Santa Clara University

SCU in the News (Feb. 24, 2011- Mar. 10, 2011)

SCU in the News (Feb. 24, 2011- Mar. 10, 2011)

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Other (156)


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Other (156)
When Watching Your Investments Can Hurt You 03/10/2011 Yahoo! Finance Text View Clip
Santa Clara's increase in Asian population reflects broader trend 03/10/2011 Oroville Mercury-Register Text View Clip
Santa Clara's increase in Asian population reflects broader trend 03/10/2011 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Google Again Sued Over Gmail Content Scanning 03/10/2011 TechWeb Text View Clip
Santa Clara's increase in Asian population reflects broader trend 03/10/2011 SiliconValley.com Text View Clip
Humans originated in South Africa new gene study shows 03/09/2011 Examiner.com Text View Clip
Retroficiency: Software for Cutting the Fat Out of Retrofits 03/09/2011 Greentech Media Text View Clip
Justice Department: Speed up health care case 03/09/2011 Politico - Online Text View Clip
My letter opting out of NCLB testing 03/09/2011 DAILY KOS Text View Clip
THE FACADE of U.S. $UPREME COURT JU$TICE CLARENCE THOMAS WANTING 2 BE TRUSTED AGAIN IN JUDGING OTHER CRIMINAL MIND$ IN AMERICA ??? 03/09/2011 Boston Indpendent Media Center Text View Clip
Most Would Cross Picket Lines For the Right Job 03/09/2011 Fins Text View Clip
Santa Clara: Bomb squad at apartment complex after beakers, liquids spotted 03/09/2011 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Audit Notes: More Murdoch, Hiltzik on the Social Security Trust Fund 03/09/2011 Columbia Journalism Review - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara's increase in Asian population reflects broader trend 03/09/2011 Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara's increase in Asian population reflects broader trend 03/09/2011 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Buy low, sell smoggy. 03/08/2011 Progress Report Text View Clip
Just Because You Don't Like Something Online, Doesn't Mean We Should Blame Third Parties 03/08/2011 AltAssets.net Text View Clip
Religion and Spirituality Conference 03/08/2011 Columbia Patch Text View Clip
Have You Earned the Right to Lead? 03/08/2011 Quality Digest Text View Clip
BU Satellite Team Looking for a Few Good Engineers 03/08/2011 Boston University Law Review Text View Clip
When Murdoch wins, citizens lose 03/08/2011 Washington Post Text View Clip
Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion 03/07/2011 Whittier Daily News Text View Clip
Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion 03/07/2011 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion 03/07/2011 Contra Costa Times - Online Text View Clip
Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion 03/07/2011 Press-Telegram - Online Text View Clip
Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion 03/07/2011 Tri-Valley Herald Text
Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion 03/07/2011 San Mateo County Times Text
Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion 03/07/2011 Daily Review, The Text
Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion 03/07/2011 Oakland Tribune Text
Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion 03/07/2011 Argus, The Text
Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion 03/07/2011 Alameda Times-Star Text
IEEE Around the World 03/07/2011 Institute, The Text View Clip
Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion 03/07/2011 Contra Costa Times Text
Tips to land a small biz internship 03/07/2011 Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal - Online Text View Clip
Just Because You Don't Like Something Online, Doesn't Mean We Should Blame Third Parties 03/07/2011 Techdirt Text View Clip
When watching your investments can hurt you 03/07/2011 Stuff.co.nz - Online Text View Clip
Mistakenly Seized Sites Should Sue Government, Says Congresswoman 03/07/2011 PC World - Online Text View Clip
Concern Over Newsom's Shared Office At Founders Den 03/07/2011 Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights, The Text View Clip
Congresswoman: mistakenly seized sites should sue the government 03/07/2011 Computerworld Text View Clip
Using good judgment and making ethical decisions 03/07/2011 Examiner.com Text View Clip
Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion 03/07/2011 Campbell Reporter Text View Clip
NEW GROUP AIMS TO BRIDGE DIVIDES 03/07/2011 San Jose Mercury News Text
Concern over Newsom's shared office at Founders Den 03/06/2011 San Francisco Chronicle - Online Text View Clip
Concern over Newsom's shared office 03/06/2011 San Francisco Chronicle Text
NANCY UNGER: Wisconsin has a history of leading the nation -- for better or worse 03/06/2011 Bakersfield Californian - Online, The Text View Clip
Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion 03/06/2011 San Gabriel Valley Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Opinion: Defendants exonerated, but off-base prosecutors pay no price 03/05/2011 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Các nguyên tắc giúp bạn quản l ý tiền bạc hiệu quả 03/05/2011 Bao Moi.com Text View Clip
Three Decades of Fantasy Come True at Atlantis Fantasyworld 03/05/2011 Santa Cruz Patch Text View Clip
U.S. VOTERS ALL DESERVE 2 HAVE AN INVESTIGATION INTO FINDING OUT THE TRUTH ABOUT THIS CORRUPTED STOLEN TARP BAILOUT $$ BEING INFUSED INTO SECRET 501c4 SLU$H POLITICAL ACCOUNT$ THIS PAST ELECTION AT THE STATE FEDERAL LEVEL$... 03/05/2011 Boston Indpendent Media Center Text View Clip
Letters to the editor, March 4 03/04/2011 San Francisco Chronicle - Online Text View Clip
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 03/04/2011 San Francisco Chronicle Text
Why Warren Buffett Is a Terrible Guide for Small Investors - DailyFinance 03/04/2011 DailyFinance Text View Clip
Middle East expert says Isreal- Palestinian peace process is over 03/04/2011 Oregonian, The Text
Middle East expert says Isreal- Palestinian peace process is over 03/04/2011 OregonLive.com Text View Clip
Third time to be a charm for either Gunn or Palo Alto girls in finale 03/04/2011 Palo Alto Weekly - Online Text View Clip
The Legal Magic Bullet That Protects Twitter And Yelp | paidContent 03/04/2011 paidContent.org Text View Clip
When watching your investments can hurt you 03/04/2011 Reuters - Analysis & Opinion Text View Clip
The Legal Magic Bullet That Protects Twitter And Yelp 03/04/2011 Yahoo! Canada Text View Clip
OVERZEALOUS PROSECUTORS HURTING U.S. JUSTICE SYSTEM 03/04/2011 San Jose Mercury News Text
INTERRELIGIOUS COUNCIL TO HOST 'CONVERSATION' 03/04/2011 San Jose Mercury News Text
County names new top attorney 03/03/2011 San Mateo Daily Journal Text View Clip
47 U.S.C. §230: a 15 Year Retrospective 03/03/2011 Cooley Godward LLP Text View Clip
Five Ways to Cut the Cost of College 03/03/2011 CNBC - Online Text View Clip
Have You Earned The Right to Lead? 10 of The Biggest Mistakes Leaders Make 03/03/2011 Baret News - Online Text View Clip
2011 College and University Programs in Theater 03/03/2011 BackStage.com Text View Clip
TaxProf Blog: Cain: Advice for Same-Sex Couples Filing Their 2010 Tax Returns 03/03/2011 Tax Prof Text View Clip
The Scroller by Peter Kavanagh 03/03/2011 Catholic Register - Online Text View Clip
THE PROS SHOW HOW THEY LEARNED FROM THEIR MISTAKES 03/03/2011 Sun Sentinel Text
Two identically named day spas are sparring in court... 03/03/2011 Warren's Washington Internet Daily Text
20-YEAR-OLD SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY STUDENT YASER AFIFI ARRIVED IN SAN JOSE LAST NIGHT AFTER BEING IN WASHINGTON, DCHE'S SUING THE FBI FOR VIOLATING HIS CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS. 03/03/2011 NBC Bay Area News at 5 AM - KNTV-TV Text
Midweek briefing ... 03/02/2011 Pittsburgh Tribune-Review - Online Text View Clip
Calif. attorney general pushes to let gays marry now 03/02/2011 NorthJersey.com Text View Clip
Opinion 03/02/2011 Pittsburgh Tribune-Review - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities 03/02/2011 Contra Costa Times - Online Text View Clip
Kamala Harris asks court to let gay marriages resume 03/02/2011 Fresno Bee - Online Text View Clip
Kamala Harris asks court to let gay marriages resume 03/02/2011 Sacramento Bee, The Text
Kamala Harris asks court to let gay marriages resume 03/02/2011 Sacramento Bee - Online, The Text View Clip
Ivi Seeks To Stay Shutdown Order 03/02/2011 MediaPost.com Text View Clip
Facebook Dragged Into Spa's Trademark Dispute 03/02/2011 MediaPost.com Text View Clip
Kamala Harris asks court to let gay marriages resume 03/02/2011 American Chronicle Text View Clip
Atlantic Beach rejects inclusion in Jacksonville ethics panel and policies; Neptune Beach considering 03/02/2011 Florida Times-Union - Online Text View Clip
Nancy C. Unger: Wisconsin leads nation -- for better or worse 03/02/2011 Wisconsin State Journal Text View Clip
Chromasun helps SCU go carbon-neutral 03/02/2011 Business Review - Online Text View Clip
African American Students Recognized in District Awards Ceremony 03/02/2011 Milpitas Patch Text View Clip
This Was Printed From Silicon Valley / San Jose Business Journal 03/02/2011 Business Review - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities 03/02/2011 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Midweek briefing ... 03/02/2011 Pittsburgh Tribune-Review Text
THIS 1 % OF WEALTHY ELITE AMERICANS LOBBYISTS HUSTLED AWAY $140 BILLION IN U.S. TAX ENTITLEMENT$ WHILE THE REST OF MIDDLE~CLASS AND POORER AMERICANS CAN ALL GO ..... 03/02/2011 Boston Indpendent Media Center Text View Clip
JDHS grad places second in national poster contest 03/02/2011 Capital City Weekly - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara University Professor Named Google Science Communication Fellow 03/01/2011 EnvironmentalExpert.com Text View Clip
2011 California Lawyer Attorneys of the Year 03/01/2011 California Lawyer Text View Clip
Editor's Note 03/01/2011 California Lawyer Text View Clip
George Watkins: Palma to take SCCAL challenge 03/01/2011 Salinas Californian - Online, The Text View Clip
Have You Earned the Right to Lead? Ten Deeply Destructive Mistakes That Suggest the Answer Is No 03/01/2011 American Surveyor - Online, The Text View Clip
Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities 03/01/2011 Tri-Valley Herald Text View Clip
Governor Fights Attorney General Over Health Reform in Washington State 03/01/2011 ABC News - Online Text View Clip
Calif. attorney general asks appeals court to lift stay on same-sex marriage ruling 03/01/2011 Sacramento Bee - Online, The Text View Clip
Jerry Brown 03/01/2011 Silicon Alley Insider Text View Clip
Calif. Attorney General Asks Appeals Court to Lift Stay on Same-sex Marriage Ruling 03/01/2011 Hispanic Business - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities 03/01/2011 San Mateo County Times Text
Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities 03/01/2011 Oakland Tribune Text
Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities 03/01/2011 Daily Review, The Text
Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities 03/01/2011 Argus, The Text
Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities 03/01/2011 Alameda Times-Star Text
Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities 03/01/2011 Contra Costa Times Text
READERS' LETTERS 03/01/2011 San Jose Mercury News Text
Wisconsin: A History of Leading the Nation for Better or Worse 02/28/2011 History News Network Text View Clip
The next frontier: behavioural finance 02/28/2011 Globe and Mail - Online, The Text View Clip
Professor Statman Says 'Luck Predominates' in Investment: Video 02/28/2011 Bloomberg News - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara University Professor Named Google Science Communication Fellow 02/28/2011 Fort Worth Star-Telegram - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara University Professor Named Google Science Communication Fellow 02/28/2011 UPI.com Text View Clip
Santa Clara University Professor Named Google Science Communication Fellow 02/28/2011 Centre Daily Times - Online Text View Clip
Why Are We More Future-Focused When We Are in a Happy Mood? 02/28/2011 Science + Religion Today Text View Clip
Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? 02/27/2011 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? 02/27/2011 SiliconValley.com Text View Clip
Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? 02/27/2011 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
The pros show how they learned from their mistakes 02/27/2011 Chicago Tribune Collections Text View Clip
Telling A Lie; How Unethical? 02/27/2011 Modernghana.com Text View Clip
Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? 02/27/2011 Inland Valley Daily Bulletin - Online Text View Clip
A Companion to Early Modern Philosophy 02/27/2011 ARN - Online Text View Clip
Controversial cardinal's legacy still being written 02/27/2011 Ventura County Star - Sacramento Bureau Text
Apple's latest demand may backfire 02/27/2011 San Francisco Chronicle Text
The pros show how they learned from their mistakes 02/27/2011 Chicago Tribune Text
Nevada's budget shortfall is nothing new to lobbyist 02/27/2011 Las Vegas Review-Journal Text
DIGITAL SPIRITUALITY 02/27/2011 San Jose Mercury News Text
Upcoming Parent Ed Speaker -- Dr. Jerry Shapiro 02/26/2011 Menlo Park Patch Text View Clip
March Cultural Events; BAY AREA 02/26/2011 India Currents Text View Clip
Controversial cardinal's legacy still being written 02/26/2011 Ventura County Star - Online Text View Clip
The pros show how they learned from their mistakes 02/26/2011 Chicago Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? 02/26/2011 Tri-Valley Herald Text
Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? 02/26/2011 San Mateo County Times Text
Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? 02/26/2011 Oakland Tribune Text
Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? 02/26/2011 Daily Review, The Text
Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? 02/26/2011 Argus, The Text
Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? 02/26/2011 Alameda Times-Star Text
Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? 02/26/2011 Contra Costa Times Text
Pro Sports vs. the Web Pirates 02/25/2011 Bloomberg BusinessWeek - Online Text View Clip
Wintery Weekend Ahead 02/25/2011 MSNBC.com Text View Clip
February Snow Photos 02/25/2011 KNTV-TV - Online Text View Clip
BLOG: IP Hall of Fame inductees for 2011 announced 02/25/2011 Intellectual Asset Management Text View Clip
The mythology of a scandal 02/25/2011 philly.com Text View Clip
Georgetown Students Create Interview Question Site | Martinsville Daily 02/25/2011 Martinsville Daily Text View Clip
Humanist Community in Silicon Valley Sunday Morning Forum: The Humanism of Julia Child, America's French Chef 02/25/2011 Palo Alto Patch Text View Clip
The Scroller by Peter Kavanagh 02/24/2011 Catholic Register - Online Text View Clip
Duke CEO, IURC chief scheduled meetings 02/24/2011 Indianapolis Star - Online, The Text View Clip
ENDERS 02/24/2011 San Francisco Chronicle - Online Text View Clip
How to lower the cost of medical imaging R & D 02/24/2011 EFY Text View Clip
Snow Forecast All About Timing 02/24/2011 KNTV-TV - Online Text View Clip
Media Bloggers Association Challenges Righthaven 02/24/2011 MediaPost.com Text View Clip
THE WAY IT LOOKS FEBRUARY 5th, 1976, AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY. 02/24/2011 ABC 7 Morning News at 5 AM - KGO-TV Text
THE WAY IT LOOKS FEBRUARY 5th, 1976, AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY. 02/24/2011 ABC 7 Morning News at 6 AM - KGO-TV Text
SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, LOOK AT THE STUDENTS ENJOYING WHAT A RARE TREAT. 02/24/2011 ABC 7 Morning News at 6 AM - KGO-TV Text
SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, LOOK AT THE STUDENTS ENJOYING WHAT A RARE TREAT. 02/24/2011 ABC 7 Morning News at 5 AM - KGO-TV Text
Laughter Leads to Wise Financial Choices 02/17/2011 Wall Street Journal Text View Clip
Happy to Wait 02/11/2011 Freakonomics Text View Clip


When Watching Your Investments Can Hurt You | View Clip
03/10/2011
Yahoo! Finance

Even though he considers himself a relaxed investor, who rarely does any trading, Meir Statman usually takes a look at his investment account at Vanguard at least a few times a week. By doing so, the Glenn Klimek Professor of Finance at Santa Clara University and author of "What Investors Really Want" ignores traditional buy-and-hold wisdom, which suggests that checking up on things a couple of times a year, and rebalancing if necessary, is plenty for most investors.

The 63-year-old behavioral finance expert might sneak a peek at his portfolio if he's working and needs a break, or after he's checked his email. Like many people, he enjoys the satisfaction of seeing the little green numbers pop up when the market has done well. But he doesn't obsess about losses on down days.

"As an investor, I'm kind of like a sail boat with its sails down, bobbing with the waves and taking things as they come," he says philosophically. "A lot of people view following the market and their investments as a kind of pastime, like watching football, but don't necessarily take any action in response. And that's perfectly OK."

What's not OK is when emotional reactions to witnessing the daily market gains and losses get in the way of clear thinking, which evidence suggests happens an awful lot. During the 1980s, Statman co-authored a study that first documented the "disposition effect," a tendency for investors to take gains off the table on winning transactions too hastily and reluctance to realize losses. In 2007, a team of researchers in Israel concluded that access to market performance information increases the odds that people will follow those patterns.

Other academic research, as well as statistical data such as the flow of money in and out of mutual funds, suggests that when the market rises for awhile investors believe it will continue on an upward path and pile in. Conversely, when the market drops, they assume such negative performance will continue and stay away from the market or sell their holdings. In either case, frequent quote lookups and portfolio peeking are likely to exacerbate these emotional reactions.

Charles Rotblut, vice-president of the American Association of Individual Investors, has noticed that interest in checking portfolios appears to wax and wane with the market tides. When the market is up, traffic to the association's website spikes as investors check quotes more often and use portfolio management tools. When the market falls for an extended period, traffic to the website declines as investors take on a bunker mentality.

Despite ample evidence that many investors do the wrong thing at the wrong time, Rotblut says frequent monitoring of a portfolio is perfectly fine as long as you take steps to wring the emotion out of the process.

"If you're investing in individual stocks you need to check at least once a week because it's important to stay on top of breaking news, earnings guidance, mergers, or management changes," he says. "If you're investing in diversified mutual funds or exchange-traded funds, once a month or even once every quarter is probably enough." Rotblut, who prefers stocks of individual companies over mutual funds or ETFs, likes to check his portfolio every day because it "gives me a sense of control about things."

In an age when checking intra-day values and making trades is just a few potentially hazardous mouse clicks away, how can investors avoid the temptation to react impetuously to daily gyrations?

Rotblut advises stock investors to separate normal market fluctuations from what is going on at a company, and to discipline themselves so they can avoid reacting too hastily to either positive or negative information. "Before I buy a stock, I write down the reasons I like it, and what would make me decide to sell. When it goes down, I look at what I wrote and ask myself if the downturn is because of a fundamental change in the business or just market fallout."

He also sets downside price targets, and sticks to them. If a stock drops 10 percent from his purchase price, he'll review his original analysis of a company and determine if the reasons he bought it are still valid. If it drops 20 percent, he will assume that there is something amiss with the company that he may not be aware of and will likely sell.

Statman has a simpler solution.

"If you're tempted to do something silly, my suggestion would be to grab a piece of chocolate or go take a cold shower instead."

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Santa Clara's increase in Asian population reflects broader trend | View Clip
03/10/2011
Oroville Mercury-Register

A sign along El Camino Real in Santa Clara shows both English and Korean languages on March 9. 2011. The 2010 Census showed an increase in the Asian population for the city of Santa Clara. There has been a huge growth spurt in the past ten years as evidenced by the rise in Asian businesses along El Camino Real and new housing developments that have attracted Asian residents. (Gary Reyes /Mercury News)

At the huge Rivermark housing complex in Santa Clara, the chatter between mothers and children at the spiffy playground floats up in Japanese, Korean and Punjabi, and then echoes throughout Silicon Valley.

"I love this place," said Nida Qamar, 33, who moved from Pakistan to Santa Clara in 2007 when her husband got an engineering job nearby. "I have made so many friends, mostly Indians and Chinese. If I want to live in Silicon Valley, it has to be here and nowhere else."

The city is clean, she said, and safe.

And as the 2010 census report released this week shows, Santa Clara reflects a huge, ongoing demographic shift for the Bay Area and state.

While most valley and Peninsula towns grew at a

sluggish pace or even lost population, Santa Clara grew at a brisk 13.8 percent clip and turned a demographic corner to become a predominantly minority city. Sitting in the center of high technology, the medium-size city offered the right amenities at the right time to thousands of newcomers who don't look anything like the old-timers.

Attracted to thousands of new affordable condos and apartments, young immigrants from Korea, India, Pakistan, Taiwan, Mexico and elsewhere poured in. So did Mexican-Americans from giant San Jose next door. In Santa Clara, they could fall out of bed and be halfway to their jobs at Intel, Applied Materials and other companies in town. They soon turned tired shopping strips on El Camino Real into ethnic

restaurants, karaoke bars or taquerias.

In 2000, the population of Santa Clara hovered near 102,000, and it was roughly half white and half Asian or Hispanic.

Since then Santa Clara has grown to 116,468 people, but the mix is entirely different today.

A turning point

During the decade, the number of white people dropped by 7,400. Meanwhile, the city's population increased by about 13,700 Asians and 6,200 Latinos. Together, the two minority groups made up for Santa Clara's loss of whites and virtually all its population growth.

Asians now form Santa Clara's largest racial group, at 37.7 percent. Latinos steadily increased to 19.4 percent. The non-Hispanic white population dropped to 36.1 percent.

How did this happen?

Santa Clara had been on the path to a majority of none for two decades, but City Hall made a crucial decision at the turn of the 21st century to build more affordable homes than required. It added 5,500 new homes, far more than its medium-size neighbors and more than any town in Santa Clara County except San Jose, a city of nearly 1 million.

Rivermark was one of those new developments.

Marilyn Fernandez easily could observe this growth

and demographic shift from her perch at Santa Clara University, where she teaches sociology.

"You have to look for the amenities offered to these young people," she said. "They were looking for relatively cheap housing and job opportunity." While the city's Asian population exploded by 46.5 percent, their various national origins won't be known until the Census Bureau issues the breakdown later this year. However, it's safe to say it will be a diverse group.

Richard Wang, a 39-year-old mortgage broker, rejected Cupertino and Sunnyvale, two Asian-heavy cities where he attended school and grew up.

"I chose Santa Clara because I wanted to start my own Cupertino," Wang said.

Another place to see the Asian infusion up close is El Camino, where a new Koreatown has blossomed. Many business signs don't have English translations.

Young S. Choi, 56, has called Santa Clara home for 15 years, starting a rice bakery along El Camino, next to a karaoke club and a sushi bar.

"Eight years ago, I called my sister and said, 'Why don't you open a restaurant here?' " She did three blocks away.

Steady Latino growth

While the Asian influx has been dramatic, the Latino movement into Santa Clara has been steady.

When insurance agent Alexandra Anderson decided to become her own boss, the Mexico City-born agent put up her shingle on El Camino in 2004.

"What appealed to me, first of all, was that there was a

large Hispanic base here," she said. "I saw there was a great need for insurance services that wasn't being met." Half of her clients are working- or middle-class Latinos.

"What they're looking for is a good education for their children," Anderson said. "It always works up to that."

The Santa Clara Unified School District certainly has felt the demographic shift.

Generally, the overall student body has become less white and more Asian and Latino, and requires new sorts of attention.

Ten years ago, it had 2,971 students who needed help learning English. Today, that number is 4,739. To get the job done, the district has added almost 100 teachers trained to educate them.

Meanwhile, the city's white population has aged but not disappeared.

San Jose resident Ralph Ciarlanti, 73, has watched the demographic change through his eyes as a produce clerk in Santa Clara. For 18 years he worked at the local Cosentino's supermarket. Less than four years ago, the Super Kyo-Po market took over, and the new owners kept him on.

He's still in charge of the "American section," for vegetables, but he's getting squeezed out by the pallets of Korean pears and napa cabbage.

Most city leaders white

Politically, Santa Clara's leadership remains mostly white.

Santa Clara Councilwoman and real estate agent Lisa Gillmor has lived in Santa Clara for four generations. The reason the number of whites is dwindling in town is harder to diagnose, she said.

"I just know what I see," she said. "Baby boomers are getting older, retiring, moving out of the area and finding cheaper places to live. A younger, more urban population is moving into town with children."

"It's a numerical majority-minority, but there's more to it than numbers," said Fernandez, the Santa Clara University sociologist. "It's also about political power, wealth and all that."

Mohammed Nadeem, an Indo-American educator who narrowly lost his race for a seat on the City Council recently, said he believes minorities will start winning elections within several years.

"The people of Santa Clara are very open-minded and have big hearts," he said. "In two to four years, there will be a tremendous increase in civic engagement."

Researcher Leigh Poitinger and staff writer Lisa Fernandez contributed to this report. Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767 or jrodriguez@mercurynews.com.

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Santa Clara's increase in Asian population reflects broader trend | View Clip
03/10/2011
InsideBayArea.com

Click for larger image

Minako Kojima and her son Andrew Babrik, 7, finish soccer practice at Live Oak Park in the Rivermark neighborhood in Santa Clara on March 9, 2011. She is holding her friend's 18-month-old daughter, Yoko Asano. Kojima immigrated from Japan three years ago. The 2010 Census showed an increase in the Asian population for the city of Santa Clara. There has been a huge growth spurt in the past ten years as evidenced by the rise in Asian businesses along El Camino Real and new housing developments that have attracted Asian residents. (Gary Reyes /Mercury News)

More local statistics

At the huge Rivermark housing complex in Santa Clara, the chatter between mothers and children at the spiffy playground floats up in Japanese, Korean and Punjabi, and then echoes throughout Silicon Valley.

"I love this place," said Nida Qamar, 33, who moved from Pakistan to Santa Clara in 2007 when her husband got an engineering job nearby. "I have made so many friends, mostly Indians and Chinese. If I want to live in Silicon Valley, it has to be here and nowhere else."

The city is clean, she said, and safe.

And as the 2010 census report released this week shows, Santa Clara reflects a huge, ongoing demographic shift for the Bay Area and state.

While most valley and Peninsula towns grew at a sluggish pace or even lost population, Santa Clara grew at a brisk 13.8 percent clip and turned a demographic corner to become a predominantly minority city. Sitting in the center of high technology, the medium-size city offered the right amenities at the right time to thousands of newcomers who don't look anything like the old-timers.

Attracted to thousands of new affordable condos and apartments, young immigrants from Korea, India, Pakistan, Taiwan, Mexico and elsewhere poured in. So did Mexican-Americans from giant San Jose next door. In Santa Clara, they could fall out of bed and be halfway to their jobs at Intel, Applied Materials and other companies in town. They soon turned tired shopping strips on El Camino Real into ethnic

restaurants, karaoke bars or taquerias.

In 2000, the population of Santa Clara hovered near 102,000, and it was roughly half white and half Asian or Hispanic.

Since then Santa Clara has grown to 116,468 people, but the mix is entirely different today.

A turning point

During the decade, the number of white people dropped by 7,400. Meanwhile, the city's population increased by about 13,700 Asians and 6,200 Latinos. Together, the two minority groups made up for Santa Clara's loss of whites and virtually all its population growth.

Asians now form Santa Clara's largest racial group, at 37.7 percent. Latinos steadily increased to 19.4 percent. The non-Hispanic white population dropped to 36.1 percent.

How did this happen?

Santa Clara had been on the path to a majority of none for two decades, but City Hall made a crucial decision at the turn of the 21st century to build more affordable homes than required. It added 5,500 new homes, far more than its medium-size neighbors and more than any town in Santa Clara County except San Jose, a city of nearly 1 million.

Rivermark was one of those new developments.

Marilyn Fernandez easily could observe this growth

and demographic shift from her perch at Santa Clara University, where she teaches sociology.

"You have to look for the amenities offered to these young people," she said. "They were looking for relatively cheap housing and job opportunity." While the city's Asian population exploded by 46.5 percent, their various national origins won't be known until the Census Bureau issues the breakdown later this year. However, it's safe to say it will be a diverse group.

Richard Wang, a 39-year-old mortgage broker, rejected Cupertino and Sunnyvale, two Asian-heavy cities where he attended school and grew up.

"I chose Santa Clara because I wanted to start my own Cupertino," Wang said.

Another place to see the Asian infusion up close is El Camino, where a new Koreatown has blossomed. Many business signs don't have English translations.

Young S. Choi, 56, has called Santa Clara home for 15 years, starting a rice bakery along El Camino, next to a karaoke club and a sushi bar.

"Eight years ago, I called my sister and said, 'Why don't you open a restaurant here?' " She did three blocks away.

Steady Latino growth

While the Asian influx has been dramatic, the Latino movement into Santa Clara has been steady.

When insurance agent Alexandra Anderson decided to become her own boss, the Mexico City-born agent put up her shingle on El Camino in 2004.

"What appealed to me, first of all, was that there was a

large Hispanic base here," she said. "I saw there was a great need for insurance services that wasn't being met." Half of her clients are working- or middle-class Latinos.

"What they're looking for is a good education for their children," Anderson said. "It always works up to that."

The Santa Clara Unified School District certainly has felt the demographic shift.

Generally, the overall student body has become less white and more Asian and Latino, and requires new sorts of attention.

Ten years ago, it had 2,971 students who needed help learning English. Today, that number is 4,739. To get the job done, the district has added almost 100 teachers trained to educate them.

Meanwhile, the city's white population has aged but not disappeared.

San Jose resident Ralph Ciarlanti, 73, has watched the demographic change through his eyes as a produce clerk in Santa Clara. For 18 years he worked at the local Cosentino's supermarket. Less than four years ago, the Super Kyo-Po market took over, and the new owners kept him on.

He's still in charge of the "American section," for vegetables, but he's getting squeezed out by the pallets of Korean pears and napa cabbage.

Most city leaders white

Politically, Santa Clara's leadership remains mostly white.

Santa Clara Councilwoman and real estate agent Lisa Gillmor has lived in Santa Clara for four generations. The reason the number of whites is dwindling in town is harder to diagnose, she said.

"I just know what I see," she said. "Baby boomers are getting older, retiring, moving out of the area and finding cheaper places to live. A younger, more urban population is moving into town with children."

"It's a numerical majority-minority, but there's more to it than numbers," said Fernandez, the Santa Clara University sociologist. "It's also about political power, wealth and all that."

Mohammed Nadeem, an Indo-American educator who narrowly lost his race for a seat on the City Council recently, said he believes minorities will start winning elections within several years.

"The people of Santa Clara are very open-minded and have big hearts," he said. "In two to four years, there will be a tremendous increase in civic engagement."

Researcher Leigh Poitinger and staff writer Lisa Fernandez contributed to this report. Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767 or jrodriguez@mercurynews.com.

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Google Again Sued Over Gmail Content Scanning | View Clip
03/10/2011
TechWeb

Attorneys representing former Gmail user Kelly Michaels of Smith County, Texas, have sued Google, claiming that its Gmail service violates users' privacy by scanning e-mail messages to serve relevant ads.

This is not the first time Google has faced such a suit. Another Texas resident, Keith Dunbar,

made similar claims in November, 2010. It's an issue Google has been dealing with since Gmail was introduced in 2004.

At Google's request, the Dunbar suit has been sealed. However, in a reply filed prior to the sealing of the case, Google's attorneys provide highlighted terms of service and the company's privacy policy as exhibits to show that users are informed about how Gmail operates.

Michaels's complaint takes the novel approach of arguing that while Google asks users to accept its terms of service, the company doesn't require that users actually understand what they're agreeing to. Such comprehension is all but impossible, the complaint suggests, because terms of service documents are difficult to read, if they're read at all.

The complaint bemoans how users who wish to read Google's Terms of Service have to scroll through a small text box with something like 92 paragraphs or visit a 15-page print-friendly version. Then there's a separate Program Policy and Privacy Policy, each on different Web pages, and the Privacy Policy includes some 55 external links.

"None of the multiple pages or links provides an opportunity for a user to inquire about the meaning of any of the terms used or negotiate the addition or deletion of the terms of the documents the user is supposed to be accepting," the complaint says, as if there were any Terms of Service documents that supported the addition or deletion of specific terms. That may happen in face-to-face contract negotiation but Web contracts have traditionally been take-it-or-leave-it affairs.

The complaint goes on to observe that no less than U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts "has admitted he doesn't usually read the 'fine print' that is a condition for accessing some Web sites."

It's widely known that people don't read lengthy documents online, particularly dry legalese. There's even Internet shorthand for the phenomenon:

"TL; DR," which stands for "too long; didn't read."

Sadly for the plaintiff, there's no legal recognition of "TL; DR," even if companies like Google and Facebook

recognize the problem. Both companies have acknowledged how difficult it is to read and understand lengthy privacy and terms of service documents, and have tried to make them less impenetrable.

Readability also recently surfaced in the ongoing

legal battle between Microsoft and Apple over whether the term "App Store" can be trademarked. Microsoft argued that Apple's court filing should be rejected because it uses an impermissibly small font. However, that claim is based on specific rules for document presentation set forth by the court.

Eric Goldman, associate professor of law at Santa Clara University School of Law, characterized Dunbar v. Google last year as an "are-you-kidding-me? lawsuit" on

his blog. He considers Michaels v. Google to be essentially the same.

"Both of these lawsuits feel like they should have been brought in 2004, not 2011," he wrote in an e-mail. "There is no additional merit to arguing the user agreement was 'TL; DR.'"

Goldman says that the most interesting thing about the case is its location, the

Eastern District of Texas, a venue notorious in the past as a breeding ground for patent litigation.

"There have been some changes in patent litigation that may be reducing the amount of patent work taking place in that district," wrote Goldman. "Maybe some of those lawyers are going to repurpose into privacy plaintiff lawyers with their newly available time?"

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Santa Clara's increase in Asian population reflects broader trend | View Clip
03/10/2011
SiliconValley.com

By Joe Rodriguez and Julia Prodis Sulek

Click for larger image

Minako Kojima and her son Andrew Babrik, 7, finish soccer practice at Live Oak Park in the Rivermark neighborhood in Santa Clara on March 9, 2011. She is holding her friend's 18-month-old daughter, Yoko Asano. Kojima immigrated from Japan three years ago. The 2010 Census showed an increase in the Asian population for the city of Santa Clara. There has been a huge growth spurt in the past ten years as evidenced by the rise in Asian businesses along El Camino Real and new housing developments that have attracted Asian residents. (Gary Reyes /Mercury News)

More local statistics

At the huge Rivermark housing complex in Santa Clara, the chatter between mothers and children at the spiffy playground floats up in Japanese, Korean and Punjabi, and then echoes throughout Silicon Valley.

"I love this place," said Nida Qamar, 33, who moved from Pakistan to Santa Clara in 2007 when her husband got an engineering job nearby. "I have made so many friends, mostly Indians and Chinese. If I want to live in Silicon Valley, it has to be here and nowhere else."

The city is clean, she said, and safe.

And as the 2010 census report released this week shows, Santa Clara reflects a huge, ongoing demographic shift for the Bay Area and state.

While most valley and Peninsula towns grew at a sluggish pace or even lost population, Santa Clara grew at a brisk 13.8 percent clip and turned a demographic corner to become a predominantly minority city. Sitting in the center of high technology, the medium-size city offered the right amenities at the right time to thousands of newcomers who don't look anything like the old-timers.

Attracted to thousands of new affordable condos and apartments, young immigrants from Korea, India, Pakistan, Taiwan, Mexico and elsewhere poured in. So did Mexican-Americans from giant San Jose next door. In Santa Clara, they could fall out of bed and be halfway to their jobs at Intel, Applied Materials and other companies in town. They soon turned tired shopping strips on El Camino Real into ethnic

restaurants, karaoke bars or taquerias.

In 2000, the population of Santa Clara hovered near 102,000, and it was roughly half white and half Asian or Hispanic.

Since then Santa Clara has grown to 116,468 people, but the mix is entirely different today.

A turning point

During the decade, the number of white people dropped by 7,400. Meanwhile, the city's population increased by about 13,700 Asians and 6,200 Latinos. Together, the two minority groups made up for Santa Clara's loss of whites and virtually all its population growth.

Asians now form Santa Clara's largest racial group, at 37.7 percent. Latinos steadily increased to 19.4 percent. The non-Hispanic white population dropped to 36.1 percent.

How did this happen?

Santa Clara had been on the path to a majority of none for two decades, but City Hall made a crucial decision at the turn of the 21st century to build more affordable homes than required. It added 5,500 new homes, far more than its medium-size neighbors and more than any town in Santa Clara County except San Jose, a city of nearly 1 million.

Rivermark was one of those new developments.

Marilyn Fernandez easily could observe this growth

and demographic shift from her perch at Santa Clara University, where she teaches sociology.

"You have to look for the amenities offered to these young people," she said. "They were looking for relatively cheap housing and job opportunity." While the city's Asian population exploded by 46.5 percent, their various national origins won't be known until the Census Bureau issues the breakdown later this year. However, it's safe to say it will be a diverse group.

Richard Wang, a 39-year-old mortgage broker, rejected Cupertino and Sunnyvale, two Asian-heavy cities where he attended school and grew up.

"I chose Santa Clara because I wanted to start my own Cupertino," Wang said.

Another place to see the Asian infusion up close is El Camino, where a new Koreatown has blossomed. Many business signs don't have English translations.

Young S. Choi, 56, has called Santa Clara home for 15 years, starting a rice bakery along El Camino, next to a karaoke club and a sushi bar.

"Eight years ago, I called my sister and said, 'Why don't you open a restaurant here?' " She did three blocks away.

Steady Latino growth

While the Asian influx has been dramatic, the Latino movement into Santa Clara has been steady.

When insurance agent Alexandra Anderson decided to become her own boss, the Mexico City-born agent put up her shingle on El Camino in 2004.

"What appealed to me, first of all, was that there was a

large Hispanic base here," she said. "I saw there was a great need for insurance services that wasn't being met." Half of her clients are working- or middle-class Latinos.

"What they're looking for is a good education for their children," Anderson said. "It always works up to that."

The Santa Clara Unified School District certainly has felt the demographic shift.

Generally, the overall student body has become less white and more Asian and Latino, and requires new sorts of attention.

Ten years ago, it had 2,971 students who needed help learning English. Today, that number is 4,739. To get the job done, the district has added almost 100 teachers trained to educate them.

Meanwhile, the city's white population has aged but not disappeared.

San Jose resident Ralph Ciarlanti, 73, has watched the demographic change through his eyes as a produce clerk in Santa Clara. For 18 years he worked at the local Cosentino's supermarket. Less than four years ago, the Super Kyo-Po market took over, and the new owners kept him on.

He's still in charge of the "American section," for vegetables, but he's getting squeezed out by the pallets of Korean pears and napa cabbage.

Most city leaders white

Politically, Santa Clara's leadership remains mostly white.

Santa Clara Councilwoman and real estate agent Lisa Gillmor has lived in Santa Clara for four generations. The reason the number of whites is dwindling in town is harder to diagnose, she said.

"I just know what I see," she said. "Baby boomers are getting older, retiring, moving out of the area and finding cheaper places to live. A younger, more urban population is moving into town with children."

"It's a numerical majority-minority, but there's more to it than numbers," said Fernandez, the Santa Clara University sociologist. "It's also about political power, wealth and all that."

Mohammed Nadeem, an Indo-American educator who narrowly lost his race for a seat on the City Council recently, said he believes minorities will start winning elections within several years.

"The people of Santa Clara are very open-minded and have big hearts," he said. "In two to four years, there will be a tremendous increase in civic engagement."

Researcher Leigh Poitinger and staff writer Lisa Fernandez contributed to this report. Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767 or jrodriguez@mercurynews.com.

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Humans originated in South Africa new gene study shows | View Clip
03/09/2011
Examiner.com

A genetic study of twenty-seven different African populations indicate human being originated in southern Africa according to a report in the March 7, 2011, on line issueof the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

This finding contradicts a long held theory that humans originated in Eastern Africa.

A central assumption of this research is that certain groups of hunter gatherers segregated into unique population clusters that remained separate from other populations over time. This idea is reflected in the genetic data that indicates the Hadza and Sandawe of Tanzania, and the Khomani Bushmen of South Africa retain more of the original Africa mitochondrial DNA than any other groups.

These three distinctive hunter gatherer populations have distinct genetic ancestry that is separate from agriculturists that predominated in Eastern Africa indicating further evidence that the first humans in Africa were in South Africa.

This evidence correlates with other evidence of a more hospitable climate in South Africa 60 to 70,000 years ago.

This is the first definitive genetic proof of the origin of humans in southern Africa.

Paper

"Hunter-gatherer genomic diversity suggests a southern African origin for modern humans"

Authors

Brenna M. Henn a, 1, Christopher R. Gignoux b, Matthew Jobin c,d, Julie M. Granka e, J. M. Macpherson f, Jeffrey M. Kidd a, Laura Rodríguez-Botigué g, Sohini Ramachandran h, Lawrence Hon f, Abra Brisbin i, Alice A. Lin j, Peter A. Underhill j, David Comas g, Kenneth K. Kidd k, Paul J. Norman l, Peter Parham l, Carlos D. Bustamante a, Joanna L. Mountain f,and Marcus W. Feldman e

A Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA

B University of California, San Francisco,

C Department of Anthropology, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA

D Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA

E Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford CA

F 23andMe, Inc., Mountain View, CA

G Institute of Evolutionary Biology, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain

H Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Brown University, Providence,

I Department of Biological Statistics and Computational Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

J Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA

K Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

L Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University, Stanford

Bryan Hamaker is a Chemist and Mathematician. He developed a coating for beer cans that two billion people use daily. Expertise in metal,...

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Retroficiency: Software for Cutting the Fat Out of Retrofits | View Clip
03/09/2011
Greentech Media

It's almost a hybrid of Recurve and Scientific Conservation.

You don't need as much original data as you think.

That is the operative principle behind Retroficiency, a startup that emerged today with $800,000 in backing. The company has developed a software-as-a-service application that can analyze the efficiency of commercial office buildings and determine the most cost-effective repairs and retrofits.

The system examines data and characteristics of the building in question -- general power loads, utility bills, etc. -- but it also runs the data through a comparative analysis of other, similarly situated buildings. You want to retrofit a 15-story building in Boston with gas heating built in the mid '70s? No problem, comparative data exists. Retroficiency has characterized over 2,000 structures.

"You mitigate the need to collect all that data," says CEO Bennett Fisher, who said that the service can eliminate 30 percent to 50 percent of the time spent on pre-retrofit building analysis.

The system can then be used to perform continuous commissioning services, i.e., examining subsequent building performance to determine whether air conditioners and carbon monoxide sensors function as they are supposed to. Retroficiency will largely sell its services to energy service providers and not directly to real estate investment trusts and property owners.

Recurve, which specializes in home energy retrofits, has come up with a similar tool for residential retrofits. While Recurve uses the software for its own retrofits, the larger opportunity is in licensing it to established national contractors. Scientific Conservation, meanwhile, has come up with a predictive analysis tool for improving the energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Scientific, which hopes to expand from 15 million to 100 million to 150 million square feet under its purview by the end of the year, concentrates mostly on continuous commissioning. Thus, Retroficiency, and its appropriately retrofitted name, looks like a hybrid.

The optimal business model in this industry -- software as a service, fees calculated as a portion of energy saved -- has yet to be determined. Expect to see quite a bit of experimentation. Even with the lull in construction, building efficiency should become a huge market. Forty percent of all of the energy in the U.S. gets consumed by buildings. Half of that energy gets consumed in commercial buildings and a large portion gets wasted. Lights get left on at night and heaters flip on on sunny days. In California, only one percent of lights in offices are even networked, according to PG&E data.

While some might scoff at the initial funding of $800,000, that could turn out to be a strength. Several companies are marketing these types of services and ultimately the winners will be acquired into large energy service companies, like Siemens, or software conglomerates like IBM. And when it comes to acquiring someone, the less VC backing a target has, sometimes the better. Serious Materials last year got into energy retrofits by acquiring Valence Energy, a startup out of Santa Clara University that had customers but not a lot of independent funding. Siemens last year also bought SureGrid at an early stage in that company's development: SureGrid had customers but not the baggage of several VC rounds.

The main investor is World Energy, which is mostly known for its carbon auctions. There's another trend for you: companies originally coined with the idea of carbon taxes coming to the U.S. -- ENXSuite, Serious Materials etc. -- expanding into general energy management.

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Justice Department: Speed up health care case | View Clip
03/09/2011
Politico - Online

Send to a friendJustice Department: Speed up health care case

For health care, the Justice Department is reversing course on its previous 'go-slow' approach. | AP Photo Close

The Obama administration has asked the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals to expedite consideration of the health care reform law — reversing course on its previous “go-slow” approach.

U.S. District Judge Roger Vinson ruled in January that the entire health care law was unconstitutional. The administration waited until late February to file a motion for clarification – a delay that drew the ire of Vinson, who responded by staying his ruling but ordering the administration to file its appeal within seven days.

The administration met that deadline Tuesday, then took matters a step further by asking the 11th Circuit to move quickly on its appeal.

“Expedition in this case is particularly warranted because of the district court's unprecedented severability ruling, which presents issues that the federal government has not previously addressed in appellate briefs and covers numerous provisions of the Act already in effect,” the administration's lawyers wrote.

The Justice Department proposed that its appeal brief would be due April 18. The 26 states and National Federation of Independent Business would have a month to respond. The Justice Department's final response would be due June 1.

Brad Joondeph, a Santa Clara University professor who is following the suits, said the schedule could lead to oral arguments in late June or early July.

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My letter opting out of NCLB testing | View Clip
03/09/2011
DAILY KOS

In Pennsylvania, parents have the right to have their children exempted from NCLB testing (called the PSSAs). In order to get the exemption, we must first review the test materials. The school district must provide the opportunity for parents to do this, including scheduling time in the evening if requested. The grounds for the exemption are "religious" but the parents do not have to explain what their faith is, what about the testing is in violation of their faith, or anything else.

According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, if you believe that it is morally wrong to put your kids through the ordeal of a week of pointless testing, that's good enough.

Your request cannot be challenged or denied by law: PA Code Title 22 Chapter 4, Section 4 (d)(5).

Below are two examples of such letters.

The following faiths can use the Ethic of Reciprocity as a religious reason for "opting out" of NCLB testing. http://www.religioustolerance.org/...

- Bahá'í Faith: And if thine eyes be turned towards justice, choose thou for thy neighbour that which thou choosest for thyself.

- Brahmanism: This is the sum of Dharma [duty]: Do naught unto others which would cause you pain if done to you.

- Buddhism: Hurt not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful.

- Confucianism: Do not do to others what you do not want them to do to you

- Hinduism: This is the sum of duty: do not do to others what would cause pain if done to you.

- Islam: None of you [truly] believes until he wishes for his brother what he wishes for himself.

- Judaism: What is hateful to you, do not to your fellow man. This is the law: all the rest is commentary.

For Atheist it's either just morally wrong or it's the psuedo-science of standardized testing in this country is the intellectual equivalent of intelligent design or creationism.

But the bottom line is you don't have to say why or what religion at all. However, if you'd like to make a point, as these letters do, about why NCLB and high stakes standardized testing are wrong, then by all means please feel free to adapt either of these letters.

And for any attorneys out there, I am wondering if under the equal protection clause, we in Pennsylvania are getting a little more protection than people in other states.

And now on to the letters. The following letters are from a Catholic and Unitarian.

Letter One

Michael Hardy

Acting Superintendent

State College Area School District

131 W. Nittany Ave

State College, PA 16801

Dear Mr. Hardy,

After consulting with attorneys at the Southern Poverty Law Center, speaking with the Director of the Bureau of Assessment and Accountability at the Pennsylvania Department of Education in Harrisburg, and much soul searching, I am informing you that my children will not be participating in this years PSSA testing. Additionally, I am informing you that I have been actively encouraging other parents to arrange religious exemptions for their children. Again, I have spoken with education attorneys at the SPLC as well as Mary Bauer, the SPLC Legal Director. What I am doing is perfectly legal.

On Monday last, as per PA Code Title 22 Chapter 4, Section 4 (d)(5), I inspected the testing materials shipped from Data Recognition Corp, a Minnesota private company to which the state pays $30 million annually to have these tests printed and then scored. These tests are scored by armies of temporary workers with no training in education. If you do nothing else, please read this article: http://www.citypages.com/.... I also highly recommend the book, Making the Grades, by Todd Farley. Anyone involved in education and in the administration of these tests should be informed about the fraud being perpetrated on the American school system and the American taxpayers by the private testing industry.

I have signed the confidentiality agreement and informed the principal of my decision.

I refuse to have my children take part in the testing because it is in conflict with my religious beliefs. The PDE advised me that even a medical or psychological concern meets this criteria, as long as I claim it's religious. However, in this case my Catholic faith teach me that it is a sin to participate in an action I know to be a fraud and to be harmful to my children and to my community. Ten years of research and analysis by academic experts working at universities from Penn State to Harvard (as opposed to politicians like Michelle Rhee or college drop-outs like Bill Gates) conclusively prove that high stakes like the PSSA testing harms children, undermines and restricts curriculums, and punishes schools that serve the most vulnerable members of our society — kids with special needs and kids in poverty. There are mountains of documentation out there. For a beginning reading list, I suggest you contact Dr. Timothy Slekar, Head of the Division of Education and Human Development at Penn State Altoona.

Under the law, you cannot deny my request. I have also confirmed this with the PDE. My children are a fifth grader at Park Forest Elementary and a third grader at the same wonderful school. I am opting them out of testing even though I know that this action will result in the school failing to meet AYP for the second year. I believe in public education. For years we have all known that NCLB is a bad law. In 2014, every school in the country must be at 100% proficiency. You and I both know that is not going to happen. We all keep hoping that the law will be changed even though it is long overdue for reauthorization, yet given the partisan grid-lock in Washington right now, thinking that it will get fixed any time soon is a fantasy. My faith tells me that the only way to do the right thing for my children, their school, children with disabilities and/or living in poverty, and the future of public education in this state is to call for a boycott of the testing, hoping against hope, that if enough parents join in, like the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1965, our voices will finally be heard.

I understand that you and others in the administration here really have your hands tied on this issue. Under the law you must get 95% of kids tested. But it's wrong, sir. It is all based on lies and deceit and greed and corruption. My faith demands that we must fight against this. As an undergraduate at Santa Clara University in California I saw members of our university community including priests, going down to help the people in El Salvador, even after six priests were assassinated by right wing death squads. That's my religious and educational tradition.

