP IS LIFTING ITS ESTIMATE OF THE LIKELY COST OF ITS GULF OF MEXICO OIL SPILL TO $40 BILLION THE COMPANY HAS POSTED A ONE-POINT-EIGHT-BILLION-DOLLAR THIRD QUARTER PROFIT. TO GIVE YOU SOME PERSPECTIVE, BP MADE A PROFIT OF FIVE-BILLION-DOLLARS IN THE THIRD QUARTER OF 2009.3 IT LOOKS LIKE MOTHER NATURE WILL COOPERATE FOR THE LAUNCH LAUNCH OF SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY. NASA IS ENJOYING A SMOOTH COUNTDOWN FOR DISCOVERY'S FINAL LAUNCH. DISCOVERY WILL BRING SIX VISITORS AS WELL AS A LOAD OF SUPPLIES, INCLUDING A HUMANOID ROBOT. NASA'S OLDEST SURVIVING SPACE SHUTTLE FIRST ROCKETED INTO ORBIT IN 1984. THIS WILL BE ITS 39TH AND FINAL JOURNEY. 3 3 3 ANOTHER NICE EVENING AND COLD NIGHT ON THE WAY FOR CENTRAL OHIO. CLOUDS WILL BE ON THE INCREASE WED, BUT SO WILL THE TEMPS, MID 50`S. A FEW RAIN SHOWERS ARE POSSIBLE ON THU, BUT WITH MUCH COLDER AIR MOVING IN ON FRI, A FEW SNOWFLAKES ARE POSSIBLE AS WELL! SAT WILL STILL BE COLD &BREEZY, BUT DRY, WITH MORE SUNSHINE EXPECTED ON SUN. MON/TUE OF NEXT WEEK WILL FEATURE TEMPS NEAR 60.3 AD-LIB WX OUT 3 3 THE SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS HAVE BROUGHT THEIR FIRST WORLD SERIES TITLE TO THE BAY.

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Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School"The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression.
11/02/2010
ABC6 Newscenter at 11 PM - WSYX-TV

SHOTS WERE FIRED THERE SOMETIME OVERNIGHT, AND DISCOVERED THIS MORNINGA BULLET LEFT A MARK ON A WINDOW. NO ONE WAS INJURED IN THE SHOOTING. INVESTIGATORS ARE LOOKING INTO A SERIES OF SHOOTINGS AT OTHER MILITARY BUILDINGS IN THE AREA INCLUDING THE PENTAGON, A VACANT MARINE CORPS RECRUITING STATION AND THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE MARINE CORPS. 3 JUST HOW VIOLENT IS *TOO VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO CHILDREN AND VIDEO GAMES? THE US SUPREME COURT MUJST DECIDE WHETHER THE SALE OF THESE GAMES SHOULD BE BANNED TO MINORS. ABC'S DIANA ALVEAR HAS BOTH SIDES OF THE ISSUE FROM LOS ANGELES. 3 SCRIPT: (nats of video games)DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN, OR VIOLATEFREEDOM OF SPEECH? THAT'S THE QUESTION BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT. JUSTICES ARE DEBATING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THAT MADE IT ILLEGAL TO SELL OR RENT THESE KINDS OF GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY THESE GAMES COULD CAUSE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM, AND ENCOURAGE AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR. SO FAR, IT'S BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. KGOProf. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School"The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. And I think the court in prior cases has signaled thatit really would not like to be in that position. "TUESDAY, SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN SCOPE, NOTING THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSOVIOLENT. THE GAMING INDUSTRY HAS MADE THE SAME ARGUMENT FOR YEARS. Rich Taylor/Entertainment Software Association11 58 59"Parents are the better judge of whether it's appropriate for their homes, not the government. "STILL, OTHERS, INCLUDING CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS, POINTED OUT THAT SOME OF THESE GAMES ALLOW PARTICIPANTS TO DISMEMBER, SEXUALLY ASSAULT AND EVEN URINATE ON OTHER CHARACTERS, DEVIANT ACTS FROM WHICH THEY SAID CHILDREN DESERVED TO BE PROTECTED. 1/8ON CAM TAG 3/8 THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY IF THE COURT RULES AGAINST THEM, THEY'LL TRY TOREWRITE THE LAW TO MAKE IT MORE NARROW IN SCOPE. THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN THE CASE IN JUNE. DIANA ALVEAR, ABC NEWS, LOS ANGELES. 3 BP IS BACK IN THE BLACK. SIX MONTHS AFTER THE WORST OIL SPILL IN US HISTORY, THE OIL COMPANY IS PROFITABLE AGAIN. AGAIN. BP IS LIFTING ITS ESTIMATE OF THE LIKELY COST OF ITS GULF OF MEXICO OIL SPILL TO $40 BILLION THE COMPANY HAS POSTED A ONE-POINT-EIGHT-BILLION-DOLLAR THIRD QUARTER PROFIT. TO GIVE YOU SOME PERSPECTIVE, BP MADE A PROFIT OF FIVE-BILLION-DOLLARS IN THE THIRD QUARTER OF 2009.3 IT LOOKS LIKE MOTHER NATURE WILL COOPERATE FOR THE LAUNCH LAUNCH OF SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY. NASA IS ENJOYING A SMOOTH COUNTDOWN FOR DISCOVERY'S FINAL LAUNCH. DISCOVERY WILL BRING SIX VISITORS AS WELL AS A LOAD OF SUPPLIES, INCLUDING A HUMANOID ROBOT. NASA'S OLDEST SURVIVING SPACE SHUTTLE FIRST ROCKETED INTO ORBIT IN 1984. THIS WILL BE ITS 39TH AND FINAL JOURNEY. 3 3 3 ANOTHER NICE EVENING AND COLD NIGHT ON THE WAY FOR CENTRAL OHIO. CLOUDS WILL BE ON THE INCREASE WED, BUT SO WILL THE TEMPS, MID 50`S. A FEW RAIN SHOWERS ARE POSSIBLE ON THU, BUT WITH MUCH COLDER AIR MOVING IN ON FRI, A FEW SNOWFLAKES ARE POSSIBLE AS WELL! SAT WILL STILL BE COLD &BREEZY, BUT DRY, WITH MORE SUNSHINE EXPECTED ON SUN. MON/TUE OF NEXT WEEK WILL FEATURE TEMPS NEAR 60.3 AD-LIB WX OUT 3 3 THE SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS HAVE BROUGHT THEIR FIRST WORLD SERIES TITLE TO THE BAY.

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Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School"The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression.
11/02/2010
KXLY 4 News at 5 PM - KXLY-TV

CONTINUES FOR THOSE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE CARGO PACKAGE BOMB PLOT UNCOVERED LAST WEEK. US AUTHORITIES SAY THE PLOT WASN'T A COMPLETE SURPRISE; THEY SUSPECTED SUCH A PLOT WAS IN THE WORKS MONTHS AGO. TODAY ANWAR AL AWLAKI WAS FORMERLY CHARGED IN YEMEN WITH TRYING TO KILL FOREIGNERS EVEN THOUGH HE REMAINS ON THE RUN. HE IS THE USBORN RADICAL CLERIC WHO URGES MUSLIMS TO STRIKE HIS AMERICA. AS INVESTIGATORS WORLD-WIDE RUN DOWN MORE POSSIBLE PACKAGE BOMBS, THE YEMENI GOVERNMENT HAS LAUNCHED A MAJOR COUNTER-TERRORISM OPERATION, SEARCHING FOR *AL AWLAKI AND AL-QUAIDA BOMB MAKER IBRAHIM AL-ASIRI. ("SOT BRUCE REIDEL, BROOKINGS INSTITUTENine years after September 11th, al Qaeda is still obsessed with blowing up airplanes coming into the United States of America. BELIEVED TERRORISTS TRIED A DRY RUN FOR AN AIR CARGO BOMB ATTACK BACKIN EARLY SEPTEMBER. THAT'S WHEN US INTELLIGNECE INTERCEPTED PACKAGES BEING SHIPPED FROM YEMEN TO CHICAGO, BY FEDEX AND UPS, AFTER RECIEVING A TIP. THE PACKAGES CONTAINED RELIGIOUS LITERATURE AND THE PEOPLE SHIPPED IT WERE TIED TO AL QAEDA. HOW VIOLENT IS TOO VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO VIDEO GAMES? THAT'S JUST ONE OF THE QUESTIONS FACING THE SUPREME COURT TODAY. IT'S HEARING ARGUMENTS OVER THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW THATBANNED THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY CHILDREN FACE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM FROM THESE GAMES. THE GAMING INDUSTRY SAYS ANY BAN POSES A THREAT TO FREE SPEECH. SO FAR, THE LAW HAS BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. (" Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School"The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression. And I think the court in prior cases has signaled thatit really would not like to be in that position. COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN JUNE. THE HARLEM AMBASSADOR BASKETBALL TEAM IS BRINGING IT'S FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT TO POST FALLS TONIGHT. KRIS CROCKERS IS LIVE IN POST FALLS TONIGHT WITH A LITTLE BASKETBALL AND A LITTLE WEATHER FORECASTING. ("coming up on world news tonight")WEATHER IF YOU'D LIKE MORE 65 YEARS AGO, A TEENAGE MOTHER GAVE BIRTH TO A SON IN MUSKOGEE OKLAHOMA.

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Facebook uncovers user data sales | View Clip
11/02/2010
IT Web

Facebook has taken action against developers it caught selling user names and contact lists, says the BBC.

The sales were uncovered as Facebook investigated a Web browser bug that let user IDs be shared inadvertently.

The user details were sold to data brokers who used the information to target adverts more precisely. The developers have been banned for six months from connecting to Facebook and must be audited to check they comply with the social network's policies.

Google, US govt in legal showdown

Google and the US government are headed for a legal showdown, but on different sides of the courtroom than one might expect, according to CNet.

Eric Goldman, a law professor with Santa Clara University who closely follows the tech industry, spotted a lawsuit filed by Google against the federal government claiming the US Department of the Interior did not properly evaluate Google Apps when choosing a new Web-based document system.

Google alleges that because the interior department specified that the system needed to be part of Microsoft's Business Productivity Online Suite, Google Apps never had a chance despite repeated attempts by Google to explain the product.

Microsoft in programmer backlash

Microsoft is facing a wave of disbelief and anger from Windows programmers after saying it is demoting the would-be Flash-killer Silverlight for HTML5, reports the Register.

Server and tools president Bob Muglia apologised for any “controversy and confusion” caused by comments in an interview last week, when he said Microsoft has shifted its strategy of using Silverlight to deliver a cross-platform runtime.

In a refreshing twist for a corporate president, Muglia said the interview in which he made the comments, with All-about-Microsoft's Mary-Jo Foley, was accurate.

YouTube co-founder calls it quits

YouTube co-founder Chad Hurley is stepping down as chief executive of the online video-sharing Web site, states the BBC.

Google bought the YouTube Web site in 2006 for $1.65 billion and since then has been asserting more control over the popular site.

In a statement, Hurley said Google's Salar Kamangar had led YouTube's daily operations for the past two years, while he had worked in an advisory role.

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Facebook uncovers user data sales | View Clip
11/02/2010
IT Web

Facebook has taken action against developers it caught selling user names and contact lists, says the BBC.

The sales were uncovered as Facebook investigated a Web browser bug that let user IDs be shared inadvertently.

The user details were sold to data brokers who used the information to target adverts more precisely. The developers have been banned for six months from connecting to Facebook and must be audited to check they comply with the social network's policies.

Google and the US government are headed for a legal showdown, but on different sides of the courtroom than one might expect, according to CNet.

Eric Goldman, a law professor with Santa Clara University who closely follows the tech industry, spotted a lawsuit filed by Google against the federal government claiming the US Department of the Interior did not properly evaluate Google Apps when choosing a new Web-based document system.

Google alleges that because the interior department specified that the system needed to be part of Microsoft's Business Productivity Online Suite, Google Apps never had a chance despite repeated attempts by Google to explain the product.

Microsoft is facing a wave of disbelief and anger from Windows programmers after saying it is demoting the would-be Flash-killer Silverlight for HTML5, reports the .

Server and tools president Bob Muglia apologised for any “controversy and confusion” caused by comments in an interview last week, when he said Microsoft has shifted its strategy of using Silverlight to deliver a cross-platform runtime.

In a refreshing twist for a corporate president, Muglia said the interview in which he made the comments, with All-about-Microsoft's Mary-Jo Foley, was accurate.

YouTube co-founder Chad Hurley is stepping down as chief executive of the online video-sharing Web site, states the BBC.

Google bought the YouTube Web site in 2006 for $1.65 billion and since then has been asserting more control over the popular site.

In a statement, Hurley said Google's Salar Kamangar had led YouTube's daily operations for the past two years, while he had worked in an advisory role.

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Google Apps Gets the Government Shaft to Microsoft's Benefit - Google Tries to Prove the Government Is Anticompetitive | View Clip
11/02/2010
NewsGang

( Page 2 of 2 )

Many of those seats are occupied by U.S. government employees. New York City last month picked Microsoft to give 100,000 municipal employees Web-based Microsoft applications.

Eric Goldman, a cyber-law professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law, told eWEEK:

"I think the more interesting angle is how Google is contesting the software business against Microsoft. Google is trying to expand beyond its search business, and it's willing to invest in litigation to buttress its Apps business."

Google refused to give Microsoft's might the credit for its litigation, telling eWEEK Nov. 1:

"Google is a proponent of open competition on the Internet and in the technology sector in general. Here, a fair and open process could save US taxpayers tens of millions of dollars and result in better services. We're asking the Department of Interior to allow for a true competition when selecting its technology providers."

Sources familiar with the company's plans told eWEEK Google simply feels as though it didn't get a fair shake by the DOI after the GSA accorded Google FISMA that neither Microsoft nor IBM have attained.

Google believes the DOI set itself up for litigation when it specified the new e-mail system had to be part of Microsoft BPOS.

The challenge is that Google must prove the DOI's intent to shut out fair competition as protected by the Competition in Contracting Act.

Google is accusing the government of anticompetitive practices. This comes as Microsoft and other companies try to convince the DOJ and FTC Google is guilty of thwarting competition by prioritizing its own Web services in search results.

Told you this was quite the irony onion. Does Google have a good case? Goldman isn't sure: "I don't know very much about the government contracting process, so it's a little hard to handicap winners here."

What is clear is that Google's battle with Microsoft in collaboration software has moved from contract tables in the boardroom to the court.

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Google sues U.S. government for being "restrictive of competition" | View Clip
11/02/2010
MobileBurn

Google is suing the U.S. Department of the Interior for excluding Google Apps during a decision to replace its current "hosted email and collaboration solution," the is reporting. The U.S. Department of the Interior reportedly requested quotes for any email and collaboration product that was compatible with Microsoft's Business Productivity Online Suite. Google found that restrictive.

Google believes that the government's choice to favor Microsoft is "unduly restrictive of competition." Google wants the Department of the Interior to stop bidding on new solutions and to begin "conducting a competitive procurement process," the said. But it could be more about Google's ongoing battle with Microsoft.

"Google rarely goes on the offensive in court. It's suing the Department of the Interior as a proxy in its battle against Microsoft," Eric Goldman, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law, told the WSJ. Google Docs and Google Apps compete with Microsoft's Office suites. Both suites offer mobile email and calendar sync, too.

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Google Sues US Government For Favouring Microsoft | View Clip
11/02/2010
ITProPortal.com

Google has sued the US Department of the Interior for allegedly choosing to use Microsoft's e-mail and collaboration services without seriously considering Google Apps.

The lawsuit, which was first spotted by Eric Goldman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University, claims that the DOI's decision to use Microsoft over other companies was “unduly restrictive of competition”.

According to the lawsuit filing, the Department of the Interior announced an RFQ (request for quotation) for hosted e-mail and collaboration services for 88,000 people across the agency.

The RFQ specified that the department will only consider contract proposals that involve the Microsoft Business Productivity Online Suite.

Google said in the complaint: “Significantly, the SOW (statement of work) and even certain terminology were closely aligned with Microsoft's product literature for its Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, and Office Communications Online applications.”

“This was because the DOI had defined its needs and requirements around the Microsoft products,” the company claimed.

Tags: Microsoft, google

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Google Sues US Government For Favouring Microsoft | View Clip
11/02/2010
ITProPortal.com

Google has sued the US Department of the Interior for allegedly choosing to use Microsoft's e-mail and collaboration services without seriously considering Google Apps.

The lawsuit, which was first spotted by Eric Goldman, a law professor at the Santa Clara University, claims that the DOI's decision to use Microsoft over other companies was “unduly restrictive of competition”.

According to the lawsuit filing, the Department of the Interior announced an RFQ (request for quotation) for hosted e-mail and collaboration services for 88,000 people across the agency.

The RFQ specified that the department will only consider contract proposals that involve the Microsoft Business Productivity Online Suite.

Google said in the complaint: “Significantly, the SOW (statement of work) and even certain terminology were closely aligned with Microsoft's product literature for its Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, and Office Communications Online applications.”

“This was because the DOI had defined its needs and requirements around the Microsoft products,” the company claimed.

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Google sues US government over tech contract bidding | View Clip
11/02/2010
ZDNet UK

Contract, US government, Department of the Interior, DOI, Google Apps, SharePoint, Exchange Online, Business Productivity Online Suite, Office, Complaint

NEWS

Google and the US government are headed for a legal showdown over a claim that the bidding process for a government contract rejected Google Apps without fully evaluating its features.

Eric Goldman, a law professor with Santa Clara University who closely follows the tech industry, has spotted a lawsuit filed by Google against the federal government claiming that the US Department of the Interior (DOI) did not properly evaluate Google Apps when choosing a new web-based document system. Google alleges that because the DOI specified that the system needed to be part of Microsoft's Business Productivity Online Suite, Google Apps did not have a hope of being selected despite repeated attempts by Google to explain the product.

"Significantly, the SOW (statement of work) and even certain terminology were closely aligned with Microsoft's product literature for its Exchange Online, SharePoint Online and Office Communications Online applications. This was because the DOI had defined its needs and requirements around the Microsoft products," Google wrote in its complaint.

For more on this ZDNet UK-selected story, see Man bites dog? Google sues the government on CNET News.

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Google sues US govt for favouring Microsoft over Google Apps | View Clip
11/02/2010
Total Telecom

Lawsuit alleges Department of the Interior wrote procurement requirements to suit Microsoft.

Google Inc. is suing the U.S. Department of the Interior, alleging the agency inappropriately wrote procurement requirements for a messaging contract to favor Microsoft Corp. over its own Google Apps.

The suit, filed Friday in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, claims the agency's request for quotations for an e-mail and collaboration product was written to exclude Google by specifically stating the solution had to be part of the Microsoft Business Productivity Online Suite.

The DOI's decision to only consider Microsoft's productivity suite is "unduly restrictive of competition" and violates the Competition in Contracting Act, said Google in a claim filed with its government-reselling partner Onix Networking Corp.

The U.S agency is looking for a single hosted email and collaboration solution to replace the 13 messaging platforms currently in place for its 88,000 users. The contract is estimated to be worth $59 million over five years.

Google's suit seeks to block the DOI from proceeding with requests for bids on the contract without first conducting a competitive procurement process.

Google's lawsuit turns the table on the U.S. government, which has stepped up its scrutiny and probes of the Mountain View, Calif.-based search giant's acquisitions and privacy practices in recent months.

The lawsuit is also part of the company's ongoing battle with Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft, in which Google has been pushing its Google Apps online productivity services as a alternative to Microsoft's packaged Office software.

The two companies have faced off over many government contracts for email and other productivity software. Google Apps, the company's "cloud computing" service costs $50 per user per year, while Microsoft recently launched its own cloud-computing Office service for as little as $2 per user per month.

"Google rarely goes on the offensive in court," said Eric Goldman, professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. "It's suing the Department of the Interior as a proxy in its battle against Microsoft."

According to the complaint, DOI officials told Google they were committed to an open competition for the contract even though the department had "standardized" on Microsoft technology.

But the department also cited concerns about whether Google could comply with the agency's security needs, ultimately concluding

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KGO PROF. DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL
11/02/2010
WLOX 5 O'Clock Show - WLOX-TV

WE DO NOT INTEND TO TAKE THIS LYING DOWN. IN MOSS POINT, PATRICE CLARK WLOX NEWS. THE BUSINESS OWNERS SAY SALES HAVE ALSO DECLINED BY NEARLY 40 PERCENT SINCE THE MEDIAN CONSTRUCTION STARTED. THE MAYOR SAYS, THE PROJECT WILL BE COMPLETED, BY THE END OF THE YEAR. DOES BANNING THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES PROTECT CHILDREN? COMING UP ON WLOX NEWS AT 5, WHY SOME SAY IT VIOLATES FREEDOM OF SPEECH, TRANG STANDUP MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY OFFICIALS HAVE CONFIRMED THAT 20-YEAR OLD FOOTBALL PLAYER NICK BELL DIED TODAY, LOSING HIS BATTLE WITH CANCER. BELL WAS A DEFENSIVE END ON THE MSU FOOTBALL TEAM, LOCAL CLERGY AND PROFESSIONALS FROM THE STUDENT COUNSELING SERVICE OFFICE, WILL BE BROUGHT IN TO MEET WITH GRIEVING MEMBERS OF THE TEAM. FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN ANNOUNCED. IF YOU WATCH WHEEL OF FORTUNE, THEN YOU ARE FAMILIAR WITH THE UNMISTAKABLE VOICE OF CHARLIE O'DONNELL. FOR NEARLY THREE DECADES, YOU HEARD, BUT NEVER SAW THE WHEEL OF FORTUNE ANNOUNCER, AS HE INTRODUCED THE SHOW AND CHATTED WITH PAT SAJAK. TONIGHT, WHEEL FANS AROUND THE WORLD ARE MOURNING O'DONNELL'S PASSING. CHARLIE O'DONNELL WAS 78 YEARS OLD. HOW VIOLENT IS TOO VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO VIDEO GAMES? THAT'S JUST ONE OF THE QUESTIONS FACING THE SUPREME COURT TODAY. IT'S HEARING ARGUMENTS OVER THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF A CALIFORNIA LAW, THAT BANNED THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY, CHILDREN FACE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM FROM THESE GAMES. THE GAMING INDUSTRY SAYS ANY BAN POSES A THREAT TO FREE SPEECH. SO FAR, THE LAW HAS BEEN STRUCK DOWN BY TWO LOWER COURTS. KGO PROF. DEEP GULASEKARAM/SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL "THE COURT HAS TO FIGURE OUT, DOES IT REALLY WANT TO BE IN SOME WAYS A NANNY FOR THINGS LIKE VIDEO GAMES OR THE NEWLY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INTERNET SORT OF EXPRESSION" DURING ORAL ARGUMENTS, SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERNS, THAT THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD IN SCOPE. AND POINTED OUT THAT OTHER FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT, SUCH AS BOOKS AND MOVIES, ARE ALSO VIOLENT. THE COURT IS EXPECTED TO ISSUE ITS RULING IN JUNE. COOLER WEATHER IS COMING, CARRIE WILL BE IN TO TELL US WHEN NEXT IN OUR 7 DAY FORECAST. THANKS CARRIE.

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Man bites dog? Google sues the government | View Clip
11/02/2010
Lucianne.com

Google and the U.S. government are headed for a legal showdown, but on different sides of the courtroom than one might expect. Eric Goldman, a law professor with Santa Clara University who closely follows the tech industry, spotted a lawsuit filed by Google against the federal government claiming that the U.S. Department of the Interior did not properly evaluate Google Apps when choosing a new Web-based document system. Google alleges that because the Interior Department specified that the system needed to be part of Microsoft's Business Productivity Online Suite, Google Apps never had a chance despite repeated attempts by Google

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Man bites dog? Google sues US govt | View Clip
11/02/2010
ZDNet Asia

(20 minutes ago)

Summary

Long accustomed to fending off the government's legal inquiries, Google has filed its own suit claiming the government didn't fairly evaluate Google Apps.

Events

The Mira, Hong Kong

23 - 24 Nov 2010

Grand Copthorne Waterfront hotel, Singapore

Google and the U.S. government are headed for a legal showdown, but on different sides of the courtroom than one might expect.

Eric Goldman, a law professor with Santa Clara University who closely follows the tech industry, spotted a lawsuit filed by Google against the federal government claiming that the U.S. Department of the Interior did not properly evaluate Google Apps when choosing a new Web-based document system. Google alleges that because the Interior Department specified that the system needed to be part of Microsoft's Business Productivity Online Suite, Google Apps never had a chance despite repeated attempts by Google to explain the product.

"Significantly, the SOW (statement of work) and even certain terminology were closely aligned with Microsoft's product literature for its Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, and Office Communications Online applications. This was because the DOI had defined its needs and requirements around the Microsoft products," Google wrote in its complaint.

Government agencies generally have to follow a complicated process to purchase products or services from technology companies, and Google has increasingly sought to position itself as an alternative to Microsoft's office software in companies and governments.

And, of course, the federal government and Google are no strangers when it comes to legal maneuverings. The most current dispute involves Google's proposed acquisition of ITA Software, but the list stretches back several years.

Updated 4:25 p.m.=: Google issued the following statement on its lawsuit:

"Google is a proponent of open competition on the Internet and in the technology sector in general. Here, a fair and open process could save US taxpayers tens of millions of dollars and result in better services. We're asking the Department of Interior to allow for a true competition when selecting its technology providers."

This article was first posted as a blog post on CNET News.

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Oracle - SAP Testimony Nears; HP CEO In Spotlight | View Clip
11/02/2010
New York Times - Online

Filed at 10:06 p.m. ET

Add to Portfolio

OAKLAND, California (Reuters) - A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the world's most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear on Tuesday as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG.

Attorneys from Oracle and SAP spent nearly seven hours on Monday selecting jurors and hammering out procedural rules for the five week trial. They are due to present opening arguments on Tuesday.

Larry Ellison, Oracle's co-founder and CEO, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring SAP to court on accusations that SAP's TomorrowNow subsidiary stole its software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices -- which SAP has admitted.

At issue is not whether SAP or now-defunct TomorrowNow is at fault. SAP has admitted to wrongdoing, accepted liability and shut down TomorrowNow. The two sides are fighting over the damages SAP will have to pay, anywhere from tens of millions to billions of dollars.

Also at stake is the credibility of former SAP CEO and now top Hewlett-Packard executive Leo Apotheker. SAP says Apotheker did not know of any wrongdoing initially and moved to shut TomorrowNow after he found out.

Ellison, however, has stated he has evidence Apotheker was complicit in the SAP's improper downloading of the software.

Oracle has attacked HP for naming Apotheker CEO in September. Ellison charges the German executive -- who spent just seven months as sole SAP CEO before leaving amid public criticism -- played a key role in the case. Europe's biggest software maker and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became foes following a series of executive shuffles that began in August.

HP's CEO, Mark Hurd, a close friend of Ellison left HP after accusations of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. And HP hired Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management said last week.

AND WE'RE UNDERWAY

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California on Monday. Oracle's President Safra Catz, who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as the two sides selected eight jurors out of a pool of 27.

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing it believes damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While both sides will spend the next five weeks arguing over money, several analysts said the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, since they each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money," Anderson said.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed details about the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said on Sunday that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who began his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say on Monday night whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said other potential witnesses include former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann and current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

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Oracle finally gets SAP to trial, and maybe HP CEO | View Clip
11/02/2010
Yahoo! India

Enlarge Photo The headquarters of Oracle Corporation are shown in Redwood City, California February 2, 2010. REUTERS/Robert...

Three of the world's most powerful technology companies are enmeshed in a jury trial kicking off on Monday that could make for some of the best theatre Silicon Valley has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software giant Oracle Corp , has waited 2-1/2 years to bring arch rival SAP AG to court on charges that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

Oracle has also attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former CEO Leo Apotheker as its CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

THE CASE

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to a jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome since both SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a write-down for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of the shares of either Oracle or SAP.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Larry Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sail boats and cars.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who is due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is only calling him to harass him and interfere with his duties in his new post.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott and Oracle President Safra Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

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Oracle Finally Gets SAP To Trial, And Maybe HP CEO | View Clip
11/02/2010
Post Chronicle, The

Three of the world's most powerful technology companies are enmeshed in a jury trial kicking off on Monday that could make for some of the best theater Silicon Valley has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software giant Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring arch rival SAP AG to court on charges that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

Oracle has also attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former CEO Leo Apotheker as its CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

THE CASE

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to a jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome since both SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a write-down for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of the shares of either Oracle or SAP.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Larry Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sail boats and cars.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who is due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is only calling him to harass him and interfere with his duties in his new post.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott and Oracle President Safra Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

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Oracle, SAP testimony begins | View Clip
11/02/2010
IT Web

A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the world's most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear on Tuesday as Oracle lays out its case for seeking $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG.

Attorneys from Oracle and SAP spent nearly seven hours on Monday selecting jurors and hammering out procedural rules for the five-week trial. They are due to present opening arguments on Tuesday.

Larry Ellison, Oracle's co-founder and CEO, has waited two-and-a-half years to bring SAP to court on accusations that SAP's TomorrowNow subsidiary stole its software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices, which SAP has admitted.

At issue is not whether SAP or now-defunct TomorrowNow is at fault. SAP has admitted to wrongdoing, accepted liability and shut down TomorrowNow. The two sides are fighting over the damages SAP will have to pay, anywhere from tens of millions to billions of dollars.

Also at stake is the credibility of former SAP CEO and now top Hewlett-Packard executive Leo Apotheker. SAP says Apotheker did not know of any wrongdoing initially and moved to shut TomorrowNow after he found out.

Ellison, however, has stated he has evidence Apotheker was complicit in the SAP's improper downloading of the software.

Oracle has attacked HP for naming Apotheker CEO in September. Ellison charges the German executive – who spent just seven months as sole SAP CEO before leaving amid public criticism – played a key role in the case. Europe's biggest software maker and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

While the hi-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became foes following a series of executive shuffles that began in August.

HP's CEO, Mark Hurd, a close friend of Ellison left HP after accusations of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. And HP hired Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management, said last week.

The court proceedings got under way in US District Court in Oakland, California on Monday. Oracle's president Safra Catz, who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as the two sides selected eight jurors out of a pool of 27.

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service Web site.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing it believes damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars".

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the US, to make that case to the jury.

While both sides will spend the next five weeks arguing over money, several analysts said the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, since they each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money," Anderson said.

The US government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed details about the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said on Sunday that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who began his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokesperson for HP declined to say on Monday night whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said other potential witnesses include former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann and current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott.

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Oracle-SAP battle; HP CEO in spotlight | View Clip
11/02/2010
Times of India

CALIFORNIA: A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the world's most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG.

Attorneys from Oracle and SAP spent nearly seven hours on Monday selecting jurors and hammering out procedural rules for the five week trial. They are due to present opening arguments on Tuesday.

Larry Ellison, Oracle's co-founder and CEO, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring SAP to court on accusations that SAP's TomorrowNow subsidiary stole its software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices -- which SAP has admitted.

At issue is not whether SAP or now-defunct TomorrowNow is at fault. SAP has admitted to wrongdoing, accepted liability and shut down TomorrowNow. The two sides are fighting over the damages SAP will have to pay, anywhere from tens of millions to billions of dollars.

Also at stake is the credibility of former SAP CEO and now top Hewlett-Packard executive Leo Apotheker. SAP says Apotheker did not know of any wrongdoing initially and moved to shut TomorrowNow after he found out.

Ellison, however, has stated he has evidence Apotheker was complicit in the SAP's improper downloading of the software.

Oracle has attacked HP for naming Apotheker CEO in September. Ellison charges the German executive -- who spent just seven months as sole SAP CEO before leaving amid public criticism -- played a key role in the case. Europe's biggest software maker and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became foes following a series of executive shuffles that began in August.

HP's CEO, Mark Hurd, a close friend of Ellison left HP after accusations of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. And HP hired Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management said last week.

And we're underway

The court proceedings got under way in US District Court in Oakland, California on Monday. Oracle's President Safra Catz, who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as the two sides selected eight jurors out of a pool of 27.

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing it believes damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While both sides will spend the next five weeks arguing over money, several analysts said the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, since they each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money," Anderson said.

Criminal probe

The US government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed details about the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said on Sunday that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who began his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say on Monday night whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said other potential witnesses include former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann and current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott.

The case in US District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA Inc, et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight | View Clip
11/02/2010
Creative Mac

OAKLAND, California (Reuters) - A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the world's most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear on Tuesday as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG. Attorneys from Oracle and SAP spent nearly seven hours on Monday selecting jurors and hammering out procedural rules for the five week trial. They are due to present opening arguments on Tuesday. Larry Ellison, Oracle's co-founder and CEO, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring SAP to court on accusations that SAP's TomorrowNow subsidiary stole its software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices -- which SAP has admitted. At issue is not whether SAP or now-defunct TomorrowNow is at fault. SAP has admitted to wrongdoing, accepted liability and shut down TomorrowNow. The two sides are fighting over the damages SAP will have to pay, anywhere from tens of millions to billions of dollars. Also at stake is the credibility of former SAP CEO and now top Hewlett-Packard executive Leo Apotheker. SAP says Apotheker did not know of any wrongdoing initially and moved to shut TomorrowNow after he found out. Ellison, however, has stated he has evidence Apotheker was complicit in the SAP's improper downloading of the software. Oracle has attacked HP for naming Apotheker CEO in September. Ellison charges the German executive -- who spent just seven months as sole SAP CEO before leaving amid public criticism -- played a key role in the case. Europe's biggest software maker and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker. While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically. HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago. They became foes following a series of executive shuffles that began in August. HP's CEO, Mark Hurd, a close friend of Ellison left HP after accusations of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor. Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. And HP hired Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison. "It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management said last week. AND WE'RE UNDERWAY The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California on Monday. Oracle's President Safra Catz, who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as the two sides selected eight jurors out of a pool of 27. SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website. That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing it believes damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars." Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury. While both sides will spend the next five weeks arguing over money, several analysts said the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, since they each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue. "Let's not confuse this with real money," Anderson said. CRIMINAL PROBE The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed details about the investigation. Company spokesman Bill Wohl said on Sunday that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives. One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who began his new job with HP on Monday. HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties. A spokeswoman for HP declined to say on Monday night whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness. Oracle has said other potential witnesses include former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann and current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott. The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658. (Editing by Derek Caney, Matthew Lewis, Edwin Chan and Carol Bishopric) (c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2010. Check for restrictions at: http://about.reuters.com/fulllegal.asp

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight-UPDATE 2 | View Clip
11/02/2010
Forexyard.com - Online

* Oracle gets day in court after 2-1/2 years

* SAP admits to wrongdoing, at issue are damages

* Battle also may bring HP CEO Apotheker into court (Adds paragraph about jury selection, background)

OAKLAND, Calif., Nov 1 (Reuters) - A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the world's most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear on Tuesday as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG.

Attorneys from Oracle and SAP spent nearly seven hours on Monday selecting jurors and hammering out procedural rules for the five week trial. They are due to present opening arguments on Tuesday.

Larry Ellison, Oracle's co-founder and CEO, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring SAP to court on accusations that SAP's TomorrowNow subsidiary stole its software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices -- which SAP has admitted.

At issue is not whether SAP or now-defunct TomorrowNow is at fault. SAP has admitted to wrongdoing, accepted liability and shut down TomorrowNow. The two sides are fighting over the damages SAP will have to pay, anywhere from tens of millions to billions of dollars.

Also at stake is the credibility of former SAP CEO and now top Hewlett-Packard executive Leo Apotheker. SAP says Apotheker did not know of any wrongdoing initially and moved to shut TomorrowNow after he found out.

Ellison, however, has stated he has evidence Apotheker was complicit in the SAP's improper downloading of the software.