I know that everyone is terrified of a school failing to make AYP. But to continue to participate in this corrupt farce is to undermine the very core of public education. Those pushing for ever increasing testing and “accountability” have made their agenda crystal clear: school closings, vouchers and eventually privatization, turning over education to for-profit companies. Private schools run by the Catholic Church and the Friends Council on Education are not for profit; they do not participate in this testing; their students receive a great education. For-profit schools run by large Educational Management Organizations (EMOs) have a dismal record, but that is the next step as more and more schools fail to meet AYP as we approach 2014. Eventually all schools will be closed down, reorganized and ultimately turned over to private for-profit EMOs.

We are told that private for-profit companies can do a better job than you and others who are committed to public education because of the free market. The free market resulted in scandals ranging from Halliburton and Blackwater in Iraq, to the Enron debacle, to the recent outrage in our own backyard with private for-profit prisons for kids. When our tax dollars are involved, greed and corruption run rampant in the “free market.”

Please think about your role in this and if there is anything you can do to take a stand against the Big Lie that is NCLB and high-stakes standardized testing which threatens the future of the kids you serve.

Letter Two

From: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

Dear (Insert Administrator's name here)

We are asking that you allow our son to "opt out" of NCLB and PSSA testing. There are many reasons that our family has decided to "opt out" of state and federally mandated testing, however, we have been told that there is only one legal exemption -- religion. Since religion is the only recognized legal excuse (that we could find) we will use it. Therefore, we are asking for a religious exemption.

We are Unitarian Universalists with values rooted in the teaching of Jesus. Forced participation in state testing violates the following religious principles we value and strive to teach in our home.

"Unitarian Universalists believe in the never-ending search for truth. If the mind and heart are truly free and open, the revelations that appear to the human spirit are infinitely numerous, eternally fruitful, and wondrously exciting." NCLB and PSSAs are antithetical to this belief. These tests assume a static truth and train the mind and heart to close to the possibilities of multiple answers or interpretations. They force children to believe in a single correct answer and that there is no need to search for knowledge -- knowledge is given. This contradicts the value we are trying to teach our son concerning curiosity and the endless possibilities available to him as he searches for his own truth.

As followers of the teachings of Jesus, Luke reminds us that Jesus said, "Do not judge, or you too will be judged" also "For in the same way you judge others, you will be judged, and with the measure you use, it will be measured to you. And finally, "Do not judge, and you will not be judged. Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. NCLB and PSSAs are designed exclusively to judge and condemn children, teachers, schools, and communities. We refuse to continue to take part in this pernicious system. We are also trying to teach our son to be open to the possibilities that "others" sometimes have different values or ways of seeing the world. We do not want him to judge others for their differences. We hope that one day our son will recognize differences in others and value and celebrate those differences. NCLB and PSSAs force children, teachers, and schools to devalue differences.

We also believe in the Ethic of Reciprocity or the Golden Rule -- we are to treat other people as we would wish to be treated ourselves. As a family, our belief in the Golden Rule encourages us to help our son learn the value of fairness. We want him to treat others fairly and we hope that he will in turn expect others to treat him fairly. NCLB and PSSAs have been demonstrated to not treat differences in children fairly. They fail to recognize the multiple intelligences present in all children. NCLB and PSSAs discriminate against students from lower socio-economic conditions and unfairly penalize students with special education needs.

Even though the United Nations is not a religious organization we also would like the school to understand that NCLB and PSSAs violate certain articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Article 18. Everyone has the right to freedom of thought.

NCLB and PSSAs prescribes thoughtlessness and punishes children that experiment with their curiosity or try to explain their learning in ways that can't be measured by standardized tests.

Article 26. Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups.

NCLB and PSSAs narrow the school's curriculum and therefore deprives children of the right explore the possibilities for learning in the many disciplines that have either been shortened or outright eliminated from the curriculum. For example, if science and social studies are neglected how will children learn about the scientific nature of the world and learn to appreciate and value the vast cultures on this planet?

In summary and respect, we would like you to permit our son to "opt out" of NCLB and PSSA testing this school year for the religious and cultural reasons stated above.

Sincerely,

(Insert your name here).

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THE FACADE of U.S. $UPREME COURT JU$TICE CLARENCE THOMAS WANTING 2 BE TRUSTED AGAIN IN JUDGING OTHER CRIMINAL MIND$ IN AMERICA ??? | View Clip
03/09/2011
Boston Indpendent Media Center

U.S SUPREME COURT JUSTICE CLARENCE THOMAS GOT CAUGHT WITH HIS HAND'$ IN THE ELITE'$ POCKET$, BUT CLAIMS THERE WAS ONLY $700,000

THEY CORRUPTED & COLLUDED WITH THESE U.S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE$ LIKE CLARENCE THOMA$....

UNTIL CLARENCE THOMAS RESIGNS FROM THE PEOPLES U.S. SUPREME COURT, LAWYERS FOR POOR AMERICANS WILL BE FORCED 2 CONTINUE ASKING FOR A FULL U.S. JUSTICE DEPARTMENT & U.S.CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION INTO THIS OBVIOUS FRONTING OF CORPORATE AMERICA & ELSEWHERE TO GAIN POLITICAL VOTES WITH CERTAIN U.S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICES INVOLVED WITH LAST JANUARYS LEGAL DECISION CONCERNING ALLOWING INTERNATIONAL & NATIONAL CORPORATE UNLIMITED SECRET POLITICAL 501C4 SLU$H TO INFLUENCE OUR FUTURE USA ELECTIVE PROCE$$.

THEY STARTED THIS ELITE CABAL PLAN OF DESTROYING AMERICAN LABOR UNIONS WAY BACK WHEN PRESIDENT GEORGE BUSH JR , KARL ROVE AND THE WEALTHY ELITE BILLIONAIRES CABAL GOT THE 5 CONSERVATIVE U.S.SUPREME COURT JUSTICES TO ALLOW INTERNATIONAL AND NATIONAL CORPORATIONS TO CONTRIBUTE UNLIMITED POLITICAL $$ FOR NATIONAL AND STATE ELECTIVE ELECTIONS.

THE REPUBLICAN FEC MEMBERS WERE ALSO NEEDED TO LOOK THE OTHER WAY ON ALLOWING THIS FUTURE UNLIMITED POLITICAL SLU$H TO BE HIDDEN FROM AMERICAN VOTERS IN THESE KARL ROVE STYLE 501C4 SECRET POLITICAL SLU$H ACCOUNTS.

THE BUSH~KARL ROVE WALL STREET ~BANKS STOLEN TARP BILLION$ ARE NOW GOING TO RULE OUR AMERICAN POLITICAL SCENE FOR MANY YEARS TO COME.THESE STOLEN TARP BAILOUT BILLION$ WILL BE RUNNING THESE 501C4 SLU$H ACCOUNTS FOR MANY YEARS TO COME WITHOUT ANYONE IN AMERICA EVER BEING ABLE OR ALLOWED TO INVESTIGATE !!!

OUR PAST STATE AND FEDERAL ELECTIONS HAVE ALREADY PROVEN WHAT BIG $$ CAN DO TO DISTORT THE AMERICAN VOTERS FEELINGS ON WHO THEY DESIRE FOR THEIR FUTURE POLITICAL CANDIDATES.

IF IT WERE EVER INVESTIGATED AND EXPOSED HOW OUR STOLEN little American TAXPAYERS TARP

BAILOUT$ INFLUENCED OUR PAST ELECTION CYCLE BY THIS ELITE KARL ROVE BILLIONAIRE CABAL THEN

MAYBE THE NEEDED OUTCRY FOR FUTURE PUBLIC FINANCED ELECTION$ MIGHT JUST BE ABLE TO TAKE HOLD !

WHAT IS HAPPENING TODAY AND IN THE FUTURE AGAINST OUR AMERICAN UNION MEMBERS IS A VERY WELL PLANNED PLOT OF THESE ELITE TO ENSURE THAT OUR AMERICAN MIDDLE~CLASS & POORE AMERICANS DO NOT EXPECT TO RECEIVE TO0 BIG A PIECE OF THE AMERICAN $ PIE FROM CORPORATE OWNER ELITE'$.

THE WEALTHY ELITE'S OWN CONTROLLING SHARES OF OUR CORPORATE WORLD,BANKS ETC... SO IT ONLY STANDS TO REASON THEY HAVE TO CONTROL OUR AMERICAN POLITICO'S AS WELL .THE ONLY WAY CORPORATE AMERICA & THIS ELITE CABAL OF MULTI~BILLIONAIRE OWNERS HAVE ON KEEPING CONTROL OVER THE U.S. CONGRESSIONAL SPENDING IS BY THEIR USE OF HIGH PRICED LOBBYISTS AND THEIR NEWLY ACQUIRED UNLIMITED POLITICAL 501C4 SLU$H ACCOUNTS GIVEN THEM BY THESE 5 U.S. SUPREME COURT CONSERVATIVE JUSTICES !

ANYONE IN OUR NEW AMERICAN POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT (STATE OR FEDERAL) CAN NOW BE DEFEATED WITH ENDLE$$ WELL FINANCED SWIFT BOAT ATTACK ADS THAT CAN will CONTINUE 2 BE FINANCED BY ANY CORPORATE ENTITY IN THE WORLD VIA THESE 501C4 SLU$H ACCOUNT$ !!!

THE PEOPLES U.S. CONGRESS ATTEMPTED TO PUT THE BRAKES ON ALLOWING WALL STREET~ BANKERS TARP BAILOUT FUND$ FROM BEING ALLOWED IN OUR LAST OR FUTURE U.S. ELECTIONS,BUT FELL SHORT WITH CONGRESSIONAL REPUBLICANS NOT WILLING TO JOIN THE DEMOCRATS PROPOSED LEGISLATION ...

WE ARE ALL WELL AWARE THAT NAME RECOGNITION AND PUBLIC RELATIONS ARE ONLY BOUGHT THROUGH THE AIRWAYS WITH BIG $$. ** AMERICA WILL CONTINUE TO HAVE TO DEAL WITH HAVING FUTURE AMERICAN STATE AND FEDERAL CANDIDATES WHO WILL CONTINUE TO BE CHOSEN AND WELL FINANCED WITH THIS ENDLESS SECRET 501C4 SLU$H ACCOUNT $$ TO WIN BY THESE ELITE BILLIONAIRES AND THEIR INTERNATIONAL PARTNER CORPORATIONS.

AS HAS BECOME RECENTLY KNOWN TO MOST AMERICANS FOLLOWING U.S. POLITICS, U.S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE CLARENCE THOMAS AND HIS WIFE WERE RECENTLY PUBLICLY EXPOSED 4 HAVING LIED TO ALL OF AMERICA IN KEEPING SECRET OF THEIR YEARS OF HUSTLING OFF BIG CORPORATE NON~PROFIT $$ WITHOUT DISCLOSING PUBLICLY THAT THEY BOTH HAVE BEEN BOUGHT AND PAID FOR BY CERTAIN ELITE BILLIONAIRES HIDING BEHIND A 501C3 TAX EXEMPT NON~PROFIT ORGANIZATION.

IF U.S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE CLARENCE THOMAS & HIS WIFE TOOK THE CORPORATE PAYOFF$ THROUGH HIS WIFE'S NON-PROFIT 501C3 SLU$H FUND BIG BUCK$ SALARY WITHOUT DISCLOSING IT PUBLICLY FOR OVER 10 YEARS , WE CAN ONLY IMAGINE WHAT THE OTHER 5 REPUBLICAN U.S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICES INVOLVED WITH THIS WELL PLANNED ELITE CABAL'S UNLIMITED CORPORATE POLITICAL 501C4 SLU$H CONTRIBUTION$ LEAGL DECISION RECEIVED IN RETURN FOR THEIR ACTIVE VOTE PARTICIPATION ?

NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO

The Changing Face Of Organized Labor

Karen Wallace (right) and Meryleigh Brainerd (left), both teachers in California, join in a candlelight vigil in front of the state Capitol to express solidarity with union members in Wisconsin. Decades ago, says a labor historian, the typical unionized worker was a blue-collar male. Now, it's more likely to be a schoolteacher.

text size A A AMarch 3, 2011

The new year has brought a sharp increase in labor conflict in America.

In Wisconsin and Ohio, public employee unions are battling Republicans in the legislature and the governor's office.

In Providence, R.I., the city has fired nearly 2,000 union teachers.

Then there's the NFL, where owners and players are at an impasse as the midnight deadline for negotiations nears — meaning even ESPN is on the labor beat.

Each of the conflicts has a different set of issues and different circumstances. But they also highlight how the face of organized labor in the U.S. has changed.

Unions remain a major player in American politics, pouring money and manpower into elections and other public policy debates. But labor's numbers have been shrinking for decades. Now, only about 12 percent of the U.S. workforce belongs to a union. That compares with about 20 percent in the early 1980s.

Labor historian Nelson Lichtenstein at the University of California, Santa Barbara describes what the typical unionized worker in America looked like 50 years ago:

Steve Robinson of United Auto Workers Local 422 of Framingham, Mass., holds a sign during a rally to support Wisconsin's public employees. The UAW is a much smaller organization today than it was decades ago. In fact, the total number of workers in the public sector who belong to a union is now greater than the number of members in private sector unions.

"It would be a blue-collar male working in a factory. The auto union had a million and a half members. The steelworkers had a million. Also Teamsters, truck drivers — a couple million workers in that union. So it would be a male, 45-year-old who worked with his hands."

In those days, before foreign competition changed everything for the U.S. car companies, labor/management relations were perpetually rocky.

In an interview with NPR in 1988, Orville Spencer, then a United Auto Workers local president in Michigan, described that relationship.

"You'd lose a lot of sleep on how bad the company put the screws to you during your working-hour shifts," Spencer said. "Next night, I'd lose sleep laying there giggling on how bad I put it to them."

But pressured by foreign competition, the UAW and the car companies made a kind of peace. Both sides came to realize the shared stakes.

"Nobody in the world can quarrel with the quality and results of Ford," said UAW President Bob King, in a recent interview with Detroit station WDET. "That is driven as much by the UAW as it is by Ford, because it's a strong partnership. Because of our strong respect, we've done it together."

Related NPR Stories

Providence Mayor Defends Firings As Teachers Protest

Democrats Smart From Attempts To Weaken Unions

Wis. Governor: Layoffs Friday Unless Dems Return

Why Unions Matter To Democrats: It's Not Just Money

Union Battles: A 'National Campaign' Against Labor?

Labor Strife Is A Different Game In Pro Sports

Labor Unions Fight For Their Right To Influence

But these days, the UAW is a much smaller organization. And in 2011, the total number of workers in the public sector who belong to a union is now greater than the number of members in private sector unions.

So remember that typical union member of a half-century ago? Here's how Lichtenstein describes today's version:

"It would be a hospital technician or nurse or a home health care worker or a schoolteacher or a female public employee of some sort."

Which brings us to those big union protests in Wisconsin, which have been going on for more than two weeks now.

Among the most prominent voices in Wisconsin is the teachers union. The National Education Association, with more than 3 million members, is now the largest union in the country, having surpassed the Teamsters more than a decade ago.

Wisconsin political analyst Jeff Mayers of WisPolitics.com says the teachers union is seen there as "the most powerful white-collar union, the most powerful public employees' union."

"I think the people on the conservative side would call them a worthy opponent," he adds. "But they're often vilified by conservatives and Republicans because they play such a big role in elections."

It's that clout that has helped the unions turn so many people out in ongoing protests. But it is also the thing that makes them an important target for conservative politicians.

In the short run, the GOP attack on bargaining rights may cause a backlash in the 2012 elections. But if the Republican legislatures in Wisconsin, Ohio and elsewhere do succeed in curtailing collective bargaining rights, unions will be weakened for many years to come.

LAWYERS FOR POOR AMERICANS IS A INDEPENDENT VOLUNTEER WWW LOBBY THAT SINGS OUT FOR OUR AMERICAN MIDDLE~CLASS AND POORER AMERICANS LIVING IN OUR WEALTHY ELITE'S COUNTRY.

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PATASKALA OHIO,PICKERINGTON OHIO,

JOHNSTOWN OHIO, FINDLEY OHIO,

THE ROYAL FAMILY,PRINCE CHARLES,THE POPE,

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LEADERS OF IRAN,CUBA,VENEZUELA,

PRESIDENT HUGO CHAVEZ,LONDON,ITALY,ROME,

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U.S.SENATOR DIANE FEINSTEIN,MALIBU,

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PERU,FLORIDA,COLOMBIA,COLUMBUS OHIO,

DUBLIN OHIO,CLEVELAND OHIO,

DAYTON OHIO,MARION OHIO,

CINN OHIO,TOLEDO OHIO,

OHIO STATE UNIV,KENT STATE UNIV,

HARVARD UNIV,BROWN UNIV,COLUMBIA UNIV,

PEPPERDINE UNIV,USC,UCLA,

UC IRVINE,ERWIN CHEMERINSKY,

WYOMING,NEW YORK,LONG ISLAND,

FLORIDA,MIAMI,DETROIT,AMERICAN TEA PARTY,

PENNSYLVANIA,PHILADELPHIA,SAN FRANCISCO,

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ATLANTA,NEW MEXICO,MEXICO CITY,BELIZE,

SWEDEN,NORWAY,FINLAND,

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NETHERLANDS,SPAIN,MADRID,ROME,ITALY,

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ZANESVILLE OHIO,CIRCLEVILLE OHIO,

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POWELL OHIO,DELAWARE COUNTY OHIO,

OXNARD,VENTURA,ENCINO,COSTA RICA,

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REPUBLICAN PARTY,

SOUTH CAROLINA,ALABAMA,

INDEPENDENT AMERICAN VOTERS,

WALMART~WALTON FAMILY,VATICAN,

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MICHIGAN,NEBRASKA,MONTANA,U.S.SENATE,

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ENGLAND, FRANCE, GERMANY,

GREAT BRITAIN,HOLY SEE, PRINCE CHARLES,

ROYAL FAMILY, SWEDEN, SWITZERLAND

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Most Would Cross Picket Lines For the Right Job | View Clip
03/09/2011
Fins

Many U.S. citizens wouldn't hesitate to cross picket lines and swipe a union job despite being split in their opinions of protesting union workers in Wisconsin.

When asked if they would cross a picket line for a "dream" job, 68% of 392 respondents said "yes" in the FINS.com online question forum Sign or Decline.

Jim Balassone, executive-in-residence at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University, wasn't surprised by the results.

"Unions did not fall from heaven and they weren't a creation of the state; they were necessary for workers to have bargaining power," he said. "Over time, that need has decreased."

Roughly 12% of U.S. workers are in a union, according to the federal Labor Department. In the early 1980s, that share was much higher, about 20%. Balassone noted that many Americans probably don't know many unionized workers anymore.

Discussion of organized labor has intensified in recent weeks as Wisconsin lawmakers weigh plans to hamstring the bargaining rights of unionized state workers. The issue has brought the Wisconsin legislature to a halt.

There are some signs that the public at-large is siding with the union workers. In a nationwide poll by Pew Research Center, 42% of respondents said they supported the organized labor movement, with 31% in favor of the opposition; the remainder were either unsure or didn't have a preference.

At 24.2%, New York has the greatest share of unionized workers out of any U.S. state.

Finance workers, however, aren't likely to confront picket lines anytime soon. Only about 2% of the industry's workforce is unionized, according to federal data.

What Would You Do?

Answer the question and see how you match up with the rest of the FINS community.

You've just been offered your dream job, but...you have to cross a picket line.

Sign ...or... Decline

Write to Kyle Stock

Sign or Decline is a series of questions on FINS.com that ask what you would do for your dream job. Since launch, late last year, over 100,000 answers have been received and compiled in our database. Participate in Sign or Decline here.

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Santa Clara: Bomb squad at apartment complex after beakers, liquids spotted | View Clip
03/09/2011
San Jose Mercury News - Online

Law enforcement activity at a Santa Clara apartment complex, March 9, 2011.

Swarms of police and bomb squad experts surrounded an apartment complex in Santa Clara on Wednesday, after sheriff's deputies tried to evict a tenant there only to find an apartment filled with beakers, liquids and other suspicious materials.

Santa Clara County Sheriff's civil warrants deputies arrived at the Timberleaf Apartments complex at 2147 Newhall Street shortly after 11 a.m., said Sgt. Rick Sung. The issue of the eviction was not immediately known; Sung said it's typically because a tenant didn't pay rent or follow apartment rules.

They did not find the person whom they were sent to evict, but they did find materials that possibly could be used to concoct drugs, or methamphetamine, added Santa Clara Police Lt. Phil Cooke.

Fearing the materials could be flammable and hazardous, the bomb squad evacuated much of the multi-unit apartment complex. As of 2 p.m., the unit was still at the scene, and the tenant in question had not been located.

Jonathan Opet, a 28-year-old Santa Clara University law student, lives in the apartment complex, but doesn't know the person who was being served with the eviction notice. Opet was not evacuated from his unit and could see much of what was happening from his apartment. He said it would be unusual for a meth lab to be run out of an apartment so close to his home.

"Timberleaf is in a residential community, where there are many families and students," he said. "I'm surprised."

class="taglinejb">Contact Lisa Fernandez at 408-920-5002.

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Audit Notes: More Murdoch, Hiltzik on the Social Security Trust Fund | View Clip
03/09/2011
Columbia Journalism Review - Online

A couple of weeks ago, Allan Sloan wrote about Rupert Murdoch is using $673 million of his shareholders' money to buy Murdoch's daughter Elisabeth's production company. That self-dealing caused him to say this:

It's one thing to have News Corp. employ family members. But it's a different thing to use assets of a company 88 percent owned by the public to buy businesses owned by Murdoch children. And we may not be done; Lachlan Murdoch still has his own company.

News Corp. preaches free enterprise. But when it comes to Murdochs, the company has a different value: family enterprise.

Today, Joe Strupp of Media Matterspoints out that News can't even tell its shareholders the truth:

Here's (Murdoch's) Dow Jones Newswires:

News Corp.'s (NWS, NWSA) recent deal to acquire Shine Group is unrelated to News Corp. Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch's family ties to the U.K.-based television production company, Chief Operating Officer Chase Carey said Monday…

“That had nothing to do with it,” Carey said of the family relationship, at an investor conference hosted by Deutsche Bank.

My question: Did Chase say that with a straight face? If so, Elisabeth might want to give him a part on one of Shine Group's shows. Or do the Murdochs only do that kind of thing for other Murdochs?

— And speaking of Murdoch and his vast reach, The Nation editor Katrina vanden Heuvel writes about News Corporation and media consolidation in the Washington Post:

We tend to measure the influence of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. in terms of the reach of Fox News or the circulation of the New York Post and the Wall Street Journal. But it is actually local television stations on which Murdoch has built his empire and increased his stranglehold on access to information.

He has done so, in large part, by taking advantage of a 1999 change in FCC rules that allowed a single company to own more than one television station in the same market. That arrangement, known as a duopoly, lets big conglomerates such as News Corp. buy up stations, reduce their staffs and consolidate newsrooms. Murdoch now has nine duopolies. According to Santa Clara University's Allen Hammond, a staggering 109 duopolies were created between 2000 and 2006…

The impact of media consolidation is not abstract. New Jersey has 566 municipalities, but the entire state has only two licensed commercial stations. When media conglomerates take control of those stations, consolidate their newsrooms, lay off reporters and duplicate coverage, it has the effect of creating a news vacuum across the state. Corruption goes unchecked. Local political issues with significant consequences go unnoticed.

The FCC is holding a hearing on Murdoch's New Jersey station, but vanden Heuvel isn't optimistic:

The FCC has shown a willingness, again and again, to disregard its own rules for the benefit of big media. In New Jersey, for example, News Corp.'s temporary waiver allowing it to own WWOR and the New York Post expired in 2008. But the FCC has taken no action.

— Finally, Michael Hiltzik has an excellent column about the Social Security Trust Fund and why it can't be put in a lockbox. This is great historical context:

But here's the dirty little secret about the “lockbox”: The very notion is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of how the program works. You can't lock away a trust fund amounting to about $2.5 trillion from the rest of the economy — nor would you want to…

The question of where to park this money is a perennial headache. That was so even in 1935, when a proposal to build up a Social Security reserve first came before Congress — and when the estimate of its maximum size was only $47 billion.

“What in heaven's name are you going to do with $47 billion?” Republican Sen. Arthur Vandenberg of Michigan asked a Franklin D. Roosevelt administration official. Informed that the government funds could be invested in the stock of big corporations such as U.S. Steel, Vandenberg exclaimed, “That would be socialism!”

Instead, Congress mandated that the money could be invested only one way: in U.S. Treasury securities, safe and secure. This remains the law today.

So the government borrows money from Social Security via those Treasury bonds and spends it on things like, say, the Bush tax cuts, wars, and economic stimulus.

When Social Security alarmists say the government has “squandered” the trust fund, they're just expressing their opinion about the government's budget priorities.

Post a Comment

Ryan Chittum , a former Wall Street Journal reporter, is deputy editor of The Audit, CJR's business section. If you see notable business journalism, give him a heads-up at the address above.

Also by Ryan Chittum

Corporate Cousins Wed 9 Mar 2011

Conflating Social Security and Medicare/Medicaid Wed 9 Mar 2011

CNBC Misleads on "Welfare State" Dominance Wed 9 Mar 2011

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Santa Clara's increase in Asian population reflects broader trend | View Clip
03/09/2011
Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online

By Joe Rodriguez and Julia Prodis Sulek

A sign along El Camino Real in Santa Clara shows both English and Korean languages on March 9. 2011. The 2010 Census showed an increase in the Asian population for the city of Santa Clara. There has been a huge growth spurt in the past ten years as evidenced by the rise in Asian businesses along El Camino Real and new housing developments that have attracted Asian residents. (Gary Reyes /Mercury News)

At the huge Rivermark housing complex in Santa Clara, the chatter between mothers and children at the spiffy playground floats up in Japanese, Korean and Punjabi, and then echoes throughout Silicon Valley.

"I love this place," said Nida Qamar, 33, who moved from Pakistan to Santa Clara in 2007 when her husband got an engineering job nearby. "I have made so many friends, mostly Indians and Chinese. If I want to live in Silicon Valley, it has to be here and no where else."

The city is clean, she said, and safe.

And as the 2010 Census report released this week shows, Santa Clara reflects a huge, ongoing demographic shift for the Bay Area and state.

While most valley and Peninsula towns grew at a sluggish pace or even lost population, Santa Clara grew at a brisk, 13.8 percent clip and turned a demographic corner to become a predominantly minority city. Sitting in the center of high technology, the medium-size city offered the right amenities at the right time to thousands of newcomers who don't look anything like the old-timers.

Attracted to thousands of new, affordable condos and apartments, young immigrants from Korea, India, Pakistan, Taiwan, Mexico and elsewhere poured in. So did Mexican-Americans from giant San Jose next door. In Santa Clara, they could fall out of bed and be half way to their jobs at Intel, Applied Materials and other companies in town. They soon turned tired shopping strips on El Camino Real into ethnic

restaurants, karaoke bars or taquerias.

Back in 2000, the population of Santa Clara hovered near 102,000, and it was roughly half white and half Asian or Hispanic.

Since then Santa Clara has grown to 116,468 people, but the mix is entirely different today.

During the decade, the number of white people dropped by 7,400. Meanwhile, the city's population increased by about 13,700 Asians and 6,200 Latinos. Together, the two minority groups made up for Santa Clara's loss of whites and virtually all of its population growth.

Asians now form Santa Clara's largest racial group at 37.7 percent. Latinos steadily increased to 19.4 percent. The non-Hispanic white population dropped to 36.1 percent.

How did this happen?

Santa Clara had been on the path to a majority of none for two decades, but City Hall made a crucial decision at the turn of the 21st century to build more affordable homes than required. It added 5,500 new homes, far more than its medium-size neighbors and more than any town in Santa Clara County except San Jose, a city of nearly 1 million.

Rivermark was one of those new developments.

Marilyn Fernandez easily could observe this growth and demographic shift from her perch at Santa Clara University, where she teaches sociology.

"You have to look for the amenities offered to these young people," she said. "They were looking for relatively cheap housing and job opportunity." While the city's Asian population exploded by 46.5 percent, their various national origins won't be known until the census bureau issues the breakdown later this year. However, it's safe to say it will be a diverse group.

Richard Wang, a 39-year-old mortgage broker, rejected Cupertino and Sunnyvale, two Asian-heavy cities where he attended school and grew up.

"I chose Santa Clara because I wanted to start my own Cupertino," Wang said.

Another place to see the Asian infusion up close is the El Camino, where a new Korea town has blossomed.

Many business signs don't have English translations

Young S. Choi, 56, has called Santa Clara home for 15 years, starting a rice bakery along the El Camino, next to a Karaoke club and a sushi bar.

"Eight years ago, I called my sister and said, "Why don't you open a restaurant here?" She did three blocks away.

While the Asian influx has been dramatic, the Latino movement into Santa Clara has been steady.

When insurance agent Alexandra Anderson decided to become her own boss, the Mexico-city born agent put up her shingle on the El Camino in 2004.

"What appealed to me, first of all, was that there was a large Hispanic base here," she said. "I saw there was a great need for insurance services that wasn't being met." Half of her clients are working or middle class Latinos.

"What they're looking for is a good education for their children," Anderson said. "It always works up to that."

The Santa Clara Unified School District certainly has felt the demographic shift.

Generally, the overall student body has become less white and more Asian and Latino, and requires new sorts of attention.

Ten years ago, it had 2,971 students who needed help learning English. Today, that number is 4,739. To get the job done, the district has added almost 100 teachers trained to educate them.

Meanwhile, the city's white population has aged but hasn't disappeared.

San Jose resident Ralph Ciarlanti, 73, has watched the demographic change through his eyes as a produce clerk in Santa Clara. For 18 years he worked at the local Cosentino supermarket. Less than four years ago, the Super Kyo-Po market took over, and the new owners kept him on.

He's still in charge of the "American section," for vegetable, but he's getting squeezed out by the pallets of Korean pears and Napa cabbage.

Politically, Santa Clara's leadership remains mostly white.

Santa Clara Councilwoman and real estate agent Lisa Gillmor has lived in Santa Clara for four generations. Why the number of whites is dwindling in town is harder to diagnose, she said.

"I just know what I see," she said. "Baby boomers are getting older, retiring, moving out of the area and finding cheaper places to live. A younger, more urban population is moving into town with children." Meanwhile, most of the town's political leadership remains white.

"It's a numerical majority-minority, but there's more to it than numbers," said Fernandez, the SCU sociologist. "It's also about political power, wealth and all that." Mohammed Nadeem, an Indo-American educator who narrowly lost his race for a seat on the city council recently, believes minorities will starting winning elections within several years.

"The people of Santa Clare are very open-minded and have big hearts," he said. "In two to four years, there will be a tremendous increase in civic engagement."

Researcher Leigh Poitinger and reporter Lisa Fernandez contributed to this report. Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767 or jrodriguez@mercurynews.com.

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Santa Clara's increase in Asian population reflects broader trend | View Clip
03/09/2011
San Jose Mercury News - Online

A sign along El Camino Real in Santa Clara shows both English and Korean languages on March 9. 2011. The 2010 Census showed an increase in the Asian population for the city of Santa Clara. There has been a huge growth spurt in the past ten years as evidenced by the rise in Asian businesses along El Camino Real and new housing developments that have attracted Asian residents. (Gary Reyes /Mercury News)

At the huge Rivermark housing complex in Santa Clara, the chatter between mothers and children at the spiffy playground floats up in Japanese, Korean and Punjabi, and then echoes throughout Silicon Valley.

"I love this place," said Nida Qamar, 33, who moved from Pakistan to Santa Clara in 2007 when her husband got an engineering job nearby. "I have made so many friends, mostly Indians and Chinese. If I want to live in Silicon Valley, it has to be here and no where else."

The city is clean, she said, and safe.

And as the 2010 Census report released this week shows, Santa Clara reflects a huge, ongoing demographic shift for the Bay Area and state.

While most valley and Peninsula towns grew at a sluggish pace or even lost population, Santa Clara grew at a brisk, 13.8 percent clip and turned a demographic corner to become a predominantly minority city. Sitting in the center of high technology, the medium-size city offered the right amenities at the right time to thousands of newcomers who don't look anything like the old-timers.

Attracted to thousands of new, affordable condos and apartments, young immigrants from Korea, India, Pakistan, Taiwan, Mexico and elsewhere poured in. So did Mexican-Americans from giant San Jose next door. In Santa Clara, they could fall out of bed and be half way to their jobs at Intel, Applied Materials and other companies in town. They soon turned tired shopping strips on El Camino Real into ethnic

restaurants, karaoke bars or taquerias.

Back in 2000, the population of Santa Clara hovered near 102,000, and it was roughly half white and half Asian or Hispanic.

Since then Santa Clara has grown to 116,468 people, but the mix is entirely different today.

During the decade, the number of white people dropped by 7,400. Meanwhile, the city's population increased by about 13,700 Asians and 6,200 Latinos. Together, the two minority groups made up for Santa Clara's loss of whites and virtually all of its population growth.

Asians now form Santa Clara's largest racial group at 37.7 percent. Latinos steadily increased to 19.4 percent. The non-Hispanic white population dropped to 36.1 percent.

How did this happen?

Santa Clara had been on the path to a majority of none for two decades, but City Hall made a crucial decision at the turn of the 21st century to build more affordable homes than required. It added 5,500 new homes, far more than its medium-size neighbors and more than any town in Santa Clara County except San Jose, a city of nearly 1 million.

Rivermark was one of those new developments.

Marilyn Fernandez easily could observe this growth and demographic shift from her perch at Santa Clara University, where she teaches sociology.

"You have to look for the amenities offered to these young people," she said. "They were looking for relatively cheap housing and job opportunity." While the city's Asian population exploded by 46.5 percent, their various national origins won't be known until the census bureau issues the breakdown later this year. However, it's safe to say it will be a diverse group.

Richard Wang, a 39-year-old mortgage broker, rejected Cupertino and Sunnyvale, two Asian-heavy cities where he attended school and grew up.

"I chose Santa Clara because I wanted to start my own Cupertino," Wang said.

Another place to see the Asian infusion up close is the El Camino, where a new Korea town has blossomed.

Many business signs don't have English translations

Young S. Choi, 56, has called Santa Clara home for 15 years, starting a rice bakery along the El Camino, next to a Karaoke club and a sushi bar.

"Eight years ago, I called my sister and said, "Why don't you open a restaurant here?" She did three blocks away.

While the Asian influx has been dramatic, the Latino movement into Santa Clara has been steady.

When insurance agent Alexandra Anderson decided to become her own boss, the Mexico-city born agent put up her shingle on the El Camino in 2004.

"What appealed to me, first of all, was that there was a large Hispanic base here," she said. "I saw there was a great need for insurance services that wasn't being met." Half of her clients are working or middle class Latinos.

"What they're looking for is a good education for their children," Anderson said. "It always works up to that."

The Santa Clara Unified School District certainly has felt the demographic shift.

Generally, the overall student body has become less white and more Asian and Latino, and requires new sorts of attention.

Ten years ago, it had 2,971 students who needed help learning English. Today, that number is 4,739. To get the job done, the district has added almost 100 teachers trained to educate them.

Meanwhile, the city's white population has aged but hasn't disappeared.

San Jose resident Ralph Ciarlanti, 73, has watched the demographic change through his eyes as a produce clerk in Santa Clara. For 18 years he worked at the local Cosentino supermarket. Less than four years ago, the Super Kyo-Po market took over, and the new owners kept him on.

He's still in charge of the "American section," for vegetable, but he's getting squeezed out by the pallets of Korean pears and Napa cabbage.

Politically, Santa Clara's leadership remains mostly white.

Santa Clara Councilwoman and real estate agent Lisa Gillmor has lived in Santa Clara for four generations. Why the number of whites is dwindling in town is harder to diagnose, she said.

"I just know what I see," she said. "Baby boomers are getting older, retiring, moving out of the area and finding cheaper places to live. A younger, more urban population is moving into town with children." Meanwhile, most of the town's political leadership remains white.

"It's a numerical majority-minority, but there's more to it than numbers," said Fernandez, the SCU sociologist. "It's also about political power, wealth and all that." Mohammed Nadeem, an Indo-American educator who narrowly lost his race for a seat on the city council recently, believes minorities will starting winning elections within several years.

"The people of Santa Clare are very open-minded and have big hearts," he said. "In two to four years, there will be a tremendous increase in civic engagement."

Researcher Leigh Poitinger and reporter Lisa Fernandez contributed to this report. Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767 or jrodriguez@mercurynews.com.

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Buy low, sell smoggy. | View Clip
03/08/2011
Progress Report

That’s the implication of a study conducted by two Israeli scholars published in the

Journal of Economic Psychology. They report poor air quality in the vicinity of the trading floor “is negatively related to stock returns, even when controlling for other variables.”

Tamir Levy of Netanya Academic College and Joseph Yagil of Haifa University note that exposure to polluted air can trigger depression, anxiety and anger in some people. When a significant number of investors experience these negative emotions, this “may lead to a collective change in the level of risk aversion, resulting in lower stock returns,” they write.

“These findings lend support to the relationship between air pollution and mood established by psychologists, and the relationship between mood and economic consequences established by economists,” they add. “Mood has an impact on decision-making, one type of which is an investment in stocks.”

Levy and Yagil examined daily data on stock returns for an entire decade -- from Jan. 1, 1997 to June 30, 2007. They looked at five leading indices: The S&P 500, the Dow Jones Industrial Average, the NASDAQ Composite Index, the AMEX Composite Index and the Philadelphia Stock Exchange Utility Sector Index.

The researchers compared those figures to the Air Quality Index reports for Philadelphia and Kings County (Brooklyn), the station closest to the New York exchanges. They specifically noted whether each day’s air quality was considered good or unhealthy.

Air quality reached unhealthy levels on only 1.43 percent of the approximately 2,600 trading days examined in New York, and 1.65 percent of the days in Philadelphia. Those were not good days for joggers, asthmatics -- or the markets.

“The mean daily return for unhealthy days is statistically negative for all five stock indices examined,” the researchers report. In contrast, during days with acceptable air quality, “the mean daily stock return … is positive and generally not statistically significant.”

Interestingly, the scholars also found an association between bad air days in New York and negative stock returns in Philadelphia. They surmise this is “probably due to the trading on that exchange conducted by New York traders.”

“One implication of this study is that if air pollution is negatively related to stock returns, one can devise an investment strategy that can lead to abnormal profits,” the researchers write. If you can successfully predict which days will have poor air quality -- not an impossible task, given that certain weather patterns make bad air more likely -- you can proceed on the likelihood that the market will end the day lower than it began.

In fact, if you use one of two pollution prediction methods, “We have shown that the rate of return generated by the suggested strategy is much higher than the return obtained under the simple buy-and-hold policy, even when accounting for transaction costs,” they conclude.

Of course, with more and more trading being done by computers -- who are, presumably, oblivious to smog levels -- this strategy may not work for long. In the meantime, investors are well advised to keep current on climatic conditions in lower Manhattan.

JJS: To profit in the short term, investors can use human abuse of the environment as an indicator. To profit in the long term, investors can use human use of land as an indicator. That is, our buying and selling of land pushes the price of land into an 18-year cycle of boom followed by bust (some call it the real estate cycle but it’s really the land-price cycle).

Unlike conventional economists, the ones who did predict the 2007 recession, in print, well in advance, to the exact year, and explained why it had to happen in clear, simple statements were “geonomists”. By acknowledging and using the 18-year land-price cycle, they’re the real experts:

In the UK, Fred Harrison, PhD, who resurrected Homer Hoyt’s century-old work on Chicago land prices, predicted the 2007 crisis in his book

Boom Bust. It was published in ‘05, but he's been making that prediction since at least 1997.

Harrison also wrote several articles that appeared in

MoneyWeek, the first in August of ’05 ( click here )the next in November of ’06 ( click here ) and the last in November of ’07 ( click here ).

He also showed that the bust would be worse in areas where land taxes are low.

Another article he wrote referring to his earlier predictions is posted at the Progress Report (

In the US, Dr Fred Foldvary, Sr Editor at the Progress Report and economics professor at Santa Clara University, also predicted the 2008 crash several times:

in his article on "The Business Cycle" in the October 1997 issue of the American Journal of Economics and Sociology (AJES).

For short and to the point, he editorialized here in 2004 (

In July 2007 he updated the analysis in "The Depression of 2008" (

A web search using “Foldvary 2008 depression” will turn up others.

Aussie Phil Anderson, in his newsletter to clients in 2003, even advised them to short bank stocks in three years.

Also yours truly, informally-trained editor of the Progress Report, used the 18-year land price cycle to forecast accurately. In my ’06 Q1 (winter) newsletter, I reminded members of my organization that ’06 would be the peak year for land prices (it was) and to prepare their portfolios for the subsequent downturn.

(My private advice to my broker was to load me up on gold, then about $550, and keep it for the duration of the bottom of the land price cycle, which is still going on. Today gold is nearly three times what it was five years ago, so theoretically one could have tripled one's money over the course of the recession. I let him, the pro, talk me out of my plan, deciding instead to go with "professional" advice that was anything but sound. Oh well, hind sight is 20/20, but from here on I'm sticking with the 18-yr cycle).

One can find more instance of “geonomists” (rent-tracking economists) doing what land-lacking economists could not do -- predict accurately -- but these several examples should suffice to suggest that is possible to understand economies and for society to apply a policy to create economic justice.

Editor Jeffery J. Smith runs the Forum on Geonomics.

Also see:

http://www.progress.org/2010/obama.htm

http://www.progress.org/2010/pollute.htm

http://www.progress.org/2009/renttax.htm

What are your views? Share your opinions with The Progress Report:

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Check this box if you'd like to receive occasional Economic Justice announcements via email. No more than one every three weeks on average.

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Just Because You Don't Like Something Online, Doesn't Mean We Should Blame Third Parties | View Clip
03/08/2011
AltAssets.net

Last Thursday and Friday were a pair of very interesting conferences about secondary liability in the Bay Area. On Thursday, there was a one day event all about secondary liability, and on Friday there was the (already mentioned) one day symposium all about Section 230 (which is a law having to do with secondary liability) put on by the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University. This is a big and important topic -- even if it may sound boring if you don't follow specific legal issues. As multiple people pointed out at both events, having strong protections against secondary liability are a large part of what allowed the internet to become so successful. Without these kinds of pro...

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Religion and Spirituality Conference | View Clip
03/08/2011
Columbia Patch

Location: Loyola College
8890 McGaw Rd, Columbia, MD When:
Daily
Loyola University Maryland's department of pastoral counseling will co-host the ninth annual Mid-Year Conference on Religion and Spirituality with Division 36 (Psychology of Religion) of the American Psychological Association.


The event takes place Friday and Saturday, April 15 and 16, at Loyola's Graduate Center – Columbia Campus. Pre-conference seminars will be held on April 14.

The nation's only professional conference focused on research in religion and spirituality, the conference provides a supportive academic forum where professionals can discuss the latest research findings and scientific advances in the field.


Session topics range from “The Role of Individual Differences in Understanding Self and God,” “Prayer and Wellbeing among Cancer Patients,” “Multicultural Issues in Spirituality,” and “Globalization and Ethical Practice.”


Thomas Plante, Ph.D., professor of psychology at Santa Clara University, will offer the conference's presidential address. Other participating speakers include Roy Baumister, Ph.D., the Eppes Prominent Professor of Psychology and head of the social psychology graduate program at Florida State University, who will present “Toward a Scientific Theory of Free Will,” and Paul Costa, Ph.D., professor of mental health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, who will present “The Five-Factor Model and Five-Factor Theory of Personality in Understanding and Researching Constructs of Religiousness and Spirituality.”


For more information, including costs, accommodation details, and sponsorship opportunities, please visit  www.loyola.edu/pastoralcounseling/myc , e-mail  mcdaniels@loyola.edu , or call 410-617-7608
Website: http://www.loyola.edu/pastoralcounseling/myc Phone: 410-617-7608 Email: mcdaniels@loyola.edu

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Have You Earned the Right to Lead? | View Clip
03/08/2011
Quality Digest

Ten destructive mistakes that suggest the answer is no

There are people in every organization whose titles indicate they are leaders. Often, and unfortunately, their employees beg to differ. Oh, they don't say it directly, not to the boss's face, anyway. They say it with their ho-hum performance, their games of avoidance, and their dearth of enthusiasm. Leaders—real leaders who have mastered their craft—don't preside over such lackluster followers. If reading this makes you squirm with recognition, you may have a problem lurking.

Real leadership equity is only earned, not bestowed. When times are good, not-so-great leaders can get by. They're cushioned by a surplus of cash, and their missteps are covered up by the thrill of top-line growth, which hides a multitude of sins. But when the cloak of prosperity falls away, their mediocrity is ruthlessly exposed.

I've spent my career studying practitioners of great leadership via my work as a venture capitalist, board member, high-level consultant, and professor of leadership at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University. In my new book, Unusually Excellent: The Necessary Nine Skills Required for the Practice of Great Leadership (Jossey-Bass/Wiley, 2011), I offer both seasoned and aspiring leaders a framework for understanding and applying the battle-tested fundamentals of leadership at every stage of their careers.

These aren't radically new ideas. Human nature hasn't changed that much over the millennia, so neither have the core laws of leadership. It's just that in the heat of the day-to-day battle, leaders inevitably lose their grip on the basic principles of leadership. In other cases, they never learned these fundamentals, or they learned them earlier in their careers but never mastered them. And finally, sad to say, some people just aren't cut out to lead and need to understand why.

“Normal” leadership is a complex system of behaviors that can tolerate a lot of little mistakes. Extraordinary leadership cannot. So how can you tell whether you really are a great leader in the minds of your employees—or whether you're just playing one? Unfortunately, the depth and breadth of the mistakes you make often tell the true tale. Below are 10 of the most common, deeply destructive mistakes organizational leaders make:

No. 1: Role-playing authenticity rather than living it

Authenticity is about owning your failures and shortcomings. It's about maintaining your authentic self in a situation of meaningful consequence, one where your decisions affect others, sometimes on a grand scale and sometimes in personal or dramatic ways.

Holding true to yourself in the most difficult moments is the “ground zero” of leadership credibility. It's the only way to create the trusted connections you need to lead with real influence. Unfortunately, leaders stumble for a variety of reasons: They get scared and veer away at the last moment, or they sacrifice the truth on the altar of protecting other people's feelings, or they simply seek to avoid the pain of conflict.

When we make the decision to compromise our authenticity, we end up delivering a message that may feel easier but isn't truly what we want or need to say. Deception conspires with fear and seduces us down a dark road of believing we can “fake it.”

No. 2: Underestimating the effect of small acts of dishonesty

In my book, I recount an incident at a fast-growing technology company in which an inexperienced but talented associate had what he thought was a powerful new marketing plan. He asked the chief marketing officer (CMO) to broker a meeting with the chief executive officer (CEO) to make a presentation on the subject. During the presentation the CEO was polite, if noncommittal. He gave the associate some passively-accepting feedback with, “Nice point,” “Interesting,” and so on; he thanked the presenter for his initiative, and wrapped up the meeting quickly.

The CMO could sense duplicity in the CEO's behavior as the parties returned to their offices. Then, 10 minutes after the meeting, the CEO called the CMO into his office and said, in essence, “That presentation was absolutely terrible. That guy's an idiot. I want you to fire him, today.”

The story of the firing spread throughout the company, morale slipped, and the CMO never completely trusted his boss again. The wreckage from one seemingly small act of dishonesty was strewn all over the company and could never be completely cleaned up.

No. 3: Being two-faced

In another scenario, a CEO had one executive on his team whom he really trusted and in whom he could confide. One day, a couple of other members of that company's executive team made a presentation at a board meeting that didn't go well. Later, while walking down a hallway, the CEO turned to his trusted executive and said, “We need to get rid of those guys. They were a disaster at the board meeting; they embarrassed me.”

Nothing happened. Work at the company went on, and the targeted executives remained in their jobs. During the months that passed, the trusted executive found himself in meetings attended by both the CEO and the targeted executives. It was as if the whole incident had never happened. The CEO joked with the men, complimented them on their work, and treated them as long-term team members.

The trusted executive watched this and asked himself: Did the boss mean what he said? If he's willing to stab those guys in the back and then pretend to be their trusting partner, how do I know he hasn't been doing the same thing with me? Just how duplicitous is this guy?

Such are the dangers of assuming that a communication such as the one just described does not qualify as a “casual” comment. Once said, it must be resolved, and if it is not, there is a lingering odor that in one way or another will remain smelly until fixed.

No. 4: Squelching the flow of bad news

Do you shoot the messenger when she brings bad news? If so, you can be certain that her priority is not to bring you the information you need but to protect her own hide. Unusually excellent leaders understand this reality. To combat it they work hard to build a primary and insatiable demand for the unvarnished facts, raw data, actual measurements, honest feedback, and real information.

Leaders must value the facts, truth, and speed of delivery, not the judgments or interpretations of “good” or “bad.” If leaders can do this, then the entire behavior pattern of performance information flow will change for the better. The payback associated with improving the speed and accuracy of the information you need most to make difficult or complex decisions can't be overestimated.

No. 5: Punishing “good failures”

Great organizations encourage risk-taking because innovation requires it. But if your employees take a risk and fail, and you come down hard on them, they'll never risk anything again. Unusually excellent leaders deliberately create high-risk, low-cost environments—a.k.a. cultures of trust—where people don't live in fear of the consequences of failure.

No 6: Letting employee enthusiasm fizzle

A big part of a leader's job is to be compelling. That means you must recruit “A” players through a big vision of the future and a personal commitment to a mission. However, never assume “once enrolled, always enrolled.” Even the best followers need to be reminded again and again how fun, rewarding, and meaningful their work is.

Enthusiasm is a renewable resource. Part of being compelling is reminding yourself that people want and need to be re-enrolled all the time. This message doesn't have to be over the top to be compelling. It may just entail reminding your team, once per quarter, why you come to the office every day, and letting them reflect on the reason they do the same.

No. 7: Refusing to deal with your weakest links

Chronic underperformers create resentment among employees who are giving it their all, and they drag down productivity. Leaders must have a plan for getting these problem children off the playground—and leaders must act on that plan without procrastination.

The worst scenario of all is to have a plan for dealing with underperformers, to identify who are those underperformers, and then not pull the trigger.

Nothing can be more damaging to a team's morale than a leader who won't follow through on announced consequences, whether for reasons of sentimentality, weakness, favoritism, or, worst of all, an attempt to preserve leadership popularity. That behavior destroys your authenticity, trustworthiness, and ability to compel others to act. It is the end of you as a leader.

No. 8: Allowing people to “fail elegantly”

There are two basic operating modes for organizations under high-stakes execution pressure. One is the mentality of winning, which we know about; the less obvious mode is the liability of failing elegantly. This is a sophisticated and veiled set of coping behaviors by individuals to avoid embarrassment when lousy results are exposed for all to see.

Essentially, when people stop believing they can win, some will channel their energy toward how best to lose. This often manifests as excuse-making, blaming, tolerating cut corners, and manipulating and editorializing data. Unusually excellent leaders know how to recognize these symptoms and intervene to get everyone back on the high road, i.e., the winner's mindset.

Passive acceptance of failure, and the rationalization that always goes with it, is a cancer that can begin anywhere in an organization, then metastasize to every office, including your own. You can prevent it by setting clear and precise standards of behavior for everyone on the team, as well as clear consequences for violating those standards. And you can control it through continuous and open communication with every team member and, where necessary, redundant processes and systems.

Most of all, you can cure this disease by establishing a zero tolerance for it (at the same time that you welcome honest admissions of error), by exhibiting precision and care in all your work, focusing on unvarnished results, and committing totally to your success.

No. 9: Delaying decisions until it's too late

Not making a decision is almost always worse than making a bad one. As long as they aren't utterly ill-advised and catastrophic, bad decisions at least keep the organization moving in pace with changing events and can often be rectified by a course correction.

Unusually excellent leaders don't just make decisions; they pursue them. Because the speed of the organization is often its destiny, and because that speed directly correlates with the speed with which its decisions are made or not made, these leaders ensure that nowhere in the organization is a critical decision allowed to be orphaned and unmade.

No. 10: Underestimating the weight your words and moods carry

Consider the story of John Adler, who, prior to his CEO tenure at Adaptec, was a senior vice president at Amdahl, one of the pioneering computer companies of Silicon Valley. One morning as he was walking down the hallway to his office, he encountered some maintenance guys doing repairs. He greeted them cheerfully and then, to make conversation, mentioned how difficult it must be to work in such a dark hallway.

The next morning when Adler came to work, he found five maintenance men replacing every light bulb in the hallway. When he questioned this, one worker said, “We're replacing the light bulbs, boss. You said it was too dark in here.” This story illustrates why leaders need to think carefully about every word they say—because others certainly will. Every conversation with a leader, and every communication from a leader, carries added weight because of the authority of the position behind it. Your mood matters. Don't make it your employees' problem.

Leadership is a choice. It starts with a deep, burning desire to engage with people and rally a community to achieve greatness. Leadership can be difficult, thankless, frustrating, and maddening work at times. It is only the passion of leading on the field—the thrill of looking other human beings in the eyes and seeing their energy, willingness, trust, and commitment—that makes it worthwhile, in a very quiet, private way.

John Hamm is one of the top leadership experts in Silicon Valley. He was named one of the country's Top 100 venture capitalists in 2009 by AlwaysOn and has led investments in many successful high-growth companies as a partner at several Bay Area VC firms. Hamm has also been a CEO, a board member at more than 30 companies, and a CEO adviser and executive coach to senior leaders at companies such as Documentum, Cisco, Hewlett-Packard, TaylorMade-Adidas, Golf, and McAfee. Hamm teaches leadership at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University.

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BU Satellite Team Looking for a Few Good Engineers | View Clip
03/08/2011
Boston University Law Review

Calling all engineers for Air Force satellite competition

Building a perfect cube is essential to BU's nanosatellite. Photo courtesy of BUSAT

If you're interested in space physics and have an engineering background, the BU Student-satellite for Applications and Training project (BUSAT) team wants to hear from you. The team is in the early stages of a competition to design and build a weather satellite for the Air Force and is looking for students to participate.

The competition is sponsored by the University Nanosat Program (UNP), which is jointly run by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate, and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Every two years, UNP pits 11 universities against one another in a showcase of engineering know-how. The universities compete to make the best weather satellite. Participating BU students are asked to make a two-year commitment, since it takes that long to complete the concept-to-flight-ready spacecraft competition. The winning satellite is then launched into orbit.

The University Nanosat Program began in 1999, and BUSAT was among those competing in the first competition. Since its inception, 27 institutions and 4,500 students have been involved in the program, whose objective is to train the next generation of space professionals. Other schools that have participated are MIT, Santa Clara University, Texas A&M, and Michigan Tech University, the winner of the 2009-2011 competition.

BUSAT has already pitched its concept to the UNP and is moving on to more specific design proposals. However, the group's next step could be its toughest one: finding more students to participate.

“Anyone can participate, as long as they interested in it for the long run,” says BUSAT project manager Nathan Darling (ENG'13). “We have grad students, undergraduates, and faculty members working together on the project.”

Because of the demands engineering students face during the academic year, much of the BUSAT work takes place at the end of spring semester. “We're looking for 30 students who can work over the summer,” says Darling. “All disciplines can help out. We have mechanical engineers, electrical engineers, and biomedical engineers as of now.”

As project manager, Darling is responsible for finding project sponsors to help underwrite the team's satellite design and construction costs. Each university gets a $110,000 UNP grant over the course of the two-year competition, but costs can run as much as $300,000. Darling says the University has been generous in the past in supporting the team, as have companies that include Alstom, which specializes in transportation sciences, and Scadata, a communication and data technology company. Companies like these, he says, provide BUSAT with technology essential to developing the satellite.

Building a satellite that meets the rigorous research and design standards laid out by UNP is a complex task. The satellite has 14 different subsystems and uses space industry technology in such components as altitude control to monitor the satellite's orbital positioning, solar arrays to provide the satellite with postlaunch power, and a ground control system to operate the satellite and receive satellite data.

The task of building a spacecraft might seem daunting to many students, but Darling assures students that they don't need any experience in the field. “Before I joined BUSAT, I didn't know much about space physics,” he says. “I'm sort of taking my own crash course.”

The competition offers a rare opportunity for hands-on experience, he says. “How often do you get to work with real space launch equipment? We get to build this satellite. We can make this happen.” The competition, he says, offers a chance to have an impact on the space industry. “We have real industry-level goals. It could eventually show up in industry hardware.”

The winner of the 2011-2013 competition will be announced in January 2013.

More information is available here or email Professor Theodore Fritz at fritz@bu.edu or Nathan Darling at thomas77@bu.edu. Interested in joining? Email to Darling to schedule a meeting.

John Fichera can be reached at jfichera@bu.edu.

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When Murdoch wins, citizens lose | View Clip
03/08/2011
Washington Post

By Katrina vanden Heuvel
Tuesday, March 8, 2011

We tend to measure the influence of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. in terms of the reach of Fox News or the circulation of the New York Post and the Wall Street Journal. But it is actually local television stations on which Murdoch has built his empire and increased his stranglehold on access to information.

He has done so, in large part, by taking advantage of a 1999 change in FCC rules that allowed a single company to own more than one television station in the same market. That arrangement, known as a duopoly, lets big conglomerates such as News Corp. buy up stations, reduce their staffs and consolidate newsrooms. Murdoch now has nine duopolies. According to Santa Clara University's Allen Hammond, a staggering 109 duopolies were created between 2000 and 2006.

The problem isn't just that control over the airwaves becomes concentrated; it's that such consolidation often results in the gutting of local news coverage. Duopoly owners tend to duplicate their local coverage and reduce the amount of airtime dedicated to community news. The subsequent lack of coverage gives local governments a free pass to operate without any real media scrutiny.

In New Jersey, for example, News Corp. owns both WWOR, northern New Jersey's local station, and WNYW just across the river in New York. In 2009, WWOR's only hour of local news was reduced to 30 minutes. And because so many news resources are shared between WWOR and WNYW (including, not incidentally, a co-anchor), very little of what is covered in the newscast focuses on northern New Jersey. As Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) complained to the New York Times, "We don't have a reliable station within our midst."

But media and democracy groups haven't taken that lying down. In 2007, a citizens' group called Voice for New Jersey challenged WWOR's license renewal. The FCC agreed to hold a public hearing and has since expanded its investigation to see whether News Corp. lied in filings about how much local coverage it actually offers and how many reporters it employs.

Duopolies are not the only gift the FCC has given to big corporate media. In 2007, the FCC relaxed its rules on cross-ownership, allowing a single company to own a newspaper as well as either a television or radio station in the same community. "The mogul's dream is the citizen's nightmare," The Nation's John Nichols wrote at the time.

Kevin Martin, the FCC chairman at that time, claimed that such rules would help newspapers and other local outlets survive in a challenging financial climate.

But Michael Copps and Jonathan Adelstein, the two Democrats on the commission, called the proposal "a wolf in sheep's clothing" and said it would result in less news, not more. "In the final analysis, the real winners today are businesses that are in many cases quite healthy," Copps said, "and the real losers are going to be all of us who depend on the news media to learn what's happening in our communities and to keep an eye on local government."

Then-Sen. Barack Obama and Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.) asked the Appropriations Committee to deny funding for implementing the rules out of concern that it would reduce the number of minority- and female-owned stations nationwide. The rules have been challenged in court, and may soon be overturned; oral arguments in front of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit were heard at the end of February. But given the FCC's track record, it's an open question whether such a ruling would have a noticeable impact.

That's because the FCC has the authority to grant waivers to broadcasters if they can show that an otherwise prohibited merger is in the public interest. The FCC has shown a willingness, again and again, to disregard its own rules for the benefit of big media. In New Jersey, for example, News Corp.'s temporary waiver allowing it to own WWOR and the New York Post expired in 2008. But the FCC has taken no action.

While the relaxation of the duopoly rules still prevents certain TV station mergers (between two top-ranked stations, for example), broadcasters are circumventing them. According to Corie Wright of Free Press, these broadcasters are "entering into contractual agreements whereby they share news coverage and station operations, though they purport to maintain separate ownership structures. The arrangements result in duplicate coverage being aired on stations that are supposed to be competing for viewers." Complaints have been filed with the FCC; not surprisingly, the FCC has not acted.

The impact of media consolidation is not abstract. New Jersey has 566 municipalities, but the entire state has only two licensed commercial stations. When media conglomerates take control of those stations, consolidate their newsrooms, lay off reporters and duplicate coverage, it has the effect of creating a news vacuum across the state. Corruption goes unchecked. Local political issues with significant consequences go unnoticed. It also results in the decline of other important programming. According to a study by Children Now, duopoly stations decrease their amount of children's programming at four to five times the rate as non-duopoly stations.

It's time for the FCC to take its role and its obligations more seriously, to recognize that the public interest is not served by unchecked media consolidation. Access to news and information is fundamental to democracy; attempts to weaken it should be met with protest. If the FCC were doing its job, it would deny any further ownership waivers to News Corp. in New Jersey and elsewhere. And it would compel News Corp. to divest from any anti-competitive arrangement where a waiver has already expired.

Either the rules mean something in a democracy, or they don't.

Katrina vanden Heuvel is editor and publisher of The Nation. She writes a weekly online column for The Post.

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Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion | View Clip
03/07/2011
Whittier Daily News

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley, but we often don't know what each other is doing," said the Rev. D. Andrew Kille, a Baptist who led the committee that founded the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in the creation of the group. A three-year study by the Knight Foundation released in 2010, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

The Rev. Jon Pedigo, a Catholic priest, noted that among the most disconnected

groups is the valley's working class of mostly immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will participate in a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after the Sept. 11 terror attacks held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said. "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships," she said.

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC, clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

The South Bay CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Hunger Walk will be held April 3 at 1 p.m. The walk will begin at Hoover Middle School, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose. Contributions may be designated to different religious relief agencies. For information, go to

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Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion | View Clip
03/07/2011
InsideBayArea.com

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley, but we often don't know what each other is doing," said the Rev. D. Andrew Kille, a Baptist who led the committee that founded the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in the creation of the group. A three-year study by the Knight Foundation released in 2010, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

The Rev. Jon Pedigo, a Catholic priest, noted that among the most disconnected

groups is the valley's working class of mostly immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will participate in a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after the Sept. 11 terror attacks held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said. "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships," she said.

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC, clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

SOUTH BAY crop walk

The South Bay CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Hunger Walk will be held April 3 at 1 p.m. The walk will begin at Hoover Middle School, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose. Contributions may be designated to different religious relief agencies. For information, go to www.sivicouncil.org.

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Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion | View Clip
03/07/2011
Contra Costa Times - Online

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley, but we often don't know what each other is doing," said ?the Rev. D. Andrew Kille, a Baptist who led the committee that founded the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in the creation of the group. A three-year study by the Knight Foundation released in 2010, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation. The Rev. ?Jon Pedigo, a Catholic priest, noted that among the most disconnected groups is the valley's working class of mostly immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will participate in a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after the Sept. 11 terror attacks held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said. "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships," she said.

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC, clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

Return to Top



Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion | View Clip
03/07/2011
Press-Telegram - Online

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley, but we often don't know what each other is doing," said the Rev. D. Andrew Kille, a Baptist who led the committee that founded the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in the creation of the group. A three-year study by the Knight Foundation released in 2010, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

The Rev. Jon Pedigo, a Catholic priest, noted that among the most disconnected

groups is the valley's working class of mostly immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will participate in a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after the Sept. 11 terror attacks held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said. "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships," she said.

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC, clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

The South Bay CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Hunger Walk will be held April 3 at 1 p.m. The walk will begin at Hoover Middle School, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose. Contributions may be designated to different religious relief agencies. For information, go to

Return to Top



Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion
03/07/2011
Tri-Valley Herald

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley, but we often don't know what each other is doing," said the Rev. D. Andrew Kille, a Baptist who led the committee that founded the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in the creation of the group. A three-year study by the Knight Foundation released in 2010, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

The Rev. Jon Pedigo, a Catholic priest, noted that among the most disconnected groups is the valley's working class of mostly immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will participate in a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after the Sept. 11 terror attacks held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said. "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships," she said.

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC, clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

SOUTH BAY crop walk

The South Bay CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Hunger Walk will be held April 3 at 1 p.m. The walk will begin at Hoover Middle School, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose. Contributions may be designated to different religious relief agencies. For information, go to .

Copyright © 2011 Tri-Valley Herald. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion
03/07/2011
San Mateo County Times

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley, but we often don't know what each other is doing," said the Rev. D. Andrew Kille, a Baptist who led the committee that founded the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in the creation of the group. A three-year study by the Knight Foundation released in 2010, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

The Rev. Jon Pedigo, a Catholic priest, noted that among the most disconnected groups is the valley's working class of mostly immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will participate in a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after the Sept. 11 terror attacks held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said. "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships," she said.

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC, clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

SOUTH BAY crop walk

The South Bay CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Hunger Walk will be held April 3 at 1 p.m. The walk will begin at Hoover Middle School, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose. Contributions may be designated to different religious relief agencies. For information, go to .

Copyright © 2011 San Mateo County Times. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion
03/07/2011
Daily Review, The

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley, but we often don't know what each other is doing," said the Rev. D. Andrew Kille, a Baptist who led the committee that founded the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in the creation of the group. A three-year study by the Knight Foundation released in 2010, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

The Rev. Jon Pedigo, a Catholic priest, noted that among the most disconnected groups is the valley's working class of mostly immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will participate in a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after the Sept. 11 terror attacks held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said. "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships," she said.

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC, clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

SOUTH BAY crop walk

The South Bay CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Hunger Walk will be held April 3 at 1 p.m. The walk will begin at Hoover Middle School, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose. Contributions may be designated to different religious relief agencies. For information, go to .

Copyright © 2011 The Daily Review. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion
03/07/2011
Oakland Tribune

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley, but we often don't know what each other is doing," said the Rev. D. Andrew Kille, a Baptist who led the committee that founded the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in the creation of the group. A three-year study by the Knight Foundation released in 2010, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

The Rev. Jon Pedigo, a Catholic priest, noted that among the most disconnected groups is the valley's working class of mostly immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will participate in a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after the Sept. 11 terror attacks held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said. "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships," she said.

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC, clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

SOUTH BAY crop walk

The South Bay CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Hunger Walk will be held April 3 at 1 p.m. The walk will begin at Hoover Middle School, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose. Contributions may be designated to different religious relief agencies. For information, go to .

Copyright © 2011 The Oakland Tribune. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion
03/07/2011
Argus, The

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley, but we often don't know what each other is doing," said the Rev. D. Andrew Kille, a Baptist who led the committee that founded the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in the creation of the group. A three-year study by the Knight Foundation released in 2010, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

The Rev. Jon Pedigo, a Catholic priest, noted that among the most disconnected groups is the valley's working class of mostly immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will participate in a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after the Sept. 11 terror attacks held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said. "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships," she said.

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC, clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

SOUTH BAY crop walk

The South Bay CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Hunger Walk will be held April 3 at 1 p.m. The walk will begin at Hoover Middle School, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose. Contributions may be designated to different religious relief agencies. For information, go to .

Copyright © 2011 The Argus. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion
03/07/2011
Alameda Times-Star

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley, but we often don't know what each other is doing," said the Rev. D. Andrew Kille, a Baptist who led the committee that founded the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in the creation of the group. A three-year study by the Knight Foundation released in 2010, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

The Rev. Jon Pedigo, a Catholic priest, noted that among the most disconnected groups is the valley's working class of mostly immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will participate in a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after the Sept. 11 terror attacks held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said. "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships," she said.

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC, clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

SOUTH BAY crop walk

The South Bay CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Hunger Walk will be held April 3 at 1 p.m. The walk will begin at Hoover Middle School, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose. Contributions may be designated to different religious relief agencies. For information, go to .

Copyright © 2011 Alameda Times-Star. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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IEEE Around the World | View Clip
03/07/2011
Institute, The

Photo: iStockphoto

Northeastern

United States

Schenectady (N.Y.) Section establishes IEEE Signal Processing Society chapter.

Worcester County (Mass.) Section establishes IEEE Robotics & Automation Society chapter.

Southeastern

United States

East Tennessee Section celebrates 75th anniversary.

Hampton Roads (Va.) Section celebrates 50th anniversary.

Palm Beach (Fla.) Section celebrates 50th anniversary.

Jamaica Section establishes Consultants Network affinity group.

Student branch formed at Georgia State University, Atlanta.

Orlando (Fla.) Section establishes Women in Engineering (WIE) affinity group.

Central

United States

Southeastern Michigan Section celebrates 100th anniversary.

Siouxland Section, which covers South Dakota, Iowa, and Nebraska, celebrates 50th anniversary.

Western United States

Student branch at Santa Clara University, California, establishes chapter of IEEE Electron Devices Society.

Student branch formed at ITT Technical Institute–Spokane, Spokane Valley, Wash.

Canada

Vancouver Section celebrates 100th anniversary.

Montreal Section celebrates 75th anniversary.

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

France Section celebrates 50th anniversary and also establishes IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems chapter.

United Arab Emirates Section establishes IEEE Circuits and Systems Society chapter.

Oman Section establishes IEEE Power & Energy Society chapter.

Iraq Section establishes Graduates of the Last Decade (GOLD) affinity group.

Texas A&M University at Qatar, Doha, establishes WIE affinity group.

Sfax (Tunisia) Subsection is formed. Student branch at the National Engineering School of Sfax establishes chapter of IEEE Industry Applications Society.

Student branch formed at University of Greenwich, London

Student branch formed at University of Bedfordshire, England.

Italy Section establishes IEEE Industry Applications Society chapter.

Student branch at Sapienza University of Rome establishes chapter of IEEE Industry Applications Society.

Student branch formed at Gydnia Maritime University, Poland.

Student branch formed at Pentecost University College, Accra, Ghana.

Latin America

Chile Section celebrates 50th anniversary.

Costa Rica Section, El Salvador Section, and Guatemala Section all celebrate their 25th anniversaries.

Argentina Section establishes joint chapter of IEEE Electron Devices and IEEE Solid-State Circuits societies.

Student branch formed at Universidad Nacional del Noroeste de la Provincia de Buenos Aires.

Centro Occidente (Mexico) Section establishes GOLD affinity group.

Student branch at the Universidad del Sol, Cuernavaca, Mexico, establishes IEEE Industry Applications Society.

Guadalajara (Mexico) Section establishes IEEE Robotics & Automation Society chapter.

South Brazil Section establishes IEEE Signal Processing Society chapter and WIE affinity group.

Universidad Tecnológica de Bolívar, Cartagena, Colombia, establishes WIE affinity group.

Student branch at Tecnológico Pascual Bravo Institución Universitaria, Medellín, Colombia, establishes chapter of IEEE Robotics & Automation Society.

Student branch at Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco, Peru, establishes chapter of IEEE Robotics & Automation Society.

Student branch at University of San Martín de Porres, Lima, Peru, establishes IEEE Robotics & Automation Society chapter.

Paraguay Section is formed.

Asia and Pacific

Islamabad Section establishes IEEE Communications Society chapter.

New Zealand Central Section establishes IEEE Power & Energy Society chapter.

Beijing Section establishes GOLD affinity group.

Beijing (Changsha) Section establishes IEEE Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology Society chapter.

Beijing (Guangzhou) Section establishes IEEE Signal Processing Society chapter.

Nanjing (China) Section establishes GOLD affinity group.

Nanjing (Hefei) Section establishes IEEE Computational Intelligence Society chapter.

Student branch formed at Tianjin University, China.

National University of Singapore establishes WIE affinity group.

Student branch formed at Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand.

Student branch formed at Kansai University, Suita-Shi, Japan.

Student branch formed at Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Kajang, Malaysia.

WIE affinity groups established in India at College of Engineering–Karunagappally, Pydah College of Engineering & Technology, Rajasthan College of Engineering for Women, College of Engineering Adoor, G.H. Raisoni College of Engineering, and Vignana Bharathi Institute of Technology.

Student branches formed in India at St. Joseph's College of Engineering and Technology, Royal College of Engineering & Technology, Lingaya's Institute of Management and Technology, Sudharsan Engineering College, Charotar University of Science and Technology, Pandian Saraswathi Yadav Engineering College, DMI College of Engineering, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, and Haryana College of Technology and Management.

Send your region or section news to institute@ieee.org.

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Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion
03/07/2011
Contra Costa Times

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley, but we often don't know what each other is doing," said the Rev. D. Andrew Kille, a Baptist who led the committee that founded the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in the creation of the group. A three-year study by the Knight Foundation released in 2010, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

The Rev. Jon Pedigo, a Catholic priest, noted that among the most disconnected groups is the valley's working class of mostly immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will participate in a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after the Sept. 11 terror attacks held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said. "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships," she said.

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC, clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

SOUTH BAY crop walk

The South Bay CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Hunger Walk will be held April 3 at 1 p.m. The walk will begin at Hoover Middle School, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose. Contributions may be designated to different religious relief agencies. For information, go to www.sivicouncil.org.

Copyright © 2011 Contra Costa Times.

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Tips to land a small biz internship | View Clip
03/07/2011
Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal - Online

Good tips from Glassdoor.com:

March is usually the peak month for internship job postings, according to job search site Indeed.com , which offers advice for would-be interns on its blog.

“Every day it's something new” at a start-up company, said Daniel Aguiar, Santa Clara University's executive director for entrepreneurship programs. Interns could end up taking on a broad array of duties – from assisting with the business plan to developing a website to sales calls with the CEO – if they work for a company with only a few paid staffers.

Here are some ideas from Aguiar on where to seek start-up and small company opportunities:

• Head to business incubators and business parks. Incubators can house 20 to 100 start-ups and growing companies, so bring a lot of resumes along. Business parks may have dozens of prospects too, many of them below the radar.

• Read up on who's revving up. A company that has just landed an angel investor or some new funding may want some bright young talent. So will one with a major new client. So check the business journals, small business magazines and blogs, and watch the chamber and economic development newsletters for profiles and news that shows promise.

• Look to lawyers and alumni associations. Both may be fertile grounds to identify small business owners and start-ups, Aguiar said.

Students need to show they're very flexible and have a breadth of academic or other experience to land at a small company.

“Show a lot of initiative. They're going to look for fit, someone who's a go-getter,” Aguiar said. Demonstrate that you're proactive and a good communicator.

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Just Because You Don't Like Something Online, Doesn't Mean We Should Blame Third Parties | View Clip
03/07/2011
Techdirt

from the thinking-through-the-liability dept

Last Thursday and Friday were a pair of very interesting conferences about secondary liability in the Bay Area. On Thursday, there was a one day event all about secondary liability, and on Friday there was the (already mentioned) one day symposium all about Section 230 (which is a law having to do with secondary liability) put on by the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University. This is a big and important topic -- even if it may sound boring if you don't follow specific legal issues. As multiple people pointed out at both events, having strong protections against secondary liability are a large part of what allowed the internet to become so successful. Without these kinds of protections, the simple risk of running an internet company would be quite high, and would certainly limit much of what we see online.

However, not everyone appreciates the reasoning behind secondary liability protections, and a trio of (separate) speakers at Friday's event all focused on their own reasons for disagreeing with the basic premise behind Section 230, with two of them even suggesting that the law should be changed. What troubled me was that I think all three were confusing and conflating different ideas, and doing so in a way that puts some basic First Amendment principles at risk.

The first was Ken Zeran, who is famous for his role in Zeran vs. AOL -- the seminal lawsuit that more or less helped define the protections offered by Section 230 of the CDA. Zeran, an artist and a journalist, sued AOL after he was subject to a series of bullying attacks via AOL. Basically, someone anonymously posted some offensive comments (basically speaking out in support of Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City bombings) and included Zeran's phone number. After asking AOL to remove the posts, and having more posts come back, Zeran sued AOL for negligence in failing to remove all such comments. He eventually lost the case, as the court found that AOL, as a third party, was clearly protected under Section 230.

Zeran speaking was a big deal, because for almost fifteen years, he has refused to speak out about the case, turning down all media requests. In fact, he noted that he initially turned down Eric Goldman, who organized this event, but after thinking about it, and realizing who else would be there, he wanted to take part, and read a statement. That statement, however, was quite a doozy. While you can understand why Zeran is upset about Section 230, he seems to have conflated anonymity and the fact that some people do bad stuff online with the idea that (a) anonymity is automatically bad and (b) that anyone who allows anonymity is equally bad.

He called the internet an "engraved invitation for anonymous crime," ignoring the fact that it's really not that anonymous and there are all sorts of tools for uncovering people who have broken the law (something Zeran never did with his own attacker -- who he says he believed was just someone who chose him at random). Zeran did a lengthy bible quote about the "Good Samaritan" in response to the fact that part (c) of Section 230 mentions how it's about protection of "Good Samaritan" efforts. His argument is that Section 230 actually encourages the opposite behavior, in that it encourages service providers to do absolutely nothing to protect people (like himself) online, because they have no liability.

Unfortunately, Zeran is slightly misguided here. He is correct that third parties have no liability, but he is totally misunderstanding the context. Section 230 was put in place due to an earlier court ruling, which said that if a service provider did any editorial work, it could be held liable for the speech of its users. The inevitable result of such a ruling is that service providers would do absolutely no filtering/monitoring whatsoever, because doing any such thing opened them up to liability. What Section 230 does is allow them to monitor and filter what they feel is appropriate, without facing liability. It actually encourages more filtering and monitoring by service providers, by protecting them for their good faith efforts to cultivate the content they host.

From there, Zeran went on to propose an amended version of Section 230, which basically would make any website liable if it didn't take down content when contacted by law enforcement claiming that the content was violating the law. This raised a lot of eyebrows in the room, as it basically hands a ton of power to law enforcement to censor content at will -- something we've noticed law enforcement has a history of violating. Of course, this ignores the fact that Section 230 already does not apply to criminal law violations, so it's difficult to see why his amendment is needed. But making it explicit risks all sorts of dangerous incentives for the government to block expression. Someone in the audience pointed this out, highlighting previous cases of police "protecting friends" by claiming certain claims were violating the law when they were not, and all Zeran could say in response is "well, nothing's perfect." Sure, nothing's perfect, but when you're presenting a law that pretty clearly goes against the First Amendment, you should have a better answer than that.

Zeran, unfortunately, seemed completely oblivious to the idea that his proposed amendment would absolutely be abused to block speech. Mark Lemley, from the audience, pointed out that we already have an example of this with the DMCA's notice-and-takedown procedure for copyright content, and it is abused quite frequently by people seeking to stifle content. Expanding such a regime beyond copyright would almost certainly lead to even greater abuses. Again, Zeran didn't have much in the way of a response beyond "nothing's perfect."

In the end, Zeran was definitely the victim of a tragic circumstance, and as is too often the case in such a situation, his response is to throw out the baby of the First Amendment with the bathwater of abuse. He seems to think that anonymity itself is a bad thing, and spoke out a few times against the concept of anonymity, refusing to acknowledge that anonymity has many positives as well.

Judge Alex Kozinski

Next up in those who are at least, less than enamored with Section 230, was judge Alex Kozinski. Kozinski, as we've mentioned many times before, is an appeals court judge here in the 9th Circuit, and renowned as one of the most entertaining judges on the bench. He's been involved with a few Section 230 rulings, most notably, the Roommates.com ruling, which is one of the very few cases that put a significant limit on Section 230 -- though it's still being argued just how significant that limit is.

He certainly didn't fail to deliver on the entertainment level, tossing out a variety of amusing quips, kicking off with a mention that earlier in the day he'd received an email from Chris Cox -- former Congressional Rep. (and SEC boss) who was an original author of Section 230 -- who was at the event as well, with Cox telling Kozinski that he thought Kozinski got the Roommates ruling right. Kozinski noted that this was sort of like being a Talmud scholar for many years and suddenly receiving a direct message from God saying "it's okay to eat swordfish."

However, he soon drifted into a bit of an anti-230 discussion himself -- which is a bit worrying, considering that he's a judge ruling on cases involving Section 230. It turns out that Kozinski is a bit of a closet luddite. When it was pointed out that many of the wonderful things online are probably only there because of safe harbors like Section 230, he pushed back. He pointed out that the internet really isn't that great, and if he had the option of flipping a switch to turn it off, he's not entirely convinced that he would leave it on. He said he's just not sure it's really done that much good, and that we might be better off without it.

He also made the rather incredible statement, echoing Zeran, asking "where is it written that you have a right to speak anonymously." Of course, many believe that right is embedded within the First Amendment, and many of Kozinski's colleagues on the bench have made that right to anonymous speech pretty explicit in the case law. It's a bit disappointing to see that Kozinski doesn't agree.

Kozinski did point out that many people don't realize what it's like to be the subject of an anonymous internet attack, and people might feel differently if they were. Now, to be fair, Kozinski has been subject to just such attacks, including a highly publicized situation a few years ago in which an anonymous Kozinski-hater got a bunch of attention directed at Kozinski, after discovering that Kozinski had (sloppily) stored a bunch of jokey viral content on a server that he failed to secure, which got twisted into a claim that he had "obscene" content, leading to a rash of misleading press coverage, and an investigation (which eventually cleared him of any wrong doing).

So, perhaps it's understandable that he's not a fan of anonymity online, but like Zeran before him, he seems to conflate anonymity online with "bad activity" online, without acknowledging that plenty of important and valuable speech is made available because it's anonymous. Protecting anonymous speech is quite important, and a federal judge should recognize that. It was pretty disappointing to see judge Kozinski appear to lean the other way.

Nancy Kim

The third in the misguided Section 230 haters was Professor Nancy Kim, who has focused on a very, very small number of websites that have encouraged people to "dish" gossip about others online, and used those as an example of why Section 230 needs wholesale changes. Once again, she seems to think that anonymity automatically means "bad." She even suggested that perhaps sites that allow anonymous comments shouldn't be allowed safe harbors like Section 230's. Beyond just anonymous comment, she seems to dislike "impulsive behavior," suggesting that sites should strive to prevent people from impulsively presenting content, as that, too, is bad.

Like Zeran and Kozinski, Kim seems to be automatically taking a few bad actors, and blaming their bad actions on separate issues (anonymity and impulsive content posting). She also seemed to ignore that there are plenty of non-legal reasons why websites would seek to improve quality of commentary online: because it makes them more credible. She points to some of the "worst" sites like JuicyCampus and AutoAdmit, but doesn't seem to recognize that almost no one took comments on either site seriously, because everyone knew that anyone could write whatever they wanted on those sites, and they were filled with junk that wasn't trustworthy. Instead, she seems to assume that even if the site isn't credible, people automatically believe everything that was written on them. That's just silly. And wrong.

Furthermore, as Cathy Gellis pointed out, Kim (and Zeran) seemed to think that the US government's policy goal should be to promote "culturally beneficial" communication -- but it's not. The government isn't supposed to have a specific role in determining which kind of speech is is okay, and which kind is not. That's the key point behind the First Amendment.

This point was driven home earlier in the day when Paul Alan Levy from Public Citizen was on a panel, and responded to one of many questions asked about "reopening" Section 230 to amend the law. As he pointed out, plenty of people would probably love to "reopen" the First Amendment as well, because they don't like some of the speech enabled by it. However, on the whole, most people who understand and value the First Amendment and the idea of Freedom of Expression recognize that, while it allows speech "we don't like," the end result is that it also enables tons of speech that we do value. The same is true of Section 230. Yes, it allows some "bad" speech to get out there, but there's no way to effectively limit that without causing massive collateral damage as well. Asking to change or hinder Section 230 is no different than asking that we cut back on our free speech rights.

In the end, hopefully these three folks who were skeptical of Section 230 really represent extreme outliers. It certainly appeared that way from the audience, which included a ton of experts in Section 230 who mostly (especially from the Twitter backchannel) were horrified at the suggestions to modify Section 230. However, we should be careful, as there are certainly serious efforts underway to slice up Section 230 and take away this very important tool of free speech. The problem is that most of those attacking Section 230 seem to not understand the basic fact that all it does is make sure liability is accurately placed on those who actually said stuff, rather than a third party. Either that, or as we saw with these three speakers, they seemed to confuse things like anonymity with "bad speech" and assumed that you could somehow use that confusion to carve out "bad speech" without having a serious negative impact on perfectly legitimate speech.

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When watching your investments can hurt you | View Clip
03/07/2011
Stuff.co.nz - Online

Even though he considers himself a relaxed investor, who rarely does any trading, Meir Statman usually takes a look at his investment account at Vanguard at least a few times a week.

By doing so, the Glenn Klimek Professor of Finance at Santa Clara University and author of What Investors Really Want ignores traditional buy-and-hold wisdom, which suggests that checking up on things a couple of times a year, and rebalancing if necessary, is plenty for most investors.

The 63-year old behavioural finance expert might sneak a peek at his portfolio if he's working and needs a break, or after he's checked his email.

Like many people, he enjoys the satisfaction of seeing the little green numbers pop up when the market has done well. But he doesn't obsess about losses on down days.

"As an investor, I'm kind of like a sail boat with its sails down, bobbing with the waves and taking things as they come," he says philosophically.

"A lot of people view following the market and their investments as a kind of pastime, like watching football, but don't necessarily take any action in response. And that's perfectly okay."

What's not OK is when emotional reactions to witnessing the daily market gains and losses get in the way of clear thinking, which evidence suggests happens an awful lot.

During the 1980s, Statman co-authored a study that first documented the "disposition effect," a tendency for investors to take gains off the table on winning transactions too hastily and reluctance to realize losses.

In 2007, a team of researchers in Israel concluded that access to market performance information increases the odds that people will follow those patterns.

Other academic research, as well as statistical data such as the flow of money in and out of mutual funds, suggests that when the market rises for awhile investors believe it will continue on an upward path and pile in.

Conversely, when the market drops, they assume such negative performance will continue and stay away from the market or sell their holdings.

In either case, frequent quote lookups and portfolio peeking are likely to exacerbate these emotional reactions.

Charles Rotblut, vice-president of the American Association of Individual Investors, has noticed that interest in checking portfolios appears to wax and wane with the market tides.

When the market is up, traffic to the association's website spikes as investors check quotes more often and use portfolio management tools.

When the market falls for an extended period, traffic to the website declines as investors take on a bunker mentality.

Despite ample evidence that many investors do the wrong thing at the wrong time, Rotblut says frequent monitoring of a portfolio is perfectly fine as long as you take steps to wring the emotion out of the process.

"If you're investing in individual stocks you need to check at least once a week because it's important to stay on top of breaking news, earnings guidance, mergers, or management changes," he says.

"If you're investing in diversified mutual funds or exchange-traded funds, once a month or even once every quarter is probably enough." Rotblut, who prefers stocks of individual companies over mutual funds or ETFs, likes to check his portfolio every day because it "gives me a sense of control about things."

In an age when checking intra-day values and making trades is just a few potentially hazardous mouse clicks away, how can investors avoid the temptation to react impetuously to daily gyrations?

Rotblut advises stock investors to separate normal market fluctuations from what is going on at a company, and to discipline themselves so they can avoid reacting too hastily to either positive or negative information.

"Before I buy a stock, I write down the reasons I like it, and what would make me decide to sell. When it goes down, I look at what I wrote and ask myself if the downturn is because of a fundamental change in the business or just market fallout."

He also sets downside price targets, and sticks to them. If a stock drops 10 percent from his purchase price, he'll review his original analysis of a company and determine if the reasons he bought it are still valid.

If it drops 20 percent, he will assume that there is something amiss with the company that he may not be aware of and will likely sell.

Statman has a simpler solution.

"If you're tempted to do something silly, my suggestion would be to grab a piece of chocolate or go take a cold shower instead."

- Reuters

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Mistakenly Seized Sites Should Sue Government, Says Congresswoman | View Clip
03/07/2011
PC World - Online

If someone labeled your business as being connected to child pornography, when it fact it had nothing to do with child porn, would you sue for defamation? What if that someone who tarnished your reputation with child porn-related accusations was the federal government? Well one congresswoman believes you should sue. In fact, I found her outspokenness both refreshing and amusing and wanted to share it with you in case you missed it.

In the past, after blogs simply linked to news about file sharing and were shutdown, I shared my thoughts on the twisted evidence of ICE domain seizures and the possibility of P2P DNS as an alternative system. Since President Obama has repeatedly filled Justice Department positions with former RIAA attorneys and nominated a previous RIAA attorney for solicitor general, it's not too often you see a public figure in a public meeting being quite so blunt with her opinions of our governments' way of dealing with copyright infringement and piracy. U.S. Representative Zoe Lofgren amused me.

Lofgren suggested that instead of going after the little fish, there is a big problem of commercial piracy that needs to be dealt with, despite the "chicken poo" reports by copyright enforcement officials to the contrary.

Rep. Lofgren didn't stop there. Last week, during a House Judiciary Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, Competition, and the Internet, Lofgren questioned the Obama administration's Intellectual Property Czar Victoria Espinel about the legality of Homeland Security domain seizures. Specifically, Lofgren questioned the "due process" in regard to "Operation Protect Our Children" when ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) confiscated 84,000 website addresses by "mistake" on behalf of the Department of Homeland Security. Each of those websites then displayed the banner below.

TorrentFreak explained the problem was when the government seized the domain mooo.com "which belongs to the DNS provider FreeDNS. It is the most popular shared domain at afraid.org and as a result of the authorities' actions a massive 84,000 subdomains were wrongfully seized as well. "

At the time, , Eric Goldman, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law, claimed our government had gone rogue. "Our government is going into court with half-baked facts and half-baked legal theories and shutting down operations," Goldman said. "This is exactly what we thought the government couldn't do. I'm scratching my head why we aren't' grabbing the pitchforks."

Rep. Zoe Lofgren seems to agree that ICE was out of line and abused due process. During a Silicon Valley legal conference, Lofgren said ICE takedowns involved no due process and apparently had no regard for the "First Amendment or fair use."

Lofgren had the opportunity to question IP Czar Victoria Espinel about the domain seizures. According to Espinel, the government "really cares" about the First Amendment and claimed there was due process before the domains were seized. Lofgren's reply to Espinel's claim about due process was so elegant that I'll quote Techdirt who quotes Lofgren.

In other copyright protection news, a new report, Media Piracy in Emerging Economies, by the Social Science Research Council, was based on three years of work by 35 independent researchers studying piracy. The report claims that music, movie and software piracy flourishes because prices in legal markets are not affordable for people within emerging countries. It also found that law enforcement and anti-piracy education have failed. Researchers discovered there are no "systematic links between media piracy and organized crime or terrorism in any of the countries examined."

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Concern Over Newsom's Shared Office At Founders Den | View Clip
03/07/2011
Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights, The

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom's plan to lease office space from a San Francisco company whose managing partner contributed $12,000 to his statewide campaign raises ethical concerns, government experts say.

The lieutenant governor announced last week that he is not going to open an office in the state building in San Francisco but instead will work from shared office space at a private club in the South of Market district.

Zachary Bogue, a managing partner of the private, invitation-only Founders Den for entrepreneurs, contributed the maximum amount allowed under law to Newsom's primary and general election campaign for lieutenant governor, and he invited Newsom to work in the new office space, according to a spokesman for Newsom.

But some experts in governmental ethics said they have concerns about Newsom's move because the 17 startups in the shared office space could get special access to a top state official, thanks to a campaign donor.

"I think that it raises a red flag and poses some important questions about fairness and how campaign relationships may have an impact on officeholder actions," said Judy Nadler, former mayor of Santa Clara and senior fellow of government ethics at Santa Clara University's Markkula Center for Applied Ethics.

"Being in the environment where the lieutenant governor is there and being part of an incubator that has basically been blessed by the lieutenant governor gives all persons who are involved a real advantage over people who weren't invited to become part of this," she added.

Newsom did not comment on the matter, but his spokesman, Francisco Castillo, said the lieutenant governor wants to focus on economic development and job creation in a real-world setting. The terms of the lease, Castillo added, were the same as those for start-ups.

"He feels that working among these entrepreneurs will redefine how government and business interact," Castillo said. "There's no hidden agenda."

Last week, in a video interview taped at Founders Den and posted on TechCrunch.com, Newsom said, "It's nice to be here ... wearing a governmental hat because a lot of these folks want to move from a space like this into their growth phase, and how do you interact with permitting? How do you interact with tax incentives or government in a general sense, regulatory sense?"

'One-stop shop'

He went on to say, "I've got experience on the receiving end and on the giving end in terms of setting up those regulations. But hopefully I can be a one-stop shop to help some of these businesses as well."

State officials like Newsom actually have to rent space in state office buildings, paying out of their allotted budget. Newsom is keeping the main office in the Capitol, which costs $5,530 per month, according to the Department of General Services.

Newsom terminated a lease on a small space in a state office building in Los Angeles, which cost about $650, and entered into a six-month lease with Founders Den for one desk space and access to the common area, said Eric Lamoureux, spokesman for the Department of General Services. The new lease is $500 per month.

Tom Poser, who represents several shared space operations in San Francisco at the commercial real estate firm Jones Lang LaSalle, said the type of space Newsom is renting typically goes for between $500 and $600.

Founders Den is located at 665 Third St., two blocks from AT&T Park in a hip, up and coming area of the South of Market neighborhood. The former home of the Northern California Print Center originally housed MJB Coffee Co.'s headquarters. The industrial building has been converted into loft office space, featuring large windows.

Founders Den shares the building with at least a dozen other businesses. Its ground-floor office is easy to get to, but an office manager for the building sits at the front. The lieutenant governor's new desk is set among clusters of desks in the office's main work area, upstairs from a "clubhouse" space on the ground floor, an area with a coffee shop-like atmosphere that includes clusters of couches, tables and chairs.

On a recent visit, Newsom's space was empty, except for a power cord and a few of his business cards.

Next desk over

Michael Levit, one of four managing partners who set up Founders Den, works at the desk next to Newsom. He did not contribute to the campaign. Levit has a startup, called Spigot, which "provides publisher and advertiser solutions to downloadable software companies."

Levit said Newsom's wife, Jennifer Siebel Newsom, and his wife attended Stanford University together but that he had only met the former mayor a few times before he became a member of Founders Den. Bogue could not be reached for comment.

Levit said visitors without an appointment would be asked to call Newsom's main office in Sacramento. When a Chronicle reporter and photographer dropped by last week, the office manager was friendly but didn't offer access until she found Levit.

Levit said the space opened six weeks ago. In addition to the startups that rent space - ranging from private offices to the cluster of desks in an open room - sponsors are welcome to use the clubhouse.

No staff

The lieutenant governor will hold meetings there as he will in the Sacramento main office, said Castillo, but there will be no staff there. Newsom looked at other similar hubs for space in San Francisco but chose Founders Den, Castillo said. He said he didn't know why the lieutenant governor made the specific choice.

Doug Heller, executive director of the good government group Consumer Watchdog, said he does not know of another elected official renting space inside a private office - the state does lease space in privately owned buildings - and said Newsom will need to take steps to make sure there is no impropriety with a donor.

He suggested Newsom "recuse himself," by announcing that he wouldn't provide individual assistance to the startups around him.

"It's the job of public officials to make the barriers to influence too high to scale, and so Newsom better put up some pretty big cubicle walls to ensure that it doesn't look like his donor's company is getting special access," Heller said.

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Congresswoman: mistakenly seized sites should sue the government | View Clip
03/07/2011
Computerworld

If someone labeled your business as being connected to child pornography, when it fact it had nothing to do with child porn, would you sue for defamation? What if that someone who tarnished your reputation with child porn-related accusations was the federal government? Well one congresswoman believes you should sue. In fact, I found her outspokenness both refreshing and amusing and wanted to share it with you in case you missed it. In the past, after blogs simply linked to news about file sharing and were shutdown, I shared my thoughts on the twisted evidence of ICE domain seizures and the possibility of P2P DNS as an alternative system . Since President Obama has repeatedly filled Justice Department positions with former RIAA attorneys and nominated a previous RIAA attorney for solicitor general , it's not too often you see a public figure in a public meeting being quite so blunt with her opinions of our governments' way of dealing with copyright infringement and piracy. U.S. Representative Zoe Lofgren amused me. Lofgren suggested that instead of going after the little fish, there is a big problem of commercial piracy that needs to be dealt with, despite the "chicken poo" reports by copyright enforcement officials to the contrary. Rep. Lofgren didn't stop there. Last week, during a House Judiciary Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, Competition, and the Internet, Lofgren questioned the Obama administration's Intellectual Property Czar Victoria Espinel about the legality of Homeland Security domain seizures. Specifically, Lofgren questioned the "due process" in regard to " Operation Protect Our Children " when ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) confiscated 84,000 website addresses by "mistake" on behalf of the Department of Homeland Security. Each of those websites then displayed the banner below. TorrentFreak explained the problem was when the government seized the domain mooo.com "which belongs to the DNS provider FreeDNS . It is the most popular shared domain at afraid.org and as a result of the authorities' actions a massive 84,000 subdomains were wrongfully seized as well. " At the time, according to The Register , Eric Goldman, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law, claimed our government had gone rogue. "Our government is going into court with half-baked facts and half-baked legal theories and shutting down operations," Goldman said. "This is exactly what we thought the government couldn't do. I'm scratching my head why we aren't' grabbing the pitchforks." Rep. Zoe Lofgren seems to agree that ICE was out of line and abused due process . During a Silicon Valley legal conference, Lofgren said ICE takedowns involved no due process and apparently had no regard for the "First Amendment or fair use." Lofgren had the opportunity to question IP Czar Victoria Espinel about the domain seizures. According to Espinel, the government "really cares" about the First Amendment and claimed there was due process before the domains were seized. Lofgren's reply to Espinel's claim about due process was so elegant that I'll quote Techdirt who quotes Lofgren. With all due respect, judges sign a lot of things... For example, the FreeDNS takedown -- it wasn't a copyright enforcement, but "supposedly" a child pornography enforcement -- ICE took down 84,000 websites of small business people that have nothing to do with child pornography at all. And put up a little banner saying "this was taken down for child pornography." Really smearing them. If I were them, I'd sue the Department. These were just small businesses. They had nothing to do with anything, and yet a judge signed that. So, if that's the protection, it's no protection . I want to know, what is the Department doing to think about the affirmative defenses, to think about -- yes, there's piracy, and all of us are united that we gotta do something about piracy -- but there's also a First Amendment that you should be considering when you go and destroy a small business. Are you thinking about that? In other copyright protection news, a new report, Media Piracy in Emerging Economies , by the Social Science Research Council, was based on three years of work by 35 independent researchers studying piracy. The report claims that music, movie and software piracy flourishes because prices in legal markets are not affordable for people within emerging countries. It also found that law enforcement and anti-piracy education have failed. Researchers discovered there are no "systematic links between media piracy and organized crime or terrorism in any of the countries examined."

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Using good judgment and making ethical decisions | View Clip
03/07/2011
Examiner.com

Prof. J. Michael Bailey has apologized for a decision which has caused a bit of embarrassment for him and Northwestern University.  Bailey, professor for a Human Sexuality class at Northwestern, orchestrated an optional after-class lecture during which a woman and her fiancé demonstrated the use of a high-powered sex toy in front of more than 100 students. While the majority of students did not complain, in hindsight and with his job in jeopardy, Bailey says he should have used better judgment.

Well, what's done is done and there is no “do over” for the professor.  However when you need to make a major work decision, make sure you think it through carefully and ethically.  This framework for thinking ethically, provided by the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University, can help to guide your thought processes.  Bailey might be in a different place if he had given the decision more thought and asked himself some of these questions:

Recognize an Ethical Issue

Could this decision or situation be damaging to someone or to some group? Does this decision involve a choice between a good and bad alternative, or perhaps between two "goods" or between two "bads"?

Is this issue about more than what is legal or what is most efficient? If so, how?

Get the Facts

What are the relevant facts of the case? What facts are not known? Can I learn more about the situation? Do I know enough to make a decision?

What individuals and groups have an important stake in the outcome? Are some concerns more important? Why?

What are the options for acting? Have all the relevant persons and groups been consulted? Have I identified creative options?

Evaluate Alternative Actions

Evaluate the options by asking the following questions:

Which option will produce the most good and do the least harm? (The Utilitarian Approach)

Which option best respects the rights of all who have a stake? (The Rights Approach)

Which option treats people equally or proportionately? (The Justice Approach)

Which option best serves the community as a whole, not just some members?  (The Common Good Approach)

Which option leads me to act as the sort of person I want to be? (The Virtue Approach)

Make a Decision and Test It

Considering all these approaches, which option best addresses the situation?