Oracle has attacked HP for naming Apotheker CEO in September. Ellison charges the German executive -- who spent just seven months as sole SAP CEO before leaving amid public criticism -- played a key role in the case. Europe's biggest software maker and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became foes following a series of executive shuffles that began in August.

HP's CEO, Mark Hurd, a close friend of Ellison left HP after accusations of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. And HP hired Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management said last week.

AND WE'RE UNDERWAY

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California on Monday. Oracle's President Safra Catz, who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as the two sides selected eight jurors out of a pool of 27.

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing it believes damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While both sides will spend the next five weeks arguing over money, several analysts said the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, since they each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money," Anderson said.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed details about the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said on Sunday that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who began his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say on Monday night whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said other potential witnesses include former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann and current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658. (Editing by Derek Caney, Matthew Lewis, Edwin Chan and Carol Bishopric)

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Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School
11/02/2010
9 News at 5 PM - WCPO-TV

HOW VIOLENT IS TOO VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO VIDEO GAMES? THAT'S ONE OF THE QUESTIONS FACING THE US SUPREME COURT. TODAY THE JUSTICES HEARD ARGUMENTS OVER A CALIFORNIA LAW THATBANNED THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY CHILDREN FACE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM FROM THESE GAMES. THE GAMING INDUSTRY SAYS ANY BAN POSES A THREAT TO FREE SPEECH. TWO LOWER COURTS HAVE SO FAR STRUCK DOWN THE LAW. Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression" SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERNS THAT THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD, AND POINTED OUT THAT BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. OTHERS SAID CHILDREN DESERVE PROTECTION FROM THE MOST VIOLENT GAMES. ASPIRING TEACHERS ARE PREPARING FOR NEW, MORE DEMANDING REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHING LICENSES IN THE NEXT FEW YEARS. UNDER THE NEW SYSTEM, VIDEO OF STUDENT TEACHERS IN THEIR CLASSROOMS WILL BE EVALUATED, ALONG WITH DOCUMENTS SHOWING CANDIDATES CAN PREPARE A LESSON, TAILOR IT FOR DIFFERENT KINDS OF STUDENTS AND PRESENT IT EFFECTIVELY. MOST STATES NOW ONLY REQUIRE THAT WOULD-BE TEACHERS PASS THEIR CLASS WORK AND A WRITTEN TEST. A 4-YEAR-OLD BOY, HIS PARENTS, AND HIS PRE-SCHOOL ARE BATTLING OVER THE SCHOOL'S DRESS CODE, AND THE BOY'S LONG HAIR. JACK SZABLEWSKI IS DONATING HIS 12 INCHES OF HAIR TO A WIG FOR A KID WITH LEUKEMIA AS A DEDICATION TO HIS GRANDFATHER. BUT HIS PAROCHIAL SCHOOL IN BRICK, NEW JERSEY SAYS JACK'S LONG HAIR DOESN'T FIT ITS DRESS CODE. HIS MOM SAYS JACK HAD AN APPOITNMENT FOR A HAIRCUT, BUT BAD WEATHER FORCED THEM TO CANCEL IT. WHEN JACK WENT BACK TO SCHOOL WITH HIS LONG LOCKS, THE SCHOOL KICKED HIM OUT. ONE OF DISNEY'S BIGGEST STARS HAS CHECKED HERSELF INTO A TREATMENT CENTER. AND A CIVICS LESSON IN A VOTING BOOTH. WE'RE ON YOUR SIDE WITH A LOCAL PROGRAM PREPARING KIDS TO BE THE CITIZENS OF TOMORROW.

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Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School
11/02/2010
9 News at 5 PM - WCPO-TV

HOW VIOLENT IS TOO VIOLENT WHEN IT COMES TO VIDEO GAMES? THAT'S ONE OF THE QUESTIONS FACING THE US SUPREME COURT. TODAY THE JUSTICES HEARD ARGUMENTS OVER A CALIFORNIA LAW THATBANNED THE SALE OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES TO MINORS. THE LAW'S SUPPORTERS SAY CHILDREN FACE PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM FROM THESE GAMES. THE GAMING INDUSTRY SAYS ANY BAN POSES A THREAT TO FREE SPEECH. TWO LOWER COURTS HAVE SO FAR STRUCK DOWN THE LAW. Prof. Deep Gulasekaram/Santa Clara University Law School "The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and internet sort of expression" SOME JUSTICES EXPRESSED CONCERNS THAT THE LAW WAS TOO BROAD, AND POINTED OUT THAT BOOKS AND MOVIES ARE ALSO VIOLENT. OTHERS SAID CHILDREN DESERVE PROTECTION FROM THE MOST VIOLENT GAMES. ASPIRING TEACHERS ARE PREPARING FOR NEW, MORE DEMANDING REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHING LICENSES IN THE NEXT FEW YEARS. UNDER THE NEW SYSTEM, VIDEO OF STUDENT TEACHERS IN THEIR CLASSROOMS WILL BE EVALUATED, ALONG WITH DOCUMENTS SHOWING CANDIDATES CAN PREPARE A LESSON, TAILOR IT FOR DIFFERENT KINDS OF STUDENTS AND PRESENT IT EFFECTIVELY. MOST STATES NOW ONLY REQUIRE THAT WOULD-BE TEACHERS PASS THEIR CLASS WORK AND A WRITTEN TEST. A 4-YEAR-OLD BOY, HIS PARENTS, AND HIS PRE-SCHOOL ARE BATTLING OVER THE SCHOOL'S DRESS CODE, AND THE BOY'S LONG HAIR. JACK SZABLEWSKI IS DONATING HIS 12 INCHES OF HAIR TO A WIG FOR A KID WITH LEUKEMIA AS A DEDICATION TO HIS GRANDFATHER. BUT HIS PAROCHIAL SCHOOL IN BRICK, NEW JERSEY SAYS JACK'S LONG HAIR DOESN'T FIT ITS DRESS CODE. HIS MOM SAYS JACK HAD AN APPOITNMENT FOR A HAIRCUT, BUT BAD WEATHER FORCED THEM TO CANCEL IT. WHEN JACK WENT BACK TO SCHOOL WITH HIS LONG LOCKS, THE SCHOOL KICKED HIM OUT. ONE OF DISNEY'S BIGGEST STARS HAS CHECKED HERSELF INTO A TREATMENT CENTER. AND A CIVICS LESSON IN A VOTING BOOTH. WE'RE ON YOUR SIDE WITH A LOCAL PROGRAM PREPARING KIDS TO BE THE CITIZENS OF TOMORROW.

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Santa Clara's Team California Wins Third Place in the 2009 Solar Decathlon | View Clip
11/02/2010
JesuitUSA News

Team California, made up of students from Santa Clara University and the California College of the Arts, won third place at the 2009 Solar Decathlon, which is held every two years and features 20 college teams from around the world that compete by building an energy-efficient home that's 100 percent powered by the sun.

The judges described Team California's 800-square-foot house, called Refract House, "masterfully executed, exquisite, and well designed."

In addition to winning third place overall, Team California also received first-place awards for architecture and communication and second-place awards for engineering, appliances, and home entertainment.

Watch Team California arriving in D.C. and reassembling their solar house:

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Silicon Valley giants set to fight it out in court | View Clip
11/02/2010
Qatar Tribune - Online

REUTERS

SAN FRANCISCO THREE of the world's most powerful technology companies are enmeshed in a jury trial kicking off on Monday that could make for some of the best theatre Silicon Valley has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the cofounder and CEO of software giant Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring arch rival SAP AG to court on charges that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

Oracle has also attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former CEO Leo Apotheker as its CEO in late September.

Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case.

SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison.

Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president.

HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

“It has gotten very, very personal.

And it's not going to stop,” said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer- service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages.

SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the “tens of millions of dollars.” Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to a jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome since both SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

“Let's not confuse this with real money.

It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion,” Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a write-down for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of the shares of either Oracle or SAP.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

“The drama of it all... It's so Silicon Valley,” Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Larry Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sail boats and cars.

The US government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely.

That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007.

The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators.

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Sleeping With the Stereo On | View Clip
11/02/2010
ASU Web Devil

Ever wondered how much of “real life” carries over into sleep?

SPM was wondering that, too. After some good ol' fashioned research, excavating articles from library basements, we have…  more questions.

How might something, like the music you listen to before bed, enter and imbue your dreams?

The beginnings of an answer arose from a 2000 study (published in the oft-read, and always scintillating, academic journal Perceptual and Motor Skills.) The study's researchers gave participants a questionnaire to find out how frequently “waking-life activities” — things they actually did that day, like walking, talking, reading, writing, using a computer and even sexual activity — occurred in their dreams.

Cognitive (or focused thinking) activities were dreamed of much more rarely than physical movement, even though participants reported doing all activities comparatively often while awake. Translation: You dream more about sex (or walking) than all that hard-thinkin' stuff you do at work.

The researchers said this supports the idea that “dream content is likely to reflect the emotional content of the dreamer.” Why? They couldn't say. Maybe dreams come from a more primal part of our brain. Maybe the actual acts of watching TV or reading aren't processed in dreams, but the ideas you gain from them are.

One activity this study didn't look at was listening to music. Does a person's contact with music while awake affect what they dream about, or if they dream at all? Are musicians dreamers? SPM kept reading.

A 2005 study at the University of Florence found that musicians and non-musicians dreamed about the same number of times per month, with about the same depth of content to their dreams.

However, musicians had twice as many dreams with music in them compared to non-musicians, and the earlier in life they'd started learning the “language of music,” the more musical dreams they had (neither total number of years playing music nor amount of daily practice seemed to factor in).

And these weren't just Top 40 radio repeats. The musicians dreamed of new songs they'd never heard before 28 percent of the time. According to the study, this suggests the capacity to create original music — something experts thought could only be done while conscious — “could be at work even during sleep.”

This leads SPM (and hopefully you, if we haven't put you to sleep yet) to another question: Does the type of music you listen to affect the types of dreams you have?

According to yet another study, this one from Santa Clara University in 2008, yes. Well, probably. It found some “significant correlations” between preference for certain music genres and tendencies toward certain dream habits.

For example, classical music aficionados were likely to have “dreams of flying” and “discontendedness” in dreams — signs of euphoric thoughts and a grandiose, manic personality, according to Carl Jung (and this guy).

Other interesting findings: Jazz fans were likely to have recurring pleasantness in dreams, and rap fans often dreamed more about sex.

Perhaps the most remarkable results, though, were those on heavy metal. The study found that metalheads have more “dissociative avoidance” in their dreams. This means that the dreamer takes on the role of observer, like in a dream of oneself sleeping or that infamous “dream within a dream.”

These kinds of dreams suggest a “disconnect from emotional reality,” the researchers wrote. Yet, metal fans tended to have recurring pleasantness in dreams, and heavy metal was the only music genre to have a negative correlation to “abrupt awakening from dreams.” Meaning, metalheads actually sleep more soundly and dream more happily than anyone else.

There's one lingering question that none of this impressive (and hopelessly obscure) academic research answered: Does music cause the dream, or does the way you dream inform your musical tastes? Does listening to music as you fall asleep affect if and how you dream?

SPM finally resorted to answer these questions the way we know best: self-experimentation. (We'll skip obvious puns about “Sweet Dreams” or “REM.”) Here are some suggestions on how to use music to invoke your unconscious psyche.

To reaffirm depression, ennui or heartbreak – Azure Ray, “Burn and Shiver”

Bittersweet dream-pop duo Azure Ray makes you glad to be sad, and sad to be glad. Honestly, this makes a lot more sense lying on your back in bed at 2:30 a.m.

When you're too pissed to be awake, and too pissed to be asleep – Pelican, “Australasia”

This Chicago band has been called both “art metal” and “trance-metal.” Whatever they are, they screwed up your dreams.

Listening to this album as deep sleep darkly descended, our reporter dreamed of watching the pilot for a new Tarantino/Rodriguez film from within the movie itself. We'll spare you the details, but highlights include car crashes, cold highway turnpikes, massive head wounds, revenge murders, Paul Rudd and John C. Reilly.

Yikes. Will not repeat this experiment.

For a catnap after a morning hike – The French Kicks (any album)

Ah, The French Kicks. Much better, and less terrifying.

Their music is almost scenic. You want to take pictures of it, but you're too busy looking at your feet as you trek through it. Like a morning hike for your mind, listening to the French Kicks is exercise that doesn't feel like exercise. After conquering Camelback Mountain (or wherever), put on a pair of good headphones, any French Kicks song, and crash hard for 15 minutes on a sunlit bed. Enjoy the good-vibe transference.

Contact the reporter at trabens@asu.edu.

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Supreme Court to hear arguments on video game law | View Clip
11/02/2010
ABC Local - Online

A high-stakes California case goes before the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday. The issue is over the sale of violent video games. The high court will hear arguments about whether California's law to protect children is constitutional.

A California law passed five years ago makes it illegal to sell or rent violent video games to minors. However, it has been struck down by two lower courts.

The Supreme Court of the United States is now taking up the case with one side arguing it's a violation of the First Amendment, and the other saying the games incite children to be violent.

"The court has to figure out, does it really want to be in some ways a nanny for things like video games or the newly emerging technologies and Internet sorts of expression?" says Deep Gulasekaram, a professor at Santa Clara University Law School who specializes in constitutional law. "And I think the court in prior cases has signaled that it really would not like to be in that position."

Six other states have also tried unsuccessfully to ban the sale or rental of violent games. So California could find it a challenge to defend its law. The law was written by State Sen. Leland Yee of San Francisco.

"If in fact they strike down our law, that they will at least provide a pathway for us lawmakers as to how we might craft a narrowly tailored bill that really protects children, but that at the same time stands any First Amendment challenge," said Yee.

Game developers argue the case is important to a $10 billion industry.

"I think we have the Constitution on our side," said Ted Price, founder and CEO of Insomniac Games, who will sit in on the Supreme Court hearing. "Games have the same rights as films, television and other forms of media when it comes to freedom of expression, and I'd be really surprised if the Supreme Court didn't recognize that."

The Supreme Court's decision will be issued sometime next spring.

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When faculty meets felony | View Clip
11/02/2010
FT.com

In a case that underscores business schools' heightened focus on ethics and moral responsibility, a US district judge has upheld the decision by NYU Stern School of Business to deny an MBA to a student who hid his conviction for insider trading from school officials.

The decision comes as business schools are under fire for their role in the financial crisis. Critics have blamed business schools for shaping and perpetuating a business culture that not only embraces risky, exotic financial instruments and badly designed compensation plans, but that fosters greed and self-entitlement among their students.

In 2007, Ayal Rosenthal, the former student, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit securities fraud after he tipped off his brother to non-public information he became privy to while working at PwC, the accountancy firm, in 2005. At the time he was also pursuing a part-time MBA at Stern. As a sentence, he served 60 days in prison.

Mr Rosenthal had completed the degree requirements but he was denied his MBA for violating Stern's Honor Code and Code of Conduct while enrolled at the school.

Following Stern's internal decision in 2007, Mr Rosenthal brought an action against the school in the federal district court in New York for alleging that Stern's decision was “fundamentally unfair”. But the judge upheld the university's initial decision to withhold the degree.

“Rosenthal managed to complete his course requirements only by concealing his criminal investigation from Stern,” the judge ruled. “The authority and discretion to determine whether Rosenthal was qualified to receive an MBA degree from Stern properly rested with its faculty.”

According to John Fernandes, president and CEO of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, this is the first time a business school has had to decide whether or not to grant a degree to an enrolled student convicted of a felony related to his professional dealings.

The ruling, he says, comes as: “business schools are increasingly sensitive to be seen as operating in a transparent environment”.

Mr Rosenthal's attorney, Edward Hernstadt, said he believed the judge's ruling was wrong because it created a “dangerous slippery slope” by giving the faculty full discretion “to decide who or who doesn't deserve the benefit of MBA”.

However, ethics experts dispute the notion that by not granting a business degree to an enrolled student who has admitted to securities fraud, a faculty is going beyond its powers. “The conviction of a felony is a bright line between acceptable behaviour and unacceptable behaviour,” says Kirk Hanson, executive director of the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University.

“It's entirely within the rights of a ... business school to set the criteria for graduation, and if it chooses to set the criteria to include moral qualities, it seems to me to be perfectly appropriate.”

In the wake of scandals such as Enron, WorldCom and HealthSouth, Prof Hanson says: “It's critical for schools to communicate that integrity and ethics matter in business management.

“To tolerate the presence of an MBA who, while they were enrolled, has been convicted of a crime of dishonesty... sends the wrong message.”

The fact that Mr Rosenthal pleaded guilty while in business school is another key detail, say ethics experts. If he had committed a crime after graduation, it would be difficult for the school to rescind his degree because he had earned it at the time by fulfilling the requirements.

Disgraced executives from the Enron scandal – Jeff Skilling, former chief executive and Andrew Fastow, former chief financial officer – were sentenced to prison for their role in the 2001 demise of the energy company. Both have MBAs, Mr Skilling from Harvard Business Schooland Mr Fastow from Northwestern's Kellogg School of Management.

Leigh Hafrey, a senior lecturer on ethics at MIT Sloan School of Management, notes that “if one of your graduates does something evil, it makes your school look bad, but it would be very difficult for that school to argue that anyone 15-20 years fter graduation] violated its honour code.”

The case, he says, could renew interest in devising an MBA honour code where graduates pledge to act ethically in business.

“This would effectively professionalise business,” he says.

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Bailouts deserve blame for stalling market's natural selection process | View Clip
11/01/2010
Centre Daily Times - Online

The Oct. 8 jobs report showed that the U.S. economy shed 95,000 jobs in September.

The private sector created a mere 64,000 jobs, well below the roughly 100,000 per month needed to keep employment stable and even further below the 400,000 a month needed to significantly reduce unemployment. In fact, numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveal that the current job creation rate is well below the rate recorded as the economy rebounded from the five previous recessions.

Some argue that regulations advocated by the Obama administration are anti-business and one major reason for this jobless recovery.