If I told someone I respect-or told a television audience-which option I have chosen, what would they say?

Act and Reflect on the Outcome

How can my decision be implemented with the greatest care and attention to the concerns of all stakeholders?

How did my decision turn out and what have I learned from this specific situation?

Northwestern sex prof apologizes for after-class sex demo

Read the professor's statement

Loventrice Farrow is an experienced HR professional with more than 15 years in the HR field. She is also a professional writer, speaker and...

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Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion | View Clip
03/07/2011
Campbell Reporter

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley, but we often don't know what each other is doing," said the Rev. D. Andrew Kille, a Baptist who led the committee that founded the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in the creation of the group. A three-year study by the Knight Foundation released in 2010, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

The Rev. Jon Pedigo, a Catholic priest, noted that among the most disconnected

groups is the valley's working class of mostly immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will participate in a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after the Sept. 11 terror attacks held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said. "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships," she said.

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC, clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

The South Bay CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Hunger Walk will be held April 3 at 1 p.m. The walk will begin at Hoover Middle School, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose. Contributions may be designated to different religious relief agencies. For information, go to

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NEW GROUP AIMS TO BRIDGE DIVIDES
03/07/2011
San Jose Mercury News

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley, but we often don't know what each other is doing," said the Rev. D. Andrew Kille, a Baptist who led the committee that founded the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in the creation of the group. A three-year study by the Knight Foundation released in 2010, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

The Rev. Jon Pedigo, a Catholic priest, noted that among the most disconnected groups is the valley's working class of mostly immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will participate in a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after the Sept. 11 terror attacks held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said. "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships," she said.

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC, clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

Copyright © 2011 San Jose Mercury News

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Concern over Newsom's shared office at Founders Den | View Clip
03/06/2011
San Francisco Chronicle - Online

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom's plan to lease office space from a San Francisco company whose managing partner contributed $12,000 to his statewide campaign raises ethical concerns, government experts say.

The lieutenant governor announced last week that he is not going to open an office in the state building in San Francisco but instead will work from shared office space at a private club in the South of Market district.

Zachary Bogue, a managing partner of the private, invitation-only Founders Den for entrepreneurs, contributed the maximum amount allowed under law to Newsom's primary and general election campaign for lieutenant governor, and he invited Newsom to work in the new office space, according to a spokesman for Newsom.

But some experts in governmental ethics said they have concerns about Newsom's move because the 17 startups in the shared office space could get special access to a top state official, thanks to a campaign donor.

"I think that it raises a red flag and poses some important questions about fairness and how campaign relationships may have an impact on officeholder actions," said Judy Nadler, former mayor of Santa Clara and senior fellow of government ethics at Santa Clara University's Markkula Center for Applied Ethics.

"Being in the environment where the lieutenant governor is there and being part of an incubator that has basically been blessed by the lieutenant governor gives all persons who are involved a real advantage over people who weren't invited to become part of this," she added.

Newsom did not comment on the matter, but his spokesman, Francisco Castillo, said the lieutenant governor wants to focus on economic development and job creation in a real-world setting. The terms of the lease, Castillo added, were the same as those for start-ups.

"He feels that working among these entrepreneurs will redefine how government and business interact," Castillo said. "There's no hidden agenda."

Last week, in a video interview taped at Founders Den and posted on TechCrunch.com, Newsom said, "It's nice to be here ... wearing a governmental hat because a lot of these folks want to move from a space like this into their growth phase, and how do you interact with permitting? How do you interact with tax incentives or government in a general sense, regulatory sense?"

'One-stop shop'

He went on to say, "I've got experience on the receiving end and on the giving end in terms of setting up those regulations. But hopefully I can be a one-stop shop to help some of these businesses as well."

State officials like Newsom actually have to rent space in state office buildings, paying out of their allotted budget. Newsom is keeping the main office in the Capitol, which costs $5,530 per month, according to the Department of General Services.

Newsom terminated a lease on a small space in a state office building in Los Angeles, which cost about $650, and entered into a six-month lease with Founders Den for one desk space and access to the common area, said Eric Lamoureux, spokesman for the Department of General Services. The new lease is $500 per month.

Tom Poser, who represents several shared space operations in San Francisco at the commercial real estate firm Jones Lang LaSalle, said the type of space Newsom is renting typically goes for between $500 and $600.

Founders Den is located at 665 Third St., two blocks from AT&T Park in a hip, up and coming area of the South of Market neighborhood. The former home of the Northern California Print Center originally housed MJB Coffee Co.'s headquarters. The industrial building has been converted into loft office space, featuring large windows.

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Concern over Newsom's shared office
03/06/2011
San Francisco Chronicle

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom's plan to lease office space from a San Francisco company whose managing partner contributed $12,000 to his statewide campaign raises ethical concerns, government experts say.

The lieutenant governor announced last week that he is not going to open an office in the state building in San Francisco but instead will work from shared office space at a private club in the South of Market district.

Zachary Bogue, a managing partner of the private, invitation-only Founders Den for entrepreneurs, contributed the maximum amount allowed under law to Newsom's primary and general election campaign for lieutenant governor, and he invited Newsom to work in the new office space, according to a spokesman for Newsom.

But some experts in governmental ethics said they have concerns about Newsom's move because the 17 startups in the shared office space could get special access to a top state official, thanks to a campaign donor.

"I think that it raises a red flag and poses some important questions about fairness and how campaign relationships may have an impact on officeholder actions," said Judy Nadler, former mayor of Santa Clara and senior fellow of government ethics at Santa Clara University's Markkula Center for Applied Ethics.

"Being in the environment where the lieutenant governor is there and being part of an incubator that has basically been blessed by the lieutenant governor gives all persons who are involved a real advantage over people who weren't invited to become part of this," she added.

Newsom did not comment on the matter, but his spokesman, Francisco Castillo, said the lieutenant governor wants to focus on economic development and job creation in a real-world setting. The terms of the lease, Castillo added, were the same as those for start-ups.

"He feels that working among these entrepreneurs will redefine how government and business interact," Castillo said. "There's no hidden agenda."

Last week, in a video interview taped at Founders Den and posted on TechCrunch.com, Newsom said, "It's nice to be here ... wearing a governmental hat because a lot of these folks want to move from a space like this into their growth phase, and how do you interact with permitting? How do you interact with tax incentives or government in a general sense, regulatory sense?"

'One-stop shop'He went on to say, "I've got experience on the receiving end and on the giving end in terms of setting up those regulations. But hopefully I can be a one-stop shop to help some of these businesses as well."

State officials like Newsom actually have to rent space in state office buildings, paying out of their allotted budget. Newsom is keeping the main office in the Capitol, which costs $5,530 per month, according to the Department of General Services.

Newsom terminated a lease on a small space in a state office building in Los Angeles, which cost about $650, and entered into a six-month lease with Founders Den for one desk space and access to the common area, said Eric Lamoureux, spokesman for the Department of General Services. The new lease is $500 per month.

Tom Poser, who represents several shared space operations in San Francisco at the commercial real estate firm Jones Lang LaSalle, said the type of space Newsom is renting typically goes for between $500 and $600.

Founders Den is located at 665 Third St., two blocks from AT&T Park in a hip, up and coming area of the South of Market neighborhood. The former home of the Northern California Print Center originally housed MJB Coffee Co.'s headquarters. The industrial building has been converted into loft office space, featuring large windows.

Founders Den shares the building with at least a dozen other businesses. Its ground-floor office is easy to get to, but an office manager for the building sits at the front. The lieutenant governor's new desk is set among clusters of desks in the office's main work area, upstairs from a "clubhouse" space on the ground floor, an area with a coffee shop-like atmosphere that includes clusters of couches, tables and chairs.

On a recent visit, Newsom's space was empty, except for a power cord and a few of his business cards.

Next desk overMichael Levit, one of four managing partners who set up Founders Den, works at the desk next to Newsom. He did not contribute to the campaign. Levit has a startup, called Spigot, which "provides publisher and advertiser solutions to downloadable software companies."

Levit said Newsom's wife, Jennifer Siebel Newsom, and his wife attended Stanford University together but that he had only met the former mayor a few times before he became a member of Founders Den. Bogue could not be reached for comment.

Levit said visitors without an appointment would be asked to call Newsom's main office in Sacramento. When a Chronicle reporter and photographer dropped by last week, the office manager was friendly but didn't offer access until she found Levit.

Levit said the space opened six weeks ago. In addition to the startups that rent space - ranging from private offices to the cluster of desks in an open room - sponsors are welcome to use the clubhouse.

No staffThe lieutenant governor will hold meetings there as he will in the Sacramento main office, said Castillo, but there will be no staff there. Newsom looked at other similar hubs for space in San Francisco but chose Founders Den, Castillo said. He said he didn't know why the lieutenant governor made the specific choice.

Doug Heller, executive director of the good government group Consumer Watchdog, said he does not know of another elected official renting space inside a private office - the state does lease space in privately owned buildings - and said Newsom will need to take steps to make sure there is no impropriety with a donor.

He suggested Newsom "recuse himself," by announcing that he wouldn't provide individual assistance to the startups around him.

"It's the job of public officials to make the barriers to influence too high to scale, and so Newsom better put up some pretty big cubicle walls to ensure that it doesn't look like his donor's company is getting special access," Heller said.

Copyright © 2011 San Francisco Chronicle

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NANCY UNGER: Wisconsin has a history of leading the nation -- for better or worse | View Clip
03/06/2011
Bakersfield Californian - Online, The

The Bakersfield Californian | Saturday, Mar 05 2011 11:01 PM

Wisconsin doesn't often provide political leadership at the national level, but when it does, it's like that old nursery rhyme about the little girl with the curl right in the middle of her forehead: When it's good, it's very, very good, and when it's bad, it's horrid.

For the past couple of weeks, Americans have been following the protests in Madison. Most of the protesters oppose the proposals of their newly elected governor, Scott Walker, especially his effort to curtail the power of public employee unions. They share the view of New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, who says that Walker and his backers are trying to "make Wisconsin -- and eventually, America -- less of a functioning democracy and more of a third-world-style oligarchy."

Walker is not without his defenders, who counter that, as Wisconsin's duly elected governor, Walker has the right and the obligation to do what it takes to rein in costs. They have little sympathy for unions, denigrating them as organizations concerned only with power and with pampering their members at the cost of the common good.

Union leaders, however, have offered to make economic concessions, including pay cuts, in response to the need for shared sacrifice. They point out that stripping away their organizations' collective bargaining rights will add nothing to state coffers, whose depletion will be compounded when Walker's tax breaks for business begin to take hold next year.

It seems that Wisconsin will lead in one way or the other in this epic battle. Either Gov. Walker will triumph and unions will lose, or the protesters will prevail and unions will retain their collective bargaining power.

Similar battles have begun in Ohio, Indiana and Michigan, but eyes are still on the Wisconsin show down.

During periods of crisis in the past, Wisconsin has provided some of nation's greatest leadership -- and some of its worst.

In his three terms as governor (1900-1906), Robert La Follette saw big business threaten the foundation of democracy. He responded by making his state a leader in the burgeoning progressive reform movement.

"Fighting Bob" sought to regulate business owners like George F. Baer, who scoffed at the need for labor unions, claiming that "the rights and interests of the laboring man will be protected and cared for -- not by the labor agitators, but by Christian men to whom God has given control of the property rights of the country."

La Follette's reforms in Wisconsin were consistent with his ultimate goal: to distribute more equitably the nation's wealth and power. His reforms included regulation of railroads and other powerful utilities, civil service reform, regulation of lobbyists, resource conservation measures, tax reform and candidate nomination by primary election. As a U.S. senator from 1906 until his death in 1925, he continued his efforts to prevent what he termed "the encroachment of the powerful few upon the rights of the many."

Robert La Follette Jr. was elected as his father's successor in the Senate and continued Wisconsin's reform tradition for another 21 years.

Most Americans today don't know the name La Follette, but they immediately recognize the name of the man who in 1946 ended the family's 40-year reign in the Senate: Joseph McCarthy. McCarthy, whose insistence that communists had infiltrated America's unions as well as the State Department and the Army, provided a very different kind of national leadership.

In the early 1950s McCarthy enjoyed enormous popularity. He was hailed as a hero for his aggressive efforts to ferret out the internal communist menace. He was featured on the covers of Time and Newsweek magazines and celebrated by social and political organizations nationwide for displaying the kind of toughness the country needed in the crisis of the Cold War.

Despite his short-term popularity, McCarthy's aggressive crusade exacerbated rather than solved the nation's problems. Formally censured in 1954 for bringing "dishonor and disrepute" upon the U.S. Senate, McCarthy left in his wake broken careers and damaged lives. His leadership proved an international embarrassment.

After McCarthy, Wisconsin scrambled to regain its reputation as a pioneer in democratic reforms, becoming in 1959 the first state to grant public employees the right to bargain collectively.

Wisconsin is poised once again to lead the nation. In Madison on the second floor of the Capitol rotunda, a bust of Robert La Follette looks out over the sea of protesters. With the state and the nation at a crossroads, Wisconsin is adding another crucial chapter to its history of leadership.

That history shows just how good, or just how horrid, that leadership can be.

Nancy C. Unger is associate professor of history at Santa Clara University and author of "Fighting Bob La Follette: The Righteous Reformer." She wrote this for the History News Service.

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Silicon Valley interreligious group launched to promote harmony and compassion | View Clip
03/06/2011
San Gabriel Valley Tribune - Online

Promising to reach beyond their own religious traditions, the South Bay faithful gave birth Sunday to a transreligious group they hope will bridge differences and create a community forged by care and respect.

The Silicon Valley Interreligious Council intends to build understanding and harmony among religious groups and individuals who want to unite and promote a just and compassionate community.

At a meeting Sunday afternoon at Santa Clara University attended by about 200 people, SiVIC (pronounced "civic") was praised by people of various faiths.

"There's a huge entrepreneurial spirit in the valley but we often don't know what each other is doing," said Baptist Rev. D. Andrew Kille, who led the committee that crafted the new group.

So why would Silicon Valley, which hosts many interfaith groups, need another one?

"We don't have a real sense of focus or centeredness," said the Rev. Bruce Bramlett, an Episcopalian, who also was involved in creation of the group. A recent study by the Knight Foundation, "The Soul of the Community," found that two-thirds of respondents in the valley felt disconnected. SiVIC's enthusiastic members hope to help remedy that.

"We want to help create the glue to connect various communities," said Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

Father Jon Pedigo noted that among the most disconnected groups is the valley's working class of mostly

immigrants.

SiVIC has wasted no time in getting to work. On April 3 it will hold a walk to raise awareness and dollars to combat world hunger and poverty. And the group hopes to create a plan for a mental health and spiritual response to disaster.

SiVIC's roots reach back to 1973, in the founding of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Over the years that group incorporated other faiths, and after 9/11 held interfaith discussions called the "Circle of Palms," named after its downtown San Jose meeting place. And two years ago, SiVIC's predecessor became a partner in the Parliament of World Religions.

The existence of a group like SiVIC helps embolden government to act, said Dave Cortese, president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, referring to lobbying on immigration, child health and other issues.

Religious leaders strengthen relationships and bring needed light to dark times, former San Jose Councilwoman Cindy Chavez said: "One of the reasons we are such a peaceful place is because of those relationships."

If it sounded like SiVIC is the antithesis of the high-decibel anger of the tea party and talk radio, Cortese said he thought the group would welcome both the political left and right into a broad movement.

But the long list of organizations and leaders did not seem to include fundamentalist Christians nor right-wing agencies. Nor did it seem that those who are disenfranchised -- either economically, socially or religiously -- were at the gathering.

Still, the members were enthusiastic about SiVIC , clapping and swaying to Sunnyvale's Joyful Noise Gospel Singers, singing "Right here, right now, we build community."

Contact Sharon Noguchi at 408-271-3775.

SIvac crop walk

The South Bay CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Hunger Walk, sponsored by the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council, will be held 1 p.m. April 3. The walk will begin at Hoover Middle School, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose. Contributions may be designated to different religious relief agencies. For information, go to

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Opinion: Defendants exonerated, but off-base prosecutors pay no price | View Clip
03/05/2011
San Jose Mercury News - Online

In a remarkable ruling, a California federal appeals court has set aside the conviction, prison sentence and $200,000 fine assessed against Prabhat Goyal, the former chief financial officer of a Silicon Valley software firm who had been found guilty by a jury of charges he misstated revenue and lied to auditors.

The court didn't just reverse the case for a new trial, it threw it out completely. The author of the ruling, 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Richard Clifton, wrote in the December decision, "Even viewing the evidence in the light most favorable to the prosecution, no reasonable juror could have found Goyal guilty beyond a reasonable doubt of any of the charges against him."

In other words, there was no evidence of a crime.

The case, another in a string of imploded federal prosecutions, makes Goyal the latest victim of overzealous prosecutors.

His prosecution so angered another member of the three-judge panel, Judge Alex Kozinski, that he wrote a blistering concurring opinion that should be required reading for every prosecutor in America.

"This is just one of a string of recent cases in which courts have found that federal prosecutors overreached by trying to stretch criminal law beyond its proper bounds," Kozinski said, pointing to cases brought against former accounting giant Arthur Anderson and the prosecution of former Brocade executive Gregory Reyes, among others.

In the recent spate of white-collar

cases in which courts declared misconduct was committed, not one prosecutor has yet been held to answer for it. The only cost has been to remove the case from the victory column -- a consequence that too many prosecutors find well worth the risk.

Goyal was the former chief financial officer of Network Associates, a Santa Clara-based software manufacturing firm that later became known as McAfee. In 2004, he was accused of securities fraud and making false statements. Convicted in 2007, Goyal was sentenced to a year and a day in prison and fined $200,000.

"(C)riminal law should clearly separate conduct that is criminal from conduct that is legal," Kozinski wrote. "That is not only because of the dire consequences of a conviction -- including disenfranchisement, incarceration and even deportation -- but also because criminal law represents the community's sense of the type of behavior that merits the moral condemnation of society.

"When prosecutors have to stretch law or the evidence to secure a conviction, as they did here, it can hardly be said that such moral judgment is warranted," Kozinski wrote.

In October 2010, the Northern California Innocence Project published, "Preventable Error: A Report on Prosecutorial Misconduct in California 1997-2009," which identified more than 700 cases where courts had found misconduct. Of those, only seven prosecutors were disciplined.

Prosecutorial misconduct fundamentally perverts justice and costs taxpayers millions of dollars. It undermines our trust in the justice system and subverts the notion that we are a fair society.

Yet, until recently, in the vast majority of cases, courts and agencies charged with overseeing attorney conduct have failed to acknowledge it, let alone do anything to deter it.

More than six years after he was charged, Goyal has been exonerated, but at a steep cost to him, to the public, and to the criminal justice system.

"That is not the way criminal law is supposed to work," the judge said.

KATHLEEN RIDOLFI is executive director of the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law. MAURICE POSSLEY, a Pulitzer Prize winning former investigative reporter for the Chicago Tribune, is an investigator and researcher with the project. They wrote this article for this newspaper.

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Các nguyên tắc giúp bạn quản l ý tiền bạc hiệu quả | View Clip
03/05/2011
Bao Moi.com

Những nhà đầu tư cá nhân thường không có thời gian cũng như kỹ năng để theo rõi các bước ngoặt lớn về tài chính; về thị trường chứng khoán; hiểu rõ những chỉ số tài chính; các chính sách về tiền tệ của chính phủ cũng như các động thái của những nhà đầu tư chuyên nghiệp. Sau đây, báo Wall Street Journal đưa ra những thủ thuật đơn giản giúp bạn bảo toàn vốn và đầu tư hiệu quả.

Cứng rắn và nhất quán

Một trong những nguyên tắc đầu tiên của việc này là bạn phải nhất quán và có kỷ luật. Khi lên danh mục vốn đầu tư bao gồm: những cổ phiếu; trái phiếu cần đầu tư; cổ phần trong những quỹ đầu tư hoặc những khoản tiền gửi ngân hàng, bạn cần giữ vững tỷ lệ tương quan giữa chúng. Không vì bất cứ một sự dao động ngắn hạn nào của thị trường, sự xuất hiện một ‎ý tưởng đầu tư mới hay những cổ phiếu mới xuất hiện mà bạn lại thay đổi phương pháp đã được xác lập. Ngoài ra, bạn cần định kỳ “đổ” thêm tiền vào danh mục đầu tư của bạn. Điều này có thể không dễ dàng, nhất là khi thị trường tại thời điểm đó không tăng trưởng, bạn không nhìn thấy vốn đầu tư tăng lên và không nhận được sự thỏa mãn tức thời. Nhưng việc định kỳ tăng vốn đầu tư sẽ triệt tiêu hóa sự dao động của thị trường.

Thông thường, khi giá trị của một loại hình đầu tư nào đó tăng vọt thường có tác động mạnh đến tâm l‎ý của những nhà đầu tư. Khi nhìn vào sự tăng trưởng nhanh chóng của một loại cổ phiếu hay tổng số vốn của một quỹ đầu tư nào đó, mọi người liền đổ tiền vào chúng trong trạng thái kích động mạnh – nhưng thường khi đó thời kỳ tăng trưởng mạnh nhất đã trôi qua. “Mọi người hay bỏ tiền ra mua những cổ phiếu hoặc thả tiền vào một quỹ đầu tư nào đó mà đáng ra họ phải làm điều này từ một năm trước đây, - giáo sư Tarrans Odin, một chuyên gia trong lĩnh vực tài chính của Trường đại học Tổng hợp California, nói. – Điều này phần nào được giải thích rằng mọi người thường ngoại suy những kết quả từ quá khứ ra tương lai. Hơn nữa, phần đông những nhà đầu tư nghiệp dư thường đơn giản hóa thị trường hơn nó vốn có”.

Đừng tiêu tiền thiếu suy nghĩ

Hạnh phúc không thể mua được bằng tiền, nhưng nhiều người cứ “cố đấm ăn xôi cuối” cùng trở thành “tù chung thân” của những món nợ. Chắc hẳn bạn đã gặp phải tình huống như sau: bạn nhìn thấy một đồ vật gì đó trong cửa hàng và thấy rằng vật này rất cần cho mình nên bỏ tiền ra mua, nhưng sau đó một tuần hay một tháng bạn không còn nhớ gì đến chúng nữa. Ham muốn có được những đồ vật mà mình thích nhưng không thực sự cần thiết là một thói quen “có hại cho túi tiền” của bạn. Vậy bài học ở đây là gì? Nếu bạn muốn tìm kiếm hạnh phúc, thì chắc chắn không thể tìm thấy trong các trung tâm thương mại.

Chúng ta chính là thị trường

Ai trong chúng ta cũng muốn kiếm được lợi nhiều nhất từ thị trường. Tuy nhiên, không phải ai cũng làm được điều đó, vì thị trường chính là chúng ta, vậy nên nếu trong chúng ta có kẻ thắng, thì tức là sẽ có người thua.

Thông thường, mọi người chỉ muốn kết thúc một phi vụ giao dịch khi nhận được lợi nhuận cao nhất có thể, - giáo sư Mair Steman, một chuyên gia về tài chính, của trường Đại học Santa Clara University nhận xét, - cho dù đó là phi vụ trong thị trường chứng khoán hay bất động sản. “Mọi người nói rằng: OK, thị trường bất động sản sẽ còn tăng giá. Nhưng trên thực tế thì họ không muốn bán theo giá cả vào thời điểm hiện tại, - Steman nói. – Họ đánh giá giá trị của ngôi nhà của mình là một triệu USD, bởi vì hàng xóm của họ đã bán nhà của mình với giá một triệu USD vào năm ngoái. Vì vậy, sau khi thông báo bán nhà suốt cả ba tháng mà họ vẫn không tìm được người mua. Bởi vì một l‎ý do đơn giản giá trị ngôi nhà của họ vào thời điểm hiện tại chỉ là 800.000 USD”.

Hơn nữa, nếu tính đến những chi phí phải trả cho những nhà môi giới, thuế, sửa chữa theo yêu cầu nào đó của người mua... thì bạn không thể thu được con số cao nhất mà bạn chỉ có thể nhìn thấy trong các bản báo cáo hoặc phân tích tài chính.

Hạn chế chi phí ở mức thấp nhất

Bạn đừng bao giờ quên rằng, sự thành công trong đầu tư của bạn bao giờ cũng phải san sẻ với hai người nữa đó là những người môi giới và phòng thuế. Nếu không muốn chia lợi nhuận thu được ra làm ba phần, bạn cần nghĩ cách hạn chế các chi phí đầu tư và trả thuế ở mức thấp nhất trong chừng mực có thể.

Cần đến sự giúp đỡ

Phần lớn những nhà đầu tư nghiệp dư đều không có thời gian, hứng thú, kiến thức và cuối cùng là sự nhẫn nại để thực hiện các phi vụ đầu tư độc lập một cách thành công. Thậm chí, ngay cả khi bạn đầu tư thành công và thu được lợi nhuận, điều này hoàn toàn không có nghĩa là bạn đã biến thành một người có uy tín trong lĩnh vực tài chính. “Mọi người sau khi thu được một số thành tựu nào đó (trên thị trường), - giáo sư Odin nói, - thì họ nghĩ rằng mình đã hiểu phải làm như thế nào. Nhưng trên thực tế, thì họ đã nhầm lẫn giữu sự thành công và tri thức”.

Nhưng đáng tiếc là với sự giúp đỡ của các nhà môi giới hay tư vấn tài chính cũng chưa chắc đã đảm bảo sự thành công cho những quyết định đầu tư của bạn. Rất nhiều người trong số họ đòi hỏi giá cả dịch vụ rất cao, trong khi bản thân với một cái bằng về tài chính thì chưa đủ hiểu biết cũng như kinh nghiệm để hiểu được rắc rối của thị trường tài chính. Chính vì vậy, khi lựa chọn một nhà tư vấn tài chính, bạn phải đặc biệt cẩn trọng.

Đừng bỏ tất cả trứng vào trong một cái giỏ duy nhất

Khi nói về sự cần thiết phải đa dạng hóa danh mục đầu tư, các chuyên gia tài chính thường dựa trên luận điểm rằng đây là phương pháp cần thiết để giảm sự mạo hiểm: nếu một hướng đầu tư nào đó của bạn đang trong chiều hướng lỗ thì có thể hướng khác vẫn đem lại lợi nhuận cho bạn. Tuy nhiên, bạn cũng nên lưu ‎ý rằng khi xảy ra những cuộc khủng hoảng tài chính lớn thì sự đa dạng cũng không có‎ ý nghĩa nhiều lắm. Hoặc trong những thị trường khác nhau thì độ dao động và mức độ thu nhập trong năm cũng khác nhau, ví dụ thị trường chứng khoán Mỹ tăng trưởng chậm hơn thị trường ở những nước phát triển, nhưng độ dao động của nó cũng thấp hơn hẳn. Trái phiếu không bao giờ giảm giá nhanh chóng như cổ phiếu.

Đừng bao giờ quên gia đình

Gia đình đồng thời là một khoản vốn và một khoản nợ quan trọng của bạn. Nếu như các con hoặc bố mẹ bạn đang gặp khó khăn về tài chính, thì hiển nhiên bạn phải giúp đỡ họ và ngược lại. Bạn không bao giờ được quên điều này. Con cái không những là người thừa kế tài sản sau khi bạn mất đi mà chúng còn thừa kế cả những thói quen về tài chính của bạn. Hãy dạy chúng có những quan niệm đúng đắn về tiền bạc. Khi sử dụng tiền bạc, bạn đừng bao giờ quên những hậu quả của những hành động mà nó có thể gây ra cho gia đình mình.

Đầu tư dài hạn

Nếu chẳng may bạn chết sớm thì vợ và con bạn có thể gặp khó khăn về tài chính, nhưng nếu bạn trường thọ thì cũng là một vấn đề cần suy nghĩ. Không ít người khi về hưu có rất ít tiền tiết kiệm hoặc thậm chí chả có đồng nào cả, hay sau khi về hưu một thời gian họ đã tiêu hết số tiền dành dụm được. Điều này sẽ chẳng thành vấn đề nếu hai vợ chồng bạn không sống lâu quá, hoặc bạn cũng chẳng quan tâm lắm đến chuyện tuổi già mình sẽ sống như thế nào. Chuyện gì sẽ xảy ra nếu bạn sẽ sống rất lâu trong khi không có tiền lương hưu hoặc bảo hiểm trọn đời hay nhiều tiền tiết kiệm trong nhà băng? Vì vậy, bạn nên trù liệu trước và triệt để tiết kiệm tiền bạc trong chừng mực có thể.

Đừng quên lạm phát

Thậm chí, ngay cả khi mọi việc xung quanh vẫn đang diễn ra tốt đẹp, tiền tiết kiệm và các khoản đầu tư của bạn vẫn đang sinh sôi nảy nở, thì bạn vẫn đang mất một số tiền nhất định hàng năm vì lạm phát. Chính vì vậy, bạn không nên quá chú ‎ý tới con số lãi trên giấy tờ mà nên đánh giá nó trong sự tương đối – tức là % thu nhập của bạn không được phép thấp hơn % lạm phát.

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Three Decades of Fantasy Come True at Atlantis Fantasyworld | View Clip
03/05/2011
Santa Cruz Patch

Joe Ferrera's first customer 35 years ago at Atlantis Fantasyworld in Santa Cruz bought an X-Men comic for $1.50 that was later worth $1,000. 


The customer didn't do so badly either. Doug Nichols went on to work for Pixar and helped create the movie "The Incredibles," among others.


As Ferrara celebrates his 35th year in the business with a big sale this weekend, he's surrounded by stories, on the shelves and in his memory. He's seen stars come and go; he's watched comic stories elevated into the most profitable movies of a new era; and he's had his own fantasies come true.


He's sung the National Anthem for the San Francisco Giants 30 years in a row and this week was asked to sing it for the San Jose Sharks when they play an outdoor hockey game at his alma mater, Santa Clara University.


"I guess the best thing is to be a part of the fabric of the community, " says Ferrara, 61, who is to words what superheros are to brightly-colored costumes. He's got plenty in stock.


When he's not selling comics, he's singing songs at the Shadowbrook restaurant in Capitola, or serving on the Downtown Association or the Convention and Visitors Council, or proseltyzing to men to get prostate cancer screening. He also hosts the weekly Thursday night Flashback movie series at Cinema 9, with trivia questions and prizes.


He's watched legions of kids grow from comic readers to comic and movie writers, noting that held within these colorful bursts of creativity are the seeds for creative futures that break through traditional boundaries.


The thing that Ferrara likes best about comics is the way they stretch possibilities. He remembers reading his first comic at the age of 7, a “World's Finest,” featuring Batman, Robin and Superman.


Batman and Robin were stuck back in time, prisoners in a castle, and Robin said, “I wish Superman was here.”


“Sure, kid,” Joe thought. “We all wish there was a Superman.”


 But then, in the comic, Superman burst through the wall and saved them. Joe was amazed. “There is a Superman ,” he recalls thinking. “There are no limits. Anything is possible.”


 It inspired him to read comics, so much so that his mother complained to the nuns in school, who told her to be happy he was reading. It also fueled his life's vision, knowing that creativity and imagination offered so many possibilities.


When customers enter his downtown store, he wants them to feel like they are in the most famous theme park in the world.


 “When you go to Disneyland, you don't even think you are in L.A.,” he says. “You don't even know what day of the week it is. You suspend everything. You aren't living  in real time. You'll walk farther than you ever would outside. People complain about walking two blocks for a cup of coffee, but they will walk around Disneyland all day happily.”


 His formula has worked. Atlantis has outlasted, outplayed and outfantasied the competition. To celebrate, Ferrara, known as “Captain Joe,” is discounting everything Saturday and Sunday. Back issues are 60 percent off and other merchandise can be reduced by 20 to 50 percent by spinning a Wheel of Fortune.


 A San Jose native, Ferrara opened his first store on lower Pacific Avenue after graduating from the University of Santa Clara and San Jose State University. He was a musician with a comic book hobby, who needed a truck to move his collection of 6,000 of the colorful books.


He had stopped reading comics for a while, but his love was reborn in college, when his roommate Mike Friedrich, was writing comics professionally. He was writing a series on Robin, when the character was in college. Joe got the habit and never quit again.


 “Someone asked what I would do with all those comics, and my mom said, ‘He'll probably open his own store,' and it clicked.”


 Up to then, he was driving over the hill to San Jose to buy the ones he liked, so he saw the need and filled it. After the earthquake, he moved to the downtown location at 1020 Cedar St.


 While playing songs in clubs five nights a week, he needed something to do in the daytime. Before long, his comic book hobby became his business and the music he loves before his hobby. He plays songs on guitar and sings every Friday at the Shadowbrook restaurant in Capitola.


 “If you told me 35 years ago that I'd be doing this today, I'd have said, just shoot me now. Because when you are young the last thing you want is to have limitations. But the stability of the store has given me freedom to do other things, like with my music.”


 In the 1960s and 1970s there was a big movement of people collecting comics as a source of income. Older comics were rare and had hugely inflated prices, with people paying thousands more than cover price for the most valuable of them. As more people started collecting, the values plummeted and today the business is more about entertainment, says Ferrara.


Disney, for example, bought Marvel Comics for $4 billion for the movie possibilities and the enduring characters. Comics aren't something the business world takes lightly. 


But will comic stores survive in a digital era or struggle the way bookshops have? 


"It's happening, but slower than books, because people still want something they can hold in their hand. The artwork is still better in comics. But it won't be long before kids remember holding a tablet in their hand, not hiding under the covers with a flashlight to read comics."


His original store was filmed as part of the movie, "The Lost Boys" and fans come from a ll over the world to be photographed with a comic book that was made for that movie and that Joe keeps. 


The store also has hosted its share of celebrities, including Noel Neill, who played Lois Lane on the television drama of Superman and Denise Crosby, who played Tasha Yar in Star Trek: The Next Generation .


Those are the kinds of things he promotes to keep his business vital and have sustained an old art form into a digital future.


"After all," he says. "When is the last time you saw someone selling a typewriter?"


Atlantis Fantasyworld Trivia:


1. What is today's hottest comic? 


2. How did the store get its name? 


3. Whatever happened to the Atom, that little Superman guy?


Answers right here tomorrow in the Comments section.

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U.S. VOTERS ALL DESERVE 2 HAVE AN INVESTIGATION INTO FINDING OUT THE TRUTH ABOUT THIS CORRUPTED STOLEN TARP BAILOUT $$ BEING INFUSED INTO SECRET 501c4 SLU$H POLITICAL ACCOUNT$ THIS PAST ELECTION AT THE STATE FEDERAL LEVEL$... | View Clip
03/05/2011
Boston Indpendent Media Center

AMERICAN & INTERNATIONAL BILLIONAIRE ELITE NOW OWN U.S. ELECTIONS VIA U.S. SUPREME COURT & FEC & THESE SECRET 501C4 SLU$H FUNDING$$$$...

THEY CORRUPTED & COLLUDED WITH THESE U.S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE$ LIKE CLARENCE THOMA$....

UNTIL CLARENCE THOMAS RESIGNS FROM THE PEOPLES U.S. SUPREME COURT, LAWYERS FOR POOR AMERICANS WILL BE FORCED 2 CONTINUE ASKING FOR A FULL U.S. JUSTICE DEPARTMENT AND U.S.CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION INTO THIS OBVIOUS FRONTING OF CORPORATE AMERICA & INTERNATIONAL CORPORATIONS TO GAIN POLITICAL VOTES WITH CERTAIN U.S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICES INVOLVED WITH LAST JANUARYS LEGAL DECISION CONCERNING THE NEW LEGAL APPROVAL OF THESE INTERNATIONAL AND NATIONAL CORPORATE UNLIMITED SECRET POLITICAL 501C4 SLU$H$ TO INFLUENCE OUR FUTURE USA ELECTIVE PROCE$$.

THEY STARTED THIS ELITE CABAL PLAN OF DESTROYING AMERICAN LABOR UNIONS WAY BACK WHEN PRESIDENT GEORGE BUSH JR , KARL ROVE AND THE WEALTHY ELITE BILLIONAIRES CABAL GOT THE 5 CONSERVATIVE U.S.SUPREME COURT JUSTICES TO ALLOW INTERNATIONAL AND NATIONAL CORPORATIONS TO CONTRIBUTE UNLIMITED POLITICAL $$ FOR NATIONAL AND STATE ELECTIVE ELECTIONS.

THE REPUBLICAN FEC MEMBERS WERE ALSO NEEDED TO LOOK THE OTHER WAY ON ALLOWING THIS FUTURE UNLIMITED POLITICAL SLU$H TO BE HIDDEN FROM AMERICAN VOTERS IN THESE KARL ROVE STYLE 501C4 SECRET POLITICAL SLU$H ACCOUNTS.

THE BUSH~KARL ROVE WALL STREET ~BANKS STOLEN TARP BILLION$ ARE NOW GOING TO RULE OUR AMERICAN POLITICAL SCENE FOR MANY YEARS TO COME.THESE STOLEN TARP BAILOUT BILLION$ WILL BE RUNNING THESE 501C4 SLU$H ACCOUNTS FOR MANY YEARS TO COME WITHOUT ANYONE IN AMERICA EVER BEING ABLE OR ALLOWED TO INVESTIGATE !!!

OUR PAST STATE AND FEDERAL ELECTIONS HAVE ALREADY PROVEN WHAT BIG $$ CAN DO TO DISTORT THE AMERICAN VOTERS FEELINGS ON WHO THEY DESIRE FOR THEIR FUTURE POLITICAL CANDIDATES.

IF IT WERE EVER INVESTIGATED AND EXPOSED HOW OUR STOLEN little American TAXPAYERS TARP

BAILOUT $$ INFLUENCED OUR PAST ELECTION CYCLE BY THIS ELITE KARL ROVE BILLIONAIRE

CABAL,THEN MAYBE THE NEEDED OUTCRY FOR FUTURE PUBLIC FINANCED ELECTION$ MIGHT JUST BE ABLE TO TAKE HOLD !

WHAT IS HAPPENING TODAY AND IN THE FUTURE AGAINST OUR AMERICAN UNION MEMBERS IS A VERY WELL PLANNED PLOT OF THESE ELITE TO ENSURE THAT OUR AMERICAN MIDDLE~CLASS & POORER AMERICANS DO NOT EXPECT TO RECEIVE TO0 BIG A PIECE OF THE AMERICAN $ PIE FROM CORPORATE OWNER ELITE'$.

THE WEALTHY ELITE'S OWN CONTROLLING SHARES OF OUR CORPORATE WORLD,BANKS ETC... SO IT ONLY STANDS TO REASON THEY HAVE TO CONTROL OUR AMERICAN POLITICO'S AS WELL .THE ONLY WAY CORPORATE AMERICA AND THIS ELITE CABAL OF MULTI~BILLIONAIRE OWNERS HAVE ON KEEPING CONTROL OVER THE U.S. CONGRESSIONAL SPENDING IS BY THEIR USE OF HIGH PRICED LOBBYISTS AND THEIR NEWLY ACQUIRED UNLIMITED POLITICAL 501C4 SLU$H ACCOUNTS GIVEN THEM BY THESE 5 U.S. SUPREME COURT CONSERVATIVE JUSTICES !

ANYONE IN OUR NEW AMERICAN POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT (STATE OR FEDERAL) CAN NOW BE DEFEATED WITH ENDLE$$ WELL FINANCED SWIFT BOAT ATTACK ADS THAT CAN will CONTINUE 2 BE FINANCED BY ANY CORPORATE ENTITY IN THE WORLD VIA THESE 501C4 SLU$H ACCOUNT$ !!!

THE PEOPLES U.S. CONGRESS ATTEMPTED TO PUT THE BRAKES ON ALLOWING WALL STREET~ BANKERS TARP BAILOUT FUND$ FROM BEING ALLOWED IN OUR LAST OR FUTURE U.S. ELECTIONS,BUT FELL SHORT WITH CONGRESSIONAL REPUBLICANS NOT WILLING TO JOIN THE DEMOCRATS PROPOSED LEGISLATION ...

WE ARE ALL WELL AWARE THAT NAME RECOGNITION AND PUBLIC RELATIONS ARE ONLY BOUGHT THROUGH THE AIRWAYS WITH BIG $$. ** AMERICA WILL CONTINUE TO HAVE TO DEAL WITH HAVING FUTURE AMERICAN STATE AND FEDERAL CANDIDATES WHO WILL CONTINUE TO BE CHOSEN AND WELL FINANCED WITH THIS ENDLESS SECRET 501C4 SLU$H ACCOUNT $$ TO WIN BY THESE ELITE BILLIONAIRES AND THEIR INTERNATIONAL PARTNER CORPORATIONS.

AS HAS BECOME RECENTLY KNOWN TO MOST AMERICANS FOLLOWING U.S. POLITICS, U.S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE CLARENCE THOMAS AND HIS WIFE WERE RECENTLY PUBLICLY EXPOSED 4 HAVING LIED TO ALL OF AMERICA IN KEEPING SECRET OF THEIR YEARS OF HUSTLING OFF BIG CORPORATE NON~ PROFIT $$ WITHOUT DISCLOSING PUBLICLY THAT THEY BOTH HAVE BEEN BOUGHT AND PAID FOR BY CERTAIN ELITE BILLIONAIRES HIDING BEHIND A 501C3 TAX EXEMPT NON~PROFIT ORGANIZATION.

IF U.S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE CLARENCE THOMAS AND HIS WIFE TOOK THE CORPORATE PAYOFF$ THROUGH HIS WIFE'S NON-PROFIT 501C3 SLU$H FUND BIG BUCK$ SALARY WITHOUT DISCLOSING IT PUBLICLY FOR OVER 10 YEARS , WE CAN ONLY IMAGINE WHAT THE OTHER 5 REPUBLICAN U.S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICES INVOLVED WITH THIS WELL PLANNED ELITE CABAL'S UNLIMITED CORPORATE POLITICAL 501C4 SLU$H CONTRIBUTION$ LEAGL DECISION RECEIVED IN RETURN FOR THEIR ACTIVE VOTE PARTICIPATION ?

NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO

The Changing Face Of Organized Labor

The new year has brought a sharp increase in labor conflict in America.

In Wisconsin and Ohio, public employee unions are battling Republicans in the legislature and the governor's office.

In Providence, R.I., the city has fired nearly 2,000 union teachers.

Then there's the NFL, where owners and players are at an impasse as the midnight deadline for negotiations nears — meaning even ESPN is on the labor beat.

Each of the conflicts has a different set of issues and different circumstances. But they also highlight how the face of organized labor in the U.S. has changed.

Unions remain a major player in American politics, pouring money and manpower into elections and other public policy debates. But labor's numbers have been shrinking for decades. Now, only about 12 percent of the U.S. workforce belongs to a union. That compares with about 20 percent in the early 1980s.

Labor historian Nelson Lichtenstein at the University of California, Santa Barbara describes what the typical unionized worker in America looked like 50 years ago:

Steve Robinson of United Auto Workers Local 422 of Framingham, Mass., holds a sign during a rally to support Wisconsin's public employees. The UAW is a much smaller organization today than it was decades ago. In fact, the total number of workers in the public sector who belong to a union is now greater than the number of members in private sector unions.

"It would be a blue-collar male working in a factory. The auto union had a million and a half members. The steelworkers had a million. Also Teamsters, truck drivers — a couple million workers in that union. So it would be a male, 45-year-old who worked with his hands."

In those days, before foreign competition changed everything for the U.S. car companies, labor/management relations were perpetually rocky.

In an interview with NPR in 1988, Orville Spencer, then a United Auto Workers local president in Michigan, described that relationship.

"You'd lose a lot of sleep on how bad the company put the screws to you during your working-hour shifts," Spencer said. "Next night, I'd lose sleep laying there giggling on how bad I put it to them."

But pressured by foreign competition, the UAW and the car companies made a kind of peace. Both sides came to realize the shared stakes.

"Nobody in the world can quarrel with the quality and results of Ford," said UAW President Bob King, in a recent interview with Detroit station WDET. "That is driven as much by the UAW as it is by Ford, because it's a strong partnership. Because of our strong respect, we've done it together."

Related NPR Stories

Providence Mayor Defends Firings As Teachers Protest

Democrats Smart From Attempts To Weaken Unions

Wis. Governor: Layoffs Friday Unless Dems Return

Why Unions Matter To Democrats: It's Not Just Money

Union Battles: A 'National Campaign' Against Labor?

Labor Strife Is A Different Game In Pro Sports

Labor Unions Fight For Their Right To Influence

But these days, the UAW is a much smaller organization. And in 2011, the total number of workers in the public sector who belong to a union is now greater than the number of members in private sector unions.

So remember that typical union member of a half-century ago? Here's how Lichtenstein describes today's version:

"It would be a hospital technician or nurse or a home health care worker or a schoolteacher or a female public employee of some sort."

Which brings us to those big union protests in Wisconsin, which have been going on for more than two weeks now.

Among the most prominent voices in Wisconsin is the teachers union. The National Education Association, with more than 3 million members, is now the largest union in the country, having surpassed the Teamsters more than a decade ago.

Wisconsin political analyst Jeff Mayers of WisPolitics.com says the teachers union is seen there as "the most powerful white-collar union, the most powerful public employees' union."

"I think the people on the conservative side would call them a worthy opponent," he adds. "But they're often vilified by conservatives and Republicans because they play such a big role in elections."

It's that clout that has helped the unions turn so many people out in ongoing protests. But it is also the thing that makes them an important target for conservative politicians.

In the short run, the GOP attack on bargaining rights may cause a backlash in the 2012 elections. But if the Republican legislatures in Wisconsin, Ohio and elsewhere do succeed in curtailing collective bargaining rights, unions will be weakened for many years to come.

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Keck Graduate Institute of Applied Life Sciences

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DeVry University–Pomona

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Institute of Transpersonal Psychology

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Phillips Graduate Institute

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Saint John's Seminary

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Samuel Merritt University

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San Francisco Art Institute

San Francisco Conservatory of Music

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Santa Clara University

Saybrook University

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Southern California College of Optometry

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Berkeley

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Letters to the editor, March 4 | View Clip
03/04/2011
San Francisco Chronicle - Online

2 of a kind:

Oh, that Hitler

Regarding John Galliano ("Dior designer fired after rant - "I love Hitler," March 2), that arrogant, ignorant drunk, doesn't he know what his own fate would have been had he lived in Hitler's time?

Does he think Hitler would have made an exception for him?

Karen Feistman, Santa Cruz

'Bye, Charlie

Charlie, Charlie, Charlie ("Sheen's public rants spur CBS to end show's season," Feb. 25):

You self-absorbed, self-indulgent, self-centered egotistical narcissist. You are done! Save your money for your old age and psychiatric help as you will never work in Hollywood again. $3 million an episode? You're a joke!

And the reason you have two 24-year-old "goddesses"? Because one 48-year-old wouldn't tolerate your ridiculousness!

Lance Greenfield, San Francisco

We depend on Caltrain

I'm a law student at Santa Clara University living in San Jose. I moved there in August 2010 and have relied on Caltrain since. I take the train to San Francisco every weekend and at various times during any given week for events, panels and clinics.

Cutting the Santa Clara station would effectively eliminate a valuable source of income for Caltrain; students will not drive or take a cab to Diridon Station in San Jose. Fans attending the Earthquakes games, played at the university, will be forced to find an alternative if one exists.

Public transportation is a vital component of a local economy and must remain in service to keep it vibrant. The cost of owning, maintaining and running a personal vehicle can be particularly onerous for those on a fixed or lower income and is alleviated by services like Caltrain. The relationship between a community and public transit is co-dependent; they depend on each other, and severing one would be disastrous for the other ("Caltrain partner steps up with a short-term plan," March 2).

Matthew Izzi, San Jose

Cuts would disrupt our lives

If Caltrain makes its proposed service changes, specifically the seven station closures and the nighttime service cuts, my household will no longer be able to ride Caltrain.

This will not be a temporary change; it will be a life-altering adjustment. We will be forced to buy a second car, and we will never have an opportunity to commute to our jobs by public transportation again.

I don't think the Metropolitan Transportation Commission or the Joint Powers Board realized the irreparable damage they will cause throughout the Bay Area if they enact these service cuts. These changes will not only kill ridership for Caltrain (easily two-thirds of its customer base will be affected by these cuts), but more seriously, they will disrupt people's lives: lives that Caltrain riders (and their communities) planned specifically for train transportation. I can say with complete confidence, and I know the MTA has to admit this itself, that if these cuts are made, Caltrain will be forced into bankruptcy, and the service will die.

There is simply no turning back. For Caltrain and its vital customer base alike, everything possible must be done to avoid enacting any of the proposed service cuts. The Bay Area cannot afford such a drastic, horrific step backward.

Emily Hunter, Belmont

Harm to biotech

I use Caltrain to travel between my home in San Mateo and my job as a biotech scientist in South San Francisco. The proposal to close many stations (including South City) and reduce off-peak service would dramatically harm me and other workers in the biotech industry, an industry that contributes tremendously to the regional tax base.

Caltrain addresses the No. 1 transportation challenge that most Bay Area residents face: how to get to and from work each day. Transportation to and from work is actually a more important transportation problem than the long-distance transportation challenge addressed by high-speed rail. Thus, I would encourage our elected officials to attract some of the high-speed rail funds to provide long-term funding for Caltrain.

If high-speed rail could terminate in San Jose, and Caltrain bullets could provide service for the final leg up the Peninsula, this could not only reduce the cost of high-speed and avoid the problems associated with it on the Peninsula, but it could also provide dedicated funds for improving and expanding Caltrain service.

Daniel Kaplan, San Mateo

This article appeared on page A - 15 of the San Francisco Chronicle

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
03/04/2011
San Francisco Chronicle

2 of a kind:

Oh, that HitlerRegarding John Galliano ("Dior designer fired after rant - "I love Hitler," March 2), that arrogant, ignorant drunk, doesn't he know what his own fate would have been had he lived in Hitler's time?

Does he think Hitler would have made an exception for him?

Karen Feistman, Santa Cruz

'Bye, CharlieCharlie, Charlie, Charlie ("Sheen's public rants spur CBS to end show's season," Feb. 25):

You self-absorbed, self-indulgent, self-centered egotistical narcissist. You are done! Save your money for your old age and psychiatric help as you will never work in Hollywood again. $3 million an episode? You're a joke!