For example, a recent report by Goldman Sachs' Jan Hatzius calculated that the Basel III bank capital requirements, strongly advocated by the Obama administration, will reduce future U.S. GDP growth by 2 percent.

This viewpoint holds that new regulations, by increasing costs for financial institutions, health care companies, energy firms and others will dampen economic growth.

Even if one accepts questionable calculations such as these, it is extremely unlikely that recent regulatory reforms have had any effect yet on job creation. The more likely culprit is the administration's “bailout approach” to business.

A thriving economy undergoes a process of constant natural selection. Less efficient firms fall away, while more efficient, innovative firms take their place and grow.

This process is especially important as an economy attempts to recover from a contraction. To the extent that government policy props up inefficient businesses and prevents them from failing, it prevents those businesses that are more innovative and efficient from growing — and hiring.

For example, in the last recession the death of many steel companies, such as National Steel and Birmingham Steel, cleared the way for healthier firms such as Nucor Steel and U.S. Steel to grow and led to job creation.

In the recession before that, the death of once-dominant mini-computer makers like DEC and Wang gave way to the rise of now-dominant personal computer makers like Apple and HP.

Explicit bailouts of firms in the financial services and automotive industries — involving both the Bush and Obama administrations — and implicit bailouts of countless other firms receiving money via the bloated $787 billion fiscal stimulus package have slowed the market's natural selection process.

And this has occurred at a critical time — in a recession — when it is especially important that poorly managed firms fall away and clear the way for better-managed competitors to grow and create jobs. For example, while GM needed a bailout, Ford Motor Co. did not; yet Ford and its suppliers were not rewarded for their ability to run their firms more efficiently.

This slowdown of the natural selection process has not been confined to businesses. When the Obama administration bailed out homeowners in default on their mortgages via loan modifications, it slowed down the process by which ownership of assets was transferred to those best capable of developing those assets.

This friction in turn hampered recovery in the residential real estate industry — from real estate agents to home builders to the home improvement industry.

In the end, according to government figures more than half of the loans that were modified returned to default within six months. So this policy benefited a few for a short period of time but delayed the recovery of several large industries — thus slowing job growth.

The regulations advocated by the present administration — something that has not yet impacted hiring, and will likely reduce economic volatility in the long run — are not the problem.

In order to create jobs, businesses have to grow.

And for businesses to grow we cannot allow the poor decisions of individuals and management teams to get in the way of more capable people. We have to allow natural selection to function in the marketplace.

George Chacko is an associate professor of finance and Carolyn Evans is an associate professor of economics at Santa Clara University's Leavey School of Business and Administration. Contact them at SCU, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053.

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Bailouts deserve blame for stalling market's natural selection process
11/01/2010
Centre Daily Times

The Oct. 8 jobs report showed that the U.S. economy shed 95,000 jobs in September.

The private sector created a mere 64,000 jobs, well below the roughly 100,000 per month needed to keep employment stable and even further below the 400,000 a month needed to significantly reduce unemployment. In fact, numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveal that the current job creation rate is well below the rate recorded as the economy rebounded from the five previous recessions.

Some argue that regulations advocated by the Obama administration are anti-business and one major reason for this jobless recovery.

For example, a recent report by Goldman Sachs' Jan Hatzius calculated that the Basel III bank capital requirements, strongly advocated by the Obama administration, will reduce future U.S. GDP growth by 2 percent.

This viewpoint holds that new regulations, by increasing costs for financial institutions, health care companies, energy firms and others will dampen economic growth.

Even if one accepts questionable calculations such as these, it is extremely unlikely that recent regulatory reforms have had any effect yet on job creation. The more likely culprit is the administration's "bailout approach" to business.

A thriving economy undergoes a process of constant natural selection. Less efficient firms fall away, while more efficient, innovative firms take their place and grow.

This process is especially important as an economy attempts to recover from a contraction. To the extent that government policy props up inefficient businesses and prevents them from failing, it prevents those businesses that are more innovative and efficient from growing — and hiring.

For example, in the last recession the death of many steel companies, such as National Steel and Birmingham Steel, cleared the way for healthier firms such as Nucor Steel and U.S. Steel to grow and led to job creation.

In the recession before that, the death of once-dominant mini-computer makers like DEC and Wang gave way to the rise of now-dominant personal computer makers like Apple and HP.

Explicit bailouts of firms in the financial services and automotive industries — involving both the Bush and Obama administrations — and implicit bailouts of countless other firms receiving money via the bloated $787 billion fiscal stimulus package have slowed the market's natural selection process.

And this has occurred at a critical time — in a recession — when it is especially important that poorly managed firms fall away and clear the way for better-managed competitors to grow and create jobs. For example, while GM needed a bailout, Ford Motor Co. did not; yet Ford and its suppliers were not rewarded for their ability to run their firms more efficiently.

This slowdown of the natural selection process has not been confined to businesses. When the Obama administration bailed out homeowners in default on their mortgages via loan modifications, it slowed down the process by which ownership of assets was transferred to those best capable of developing those assets.

This friction in turn hampered recovery in the residential real estate industry — from real estate agents to home builders to the home improvement industry.

In the end, according to government figures more than half of the loans that were modified returned to default within six months. So this policy benefited a few for a short period of time but delayed the recovery of several large industries — thus slowing job growth.

The regulations advocated by the present administration — something that has not yet impacted hiring, and will likely reduce economic volatility in the long run — are not the problem.

In order to create jobs, businesses have to grow.

And for businesses to grow we cannot allow the poor decisions of individuals and management teams to get in the way of more capable people. We have to allow natural selection to function in the marketplace.

George Chacko is an associate professor of finance and Carolyn Evans is an associate professor of economics at Santa Clara University's Leavey School of Business and Administration . Contact them at SCU, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053.

Copyright © 2010 McClatchy-Tribune Information Services

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Brown's Secret Weapon: Independent Cash | View Clip
11/01/2010
Bay Citizen, The

Throughout the governor's race, Democratic nominee Jerry Brown has assailed Republican Meg Whitman's record-breaking investment in her campaign. Yet a record-busting torrent of cash from outside groups has provided a critical counterweight on Brown's behalf.

The fractious contest has attracted $29 million from these shadowy groups — the largest sum of any gubernatorial election in California, campaign finance reports released Monday show. The bulk of those funds, about $26.5 million, has gone to Brown. The money has financed advertising and a get-out-the-vote campaign that have helped to offset spending by Whitman, who has infused her campaign with $141 million.

“Our job was to get his messages out to the voters over the summer while Meg Whitman was spending her private wealth to bash Jerry Brown,” said David Koenig, a consultant for Working Californians to Support Jerry Brown for Governor 2010, which is largely financed by unions representing state employees, electricians and teachers. “We made it our job to help Jerry Brown survive the onslaught.”

Working Californians spent about $2.6 million on Brown's behalf over the summer, allowing him to blanket the state with radio, television and newspaper ads. The group targeted Latino voters in the Bay Area and black voters in the Los Angeles area with radio ads featuring Stevie Wonder and former NBA star Magic Johnson.

The proliferation of independent expenditures from special interest groups this year has worried government watchdog groups. Outside groups are exempt from campaign limits, which prevent individuals from contributing more than $25,900 per candidate in the governor's race.

Most of the outside groups supporting Brown are financed by labor unions. Most of the groups supporting Whitman are financed by law enforcement organizations. But the effect has been to provide Brown with a windfall of cash, while shielding him from some of the media attention — and perhaps some voter backlash — that have accompanied Whitman's lavish spending.

Roughly 40 independent committees are backing Brown. Among the top spenders are Concerned Educators for Jerry Brown for Governor, sponsored by the California Teachers Association ($3.2 million); Cambiando California-Jerry Brown for Governor, which represents teachers, public employees and health care workers ($2.3 million); and Alliance for a Better California 2010, composed of labor groups, educators, and others ($1.3 million).

Some law enforcement groups are backing Brown. The California Correctional Peace Officers Association, which represents 30,000 prison guards, has spent about $1.6 million on initiatives that attack Whitman, including YouTube videos that parody Whitman as a bobblehead doll who has “spent more than anyone in history.”

Whitman's campaign said the labor-backed infusion of cash into Brown's campaign effectively makes him “a wholly owned subsidiary” of the unions.

“Should he win, the unions will be expecting payback, mostly likely in the form of a tax increase to pay for higher wages and the gold-plated pensions of state workers,” said Darrel Ng, a Whitman spokesman.

But some political observers said the independent expenditures have helped Brown distance himself from the focus on money that has dominated the Whitman campaign.

“Independent expenditures free up the candidate, so they don't have to get their hands dirty,” said James Cottrill, an assistant political science professor at Santa Clara University. “They have helped Brown promote a positive agenda, and that gives voters something to turn out for.”

A Field Poll released Thursday showed Brown with a 10-point lead over the former eBay chief executive, 49 percent to 39 percent.

As the polls turned in his favor over the last few weeks, Brown invoked more positive political rhetoric. He took a calculated gamble at a women's conference last week when he offered to pull negative ads. With a deficit to make up, Whitman refused. The crowd booed.

Brown's staff attributed their candidate's lead to hard work and an engaging political platform, adding that the campaign has nothing to do with the financial contributions of special interest groups.

“People view him as a candidate that has offered reasons to vote for him,” said Sterling Clifford, a spokesman for Brown. “They operate independently of us.”

But Clifford acknowledged that waiting until after Labor Day to unleash his campaign cash was key to Brown's surge in the polls.

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City blight? There s an app store for that | View Clip
11/01/2010
Tri-Valley Herald

By Mike Cassidy

mcassidy@mercurynews.com

These are tough times for local governments.

Maybe you've heard. Cities, counties, schools are all scrambling to pay to bring you the services you expect. Mass transit is massively underfunded. Parks are going to seed. Buildings, bridges and roads are crumbling. Budgets are in worse shape than the infrastructure.

But there is hope. And it's called Apple.

Did you hear that the Cupertino maker of all-things-hip opened a new store in Chicago on Oct. 23? And yeah, the store is gorgeous, because Apple is into gorgeous, but what is even more beautiful is the transformation of the subway station that leads to the Apple store's door.

The station was remade from a horrendous dump to a lovely public space on Apple's dime. Well, Apple's 40 million dimes. The company put up $4 million, give or take, to fix up the train stop and to build a comfy plaza (with wireless) out front where happy Apple customers and others can sit and contemplate a gurgling fountain.

Look, if Google can blow $2 billion to buy one of New York City's biggest buildings (as the New York Post reported it might), surely Apple, which is sitting on $51 billion in cash, can drop $4 million in the Second City to fix up the transit gateway to its newest store.

And you know what this means, don't you? Now everyone is going to want an Apple store. Yes, please, absolutely in my backyard. Think of the subway rehab as part of Steve Jobs' own Works Progress Administration, the Depression-era program that created jobs through government spending on public works. He found a shovel-ready project and started shoveling money at it. The guy has been a one-man stimulus plan.

Forget big government. This is Big Apple, which built a lovely plaza, with tables and such, in front of its Manhattan store in the Other Big Apple. It kicked in for a public plaza outside its new Shanghai store and it has preserved pieces of historic buildings in France and England as it opened stores there.

Apple is not talking about the Chicago station rehab, but the move is not exactly retail rocket science. This is not a company that leaves much to chance and there was no way the sales gurus in Cupertino were going to let a dungeonlike transit stop present the first impression of their sleek and glassy store.

Remember, Apple sells an experience as much as it sells products.

"The public might not think of it this way, but the retail experience doesn't start exactly in your store. It starts when they approach your store," says Kirthi Kalyanam, a professor with the Retail Management Institute at Santa Clara University's Leavey School of Business.

Based on accounts from Chicagoans on blogs and in the local press, the investment is already paying off. The station, which once consisted of a weary brick entrance building sporting peeling paint and the distinctive odor of urine, now boasts clean bricks, big windows and a thoroughly scrubbed interior that has been painted and plastered with ads for all things Apple.

This is how Chicago, "the city that works," works. But why not make it work for the Bay Area, too? How about BART to downtown San Jose. You say it will never happen? Why not an Apple store at either end of the Fremont-to-downtown route, with Apple picking up the construction tab? Worried about the deferred maintenance at your kids' school? How does Apple Academy -- complete with Apple store -- sound? And why close state parks when you can simply replace those gift shops -- with their trail guides and DEET -- with Apple stores packed with iPhones (think GPS) and iPads (good alternative to singing around the campfire)?

OK, maybe the state park store is a little out there. But remember this: With Apple, and a little dough, all things are possible.

Contact Mike Cassidy at mcassidy@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5536. Follow him at Twitter.com/mikecassidy.

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City blight? There s an app store for that | View Clip
11/01/2010
San Jose Mercury News - Online

These are tough times for local governments.

Maybe you've heard. Cities, counties, schools are all scrambling to pay to bring you the services you expect. Mass transit is massively underfunded. Parks are going to seed. Buildings, bridges and roads are crumbling. Budgets are in worse shape than the infrastructure.

But there is hope. And it's called Apple.

Did you hear that the Cupertino maker of all-things-hip opened a new store in Chicago on Oct. 23? And yeah, the store is gorgeous, because Apple is into gorgeous, but what is even more beautiful is the transformation of the subway station that leads to the Apple store's door.

The station was remade from a horrendous dump to a lovely public space on Apple's dime. Well, Apple's 40 million dimes. The company put up $4 million, give or take, to fix up the train stop and to build a comfy plaza (with wireless) out front where happy Apple customers and others can sit and contemplate a gurgling fountain.

Look, if Google can blow $2 billion to buy one of New York City's biggest buildings (as the New York Post reported it might), surely Apple, which is sitting on $51 billion in cash, can drop $4 million in the Second City to fix up the transit gateway to its newest store.

And you know what this means, don't you? Now everyone is going to want an Apple store. Yes, please, absolutely in my backyard.

Think of the subway rehab as part of Steve Jobs' own Works Progress Administration,

the Depression-era program that created jobs through government spending on public works. He found a shovel-ready project and started shoveling money at it. The guy has been a one-man stimulus plan.

Forget big government. This is Big Apple, which built a lovely plaza, with tables and such, in front of its Manhattan store in the Other Big Apple. It kicked in for a public plaza outside its new Shanghai store and it has preserved pieces of historic buildings in France and England as it opened stores there.

Apple is not talking about the Chicago station rehab, but the move is not exactly retail rocket science. This is not a company that leaves much to chance and there was no way the sales gurus in Cupertino were going to let a dungeonlike transit stop present the first impression of their sleek and glassy store.

Remember, Apple sells an experience as much as it sells products.

"The public might not think of it this way, but the retail experience doesn't start exactly in your store. It starts when they approach your store," says Kirthi Kalyanam, a professor with the Retail Management Institute at Santa Clara University's Leavey School of Business.

Based on accounts from Chicagoans on blogs and in the local press, the investment is already paying off. The station, which once consisted of a weary brick entrance building sporting peeling paint and the distinctive odor of urine, now boasts clean bricks, big windows and a thoroughly scrubbed interior that has been painted and plastered with ads for all things Apple.

This is how Chicago, "the city that works," works. But why not make it work for the Bay Area, too? How about BART to downtown San Jose. You say it will never happen? Why not an Apple store at either end of the Fremont-to-downtown route, with Apple picking up the construction tab? Worried about the deferred maintenance at your kids' school? How does Apple Academy -- complete with Apple store -- sound? And why close state parks when you can simply replace those gift shops -- with their trail guides and DEET -- with Apple stores packed with iPhones (think GPS) and iPads (good alternative to singing around the campfire)?

OK, maybe the state park store is a little out there. But remember this: With Apple, and a little dough, all things are possible.

Contact Mike Cassidy at mcassidy@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5536. Follow him at Twitter.com/mikecassidy.

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COMMUNITY NEWS: NCT, Monday Nov. 1 | View Clip
11/01/2010
North County Times - Online

RANCHO PENASQUITOS ---- The Rancho Penasquitos Library is offering a three-part poetry series workshop for children in grades 2-5 from 4 to 5 p.m. Nov. 5, 12 and 19 at 13330 Salmon River Road. Local high school students will introduce children to different forms of poetry and help children write their own poetry Register at 858-538-8159.

Open house scheduled

SAN MARCOS ---- The Friends of the San Marcos Library will host an Open House for new volunteers from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 6 at 2 Civic Center Place. Volunteers with be given a tour of the library bookstore and will go home with their choice of one of the hardbound fiction novels. Potential volunteers must be over 18. Call 760-798-1645.

Holiday Boutique to be held

SAN MARCOS ---- The City of San Marcos and the San Elijo Hills Women's Club will hold the fifth annual San Elijo Holiday Boutique from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 6 at the San Elijo Hills Recreation Center, 1105 Elfin Forest Road. This event will include arts and crafts vendors, food, entertainment, a free children's craft area and more. Call 760-744-9000 or visit www.san-marcos.net .

Learn how to use powerpoint

VISTA ---- OASIS will hold the "Introduction to MS Powerpoint" computer class from 1 to 3 p.m. Wednesdays Nov. 3-24 at the McClellan Senior Center, 1400 Vale Terrace Drive. Learn how to use Microsoft's Powerpoint 2007 application to create presentations. The class will explain basic slides, inserting pictures, formatting/editing for special effects and adding music/sound to your presentation. The cost is $30. A $10 trimester fee may apply. Bring a flash drive. Register at 760-796-6020.

Learn how to buy, sell stocks

VISTA ---- OASIS will hold the "Value Investing in the Stock Market" class with local radio host Bill Gunderson from 1 to 3 p.m. Nov. 4 at the McClellan Senior Center, 1400 Vale Terrace Drive. Learn how to place values on companies, buy them at half-price and sell them at full price. The cost is $4. A $10 trimester fee may apply. Register at 760-796-6020.

Dancers to celebrate 59th

VISTA ---- The Ocean Wavers Square Dance Club will hold its 59th anniversary dance at 8 p.m. Nov. 5 at the Vista Townsite Center, 642 Vista Village Drive. Jim Randall and Ray Holmes will call, Regina Aubrey will cue. Pre-rounds will be held at 7:30 p.m. Donation is $6. Call 760-724-2262.