And the reason you have two 24-year-old "goddesses"? Because one 48-year-old wouldn't tolerate your ridiculousness!

Lance Greenfield, San Francisco

We depend on CaltrainI'm a law student at Santa Clara University living in San Jose. I moved there in August 2010 and have relied on Caltrain since. I take the train to San Francisco every weekend and at various times during any given week for events, panels and clinics.

Cutting the Santa Clara station would effectively eliminate a valuable source of income for Caltrain; students will not drive or take a cab to Diridon Station in San Jose. Fans attending the Earthquakes games, played at the university, will be forced to find an alternative if one exists.

Public transportation is a vital component of a local economy and must remain in service to keep it vibrant. The cost of owning, maintaining and running a personal vehicle can be particularly onerous for those on a fixed or lower income and is alleviated by services like Caltrain. The relationship between a community and public transit is co-dependent; they depend on each other, and severing one would be disastrous for the other ("Caltrain partner steps up with a short-term plan," March 2).

Matthew Izzi, San Jose

Cuts would disrupt our livesIf Caltrain makes its proposed service changes, specifically the seven station closures and the nighttime service cuts, my household will no longer be able to ride Caltrain.

This will not be a temporary change; it will be a life-altering adjustment. We will be forced to buy a second car, and we will never have an opportunity to commute to our jobs by public transportation again.

I don't think the Metropolitan Transportation Commission or the Joint Powers Board realized the irreparable damage they will cause throughout the Bay Area if they enact these service cuts. These changes will not only kill ridership for Caltrain (easily two-thirds of its customer base will be affected by these cuts), but more seriously, they will disrupt people's lives: lives that Caltrain riders (and their communities) planned specifically for train transportation. I can say with complete confidence, and I know the MTA has to admit this itself, that if these cuts are made, Caltrain will be forced into bankruptcy, and the service will die.

There is simply no turning back. For Caltrain and its vital customer base alike, everything possible must be done to avoid enacting any of the proposed service cuts. The Bay Area cannot afford such a drastic, horrific step backward.

Emily Hunter, Belmont

Harm to biotechI use Caltrain to travel between my home in San Mateo and my job as a biotech scientist in South San Francisco. The proposal to close many stations (including South City) and reduce off-peak service would dramatically harm me and other workers in the biotech industry, an industry that contributes tremendously to the regional tax base.

Caltrain addresses the No. 1 transportation challenge that most Bay Area residents face: how to get to and from work each day. Transportation to and from work is actually a more important transportation problem than the long-distance transportation challenge addressed by high-speed rail. Thus, I would encourage our elected officials to attract some of the high-speed rail funds to provide long-term funding for Caltrain.

If high-speed rail could terminate in San Jose, and Caltrain bullets could provide service for the final leg up the Peninsula, this could not only reduce the cost of high-speed and avoid the problems associated with it on the Peninsula, but it could also provide dedicated funds for improving and expanding Caltrain service.

Daniel Kaplan, San Mateo

Copyright © 2011 San Francisco Chronicle

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Why Warren Buffett Is a Terrible Guide for Small Investors - DailyFinance | View Clip
03/04/2011
DailyFinance

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Why Warren Buffett Is a Terrible Guide for Small Investors

Sure, Warren Buffett is America's second-richest man, and the stock of his company, Berkshire Hathaway ( BRK.A), has had compounded returns of 20.2% for the past 46 years. But does that mean when the "Oracle of Omaha" speaks about investing, the small investor should try to do what Warren does? released an upbeat assessment of his company and the American economy in his annual letter to investors. Several days later, while appearing on CNBC, he gave his view on investing in stocks vs. bonds.

"I think it would be very, very foolish to have your money in long-term fixed-dollar investments or short-term fixed-dollar investments if you had the ability to own equities and hold them for a considerable period of time," Buffett said. So should investors run out and sell their Treasury bills and buy stocks? Amazon is full of books about how to invest "the Warren Buffett way" -- and some clever entrepreneurs even sell online courses in Buffett-style investing. But can the little guy actually make money that way?

"You can't do what he does," says William J. Bernstein, an investment adviser and author of The Investor's Manifesto: Preparing for Prosperity, Armageddon and Everything in Between , an investment guide that advocates putting money in a mixture of bond and stock index funds.

"Why do you have to listen to Warren Buffett tell you to buy equities?" Bernstein asks. "He was also telling you to buy stocks 18 months ago -- why weren't you listening to him then?"

"You'll Always Be Three Steps Behind"

Meir Statman, a professor of finance at Santa Clara University in California and author of the recent book, ow What Drives Investor Behavior and Make Smarter Financial Decisions , says small investors can't make money trying to copy Buffett's admittedly brilliant investment style.

"Don't try to emulate Buffett, though it's tempting to try," Statman says, "because you'll always be three steps behind him. When he buys a stock of an individual company, Buffett doesn't say 'in a week I'm going to buy this stock.' He buys it, and you'll find out a week or a month or a year later. And when he sells, you'll find out too late."

Although Buffett likes to call himself a value investor, he hasn't followed in the footsteps of classical value gurus like Benjamin Graham and David Dodd. For one thing, Berkshire makes much of its money -- $2 billion in profit last year -- simply earning a return on the "float" of its insurance companies, which has nothing to do with buying the shares of a company that seem underpriced by some form of financial analysis.

Why Buy High?

He also likes companies with so-called intangible value -- the cachet of Coca-Cola's ( KO) brand, which arguably isn't a value company, either.

"Buffett was never a cigar-butt investor in the style of Ben Graham's investing," says Bernstein. "You can't do what Buffett does. He doesn't buy stocks, he basically buys companies and takes a corner office. He buys huge blocks of stock when he can pick it up for next to nothing." Sponsored Links In fact, Bernstein disagrees with Buffett's investment advice; saying this isn't the time to buy equities. "The time to be piling into stocks was in 2008 and 2009 when stocks were low," Bernstein says. "What makes you think buying when stocks are high is a good idea? Whatever your stock allocation was 18 months ago, it should be lower now because stocks are more expensive."

Both Bernstein and Statman are equally dubious about even buying Berkshire Hathaway stock -- despite Buffett's legendary reputation as a picker of great businesses, such as his 2010 purchase of Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad.

Bernstein says Berkshire carries an enormous premium compared to what it actually owns. "There's a Buffett premium that's built into Berkshire, and he's no spring chicken. The minute he catches a cold, the Berkshire premium is going to disappear." Buffett turned 80 last year.

Holding on to Those Treasury Bills

Statman is also cautious on the stock. "Whenever you buy shares of Berkshire Hathaway, you're buying from another shareholder," he says. "Unless that other shareholder is totally or generally underestimating Warren Buffett's abilities and therefore getting rid of the stock at some bargain price, you're not going to benefit from it."

And what about those long- and short-term fixed-dollar investments that Buffett advised against?

According to the Berkshire Hathaway annual report, the company held $33 billion in fixed-income investments, including U.S. Treasurys and corporate bonds, and $34.7 billion in cash and cash equivalents, which include Treasury bills, money market funds and other investments of three-months duration or less.

Buffett told the story of how his grandfather gave his children $1,000 each and advised them not to invest the money, because they always might need cash. He explained that's why his company is holding over $30 billion in cash now.

Charles Wallace is a veteran business journalist who has written about economics, corporate finance and consumer electronics for

Time, Fortune, The Los Angeles Times, The Financial Times and

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Middle East expert says Isreal- Palestinian peace process is over
03/04/2011
Oregonian, The

March 04--The Israeli- Palestinian peace process is over.

That's just one of the stinging observations offered Thursday by author and religious scholar Reza Aslan during a presentation at Portland Community College's Sylvania campus.

"There is no peace process. There is no two-state solution. It's over," Aslan said.

Half a million Israelis now live in what was supposed to be Palestinian land. "There is no Palestine. There's not going to be a Palestine," he said.

The world is going to have to adjust to the idea of a single state for two peoples, something nobody wants. Models for a bi-national state exist: Belgium and Northern Ireland, for example.

Born in Iran, Aslan is the author of "No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam."

He's a contributing editor at the Daily Beast. He has degrees in religions from Santa Clara University, Harvard University, and the University of California, Santa Barbara, as well as a master of fine arts from the University of Iowa.

He is also the author of "How to Win a Cosmic War" (published in paperback as Beyond Fundamentalism: Confronting Religious Extremism in a Globalized Age), and editor of the just published anthology from Norton titled Tablet & Pen: Literary Landscapes from the Modern Middle East.

Aslan is President and CEO of Aslan Media Inc, whose holdings include BoomGen Studios, a media company focused entirely on entertainment about the Middle East and its Diaspora communities. He now lives in Los Angeles where he is associate professor of creative writing at the University of California, Riverside.

His appearance at PCC was sponsored by the Institute for Christian Muslim Understanding, and the Muslin Education Trust.

A video of the event will be available on Youtube.com/pccvideos.

Responding to questions from PCC literature instructor Bryan Hull, and members of the audience, Aslan touched on the current resolutions in the Middle East and how the United States can help them succeed, the U.S. relationship with Iran, and the role of poetry in giving voice to social criticism in police states.

What the revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt and Libya have in common is they are powered by the young.

"There is a massive youth bulge" in the Middle East and North Africa, Aslan said. Three quarters of the population in the region in under 35 years old.

A major factor in all these uprisings is the sudden availability of communication -- the Internet, Facebook and satellite telephones.

"Unlike their parents. This population can't be isolated," he said. "If you control communication you can control your people."

Aslan said it is just getting started. Libya is next, and then, perhaps Oman, "and keep your eye on Algeria."

He said that the concern about Egypt falling into the hands of Muslim radicals is overstated. The Muslim Brotherhood is the only remotely organized opposition force in the country.

"But here's the fascinating thing," Aslan said. "They had nothing to do with the revolution."

They are part of the older generation that the young revolutionaries want to be rid of, he said.

The United States can't get involved in another war in the Middle East, he said.

Our response to the unrest in Libya -- freezing assets and banning travel -- has been about right, he said.

A No Fly Zone is complicated. "You can't have a No Fly Zone unless you are willing to shoot people down, and be shot down."

But, he said, "Let's be clear, Muammar Gaddafi is a lunatic."

And not just the crazy like other dictators we might be used to in other parts of the world.

"He's living in a rubber room playing with his poop."

Gaddafi can't be swayed by international pressure.

"This is only going to end with a bullet in his brain," Aslan said. "We're not going to do it, but we've got to get someone else to do it."

No one knows what will happen when Gaddafi is gone. He has destroyed all institutions in the country who might replace him, and even the Army is weak.

The situation is different in Egypt. . And the Army will be in charge, no matter what happens here, he said.

America can help by directing a fraction of the $2 billion it currently gives to the country's generals each year into building civil systems.

He said if democracy really takes hold in the Middle East, the U.S. will have to abandon its strategy of using Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Jordan to pressure Iran on behalf of Israel. Polls show people in those countries don't have a problem with Iran.

But he noted that worries that Egypt might go back on its peace treaty with Israel are overblown.

Egypt was crushed in four wars with Israel, and "nobody in Egypt wants fifth war with Israel."

He said the current habit of demonizing Islam in America will fade. He recalled that previous generations of Americans did the same with Catholics, and then Jews.

"It's what we do." he said. In 10 or 15 years, it will be some one else.

"Probably the Chinese."

--James Mayer

Copyright © 2011 The Oregonian, Portland, Ore.

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Middle East expert says Isreal- Palestinian peace process is over | View Clip
03/04/2011
OregonLive.com

By James Mayer, The Oregonian

Reza Aslan

The Israeli- Palestinian peace process is over.

That's just one of the stinging observations offered Thursday by author and religious scholar Reza Aslan during a presentation at Portland Community College's Sylvania campus.

“There is no peace process. There is no two-state solution. It's over,” Aslan said.

Half a million Israelis now live in what was supposed to be Palestinian land. “There is no Palestine. There's not going to be a Palestine,” he said.

The world is going to have to adjust to the idea of a single state for two peoples, something nobody wants. Models for a bi-national state exist: Belgium and Northern Ireland, for example.

Born in Iran, Aslan is the author of “No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam.”

He's a contributing editor at the Daily Beast. He has degrees in religions from Santa Clara University, Harvard University, and the University of California, Santa Barbara, as well as a master of fine arts from the University of Iowa.

He is also the author of "How to Win a Cosmic War" (published in paperback as Beyond Fundamentalism: Confronting Religious Extremism in a Globalized Age), and editor of the just published anthology from Norton titled Tablet & Pen: Literary Landscapes from the Modern Middle East.

Aslan is President and CEO of Aslan Media Inc, whose holdings include BoomGen Studios, a media company focused entirely on entertainment about the Middle East and its Diaspora communities. He now lives in Los Angeles where he is associate professor of creative writing at the University of California, Riverside.

His appearance at PCC was sponsored by the Institute for Christian Muslim Understanding, and the Muslin Education Trust.

A video of the event will be available on Youtube.com/pccvideos.

Responding to questions from PCC literature instructor Bryan Hull, and members of the audience, Aslan touched on the current resolutions in the Middle East and how the United States can help them succeed, the U.S. relationship with Iran, and the role of poetry in giving voice to social criticism in police states.

What the revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt and Libya have in common is they are powered by the young.

“There is a massive youth bulge” in the Middle East and North Africa, Aslan said. Three quarters of the population in the region in under 35 years old.

A major factor in all these uprisings is the sudden availability of communication -- the Internet, Facebook and satellite telephones.

“Unlike their parents. This population can't be isolated,” he said. “If you control communication you can control your people.”

Aslan said it is just getting started. Libya is next, and then, perhaps Oman, “and keep your eye on Algeria.”

He said that the concern about Egypt falling into the hands of Muslim radicals is overstated. The Muslim Brotherhood is the only remotely organized opposition force in the country.

“But here's the fascinating thing,” Aslan said. “They had nothing to do with the revolution.”

They are part of the older generation that the young revolutionaries want to be rid of, he said.

The United States can't get involved in another war in the Middle East, he said.

Our response to the unrest in Libya – freezing assets and banning travel – has been about right, he said.

A No Fly Zone is complicated. “You can't have a No Fly Zone unless you are willing to shoot people down, and be shot down.”

But, he said, “Let's be clear, Muammar Gaddafi is a lunatic.”

And not just the crazy like other dictators we might be used to in other parts of the world.

“He's living in a rubber room playing with his poop.”

Gaddafi can't be swayed by international pressure.

“This is only going to end with a bullet in his brain,” Aslan said. “We're not going to do it, but we've got to get someone else to do it.”

No one knows what will happen when Gaddafi is gone. He has destroyed all institutions in the country who might replace him, and even the Army is weak.

The situation is different in Egypt. . And the Army will be in charge, no matter what happens here, he said.

America can help by directing a fraction of the $2 billion it currently gives to the country's generals each year into building civil systems.

He said if democracy really takes hold in the Middle East, the U.S. will have to abandon its strategy of using Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Jordan to pressure Iran on behalf of Israel. Polls show people in those countries don't have a problem with Iran.

But he noted that worries that Egypt might go back on its peace treaty with Israel are overblown.

Egypt was crushed in four wars with Israel, and “nobody in Egypt wants fifth war with Israel.”

He said the current habit of demonizing Islam in America will fade. He recalled that previous generations of Americans did the same with Catholics, and then Jews.

“It's what we do.” he said. In 10 or 15 years, it will be some one else.

“Probably the Chinese.”

Return to Top



Third time to be a charm for either Gunn or Palo Alto girls in finale | View Clip
03/04/2011
Palo Alto Weekly - Online

Palo Alto Online Sports

As the 2010-11 girls' basketball season got under way, talk quickly shifted to the obvious — that Pinewood and Eastside Prep could meet up to five times with one advancing to the CIF Division V state championship game.

There was no such talk about Palo Alto and Gunn. While the teams did have a natural rivalry, only the Titans had ever made it to a Central Coast Section final.

The chances of these two teams meeting in a CCS championship game was not much of an issue, until now.

Thanks to increased enrollments at both schools, the Vikings and Titans were elevated into Division I for the postseason and away from the likes of Presentation, Mitty and any other Catholic school that has ruined the hopes of Paly and Gunn over the years.

As the season progressed and victories by each team began to pile up, it finally did become obvious that the Vikings and Titans not only would qualify for the postseason but quite likely earn high seeds and — hold your breath — somehow wind up playing each other in the CCS championship game.

Could it be? Was it possible? Yes, it is.

For the first time since 1977, when 14 league champions were brought together for the first girls' CCS playoffs, No. 1-seeded Palo Alto (21-4) and No. 3-seeded Gunn (19-5) will face each other in the section finals. They'll meet Saturday at Santa Clara University at 6 p.m., with both teams also earning berths in the CIF NorCal playoffs that begin Tuesday at 7 p.m.

Gunn reached the 2009 CCS Division II finals, but lost to Mitty and eventually finished with a 29-3 record, best in school history. The current Titans, however, are in a better position to bring home the first section girls' title in school history.

"Absolutely," said Gunn coach Sarah Stapp. "This team is very special in its own right. It took that 2009 team until they were almost all seniors to make that championship game (granted they were in a division with Pres and Mitty) and this team has done it with nine healthy players (one freshman, five sophomores, and three juniors). We have an additional sophomore and junior who are out for the season."

Palo Alto, meanwhile, will be playing in its first CCS final. Coach Scott Peters guided his 2006 squad to a 25-5 record, but that squad fell in the semifinals — to Mitty.

"I think it is a great honor for our girls to get a chance to play for the CCS championship," Peters said. "I think the game with Gunn will be another war; should be very fun."

Palo Alto already has beaten Gunn twice on its way to completing its first 12-0 season ever in the SCVAL De Anza Division.

"I wouldn't say this third game is harder or easier for anyone, but I do feel the pressure is on Paly and not us," Stapp said. "They already have the league title, but the CCS title is what's up for grabs and I know if they were going to lose to us anytime this season they wouldn't want to lose this game. I think it's very hard to beat someone three times and I like where we are as a team heading into this game."

Palo Alto and Gunn advanced out of semifinal games Wednesday night at Christopher High in Gilroy.

The Vikings had the early game and struggled offensively — trailing at the half, 11-9, before stepping up its offense and clamping down its defense to beat No. 5 North Salinas, 33-25.

"We stuck with our game plan in the second half, of pressuring their ball-handlers, which helped us get some steals and easy shots," said Peters. "Our girls play very hard, with a lot of passion and effort. It may not be pretty to watch, but our girls are going to make you work for every inch of the court."

Both teams struggled offensively and were plagued by turnovers — the teams combined for more than 60 — but the Vikings came up with the key stops when needed. Junior Emilee Osagiede led the way with 15 points while sophomore center Josie Butler grabbed 10 rebounds and swatted away numerous shots to further disrupt the North Salinas offense.

In the nightcap, Titans rallied for an exciting 43-40 victory over No. 2 Gilroy (22-2). Julia Maggioncalda led Gunn with 13 points while fellow junior Cat Perez added 12.

The Titans trailed 40-36 with just over a minute remaining Nora Shevick hit a three-pointer with 1:12 left for a 40-39 game and then Gunn stopped Gilroy on back-to-back possession, with Maggioncalda grabbing the rebound each time and getting fouled. She made two with 43 seconds left to give Gunn the lead and hit two more with eight seconds remaining for the final margin of victory.

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The Legal Magic Bullet That Protects Twitter And Yelp | paidContent | View Clip
03/04/2011
paidContent.org

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Yelp and Twitter both get thousands of complaints a month, often asking for material to be taken down that is allegedly defamatory or otherwise illegal. They almost never comply. Speaking today at an event in Silicon Valley, the general counsels of both companies gave insight into how they deal with the flood of vitriol that vigorous user-generated content sites produce-and praised the U.S. law that protects their businesses from frivolous speech-based lawsuits.

That law is Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act (CDA), and it has an unusual history. The CDA was essentially meant to be the first regulation of online pornography, and was passed overwhelmingly in 1996 despite concerns by free speech advocates. Section 230 of that law was meant to balance it out by protecting websites from liability for things their

But in 1997, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down all of the CDA,

except Section 230. (That produced the odd result that this key internet law in the U.S. bears the name "Communications Decency Act," which is misleading.)

Today, CDA 230 is the law that protects websites from lawsuits over speech in their online forums, even if they refuse to take down the offending post or video. Unlike many parts of internet law, Section 230 has generally been consistently interpreted and upheld by courts around the country, and the event at Santa Clara had a largely celebratory feel, with the room fairly stocked with supporters of the law like in-house counsel at web companies, internet law academics, and defense-oriented law firm types.

Some interesting points that came up:

Twitter and Yelp get thousands of complaints per month-and most of it is just speech that someone doesn't like.

Twitter GC Alex Macgillivray noted that most of the complaints about about alleged defamation, as opposed to actual defamation. But CDA 230 means that web companies don't have to jump at every case of alleged defamation, which would paralyze their operations.

And content that is only alleged to be defamation, is often some of the most valuable speech online, noted Macgillivray-consider critical reviews of products or professionals like doctors and lawyers.

A growing trend: pretending that a complaint about the substance of what a user writes is actually a copyright or trademark complaint.

"We definitely get this re-casting," said Yelp GC Laurence Wilson. The typical one is a business owner who doesn't like his or her reviews, said Wilson. Instead of running into the brick wall of asking for a takedown by saying the review is false-a complaint that Yelo could not evaluate and would not be obligated to respond to-the business owner claims that their intellectual property rights are being violated. "They'll claim a copyright or trademark interest in their business listing, and say it can't be used to allow someone to write reviews on them. Obviously, that's poppycock and not going to fly."

CDA 230 protects websites from liability for things like defamation complaints, but not intellectual property complaints such as claims that user-generated sites are violating copyrights or trademarks. Some complainers know that an intellectual property complaint will be taken more seriously than another type of complaint, so they'll try to style almost any kind of gripe as an IP complaint.

Yelp and Twitter seemed to diverge on how they handled international complaints.

Yelp GC Wilson told the audience that his company considers gripes from international users "in a completely different framework" and that "it's much more complicated," Twitter's Macgillivray said that Twitter's response to complainers doesn't really vary depending on where the user is. "It's one of the wonderful things about working in Silicon Valley," he said. "We tell them, we're a U.S. company, we have CDA 230 here, and you're welcome "We respond to [takedown] requests from other companies conference that the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University School of Law, which focused entirely on Section 230.

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When watching your investments can hurt you | View Clip
03/04/2011
Reuters - Analysis & Opinion

Even though he considers himself a relaxed investor, who rarely does any trading, Meir Statman usually takes a look at his investment account at Vanguard at least a few times a week.  By doing so, the Glenn Klimek Professor of Finance at Santa Clara University and author of What Investors Really Want ignores traditional buy-and-hold wisdom, which suggests that checking up on things a couple of times a year, and rebalancingif necessary, is plenty for most investors.

The 63-year old behavioral finance expert might sneak a peek at his portfolio if he's working and needs a break, or after he's checked his email. Like many people, he enjoys the satisfaction of seeing the little green numbers pop up when the market has done well. But he doesn't obsess about losses on down days.

“As an investor, I'm kind of like a sail boat with its sails down, bobbing with the waves and taking things as they come,” he says philosophically. “A lot of people view following the market and their investments as a kind of pastime, like watching football, but don't necessarily take any action in response. And that's perfectly okay.”

What's not OK is when emotional reactions to witnessing the daily market gains and losses get in the way of clear thinking, which evidence suggests happens an awful lot.  During the 1980s, Statman co-authored a study that first documented the “disposition effect,” a tendency for investors to take gains off the table on winning transactions too hastily and reluctance to realize losses. In 2007, a team of researchers in Israel concluded that access to market performance information increases the odds that people will follow those patterns.

Other academic research, as well as statistical data such as the flow of money in and out of mutual funds, suggests that when the market rises for awhile investors believe it will continue on an upward path and pile in. Conversely, when the market drops, they assume such negative performance will continue and stay away from the market or sell their holdings.  In either case, frequent quote lookups and portfolio peeking are likely to exacerbate these emotional reactions.

Charles Rotblut, vice-president of theAmerican Association of Individual Investors, has noticed that interest in checking portfolios appears to wax and wane with the market tides. When the market is up, traffic to the association's website spikes as investors check quotes more often and use portfolio management tools. When the market falls for an extended period, traffic to the website declines as investors take on a bunker mentality.

Despite ample evidence that many investors do the wrong thing at the wrong time, Rotblut says frequent monitoring of a portfolio is perfectly fine as long as you take steps to wring the emotion out of the process.

“If you're investing in individual stocks you need to check at least once a week because it's important to stay on top of breaking news, earnings guidance, mergers, or management changes,” he says. “If you're investing in diversified mutual funds or exchange-traded funds, once a month or even once every quarter is probably enough.” Rotblut, who prefers stocks of individual companies over mutual funds or ETFs, likes to check his portfolio every day because it “gives me a sense of control about things.”

In an age when checking intra-day values and making trades is just a few potentially hazardous mouse clicks away, how can investors avoid the temptation to react impetuously to daily gyrations?

Rotblut advises stock investors to separate normal market fluctuations from what is going on at a company, and to discipline themselves so they can avoid reacting too hastily to either positive or negative information.  “Before I buy a stock, I write down the reasons I like it, and what would make me decide to sell. When it goes down, I look at what I wrote and ask myself if the downturn is because of a fundamental change in the business or just market fallout.”

He also sets downside price targets, and sticks to them. If a stock drops 10 percent from his purchase price, he'll review his original analysis of a company and determine if the reasons he bought it are still valid. If it drops 20 percent, he will assume that there is something amiss with the company that he may not be aware of and will likely sell.

Statman has a simpler solution.

“If you're tempted to do something silly, my suggestion would be to grab a piece of chocolate or go take a cold shower instead.”

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The Legal Magic Bullet That Protects Twitter And Yelp | View Clip
03/04/2011
Yahoo! Canada

Joe Mullin, On Friday March 4, 2011, 9:00 pm EST

Yelp and Twitter both get thousands of complaints a month, often asking for material to be taken down that is allegedly defamatory or otherwise illegal. They almost never comply. Speaking today at an event in Silicon Valley, the general counsels of both companies gave insight into how they deal with the flood of vitriol that vigorous user-generated content sites produce—and praised the U.S. law that protects their businesses from frivolous speech-based lawsuits.

That law is Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act (CDA), and it has an unusual history. The CDA was essentially meant to be the first regulation of online pornography, and was passed overwhelmingly in 1996 despite concerns by free speech advocates. Section 230 of that law was meant to balance it out by protecting websites from liability for things their users post or write.

But in 1997, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down all of the CDA, except Section 230. (That produced the odd result that this key internet law in the U.S. bears the name “Communications Decency Act,” which is misleading.)

Today, CDA 230 is the law that protects websites from lawsuits over speech in their online forums, even if they refuse to take down the offending post or video. Unlike many parts of internet law, Section 230 has generally been consistently interpreted and upheld by courts around the country, and the event at Santa Clara had a largely celebratory feel, with the room fairly stocked with supporters of the law like in-house counsel at web companies, internet law academics, and defense-oriented law firm types.

Some interesting points that came up:

Twitter and Yelp get thousands of complaints per month—and most of it is just speech that someone doesn't like. Twitter GC Alex Macgillivray noted that most of the complaints about about alleged defamation, as opposed to actual defamation. But CDA 230 means that web companies don't have to jump at every case of alleged defamation, which would paralyze their operations.

And content that is only alleged to be defamation, is often some of the most valuable speech online, noted Macgillivray—consider critical reviews of products or professionals like doctors and lawyers.

A growing trend: pretending that a complaint about the substance of what a user writes is actually a copyright or trademark complaint. “We definitely get this re-casting,” said Yelp GC Laurence Wilson. The typical one is a business owner who doesn't like his or her reviews, said Wilson. Instead of running into the brick wall of asking for a takedown by saying the review is false—a complaint that Yelo could not evaluate and would not be obligated to respond to—the business owner claims that their intellectual property rights are being violated. “They'll claim a copyright or trademark interest in their business listing, and say it can't be used to allow someone to write reviews on them. Obviously, that's poppycock and not going to fly.”

CDA 230 protects websites from liability for things like defamation complaints, but not intellectual property complaints such as claims that user-generated sites are violating copyrights or trademarks. Some complainers know that an intellectual property complaint will be taken more seriously than another type of complaint, so they'll try to style almost any kind of gripe as an IP complaint.

Yelp and Twitter seemed to diverge on how they handled international complaints. Yelp GC Wilson told the audience that his company considers gripes from international users “in a completely different framework” and that “it's much more complicated,” Twitter's Macgillivray said that Twitter's response to complainers doesn't really vary depending on where the user is. “It's one of the wonderful things about working in Silicon Valley,” he said. “We tell them, we're a U.S. company, we have CDA 230 here, and you're welcome “We respond to [takedown] requests from other companies

The panel was part of a day-long conference that the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University School of Law, which focused entirely on Section 230.

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Copyright © 2010 paidContent.org. All rights reserved.

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OVERZEALOUS PROSECUTORS HURTING U.S. JUSTICE SYSTEM
03/04/2011
San Jose Mercury News

In a remarkable ruling, a California federal appeals court has set aside the conviction, prison sentence and $200,000 fine assessed against Prabhat Goyal, the former chief financial officer of a Silicon Valley software firm who had been found guilty by a jury of charges he misstated revenue and lied to auditors.

The court didn't just reverse the case for a new trial, it threw it out completely. The author of the ruling, 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Richard Clifton, wrote in the December decision, "Even viewing the evidence in the light most favorable to the prosecution, no reasonable juror could have found Goyal guilty beyond a reasonable doubt of any of the charges against him."

In other words, there was no evidence of a crime.

The case, another in a string of imploded federal prosecutions, makes Goyal the latest victim of overzealous prosecutors.

His prosecution so angered another member of the three-judge panel, Judge Alex Kozinski, that he wrote a blistering concurring opinion that should be required reading for every prosecutor in America.

"This is just one of a string of recent cases in which courts have found that federal prosecutors overreached by trying to stretch criminal law beyond its proper bounds," Kozinski said, pointing to cases brought against former accounting giant Arthur Anderson and the prosecution of former Brocade executive Gregory Reyes, among others.

In the recent spate of white-collar cases in which courts declared misconduct was committed, not one prosecutor has yet been held to answer for it. The only cost has been to remove the case from the victory column -- a consequence that too many prosecutors find well worth the risk.

Goyal was the former chief financial officer of Network Associates, a Santa Clara-based software manufacturing firm that later became known as McAfee. In 2004, he was accused of securities fraud and making false statements. Convicted in 2007, Goyal was sentenced to a year and a day in prison and fined $200,000.

"(C)riminal law should clearly separate conduct that is criminal from conduct that is legal," Kozinski wrote. "That is not only because of the dire consequences of a conviction -- including disenfranchisement, incarceration and even deportation -- but also because criminal law represents the community's sense of the type of behavior that merits the moral condemnation of society.

"When prosecutors have to stretch law or the evidence to secure a conviction, as they did here, it can hardly be said that such moral judgment is warranted," Kozinski wrote.

In October 2010, the Northern California Innocence Project published, "Preventable Error: A Report on Prosecutorial Misconduct in California 1997-2009," which identified more than 700 cases where courts had found misconduct. Of those, only seven prosecutors were disciplined.

Prosecutorial misconduct fundamentally perverts justice and costs taxpayers millions of dollars. It undermines our trust in the justice system and subverts the notion that we are a fair society.

Yet, until recently, in the vast majority of cases, courts and agencies charged with overseeing attorney conduct have failed to acknowledge it, let alone do anything to deter it.

More than six years after he was charged, Goyal has been exonerated, but at a steep cost to him, to the public, and to the criminal justice system.

"That is not the way criminal law is supposed to work," the judge said.

KATHLEEN RIDOLFI is executive director of the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law. MAURICE POSSLEY, a Pulitzer Prize-winning former investigative reporter for the Chicago Tribune, is an investigator and researcher with the project. They wrote this article for this newspaper.

Copyright © 2011 San Jose Mercury News

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INTERRELIGIOUS COUNCIL TO HOST 'CONVERSATION'
03/04/2011
San Jose Mercury News

Religious and civic leaders are meeting in Santa Clara on Sunday to have a "community conversation" as they launch a new group, the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council.

The key question the group's leaders will be discussing is: "What role can and should our diverse religious communities play in shaping life in Silicon Valley?"

Much of the dialogue will also focus on the Knight Foundation's study of the "Soul of the Community," co-organizer Samina Sundas said.

Speakers will include: Chris Block, CEO of the American Leadership Forum; the Rev.Jon Pedgo, pastor of St. Julie Billiart Catholic Parish; Feeza Mohamed, a junior at Notre Dame High School and GiveLight Foundation volunteer; and Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens, chief philanthropic development officer at Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

The event is Sunday from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the Mission Room at the Benson Center at Santa Clara University.

Copyright © 2011 San Jose Mercury News

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County names new top attorney | View Clip
03/03/2011
San Mateo Daily Journal

San Mateo County supervisors threw the recruitment net wide but in the end stayed in-house to name Chief Deputy County Counsel John Beiers the county's new top attorney.

The Board of Supervisors announced the pick yesterday.

Beiers, 50, will fill the vacancy left when current County Counsel Mike Murphy retires later this month.

His annual salary will be $230,748.

The county counsel is appointed by the Board of Supervisors and serves as attorney for the county, its elected offices, the courts and all departments and agencies. The office also serves 22 of the county's 24 school districts and represents several other governmental agencies in San Mateo County.

Beiers joined the office in 1995 and was named chief deputy in 2006. His experience runs the gamut of county departments, board and commissions but has been particularly involved representing school districts.

Beiers, in a prepared statement, said he is “very humbled” to have been chosen.

Board President Carole Groom pointed to Beiers' knowledge as a reason for the choice.

“John Beiers is a true public servant who puts the interest of his community first,” Groom said in the announcement of the appointment. “We know that our public agencies will continue to receive top legal advice from John and his team.”

Prior to joining the county, Beiers was an environmental litigator for private law firms in Washington, D.C. and San Francisco. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of California at Santa Barbara and a law degree from Santa Clara University.

Beiers and his wife live in San Carlos and have three children.

Murphy's retirement ends nearly three decades with the office, including his time as its head since former county counsel Tom Casey stepped down in August. 2007. Murphy called the position his “dream job.”

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47 U.S.C. §230: a 15 Year Retrospective | View Clip
03/03/2011
Cooley Godward LLP

High Tech Law Institute

The Mission Room

Benson Center

Santa Clara University

500 El Camino Real

Santa Clara, CA 95053

03/04/2011

9:00 AM - 5:30 PM

Partner Mike Rhodes will be speaking at the High Tech Law Institute event at Santa Clara University on the litigators' perspective of 47 USC §230.

47 USC §230 is widely regarded as the most important Internet-specific law. This symposium will celebrate the 15 year anniversary of Congress' enactment of Section 230. The symposium will bring together some of the key historical figures involved in the development of Section 230 to talk about how we got where we are. The symposium also will discuss some of the latest cutting-edge research about Section 230 issues.

For more information, visit the event website.

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Five Ways to Cut the Cost of College | View Clip
03/03/2011
CNBC - Online

Fuse | Getty Images

College acceptance letters should be hitting the mailboxes of anxious high school seniors any time now. Once students choose their institution of higher learning comes the hard part: paying for it.

Financial aid, ranging from need-based federal Pell grants and student loans to privately-funded merit scholarships, can cover a big chunk of tuition bills. But filling in the gaps not covered by aid is equally crucial.

To keep a lid on expenses, Dan Landau decided to only apply to colleges close to his Bridgewater, N.J. home. By commuting to Fairleigh Dickinson University, holding down a part-time job, and graduating in three years, he saved over $20,000 on his bachelor's degree while accruing no student debt.

“The path I took to save money on college is not for everyone, but there are ways to get a quality college education on the cheap,'' says Landau.

In that spirit of frugality, here are five strategies for cutting your college bills.

1. Graduate ahead of schedule

With tuition alone averaging $7,020 at in-state public colleges and $26,273 at private schools, knocking a year or more off the traditional four-year degree is a sure way to shave costs. Here are a few ways.

2. Earn income in college

Many students take on jobs in college to bridge expense gaps.

ADDEDLINK

Divya Bahl lived rent-free her last two years at Boston University by serving as a resident adviser in a student dorm. Manuel Fabriquer, a college counselor in San Jose, Calif., says RA positions save students at Santa Clara University $15,000 a year.

Professional schools and academic departments can provide leads on education and research-related jobs. Carnegie Mellon University's Academic Development Office, for example, employs 140 students in tutoring programs. Career services and alumni associations, meanwhile, are a good resource for off-campus employment.

Brooke Kamenoff, a freshman at Northeastern University, plans to utilize her school's co-op program to take time off to work and earn income for her five-year degree program.

3. Lean on Uncle Sam

The American Opportunity Credit, a tax credit for college tuition and fees, has been extended through 2012. Formerly known as the Hope Credit, it can reduce your tax bill by up to $2,500 per undergraduate.

Alternately, you can deduct up to $4,000 in education expenses per student from your taxable income. You must choose the credit or the deduction—tax credits are always more valuable than deductions.

CONTINUED: Home Room

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Have You Earned The Right to Lead? 10 of The Biggest Mistakes Leaders Make | View Clip
03/03/2011
Baret News - Online

There are people in every organization you know whose titles indicate they are leaders. Often, and unfortunately, their employees beg to differ. Oh, they don't say it directly, not to the boss's face, anyway. They say it with their ho-hum performance, their games of avoidance, their dearth of enthusiasm. Leaders- real leaders who have mastered their craft-don't preside over such lackluster followers. If reading this makes you squirm with recognition, leadership expert John Hamm says you may have a problem lurking.

You're really just masquerading. You haven't yet earned the right to lead.

“When times are good, not-so-great leaders can get by,” says Hamm, author of “Unusually Excellent: The Necessary Nine Skills Required for the Practice of Great Leadership.”

“They're cushioned by a surplus of cash, and their missteps are covered up by the thrill of top-line growth, which hides a multitude of sins. But when the cloak of prosperity falls away, their mediocrity is ruthlessly exposed. “Real leadership equity is only earned, not bestowed,” he adds.

Hamm has spent his career studying the practitioners of great leadership via his work as a venture capitalist, board member, high-level consultant, and professor of leadership at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University. In his new book, he shares what he has learned and brings those lessons to life with real-world stories.

“Unusually Excellent” is a powerful back-to-basics reference book that offers both seasoned and aspiring leaders a framework for understanding and a guide for applying the battle-tested fundamentals of leadership at every stage of their careers.

“These aren't radically new ideas,” asserts Hamm. “Human nature hasn't changed that much over the millennia, so neither have the core laws of leadership. It's just that in the heat of the day-to-day battle, leaders inevitably lose their grip on the basic principles of leadership. In other cases, they never learned these fundamentals or mastered them earlier in their career. And finally, sad to say, some people just aren't cut out to lead and need to understand why.”

“Normal” leadership is a complex system of behaviors that can tolerate a lot of little mistakes, explains Hamm. *Extraordinary* leadership cannot.

Think about it this way: Anyone can snap a photo that looks okay or cook a meal that satiates hunger. However, when an award-winning photographer takes the picture, or a five-star chef prepares dinner, anyone can tell a master has been at work. The same is true of leadership. The small deficiencies in how the novice leads, as opposed to the unusually excellent professional, create a radical difference in the outcome.

So how can you tell whether you really are a great leader in the minds of your employees-or whether, to paraphrase the old television commercial, you're just playing one on TV? Unfortunately, the depth and breadth of the mistakes you make often tell the true tale.

Below, excerpted from “Unusually Excellent,” Hamm reveals ten of the most common, deeply destructive mistakes organizational leaders make:

MISTAKE #1: “Role playing” authenticity rather than living it. Authenticity is about owning your failures and shortcomings. It's about allowing others to *really* know you, vulnerabilities, warts, and all. It's about having the guts to seek feedback from others in a sincere and genuine fashion. And it's about being able to maintain your authentic self in a situation of meaningful consequence-where your decisions affect others, sometimes on a grand scale and sometimes in very personal or dramatic ways.

Knowing who you really are and holding true to yourself in the most difficult moments is the “ground zero” of leadership credibility. It's the only way to create the trusted connections you need to lead with real influence. Unfortunately, leaders stumble for a variety of reasons: They get scared and veer away at the last moment, or they sacrifice the truth on the altar of protecting other people's feelings, or they simply seek to avoid the pain of conflict.

MISTAKE #2: Underestimating the impact of small acts of dishonesty. In his book, Hamm describes an incident that took place at a famous, fast-growing technology company. A young, inexperienced, but talented associate had what he thought was a plan for a powerful new marketing initiative. So he asked the CMO to broker a meeting with the CEO to make a presentation on the subject. The CMO agreed, and the meeting took place.

During the presentation the CEO was polite, if noncommittal. He gave the presenter a sort of passively accepting feedback-”Nice point,” “Interesting,” and so on-and wrapped up the meeting quickly, thanking the presenter for his initiative. But the CMO could sense a duplicity in the CEO's behavior and attitude as the parties all headed back to their respective offices. Then, ten minutes after the meeting, the CEO called the CMO into his office and said, in essence, “That presentation was absolutely terrible. That guy's an idiot. I want you to fire him, today.”

MISTAKE #3: Being two-faced (and assuming others won't notice). In another scenario from Hamm's book, a CEO had one executive on his team whom he really trusted and in whom he could confide. One day, a couple of other members of that company's executive team made a presentation at a board meeting that didn't go so well. Later, as they were walking down a hallway, the CEO turned to his trusted executive and said, “We need to get rid of those guys. They were a disaster at the board meeting-they embarrassed me.”

But then nothing happened. Life at the company went on as before, and the targeted executives remained in their jobs. In the months that passed, the trusted executive found himself in meetings attended by both the CEO and the targeted executives. And it was as if the whole incident had never happened. The CEO joked with the men, complimented them on their work, and treated them as long-term team members.

MISTAKE #4: Squelching the flow of bad news. Do you (or others under you) shoot the messenger when she brings you bad news? If so, you can be certain that the messenger's priority is not bringing you the information you need: It's protecting her own hide. That's why in most organizations good news zooms to the top, while bad news-data that reveals goals missed, problems lurking, or feedback that challenges or defeats our strategy-flows uphill like molasses in January.

Unusually excellent leaders understand this reality, says Hamm. To combat it they work hard to build a primary and insatiable demand for the unvarnished facts, the raw data, the actual measurements, the honest feedback, the real information.

MISTAKE #5: Punishing “good failures.” Great organizations encourage risk-taking. Why? Because innovation requires it. There can be no reward without risk. But if your employees take a risk and fail, and you come down on them like a hammer, guess what? They'll never risk anything again. Unusually excellent leaders deliberately create high-risk, low-cost environments-a.k.a. cultures of trust-where people don't live in fear of the consequences of failure.

Hamm says a digital camera is the perfect analogy to the kind of culture you want to create.

MISTAKE #6: Letting employee enthusiasm fizzle. A big part of a leader's job is to be compelling. That means you must recruit “A players” through a big vision of the future and a personal commitment to a mission. But it's not enough to recruit once and then move on. Never assume “once enrolled, always enrolled.” Even the best followers need to be reminded again and again how fun, rewarding, and meaningful their work is.

In other words, when people seem to be losing their spark, they need to become “born again” employees. (Time to put on your evangelist cloak!)

MISTAKE #7: Refusing to deal with your “weakest links.” Chronic underperformers spoil things for everyone else. They create resentment among employees who are giving it their all, and they drag down productivity. Leaders must have a plan for getting these problem children off the playground-and they must act on that plan without procrastination.

“The worst scenario of all is to have a plan for dealing with underperformers, to identify who those individuals are, and then not pull the trigger on the announced consequences, for reasons of sentimentality, weakness, or favoritism-or worst of all, an attempt to preserve leadership popularity,” writes Hamm.

MISTAKE #8: Allowing people to “fail elegantly.” There are two basic operating modes for organizations under high-stakes execution pressure, writes Hamm. One is the mentality of winning, which we know about; the other, less obvious to the untrained eye, the disease of *failing elegantly*, is a very sophisticated and veiled set of coping behaviors by individuals, the purpose of which is to avoid the oncoming train of embarrassment when the cover comes off the lousy results that we'd prefer no one ever sees.

Essentially, when people stop believing they can win, some then devote their energy to how best to lose. This fancy losing often manifests as excuse-making, blaming, tolerating cut corners, and manipulating and editorializing data. Unusually excellent leaders know how to recognize these symptoms and intervene with urgency and strength of conviction to get everyone on the high road-a.k.a., *the winner's mindset*.

MISTAKE #9: Delaying decisions until it's too late. *Not making a decision is almost always worse than making a bad decision, says Hamm. As long as they aren't utterly ill-advised and catastrophic, bad decisions at least keep the organization moving in pace with changing events-and thus can often be rectified by a course correction.

Not making a decision at all, although it may seem the safe choice-because, intellectually, it positions you to make the right move when the reality of the situation is more revealed-actually strips your organization of its momentum, stalling it at the starting line, and makes it highly unlikely that you can ever get up to speed in time to be a serious player.

“Unusually excellent leaders don't just make decisions; they pursue them,” writes Hamm. “Because the speed of the organization is often its destiny-and because that speed directly correlates with the speed with which its decisions are made or not made-these leaders are haunted by the fear that somewhere in the organization a critical decision is being left orphaned and unmade.”

MISTAKE #10: Underestimating the weight your words-and your moods-carry.*Hamm tells the story of John Adler, who, prior to his CEO tenure at Adaptec, was a senior vice president at Amdahl, one of the pioneering computer companies of Silicon Valley. One morning as he was walking down the long hallway to his office, he encountered some maintenance guys who were doing repairs. He greeted them cheerfully and then, just to make conversation, mentioned how difficult it must be to work in such a dark hallway.

The next morning when Adler came to work, he was surprised to find five maintenance men all carefully replacing every light bulb in the hallway. When he questioned the flurry of activity, the men said, “We're replacing the light bulbs, boss. You said it was too dark in here.” Hamm says this story illustrates why leaders need to think carefully about every word they say-because others certainly will.

So if you recognize any of these mistakes in yourself, are you forever doomed as a leader? Of course not, says Hamm. We're all human, and we can all learn from our errors and redeem ourselves. And yet, he adds, there is no shame in realizing that leadership is not for everyone-or in declining to lead if it's not for you. (In your heart you probably already know.)

“Leadership is a choice,” he says. “It is a deep, burning desire to engage with people and rally a community to achieve greatness. Leadership can be difficult, thankless, frustrating, maddening work at times. It is only the passion of leading on the field-the thrill of looking other human beings in the eyes and seeing their energy, willingness, trust, and commitment-that makes it all worthwhile, in a very quiet, private way.”

About the Author: John Hamm is one of the top leadership experts in Silicon Valley. He was named one of the country's Top 100 venture capitalists in 2009 by AlwaysOn and has led investments in many successful high-growth companies as a partner at several Bay Area VC firms. Hamm has also been a CEO, a board member at over thirty companies, and a CEO adviser and executive coach to senior leaders at companies such as Documentum, Cisco, Hewlett-Packard, TaylorMade-adidas Golf and McAfee. John teaches leadership at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University.

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2011 College and University Programs in Theater | View Clip
03/03/2011
BackStage.com

Page 1 of 8

The following is a list of accredited, degree-granting acting programs at colleges and universities in the United States and the United Kingdom. It includes schools that grant either a degree in acting or a degree in another major that has an acting component or concentration. In general, B.A.and M.A.programs are more academic in nature (though they may offer a performance component or concentration),while BFA and MFA programs focus on training professional performers.An A.A.is a two-year junior-college degree.The list also includes nondegree acting programs that have a structured curriculum.

Department of Theatre, 211 Telfair B. Peet Theatre, Auburn, AL, 36849-5422. Dan LaRocque, chair, theatre@auburn.edu; http://media.cla.auburn.edu/theatre; 334-844-4748; B.A. in theater, BFA in music theater, performance, design/tech, stage management, and theater management

Department of Communication and Dramatic Arts, PO Box 244023, Rm 223 Liberal Arts, Montgomery, AL, 36124-4023. Adrianne Giles, executive secretary, agiles@aum.edu; www.aum.edu; 334-244-3382 (dept. of communications) or 334-244-3379 (general info); B.A. in communication and dramatic arts (with an emphasis in theater)

Drama Department, 700 Pelham Rd. North, Jacksonville, AL, 36265. Jan Rhodes, dept. secretary, jrhodes@jsu.edu; www.jsu.edu/drama/; 256-782-5623; B.A. in drama performance and design/technology

UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA AT BIRMINGHAM

Department of Theatre, ASC 255, 1530 Third Ave. South, Birmingham, AL, 35294-1263. Mel Christian, program manager (205-934-3237), cmel@uab.edu; http://theatre.hum.uab.edu/; 205-934-3236; B.A. in theater

Department of Theatre and Dance, Box 870239, 115 Rowand-Johnson Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL, 35487-0239. William Teague, chair; Christopher M. Montpetit, director, theater management, theatre.dance@ua.edu; theatre.ua.edu; 205-348-5283; B.A. in theater or musical theater

Department of Communication Arts/Theatre Division, Station 6210, Montevallo, AL, 35115. David Callaghan, dept. chair, callaghand@montevallo.edu; www.montevallo.edu/thea/; 205-665-6210; B.A. or B.S. in theater, BFA in acting, directing, musical theater, design/technology: costume emphasis, and design/technology: scenic and lighting emphasis

Department of Communication and Theatre, Florence, AL, 35632-0001. Dr. David McCullough, chair, dmmccullough@una.edu; www2.una.edu/theatre; 256-765-4516; B.A. or B.S. in communication arts with an option in theater

Department of Dramatic Arts, 5751 USA Dr. S, Rm. 1052, Mobile, AL, 36688-0002. Dr. Leon Van Dyke, chair; Janet Lambart, dept. secretary, lmiller@usouthal.edu; lvandyke@usouthal.edu; www.southalabama.edu/drama; 251-460-6305; B.A. in drama or BFA in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA, ANCHORAGE

Department of Theatre and Dance, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK, 99508. Anna Owens, student info/front desk; Tom T. Skore, dept. chair; Jill Crosby, dance program coordinator, theatre@uaa.alaska.edu; http://theatre.uaa.alaska.edu/; 907-786-1792; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA, FAIRBANKS

Theatre Department, 302 Great Hall, Fairbanks, AK, 99775-5700. Heather Kasvinsky, dept. coordinator, theatre.uaf@alaska.edu; heather@alaska.edu; www.uaf.edu/theatre; 907-474-6590; B.A. in theater with choice of emphasis in design/tech, direction, film, or performance

School of Theatre and Film, 232 Dixie Gammage Hall, PO Box 872002, Tempe, AZ, 85287-2002. Guillermo Reyes, interim director, School of Theater and Film; Simon Dove, director, School of Dance, megan.packard@asu.edu (theater); jeanette.beck@asu.edu (dance); theatre.asu.edu; dance.asu.edu; 480-965-5337 (theater); 480-965-5029 (dance); B.A. in theater and film; School of Dance: Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, School of Dance, PO Box 870304, Tempe, AZ 85287-0304

College of Arts & Letters, Department of Theatre, PO Box 6040, Bldg. 37, Rm. 120, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011-6040. Kathleen McGeever, dept. chair (928-523-4500), theatre@nau.edu; kathleen.mcgeever@nau.edu; www.cal.nau.edu/theatre; 928-523-3781; B.A. or B.S. in performance, design/tech, or theater studies

School of Theater Arts, PO Box 210003, 1025 N. Olive Rd., Drama Bldg., Rm. 239, Tuscon, AZ, 85721-0003. Bruce Brockman, director (theater); Jory Hancock, interim dean and director (dance), theatre@email.arizona.edu; dance@email.arizona.edu; www.cfa.arizona.edu/tfty (theater); www.cfa.arizona.edu/dance; 520-621-7008 (theater); 520-621-4698 (dance); B.A. in theater studies, BFA in musical theater, acting, dramaturgy, or design/technology; School of Dance: PO Box 210093, 1713 E. University Blvd., Ina Gittings Bldg. Rm 121, Tucson, AZ 85721-0093

Theatre Department, PO Box 2317, 2300 Highland Rd., Batesville, AR, 72503. Dr. Michael Counts, director, michael.counts@lyon.edu; theatre.lyon.edu; 870-307-7511; B.A. in theater

Department of Theatre and Mass Communication, SAU Box 9203, Magnolia, AR, 71754-9203. D. David Murphy, chair, ddmurphy@saumag.edu; www.saumag.edu/theatre; 870-235-4255; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT FAYETTEVILLE

J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Drama, 619 Kimpel Hall, Fayetteville, AR, 72701. Amy Herzberg, director of performance program; D. Andrew Gibbs, chair, drama@cavern.uark.edu; herzberg@uark.edu; www.uark.edu/~drama; 479-575-2953; B.A. in drama

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK

Theatre Arts and Dance Department, 2801 S. University Ave., Little Rock, AR, 72204. Jay E. Raphael, chair, jeraphael@ualr.edu; www.ualr.edu/; 501-569-3291; B.A. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS

Department of Mass Communication and Theatre, 201 Donaghey Ave., Snow Fine Arts 233, Conway, AR, 72035. Dr. Gregory Blakey, director of theatre, gregb@uca.edu; www.uca.edu/theatre; 501-450-5092; B.A. or B.S. in theater

79 New Montgomery St., San Francisco, CA, 94105. Marian Shaffner, faculty development director, info@academyart.edu; www.academyart.edu; 800-544-2787; BFA in motion pictures and television (with a concentration in acting)

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DRAMATIC ARTS, LOS ANGELES

1336 N. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles, CA, 90028. Theresa Hayes, acting director of instruction, admissions@ca.aada.org; www.aada.edu; 323-464-2777 or 800-222-2867; A.A. in acting

AMERICAN MUSICAL AND DRAMATIC ACADEMY

6305 Yucca St., Los Angeles, CA, 90028. ethompson@amda.edu; www.amda.edu; 866-374-5300; BFA in acting, dance, performing arts, or musical theater. Also two-year conservatory program in musical theater or acting. Students who complete the two-year conservatory programs in N.Y. or L.A. may transfer into the BFA programs in L.A. upon completion.

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF THE ARTS

School of Theater; Sharon Disney Lund School of Dance, 24700 McBean Parkway, Valencia, CA, 91355-2397. Travis Preston, dean (theater); Stephan Koplowitz, dean (dance), admissions@calarts.edu; www.calarts.edu; 661-253-7853; 661-253-7898 (dance); BFA in acting, scenic design, technical direction, lighting design, management, costuming, or sound design

CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY

Theatre Department, 3801 W. Temple Ave., Bldg. 25, Pomona, CA, 91768. Marie Maslowski, dept. secretary, mmmaslowski@csupomona.edu; www.class.csupomona.edu/th/; 909-869-3900; B.A. in theater

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, BAKERSFIELD

Theatre Department, Music Building 102, 9001 Stockdale Highway, Bakersfield, CA, 93311. Mandy Rees, chair; Karen Mendenhall-Gregory, office coord., kmendenhall_gregory@csub.edu; www.csub.edu/theatre; 661-654-3093; B.A. in theater

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, DOMINGUEZ HILLS

Department of Theater Arts and Dance, 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson, CA, 90747. Sydell Weiner, chair, theatrearts@csudh.edu; www.csudh.edu/theatre; 310-243-3588 or 310-243-3696; B.A. in theater arts

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FRESNO

Department of Theatre Arts, 5201 N. Maple Ave., M/S SA46, Fresno, CA, 93740-8027. Melissa Gibson, mgibson@csufresno.edu; pamd@csufresno.edu; www.csufresno.edu/theatrearts; 559-278-3987; B.A. in theater arts

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON

Department of Theatre and Dance, 800 N. State College Blvd., PO Box 6850, Fullerton, CA, 92834-6850. Bruce Goodrich, chair, bgoodrich@fullerton.edu; www.fullerton.edu/arts; 657-278-3628; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting and musical theater

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH

Theatre Arts Department, 1250 Bellflower Blvd., Long Beach, CA, 90840. Joanne Gordon, chair; Micky Small, business manager, theatre@csulb.edu; www.csulb.edu/depts/theatre; www.calrep.org; 562-985-7891; B.A. in theater arts

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LOS ANGELES

Department of Theatre Arts and Dance, 5151 State University Dr., Los Angeles, CA, 90032. James Hatfield, dept. chair, tad@calstatela.edu; www.calstatela.edu/dept/theatre_dance/; 323-343-4110; B.A. in theater arts

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, NORTHRIDGE

Department of Theater, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge, CA, 91330-8320. Garry D. Lennon, dept. chair, theatre@csun.edu; www.csun.edu/theatre; 818-677-3086; B.A. in theater

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SACRAMENTO

Department of Theatre and Dance, 6000 J St., Shasta Hall, Sacramento, CA, 96819-6069. Linda S. Goodrich, chair, theatre.dance@csus.edu; achebe@csus.edu; www.csus.edu/dram; 916-278-6368; B.A. in theater

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SAN BERNARDINO

Department of Theater Arts, Performing Arts Building, Rm. 111, 5500 University Parkway, San Bernardino, CA, 92407-2397. Margaret Perry, acting dept. chair, moreinfo@csusb.edu; http://theatre.csusb.edu/; 909-537-5876; B.A. in theater arts

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, STANISLAUS

Department of Theatre, Drama Building, Room D15, One University Circle, Turlock, CA, 95382. John A. Mayer, chair, coa@csustan.edu; www.csustan.edu/theatre; 209-667-3451; B.A. in theater arts

Theatre Department, 16007 Crenshaw Blvd., Torrance, CA, 90506. Ms. Constance Fitzsimons, dean of fine arts, cfitzsimons@elcamino.edu; www.elcamino.edu; A.A. in theater

Fine Arts and Communication Division, Department of Theatre Arts, 12345 El Monte Rd., Los Altos Hills, CA, 94022. Mark Anderson, dean, andersonmark@foothill.edu; www.foothill.edu; 650-949-7777; A.A. in theater arts

Department of Theatre, Film & Dance, 1 Harpst St., Arcata, CA, 95521. Bernadette Cheyne, dept. chair, theatre@humboldt.edu; www.humboldt.edu; 707-826-3566; B.A. in theater arts

Theatre Academy in Hollywood, 855 N. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, CA, 90029. Kevin Morrissey, chair, morriskl@lacitycollege.edu; http://theatreacademy.lacitycollege.edu; 323-953-4000, ext. 2992; Training leads to certificate; Additional requirements must be taken outside the academy to earn the A.A. in arts degree.

Theater Arts Department, 5800 Fulton Ave., Valley Glen, CA, 91401. Peter Parkin, dept. chair, info@lavctheater.com; http://www.lavctheater.com/entrypage.html; 818-947-2786; Certificate in theater arts

Department of Theatre Arts, One LMU Drive, Foley 308, Los Angeles, CA, 90045-8210. juribe@lmu.com (theater); lmcghee1@lmu.edu (dance); www.lmu.edu; 310-338-2839 or 310-338-5233 (dance); B.A. in theater arts

Theatre Arts Department, 980 Fremont St., Monterey, CA, 93940. Gary Bolen, co-chairman, gbolen@mpc.edu; www.mpctheatre.com; 831-646-4085; A.A. in theater arts

Theater Department, 1600 Campus Rd., Los Angeles, CA, 90041-3314. Beatrice Gonzales, administrative assistant, beatrice@oxy.edu; http://departments.oxy.edu/theater; 323-259-2771; B.A. in theater

PACIFIC CONSERVATORY OF THE PERFORMING ARTS

Allan Hancock College, 800 S. College Drive, Santa Maria, CA, 93454-6399. Gloria Lopez, pcpa@pcpa.org; conservatory@pcpa.org; www.pcpa.org; 805-928-7731 ext. 4415; Non-degree program

Seaver College/Fine Arts Division, Department of Theater, 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu, CA, 90263. Dr. Gary Cobb, chair, gary.cobb@pepperdine.edu; www.pepperdine.edu; 310-506-4462; B.A. in theater arts, theater and television, or theater and music

Department of Theatre and Dance, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont, CA, 91711. Arthur Horowitz, dept. chair, mtr04747@pomona.edu; http://theatre.pomona.edu; 909-621-8186; B.A. in theater

School of Theatre, Television, and Film, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA, 92182-7601. Angie Parkhurst, TTF coordinator, aparkhur@mail.sdsu.edu; http://theatre.sdsu.edu/; 619-594-5091; B.A. in theater arts

SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater Arts, Creative Arts Building-CA 103, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco, CA, 94132-4157. Todd Roehrman, dept. chair, tha@sfsu.edu; theatre@sfsu.edu; tempthadesk@gmail.com; http://theatre.sfsu.edu/; 415-338-1341; B.A. in drama

Department of Television, Radio, Film, Theatre, Animation and Illustration, Hugh Gillis Hall, Rm. 100, 1 Washington Square, San Jose, CA, 95192-0098. Dr. Ed Harris, chair, info@tvradiofilmtheatre.com; www.tvradiofilmtheatre.com; 408-924-4530 or 408-924-4567; B.A. in theater arts, radio-television-film, or musical theater

Theatre Arts Department, 1530 W. 17th St., Santa Ana, CA, 92706. Valinda Tivenan, dept. chair, donchey_sheryl@sac.edu or tivenan_valinda@sac.edu; http://ext.sac.edu/academic_progs/theatre_arts/; 714-564-5666 or 714-564-5668; A.A. in theater arts or certificate in intelligent lighting

Department of Theatre and Dance, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA, 95053-0340. Barbara Murray, chair, bmurray@scu.edu; www.scu.edu/cas/theatre/index.cfm; 408-554-4989 or 408-554-4669; B.A. in theater arts

Department of Theater Arts, 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park, CA, 94928. Shelley Martin, administrative coordinator, shelley.martin@sonoma.edu; www.sonoma.edu/performingarts/theatre/index.shtml; 707-664-2474; B.A. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY

Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies, 101 Dwinelle Annex, Berkeley, CA, 94720-2560. Michael Mansfield, undergraduate advisor, tdps@berkeley.edu; tdps.berkeley.edu; 510-642-1677; B.A .in theater and performance studies

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS

Department of Theatre and Dance, 222 Wright Hall, Davis, CA, 95616-8577. Soccoro Figueroa, undergraduate matters, svfigueroa@ucdavis.edu; www.ucdavis.edu; 530-752-0888; B.A. in dramatic art

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE

Department of Drama, 249 Drama, Irvine, CA, 92697-2775. Eli Simon, chair, drama@uci.edu; http://drama.arts.uci.edu; 949-824-6614; B.A. in drama, BFA in musical theater

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES

School of Theater, Film, and Television, 102 East Melnitz, PO Box 951622, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1622. Michael Hackett, chair, info@tft.ucla.edu; mhackett@tft.ucla.edu; www.tft.ucla.edu; 310-825-5761; B.A. in theater or film, television, and digital media

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE

Department of Theatre, Fine Arts Building, 900 University Ave., Riverside, CA, 92521. Eric Barr, dept. chair, eric.barr@ucr.edu; www.theatre.ucr.edu; 951-827-3343; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO

Department of Theater and Dance, 9500 Gilman Drive MC0344, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0344. theatredance-ug@ucsd.edu; lajimenez@ucsd.edu; www.theatre.ucsd.edu; 858-534-3791; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA

Department of Theater and Dance, 552 University Road, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106-7060. Simon Williams, chair, theaterdance-ugradadv@theaterdance.ucsb.edu; www.theaterdance.ucsb.edu; 805-893-3241; B.A. or BFA in theater with an acting emphasis

Department of Theater Arts, 1950 Third St., La Verne, CA, 91750. D. David Flaten, dept. chair, theatre@ulv.edu; flatend@ulv.edu; www.ulv.edu/theatre; 909-593-3511, ext. 4552; B.A. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

School of Theatre, 1029 Childs Way, Los Angeles, CA, 90089-0791. Madeline Puzo, dean, thtrinfo@usc.edu; theatre.usc.edu; 213-740-1286; B.A. in theater or BFA in acting, design, technical direction, and stage management

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA - CONTINUING EDUCATION

School of Theatre, 1029 Childs Way, Los Angeles, CA, 90089-0791. thtrinfo@usc.edu; theatre.usc.edu; 213-740-1286; Continuing education classes may apply toward B.A. or BFA in theater; School of Theater offers continuing education classes throughout the year.

Theater Arts Department, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA, 95211. Cathie McClellan, dept. chair, cmcclellan@pacific.edu; http://web.pacific.edu/x13787.xml; 209-946-2116; B.A. in theater arts

VANGUARD UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Theatre Department, 55 Fair Dr., Costa Mesa, CA, 92626-9601. Susan K. Berkompas, Chair, sberkompas@vanguard.edu; www.vanguard.edu/theatrearts; 714-556-3610 ext. 2953; B.A. in theater arts (performance/directing, design/technical, or musical theater)

2011 College and University Programs in Theater

Gary Fung

The following is a list of accredited, degree-granting acting programs at colleges and universities in the United States and the United Kingdom. It includes schools that grant either a degree in acting or a degree in another major that has an acting component or concentration. In general, B.A.and M.A.programs are more academic in nature (though they may offer a performance component or concentration),while BFA and MFA programs focus on training professional performers.An A.A.is a two-year junior-college degree.The list also includes nondegree acting programs that have a structured curriculum.

UNDERGRADUATE

ALABAMA

AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, 211 Telfair B. Peet Theatre, Auburn, AL, 36849-5422. Dan LaRocque, chair, theatre@auburn.edu; http://media.cla.auburn.edu/theatre; 334-844-4748; B.A. in theater, BFA in music theater, performance, design/tech, stage management, and theater management

AUBURN UNIVERSITY, MONTGOMERY

Department of Communication and Dramatic Arts, PO Box 244023, Rm 223 Liberal Arts, Montgomery, AL, 36124-4023. Adrianne Giles, executive secretary, agiles@aum.edu; www.aum.edu; 334-244-3382 (dept. of communications) or 334-244-3379 (general info); B.A. in communication and dramatic arts (with an emphasis in theater)

JACKSONVILLE STATE UNIVERSITY

Drama Department, 700 Pelham Rd. North, Jacksonville, AL, 36265. Jan Rhodes, dept. secretary, jrhodes@jsu.edu; www.jsu.edu/drama/; 256-782-5623; B.A. in drama performance and design/technology

UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA AT BIRMINGHAM

Department of Theatre, ASC 255, 1530 Third Ave. South, Birmingham, AL, 35294-1263. Mel Christian, program manager (205-934-3237), cmel@uab.edu; http://theatre.hum.uab.edu/; 205-934-3236; B.A. in theater

THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA

Department of Theatre and Dance, Box 870239, 115 Rowand-Johnson Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL, 35487-0239. William Teague, chair; Christopher M. Montpetit, director, theater management, theatre.dance@ua.edu; theatre.ua.edu; 205-348-5283; B.A. in theater or musical theater

UNIVERSITY OF MONTEVALLO

Department of Communication Arts/Theatre Division, Station 6210, Montevallo, AL, 35115. David Callaghan, dept. chair, callaghand@montevallo.edu; www.montevallo.edu/thea/; 205-665-6210; B.A. or B.S. in theater, BFA in acting, directing, musical theater, design/technology: costume emphasis, and design/technology: scenic and lighting emphasis

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH ALABAMA

Department of Communication and Theatre, Florence, AL, 35632-0001. Dr. David McCullough, chair, dmmccullough@una.edu; www2.una.edu/theatre; 256-765-4516; B.A. or B.S. in communication arts with an option in theater

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH ALABAMA

Department of Dramatic Arts, 5751 USA Dr. S, Rm. 1052, Mobile, AL, 36688-0002. Dr. Leon Van Dyke, chair; Janet Lambart, dept. secretary, lmiller@usouthal.edu; lvandyke@usouthal.edu; www.southalabama.edu/drama; 251-460-6305; B.A. in drama or BFA in theater arts

ALASKA

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA, ANCHORAGE

Department of Theatre and Dance, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK, 99508. Anna Owens, student info/front desk; Tom T. Skore, dept. chair; Jill Crosby, dance program coordinator, theatre@uaa.alaska.edu; http://theatre.uaa.alaska.edu/; 907-786-1792; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA, FAIRBANKS

Theatre Department, 302 Great Hall, Fairbanks, AK, 99775-5700. Heather Kasvinsky, dept. coordinator, theatre.uaf@alaska.edu; heather@alaska.edu; www.uaf.edu/theatre; 907-474-6590; B.A. in theater with choice of emphasis in design/tech, direction, film, or performance

ARIZONA

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

School of Theatre and Film, 232 Dixie Gammage Hall, PO Box 872002, Tempe, AZ, 85287-2002. Guillermo Reyes, interim director, School of Theater and Film; Simon Dove, director, School of Dance, megan.packard@asu.edu (theater); jeanette.beck@asu.edu (dance); theatre.asu.edu; dance.asu.edu; 480-965-5337 (theater); 480-965-5029 (dance); B.A. in theater and film; School of Dance: Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, School of Dance, PO Box 870304, Tempe, AZ 85287-0304

NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY

College of Arts & Letters, Department of Theatre, PO Box 6040, Bldg. 37, Rm. 120, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011-6040. Kathleen McGeever, dept. chair (928-523-4500), theatre@nau.edu; kathleen.mcgeever@nau.edu; www.cal.nau.edu/theatre; 928-523-3781; B.A. or B.S. in performance, design/tech, or theater studies

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

School of Theater Arts, PO Box 210003, 1025 N. Olive Rd., Drama Bldg., Rm. 239, Tuscon, AZ, 85721-0003. Bruce Brockman, director (theater); Jory Hancock, interim dean and director (dance), theatre@email.arizona.edu; dance@email.arizona.edu; www.cfa.arizona.edu/tfty (theater); www.cfa.arizona.edu/dance; 520-621-7008 (theater); 520-621-4698 (dance); B.A. in theater studies, BFA in musical theater, acting, dramaturgy, or design/technology; School of Dance: PO Box 210093, 1713 E. University Blvd., Ina Gittings Bldg. Rm 121, Tucson, AZ 85721-0093

ARKANSAS

LYON COLLEGE

Theatre Department, PO Box 2317, 2300 Highland Rd., Batesville, AR, 72503. Dr. Michael Counts, director, michael.counts@lyon.edu; theatre.lyon.edu; 870-307-7511; B.A. in theater

SOUTHERN ARKANSAS UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre and Mass Communication, SAU Box 9203, Magnolia, AR, 71754-9203. D. David Murphy, chair, ddmurphy@saumag.edu; www.saumag.edu/theatre; 870-235-4255; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT FAYETTEVILLE

J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Drama, 619 Kimpel Hall, Fayetteville, AR, 72701. Amy Herzberg, director of performance program; D. Andrew Gibbs, chair, drama@cavern.uark.edu; herzberg@uark.edu; www.uark.edu/~drama; 479-575-2953; B.A. in drama

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK

Theatre Arts and Dance Department, 2801 S. University Ave., Little Rock, AR, 72204. Jay E. Raphael, chair, jeraphael@ualr.edu; www.ualr.edu/; 501-569-3291; B.A. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS

Department of Mass Communication and Theatre, 201 Donaghey Ave., Snow Fine Arts 233, Conway, AR, 72035. Dr. Gregory Blakey, director of theatre, gregb@uca.edu; www.uca.edu/theatre; 501-450-5092; B.A. or B.S. in theater

CALIFORNIA

ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSITY

79 New Montgomery St., San Francisco, CA, 94105. Marian Shaffner, faculty development director, info@academyart.edu; www.academyart.edu; 800-544-2787; BFA in motion pictures and television (with a concentration in acting)

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DRAMATIC ARTS, LOS ANGELES

1336 N. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles, CA, 90028. Theresa Hayes, acting director of instruction, admissions@ca.aada.org; www.aada.edu; 323-464-2777 or 800-222-2867; A.A. in acting

AMERICAN MUSICAL AND DRAMATIC ACADEMY

6305 Yucca St., Los Angeles, CA, 90028. ethompson@amda.edu; www.amda.edu; 866-374-5300; BFA in acting, dance, performing arts, or musical theater. Also two-year conservatory program in musical theater or acting. Students who complete the two-year conservatory programs in N.Y. or L.A. may transfer into the BFA programs in L.A. upon completion.

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF THE ARTS

School of Theater; Sharon Disney Lund School of Dance, 24700 McBean Parkway, Valencia, CA, 91355-2397. Travis Preston, dean (theater); Stephan Koplowitz, dean (dance), admissions@calarts.edu; www.calarts.edu; 661-253-7853; 661-253-7898 (dance); BFA in acting, scenic design, technical direction, lighting design, management, costuming, or sound design

CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY

Theatre Department, 3801 W. Temple Ave., Bldg. 25, Pomona, CA, 91768. Marie Maslowski, dept. secretary, mmmaslowski@csupomona.edu; www.class.csupomona.edu/th/; 909-869-3900; B.A. in theater

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, BAKERSFIELD

Theatre Department, Music Building 102, 9001 Stockdale Highway, Bakersfield, CA, 93311. Mandy Rees, chair; Karen Mendenhall-Gregory, office coord., kmendenhall_gregory@csub.edu; www.csub.edu/theatre; 661-654-3093; B.A. in theater

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, DOMINGUEZ HILLS

Department of Theater Arts and Dance, 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson, CA, 90747. Sydell Weiner, chair, theatrearts@csudh.edu; www.csudh.edu/theatre; 310-243-3588 or 310-243-3696; B.A. in theater arts

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FRESNO

Department of Theatre Arts, 5201 N. Maple Ave., M/S SA46, Fresno, CA, 93740-8027. Melissa Gibson, mgibson@csufresno.edu; pamd@csufresno.edu; www.csufresno.edu/theatrearts; 559-278-3987; B.A. in theater arts

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON

Department of Theatre and Dance, 800 N. State College Blvd., PO Box 6850, Fullerton, CA, 92834-6850. Bruce Goodrich, chair, bgoodrich@fullerton.edu; www.fullerton.edu/arts; 657-278-3628; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting and musical theater

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH

Theatre Arts Department, 1250 Bellflower Blvd., Long Beach, CA, 90840. Joanne Gordon, chair; Micky Small, business manager, theatre@csulb.edu; www.csulb.edu/depts/theatre; www.calrep.org; 562-985-7891; B.A. in theater arts

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LOS ANGELES

Department of Theatre Arts and Dance, 5151 State University Dr., Los Angeles, CA, 90032. James Hatfield, dept. chair, tad@calstatela.edu; www.calstatela.edu/dept/theatre_dance/; 323-343-4110; B.A. in theater arts

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, NORTHRIDGE

Department of Theater, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge, CA, 91330-8320. Garry D. Lennon, dept. chair, theatre@csun.edu; www.csun.edu/theatre; 818-677-3086; B.A. in theater

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SACRAMENTO

Department of Theatre and Dance, 6000 J St., Shasta Hall, Sacramento, CA, 96819-6069. Linda S. Goodrich, chair, theatre.dance@csus.edu; achebe@csus.edu; www.csus.edu/dram; 916-278-6368; B.A. in theater

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SAN BERNARDINO

Department of Theater Arts, Performing Arts Building, Rm. 111, 5500 University Parkway, San Bernardino, CA, 92407-2397. Margaret Perry, acting dept. chair, moreinfo@csusb.edu; http://theatre.csusb.edu/; 909-537-5876; B.A. in theater arts

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, STANISLAUS

Department of Theatre, Drama Building, Room D15, One University Circle, Turlock, CA, 95382. John A. Mayer, chair, coa@csustan.edu; www.csustan.edu/theatre; 209-667-3451; B.A. in theater arts

EL CAMINO COLLEGE

Theatre Department, 16007 Crenshaw Blvd., Torrance, CA, 90506. Ms. Constance Fitzsimons, dean of fine arts, cfitzsimons@elcamino.edu; www.elcamino.edu; A.A. in theater

FOOTHILL COLLEGE

Fine Arts and Communication Division, Department of Theatre Arts, 12345 El Monte Rd., Los Altos Hills, CA, 94022. Mark Anderson, dean, andersonmark@foothill.edu; www.foothill.edu; 650-949-7777; A.A. in theater arts

HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, Film & Dance, 1 Harpst St., Arcata, CA, 95521. Bernadette Cheyne, dept. chair, theatre@humboldt.edu; www.humboldt.edu; 707-826-3566; B.A. in theater arts

LOS ANGELES CITY COLLEGE

Theatre Academy in Hollywood, 855 N. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, CA, 90029. Kevin Morrissey, chair, morriskl@lacitycollege.edu; http://theatreacademy.lacitycollege.edu; 323-953-4000, ext. 2992; Training leads to certificate; Additional requirements must be taken outside the academy to earn the A.A. in arts degree.

LOS ANGELES VALLEY COLLEGE

Theater Arts Department, 5800 Fulton Ave., Valley Glen, CA, 91401. Peter Parkin, dept. chair, info@lavctheater.com; http://www.lavctheater.com/entrypage.html; 818-947-2786; Certificate in theater arts

LOYOLA MARYMOUNT UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre Arts, One LMU Drive, Foley 308, Los Angeles, CA, 90045-8210. juribe@lmu.com (theater); lmcghee1@lmu.edu (dance); www.lmu.edu; 310-338-2839 or 310-338-5233 (dance); B.A. in theater arts

MONTEREY PENINSULA COLLEGE

Theatre Arts Department, 980 Fremont St., Monterey, CA, 93940. Gary Bolen, co-chairman, gbolen@mpc.edu; www.mpctheatre.com; 831-646-4085; A.A. in theater arts

OCCIDENTAL COLLEGE

Theater Department, 1600 Campus Rd., Los Angeles, CA, 90041-3314. Beatrice Gonzales, administrative assistant, beatrice@oxy.edu; http://departments.oxy.edu/theater; 323-259-2771; B.A. in theater

PACIFIC CONSERVATORY OF THE PERFORMING ARTS

Allan Hancock College, 800 S. College Drive, Santa Maria, CA, 93454-6399. Gloria Lopez, pcpa@pcpa.org; conservatory@pcpa.org; www.pcpa.org; 805-928-7731 ext. 4415; Non-degree program

PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY

Seaver College/Fine Arts Division, Department of Theater, 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu, CA, 90263. Dr. Gary Cobb, chair, gary.cobb@pepperdine.edu; www.pepperdine.edu; 310-506-4462; B.A. in theater arts, theater and television, or theater and music

POMONA COLLEGE

Department of Theatre and Dance, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont, CA, 91711. Arthur Horowitz, dept. chair, mtr04747@pomona.edu; http://theatre.pomona.edu; 909-621-8186; B.A. in theater

SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY

School of Theatre, Television, and Film, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA, 92182-7601. Angie Parkhurst, TTF coordinator, aparkhur@mail.sdsu.edu; http://theatre.sdsu.edu/; 619-594-5091; B.A. in theater arts

SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater Arts, Creative Arts Building-CA 103, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco, CA, 94132-4157. Todd Roehrman, dept. chair, tha@sfsu.edu; theatre@sfsu.edu; tempthadesk@gmail.com; http://theatre.sfsu.edu/; 415-338-1341; B.A. in drama

SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Television, Radio, Film, Theatre, Animation and Illustration, Hugh Gillis Hall, Rm. 100, 1 Washington Square, San Jose, CA, 95192-0098. Dr. Ed Harris, chair, info@tvradiofilmtheatre.com; www.tvradiofilmtheatre.com; 408-924-4530 or 408-924-4567; B.A. in theater arts, radio-television-film, or musical theater

SANTA ANA COLLEGE

Theatre Arts Department, 1530 W. 17th St., Santa Ana, CA, 92706. Valinda Tivenan, dept. chair, donchey_sheryl@sac.edu or tivenan_valinda@sac.edu; http://ext.sac.edu/academic_progs/theatre_arts/; 714-564-5666 or 714-564-5668; A.A. in theater arts or certificate in intelligent lighting

SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre and Dance, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA, 95053-0340. Barbara Murray, chair, bmurray@scu.edu; www.scu.edu/cas/theatre/index.cfm; 408-554-4989 or 408-554-4669; B.A. in theater arts

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater Arts, 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park, CA, 94928. Shelley Martin, administrative coordinator, shelley.martin@sonoma.edu; www.sonoma.edu/performingarts/theatre/index.shtml; 707-664-2474; B.A. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY

Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies, 101 Dwinelle Annex, Berkeley, CA, 94720-2560. Michael Mansfield, undergraduate advisor, tdps@berkeley.edu; tdps.berkeley.edu; 510-642-1677; B.A .in theater and performance studies

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS

Department of Theatre and Dance, 222 Wright Hall, Davis, CA, 95616-8577. Soccoro Figueroa, undergraduate matters, svfigueroa@ucdavis.edu; www.ucdavis.edu; 530-752-0888; B.A. in dramatic art

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE

Department of Drama, 249 Drama, Irvine, CA, 92697-2775. Eli Simon, chair, drama@uci.edu; http://drama.arts.uci.edu; 949-824-6614; B.A. in drama, BFA in musical theater

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES

School of Theater, Film, and Television, 102 East Melnitz, PO Box 951622, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1622. Michael Hackett, chair, info@tft.ucla.edu; mhackett@tft.ucla.edu; www.tft.ucla.edu; 310-825-5761; B.A. in theater or film, television, and digital media

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE

Department of Theatre, Fine Arts Building, 900 University Ave., Riverside, CA, 92521. Eric Barr, dept. chair, eric.barr@ucr.edu; www.theatre.ucr.edu; 951-827-3343; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO

Department of Theater and Dance, 9500 Gilman Drive MC0344, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0344. theatredance-ug@ucsd.edu; lajimenez@ucsd.edu; www.theatre.ucsd.edu; 858-534-3791; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA

Department of Theater and Dance, 552 University Road, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106-7060. Simon Williams, chair, theaterdance-ugradadv@theaterdance.ucsb.edu; www.theaterdance.ucsb.edu; 805-893-3241; B.A. or BFA in theater with an acting emphasis

UNIVERSITY OF LA VERNE

Department of Theater Arts, 1950 Third St., La Verne, CA, 91750. D. David Flaten, dept. chair, theatre@ulv.edu; flatend@ulv.edu; www.ulv.edu/theatre; 909-593-3511, ext. 4552; B.A. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

School of Theatre, 1029 Childs Way, Los Angeles, CA, 90089-0791. Madeline Puzo, dean, thtrinfo@usc.edu; theatre.usc.edu; 213-740-1286; B.A. in theater or BFA in acting, design, technical direction, and stage management

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA - CONTINUING EDUCATION

School of Theatre, 1029 Childs Way, Los Angeles, CA, 90089-0791. thtrinfo@usc.edu; theatre.usc.edu; 213-740-1286; Continuing education classes may apply toward B.A. or BFA in theater; School of Theater offers continuing education classes throughout the year.

UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC

Theater Arts Department, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA, 95211. Cathie McClellan, dept. chair, cmcclellan@pacific.edu; http://web.pacific.edu/x13787.xml; 209-946-2116; B.A. in theater arts

VANGUARD UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Theatre Department, 55 Fair Dr., Costa Mesa, CA, 92626-9601. Susan K. Berkompas, Chair, sberkompas@vanguard.edu; www.vanguard.edu/theatrearts; 714-556-3610 ext. 2953; B.A. in theater arts (performance/directing, design/technical, or musical theater)

COLORADO

METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER

Theatre Department, Auraria Campus, Arts 269, PO Box 173362, CB93, Denver, CO, 80217-3362. Stacey Nelms, administrative assistant III, nelmss@mscd.edu; www.mscd.edu/theatre; 303-556-2152; B.A. in theater, BFA in musical theater or applied theater technology

NAROPA UNIVERSITY

Performing Arts Department, 2130 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, CO, 80302. Mark Miller, chair, markm@naropa.edu; www.naropa.edu; 303-546-5282; BFA in performance

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO

Department of Theatre and Dance, 261 UCB, Boulder, CO, 80309-0261. Kyle Neidt, academic advisor, thtrdnce@colorado.edu; www.colorado.edu/theatredance; 303-492-7355; B.A. in theater, BFA in performance, musical theater or design and production

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, DENVER

College of Arts and Media, Department of Theater, Film and Video Production, Campus Box 162, PO Box 173364, Denver, CO, 80217-3364. David Dynak, dean, david.dynak@ucdenver.edu; www.ucdenver.edu; 303-556-2279; B.A. or BFA in fine arts

UNIVERSITY OF DENVER

Department of Theater, 2199 S. University Blvd., Denver, CO, 80208. Rick Barbour, chair, theatre@du.edu; www.du.edu/thea/; 303-871-2518; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN COLORADO

School of Theatre and Dance, Frasier Hall 107, Campus Box 49, Greeley, CO, 80639. David Grapes, director, di.smice@unco.edu; www.arts.unco.edu; 970-351-2930; B.A. in theater (with emphasis in performance, theater education, theater studies, or design/tech.) or musical theater

CONNECTICUT

CENTRAL CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY

Maloney Hall, 1615 Stanley St., New Britain, CT, 06050. Tom Callery Jr., chair, callery@ccsu.edu; www.theatre.ccsu.edu; 860-832-3150; B.A. in general theater, BFA in acting, technical design, directing, or educational theater

CONNECTICUT COLLEGE

Department of Theater, Palmer Auditorium, 270 Mohegan Avenue, New London, CT, 06320. Mary Lowe, admission@conncoll.edu; www.conncoll.edu; 860-439-2605; B.A. in theater

FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY

Dept. of Visual & Performing Arts/Theater Program, 1073 North Benson Road, Fairfield, CT, 06824-5195. Lynne Porter, program director, lporter@fairfield.edu; www.fairfield.edu; 203-254-4000, ext. 3406; B.A. in theater

NATIONAL THEATER INSTITUTE (NTI)

Eugene O'Neill Theater Center, 305 Great Neck Road, Waterford, CT, 06385. Jeff Janisheski, artistic director, nti@theoneill.org; www.theoneill.org/nti; 860-443-7139; Nondegree program; fully accredited semester programs

SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, 501 Crescent St., New Haven, CT, 06515. fordr2@southernct.edu; www.southernct.edu/theatre/; 203-392-6100; B.A. in theater

TRINITY COLLEGE

Department of Theater and Dance, 300 Summit St., Hartford, CT, 06106-3100. Patricia A. Kennedy, administrative assistant, pkennedy@trincoll.edu; www.trincoll.edu; 860-297-5122; B.A. in theater and dance

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT, STORRS

Department of Dramatic Arts, 802 Bolton Road, Unit 1127, Storrs, CT, 06269-1127. Corina Wylie, administrative assistant, dramaoffice@uconn.edu; www.drama.uconn.edu; 860-486-4025; B.A. in theater studies, BFA in acting or design/tech

UNIVERSITY OF HARTFORD

Hartt School, 200 Bloomfield Ave., West Hartford, CT, 06117. coates@hartford.edu (theater); lesko@hartford.edu (dance); www.hartford.edu/hartt; 860-768-2462 (theater); 860-768-2478 (dance); BFA in actor training or musical theater, B.A. in performing arts management

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

Theater Department, 275 Washington Terrace, Middletown, CT, 06459. John F. Carr, chair, jcarr@wesleyan.edu; www.wesleyan.edu/theater; 860-685-2950 or 860-685-3029; B.A. in theater

WESTERN CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY

Theatre Arts Department, 181 White St., Danbury, CT, 06810. Sal Trapani, chair, trapanis@wcsu.edu; www.wcsu.edu; 203-837-8253 or 203-837-8258; B.A. in theater arts or musical theater

YALE UNIVERSITY

Theater Studies, PO Box 208296, New Haven, CT, 06520-8296. Toni Dorfman, director of undergraduate theater studies, toni.dorfman@yale.edu; http://theaterstudies.yale.edu; 203-432-1310; B.A. in theater studies

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY

Department of Performing Arts, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. N.W., Washington, DC, 20016-8053. Caleen Jennings, co-chair, mennige@american.edu; www.american.edu/perf_arts; 202-885-3414; B.A. in theater or musical theater

THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA

Department of Drama, 620 Michigan Ave. N.E., Washington, DC, 20064. Megan Reichelt, administrative assistant, cua-drama@cua.edu; reichelt@cua.edu; http://drama.cua.edu; 202-319-5358; B.A. in drama

GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre & Dance, 800 21st St. N.W., Ste. 227, Washington, DC, 20052. Dana Tai Soon Burgess, dept. chair, onstage@gwu.edu; http://theatredance.gwu.edu; 202-994-8072; B.A. in theater or dramatic literature

HOWARD UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre Arts, 2455 Sixth St. N.W., Washington, DC, 20059. Joe Selmon, interim chair, jselmon@howard.edu; www.coas.howard.edu/theatrearts/; 202-806-7050; BFA in acting, musical theater, pre-directing, theater education, theater arts administration, and theater technology

NATIONAL CONSERVATORY OF DRAMATIC ARTS

1556 Wisconsin Ave. N.W., Washington, DC, 20007. Nan Kyle Ficca, vice president/CFO, ncdadrama@aol.com; nficca@theconservatory.org; www.theconservatory.org; 202-333-2202; Nondegree program

FLORIDA

FLAGLER COLLEGE

Department of Theater Arts, 74 King St., St. Augustine, FL, 32084. Phyllis Gibbs, dept. chair, gibbspm@flagler.edu; www.flagler.edu; 904-819-6217; B.A. in theater arts or theater arts secondary education

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre and Dance, Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL, 33431-0991. theatre@fau.edu; www.fau.edu/theatre; 561-297-3810; B.A. in theater, BFA in theater performance

FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, Wertheim Performing Arts Center, University Park Campus, Miami, FL, 33199. Ms. Marilyn Skow, chair, carta@fiu.edu; http://carta.fiu.edu/theatre/homepage/theatre-homepage.aspx; 305-348-2895; B.A. or BFA in theater

FLORIDA SCHOOL OF THE ARTS

St. Johns River Community College, 5001 St. Johns Ave., Palatka, FL, 32177. Patti Cason, assistant to the dean, floarts@sjrcc.edu; www.floarts.org; 386-312-4300; A.A .in performing arts, A.S. in acting, A.S. in musical theater

FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE

Department of Theater Arts, 111 Lake Hollingsworth Drive, Lakeland, FL, 33801. James Beck, assistant professor, jbeck@flsouthern.edu; www.flsouthern.edu; 863-680-4226; B.A. in theater arts

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

School of Theatre, 239 Fine Arts Building, Tallahassee, FL, 32306-1160. Cameron Jackson, producing artistic director, sot-info@mailer.fsu.edu; http://theatre.fsu.edu; 850-644-7257; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting or musical theater

NEW WORLD SCHOOL OF THE ARTS

Theater Division, Building 5, Rm. 5901, 25 N.E. Second St., Miami, FL, 33132. Patrice Bailey, dean of theater, pbailey@mdc.edu; www.mdc.edu/nwsa; 305-237-3541; BFA in acting or musical theater

PALM BEACH ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY

Theater Department, PO Box 24708, West Palm Beach, FL, 33416. Mr. Josué Léon, admissions counselor, josue_leon@pba.edu; www.pba.edu; 561-803-2104; B.A. in theater

ROLLINS COLLEGE

Department of Theatre and Dance, 1000 Holt Ave., Box 2735, Winter Park, FL, 32789. Jennifer Jones Cavenaugh, dept. chair, jcavenaugh@rollins.edu; www.rollins.edu/theatre; 407-646-2501; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

UCF Conservatory Theatre, PO Box 162372, Orlando, FL, 32816. Earl Weaver, associate professor/program coordinator, eweaver@mail.ucf.edu; theatre@mail.ucf.edu; www.theatre.ucf.edu; 407-823-2862; B.A. in theater studies, BFA in acting, musical theater, stage management, and design and technology

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

School of Theatre and Dance, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL, 32611. sotd@arts.ufl.edu; www.arts.ufl.edu/theatreanddance; 352-273-0500 or 352-273-0501; B.A. in general theater, BFA in theater performance or musical theater

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI

Department of Theatre Arts, PO Box 248273, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-4820. Henry Fonte, chair, theatredepartment@miami.edu; www.miami.edu/tha; 305-284-4474; B.A. in theater arts, BFA in acting, musical theater, theater management, stage management, and design/production

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA

School of Theatre and Dance, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., TAR 230, Tampa, FL, 33620-7450. Merry Lynn Morris, theater and dance academic advisor, mmorris@arts.usf.edu; www.arts.usf.edu; 813-974-2701; B.A. in theater, BFA in design

UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA

Theatre Department, Building 82, 11000 University Parkway, Pensacola, FL, 32514. Charles Houghton, chair, theatre@uwf.edu; http://uwf.edu/theatre/backstage/; 850-474-2146; B.A. in acting/performance, musical theater performance, design/tech

GEORGIA

AGNES SCOTT COLLEGE

Department of Theater and Dance, 141 East College Ave., Decatur, GA, 30030-3797. Dudley Sanders, chair, dsanders@agnesscott.edu; www.agnesscott.edu; 404-471-6250; B.A. in theater

BERRY COLLEGE

Department of Fine Arts, Theatre Program, 2277 Martha Berry Hwy NW, Mount Berry, GA, 30149-0309. Dr. John Countryman, jcountryman@berry.edu; www.berry.edu; 706-236-2289; B.A. in theater

BRENAU UNIVERSITY

Department of Performing Arts, 500 Washington St. S.E., Gainesville, GA, 30501. Ann Demling, dept. chair, ademling@brenau.edu; www.brenau.edu; 770-534-6264; B.A. in theater, BFA in theater arts (with an emphasis in musical theater) and design/tech

COLUMBUS STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, 4225 University Ave., Columbus, GA, 31907-5645. Dr. Larry Dooley, associate professor, dooley_larry@colstate.edu; http://theatre.columbusstate.edu; 706-507-8401; B.A. in theater arts, BFA in theater arts (with concentration in acting/directing or technical theater), BSEd in theater teaching

EMORY UNIVERSITY

Theater Studies, Rich Memorial Building 230, 1602 Fishburne Drive, Atlanta, GA, 30322. Leslie Taylor, chair, jward03@emory.edu, dance@emory.edu; www.theater.emory.edu; 404-727-6463 or 404-727-0524; B.A. in theater studies

KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre & Performance Studies, Wilson Building 31, Rm. 249, 1000 Chastain Rd., #3103, Kennesaw, GA, 30144-5591. Dr. John S. Gentile, chair, jgentile@kennesaw.edu; www.kennesaw.edu/theatre; 770-499-3123; B.A. in theater and performance studies

LAGRANGE COLLEGE

Department of Theatre Arts, 601 Broad St., LaGrange, GA, 30240. Kim Barber Knoll, chair, lknopp@lagrange.edu; www.lagrange.edu; 706-880-8266 or 706-880-8324; B.A. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA

Department of Theatre and Film Studies, 203B Fine Arts Building, Athens, GA, 30602-3154. Dr. David Saltz, dept. head, saltz@uga.edu; www.drama.uga.edu; 706-542-2836; B.A. in drama or film studies

UNIVERSITY OF WEST GEORGIA

Theatre Department, 1601 Maple St., Carrollton, GA, 30118. Shelly Elman, director of theatre, relman@westga.edu; www.westga.edu/~theatre; 678-839-4700 or 678-839-4704; B.A. in theater arts

VALDOSTA STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication Arts, College of the Arts, 1500 N. Patterson St., Valdosta, GA, 31698. Jacque Wheeler, jwheeler@valdosta.edu; www.valdosta.edu; 229-333-5820; BFA in theater arts

HAWAII

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA

Kennedy Theatre, Department of Theater and Dance, 1770 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI, 96822. Dennis Carroll, chair, theatre@hawaii.edu; carroll@hawaii.edu; www.hawaii.edu/theatre; 808-956-7677; B.A. in theater

IDAHO

BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre Arts, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725-1565. Carrie Applegate, administrative assistant, theatre@boisestate.edu, carrieapplegate@boisestate.edu; http://theatre.boisestate.edu; 208-426-3957; B.A. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO

Department of Theatre Arts, PO Box 442008, Sixth and Rayburn Streets, Shoup Hall, Moscow, ID, 83844-2008. Dean Panttaja, dept. chair, theatre@uidaho.edu; www.class.uidaho.edu/irt/; 208-885-6465; B.A. or B.S. in theater, BFA in theater and film

ILLINOIS

BRADLEY UNIVERSITY

Slane College of Communication and Fine Arts, Department of Theater Arts, 1501 W. Bradley Ave., Peoria, IL, 61625. George H. Brown, chair, theatre@bradley.edu; http://slane.bradley.edu/theatre-arts; 309-677-2660; B.A. or B.S. in theater arts

CHICAGO STATE UNIVERSITY

Douglas Library, Breakey Theatre, 9501 S. King Dr., Chicago, IL, 60628. Arthur M. Reese, program coordinator, am-reese@csu.edu; www.csu.edu/speech; 773-995-2280; B.A. in speech or media communications with a minor in theater

COLUMBIA COLLEGE CHICAGO

Theater Department, 72 E. 11th St., Rm. 300, Chicago, IL, 60605. John Green, dept. chair, theatre@colum.edu; www.colum.edu; 312-369-6101; B.A. or BFA in acting, musical theater, design, or directing

DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

The Theatre School, 2135 N. Kenmore Ave., Chicago, IL, 60614. Jason Beck, director of admissions, theatreadmissions@depaul.edu; http://theatreschool.depaul.edu; 773-325-7999 or 800-4-DEPAUL, ext. 57999; BFA in acting, costume design, costume technology, lighting design, scenic design, sound design, stage management, theater technology, dramaturgy/criticism, playwriting, theater arts, or theater management

ELMHURST COLLEGE

190 Prospect Ave., Elmhurst, IL, 60126. Alan W. Weiger, chair of department of communication arts and sciences; Janice Pohl, director of theatre, alanw@elmhurst.edu; janicep@elmhurst.edu; www.elmhurst.edu; 630-617-3006 (chair); 630-617-3008 (director of theater); B.A. in theater or musical theater

ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY

College Of Fine Arts, School of Theater/Dance Program, Campus Box 5700, Normal, IL, 61790-5700. lmerri@ilstu.edu; www.ilstu.edu; 309-438-2850; B.A. or B.S. in theater

ILLINOIS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

School of Theater Arts, PO Box 2900, Bloomington, IL, 61702-2900. Curtis C. Trout, director, ctrout@iwu.edu; www.iwu.edu/theatre; 309-556-3944 or 309-556-3315; B.A. in theater arts, BFA in acting, music theater, or design/tech

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHICAGO

Department of Fine and Performing Arts, Mundelein Center Suite 1200, 1020 West Sheridan Rd., Chicago, IL, 60626. Mark Lococo, director of theatre, theatre-info@luc.edu; www.luc.edu/theatre; 773-508-3830 or 773-508-7511; B.A. in theater

MILLIKIN UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre and Dance, 1184 W. Main St., Decatur, IL, 62522. Laura Ledford, Chair, mspencer@milikin.edu; www.millikin.edu; 217-424-6282; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting, musical theater, design/tech, stage management, or theater administration

NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY

School of Theatre and Dance, Stevens Building, DeKalb, IL, 60115-2854. Alexander Gelman, director, agelman@niu.edu; www.niu.edu/theatre; 815-753-1334 or 815-753-8253; B.A. in theater studies or BFA in acting, design/tech

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

School of Communication, Department of Theater, 1949 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL, 60208. Rives Collins, dept. chair, r-collins@northwestern.edu, v-valliere@northwestern.edu; www.communication.northwestern.edu/theatre; 847-491-3170; B.A. or B.S. in theater, music theater certificate

ROOSEVELT UNIVERSITY/CHICAGO COLLEGE OF PERFORMING ARTS

The Theatre Conservatory, 430 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL, 60605. Sean Kelley, assoc. dean/director, theatre@roosevelt.edu; www.roosevelt.edu/ccpa/admissions/theatreconservatoryadmissions.aspx; 312-341-6735; BFA in acting or musical theater

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY AT EDWARDSVILLE

Department of Theater and Dance, Katherine Dunham Hall #1031, Campus Box 1777, SIUE, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1777. Peter Cocuzza, chair, pcocuzz@siue.edu; osweeze@siue.edu; www.siue.edu/artsandsciences/theater/; 618-650-2773 or 618-650-5614; B.A. or B.S. in theater and dance (with specialization in performance or liberal studies),B.A. in musical theater