Kiwanians to dine, bid

VISTA ---- The Kiwanis Club of Vista will hold a Spaghetti Feed fundraiser from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Nov. 5 at the Antique Gas and Steam Engine Museum, 2040 N. Santa Fe Ave. Enjoy musical entertainment from the Rancho Buena Vista Saxaphones, a silent auction and a raffle. Call 760-445-0244 or e-mail frankharper@juno.com.

Star gazing hike offered

POWAY ---- Goodan Ranch/Sycamore Canyon Preserve is offering a star gazing hike from 5 to 7 p.m. Nov. 6 meeting at the Goodan Staging Area, 16281 Sycamore Canyon Road. Join George Varga for an enlightening star gazing hike. Guests will be shown the Andromeda Galaxy, the Pleiades, the Orion Nebula, the Double Cluster and others visible with the naked eye while enjoying Sycamore Canyon at night. Participants are encouraged to bring binoculars as well as sturdy shoes and warm clothes. Space is limited to 30 individuals. Reserve at 858-513-4737. Rain or cloudy conditions cancel.

Quilt show, auction

ESCONDIDO ---- The North County Quilter's Association will hold the 25th anniversary Quilt Show and Auction from 10 a.m .to 4 p.m. Nov. 6 at the Church of the Resurrection Parish Hall, 1445 Conway Drive. More than 100 quilts will be on display and for sale and for auction. A live quilt auction is at 2 p.m. Enjoy vendor booths, door prizes and crafts. Proceeds benefit local charities. Visit www.ncountyquilters.com .

Justice day to be held

ESCONDIDO ---- Justice Day is an annual festival to promote the prevention of human trafficking and homelessness to be held from 2 to 7 p.m. and from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Nov. 6 in the Amphitheatre, Kit Carson Park, 3315 Bear Valley Parkway. Members of churches from across San Diego and North County are coming together under the support of C28, World Vision, San Diego Rescue Mission, Not For Sale and a number of other organizations to inform the public of these local issues affecting their community. Street festivities begin at 2 p.m. and include food, music, and entertainment. Tim Be Told will be the featured speaker at 7 p.m. Call 760-855-2662. Visit www.justice-day.com.

Historic walking tour offered

ESCONDIDO ---- The Escondido History Center is offering a one-hour historic walking tour of Downtown Escondido with Wendy Barker at 10 a.m. Nov. 6 meeting at the southeast corner of Broadway and Grand Avenue. Call 760-743-8207.

Foreclosure prevention clinic offered

ESCONDIDO ---- Mabuhay Alliance a nonprofit organization service north county as a defined HUD, will host a Foreclosure Prevention Clinic from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 6 at St. Mary Catholic Church, 1160 S. Broadway. This service is to provide assistance with real lender solutions on home retention such as loan modification, short sale and quick answers to questions on how to save homes from foreclosure. E-mail info@mabuhayalliance.org or call 858-537-1500. Visit www.mabuhayalliance.org .

Macadamia field day offered

BONSALL ---- The University of California Cooperative Extension, the California Macadamia Society and the Gold Crown Macadamia Association will hold a meeting about growing macadamia nuts in California from 8:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Nov. 6 at 6686 Via del la Reina. The meeting will provide the opportunity for all those interested in learning about growing the nuts. In addition to the commercial growers, macadamias make excellent backyard trees, are beautiful as landscaping and can be grown in tubs on your patio. The cost is $20 and incudes a continental breakfast and lunch. Reserve at www.russellfarms@roadrunner.com or call 760-728-8081.

Technology, Victorian times collide

OCEANSIDE ---- The Oceanside Museum of Art will hold the "Dr. Steampunk's Art Extravaganza" Art After Dark event from 7 to 10 p.m. Nov. 5 at 704 Pier View Way. The "industrial meets Victorian" theme combines a circus of oddities and artistic inventions. "Steampunk" is a sub-genre of science fiction where steam power and Victorian era Britain collide in fantastical inventions, ironic sculpture and technological developments. The event will feature the "Enigma Fashions Steampunk" fashion show, the "Steampunk: Vintage Futurism" exhibition, videos, live painting by artist David Joseph Gough, local band Manganista and handcrafted beer from the Lost Abbey Brewing Company. Participants can design their own Steampunk sculpture. Tickets cost $25, $20 for members. Reserve at 760-435-3720.

Discussion on Alzheimer's

OCEANSIDE ---- Kathie Way, director of Life's Neighborhood, will moderate a meeting for friends and families members to discuss the challenges with family members diagnosed with Alzheimer's from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Nov. 3 at Aegis at Shadowridge, 1440 S. Melrose Drive. Call 760-806-3600 or visit www.aegisatshadowridge.com .

Talk on stem cell research

OCEANSIDE ---- MiraCosta College's Biotechnology Program will host stem-cell researcher Dr. Eyitayo Fakunle at noon Nov. 5 at the college's little theater, 1 Barnard Drive, Room 3601. Fakunle, a UNCF/Merck postdoctoral fellow at the Scripps Research Institute, will discuss her research and the implications for stem cells in personalized medicine. The event will be hosted by MiraCosta biotech instructors Mike Fino and Gail Baughman, who will also announce winners of the 2010 Genentech Scholarships and provide an update on how MiraCosta students can apply for a fully funded, yearlong internship in stem cell research. Call 760-757-2121, ext. 6499.

Senior group to gather

OCEANSIDE ---- The LIFE at MiraCosta senior learning group will meet Nov. 5 at MiraCosta College, 1 Barnard Drive, Room 1068.

-- 1 p.m.: Eric Bishop, director of "Machinal: The Play," will provide insight into this powerful drama and will discuss women's forced financial dependency on men in the 1920s.

-- 2:30 p.m.: Deborah Polich will present "Public Library ---- Today and Tomorrow" and will provide information on current library programs and services, as well as a preview of the renovations that will give the MiraCosta Colelge library a new look.

Call 760-721-8124.

College to hold reading festival

OCEANSIDE ---- MiraCosta College's Community Learning Center will hold the fourth annual Continuing Education Reading Festival from 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Nov. 2-3 at 1831 Mission Ave. The event will feature reading workshops and cover topics such as vocabulary, making a book, life at MiraCosta College and audio books.There will also be multilingual group book reading, an open microphone period and a presentation both days by author/educator Francisco Jimenez of Santa Clara University. Call 760-795-8701.

Excel classes for seniors

CARLSBAD ---- The Carlsbad Senior Center will offer the "Intro to Windows: Making the System Work for You" computer class for adults ages 50 and older, taught by a Microsoft-certified instructor, from 10 a.m. to noon Mondays Nov. 15 through Dec. 6 at 799 Pine Ave. Discover the features that Windows has to offer. Learn how to use the control panel, accesories, My Computer and file management. A prerequisite for the class is basic PC experience or a computer literacy class. Fee is $56 for residents, $66 for nonresidents. Register at 760-602-4650.

Historical view of Veterans Day

CARLSBAD ---- Debra S. Jamison, state vice regent of the Daughters of the American Revolution, will present "WWI and the history of Veterans Day" at 10 a.m. Nov. 3 at the Carlsbad Newcomers meeting at Heritage Hall in Magee Park, 2650 Garfield St. Call 760-845-6339 or visit www.carlsbadnewcomers.org .

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Editor's Note | View Clip
11/01/2010
California Lawyer

Senility is probably not for everyone. But when I read about what young people are going through nowadays just to land a halfway decent job, I feel lucky that I'm closer to losing my mind than just starting out in the world. (My favorite recent headline is from a satirical publication called

But this month,

Life isn't a cakewalk for these aspiring lawyers; they are, after all, facing both job uncertainty

Where did Finfrock, 28, get such a crazy idea? I'm afraid I'm at least partly to blame. Last year, I hired him as a research editor for this magazine. A few months later he sat in on one of our editorial advisory board meetings, with the likes of California Supreme Court Chief Justice Ronald M. George and Santa Clara University law professor Gerald F. Uelmen, as we brainstormed about article ideas. Finfrock also struck up a correspondence with Anthony Romero, the national executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union, after fact-checking our April profile of him. And in July, Finfrock literally had a front-row seat at the federal trial that overturned Proposition 8, California's voter-approved ballot initiative banning same-sex marriages. "These were pretty inspiring experiences," he reflects. "And they pushed me over the edge in terms of what I wanted to do with the rest of my life."

If all goes according to plan, Finfrock will be out of law school sometime in 2014, at which point he'll be looking for a job.

In this issue as well, Southern California attorneys

Finally, I'm pleased to announce that

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EthicsWatch: Analysis: US alien tort law - A sword of international law blunted | View Clip
11/01/2010
Ethical Corporation Online

Human rights activists may no longer be able to raise actions against companies in US courts

The US court decision came as a bombshell. Corporate liability is not recognised under international law and therefore multinational corporations are no longer susceptible to human rights claims filed by victims living outside US borders.

The September ruling by the US court of appeals for the second circuit in Kiobel v Royal Dutch Shell reverses nearly two decades of case law premised on a 200-year-old statute, the Alien Tort Claims Act, establishing jurisdiction for torts “committed in violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the United States”. The second circuit is one of 11 US appeals courts, covering cases in Connecticut, New York and Vermont.

The decision was a complete surprise to human rights campaigners who had used the law as a pass-through mechanism linking the US judicial system to a limited set of human rights claims involving violations of international norms that are “specific, universal and obligatory”.

In these cases, mere corporate presence in a zone of abuses is not enough to establish liability, says Beth van Schaack, an associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law specialising in human rights law. Barring direct responsibility linked to employment status, van Schaack says, one needs to show “both that there’s been material and substantial support of the violations and that the corporation knew that its support would further those violations”.

The court’s rationale rests heavily on the notion that “no international tribunal has ever held a corporation liable for a violation of the law of nations”.

“Part of the problem is that human rights treaties are not drafted with corporations in mind,” says van Schaack. International law has traditionally addressed state actors and individuals as the perpetrators of such crimes – not “juridical” persons such as corporations.

Previously powerful

Application of the alien tort statute (ATS) to corporations first passed muster in a 2001 ruling in which Unocal was found complicit in the Burmese military’s use of violence and intimidation to relocate and force villagers to work on a pipeline project.

“There are lots of cases where courts have allowed ATS claims to proceed forward, and the main reason is that lawyers didn’t make the right argument,” says Joe Cyr, an attorney with the law firm Hogan Lovells.

“Campaigners may wish the 200 sovereign states on this planet uniformly accept and adopt the idea that international law recognises corporate liability but it’s not true,” Cyr says. “They don’t.”

But if parties to corporate alien tort cases feel they’re now on the defensive, the game isn’t quite yet over.

As circuit judge Pierre N Leval observes, it can also be argued that no international tribunal has ever held that a corporation could not be liable for a violation of the law of nations, an inverse reasoning based on the logical extension of existing norms.

Motions to dismiss ATS claims are expected and since the US supreme court has declined to hear the Kiobel case on appeal, attorneys are now bracing for a long fight ahead.

Van Schaack points out that judges in the other regional circuits are not bound by the second circuit ruling. “Many of the multinational corporations that have been subject to suit are subject to jurisdiction all over the country,” he says. “But it will be authoritative and it will be read very carefully by judges.”

See p39 for more analysis of this decision.

“According to the rule my colleagues have created, one who earns profits by commercial exploitation of abuse of fundamental human rights can successfully shield those profits from victims’ claims for compensation simply by taking the precaution of conducting the heinous operation in the corporate form,” Leval declares.

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Google Sues Interior Department Over Email Contract | View Clip
11/01/2010
Wall Street Journal

...company's "cloud computing" service costs $50 per user per year, while Microsoft recently launched its own cloud-computing Office service for as little as $2 per user per month. "Google rarely goes on the offensive in court," said Eric Goldman, professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. "It's suing the Department of the Interior as a proxy in its battle against Microsoft." According to the complaint, DOI officials told Google they were committed to an open competition for the contract even...

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Google Sues U.S. For Favoring Microsoft Over Google Apps | View Clip
11/01/2010
SmartMoney - Online

Of DOW JONES NEWSWIRES

SAN FRANCISCO (DOW JONES)--Google Inc. (GOOG) is suing the U.S. Department of the Interior, alleging the agency wrote procurement requirements for a messaging contract to favor rival Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) over its own Google Apps.

The suit, filed Friday in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, claims the agency's request for quotations for an e-mail and collaboration service was written to exclude Google by specifically stating the solution had to be part of the Microsoft Business Productivity Online Suite.

Interior's decision to only consider Microsoft's productivity suite is "unduly restrictive of competition," and is "arbitrary and capricious, and abuse of discretion, and otherwise contrary to the law," said Google in its claim.

Google's lawsuit, part of the company's ongoing battle with Microsoft, turns the table on the U.S. government, which has stepped up its scrutiny and probes of the Mountain View, Calif.-based search giant in recent months.

"Google rarely goes on the offensive in court," said Eric Goldman, professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. "It's suing the Department of the Interior as a proxy in its battle against Microsoft."

The U.S agency is looking for a hosted email and collaboration solution for its 88,000 users.

Google and Microsoft were not immediately available for comment.

-By Scott Morrison; Dow Jones Newswires; 415-765-6118; scott.morrison@dowjones.com

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Google Sues U.S. For Favoring Microsoft Over Google Apps | View Clip
11/01/2010
NASDAQ

SAN FRANCISCO (DOW JONES)--Google Inc. (GOOG) is suing the U.S. Department of the Interior, alleging the agency wrote procurement requirements for a messaging contract to favor rival Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) over its own Google Apps.

The suit, filed Friday in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, claims the agency's request for quotations for an e-mail and collaboration service was written to exclude Google by specifically stating the solution had to be part of the Microsoft Business Productivity Online Suite.

Interior's decision to only consider Microsoft's productivity suite is "unduly restrictive of competition," and is "arbitrary and capricious, and abuse of discretion, and otherwise contrary to the law," said Google in its claim.

Google's lawsuit, part of the company's ongoing battle with Microsoft, turns the table on the U.S. government, which has stepped up its scrutiny and probes of the Mountain View, Calif.-based search giant in recent months.

"Google rarely goes on the offensive in court," said Eric Goldman, professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. "It's suing the Department of the Interior as a proxy in its battle against Microsoft."

The U.S agency is looking for a hosted email and collaboration solution for its 88,000 users.

Google and Microsoft were not immediately available for comment.

-By Scott Morrison; Dow Jones Newswires; 415-765-6118; scott.morrison@ dowjones.com

(END) Dow Jones Newswires 11-01-101528ET Copyright (c) 2010 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.

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Google Sues U.S. For Favoring Microsoft Over Google Apps | View Clip
11/01/2010
ADVFN India

SAN FRANCISCO (DOW JONES)--Google Inc. (GOOG) is suing the U.S. Department of the Interior, alleging the agency wrote procurement requirements for a messaging contract to favor rival Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) over its own Google Apps.

The suit, filed Friday in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, claims the agency's request for quotations for an e-mail and collaboration service was written to exclude Google by specifically stating the solution had to be part of the Microsoft Business Productivity Online Suite.

Interior's decision to only consider Microsoft's productivity suite is "unduly restrictive of competition," and is "arbitrary and capricious, and abuse of discretion, and otherwise contrary to the law," said Google in its claim.

Google's lawsuit, part of the company's ongoing battle with Microsoft, turns the table on the U.S. government, which has stepped up its scrutiny and probes of the Mountain View, Calif.-based search giant in recent months.

"Google rarely goes on the offensive in court," said Eric Goldman, professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. "It's suing the Department of the Interior as a proxy in its battle against Microsoft."

The U.S agency is looking for a hosted email and collaboration solution for its 88,000 users.

Google and Microsoft were not immediately available for comment.

-By Scott Morrison; Dow Jones Newswires; 415-765-6118; scott.morrison@dowjones.com

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Google Sues U.S. For Favoring Microsoft Over Google Apps | View Clip
11/01/2010
NASDAQ

GOOG

Google Inc. NASDAQ-GS

SAN FRANCISCO (DOW JONES)--Google Inc. (GOOG) is suing the U.S. Department of the Interior, alleging the agency wrote procurement requirements for a messaging contract to favor rival Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) over its own Google Apps.

The suit, filed Friday in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, claims the agency's request for quotations for an e-mail and collaboration service was written to exclude Google by specifically stating the solution had to be part of the Microsoft Business Productivity Online Suite.

Interior's decision to only consider Microsoft's productivity suite is "unduly restrictive of competition," and is "arbitrary and capricious, and abuse of discretion, and otherwise contrary to the law," said Google in its claim.

Google's lawsuit, part of the company's ongoing battle with Microsoft, turns the table on the U.S. government, which has stepped up its scrutiny and probes of the Mountain View, Calif.-based search giant in recent months.

"Google rarely goes on the offensive in court," said Eric Goldman, professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. "It's suing the Department of the Interior as a proxy in its battle against Microsoft."

The U.S agency is looking for a hosted email and collaboration solution for its 88,000 users.

Google and Microsoft were not immediately available for comment.

-By Scott Morrison; Dow Jones Newswires; 415-765-6118; scott.morrison@ dowjones.com

(END) Dow Jones Newswires
11-01-101528ET
Copyright (c) 2010 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.

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Google Sues U.S. For Favoring Microsoft Over Google Apps | View Clip
11/01/2010
Capital.gr

SAN FRANCISCO (DOW JONES)--Google Inc. (GOOG) is suing the U.S. Department of the Interior, alleging the agency wrote procurement requirements for a messaging contract to favor rival Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) over its own Google Apps.

The suit, filed Friday in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, claims the agency's request for quotations for an e-mail and collaboration service was written to exclude Google by specifically stating the solution had to be part of the Microsoft Business Productivity Online Suite. Interior's decision to only consider Microsoft's productivity suite is "unduly restrictive of competition," and is "arbitrary and capricious, and abuse of discretion, and otherwise contrary to the law," said Google in its claim. Google's lawsuit, part of the company's ongoing battle with Microsoft, turns the table on the U.S. government, which has stepped up its scrutiny and probes of the Mountain View, Calif.-based search giant in recent months. "Google rarely goes on the offensive in court," said Eric Goldman, professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. "It's suing the Department of the Interior as a proxy in its battle against Microsoft." The U.S agency is looking for a hosted email and collaboration solution for its 88,000 users.

Google and Microsoft were not immediately available for comment.

-By Scott Morrison; Dow Jones Newswires; 415-765-6118; scott.morrison@dowjones.com

(END) Dow Jones Newswires

November 01, 2010 15:28 ET (19:28 GMT)

Copyright (c) 2010 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.

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Google Sues Uncle Sam | View Clip
11/01/2010
CBSNews.com

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Google and the U.S. government are headed for a legal showdown, but on different sides of the courtroom than one might expect.

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(Credit: AP)

Eric Goldman, a law professor with Santa Clara University who closely follows the tech industry, spotted a lawsuit filed by Google against the federal government claiming that the U.S. Department of the Interior did not properly evaluate Google Apps when choosing a new Web-based document system. Google alleges that because the DOI specified that the system needed to be part of Microsoft's Business Productivity Online Suite, Google Apps never had a chance despite repeated attempts by Google to explain the product.

"Significantly, the SOW (statement of work) and even certain terminology were closely aligned with Microsoft's product literature for its Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, and Office Communications Online applications. This was because the DOI had defined its needs and requirements around the Microsoft products," Google wrote in its complaint.

Google didn't immediately respond to a request for more information on its suit. Government agencies generally have to follow a complicated process in order to purchase products or services from technology companies, and Google has increasingly sought to position itself as an alternative to Microsoft's office software in companies and governments.

And, of course, the federal government and Google are no strangers when it comes to legal maneuverings. The most current dispute involves Google's proposed acquisition of ITA Software, but the list stretches back several years.

A copy of the complaint follows below:

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Howard Charney; entrepreneur, innovator, IT pace setter | View Clip
11/01/2010
Smartbiz Africa

Seated on a podium among other IT enthusiasts, Howard Charney strikes you as stern entrepreneur with an eye for all things technology.

The neither tall nor short Charney has a lean frame and his graying hair and receding hairline are only symbolic of many years of hard acquired knowledge and self taught business skills.

The engineer turned lawyer turned IT entrepreneur who has been described as a serial entrepreneur is a senior vice president at Cisco Systems Inc and sits on the boards of several technology companies and on the advisory board for the Center for Science, Technology and Society at Santa Clara University.

When he stands up to address a room of IT based entrepreneurs and ICT journalists in Nairobi, the atmosphere suddenly gets heavy with expectations of a long and technical speech but it turns out that this man is quite an orator. A few seconds into his speech and he transforms the mood of the event and the dull audience becomes alert as he tells on a rather light note the story of his ascent to the top of the IT world.

Charney recalls how he went to college and studied engineering after which he began working at IBM. It was not long before the youthful man decided that law was a career he wanted to venture into. He therefore quit what some would consider a dream job and enrolled in college to study law.

He successfully completed law school and was admitted to the bar. This saw the beginning of his career as a patents lawyer. The general expectation was that after so many years in college and with two degrees in careers seen as very lucrative he would now settle into his new profession and make a lot of money. In a rather funny twist of events he decided to leave writing patents.

He tells the story of how he sat in his office one day, writing a patent for a lifting machine that had been invented by a plumber who had hurt his back while lifting a toilet bowl off the floor. Charney says that he thought that maybe he too should be inventing rather than writing patents for inventions.

When all this was going through his mind, he received a call from his fraternity brother, Robert Metcalfe, asking him if they could start a company. Together with Bruce Borden and Greg Shaw, they co-founded 3Com – a company whose main focus was on Computers, Communication and Compatibility. 3Com became a leader in computer networking systems and after ten years in the company Charney decided to leave.

“It was not fun anymore!” he says.

After leaving 3Com, he talked to his friend Metcalfe and told him that he intended to start a company. Metcalfe advised him to seriously think through what the company would do.

So Charney got together a group of friends and as they sat around his kitchen table, one of them suggested that they could make Ethernet faster. They settled on making Ethernet ten times faster. They had a hook, which is what he describes as a really big idea that could change people's lives.

Grand Junction Networks was the name they run their company under. By 1995, the company had grown and the market for its products was exploding. Its projected annual revenues were nearly $32 million, more than four times as much as the year before. The company had also moved from a warehouse to a respectable building in Fremont. At around the same time Cisco started looking into Grand Junctions as they were missing low-end, fast Ethernet switching products. Cisco then acquired the company and Howard joined them as a Cisco senior vice president.

Charney admits that creating a company was a lot harder than being a lawyer or going to work daily. His advice to anyone willing to start one is that they should be smart, have a goal, be ready to take risks and surround themselves with other smart people. He especially emphasizes on going into business with smart people and even with those who are brilliant than one's self.

“Smart people take risks,” he says. “If you can't take a risk then there's no upside to it,” he adds.

He is also a firm believer in giving back to the community and says that you have to give it out to get it.

His parting shot, the next ten to twenty years will be a golden age for IT and the internet worldwide then after that nobody knows what the next big thing will be. The good news, he adds, is that IT and the internet are here to stay and grow for the next ten to twenty years so entrepreneurs had better make the best out of that period.

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Jackson learns PI lesson | View Clip
11/01/2010
Morgan Hill Times

More Letters: City needs a change, vote for College, Schmidt and Mounteer

Letters: Time for new blood on the council

> SCHOOLS

From left, Jessica Bush, Angelica Rojas and Yoali Diaz work out a solution to their fifth grade homework during the Homework Club at Jackson Elementary School Thursday.

A lot has changed at Jackson Elementary since Sept. 14, the day principal Garry Dudley resigned. The year five Program Improvement school has had a leadership overhaul: new interim principal, new team of Program Improvement specialists, new oversight committee, new curriculum strategies, new after-school programs and new weekly collaboration meetings for teachers.

Some parents have said the school even "feels different."

A big, bright yellow change is the single school bus that waits at the curb in front of Jackson an hour after school lets out for the 80 or so fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders who pack the library for the revamped homework club. The presence of the bus is new.

Many questions went unanswered at Jackson as it progressed from its first year in Program Improvement, the year before Dudley was hired, into year two, three, four and now five. Dudley resigned 11 days after a Sept. 3 story in the Times reported 18 complaints were filed against Dudley in the past two years ranging from sexual harassment to verbal abuse of students. Eleven of those claims were found - after investigation by the Morgan Hill Unified School District - to be true either in part, or totally.

Now, being pro-active is the consistent answer to Jackson's PI problem.

An "alternative governance" team was formed just before Dudley resigned with Ernie Zermeno, Gilroy High School's former principal, as the leader of the PI team. He communicates between the district office and Jackson and is helping the staff facilitate change ensuring the Single Plan for Student Achievement is carried out.

Jackson's structure and behind-the-scenes approach has also been readjusted with interim principal Ray Jimenez a refreshing addition to the principal's office, teachers say; the district is searching for a permanent replacement planned for 2011. All kindergarten through sixth-grade teachers meet after school each Monday for staff development with two more Jackson additions - Honey Berg and Miguel Montes - spearheading new teaching tactics.

Berg is a former assistant superintendent of education services at Berryessa Union School District, principal and adjunct professor at Santa Clara University and San Jose State University. She is using her expertise as a consultant to provide curriculum development. Montes is a retired school administrator from Alisal Unified School District who is working with teachers to look at student data and translating it into how to best teach students who need the most help. Title 1 and American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds are being used to pay for the stipends for Zermeno, Berg and Montes.

"The staff is very busily engaged," Jackson fourth/fifth-grade combination teacher Jocelyn Knapp said from Jackson's library last Wednesday. Homework club students were filtering out of the library to go home just before 3:30 p.m. It's been a full house at Jackson since September.

"Jackson is acting as a pilot in many ways for the district to see if these methods work," she said.

While Jackson was teetering in the balances the last four years - its test scores repeatedly not improving enough to move the school out of Program Improvement - P.A. Walsh is being treated how Jackson should have been treated, Morgan Hill Unified school board members said at a Sept. 28 meeting.

"We missed that step. Jackson did not get this," Trustee Don Moody said.

Walsh moved into PI year four this year and has since been implementing a detailed plan devised by the district office and Walsh staff to restructure the school. Now, teachers from Walsh are visiting to observe Jackson. Collaboration among schools has been the new mantra at Morgan Hill Unified since Superintendent Wes Smith started last year.

Evidence of collaborative progress at Jackson, Knapp said, was when two-thirds of the Jackson staff met voluntarily at the school for four hours on a Saturday to work on staff development.

"I have seen the changes at Jackson and they're exhilarating," said Cindy D'Angelo, a third-grade teacher. The students who can statistically account for why Jackson is still in Program Improvement, English language learners, are now in hyper-focused groups that target their language development for one hour every day.

"These kids are so successful. They have confidence like I've not seen before. It is just so fulfilling that we are meeting the needs of our kids," D'Angelo said.

New to every classroom are large posters with "I Can" statements that describe what techniques students have achieved, such as "I can identify a helping verb." The idea came from Zermeno, and will identify which students have mastered the statement, making the goal more student-friendly and visual.

"The idea is to make the students aware of it. We're focused clearly on what we should be teaching and why, instead of being text-book driven," Knapp said.

Jackson is piloting LitConn, a program for English intervention, and aligning curriculum with California standards: what every child should know before entering the next grade. Teachers from every grade are involved in the collaboration meetings so there is no overlap of what students should have in their "tool box," D'Angelo said. Public presentations by Jackson staff will become commonplace, as will visits by the oversight committee that will visit the campus and give quarterly reports at school board meetings.

How Jackson got mixed in as a PI school is based on requirements of No Child Left Behind and Adequate Yearly Progress, which determines if a school has enough students who tested proficient on state tests. If a school does not, it's susceptible to entering Program Improvement, requiring the school to follow certain rules set by the district and county.

If a school can show "significant" double-digit improvement of 10 percent growth or more over two consecutive years and every subgroup tests proficient it can move to "safe harbor" and out of PI. El Toro Elementary did exactly that this year by increasing its test scores by 33 points. If students again make improvements next year, the school will leave PI altogether.

San Martin/Gwinn did better this year by 27 points and P.A. Walsh made a small jump by 11 points, though neither school improved enough to move into safe harbor. Jackson was the only school to regress, sliding 24 points.

Jackson isn't alone. It is one of 16 schools in Santa Clara County in PI year five. Since there is no PI six or seven, eight, et cetera, some schools - mostly elementary - are stuck in PI year five for more than a single year.

The expectation of No Child Left Behind that all children test proficient or better by 2014 has been criticized by Smith and other district staff who have said its expectations are impossible. President Barack Obama and his administration have proposed relaxing NCLB, though nothing concrete has been changed or enacted. Obama's proposal would remove the AYP measure altogether, eliminate the 2014 deadline and stretch it to 2020.

Lindsay Bryant

Lindsay Bryant is a reporter for South Valley Newspapers.

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Man bites dog? Google sues the government | View Clip
11/01/2010
CNET News.com

Google and the U.S. government are headed for a legal showdown, but on different sides of the courtroom than one might expect.

Eric Goldman, a law professor with Santa Clara University who closely follows the tech industry, filed by Google against the federal government claiming that the U.S. did not properly evaluate Google Apps when choosing a new Web-based document system. Google alleges that because the Interior Department specified that the system needed to be part of Microsoft's Business Productivity Online Suite, Google Apps never had a chance despite repeated attempts by Google to explain the product.

"Significantly, the SOW (statement of work) and even certain terminology were closely aligned with Microsoft's product literature for its Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, and Office Communications Online applications. This was because the DOI had defined its needs and requirements around the Microsoft products," Google wrote in its complaint.

Google didn't immediately respond to a request for more information on its suit. Government agencies generally have to follow a complicated process to purchase products or services from technology companies, and as an alternative to Microsoft's office software in companies and governments.

And, of course, the federal government and Google are no strangers when it comes to legal maneuverings. The most current dispute involves , but the . A copy of the complaint follows below:

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Man bites dog? Google sues the government | View Clip
11/01/2010
CNET.com - New York Bureau

Google and the U.S. government are headed for a legal showdown, but on different sides of the courtroom than one might expect.

Eric Goldman, a law professor with Santa Clara University who closely follows the tech industry, spotted a lawsuit filed by Google against the federal government claiming that the U.S. Department of the Interior did not properly evaluate Google Apps when choosing a new Web-based document system. Google alleges that because the Interior Department specified that the system needed to be part of Microsoft's Business Productivity Online Suite, Google Apps never had a chance despite repeated attempts by Google to explain the product.

"Significantly, the SOW (statement of work) and even certain terminology were closely aligned with Microsoft's product literature for its Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, and Office Communications Online applications. This was because the DOI had defined its needs and requirements around the Microsoft products," Google wrote in its complaint.

Google didn't immediately respond to a request for more information on its suit. Government agencies generally have to follow a complicated process to purchase products or services from technology companies, and Google has increasingly sought to position itself as an alternative to Microsoft's office software in companies and governments.

And, of course, the federal government and Google are no strangers when it comes to legal maneuverings. The most current dispute involves Google's proposed acquisition of ITA Software, but the list stretches back several years.

A copy of the complaint follows below:

Tom Krazit

Tom Krazit writes about the ever-expanding world of Google, as the most prominent company on the Internet defends its search juggernaut while expanding into nearly anything it thinks possible. He has previously written about Apple, the traditional PC industry, and chip companies. .

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Michelle Obama: America's Got Talent | View Clip
11/01/2010
Harper's Bazaar

A Santa Clara University student and alumni were photographed with First Lady Michelle Obama.

Michelle Obama has often joked that she, President Obama, and their two daughters, Sasha and Malia, “live above the store.” But one could also compare the White House to a beehive where, upon Mrs. Obama's encouragement, young creative talents are invited to cross-pollinate on the East Room stage. She loves to invite an audience of old-school Washingtonians (or “muckety-mucks”) to see a performance by jazz singer Esperanza Spalding or a cello recital by Alisa Weilerstein. This evening, she is hosting the first-ever White House Dance Series, so the White House Entrance Hall is a scene of controlled chaos. A young Billy Elliot is chirping, “I'm free!” in one corner, while the Bhangra Empire dance troupe does traditional poses in the other. A tour group shuffles by, mouths agape.

“This morning, I was thinking, Is that the radio?” Mrs. Obama says of the din. “Then I thought, Oh, that's right, we have the music series going on downstairs.”

The first lady is sitting in the Red Room of the White House, a vibrant gem filled with gold-framed portraits, traditional landscapes, and historic furniture maintained by glove-wearing staff. (The Obamas have infused their private residence with contemporary art: Edward Ruscha, Glenn Ligon, Susan Rothenberg. “It tells, I think, a broader story of who we are,” she explains.) She is wearing a raspberry-colored L'Wren Scott sheath that fits her like an inaugural glove and a pair of bright-blue kitten heels. “Well,” she notes, “you got to get a color pop.”

It was the arts that popped for the young Michelle Robinson when she was growing up in Chicago. “I was fortunate to grow up in a family that appreciates music,” she observes. “My maternal grandfather, we called him South Side, was a big jazz-music collector. He would play jazz 24 hours a day. As my mother said, when she was growing up, ‘You learn to sleep through jazz.' He had speakers in every room in his house—including the bathroom.” It was South Side who gave Michelle her first album, Stevie Wonder's Talking Book.

At school, she performed herself once. “I remember very early on being the good fairy in Hansel and Gretel and having to sing a solo, which was humiliating.” In a fairy outfit? “Yes, it was a little tutu fairy costume, and I liked it because of the costume.” (Now, at least, Mrs. Obama's best-dressed status has a basis in history.) “Oh, and my brother,” she says, laughing, “was Hansel.”

But Mrs. Obama still found her voice. “We accessed culture in Chicago, which is one of the premier cities in the country for the arts.” Visual art is also in her blood. “My father was an artist. He sculpted and painted and spent time at the Art Institute of Chicago,” she remembers. (Fraser Robinson III died of complications from multiple sclerosis in 1991.) “Before he got really sick and had to work and raise us, he probably, if he had his choice, would have been an artist.”

It is more than 20 years since Mrs. Obama's father last painted, 19 months since Stevie Wonder gave a private concert at the White House, and five since Sir Paul McCartney thrilled her by serenading her with “Michelle.” But under Mrs. Obama's watch, the White House is less an ivory tower than an open door. “We want to lift young people up,” she argues. “The country needs to be mindful that we have all these diamonds out there, and it would be a shame not to invest in those talents.”

It's more than an investment; Mrs. Obama has the rare power to make careers. “It is powerful to see a Jason Yoder [a teenage percussionist], who is adorable. I first saw him in Pittsburgh at the first G-20 Summit that we hosted. Jason played this amazing duet with Yo-Yo Ma—breathtaking. To see all of the spouses of the world leaders just sitting in awe and tearing up over this display in a public school in America, it was pretty powerful.”
ot to mention the diplomatic power of performance. “That's the beauty of arts and culture, music and dance,” Mrs. Obama says. “It's a universal voice. When I travel to other countries, usually the first thing the spouses do is introduce you to their cultures through music and dance. [French first lady] Carla Bruni-Sarkozy is a musician. We gave her a Gibson guitar. When I came to visit, she pulled it out and played the most beautiful song. We were sitting there with family, and we started singing.” When Mrs. Obama met the Russian first lady, Svetlana Medvedeva, last year, “She took me and my girls to see beautiful Russian folk dancing, and although we didn't speak the same language, we instantly connected.” One of Mrs. Obama's priorities is to create an exchange between Russian arts students and kids from the Duke Ellington School of the Arts. “Mrs. Medvedeva grasped the significance of what arts and music and song can mean to international relations.”