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CARBONDALE

Department of Theatre, Mail Code 6608, Communications Building #1033, Carbondale, IL, 62901. Mark K. Varns, chair, varms@siu.edu; http://www.siu.edu/~mcleod/; 618-453-5741; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO

Department of Performing Arts/Theater Studies, College of Architecture and the Arts, EPASW Building, 1040 W. Harrison St., MC-255, Chicago, IL, 60607-7130. Carol E. Florek, administrative assistant, dpa@uic.edu; cefa@uic.edu; www.uic.edu/depts/adpa/index.htm; 312-996-2977 or 312-413-1058; B.A. or BFA in theater performance

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

Department of Theatre, 4-122 Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, 500 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL, 61801. David Swinford, admissions and records representative, theatre@uiuc.edu; dswinfor@illinois.edu; www.uic.edu/depts/adpa/welcome.htm; 217-333-2371; BFA in acting or theater studies

WESTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre and Dance, Browne Hall 101, 1 University Circle, Macomb, IL, 61455. David E. Patrick, chair, theatre@wiu.edu; www.wiu.edu/theatre; 309-298-1543; B.A. in theater, BFA in musical theater

INDIANA

BALL STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre and Dance, AC 306, Muncie, IN, 47306-0415. Bill Jenkins, chair; Andrea Sadler, recruitment coordinator, amsadler@bsu.edu; wjenkins@bsu.edu; theatrestu@bsu.edu; www.bsu.edu/theatre; 765-285-8740; BFA in acting or musical theater, B.A. or B.S. in design/tech, production, theatrical studies, theater education

BUTLER UNIVERSITY

Jordan College of Fine Arts, Department of Theater, Lilly Hall, Rm. 152, 4600 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis, IN, 46208. William Fisher, dept. chair theater; Larry Attaway, dept. chair dance, ljcooper@butler.edu (theater); jggonzal@butler.edu (dance); www.butler.edu/theatre/; www.butler.edu/dance/; 317-940-9659 (theater); 800-368-6852 ext. 9346 (dance); B.A. in theater

FRANKLIN COLLEGE

Theater Department, 101 Branigin Blvd., Franklin, IN, 46131. rroberts@franklincollege.edu; www.franklincollege.edu/academics/majors/theatre-major; 317-738-8259; B.A. in theater

INDIANA STATE UNIVERSITY

Theater Department, 540 N. Seventh St., Terre Haute, IN, 47809. Sherry McFadden, professor, toni.roloff@indstate.edu; www.indstate.edu/theatre; 812-237-3331; B.A. or B.S. in theater

INDIANA UNIVERSITY, BLOOMINGTON

Department of Theatre and Drama, 275 N. Jordan Ave., AD250, Bloomington, IN, 47405-1101. Charles Railsbeck, undergraduate advisor, theatre@indiana.edu; www.theatre.indiana.edu; 812-855-4342; B.A. in theater and drama; BFA in musical theater

PURDUE UNIVERSITY

Division of Theater, Pao Hall of Visual and Performing Arts, 552 W. Wood St., West Lafayette, IN, 47907-2002. Richard Stockton Rand, chair, theatre@purdue.edu; www.cla.purdue.edu/vpa/theatre/; 765-494-3074; B.A. in theater, acting, design/production

UNIVERSITY OF EVANSVILLE

Department of Theatre, 1800 Lincoln Ave., Evansville, IN, 47722. Barbara Dial, administrative assistant, theatre@evansville.edu; bd24@evansville.edu; http://theatre.evansville.edu; 812-488-2744 or 800-423-8633; B.A., BFA, or B.S. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS

Department of Theater, 1400 E. Hanna Ave., Indianapolis, IN, 46227. Jim Ream, dept. chair, bwright@uindy.edu; http://theatre.uindy.edu/; 317-788-3455; B.A. or B.S. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME

Department of Film, Television, and Theater, DeBartolo Center for the Performing Arts, Room 230, Notre Dame, IN, 46556. Donald Crafton, chair, dcrafton@nd.edu; http://ftt.nd.edu/; 574-631-7054; B.A. in film, television, and theater

VINCENNES UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater & Dance, 1002 N. First St., Vincennes, IN, 47591. JoEllen Horne, performing arts secretary, jhorne@vinu.edu; www.vinu.edu; 812-888-5110; Certificate in theater

WABASH COLLEGE

Department of Theater, PO Box 352, Crawfordsville, IN, 47933. Michael S. Abbott, dept. chair, theater@wabash.edu; www.wabash.edu/academics/theater/; 765-361-6392 or 765-361-6100; B.A. in theater

IOWA

CLARKE COLLEGE

Department of Drama, 1550 Clarke Dr., Dubuque, IA, 52001. Ellen Gabrielleschi, chair, ellen.gabrielleschi@clarke.edu; admissions@clarke.edu; www.clarke.edu; 563-588-6409 or 800-383-2345; B.A. in drama and musical theater

COE COLLEGE

Theatre Arts Department, 1220 First Ave. N.E., Cedar Rapids, IA, 52402. Steven Marc Weiss, dept. chair, sweiss@coe.edu; www.theatre.coe.edu; 319-399-8578; B.A. in theater arts

CORNELL COLLEGE

Department of Theatre and Communications Studies, 600 First St. SW, Mount Vernon, IA, 52314-1098. R. Joseph Dieker, dean, theatre@cornellcollege.edu; www.cornellcollege.edu/theatre; 319-895-4233; B.A. in theater studies

DORDT COLLEGE

Theater Arts Department, 498 Fourth Ave. N.E., Sioux Center, IA, 51250. April Hubbard, dept. chair, theatre@dordt.edu; ahubbard@dordt.edu; www.dordt.edu/arts/theatre; 712-722-6210 or 800-343-6738; B.A. in theater arts

DRAKE UNIVERSITY

Theater Arts Department, 2507 University Ave., Des Moines, IA, 50311. Judy Keyser, judy.drury@drake.edu; www.drake.edu; 515-271-2011 or 800-44-DRAKE; BFA in acting, directing, design, musical theater, or theater education; B.A. in theater arts

GRACELAND UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, 1 University Place, Lamoni, IA, 50140. Tracy Salter, theater dept. coordinator, tsalter@graceland.edu; www.graceland.edu; 641-784-5268; B.A. in film, theater, and performance studies

GRINNELL COLLEGE

Department of Theatre and Dance, 1107 Park St., Grinnell, IA, 50112. Lesley Delmenico, chair, delmenic@grinnell.edu; http://web.grinnell.edu/theatre; 641-269-3064; B.A. in theater

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, 2226 Pearson Hall, Ames, IA, 50011. Jane Cox, director, isutheatre@iastate.edu; www.theatre.iastate.edu; 515-294-2624; B.A. in performing arts

UNIVERSITY OF IOWA

Department of Theatre Arts, 107 Theatre Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1795. Alan Macvey, chair of the theater arts dept., theatre@uiowa.edu; www.uiowa.edu/~theatre/; 319-335-2700 or 800-553-IOWA; B.A. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA

Department of Theater, 1227 West 27th St., Cedar Falls, IA, 50614-0371. Eric Lange, head, dept. of theater, strayer-wood@uni.edu; www.uni.edu/theatre; 319-273-6386; B.A. in theater arts

KANSAS

KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication Studies, Theater, and Dance, Nichols Hall 107, Manhattan, KS, 66506-2304. John Uthoff, director of theater, jsutd@ksu.edu; www.k-state.edu/theatre; 785-532-6864; B.A. or B.S. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS

Department of Theatre and Film, Murphy Hall, 1530 Naismith Drive, Lawrence, KS, 66045-3102. John Staniunas, chair, kuthf@ku.edu; kudance@ku.edu; www.theatre.ku.edu; http://dance.ku.edu/; 785-864-3511; BGS in theater, B.A. in theater or theater/film

WICHITA STATE UNIVERSITY

School of Performing Arts, 1845 N. Fairmount St., Box 153, Wichita, KS, 67260-0153. Linda Starkey, director, performingarts@wichita.edu; http://finearts.wichita.edu/performing/index.asp; 316-978-3368; B.A. in theater, BFA in performing arts/theater or musical theater

KENTUCKY

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

Department of English and Theater, 521 Lancaster Ave., 306 Jane F. Campbell Building, Richmond, KY, 40475. James R. Moreton, coordinator, james.moreton@eku.edu; www.eku.edu; 859-622-1315; B.A. in theater

GEORGETOWN COLLEGE

Department of Theater & Performance Studies, 400 E. College St., Georgetown, KY, 40324-1696. Dr. Ed Smith, chair, ed_smith@georgtowncollege.edu; www.georgetowncollege.edu/departments/tpa; 502-863-8042; B.A. in theater

MURRAY STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, 106 Fine Arts Building, MSU, Murray, KY, 42071. David Balthrop, chair, david.balthrop@murraystate.edu; www.murraystate.edu; 270-809-4421; B.A. or B.S. in theater

NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre and Dance, FA-205, Nunn Dr., Highland Heights, KY, 41099-1007. Ken Jones, chair, jonesk@nku.edu; www.nku.edu/~theatre/; 859-572-6362; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting, musical theater, technical theater/design, stage management, or playwriting

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Department of Theater, 114 Fine Arts Building, Rose Street, Lexington, KY, 40506. Nancy Jones, chair, ncjone0@email.uky.edu; www.uky.edu/finearts/theatre; 859-257-3297 or 859-257-9250; B.A. in theater

WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre and Dance, Gordon Wilson Hall, 1906 College Heights Blvd., #71086, Bowling Green, KY, 42101-1086. Dr. David Young, dept. head, david.young@wku.edu; www.wku.edu/pcal/index.php?page=theatre-and-dance; 270-745-5845; B.A. in theater, BFA in performing arts

LOUISIANA

CENTENARY COLLEGE OF LOUISIANA

Theatre and Dance Department, Marjorie Lyons Playhouse, 2911 Centenary Blvd., Shreveport, LA, 71104-1188. Don Hooper, chair, dhooper@centenary.edu; www.

centenary.edu; 318-869-5242 or 318-869-5074; B.A. in theater

DILLARD UNIVERSITY

Department of Speech Communication and Theatre Arts, Samuel DuBois Cook Fine Arts and Communication Center, 1555 Poydras St., Cook Rm. 122, New Orleans, LA, 70122. Cortheal Clark, cclark@dillard.edu; www.dillard.edu; 504-816-4689; B.A. in theater arts

GRAMBLING STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre Arts, College of Arts and Sciences, Conrad Hutchinson Performing Arts Building, Carver Hall 114, Grambling, LA, 71245. King David Godwin, Ph. D., head, godwink@gram.edu; www.gram.edu; 318-274-2732; B.A. in theater

LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, 217 M & DA Building, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803. Kristin Sosnowsky, interim chair, theatre@lsu.edu; mtick1@lsu.edu; www.lsu.edu; 225-578-4174; B.A .in performance, theater studies, design/tech, literature/history/theory, or arts administration

LOUISIANA TECH UNIVERSITY

School of the Performing Arts, Stone Theater, PO Box 8608, Tech Station, Ruston, LA, 71272. Cherrie A. Sciro, coordinator, lulu@latech.edu; www.latechuniversitytheatre.com; 318-257-2930; B.A .in speech (with a concentration in theater)

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS

Department of Theatre Arts and Dance, 312 Marquette Hall, New Orleans, LA, 70118. Cheryl Conway, office manager, drama@loyno.edu; dance@loyno.edu; www.loyno.edu; 504-865-3840; B.A. in theater arts

MCNEESE STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Performing Arts, Campus Box 92175, Lake Charles, LA, 70609-2175. Michele Martin, head, webmaster@mcneese.edu; www.mcneese.edu/theatre; 337-475-5028 or 800-622-3352; B.A. in theater arts

NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA

School of Creative and Performing Arts, 150 Central Ave., Natchitoches, LA, 71497. Scott Burrell, coordinator of theater and dance, nfburrellc@nsula.edu; theatre.nsula.edu; 318-357-6891 or 318-357-4483; B.S. in theater (with concentrations in performance/directing, musical theater, design/tech)

TULANE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre and Dance, 215 McWilliams Hall, New Orleans, LA, 70118. Marty Sachs, chair, msachs@tulane.edu; www.tulane.edu; 504-314-7760; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting or design/tech

UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA AT LAFAYETTE

Department of Performing Arts, McLaurin Hall, Room 109, PO Box 43690, Lafayette, LA, 70504-3690. Jennifer Potter, administrative assistant, performingarts@louisiana.edu; http://soad.louisiana.edu/pfar/; 337-482-6357; BFA in acting

UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS

Department of Film, Theater, and Communication Arts, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, Performing Arts Center, New Orleans, LA, 70148. ftca@uno.edu; http://ftca.uno.edu; 504-280-6317; B.A. in theater arts or film arts

MAINE

BATES COLLEGE

Department of Theater, 305 College St., Lewiston, ME, 04240. Martin Andrucki, chair, mandruck@bates.edu; www.bates.edu; 207-786-6187; B.A. in theater

BOWDOIN COLLEGE

Department of Theater and Dance, 9100 College Station, Brunswick, ME, 04011-8491. Noma Petroff, dept. coordinator, theater-dance@bowdoin.edu; http://academic.bowdoin.edu/theaterdance; 207-725-3663; Minor in theater

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE

School of Performing Arts, Department of Theater/Dance, 5788 Class of 1944 Hall, Orono, ME, 04469-5788. Marcia Douglas, marcia.douglas@umit.maine.edu; www.umaine.edu/spa; 207-581-4700; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MAINE

Department of Theatre, 37 College Ave., Gorham, ME, 04038. Lil Campbell, lillianc@usm.maine.edu; www.usm.maine.edu/theatre; 207-780-5480, ext. 1; B.A. in theater or musical theater

MARYLAND

COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF BALTIMORE COUNTY

Performing Arts and Humanities, Theater Program, 7201 Rossville Blvd., Dundalk, MD, 21237. tcolonna@ccbcmd.edu; www.ccbcmd.edu; 410-780-6168; A.A. or AFA in acting or technical theater/design

GOUCHER COLLEGE

Department of Theater, 1021 Dulaney Valley Road, Baltimore, MD, 21204. Allison Campbell, chair/associate professor, acampbel@goucher.edu; www.goucher.edu/theatre; 410-337-6510; B.A. in theater

TOWSON UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater Arts, Center for the Arts, Room 3037, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD, 21252. theatre@towson.edu; www.towson.edu/theatre; 410-704-2792; B.A. or B.S. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

Theater Department, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD, 21250. Alan Kreizenbeck, chair, kreizenb@umbc.edu; www.umbc.edu/theatre; 410-455-2917; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK

Department of Theater, 2809 Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, College Park, MD, 20742-1610. Daniel MacLean Wagner, director, tdps@umd.edu; www.theatre.umd.edu; 301-405-6676; B.A. in theater

MASSACHUSETTS

AMHERST COLLEGE

Department of Theater and Dance, 27 Webster Hall, Amherst, MA, 01002. Linda T. Celi, academic dept. coordinator, ltceli@amherst.edu; www.amherst.edu; 413-542-2411; B.A. in theater

BOSTON COLLEGE

Theatre Department, Robsham Theatre Arts Center, Chestnut Hill, MA, 02467. Dr. John Houchin, dept. chair, houchijo@bc.edu; www.bc.edu; 617-552-0823; B.A. in theater

THE BOSTON CONSERVATORY

Theater Division, 8 The Fenway, Boston, MA, 02215. Neil Donohoe, director, admissions@bostonconservatory.edu; www.bostonconservatory.edu; 617-912-9153 or 617-536-6340; BFA in musical theater

BOSTON UNIVERSITY

College of Fine Arts, School of Theatre, 855 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA, 02215. Jim Petosa, director, theatre@bu.edu; pdifabio@bu.edu; www.bu.edu/cfa/theatre; 617-353-3390; BFA in acting, theater arts, design, production, and management

BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater Arts, MS 072, 415 South St., Waltham, MA, 02453. Susan Dibble, chair, theater@brandeis.edu; www.brandeis.edu; 781-736-3340; B.A. in theater arts

COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS

Department of Theater, 1 College St., Worcester, MA, 01610-2395. Edward Isser, chair, eisser@holycross.edu; www.holycross.edu/departments/theatre/website/; 508-793-3490 or 508-793-2494; B.A. in theater

EMERSON COLLEGE

Department of Performing Arts, 120 Boylston St., Boston, MA, 02116. Eric Weiss, performing arts admission coordinator, stagedoor@emerson.edu; www.emerson.edu; 617-824-8780; BFA in acting, musical theater, design/tech, or stage and production management; B.A. in theater studies or theater education (both available with concentration in acting)

MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

Department of Theatre Arts, Rooke Theatre, 50 College St., South Hadley, MA, 01075. Vanessa James, chair, theatre@mtholyoke.edu; www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/theatre; 413-538-2118; B.A. in theater arts

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, 180 Ryder Hall, 360 Huntington Ave., Boston, MA, 02115. c.najarian@neu.edu; http://nuweb2.neu.edu/theatre; 617-373-2244; B.A. or B.S. in theater

SALEM STATE COLLEGE

Department of Theater, 352 Lafayette St., Salem, MA, 01970. william.cunningham@salemstate.edu; www.salemstate.edu; 978-542-6290; B.A. or BFA in theater arts

SMITH COLLEGE

Theatre Department, Mendenhall Center for Performing Arts, Northampton, MA, 01063. Ellen W. Kaplan, dept. chair, ekaplan@smith.edu; www.smith.edu; 413-585-3201; B.A. in theater

TUFTS UNIVERSITY

Department of Drama and Dance, Aidekman Arts Center, 40 Talbot Avenue, Medford, MA, 02155. Downing Cless, chair, downing.cless@tufts.edu; http://ase.tufts.edu/drama-dance/; 617-627-3524; B.A. in drama

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

Department of Theater, Fine Arts Center West 112, 151 Presidents Drive, OFC2, Amherst, MA, 01003-9331. Penny Remsen, dept. chair, umasstheater@theater.umass.edu; www.umass.edu/theater; 413-545-3490; B.A. in theater

WELLESLEY COLLEGE

Department of Theater Studies, Alumnae Hall, 106 Central St., Wellesley, MA, 02481. Nora Hussey, director, nhussey@wellesley.edu; www.wellesley.edu; 781-283-2029; B.A. in theater

MICHIGAN

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

Theater and Educational Drama, 101 Quirk Building, Ypsilanti, MI, 48197. emu_theatre@emich.edu; www.emich.edu/emutheatre; 734-487-1220; B.A. in theater

HENRY FORD COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Fine Arts and Fitness Division/Theater Arts, MacKenzie Fine Arts Center, Room 127, 5101 Evergreen Road, Dearborn, MI, 48128. popovich@hfcc.net; www.hfcc.edu; 313-845-6478; A.A. in theatrical arts

HOPE COLLEGE

Department of Theatre, 141 East 12th St., Holland, MI, 49423. Daina Robins, robins@hope.edu; www.hope.edu; 616-395-7600; B.A. in theatre

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, 113 Auditorium Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824. Dr. George F. Peters, dept. chair, theatre@msu.edu; www.theatre.msu.edu; 517-355-6690; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting and design

NORTHERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

Forest Roberts Theater, Marquette, MI, 49855. jpanowsk@nmu.edu; www.nmu.edu; 906-227-2553; B.A. in theater

OAKLAND UNIVERSITY

Department of Music, Theater & Dance, Varner Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309-4401. mtd@oakland.edu; www.oakland.edu/mtd; 248-370-2030; B.A. in performing arts, theater

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN - ANN ARBOR

Department of Theater and Drama, Walgreen Drama Center, 1226 Murfin Ave., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-1212. Priscilla Lindsay, chair, theatre.info@umich.edu; www.music.umich.edu/departments/theatre; 734-764-5350; B.A. in theater & drama, BFA in performance, interarts performance, or design/production, Bachelor of Theater Arts

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN - FLINT

Department of Theater and Dance, Theatre 238, Flint, MI, 48502-1950. Lauren Friesen, chair, lfriesen@umflint.edu; www.umflint.edu/theatredance; 810-762-3230; B.A. in theater, BFA in performance, B.S. in theater design/tech

WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater or Maggie Allesee Department of Dance, 4841 Cass Ave., Ste. 3225, Detroit, MI, 48202. theatre@wayne.edu; dance@wayne.edu; www.theatre.wayne.edu; www.dance.wayne.edu; 313-577-3508 (theater); 313-577-4273 (dance); B.A. or BFA in theater

WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, 1903 W. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo, MI, 49008-5360. sandy.duke@wmich.edu; www.wmutheatre.com; 269-387-3220; BFA in performance, music theater performance, stage management, or design/tech

MINNESOTA

GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS COLLEGE

Theater and Dance Department, 800 W. College Ave., St. Peter, MN, 56082-1498. aseham@gac.edu; www.gustavus.edu; 507-933-7353; B.A. in theater

MINNESOTA STATE UNIVERSITY, MANKATO

Department of Theater and Dance, 201 Performing Arts Center, Mankato, MN, 56001. Paul Hustoles, chair, paul.hustoles@musu.edu; www.msutheatre.com; 507-389-2125 or 2118; B.A. or B.S. in theater arts, BFA in acting or musical theater

MINNESOTA STATE UNIVERSITY, MOORHEAD

Department of Speech and Theater, 1104 Seventh Ave. South, Moorhead, MN, 56563. ellngson@mnstate.edu; www.mnstate.edu/speech/academic/theatre.htm; 218-477-4617 or 218-477-2126; B.A. in theater arts

SOUTHWEST MINNESOTA STATE UNIVERSITY

Theater Program, Department of Art, Music, Speech Communication, & Theater, 1501 State St., Marshall, MN, 56258. diana.holmes@smsu.edu; www.smsu.edu; 507-537-7103; B.A. in theater arts

ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY

Department of Music and Theater, 2004 Randolph Ave., St. Paul, MN, 55105. jmholonbek@stkate.edu; www.stkate.edu; 651-690-6680; B.A. in music theater

ST. CLOUD STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, Film Studies, and Dance, PAC 202, 720 Fourth Ave. South, St. Cloud, MN, 56301-4498. theatrefilmdance@stcloudstate.edu; www.stcloudstate.edu; 320-308-3229; B.A. in theater

ST. OLAF COLLEGE

Theater Department, 1520 St. Olaf Ave., Northfield, MN, 55057. glimsdal@stolaf.edu; www.stolaf.edu/depts/theatre; 507-646-3240; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, TWIN CITIES

Department of Theater Arts and Dance, 580 Rarig Center, 330 21st Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN, 55455. theatre@umn.edu; www.cla.umn.edu/theatre; 612-625-6699; B.A. in theater arts; BFA in acting (with the Guthrie Theater)

WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

Theater and Dance Department, PO Box 5838, Winona, MN, 55987-5838. Gretchen Cohenour, dance director; Jim Williams, chair, gcohenour@winona.edu; www.winona.edu/thad/; 507-457-5230; B.A. in theater

MISSISSIPPI

MISSISSIPPI UNIVERSITY FOR WOMEN

Department of Music and Theater, 1110 College St., Box W-70, Columbus, MS, 39701. William Biddy, chair/professor of music and theatre, wbiddy@muw.edu; www.muw.edu/theatre; 662-329-7260; B.A. in fine arts (with a theater emphasis)

UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI

Department of Theater Arts, P.O. Box 1848, University, MS, 38677. costumes@olemiss.edu; www.olemiss.edu/depts/theatre_arts; 662-915-5816; B.A. or BFA in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI

Department of Theater and Dance, 118 College Drive, Box 5052, Hattiesburg, MS, 39406-0001. theatre@usm.edu; dance@usm.edu; www.usm.edu/theatre; 601-266-4994 (theater); 601-266-4161 (dance); B.A. in theater, BFA in acting

MISSOURI

AVILA UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, 11901 Wornall Road, Kansas City, MO, 64145. Robert Foulk, robert.foulk@avila.edu; www.avila.edu; 816-501-2405; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting or musical theater

CULVER-STOCKTON COLLEGE

Attn: Division of Fine Arts/Theater Department, Admissions Center, One College Hill, Canton, MO, 63435-1299. admissions@culver.edu; www.culver.edu; 800-537-1883; B.A. in theater, BFA in theater, musical theater, or arts management, B.S. in speech and theater education

LINDENWOOD UNIVERSITY

Fine & Performing Arts Division, 209 S. Kings Highway, St. Charles, MO, 63301. mparker@lindenwood.edu; www.lindenwood.edu; 636-949-4906; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting or musical theater

MISSOURI SOUTHERN STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, Taylor Performing Arts Center, Main Office, Room 243, 3950 E. Newman Road, Joplin, MO, 64801-1595. theatre@mail.mssu.edu; www.mssu.edu/theatre/theatre1.htm; 417-625-9393; B.A. or BSEd in theater

MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, 901 S. National Ave., Springfield, MO, 65897. Mark Templeton, managing director, theatreanddance@missouristate.edu; www.theatreanddance.missouristate.edu; 417-836-4400; B.A. in theater studies, BFA in theater or musical theater, BSEd in speech and theater education

MISSOURI VALLEY COLLEGE

Division of Fine Arts, 500 E. College St., Marshall, MO, 65340. maland@moval.edu; www.moval.edu; 660-831-4215; B.A. in music, B.A. or B.S. in theater or speech/theater, BFA in theater (concentrations include performance and musical theater)

NORTHWEST MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication, Theater, and Languages, 148 Wells Hall, Maryville, MO, 64468. jkreizi@nwmissouri.edu; www.nwmissouri.edu/dept/ctl; 660-562-1172; B.A. or B.S. in theater, BSEd in speech/theater

SOUTHEAST MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, One University Plaza MS2800, Cape Girardeau, MO, 63701. theatreanddance@semo.edu; www.semo.edu; 573-651-2149; B.A. in theater, BFA in performing arts

STEPHENS COLLEGE

School of the Performing Arts, Theater Department, Box 2077, Columbia, MO, 65215. Beth Leonard, chair, bleonard@stephens.edu; www.stephens.edu; 573-876-7194; B.A. or BFA in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL MISSOURI

Theater Department, Martin 113, Warrensburg, MO, 64093. tilden@ucmo.edu; www.ucmo.edu/theatre/; 660-543-4020; B.A. in theater, BFA. in theater (with performance option), BSEd in speech communicaion and theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI, COLUMBIA

Department of Theater, 129 Fine Arts Bldg., Columbia, MO, 65211. willisce@missouri.edu; theatre.missouri.edu; 573-882-2021; B.A. in theater (with emphasis in performance, writing, or design/tech)

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI, KANSAS CITY

Department of Theatre, 408 Performing Arts Center, Room 120, 4949 Cherry St., Kansas City, MO, 64110-2229. theatre@umkc.edu; www.umkc.edu/theatre; 816-235-2858 or 816-235-2702; B.A. in theater

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS

Performing Arts Department, 1 Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1108, St. Louis, MO, 63130-4899. pad@artsci.wustl.edu; pad.artsci.wustl.edu; 314-935-5858; B.A. in drama

WEBSTER UNIVERSITY

Conservatory of Theatre Arts, 470 E. Lockwood Ave., St. Louis, MO, 63119. Dottie Marshall Englis, chair, marshado@webster.edu; www.webster.edu; 314-968-6929; B.A. in directing, BFA in acting, musical theater, and multiple deign/tech areas

WILLIAM WOODS UNIVERSITY

Division of Visual, Performing, and Communication Arts, 1 University Ave., Fulton, MO, 65251. jpotter@williamwoods.edu; www.williamwoods.edu; 573-592-4281; B.A. in theater and B.S. in theater education

MONTANA

MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY

School of Film and Photography, PO Box 173350, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3350. sfp@montana.edu; www.sfp.montana.edu; 406-994-2484; B.A. in motion picture/video/theater or photography

THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA

School of Theatre & Dance and Montana Repertory Theatre, PARTV Center Room 197, Missoula, MT, 59812-8136. umtheatredance@umontana.edu; www.umt.edu/theatredance; 406-243-4481; B.A. or BFA in theater

NEBRASKA

NEBRASKA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication and Theater Arts, 5000 St. Paul Ave., Lincoln, NE, 68504. jlp@nebrwesleyan.edu; www.nebrwesleyan.edu; 402-465-2386; B.A. or BFA in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA - LINCOLN

Johnny Carson School of Theater and Film, 215 Temple Bldg., Lincoln, NE, 68588-0201. theatrearts@unl.edu; www.unl.edu/theatrearts; 402-472-2072; B.A. in performance or directing/management, BFA in design/tech

NEVADA

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS

UNLV Department of Theater, Nevada Conservatory Theater, Box 455036, 4505 S Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-5036. Brackley Frayer, dept. chair, nct@unlv.edu; http://theatre.unlv.edu/; 702-895-3663; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO

Department of Theatre and Dance-228, Reno, NV, 89557. Rob Gander, chair, rgander@unr.edu; www.unr.edu/cla/theatredance; 775-784-6839; B.A. or BFA in theater

NEW HAMPSHIRE

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE

Department of Theater, 6204 Hopkins Center, Hanover, NH, 03755. Peter Hackett, chair, effie.cummings@dartmouth.edu; www.dartmouth.edu/~theater; 603-646-3104 or 603-646-3691; B.A. in theater

KEENE STATE COLLEGE

Department of Theater Arts and Dance, 229 Main St., Keene, NH, 03435-2407. Daniel L. Patterson, chair, naubrey@keene.edu; http://academics.keene.edu/tad; 603-358-2162; B.A. in theater

PLYMOUTH STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Music, Theater, and Dance, MSC 37, 17 High St., Plymouth, NH, 03264-1595. Jonathan C. Santore, Ph.D., chair, mtd_dept@plymouth.edu; www.plymouth.edu/mtd; 603-535-2334; B.A. in acting, dramatic writing, musical theater performance, and theater design/tech

UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

Department of Theatre and Dance, Paul Creative Arts Center, D-22, 30 College Rd., Durham, NH, 03824. Chris Peabody, administrative assistant, c.peabody@unh.edu; www.unh.edu/theatre-dance; 603-862-2919 or 603-862-0093; B.A. in theater (with emphasis in acting, design/tech, musical theater, secondary education, or youth drama)

NEW JERSEY

DREW UNIVERSITY

Theater Arts Department, Registrar's Office, 36 Madison Ave., Madison, NJ, 07940. Jim Bazewicz, chair, theatre@drew.edu; www.depts.drew.edu/thea; 973-408-3059; B.A. in theater

FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY

Fairleigh Dickinson University, 285 Madison Ave., Madison, NJ, 07940. globaleducation@fdu.edu; www.fdu.edu; 973-443-8635; B.A. in theater arts

KEAN UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, College of Visual and Performing Arts, 1000 Morris Ave., Vaughn Eames Building, 409, Union, NJ, 07083. Michele Mossay, interim chair, theatre@kean.edu; www.kean.edu/theatre_dept/welcome.html; 908-737-4420; B.A. in theater or theater with teacher certification; BFA in theater performance or design/tech.

MASON GROSS SCHOOL OF THE ARTS AT RUTGERS

33 Livingston Ave., New Brunswick, NJ, 08901. Mandy Feiler, admissions officer, mfelier@masongross.rutgers.edu; www.masongross.rutgers.edu; 732-932-9891 (theater); 732-932-8497 (dance); BFA in acting, design, or production; B.A. in theater

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

College of the Arts, Department of Theater and Dance, Upper Montclair, NJ, 07043. Eric Diamond, dept. chair; Lori Ketterhenry, dance program coordinator, eric.diamond@montclair.edu; www.montclair.edu/arts; 973-655-7343 (Mr. Diamond); 973-655-7080 (Ms. Ketterhenry); B.A. in theater studies, BFA in acting, musical theater, or production design

ROWAN UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, Bunce Hall, 201 Mullica Hill Road, Glassboro, NJ, 08028. Elisabeth Hostetter, advisement coordinator, hostetter@rowan.edu; www.rowan.edu/colleges/fpa/theatre_dance; 856-256-4030; B.A. in theater

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY, CAMDEN

Fine Arts Complex, 314 Linden St., Camden, NJ, 08102. Martin Rosenberg, chair, mrosenbe@camden.rutgers.edu; finearts.camden.rutgers.edu; 856-225-6251; B.A. in theater

SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication, Theater, 400 South Orange Ave., South Orange, NJ, 07079. readerpe@shu.edu; www.shu.edu; 973-761-9474; B.A. in theater and performance

WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication, Theater Program, 300 Pompton Road, Wayne, NJ, 07470. Joann Lee, chair, leej67@wpunj.edu; www.wpunj.edu/coac/communication/; 973-720-2167 or 973-720-2150; B.A. in theater and comedy

NEW MEXICO

SANTA FE UNIVERSITY OF ART & DESIGN

Performing Arts Department, Greer Garson Theater Center, 1600 St. Michael's Drive, Santa Fe, NM, 87505. John Weckesser, faculty chair, tross@csf.edu, terri.ross@santafeuniversity.edu; www.csf.edu; 505-473-6439; B.A. in theater; BFA in theater (concentrations include acting, musical theater, and technical theater)

UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO

Department of Theater and Dance, MSC04 2570, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001. theatre@unm.edu; dance@unm.edu; theatre.unm.edu; 505-277-4332 (theater); 505-277-3660 (dance); B.A. in theater or design for performance

NEW YORK

ADELPHI UNIVERSITY

Performing Arts Center, Rm. 251, PO Box 701, Garden City, NY, 11530-0701. Nicholas Petron, chair (theater); Frank Augustyn, chair (dance), petron@adelphi.edu (theater); augustyn@adelphi.edu (dance); http://academics.adelphi.edu/artsci/pfa/acting/apply.php; 516-877-4930 (theater); 516-877-4250 (dance); BFA in theater

ALFRED UNIVERSITY

Division of Performing Arts/Theater, Miller Performing Arts Center, 1 Saxon Drive, Alfred, NY, 14802-1232. Dr. Lisa Lantz, division chair, performs@alfred.edu; http://las.alfred.edu/performing-arts; 607-871-2562; B.A. in theater

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DRAMATIC ARTS, NEW YORK

120 Madison Ave., New York, NY, 10016. Constantine Scopas, director of instruction, admissions@ny.aada.org; www.aada.edu; 212-686-9244 or 800-463-8990; AOS in acting (credits may be transferred to the B.A. program in theater at St. John's University or other colleges); Undergraduate

AMERICAN MUSICAL AND DRAMATIC ACADEMY

211 W. 61st St., New York, NY, 10023. David Dent Martin, artistic director, info@amda.edu; www.amda.edu; 800-367-7908; Two-year conservatory programs in musical theater or acting. Students who complete the two-year conservatory programs in N.Y. or L.A. may transfer into the BFA programs in L.A. upon completion.

BARD COLLEGE

Division of the Arts, Theater Program, PO Box 5000, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY, 12504. admission@bard.edu; www.bard.edu; 845-758-7936; B.A. in theater

BARNARD COLLEGE

Columbia University, Department of Theatre, 5th Floor, Milbank Hall, 3009 Broadway, New York, NY, 10027. W.B. Worten, chair (theater); Mary Cochran, chair (dance);, mplacito@barnard.edu (theater dept. asst.); dance@barnard.edu; www.barnard.edu/theatre; www.barnard.edu/dance; 212-854-2080 (theater), 212-854-2995 (dance); B.A. in theater

BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY, SUNY

Department of Theater, PO Box 6000, Binghamton, NY, 13902-6000. jvestal@binghamton.edu or hperraul@binghamton.edu; http://theatre.binghamton.edu; 607-777-6968; B.A. in theater

BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY, SUNY

Department of Theater, PO Box 6000, Binghamton, NY, 13902-6000. jvestal@binghamton.edu or hperraul@binghamton.edu; http://theatre.binghamton.edu; 607-777-6968; M.A. in theater

BROOKLYN COLLEGE

Department of Theater, 317 Whitehead Hall, Brooklyn, NY, 11210-2889. Thomas Bullard, chair, tbullard@brooklyn.cuny.edu; www.brooklyn.cuny.edu; 718-951-5666; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting, design, or technical theater

CIRCLE IN THE SQUARE THEATRE SCHOOL

1633 Broadway, New York, NY, 10019-6795. E. Colin O'Leary, director, admissions@circlesquare.org; www.circlesquare.org; 212-307-0388; Certificate program

CITY COLLEGE OF NEW YORK

Department of Theatre and Speech, Compton-Goethals Hall, Room 311, 160 Convent Ave., New York, NY, 10031. Eugene Nesmith, dept. chair, theatrechair@ccny.cuny.edu; www.ccny.cuny.edu/theatre; 212-650-6666; B.A. in theater

COLGATE UNIVERSITY

Theater Program, Colgate University Theater, 13 Oak Drive, Dana Arts Center, Hamilton, NY, 13346. mcampbell@mail.colgate.edu; www.colgate.edu; 315-228-7639; B.A. in theater

CORNELL UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, Film, and Dance, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, 430 College Ave., Ithaca, NY, 14850. theatre@cornell.edu; www.cornell.edu; 607-254-2700; B.A. in theater

DUTCHESS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Performing Arts Degree Program, 53 Pendell Road, Poughkeepsie, NY, 12601-1595. cosentin@sunydutchess.edu; www.sunydutchess.edu/academics/departments/performingvisualartsandcommunications; 845-431-8010; A.S. in performing arts

EUGENE LANG COLLEGE

The New School for Liberal Arts, Dance Program & Theater Program, 65 W. 11th St., New York, NY, 10011. santoraj@newschool.edu; www.lang.edu; 212-229-5100, ext. 2267; B.A. (liberal arts degree with a theater track)

FIVE TOWNS COLLEGE

Theater Division, 305 N. Service Road, Dix Hills, NY, 11746. Jared Hershkowitz, chair, jhershkowitz@ftc.edu; www.ftc.edu; 631-656-2172; BFA in theater arts

FORDHAM UNIVERSITY

Theatre Program, Lincoln Center Campus, 113 W. 60th St., Room 423, New York, NY, 10023. patton@fordham.edu, fordhamtheatre@gmail.com; www.fordham.edu/theatre; 212-636-6303 (main office) or 212-636-7562 (audition/interview info); B.A. in theater (concentrations in performance, directing, playwriting, design, and production)

HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY

Department of Drama and Dance, 112 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY, 11549-1120. David Henderson, chair, rachel.list@hofstra.edu or anita.feldman@hofstra.edu; www.hofstra.edu; 516-463-5444; B.A. in drama, BFA in theater arts

HUNTER COLLEGE

Theater Department, North Building 522, 695 Park Ave., New York, NY, 10021. bhaigler@hunter.cuny.edu; www.hunter.cuny.edu/theatre; 212-772- 5148; B.A. in theater

ITHACA COLLEGE

Department of Theater Arts, 201 Dillingham Center, Ithaca, NY, 14850-7293. theatrearts@ithaca.edu; www.ithaca.edu/theatre; 607-274-3919; B.A. in drama, BFA in acting or musical theater

THE JUILLIARD SCHOOL

Drama Division, 60 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY, 10023. www.juilliard.edu; 212-799-5000, ext. 251; BFA in acting; diploma (for those who already have a bachelor's degree)

LIMÓN INSTITUTE

José Limón Foundation, 307 W. 38th St., Ste. 1105, New York, NY, 10018. info@limon.org; www.limon.org; 212-777-3353, ext. 17; Non-degree program

LONG ISLAND UNIVERSITY

C.W. Post Campus, Theatre, Film, Dance, & Arts Management, 720 Northern Blvd., Brookville, NY, 11548. Cara Gargano, cgargano@liu.edu; www.liu.edu; 516-299-2353; B.A. in theater, BFA in arts management or theater arts (acting, production, design, or musical theater)

MANHATTAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC

120 Claremont Ave., New York, NY, 10027. www.msmnyc.edu; 212-749-2802; B.M. in voice; diploma

MARYMOUNT MANHATTAN COLLEGE

Theater Arts, 221 E. 71st St., New York, NY, 10021. theatre@mmm.edu; http://marymount.mmm.edu; 212-774-0767; B.A. in theater arts, BFA in acting

MICHAEL HOWARD STUDIOS

152 W. 25th St., 10th Fl., New York, NY, 10001. information@michaelhowardstudios.com; www.michaelhowardstudios.com; 212-645-1525; Nondegree program

NAZARETH COLLEGE

Department of Theater Arts, 4245 East Ave., Rochester, NY, 14618. Lindsay Korth, chair, lkorth3@naz.edu; www.naz.edu; 595-389-2780; B.A. in theater arts, B.S. in theater (with quad certification in K-8 education or certification in adolescent education to teach English literature) or musical theater

NEIGHBORHOOD PLAYHOUSE SCHOOL OF THE THEATRE

Professional Acting Program, 340 E. 54th St., New York, NY, 10022-5017. info@neighborhoodplayhouse.org; www.neighborhoodplayhouse.org; 212-688-3770; Nondegree program

NEW ACTORS WORKSHOP

259 W. 30th St., 2nd floor, New York, NY, 10001. newactorsw@aol.com; www.newactorsworkshop.com; 212-947-1310; Nondegree program

THE NEW YORK CONSERVATORY FOR DRAMATIC ARTS

39 W. 19th St., New York, NY, 10011. Kathy Koch, Director of Admission, info@sft.edu; www.sft.edu; 212-645-0030/888-645-0300; Nondegree program

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

Tisch School of the Arts, Department of Drama, 721 Broadway, 3rd floor south, New York, NY, 10003-6807. tisch.drama.ug@nyu.edu; drama.tisch.nyu.edu; 212-998-1850; BFA in theater

NIAGARA UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre Studies and Fine Arts, Niagara University Theatre, P.O. Box 1913, Niagara University, NY, 14109. sw@niagara.edu; www.niagara.edu/theatre; 716-286-8482; BFA in theater

PACE UNIVERSITY

Department of Performing Arts, One Pace Plaza, New York, NY, 10038. theater@pace.edu; www.pace.edu; 212-346-1352; B.A. in theater arts, BFA in acting, musical theater, or theater arts

PURCHASE COLLEGE

Conservatory of Theater Arts & Film, 735 Anderson Hill Road, Purchase, NY, 10577. Zoe Markwalter, coordinator (theater); Gregory Taylor, interim dean (dance);, www.purchase.edu; 914-251-6300 (theater); 914-251-6800 (dance); B.A. or BFA in theater

SARAH LAWRENCE COLLEGE

Theater Program/Dance Program, 1 Mead Way, Bronxville, NY, 10708-5999. Christine Farrell, director (theater), Sara Rudner, director (dance), pmcgrath@sarahlawrence.edu; cfarrell@sarahlawrence.edu; srudner@sarahlawrence.edu; www.slc.edu; 914-395-2614 or 914-395-2430; B.A. in liberal arts (theater)

SIENA COLLEGE

Theater Program, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY, 12211-1462. maciag@siena.edu; www.siena.edu/theatre; 518-783-2384; B.A. in creative arts

SKIDMORE COLLEGE

Department of Theater, 815 N. Broadway, Saratoga Springs, NY, 12866-1632. Kathy Mendenhall, theater coordinator, kmendenh@skidmore.edu; www.skidmore.edu/academics/theater/; 518-580-5431; B.S. in theater

STELLA ADLER STUDIO OF ACTING

31 W. 27th St., 3rd floor, New York, NY, 10001. info@stellaadler.com; www.stellaadler.com; 212-689-0087 or 800-270-6775; Nondegree program

STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY, SUNY

Department of Theater Arts, Staller Center for the Arts, Stony Brook, NY, 11794-5450. amkuhn@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; www.stonybrook.edu/theatrearts; 631-632-7300; B.A. in theater

SUNY BROCKPORT

Department of Theater, 1101 Tower Fine Arts Center, Brockport, NY, 14420. P. Gibson Ralph, chair (theater); Jacqueline Davis, interim chair (dance), theatre@brockport.edu; www.brockport.edu/theatre/; www.brockport.edu/dance; 585-395-2478 (theater); 585-395-2153 (dance); B.A. or B.S. in theater

SUNY FREDONIA

Department of Theater & Dance, 212 Rockefeller Arts Center, Fredonia, NY, 14063. theatre.dance@fredonia.edu; www.fredonia.edu/department/theatredance/; 716-673-3596; B.A. in general theatre studies; BFA in acting, production/design, or musical theater (with concentrations in theater, music and dance),

SUNY GENESEO

School of the Arts, One College Circle, Geneseo, NY, 14454. johnston@geneseo.edu; www.geneseo.edu; 585-245-5841; B.A. in theater, theater/English, or musical theater

SUNY NEW PALTZ

Department of TheatrerArts, 1 Hawk Dr., Ste. 1, New Paltz, NY, 12561-2443. theatre@newpaltz.edu; www.newpaltz.edu/theatre; 845-257-3865; B.A. and B.S. in theater arts

SUNY OSWEGO

Department of Theater, 105 Tyler Hall, Oswego, NY, 13126. mcole@oswego.edu; www.oswego.edu/theatre; 315-312-2140; B.A. in theater

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY

College of Visual and Performing Arts, Department of Drama, 202 Crouse College, Syracuse, NY, 13244-1010. Ralph Zito, chair; Lisa A. Tucci, office coordinator, admissu@syr.edu; latucci@syr.edu; http://vpa.syr.edu/drama/; www.syracusestage.org; 315-443-2769; B.S. or BFA in drama

UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO

College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Theater & Dance, 285 Alumni Arena, Buffalo, NY, 14260-5030. td-theatredance@buffalo.edu; www.theatredance.buffalo.edu; 716-645-6897; B.A. in theater, BFA in theater performance, musical theater, or design/technology

UNIVERSITY OF ALBANY, SUNY

Department of Theater, Performing Arts Center 262, 1400 Washington Ave., Albany, NY, 12222. www.albany.edu/theatre; 518-442-4200; B.A. in theater

WAGNER COLLEGE

Theatre Department, One Campus Road, Staten Island, NY, 10301. fruff@wagner.edu; www.wagner.edu/departments/theatre; 718-390-3223; B.A. in theater and speech, B.S. in arts administration

NORTH CAROLINA

APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, PO Box 32123, Boone, NC, 28608-2123. asutheatre@appstate.edu; www.theatre.appstate.edu; 828-262-3028; B.A. or B.S. in theater

CAMPBELL UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater Arts, PO Box 21, Fine Arts 108, Buies Creek, NC, 27506. www.campbell.edu; 910-814-4328; B.A. in theater arts

CATAWBA COLLEGE

Theater Arts Department, 2300 W. Innes St., Salisbury, NC, 28144. eahoman@catawba.edu; www.catawba.edu; 704-637-4440; B.A., BFA in theater arts, musical theater. B.S. in theater administration

DAVIDSON COLLEGE

Theater Department, P.O. Box 7141, Davidson, NC, 28035-7141. www.davidson.edu; 704-894-2361; B.A. in theater

DUKE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater Studies, 206 Bivins, Box 90680, Durham, NC, 27708-0680. theater@duke.edu; www.duke.edu; 919-660-3343; B.A. in theater

EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY

School of Theater & Dance, Messick Theatre Arts Center, 1001 E. 5th St., Greenville, NC, 27858. theatre@ecu.edu; www.theatre-dance.ecu.edu; 252-328-6390; B.A. in theater arts, BF. in theater arts or theater education (concentrations in acting or musical theater)

ELON UNIVERSITY

Department of Performing Arts, Campus Box 2800, Elon, NC, 27244. krippy@elon.edu; www.elon.edu/perarts; 336-278-5600; B.A. in theater studies or theatrical design and production, BFA in acting or music theater

GREENSBORO COLLEGE

Theater Department, 815 W. Market St., Greensboro, NC, 27401. schramd@gborocollege.edu; www.gborocollege.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 243; B.A. or B.S. in theater

GUILFORD COLLEGE

Theater Studies Department, 5800 W. Friendly Ave., Greensboro, NC, 27410. Jack Zerbe, chair, jzerbe@guilford.edu; www.guilford.edu/theatre; 336-316-2341; B.A. in theater studies (with concentrations in design/tech, dramaturgy, and performance)

LEES-MCRAE COLLEGE

Division of Performing Arts, PO Box 128, Banner Elk, NC, 28604. Janet Barton Speer, speerj@lmc.edu; www.lmc.edu; 828-898-8721; B.A. or B.S. in performing arts studies or theater arts education, BFA in musical theater

LENOIR-RHYNE COLLEGE

School of Communication and Literature, Theater Arts Program, Box 7417, Hickory, NC, 28603. jsturgeon@lrc.edu; www.lr.edu; 828-328-7164; B.A. in theater

MARS HILL COLLEGE

Department of Theater Arts, 100 Athletic St., Mars Hill, NC, 28754. nstclair@mhc.edu; www.mhc.edu/theatre; 828-689-1462; B.A. in theater arts, BFA in musical theater

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY

Theater Division, Department of Visual and Performing Arts, 1601 E. Market St., Greensboro, NC, 27411. www.ncat.edu; 336-334-7852; B.A. in theater

NORTH CAROLINA CENTRAL UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, Box 19593, Durham, NC, 27707. www.nccu.edu/academics/sc/liberalarts/theatrerdrama/index.cfm; 919-530-6242; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOL OF THE ARTS

Schools of Drama, Design, Dance, Music, and Filmmaking, 1533 S. Main St., Winston-Salem, NC, 27127-2188. Mary Jane Degnan, administrator, mjdegnan@uncsa.edu; www.uncsa.edu; 336-770-3235; BFA in drama

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL

Department of Dramatic Art, CB 3230, Center for Dramatic Art, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-3230. bfutrell@email.unc.edu; www.unc.edu; 919-962-1132; B.A. in dramatic art

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT GREENSBORO

Department of Theater, PO Box 26170, Greensboro, NC, 27402-6170. Jim Fisher, head (theater), Katie Fennell (dance), nrshephe@uncg.edu (theater); dance@uncg.edu; www.uncg.edu/the (theater); www.uncg.edu/dce (dance); 336-334-4032 (theater); 336-334-5570 (dance); B.A in drama, BFA in acting, technical production, design/tech, or theater education; Dance: Department of Dance, 323 HHP Bldg., Greensboro, NC 27402-6170