One of the privileges of being a presidential spouse is “almost everything is accessible. That's the beauty of this position,” Mrs. Obama says. Next up, Motown, opera, classical music, “because I also think about this in terms of my children. I don't want them to develop just one taste. I want them to feel the power in country as much as they feel it in Justin Bieber.” But there is power in the Bieber. “There is some power in the Bieber! But we don't have Fever,” she chuckles. “But when Paul McCartney was here singing ‘Michelle,' I was like, I'm done; I can go home now.”

Nobody says no to an invitation to the Obamas' house. “Pretty much,” Mrs. Obama says, “pretty much.” She imagines what her young guests think when they enter the White House: “‘I can't believe I'm here.' And sometimes I think that. I still think that.” She pauses, listening to the buzz outside the door. “If you can walk into the White House and come up to the first lady and introduce yourself, if you can perform in front of the president of the United States in the East Room, there is nothing that you can't do.” She smiles. “End of story.”

Not to mention the diplomatic power of performance. “That's the beauty of arts and culture, music and dance,” Mrs. Obama says. “It's a universal voice. When I travel to other countries, usually the first thing the spouses do is introduce you to their cultures through music and dance. [French first lady] Carla Bruni-Sarkozy is a musician. We gave her a Gibson guitar. When I came to visit, she pulled it out and played the most beautiful song. We were sitting there with family, and we started singing.” When Mrs. Obama met the Russian first lady, Svetlana Medvedeva, last year, “She took me and my girls to see beautiful Russian folk dancing, and although we didn't speak the same language, we instantly connected.” One of Mrs. Obama's priorities is to create an exchange between Russian arts students and kids from the Duke Ellington School of the Arts. “Mrs. Medvedeva grasped the significance of what arts and music and song can mean to international relations.”

One of the privileges of being a presidential spouse is “almost everything is accessible. That's the beauty of this position,” Mrs. Obama says. Next up, Motown, opera, classical music, “because I also think about this in terms of my children. I don't want them to develop just one taste. I want them to feel the power in country as much as they feel it in Justin Bieber.” But there is power in the Bieber. “There is some power in the Bieber! But we don't have Fever,” she chuckles. “But when Paul McCartney was here singing ‘Michelle,' I was like, I'm done; I can go home now.”

Nobody says no to an invitation to the Obamas' house. “Pretty much,” Mrs. Obama says, “pretty much.” She imagines what her young guests think when they enter the White House: “‘I can't believe I'm here.' And sometimes I think that. I still think that.” She pauses, listening to the buzz outside the door. “If you can walk into the White House and come up to the first lady and introduce yourself, if you can perform in front of the president of the United States in the East Room, there is nothing that you can't do.” She smiles. “End of story.”

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Oracle finally gets SAP to trial, and maybe HP CEO | View Clip
11/01/2010
International Business Times

Three of the world's most powerful technology companies are enmeshed in a jury trial kicking off on Monday that could make for some of the best theater Silicon Valley has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software giant

Oracle Corp , has waited 2-1/2 years to bring arch rival SAP AG to court on charges that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

Oracle has also attacked Hewlett-Packard Co HPQ.N> for naming SAP's former CEO Leo Apotheker as its CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO,

Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

THE CASE

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to a jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome since both SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a write-down for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of the shares of either Oracle or SAP.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Larry Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sail boats and cars.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who is due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is only calling him to harass him and interfere with his duties in his new post.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott and Oracle President Safra Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

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Oracle Finally Gets SAP to Trial, and Maybe HP CEO | View Clip
11/01/2010
Bank Systems & Technology

Three of the world's most powerful technology companies are enmeshed in a jury trial kicking off on Monday that could make for some of the best theater Silicon Valley has seen in years.

SAN FRANCISCO — Three of the world's most powerful technology companies are enmeshed in a jury trial kicking off on Monday that could make for some of the best theater Silicon Valley has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software giant Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring arch rival SAP AG to court on charges that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

Oracle has also attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former CEO Leo Apotheker as its CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

THE CASE

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to a jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome since both SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a write-down for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of the shares of either Oracle or SAP.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Larry Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sail boats and cars.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who is due to start his new job with HP Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is only calling him to harass him and interfere with his duties in his new post.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott and Oracle President Safra Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658. (Reporting by Jim Finkle; Editing by Derek Caney)

Copyright 2010 by Reuters. All rights reserved.

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Oracle Finally Gets SAP to Trial, and Maybe HP CEO | View Clip
11/01/2010
Financial Technology Network

Three of the worlds most powerful technology companies are enmeshed in a jury trial kicking off on Monday that could make for some of the best theater Silicon Valley has seen in years. By Reuters November 01, 2010 SAN FRANCISCO ? Three of the world's most powerful technology companies are enmeshed in a jury trial kicking off on Monday that could make for some of the best theater Silicon Valley has seen in years. Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software giant Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring arch rival SAP AG to court on charges that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

Oracle has also attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former CEO Leo Apotheker as its CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

THE CASE

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to a jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome since both SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a write-down for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of the shares of either Oracle or SAP.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Larry Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sail boats and cars.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who is due to start his new job with HP Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is only calling him to harass him and interfere with his duties in his new post.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott and Oracle President Safra Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658. (Reporting by Jim Finkle; Editing by Derek Caney)

Copyright 2010 by Reuters. All rights reserved.

digg_skin = 'compact'; digg_topic = 'business_finance'; digg_title = ' '; digg_bodytext = 'Three of the worlds most powerful technology companies are enmeshed in a jury trial kicking off on Monday that could make for some of the best theater Silicon Valley has seen in years.'; Past IssuesSubscribe Past IssuesSubscribe Past IssuesSubscribe

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Oracle finally gets SAP to trial, and maybe HP CEO | View Clip
11/01/2010
Reuters - Online

* SAP has admitted to wrongdoing in software theft suit * Oracle has attacked HP after it hired former SAP exec SAN FRANCISCO, Nov 1 (Reuters) - Three of the world's most powerful technology companies are enmeshed in a jury trial kicking off on Monday that could make for some of the best theater Silicon Valley has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software giant Oracle Corp (ORCL.O: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz), has waited 2-1/2 years to bring arch rival SAP AG (SAPG.DE: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) to court on charges that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

Oracle has also attacked Hewlett-Packard Co (HPQ.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) for naming SAP's former CEO Leo Apotheker as its CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management. SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to a jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome since both SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a write-down for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of the shares of either Oracle or SAP.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Larry Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sail boats and cars. The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who is due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is only calling him to harass him and interfere with his duties in his new post.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott and Oracle President Safra Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658. (Reporting by Jim Finkle; Editing by Derek Caney)

© Thomson Reuters 2010. All rights reserved. Users may download and print extracts of content from this website for their own personal and non-commercial use only. Republication or redistribution of Thomson Reuters content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters and its logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of the Thomson Reuters group of companies around the world.

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears | View Clip
11/01/2010
EuroInvestor.co.uk

By Jim Finkle

OAKLAND, California (Reuters) - Jury selection has kicked off in a Silicon Valley legal drama that could make for some of the best theatre the technology industry has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software company Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring archrival SAP AG to court on allegations that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, on Monday, with one of Oracle's highest-ranking executives in attendance. Safra Catz, Oracle's president who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as jury selection began.

SAP Co-Chief Executive Bill McDermott has said he will be in court on Tuesday.

An SAP lawyer, Bob Mittelstaedt, expressed concerns in court because some potential jurors indicated on a questionnaire that they might not be able to be fair to a German company.

An Oracle attorney, Geoffrey Howard, voiced concern after some potential jurors disclosed negative views about Ellison, one of the highest-paid U.S. corporate executives.

Oracle has attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former chief executive, Leo Apotheker, as its own CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

THE CASE

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion (1.3 billion pounds) in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury. While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome, since SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a writedown for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of either Oracle or SAP shares.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all ... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sailboats and cars.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who was due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO McDermott and Oracle's Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

(Reporting by Jim Finkle; Editing by Derek Caney and Matthew Lewis)

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears | View Clip
11/01/2010
Interactive Investor

OAKLAND, California (Reuters) - Jury selection has kicked off in a Silicon Valley legal drama that could make for some of the best theatre the technology industry has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software company Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring archrival SAP AG to court on allegations that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, on Monday, with one of Oracle's highest-ranking executives in attendance. Safra Catz, Oracle's president who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as jury selection began.

SAP Co-Chief Executive Bill McDermott has said he will be in court on Tuesday.

An SAP lawyer, Bob Mittelstaedt, expressed concerns in court because some potential jurors indicated on a questionnaire that they might not be able to be fair to a German company.

An Oracle attorney, Geoffrey Howard, voiced concern after some potential jurors disclosed negative views about Ellison, one of the highest-paid U.S. corporate executives.

Oracle has attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former chief executive, Leo Apotheker, as its own CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor. While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management. SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion (1.3 billion pounds) in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome, since SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a writedown for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of either Oracle or SAP shares.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all ... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sailboats and cars. The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who was due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO McDermott and Oracle's Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

(Reporting by Jim Finkle; Editing by Derek Caney and Matthew Lewis)

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears | View Clip
11/01/2010
Yahoo! UK and Ireland

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software company Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring archrival SAP AG to court on allegations that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, on Monday, with one of Oracle's highest-ranking executives in attendance. Safra Catz, Oracle's president who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as jury selection began.

SAP Co-Chief Executive Bill McDermott has said he will be in court on Tuesday.

An SAP lawyer, Bob Mittelstaedt, expressed concerns in court because some potential jurors indicated on a questionnaire that they might not be able to be fair to a German company.

An Oracle attorney, Geoffrey Howard, voiced concern after some potential jurors disclosed negative views about Ellison, one of the highest-paid U.S. corporate executives.

Oracle has attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former chief executive, Leo Apotheker, as its own CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

THE CASE

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion (1.3 billion pounds) in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome, since SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a writedown for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of either Oracle or SAP shares.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all ... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sailboats and cars.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who was due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO McDermott and Oracle's Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

(Reporting by Jim Finkle; Editing by Derek Caney and Matthew Lewis)

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears, HP CEO might appear | View Clip
11/01/2010
Yahoo! News Australia

OAKLAND, California (Reuters) - Jury selection has kicked off in a Silicon Valley legal drama that could make for some of the best theater the technology industry has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software company Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring archrival SAP AG to court on allegations that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, on Monday, with one of Oracle's highest-ranking executives in attendance. Safra Catz, Oracle's president who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as jury selection began.

SAP Co-Chief Executive Bill McDermott has said he will be in court on Tuesday.

An SAP lawyer, Bob Mittelstaedt, expressed concerns in court because some potential jurors indicated on a questionnaire that they might not be able to be fair to a German company.

An Oracle attorney, Geoffrey Howard, voiced concern after some potential jurors disclosed negative views about Ellison, one of the highest-paid U.S. corporate executives.

Oracle has attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former chief executive, Leo Apotheker, as its own CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

THE CASE

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome, since SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a writedown for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of either Oracle or SAP shares.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all ... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sailboats and cars.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who was due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO McDermott and Oracle's Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears, HP CEO might appear | View Clip
11/01/2010
International Business Times

Jury selection has kicked off in a Silicon Valley legal drama that could make for some of the best theater the technology industry has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software company Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring archrival SAP AG to court on allegations that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, on Monday, with one of Oracle's highest-ranking executives in attendance. Safra Catz, Oracle's president who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as jury selection began.

SAP Co-Chief Executive Bill McDermott has said he will be in court on Tuesday.

An SAP lawyer, Bob Mittelstaedt, expressed concerns in court because some potential jurors indicated on a questionnaire that they might not be able to be fair to a German company.

An Oracle attorney, Geoffrey Howard, voiced concern after some potential jurors disclosed negative views about Ellison, one of the highest-paid U.S. corporate executives.

Oracle has attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former chief executive, Leo Apotheker, as its own CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

THE CASE

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome, since SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a writedown for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of either Oracle or SAP shares.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all ... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sailboats and cars.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who was due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO McDermott and Oracle's Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears, HP CEO might appear | View Clip
11/01/2010
CNBC - Online

OAKLAND, California (Reuters) - Jury selection has kicked off in a Silicon Valley legal drama that could make for some of the best theater the technology industry has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software company Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring archrival SAP AG to court on allegations that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, on Monday, with one of Oracle's highest-ranking executives in attendance. Safra Catz, Oracle's president who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as jury selection began.

SAP Co-Chief Executive Bill McDermott has said he will be in court on Tuesday.

An SAP lawyer, Bob Mittelstaedt, expressed concerns in court because some potential jurors indicated on a questionnaire that they might not be able to be fair to a German company.

An Oracle attorney, Geoffrey Howard, voiced concern after some potential jurors disclosed negative views about Ellison, one of the highest-paid U.S. corporate executives.

Oracle has attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former chief executive, Leo Apotheker, as its own CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

THE CASE

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome, since SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a writedown for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of either Oracle or SAP shares.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all ... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sailboats and cars.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who was due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO McDermott and Oracle's Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

(Reporting by Jim Finkle; Editing by Derek Caney and Matthew Lewis)

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears, HP CEO might appear | View Clip
11/01/2010
International Business Times UK

Jury selection has kicked off in a Silicon Valley legal drama that could make for some of the best theater the technology industry has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software company Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring archrival SAP AG to court on allegations that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, on Monday, with one of Oracle's highest-ranking executives in attendance. Safra Catz, Oracle's president who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as jury selection began.

SAP Co-Chief Executive Bill McDermott has said he will be in court on Tuesday.

An SAP lawyer, Bob Mittelstaedt, expressed concerns in court because some potential jurors indicated on a questionnaire that they might not be able to be fair to a German company.

An Oracle attorney, Geoffrey Howard, voiced concern after some potential jurors disclosed negative views about Ellison, one of the highest-paid U.S. corporate executives.

Oracle has attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former chief executive, Leo Apotheker, as its own CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

THE CASE

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome, since SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a writedown for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of either Oracle or SAP shares.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all ... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sailboats and cars.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who was due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO McDermott and Oracle's Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

(Reporting by Jim Finkle; Editing by Derek Caney and Matthew Lewis)

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight | View Clip
11/01/2010
Yahoo! News

OAKLAND, California (Reuters) A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the world's most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear on Tuesday as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG.

Attorneys from Oracle and SAP spent nearly seven hours on Monday selecting jurors and hammering out procedural rules for the five week trial. They are due to present opening arguments on Tuesday.

Larry Ellison, Oracle's co-founder and CEO, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring SAP to court on accusations that SAP's TomorrowNow subsidiary stole its software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices -- which SAP has admitted.

At issue is not whether SAP or now-defunct TomorrowNow is at fault. SAP has admitted to wrongdoing, accepted liability and shut down TomorrowNow. The two sides are fighting over the damages SAP will have to pay, anywhere from tens of millions to billions of dollars.

Also at stake is the credibility of former SAP CEO and now top Hewlett-Packard executive Leo Apotheker. SAP says Apotheker did not know of any wrongdoing initially and moved to shut TomorrowNow after he found out.

Ellison, however, has stated he has evidence Apotheker was complicit in the SAP's improper downloading of the software.

Oracle has attacked HP for naming Apotheker CEO in September. Ellison charges the German executive -- who spent just seven months as sole SAP CEO before leaving amid public criticism -- played a key role in the case. Europe's biggest software maker and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically. HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became foes following a series of executive shuffles that began in August. HP's CEO, Mark Hurd, a close friend of Ellison left HP after accusations of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. And HP hired Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison. "It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management said last week. AND WE'RE UNDERWAY The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California on Monday. Oracle's President Safra Catz, who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as the two sides selected eight jurors out of a pool of 27.

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing it believes damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars." Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While both sides will spend the next five weeks arguing over money, several analysts said the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, since they each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue. "Let's not confuse this with real money," Anderson said. CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed details about the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said on Sunday that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who began his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say on Monday night whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said other potential witnesses include former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann and current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

(Editing by Derek Caney, Matthew Lewis, Edwin Chan and Carol Bishopric)

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight | View Clip
11/01/2010
Digital Producer

OAKLAND, California (Reuters) - A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the world's most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear on Tuesday as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG.

Attorneys from Oracle and SAP spent nearly seven hours on Monday selecting jurors and hammering out procedural rules for the five week trial. They are due to present opening arguments on Tuesday.

Larry Ellison, Oracle's co-founder and CEO, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring SAP to court on accusations that SAP's TomorrowNow subsidiary stole its software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices -- which SAP has admitted.

At issue is not whether SAP or now-defunct TomorrowNow is at fault. SAP has admitted to wrongdoing, accepted liability and shut down TomorrowNow. The two sides are fighting over the damages SAP will have to pay, anywhere from tens of millions to billions of dollars.

Also at stake is the credibility of former SAP CEO and now top Hewlett-Packard executive Leo Apotheker. SAP says Apotheker did not know of any wrongdoing initially and moved to shut TomorrowNow after he found out.

Ellison, however, has stated he has evidence Apotheker was complicit in the SAP's improper downloading of the software.

Oracle has attacked HP for naming Apotheker CEO in September. Ellison charges the German executive -- who spent just seven months as sole SAP CEO before leaving amid public criticism -- played a key role in the case. Europe's biggest software maker and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became foes following a series of executive shuffles that began in August.

HP's CEO, Mark Hurd, a close friend of Ellison left HP after accusations of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. And HP hired Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management said last week.

AND WE'RE UNDERWAY

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California on Monday. Oracle's President Safra Catz, who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as the two sides selected eight jurors out of a pool of 27.

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing it believes damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While both sides will spend the next five weeks arguing over money, several analysts said the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, since they each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money," Anderson said.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed details about the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said on Sunday that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who began his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say on Monday night whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said other potential witnesses include former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann and current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

(Editing by Derek Caney, Matthew Lewis, Edwin Chan and Carol Bishopric)

(c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2010. Check for restrictions at: http://about.reuters.com/fulllegal.asp

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight | View Clip
11/01/2010
MSN Money (US)

10:06 PM ET

By By Jim Finkle

OAKLAND, California (Reuters) - A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the world's most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear on Tuesday as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG.

Attorneys from Oracle and SAP spent nearly seven hours on Monday selecting jurors and hammering out procedural rules for the five week trial. They are due to present opening arguments on Tuesday.

Larry Ellison, Oracle's co-founder and CEO, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring SAP to court on accusations that SAP's TomorrowNow subsidiary stole its software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices -- which SAP has admitted.

At issue is not whether SAP or now-defunct TomorrowNow is at fault. SAP has admitted to wrongdoing, accepted liability and shut down TomorrowNow. The two sides are fighting over the damages SAP will have to pay, anywhere from tens of millions to billions of dollars.

Also at stake is the credibility of former SAP CEO and now top Hewlett-Packard executive Leo Apotheker. SAP says Apotheker did not know of any wrongdoing initially and moved to shut TomorrowNow after he found out.

Ellison, however, has stated he has evidence Apotheker was complicit in the SAP's improper downloading of the software.

Oracle has attacked HP for naming Apotheker CEO in September. Ellison charges the German executive -- who spent just seven months as sole SAP CEO before leaving amid public criticism -- played a key role in the case. Europe's biggest software maker and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became foes following a series of executive shuffles that began in August.

HP's CEO, Mark Hurd, a close friend of Ellison left HP after accusations of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. And HP hired Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management said last week.

AND WE'RE UNDERWAY

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California on Monday. Oracle's President Safra Catz, who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as the two sides selected eight jurors out of a pool of 27.

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing it believes damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While both sides will spend the next five weeks arguing over money, several analysts said the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, since they each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money," Anderson said.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed details about the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said on Sunday that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who began his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say on Monday night whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said other potential witnesses include former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann and current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight | View Clip
11/01/2010
Digital Animators

OAKLAND, California (Reuters) - A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the world's most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear on Tuesday as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG.

Attorneys from Oracle and SAP spent nearly seven hours on Monday selecting jurors and hammering out procedural rules for the five week trial. They are due to present opening arguments on Tuesday.

Larry Ellison, Oracle's co-founder and CEO, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring SAP to court on accusations that SAP's TomorrowNow subsidiary stole its software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices -- which SAP has admitted.

At issue is not whether SAP or now-defunct TomorrowNow is at fault. SAP has admitted to wrongdoing, accepted liability and shut down TomorrowNow. The two sides are fighting over the damages SAP will have to pay, anywhere from tens of millions to billions of dollars.

Also at stake is the credibility of former SAP CEO and now top Hewlett-Packard executive Leo Apotheker. SAP says Apotheker did not know of any wrongdoing initially and moved to shut TomorrowNow after he found out.

Ellison, however, has stated he has evidence Apotheker was complicit in the SAP's improper downloading of the software.

Oracle has attacked HP for naming Apotheker CEO in September. Ellison charges the German executive -- who spent just seven months as sole SAP CEO before leaving amid public criticism -- played a key role in the case. Europe's biggest software maker and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became foes following a series of executive shuffles that began in August.

HP's CEO, Mark Hurd, a close friend of Ellison left HP after accusations of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. And HP hired Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management said last week.

AND WE'RE UNDERWAY

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California on Monday. Oracle's President Safra Catz, who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as the two sides selected eight jurors out of a pool of 27.

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing it believes damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While both sides will spend the next five weeks arguing over money, several analysts said the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, since they each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money," Anderson said.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed details about the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said on Sunday that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who began his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say on Monday night whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said other potential witnesses include former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann and current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

(Editing by Derek Caney, Matthew Lewis, Edwin Chan and Carol Bishopric)

(c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2010. Check for restrictions at: http://about.reuters.com/fulllegal.asp

Related Sites: Creative Mac , Digital Producer , Media Workstation , Digital Video Editing , Digital CAD , Digital Animators , Animation Artist , Audio Video Producer , Digital Game Developer , Digital Pro Sound , DV Format , Presentation Master , After Effects , PhotoShop , Vegas , Digital Intermediates , DVD Studio Pro , IBN - Storage , IBN - Networking , IBN - ProductivityApps , IBN - Security , IBN - SoftwareDev , USDailyNews , Digital Facility , VideoBasedTutorials , BN - Encoding

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO in spotlight | View Clip
11/01/2010
AnimationArtist.com

ADDEDLINK

OAKLAND, California (Reuters) - A Silicon Valley legal drama that has enmeshed three of the world's most powerful technology companies kicks into high gear on Tuesday as Oracle Corp lays out its case for seeking some $2 billion in damages from rival SAP AG.

Attorneys from Oracle and SAP spent nearly seven hours on Monday selecting jurors and hammering out procedural rules for the five week trial. They are due to present opening arguments on Tuesday.

Larry Ellison, Oracle's co-founder and CEO, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring SAP to court on accusations that SAP's TomorrowNow subsidiary stole its software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices -- which SAP has admitted.

At issue is not whether SAP or now-defunct TomorrowNow is at fault. SAP has admitted to wrongdoing, accepted liability and shut down TomorrowNow. The two sides are fighting over the damages SAP will have to pay, anywhere from tens of millions to billions of dollars.

Also at stake is the credibility of former SAP CEO and now top Hewlett-Packard executive Leo Apotheker. SAP says Apotheker did not know of any wrongdoing initially and moved to shut TomorrowNow after he found out.

Ellison, however, has stated he has evidence Apotheker was complicit in the SAP's improper downloading of the software.

Oracle has attacked HP for naming Apotheker CEO in September. Ellison charges the German executive -- who spent just seven months as sole SAP CEO before leaving amid public criticism -- played a key role in the case. Europe's biggest software maker and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became foes following a series of executive shuffles that began in August.

HP's CEO, Mark Hurd, a close friend of Ellison left HP after accusations of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. And HP hired Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management said last week.

AND WE'RE UNDERWAY

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California on Monday. Oracle's President Safra Catz, who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as the two sides selected eight jurors out of a pool of 27.

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing it believes damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While both sides will spend the next five weeks arguing over money, several analysts said the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, since they each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money," Anderson said.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed details about the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said on Sunday that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who began his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say on Monday night whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said other potential witnesses include former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann and current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

(Editing by Derek Caney, Matthew Lewis, Edwin Chan and Carol Bishopric)

(c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2010. Check for restrictions at: http://about.reuters.com/fulllegal.asp

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP CEO might appear | View Clip
11/01/2010
Yahoo! India

Enlarge Photo The headquarters of Oracle Corporation are shown in Redwood City, California February 2, 2010. REUTERS/Robert...

Jury selection has kicked off in a Silicon Valley legal drama that could make for some of the best theater the technology industry has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software company Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring archrival SAP AG to court on allegations that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, on Monday, with one of Oracle's highest-ranking executives in attendance. Safra Catz, Oracle's president who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as jury selection began.

SAP Co-Chief Executive Bill McDermott has said he will be in court on Tuesday.

An SAP lawyer, Bob Mittelstaedt, expressed concerns in court because some potential jurors indicated on a questionnaire that they might not be able to be fair to a German company.

An Oracle attorney, Geoffrey Howard, voiced concern after some potential jurors disclosed negative views about Ellison, one of the highest-paid U.S. corporate executives.

Oracle has attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former chief executive, Leo Apotheker, as its own CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

THE CASE

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome, since SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a writedown for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of either Oracle or SAP shares.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all ... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sailboats and cars.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who was due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO McDermott and Oracle's Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP exec might appear | View Clip
11/01/2010
Business Spectator, The

Published 5:41 AM, 2 Nov 2010 Last update 5:41 AM, 2 Nov 2010

OAKLAND, Calif. - Jury selection has kicked off in a Silicon Valley legal drama that could make for some of the best theatre the technology industry has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and chief executive of software company Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring archrival SAP AG to court on allegations that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, on Monday, with one of Oracle's highest-ranking executives in attendance. Safra Catz, Oracle's president who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as jury selection began.

SAP co-chief executive Bill McDermott has said he will be in court on Tuesday.

An SAP lawyer, Bob Mittelstaedt, expressed concerns in court because some potential jurors indicated on a questionnaire that they might not be able to be fair to a German company.

An Oracle attorney, Geoffrey Howard, voiced concern after some potential jurors disclosed negative views about Mr Ellison, one of the highest-paid U.S. corporate executives.

Oracle has attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former chief executive, Leo Apotheker, as its own chief executive in late September. Mr Ellison charges that Mr Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Mr Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its chief executive, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Mr Ellison. Mr Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Mr Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Mr Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Mr Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

The case

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome, since SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Mr Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a writedown for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Fort Pitt Capital analyst Kim Caughey Forrest said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of either Oracle or SAP shares.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all ... It's so Silicon Valley," Ms Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Mr Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sailboats and cars.

Criminal probe

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, Santa Clara University School of Law associate professor Eric Goldman said.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Mr Apotheker, who was due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Mr Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Mr Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP chief executive Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-chief executive McDermott and Oracle's Mr Catz.

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP exec might appear | View Clip
11/01/2010
Business Spectator

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and chief executive of software company Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring archrival SAP AG to court on allegations that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, on Monday, with one of Oracle's highest-ranking executives in attendance. Safra Catz, Oracle's president who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as jury selection began.

SAP co-chief executive Bill McDermott has said he will be in court on Tuesday.

An SAP lawyer, Bob Mittelstaedt, expressed concerns in court because some potential jurors indicated on a questionnaire that they might not be able to be fair to a German company.

An Oracle attorney, Geoffrey Howard, voiced concern after some potential jurors disclosed negative views about Mr Ellison, one of the highest-paid U.S. corporate executives.

Oracle has attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former chief executive, Leo Apotheker, as its own chief executive in late September. Mr Ellison charges that Mr Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Mr Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its chief executive, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Mr Ellison. Mr Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Mr Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Mr Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Mr Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

The case

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome, since SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Mr Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a writedown for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Fort Pitt Capital analyst Kim Caughey Forrest said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of either Oracle or SAP shares.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all ... It's so Silicon Valley," Ms Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Mr Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sailboats and cars.

Criminal probe

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, Santa Clara University School of Law associate professor Eric Goldman said.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Mr Apotheker, who was due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Mr Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Mr Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP chief executive Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-chief executive McDermott and Oracle's Mr Catz.

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Oracle-SAP testimony nears; HP exec might appear | View Clip
11/01/2010
Business Spectator

OAKLAND, Calif. - Jury selection has kicked off in a Silicon Valley legal drama that could make for some of the best theatre the technology industry has seen in years. Larry Ellison, the co-founder and chief executive of software company Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring archrival SAP AG to court on allegations that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices. The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, on Monday, with one of Oracle's highest-ranking executives in attendance. Safra Catz, Oracle's president who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as jury selection began. SAP co-chief executive Bill McDermott has said he will be in court on Tuesday. An SAP lawyer, Bob Mittelstaedt, expressed concerns in court because some potential jurors indicated on a questionnaire that they might not be able to be fair to a German company. An Oracle attorney, Geoffrey Howard, voiced concern after some potential jurors disclosed negative views about Mr Ellison, one of the highest-paid U.S. corporate executives. Oracle has attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former chief executive, Leo Apotheker, as its own chief executive in late September. Mr Ellison charges that Mr Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Mr Apotheker. HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago. They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its chief executive, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Mr Ellison. Mr Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor. Oracle then hired Mr Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Mr Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Mr Ellison. While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically. "It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management. The case SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website. That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars." Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury. While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome, since SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue. "Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Mr Anderson said. SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a writedown for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying. Fort Pitt Capital analyst Kim Caughey Forrest said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of either Oracle or SAP shares. The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said. "The drama of it all ... It's so Silicon Valley," Ms Caughey Forrest said. The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Mr Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sailboats and cars. Criminal probe The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, Santa Clara University School of Law associate professor Eric Goldman said. SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation. Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives. One potential witness of high interest is Mr Apotheker, who was due to start his new job with HP on Monday. HP has declined to say whether Mr Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties. A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Mr Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness. Oracle has said it may also call former SAP chief executive Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-chief executive McDermott and Oracle's Mr Catz.

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SAP testimony nears; HP CEO might appear - Reuters | View Clip
11/01/2010
Guardian.co.uk

* Jury selection under way in high-stakes trial * SAP has admitted to wrongdoing in software theft suit * Jury will determine damages SAP must pay Oracle * Oracle has attacked HP after it hired former SAP exec (Adds jury selection details, changes dateline from SAN FRANCISCO) By Jim Finkle OAKLAND, Calif., Nov 1 (Reuters) - Jury selection has kicked off in a Silicon Valley legal drama that could make for some of the best theater the technology industry has seen in years. Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software company Oracle Corp , has waited 2-1/2 years to bring archrival SAP AG to court on allegations that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices. The court proceedings got under way in U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, on Monday, with one of Oracle's highest-ranking executives in attendance. Safra Catz, Oracle's president who rarely appears in public, sat quietly in the gallery as jury selection began. SAP Co-Chief Executive Bill McDermott has said he will be in court on Tuesday. An SAP lawyer, Bob Mittelstaedt, expressed concerns in court because some potential jurors indicated on a questionnaire that they might not be able to be fair to a German company. An Oracle attorney, Geoffrey Howard, voiced concern after some potential jurors disclosed negative views about Ellison, one of the highest-paid U.S. corporate executives. Oracle has attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former chief executive, Leo Apotheker, as its own CEO in late September. Ellison charges that Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Apotheker. HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago. They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor. Oracle then hired Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Ellison. While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically. "It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management. THE CASE SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website. That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars." Oracle has said SAP should pay more than $2 billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to the jury. While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome, since SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue. "Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's $250 million or a $1 billion," Anderson said. SAP has already taken a $160 million provision for the case and would likely take a writedown for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying. Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of either Oracle or SAP shares. The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said. "The drama of it all ... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said. The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sailboats and cars. CRIMINAL PROBE The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation. Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives. One potential witness of high interest is Apotheker, who was due to start his new job with HP on Monday. HP has declined to say whether Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is calling him only to harass him and interfere with his new duties. A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness. Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO McDermott and Oracle's Catz. The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658. (Reporting by Jim Finkle; Editing by Derek Caney and Matthew Lewis)

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Sparks to fly in Silicon Valley's mega-trial | View Clip
11/01/2010
Financial Post - Online

Jim Finkle, Reuters · Monday, Nov. 1, 2010

SAN FRANCISCO — Three of the world's most powerful technology companies are enmeshed in a jury trial kicking off on Monday that could make for some of the best theatre Silicon Valley has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software giant Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2 years to bring arch rival SAP AG to court on charges that SAP stole Oracle's software and resold the technology at bargain-basement prices.

Oracle has also attacked Hewlett-Packard Co for naming SAP's former CEO Leo Apotheker as its CEO in late September. Mr. Ellison charges that Mr. Apotheker played a key role in the case. SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, and HP have moved quickly to defend Mr. Apotheker.

HP, the world's biggest technology company by revenue, and Oracle, the biggest independent maker of business software, were close partners until three months ago.

They became fast enemies following a series of executive shuffles that began in early August: HP fired its CEO, Mark Hurd, who is a close friend of Ellison. Mr. Hurd was accused of falsifying expense reports to hide a relationship with a female contractor.

Oracle then hired Mr. Hurd as its president. HP responded by hiring Mr. Apotheker as its chief executive, which prompted a verbal firestorm from Mr. Ellison.

While the high-tech industry is one where personal rivalries and friendships play a significant role in shaping corporate warfare, it is rare for alliances to shift so quickly and dramatically.

"It has gotten very, very personal. And it's not going to stop," said Howard Anderson, a lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

THE CASE

SAP has chosen not to contest liability in the case and has admitted to wrongdoing for improperly downloading files from an Oracle customer-service website.

That means the jury case will be limited to determining the scope of damages. SAP has said in a court filing that it believes the damages should total in the "tens of millions of dollars."

Oracle has said SAP should pay more than US$2-billion in damages and has hired David Boies, one of the top trial attorneys in the United States, to make that case to a jury.

While the two sides will spend the next four to six weeks arguing over money, several analysts said that the size of the award may not have a huge impact on either company, regardless of the outcome since both SAP and Oracle each generate billions of dollars a year in revenue.

"Let's not confuse this with real money. It doesn't matter whether it's US$250 million or a US$1 billion," Mr. Anderson said.

SAP has already taken a US$160-million provision for the case and would likely take a write-down for whatever damages it ultimately ends up paying.

Kim Caughey Forrest, an analyst with Fort Pitt Capital, said that the outcome of the trial would not influence her assessment of the value of the shares of either Oracle or SAP.

The trial will be remembered more for Oracle humiliating its rivals than whatever damages are awarded, she said.

"The drama of it all... It's so Silicon Valley," Caughey Forrest said.

The biggest celebrity witness at the trial will likely be Larry Ellison himself, the brash billionaire playboy known outside the business world for racing sail boats and cars.

CRIMINAL PROBE

The U.S. government is conducting a criminal investigation into the matter and will likely be monitoring the trial closely. That could make some executives less keen on testifying in the civil trial, said Eric Goldman, associate professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

SAP disclosed the criminal probe in July 2007. The government has not disclosed any details on the investigation.

Company spokesman Bill Wohl said that SAP had been cooperating with Department of Justice investigators. He said he was not sure whether government officials had questioned any SAP executives.

One potential witness of high interest is Mr. Apotheker, who is due to start his new job with HP on Monday.

HP has declined to say whether Mr. Apotheker will testify. The company has said it believes Oracle is only calling him to harass him and interfere with his duties in his new post.

A spokeswoman for HP declined to say whether Mr. Apotheker would be working in the Silicon Valley area during the course of the trial. That would put him within the court's jurisdiction and allow Oracle to call him as a witness.

Oracle has said it may also call former SAP CEO Henning Kagermann, current SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott and Oracle President Safra Catz.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is Oracle USA, Inc., et al. v. SAP AG, et al, 07-1658.

Return to Top



Sparks to fly in Silicon Valley's mega-trial | View Clip
11/01/2010
National Post - Online

SAN FRANCISCO — Three of the world's most powerful technology companies are enmeshed in a jury trial kicking off on Monday that could make for some of the best theatre Silicon Valley has seen in years.

Larry Ellison, the co-founder and CEO of software giant Oracle Corp, has waited 2-1/2