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT PEMBROKE

English & Theater Department, Givens Performing Arts Center, 1 University Drive, Pembroke, NC, 28372-1510. chet.jordan@uncp.edu; www.uncp.edu; 910-521-6289; B.A. in English: theater

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT WILMINGTON

Department of Theatre, 601 S. College Road, Wilmington, NC, 28403. Frank P. Trimble, interim head, castagnop@uncw.edu; www.uncw.edu/thr; 910-962-2061; B.A. in theater

WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater & Dance, PO Box 7264, Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, NC, 27109. theatre@wfu.edu; www.wfu.edu; 336-758-5294; B.A. in theater

WESTERN CAROLINA UNIVERSITY

School of Stage and Screen, 246 Central Dr., ST233, Cullowhee, NC, 28723. Thomas Salzman, director, tmsalzman@wcu.edu; www.wcu.edu; 828-227-7491; B.A. in stage and screen, BFA in theater

NORTH DAKOTA

NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY

Division of Fine Arts/Theatre Arts, Dept 2336, PO Box 6050, Fargo, ND, 58108-6050., ndsu.fine.arts@ndsu.edu; www.ndsu.edu/finearts/theatre; 701-231-7932; B.A. or B.S. in theatrt arts, BFA in theatre arts (performance) or musical theater

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA

Department of Theater Arts, PO Box 8136, University Station, Grand Forks, ND, 58202-8136. kathleen_mclennan@und.nodak.edu; arts-sciences.und.edu/theatre-arts; 701-777-3446; B.A. in theater arts (with emphasis in directing, set design, lighting design, sound design, costume design, technical theater, costume construction, dance, playwriting, or dramatic literature), BFA in performance or musical theater

OHIO

BALDWIN-WALLACE COLLEGE

Conservatory of Music, 275 Eastland Road, Berea, OH, 44017-2088. thecon@bw.edu; www.bw.edu; 866-BW-MUSIC; B.A. in theater

BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Film, 338 South Hall, Bowling Green, OH, 43403. theatre@bgnet.bgsu.edu; www.bgsu.edu; 419-372-2222; B.A. in theater or communication

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106-7077. rgw4@case.edu; www.case.edu/artsci/thtr; 216-368-4868; B.A. in theater

DENISON UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, 100 West College St., Granville, OH, 43023. Marilyn Sundin, academic administrative asst., sundin@denison.edu; www.denison.edu/theatre; 740-587-6231; B.A. in theater

HIRAM COLLEGE

Theater Arts Department, PO Box 67, Hiram, OH, 44234. moellerrd@hiram.edu; www.hiram.edu; 330-569-5215; B.A. in theater arts

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

School of Theater and Dance, B 141 Music & Speech Ctr., Kent, OH, 44242-0001. Cynthia Stillings, director, theatre@kent.edu; dance@kent.edu; www.theatre.kent.edu; 330-672-2082 (theater); 330-672-2069 (dance); B.A. or BFA in theater

MIAMI UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, 131 Center for Performing Arts, Oxford, OH, 45056. theatre@muohio.edu; www.fna.muohio.edu; 513-529-3053; B.A. in theater

OBERLIN COLLEGE

Theater and Dance Program, 30 N. Professor St., Warner Center, Oberlin, OH, 44074. janice.sanborn@oberlin.edu; http://new.oberlin.edu/arts-and-sciences/departments/theater_dance; 440-775-8152; B.A. in theater

THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, Drake Performance and Event Center, 1849 Cannon Drive, Columbus, OH, 43210-1266. Beth Josephsen Simon, coordinator (theater); Susan Van Pelt Petry, chair (dance), theatre-ugrad@osu.edu; dance@osu.edu; http://theatre.osu.edu; www.dance.osu.edu; 614-292-5821 (theater); 614-292-7977 (dance); B.A. in theater

OHIO UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, Kantner Hall, Athens, OH, 45701-2979. Madeleine Scott, interim director, theater@ohio.edu; dance@ohio.edu; www.finearts.ohio.edu/theater (theater); www.finearts.ohio.edu/dance (dance); 740-593-4818 (theater); 740-593-1826 (dance); B.A. in theater, BFA in performance, design/technology, playwriting, or stage management; Dance: School of Dance, Putnam Hall 137, Athens, OH 45701-2979

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, Chappelear Drama Center, Delaware, OH, 43015-2370. thtrdnce@owu.edu; www.owu.edu; 740-368-3845; B.A. in theater

OTTERBEIN UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre and Dance, 30 S. Grove St., Westerville, OH, 43081. jstefano@otterbein.edu; www.otterbein.edu/theatre; 614-823-1657; B.A. in theater; BFA in acting or musical theater (with concentration in design/tech)

UNIVERSITY OF AKRON

School of Dance, Theater, and Arts Administration, Akron, OH, 44325-1005. theatre@uakron.edu; www.uakron.edu/dtaa; 330-972-7890; B.A in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI COLLEGE - CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC

Division of Opera, Musical Theater, Drama, and Arts Administration, PO Box 210003, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0003. Dr. Alan Yaffe (theater), Shellie Cash (dance), yaffea@ucmail.uc.edu (theater), cashsb@ucmail.uc.edu (dance); www.ccm.uc.edu; 513-556-5803; BFA in dramatic performance or musical theater

UNIVERSITY OF TOLEDO

Department of Theater and Film, Mail Stop 611, 2801 W. Bancroft St., Toledo, OH, 43606-3390. holly.monsos@utoledo.edu; www.theatrefilm.utoledo.edu; 419-530-2202; B.A. in theater

WRIGHT STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, Dance, and Motion Pictures, Dayton, OH, 45435. Stuart McDowell, stuart.mcdowell@wright.edu, victoria.oleen@wright.edu; www.wright.edu/academics/theatre; 937-775-3072; B.A. in theater studies or motion pictures, BFA in acting, acting/musical theater, motion pictures, or design/tech/stage management

YOUNGSTOWN STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, 1 University Plaza, Youngstown, OH, 44555-0002. facastronovo@ysu.edu; www.fpa.ysu.edu; 330-941-3000; B.A. in theater studies, BFA in theater or musical theater

OKLAHOMA

NORTHEASTERN STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication, Art, and Theatre, Shawnee Street Theater, 124 Shawnee St., Tahlequah, OK, 74464. mageern@nsuok.edu; www.nsuok.edu; 918-456-5511, ext. 2793; B.A. in theater

OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY

2501 N. Blackwelder Ave., Oklahoma City, OK, 73106-1493. David Herendeen, director (music theater and theater); Melanie Shelley, associate dean (dance), dherendeen@okcu.edu (theater); mshelley@okcu.edu (dance); http://www.okcu.edu/theatre; www.okcu.edu/dance_amgt; 405-208-5710; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting or design/production, BM in music theater

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, 121 Seretean Center, Stillwater, OK, 74078-4076. drama@okstate.edu; http://theatre.okstate.edu; 405-744-6094; B.A. in theater arts, BFA in acting

ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication, Arts and Media, 7777 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa, OK, 74171. lholland@oru.edu; www.oru.edu; 918-495-6870; B.A. in theater arts, musical theater, or communication arts education; B.S. in drama, television, film performance

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA

Department of Theater Arts/Department of Dance, 100 N. University Dr., Box 86, Edmond, OK, 73034-5209. Daisy Nystul, chair; Jamie Jacobson, director of dance, dnystul@uco.edu; jjacobson@uco.edu (director of dance); www.uco.edu; 405-974-5004; BFA in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

School of Drama, 640 Parrington Oval, Rm. 121, Norman, OK, 73019-3021. Dr. Gregory D. Kunesh, interim director (drama); Mary Margaret Holt, director (dance), drama_recruitment@ou.edu or musicaltheatre@ou.edu; dance@ou.edu; finearts.ou.edu; 405-325-4021 (drama); 405-325-4051 (dance); BFA in musical theater performance; Dance: School of Dance, 560 Parrington Oval, Rm. 1000, Norman , OK 73019-0319

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA

Department of Theater, Musical Theater, and Dance, 600 S. College Ave., Tulsa, OK, 74104-3189. Lisa Wilson, david-cook@utulsa.edu; www.utulsa.edu; 918-631-2566; B.A. in theater, musical theater, or arts management

OREGON

OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Speech Communication, University Theater, 141 Withycombe Hall, Corvallis, OR, 97331-6709. angela.weeks@oregonstate.edu; www.oregonstate.edu; 541-737-2853; B.A. or B.S. in speech communication (with option in theater arts)

SOUTHERN OREGON UNIVERSITY

Department of Performing Arts/Theatre, 1250 Siskiyou Blvd., Ashland, OR, 97520. theatre@sou.edu; www.sou.edu/theatre; 541-552-6346; B.A., B.S., or BFA in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

Department of Theater Arts, 216 Villard Hall, 1231 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, 97403. theatre.uoregon.edu/theatre_department; 541-346-4171; B.A. or B.S. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF PORTLAND

Drama Program, Buckley Center 235, MSC 152, 5000 N. Willamette Blvd., Portland, OR, 97203. Larry Larsen, director, pfa@up.edu; www.up.edu; 503-943-7228; B.A. in drama (with emphasis on performance, design/tech, or production management)

WESTERN OREGON UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre and Dance, 345 N. Monmouth Ave., Monmouth, OR, 97361. Lenore Eliassen, willisk@wou.edu; www.wou.edu; 503-838-8461; BFA, B.A. or B.S. in theater

WILLAMETTE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, 900 State St., Salem, OR, 97301. scoromel@willamette.edu; www.willamette.edu; 503-370-6222; B.A. in theater

PENNSYLVANIA

ARCADIA UNIVERSITY

Department of English, Theater, and Communications, Theatre Arts Program, 450 S. Easton Road, Glenside, PA, 19038-3295. admiss@arcadia.edu; www.arcadia.edu; 215-572-2900; B.A. in theater arts and English, BFA in acting

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

Department of Theater and Dance, 250 University Ave., Box 16, California, PA, 15419-1394. Michael J. Slavin, Chair, slavin@calu.edu, walmsley@calu.edu; www.calu.edu; 724-938-4220 or 4221; B.A. in theater

CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY

School of Drama, College of Fine Arts, Purnell Center for the Arts #218, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213. rblock@andrew.cmu.edu; www.drama.cmu.edu; 412-268-7219; BFA in drama

CHATHAM COLLEGE

Department of Theater, Woodland Road, Pittsburgh, PA, 15232. klacharite@chatham.edu; www.chatham.edu; 412-365-1240; B.A. in theater

CLARION UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

Theater Department, 840 Wood Street, Clarion, PA, 16214. rlevy@clarion.edu; www.clarion.edu/theatre; 814-393-2284; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting, musical theater, or design/tech, B.S. in liberal arts (with a concentration in theater)

DESALES UNIVERSITY

Performing and Fine Arts Department, 2755 Station Ave., Center Valley, PA, 18034-9568. Dennis Razze, chair (theater); Tim Cowart, chair (dance), dennis.razze@desales.edu (theater); timothy.cowart@desales.edu (dance); www.desales.edu; 610-282-1100; B.A. in theater

DICKINSON COLLEGE

Department of Theater & Dance, Carlisle, PA, 17013. lordi@dickinson.edu; www.dickinson.edu/academics/programs/theatre-and-dance; 717-245-1239; B.A. in theater

FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL COLLEGE

Department of Theatre, Dance & Film, PO Box 3003, Lancaster, PA, 17604-3003. admission@fandm.edu or jsimeral@fandm.edu; www.fandm.edu/theatre; 717-291-4017; B.A. in theater

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

Department of Theater and Dance, 104 Waller Hall, 401 S. 11th St., Indiana, PA, 15705. brjones@iup.edu; www.arts.iup.edu/theater; 724-357-2965; B.A. in theater or interdisciplinary fine arts (emphasis in musical theater)

LAFAYETTE COLLEGE

Lafayette College Theater, Williams Center for the Arts, Easton, PA, 18042. Michael C. O'Neill, director of theater/associate professor, oneillm@lafayette.edu; http://theater.lafayette.edu; 610-330-5326; B.A. in theater

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, 301 Zoellner Arts Center, 420 E. Packer Ave., Bethlehem, PA, 18015. Deb Laub, dal5@lehigh.edu; www.lehigh.edu; 610-758-3640; B.A. in theater

MARYWOOD UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication Arts, 2300 Adams Ave., Scranton, PA, 18509. merchel@es.marywood.edu; www.marywood.edu; 570-348-6209; B.A. in communication arts (concentrations include theater arts and musical theater)

MUHLENBERG COLLEGE

Department of Theatre & Dance, Trexler Pavilion for Theatre & Dance, 2400 Chew St., Allentown, PA, 18104-5586. bien@muhlenberg.edu; www.muhlenberg.edu/theatre&dance; 484-664-3335; B.A. in theater

PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

School of Theatre, 116 Theatre Building, University Park, PA, 16802-1919. theatre@psu.edu; www.theatre.psu.edu; 814-865-7586; B.A. in theater, BFA in musical theater

ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY

6001 University Blvd., Moon Township, PA, 15108-1189. Ken Gargaro, assistant professor of communications, gargaro@rmu.edu; www.rmu.edu; 412-973-2293 or 800-762-0097; B.A. in communication with a concentration in theater

SETON HILL UNIVERSITY

Theater Program, 1 Seton Hill Drive, Greensburg, PA, 15601-1599. brinodean@setonhill.edu; www.setonhilltheatre.edu; 724-552-2900; B.A. in music theater, theater performance, theater design/tech, theater business, or theater arts

SLIPPERY ROCK UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater or Department of Dance, Lang Performing Arts Center, 500 College Ave., Slippery Rock, PA, 16057. Rebecca Lindey, dept. secretary (theater); Nora Ambrosio, chair (dance), rebecca.lindey@sru.edu (theater); nora.ambrosio@sru.edu (dance); www.sru.edu; 724-738-2474 (theater); 724-738-2036 (dance); B.A. in theater

SWARTHMORE COLLEGE

Department of Theater or Department of Music and Dance, Lang Performing Arts Center, 500 College Ave., Swarthmore, PA, 19081. Allen Kuharski, chair (theater); Sharon E. Friedler, director of the dance program, jtierno1@swarthmore.edu (theater); dance@swarthmore.edu; www.swarthmore.edu; 610-328-8149 (theater); 610-328 -8227 (dance chair); B.A. in theater

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

Theater Department, Tomlinson Theater, Room 210A, 1301 W. Norris St., Philadelphia, PA, 19122. Roberta Sloan, chair (theater); Philip Grosser, program director (dance), theater@temple.edu; danceadm@temple.edu; www.temple.edu; 215-204-8414 (theater); 215-204-5169 (dance); BA in theater

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

Theatre Arts Program, 518 Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, Philadelphia, PA, 19104-6219. tharts@dept.english.upenn.edu; www.sas.upenn.edu/theatrearts; 215-898-5271; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

Department of Theatre Arts, 1617 Cathedral of Learning, Pittsburgh, PA, 15260. infothea@pitt.edu; www.play.pitt.edu; 412-624-6568; B.A. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS

Ira Brind School of Theater Arts or School of Dance, 320 S. Broad St., Philadelphia, PA, 19102. www.uarts.edu/sota; 215-717-6049 admissions 215-717-6450 theater office; BFA in acting, musical theater, design/technology, or directing, playwriting, and production

VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY

Theater Department, 800 Lancaster Ave., St. Augustine Center 205, Villanova, PA, 19085. annetta.stowman@villanova.edu; www.theatre.villanova.edu; 610-519-4760; B.A. in communication (with theater emphasis)

WILKES UNIVERSITY

Department of Visual & Performing Arts, Dorothy Dickson Darte Center, 84 W. South St., Wilkes-Barre, PA, 18766. Joseph C. Dawson, chair, joseph.dawson@wilkes.edu; www.wilkes.edu/pages/382.asp; 507-408-4417; B.A. in theater arts or musical theater

YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA

Department of English and Humanities, Theater Major, York, PA, 17405-7199. jmcghee@ycp.edu; www.ycp.edu; 717-815-1401; B.A. in theater

RHODE ISLAND

BROWN UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, Speech, and Dance, PO Box 1897, 77 Waterman St., Providence, RI, 02912. taps@brown.edu; www.brown.edu; 401-863-3283; B.A. in theater arts

PROVIDENCE COLLEGE

Department of Theater, Dance & Film, 1 Cunningham Square, Providence, RI, 02918. jgarrity@providence.edu; www.providence.edu; 401-865-2327; B.A. in theater

SALVE REGINA UNIVERSITY

Theater Arts Department, 100 Ochre Point Ave., Newport, RI, 02840-4192. Patricia Hawkridge, chair, hawkridp@salve.edu; www.salve.edu; 401-341-3163; B.A. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

Department of Theater, 105 Upper College Road, Ste. 3, Fine Arts Center, Kingston, RI, 02881. paulam@uri.edu; www.uri.edu/artsci/the; 401-874-5921; BFA in acting, musical theater, design/tech, management, or directing

SOUTH CAROLINA

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON

Department of Theatre, 66 George St., Charleston, SC, 29424. Todd McNerney, dept. chair/assoc. professor, mcnerneyt@cofc.edu; www.cofc.edu/theatre; 843-953-6306; BA with concentrations in performance, costume design, scenic/lighting design, or youth theater

COLUMBIA COLLEGE

Department of Theater or Department of Dance, 1301 Columbia College Dr., Columbia, SC, 29203. Dr. Helen Tate (theater); Wrenn Cook, chair (dance), wcook@colacoll.edu (dance); www.columbiacollegesc.edu; 803-786-3749 (theater); 803-786-3778 (dance); B.A. in communications with a theater minor

FRANCIS MARION UNIVERSITY

Department of Fine Arts, Theater Arts Program, PO Box 100547, Florence, SC, 29501-0547. finearts@fmarion.edu; www.fmarion.edu; 843-661-1385; B.A. in theater arts

LANDER UNIVERSITY

Division of Fine Arts, Department of Mass Communication and Theater, 320 Stanley Ave., Greenwood, SC, 29649. fjackson@lander.edu; www.lander.edu; 864-388-8362; B.S. in mass communication and theater

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

Department of Theater and Dance, Longstreet Theater, Green and Sumpter Streets, Main Office, Rm. 402, Columbia, SC, 29208. Lisa Martin-Stuart, undergraduate program (theater); Susan Anderson, director of dance, theatre@sc.edu; dance@sc.edu; www.cas.sc.edu/thea; www.cas.sc.edu/dance; 803-777-4288 (theater); 803-777-5636 (dance); B.A. in theater; Dance: USC Dance Program, 324 Sumter St., Columbia SC 29208

WINTHROP UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, 115 Johnson Hall, Rock Hill, SC, 29733. www.winthrop.edu/vpa; 803-323-2287; B.A. in performance or design/technical

SOUTH DAKOTA

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH DAKOTA

Department of Theater, 414 E. Clark St., Vermillion, SD, 57069-2390. Eric Hagen, chairperson, theatre@usd.edu; www.usd.edu/theatre; 605-677-5418; BFA in acting, theater, musical theater, or design/tech

TENNESSEE

AUSTIN PEAY STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication and Theater, PO Box 4446, Clarksville, TN, 37044. thea@apsu.edu; www.apsu.edu; 931-221-7378; B.A. or B.S. in communication arts (with a concentration in theater or theater education)

RHODES COLLEGE

Department of Theater, 2000 North Parkway, Memphis, TN, 38112. raiford@rhodes.edu; www.rhodes.edu; 901-843-3838; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS

Department of Theater and Dance, 144 Theater Communication Building, Memphis, TN, 38152-3150. kshupe@memphis.edu; www.memphis.edu; 901-678-2523; BFA in theater (with a concentration in performance)

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE AT MARTIN

Department of Visual and Theater Arts, 102 Fine Arts Building, Martin, TN, 38238. Douglas Cook, chair, dcook@utm.edu; www.utm.edu/departments/chfa/finearts; 731-881-7400; BFA in theater

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE

Department of Theater, 206 McClung Tower, Knoxville, TN, 37996-0420. cbt@utk.edu; http://theatre.utk.edu; 865-974-6011; B.A. in theater

VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY

Theater Department, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, VU Station B #350001, Nashville, TN, 37235-0001. jon.w.hallquist@vanderbilt.edu; www.vanderbilt.edu; 615-322-2404; B.A. in theater

TEXAS

ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, 123 Williams Performing Arts Center, ACU Box 27843, Abilene, TX, 79699. hestera@acu.edu; www.acu.edu/theatre; 325-674-4892; B.A. or BFA in theater

ANGELO STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Communications, Mass Media and Theatre, ASU Station #10895, San Angelo, TX, 76909-0895. bill.doll@angelo.edu; www.angelo.edu/dept/cmmt/index.html; 325-942-2146, ext. 246; B.A. in drama

BAYLOR UNIVERSITY

Theater Arts Department, One Bear Place, Box 97262, Waco, TX, 76798. lisa_denman@baylor.edu; www.baylor.edu/theatre; 254-710-1861; B.A. in theater, BFA in performance or design

COLLEGE OF THE MAINLAND

Community Theater, 1200 Amburn Road, Texas City, TX, 77591. Sparky Koerner, dept. chair; Joyce Palmer, program asst., jpalmer@com.edu, skoerner@com.edu; www.com.edu; 409-938-1211, ext. 345; A.A. in theater arts/drama

COLLIN COLLEGE

2800 E. Spring Creek Parkway, Plano, TX, 75074. bbaker@collin.edu; www.collintheatrecenter.com; 972-881-5679; A.A. in theater

DEL MAR COLLEGE

101 Baldwin, Corpus Christi, TX, 78404. drama@delmar.edu; www.delmar.edu/drama; 361-698-2255; A.A. in drama

HARDIN-SIMMONS UNIVERSITY

Theater Department, Box 14864, HSU Station, Abilene, TX, 79698. lwheeler@hsutx.edu; www.hasutx.edu; 325-670-1511; BFA in theater (with concentrations in musical theater, performance, and design/tech; B.A. in theater or theater education

KD STUDIO ACTORS CONSERVATORY

2600 Stemmons Freeway, Ste. 117, Dallas, TX, 75207. admissions@kdstudio.com; www.kdstudio.com; 214-638-0484 or 877-278-2283; A.A. in acting performance

SAM HOUSTON STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, Box 2297, Huntsville, TX, 77341-2297. Penelope Hasekoester, chair (theater); Jennifer Pontius, coordinator (dance), theatre@shsu.edu; www.shsu.edu/~drm_www/ ; http://www.shsu.edu/~dnc_www/ (dance); 936-294-1329; BFA in theater or musical theater, B.A. in teaching

SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY

Meadows School of the Arts, Division of Theater/Division of Dance, PO Box 750356, Dallas, TX, 75275-0356. Stan Wojewodski, Jr., chair, theatre@smu.edu; www.smu.edu/meadows/areasofstudy/theatre.aspx; www.smu.edu/meadows/areasofstudy/dance.aspx; 214-768-2558; BFA in acting or theater studies

ST. EDWARD'S UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, 3001 S. Congress Ave., Austin, TX, 78704. evl@admin.stedwards.edu; www.stedwards.edu; 512-448-8486; B.A. in theater

STEPHEN F. AUSTIN STATE UNIVERSITY

The School of Theater, PO Box 6090, S.F.A. Station, Nacogdoches, TX, 75962. shattucksh@sfasu.edu; theatre.sfasu.edu; 936-468-4003; B.A. in theater or theater education with all-level certification, BFA in theater

SUL ROSS STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Fine Arts & Communication, FAB 106, Box C-43, Alpine, TX, 79832. gschwab@sulross.edu; www.sulross.edu; 432-837-8218; BFA in theater (with concentrations in acting/directing, design/tech and production, and teacher certification in elementary and secondary levels)

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

Theater Arts Program, Department of Performance Studies, 304 Academic Building, 4240 TAMU, College Station, TX, 77843. jhamera@tamu.edu; www.tamu.edu; 979-845-3355; B.A. in theater arts

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY - COMMERCE

Department of Mass Media, Communication & Theater, PO Box 3011, Commerce, TX, 75429-3011. coas@tamu-commerce.edu; www.tamu-commerce.edu/mmct; 903-886-5346; B.A. or B.S. in theater

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY - CORPUS CHRISTI

6300 Ocean Dr., Unit 5722, Corpus Christi, TX, 78412-5722. Don Luna, chair, http://theatre.tamucc.edu; 361-825-2316; 361-825-5988 dept. chair); B.A. in theater

TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, PO Box 297510, Fort Worth, TX, 76129. Harry Parker, chair (theater); Ellen Page Shelton, chair (dance), theatre@tcu.edu; www.cfac.tcu.edu; www.dance.tcu.edu; 817-257-7625; BFA theater or musical theater

TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY - SAN MARCOS

Department of Theater & Dance, 430 Moon St., San Marcos, TX, 78666-4616. John Fleming, chair (theater); LeAnne Smith, director (dance), jf18@txstate.edu (theater); ls14@txstate.edu (dance); www.theatreanddance.txstate.edu; 512-245-2147 (theater); 512-245-2949 (dance); B.A. in theater, BFA in theater or musical theater; Division of Dance, 178 Jowers Center, San Marcos, TX 78666

TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, PO Box 42061, Lubbock, TX, 79409-2061. fred.christoffel@ttu.edu; www.ttu.edu; 806-742-3601; B.A. in theater arts, BFA in theater (with an emphasis in acting)

TEXAS WOMAN'S UNIVERSITY

Department of Music and Drama, PO Box 425768, Denton, TX, 76204-4254. Sharon Benge, program director (drama); Dr. Penelope Hanstein, chair (dance), drama@twu.edu; dance@twu.edu; www.twu.edu/drama/; www.twu.edu/dance/; 940)898-2518 drama);940-898-2085 (dance); B.A. in drama

UNIVERSITY OF DALLAS

Drama Department, 1845 E. Northgate Drive, Irving, TX, 75062-4799. drama@udallas.edu; www.udallas.edu; 972-721-5061; B.A. in drama

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

School of Theater and Dance, 133 CWM Center, Houston, TX, 77204-4016. jdemontm@central.uh.edu; www.theatredance.uh.edu; 713-743-3003; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS - PAN AMERICAN

Communication Department, 1201 W. University Dr., Edinburg, TX, 78541. Timothy P. Mottet, chair, mottettp@utpa.edu; www.panam.edu; 956-665-3583; B.A. in communication (emphasis on theater)

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

Department of Theater and Dance, College of Fine Arts, 1 University Station, D3900, Austin, TX, 78712-0362. inquiry@uts.cc.utexas.edu; www.finearts.utexas.edu/tad; 512-471-5793; B.A. in theater and dance, BFA in theater studies

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO

Department of Theater & Dance, 500 W. University Ave., FOX 371D, El Paso, TX, 79968-0549. Joel K. Murray, Ph.D, theater dept. chair; Lisa Smith, dance dept. head, www.theatredance.utep.edu; 915-747-5146; B.A in theater, BFA in theater performance, musical theater, or technology and design

UNIVERSITY OF THE INCARNATE WORD

Department of Theater, 4301 Broadway, UPO #66, San Antonio, TX, 78209. Robert Ball, chair, ball@uiwtx.edu; www.uiw.edu/theatre; 210-829-3810; B.A. in theater arts

UTAH

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Media Arts, D-581 Harris Fine Arts Center, Provo, UT, 84602-6405. Rodger Sorensen, chair (theater); Lee Wakefield, chair (dance), tma_secretary@byu.edu (theater); dance@byu.edu; www.byu.edu; dance.byu.edu; 801-422-6645; 801-422-5086 (dance); B.A. in theater arts studies or theater arts education, BFA in acting or music dance theater

DIXIE STATE COLLEGE

Fine Arts Department, Theater Program, 225 S. 700 East St., St. George, UT, 84770. Brent Hanson, Ph.D., chair, hanson@dixie.edu; http://new.dixie.edu; 435-652-7790; B.A. in theater

SOUTHERN UTAH UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater Arts & Dance, 351 W. University Blvd., Cedar City, UT, 84720. marchantj@suu.edu; www.suu.edu; 435-586-7746; B.A. or B.S. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH

Department of Theater, 240 S. 1500 East, Room 206, Performing Arts Building, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-0170. Gage Williams, chair, faye.barron@utah.edu; www.theatre.utah.edu; 801-581-6448; B.A. in theater studies, BFA in acting, musical theater, performing arts design, or stage management

UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY

Theater Arts Department, 4025 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322-4025. theatre@usu.edu; theatre.usu.edu; 435-797-3046; B.A. in general theater studies, BFA in acting, theater education, or theater design and technology

VERMONT

BENNINGTON COLLEGE

Dance/Drama Program, 1 College Drive, Bennington, VT, 05201. lhurley@bennington.edu; www.bennington.edu; 802-440-4547; B.A. in theater

MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE

Department of Theatre and Dance, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury, VT, 05753. admissions@middlebury.edu; www.middlebury.edu; 802-443-5601; B.A. in theater

SAINT MICHAEL'S COLLEGE

Department of Fine Arts, One Winooski Park, Box 224, Colchester, VT, 05439. admission@smcvt.edu; www.smcvt.edu; 802-654-2000; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT

Department of Theater, Royall Tyler Theatre, 116 University Place, Burlington, VT, 05405-0102. Jeffrey Modereger, chair, theatreacademics@uvm.edu; www.uvm.edu/theatre; 802-656-2095; B.A. in theater (with emphasis in performance, design/tech, or history/criticism)

VIRGINIA

COLLEGE OF WILLIAM AND MARY

Department of Theatre, Speech, and Dance, PO Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA, 23187-8795. jsgava@wm.edu; www.wm.edu/theatre; 757-221-2660; B.A. in theater, B.A. in interdisciplinary studies (combining dance and theater)

FERRUM COLLEGE

Theater Arts Department, PO Box 1000, Ferrum, VA, 24088. wbowman@ferrum.edu; www.ferrum.edu; 540-365-4338; B.A. or BFA in theater arts

GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY

Theater Department, 4400 University Drive, MSN 3E6, Fairfax, VA, 22030. www.theater.gmu.edu; www.gmu.edu; 703-993-1120; B.A. and BFA in theater; PK-12 theater teaching licensure certificate

HAMPTON UNIVERSITY

Department of Fine & Performing Arts, Hampton, VA, 23668. karen.ward@hamptonu.edu; www.hamptonu.edu; 757-727-5402; B.A. in theater

JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY

School of Theater and Dance, 147 Warsaw Ave., MSC 5601, Harrisonburg, VA, 22807. William Buck, director (theater); Shane O'Hara, director (dance), theatredance@jmu.edu; www.jmu.edu/theatre; 540-568-6342; B.A. with concentrations in theater or musical theater

LONGWOOD UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication Studies & Theatre, 201 High St., Farmville, VA, 23909. theatre@longwood.edu; www.longwood.edu/theatre; 434-395-2643; B.A. or BFA in theater

MARY BALDWIN COLLEGE

Department of Theater, Staunton, VA, 24401. tsouther@mbc.edu; www.mbc.edu; 540-887-7189; B.A. in theater

OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication and Theater Arts, Theater Program, Norfolk, VA, 23529. kwinters@odu.edu; www.odu.edu; 757-683-3828; B.A. in theater

RADFORD UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Cinema, PO Box 6969, Radford, VA, 24142. Carl H. Lefko (theater), Margaret Devaney (dance), clefko@radford.edu (theater); mdevaney@radford.edu (dance); http://theatre.asp.radford.edu/; www.radford.edu/dance; 540-831-5012; B.A. or B.S. in theater

SHENANDOAH UNIVERSITY

Shenandoah Conservatory, 1460 University Dr., Winchester, VA, 22601. conservatory@su.edu; www.su.edu; 540-665-4545 (theater); 540-665-4565 (dance); BFA in acting, musical theater, or theater for youth

UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND

Department of Theater & Dance, Modlin Center for the Arts, Richmond, VA, 23173. dmullin@richmond.edu; http://theatredance.richmond.edu; 804-289-8592; B.A. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

Department of Drama, 109 Culbreth Road, PO Box 400128, Charlottesville, VA, 22904-4128. drama@virginia.edu; www.virginia.edu/drama/; 434-924-3326; B.A. in drama

VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY

School of the Arts, Department of Theatre, W.E. Singleton Center for Performing Arts, 922 Park Ave., Richmond, VA, 23284-2524. Aaron Anderson, director of undergraduate studies (theater), theatre@vcu.edu; www.vcu.edu/arts/theatre/dept; 804-828-1514; B.A. or BFA in theater

VIRGINIA TECH

Department of Theater & Cinema, 250 Henderson Hall East (0141), Blacksburg, VA, 24061. Patricia Raun, dept. head, theatre@vt.edu; www.theatre.vt.edu; 540-231-5335; B.A. in theater arts

VIRGINIA UNION UNIVERSITY

Speech and Drama Program, 1500 N. Lombardy St., Richmond, VA, 23220. www.vuu.edu; 804-257-5600; B.A. in drama

WASHINGTON

CENTRAL WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre Arts, 400 E. University Way, MC 106 - MS 7460, Ellensburg, WA, 98926-7460. Scott Robinson, chair/professor of theatre arts, scott.robinson@cwu.edu; www.cwu.edu/~theatre; 509/963-1273; BFA in theater arts (performance, design, production, stage management, or musical theater), B.A. in theater arts

CORNISH COLLEGE OF THE ARTS

Theater Department or Dance Department, Main Campus Center, 1000 Lenora St., Seattle, WA, 98121. Richard E.T. White, chair (theater); Kitty Daniels, chair (dance), admissions@cornish.edu; www.cornish.edu; 206-726-5042 (theater), 206-726-5079 (dance); BFA in theater

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

School of Drama, Box 353950, Seattle, WA, 98195-1150. Shanga Parker, theater, uwdrama@washington.edu; depts.washington.edu/uwdrama; 206-543-5140; B.A. in drama

WESTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

Theater Arts Department or Dance Program, 516 High St., Performing Arts Center 395, Bellingham, WA, 98225-9060. Deborah Greer Currier, theater arts chair, Sherena Geariety, dance program coordinator, deb.currier@wwu.edu (theater); sherena.geariety@wwu.edu (dance); www.wwu.edu; 360-650-3876; B.A. in theater arts

WHITWORTH COLLEGE

Theater Department, 300 W. Hawthorne Road, Spokane, WA, 99251-0305. theatre@whitworth.edu; www.whitworth.edu; 509-777-3707; B.A. in theater

WEST VIRGINIA

DAVIS AND ELKINS COLLEGE

Fine & Performing Arts Department, 100 Campus Drive, Elkins, WV, 26241. darasa@dewv.edu; www.dewv.edu; 304-637-1212; B.A. in theater arts, design/tech, theater education

MARSHALL UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, 1 John Marshall Drive, Huntington, WV, 25755-2242. jacksonju@marshall.edu; www.marshall.edu/cofa; 304-696-6442; BFA in theater

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY

College of Creative Arts, Division of Theater & Dance, PO Box 6111, Morgantown, WV, 26506-6111. theatre@mail.wvu.edu; theatre.wvu.edu; 304-293-2020; B.A. in theater, BFA in acting, design/technology, or puppetry

WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

Department of Theater, 59 College Ave., Campus Box 98, Buckhannon, WV, 26201. Gregory Mach, dept. chair, mach@wvwc.edu; www.wvwc.edu; 304-473-8105; B.A. in theater arts or musical theater, BFA in performance or musical theater

WISCONSIN

CARROLL COLLEGE

Department of Theater Arts, 100 N. East Ave., Waukesha, WI, 53186. tbruno@cc.edu; www.cc.edu; 262-951-3121; B.A. in theater arts

LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater Arts, J. Thomas and Julie Esch Hurvis Professor of Theatre and Drama, 711 E. Boldt Way, SPC 14, Appleton, WI, 54911. Timothy X. Troy, chair/professor, timothy.x.troy@lawrence.edu; www.lawrence.edu; 920-832-6747; B.A. in theater arts

MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY

Department of Performing Arts, Helfaer Theatre, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881. phylis.ravel@marquette.edu; www.marquette.edu; 414-288-5558; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - EAU CLAIRE

Department of Music and Theatre Arts, Haas Fine Arts Center 156, Eau Claire, WI, 54702-4004. musicandtheatre@uwec.edu; www.uwec.edu/mus-the; 715-836-4954; B.A. or B.S. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - GREEN BAY

Department of Theater and Dance, 2420 Nicolet Dr., Green Bay, WI, 54311-7001. Laura Riddle, riddle@uwgb.edu; www.uwgb.edu/performarts; 920-465-2348; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - LA CROSSE

Department of Theater Arts, 154 Center for the Arts, 1725 State St., La Crosse, WI, 54601. Joseph K. Anderson, chair; Walt Elder, prospective student liason, elder.walt@uwlax.edu; www.uwlax.edu/theatre; 608-785-6701; B.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MADISON

Department of Theatre and Drama, 6173 Vilas Hall, 821 University Ave., Madison, WI, 53706-1497. Ann Archbold, chair, bclayton@wisc.edu; www.theatre.wisc.edu; 608-263-2329; B.A. or B.S. in theater and drama

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MILWAUKEE

Peck School of the Arts, Department of Theater or Department of Dance, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201. Leroy Stoner, chair (theater); Ed Burgess, chair (dance), theatreinfo@uwm.edu; danceinfo@uwm.edu; arts.uwm.edu/theatre; arts.uwm.edu/dance; 414-229-4947 (theater), 414-229-2571 (dance); B.A. in theater, BFA in acting, costume production, or technical production

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - RIVER FALLS

Department of Communication Studies and Theater Arts, College of Arts and Sciences, B24 Kleinpell Fine Arts Building, 410 Third St., River Falls, WI, 54022. kenneth.w.stofferahn@uwrf.edu; www.uwrf.edu; 715-425-3101; B.A. or B.S. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - STEVENS POINT

Department of Theatre & Dance, Noel Fine Arts Center, Room 161, 1800 Portage St., Stevens Point, WI, 54481. Stephen Trovillion Smith, acting program coordinator; Joan Karlen, dance program coordinator, theatre@uwsp.edu; dance@uwsp.edu; www.uwsp.edu/theatre-dance; 715-346-4429; B.A. in drama, BFA in acting, musical theater, or design/tech

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - WHITEWATER

Department of Theater and Dance, Greenhill Center of the Arts, 800 W. Main St., Whitewater, WI, 53190-1790. thrdnce@uww.edu; academics.uww.edu/cac/theatre/index.htm; 262-472-1566; B.A. in theater arts, BFA in performance, design tech, stage management, and management promotion, BSEd in theater education

VITERBO UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Music Theater, 900 Viterbo Drive, La Crosse, WI, 54601. Rick Walters, dept. chair, rhwalters@viterbo.edu; www.viterbo.edu/theatre; 608-796-3760; B.A. in theater arts, BFA in acting, design, production, stage management, or music theater, B.S. in theater arts education

WYOMING

CASPER COLLEGE

Department of Theater and Dance, 125 College Drive, Casper, WY, 82601. tempey@caspercollege.edu; www.caspercollege.edu; 307-268-2365; A.A. in theater performance, musical theater performance

UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING

Department of Theater and Dance, Dept. 3951, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY, 82071-3951. jchapman@uwyo.edu; www.uwyo.edu/th&d/; 307-766-2198; B.A. or BFA in theater

OVERSEAS -- LONDON

DRAMA STUDIO LONDON

Grange Court, 1 Grange Road, London, W5 5QN. registrar@dramastudiolondon.co.uk; www.dramastudiolondon.co.uk; +44 208 579 3897; Nondegree program

LONDON ACADEMY OF MUSIC & DRAMATIC ART (LAMDA)

155 Talgarth Road, Barons Court, London, W14 9DA. enquiries@lamda.org.uk; www.lamda.org.uk; +44 20 8834 0500; Comparable degree program

LONDON ACADEMY OF PERFORMING ARTS

St. Matthew's Church, St. Petersburgh Place, London, W2 4LA. admin@lapadrama.com; www.lapadrama.com; +44 20 7727 0220; Conservatory program

MOUNTVIEW ACADEMY OF THEATRE ARTS

Ralph Richardson Memorial Studios, Kingfisher Place, Clarendon Road, London, N22 6XF. admissions@mountview.ac.uk; www.mountview.org.uk; +44 20 8881 2201; B.A. in musical theater and acting

ROSE BRUFORD COLLEGE

Lamorbey Park, Burnt Oak Lane, Sidcup, Kent, DA15 9DF. enquiries@bruford.ac.uk; www.bruford.ac.uk; +44 20 8308 2600

ROYAL ACADEMY OF DRAMATIC ART

62-64 Gower St., London, WC1E 6ED. enquiries@rada.ac.uk; www.rada.ac.uk; +44 20 7636 7076; Comparable degree

ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC

Musical Theatre, Marylebone Road, London, NW1 5HT. mth@ram.ac.uk; www.ram.ac.uk/mth; +44 20 7873 7483; Comparable degree

GRADUATE

ALABAMA

ALABAMA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

University of Alabama, Professional Actor Training Program, 1 Festival Drive, Montgomery, AL, 36117. rchambers@asf.net; www.asfgradprogram.net; 334-271-5350; MFA in acting

THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA

Department of Theater & Dance, Box 870239, Tuscaloosa, AL, 35487-0239. William Teague, chair; Christopher M. Montpetit, director, theater management, theatre.dance@ua.edu; theatre.ua.edu; 205-348-5283; MFA in theater (acting, costume design, lighting design, scenic design, theater management, technical direction)

ARIZONA

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

School of Theatre and Film, 232 Dixie Gammage Hall, PO Box 872002, Tempe, AZ, 85287-2002. Guillermo Reyes, interim director, School of Theater and Film; Simon Dove, director, School of Dance, megan.packard@asu.edu (theater); jeanette.beck@asu.edu (dance); theatre.asu.edu; dance.asu.edu; 480-965-5337 (theater); 480-965-5029 (dance); M.A., MFA, and Ph.D. in theater; School of Dance: Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, School of Dance, PO Box 870304, Tempe, AZ 85287-0304

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

School of Theater Arts, PO Box 210003, 1025 N. Olive Rd., Drama Bldg., Rm. 239, Tuscon, AZ, 85721-0003. Bruce Brockman, director (theater); Jory Hancock, interim dean and director (dance), theatre@email.arizona.edu; dance@email.arizona.edu; www.cfa.arizona.edu/tftv (theater); www.cfa.arizona.edu/dance; 520-621-7008 (theater); 520-621-4698 (dance); MFA in theater design/technology; School of Dance: PO Box 210093, 1713 E. University Blvd., Ina Gittings Bldg. Rm 121, Tucson, AZ 85721-0093

ARKANSAS

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT FAYETTEVILLE

J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, 619 Kimpel Hall, Department of Drama, Fayetteville, AR, 72701. D. Andrew Gibbs, chair; Amy Herzberg, director of performance program, drama@cavern.uark.edu; dagibbs@uark.edu (dept. chair); herzberg@uark.edu; www.uark.edu/~drama; 479-575-2953; MFA in drama

CALIFORNIA

ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSITY

79 New Montgomery St., San Francisco, CA, 94105. Marian Shaffner, faculty development director, info@academyart.edu; www.academyart.edu; 800-544-2787; MFA in acting

AMERICAN CONSERVATORY THEATER

30 Grant Ave., 6th fl., San Francisco, CA, 94108-5834. jsharrar@act-sf.org; www.actactortraining.org; 415-439-2350; MFA in acting

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF THE ARTS

School of Theater; Sharon Disney Lund School of Dance, 24700 McBean Pkwy., Valencia, CA, 91355-2397. Travis Preston, dean (theater); Stephan Koplowitz, dean (dance), admissions@calarts.edu; www.calarts.edu; 661-255-1050; MFA in acting, scene design, costuming, sound design

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON

Department of Theatre and Dance, 800 N. State College Blvd., PO Box 6850, Fullerton, CA, 92834-6850. www.fullerton.edu/arts; 714-278-3628; MFA in theater arts, acting, directing, design and technical production

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH

Theatre Arts Department, 1250 Bellflower Blvd., Long Beach, CA, 90840. Joanne Gordon, chair; Micky Small, business manager, theatre@csulb.edu; www.csulb.edu/depts/theatre; www.calrep.org; 562-985-7891; MFA in acting or design; MFA/MBA in theater management (with California Repertory Company)

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LOS ANGELES

Department of Theatre Arts and Dance, 5151 State University Dr., Los Angeles, CA, 90032. James Hatfield, dept. chair, tad@calstatela.edu; www.calstatela.edu/dept/theatre_dance/; 323-343-4110; M.A. in theater arts, MFA in television, film, and theater

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, NORTHRIDGE

Department of Theater, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge, CA, 91330-8320. Garry D. Lennon, dept. chair, theatre@csun.edu; www.csun.edu/theatre; 818-677-3086; M.A. in theater

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SAN BERNARDINO

Department of Theater Arts, Performing Arts Building, Rm. 111, 5500 University Parkway, San Bernardino, CA, 92407-2397. Margaret A. Perry, dept. chair, moreinfo@csusb.edu; http://theatre.csusb.edu/; 909-880-5876; M.A. in theater arts

DELL'ARTE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL THEATRE

P.O. Box 816, Blue Lake, CA, 95525. info@dellarte.com; www.dellarte.com; 707-668-5663; MFA in ensemble-based physical theater

HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, Film & Dance, 1 Harpst St., Arcata, CA, 95521. theatre@humboldt.edu; www.humboldt.edu; 707-826-3566; M.A. in theater production

OLD GLOBE THEATRE/UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO

PO Box 122171, San Diego, CA, 92112-2171. lbower@theoldglobe.org; www.globemfa.org; 619-235-2161; MFA in acting

SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY

School of Theatre, Television, and Film, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA, 92182-7601. Angie Parkhurst, TTF coordinator, aparkhur@mail.sdsu.edu; http://theatre.sdsu.edu/; 619-594-5091; M.A. in theater arts, MFA in musical theater or design/tech

SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater Arts, Creative Arts Building-CA 103, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco, CA, 94132-4157. Todd Roehrman, dept. chair, tha@sfsu.edu or theatre@sfsu.edu; http://theatre.sfsu.edu/; 415-338-1341; M.A. in drama, MFA in theater arts

SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Television, Radio, Film, Theatre, Animation and Illustration, Hugh Gillis Hall, Rm. 100, 1 Washington Square, San Jose, CA, 95192-0098. Dr. Ed Harris, chair, info@tvradiofilmtheatre.com; www.tvradiofilmtheatre.com; 408-924-4530 or 408-924-4567; M.A. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY

Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies, 101 Dwinelle Annex, Berkeley, CA, 94720-2560. tdps@berkeley.edu; tdps.berkeley.edu; 510-642-1677; PhD in performance studies

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS

Department of Theater & Dance, 222 Wright Hall, Davis, CA, 95616-8577. jbisgaard@ucdavis.edu; www.ucdavis.edu; 530-752-8710; MFA in dramatic art

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE

Department of Drama, 249 Drama, Irvine, CA, 92697-2775. Eli Simon, chair, drama@uci.edu; http://drama.arts.uci.edu; 949-824-6614; MFA in acting, directing, stage management, design, Ph.D. in drama and theater

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES

School of Theater, Film, and Television, 102 East Melnitz, PO Box 951622, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1622. info@tft.ucla.edu; www.tft.ucla.edu; 310-825-5761; MFA in acting, design, directing, playwriting, animation, cinematography, producing, or production/directing, M.A. in theater, cinema/media studies, or moving image archive studies

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO

Department of Theater and Dance, 9500 Gilman Drive MC0344, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0344. Allyson Green, dance dept. chair; Kyle Donnelly, head of acting, meward@ucsd.edu (graduate); lajimenez@ucsd.edu (undergraduate); www.theatre.ucsd.edu; 858-534-3791; MFA in theater, design, directing, playwriting, or stage management, Ph.D. in theater and drama (joint program with UC Irvine)

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

School of Theatre, 1029 Childs Way, Los Angeles, CA, 90089-0791. Madeline Puzo, dean, thtrinfo@usc.edu; theatre.usc.edu; 213-740-1286; MFA in acting or dramatic writing, M.A. in applied theater arts

COLORADO

NAROPA UNIVERSITY

Performing Arts Department, 2130 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, CO, 80302. Wendell Beavers, chair, wbeavers@naropa.edu; www.naropa.edu/academics/graduate/maperformarts/index.cfm; 303-546-5281; MFA in theater: contemporary performance

NATIONAL THEATRE CONSERVATORY

Denver Center for the Performing Arts, 1101 13th St., Denver, CO, 80204. Daniel Renner, dean, ntc@dcpa.org; www.denvercenter.org; 303-446-4855; MFA in acting

CONNECTICUT

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT, STORRS

Department of Dramatic Arts, 802 Bolton Road, Unit 1127, Storrs, CT, 06269-1127. dramaticarts@uconn.edu; dramaoffice@uconn.edu; 860-486-4025; MFA in acting (with the Connecticut Repertory Theater)

YALE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF DRAMA

P.O. Box 208325, New Haven, CT, 06520-8325. James Bundy, dean; Maria Leveton, registrar/admissions administrator, maria.leveton@yale.edu (registrar); www.yale.edu/drama; 203-432-1507; MFA in acting, design, sound design, dramaturgy and dramatic criticism, direction, playwriting, stage management, technical design and production, or theater management, DFA in drama

DELAWARE

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

Professional Theater Training Program, Department of Theater, 413 Academy St., Newark, DE, 19716. ud-pttp@udel.edu; www.udel.edu/theatre; 302-831-2201; MFA in acting, stage management, or technical production

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA

Department of Drama, 620 Michigan Ave. N.E., Washington, DC, 20064. cua-drama@cua.edu; http://drama.cua.edu; 202-319-5358; MFA in acting, directing, or playwriting, M.A. in theater history and criticism or theater education

SHAKESPEARE THEATRE COMPANY

Academy for Classical Acting, 516 Eighth St. S.E., Washington, DC, 20003. stc_aca@shakespearedc.org; www.shakespearetheatre.org/academy/; 202-547-3230, ext. 2402; MFA in classical acting (with George Washington University)

FLORIDA

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY/ASOLO CONSERVATORY FOR ACTOR TRAINING

5555 N. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, FL, 34243. debi.schalch@conservatory.fsu.edu; http://theatre.fsu.edu or www.asolo.org; 941-351-9010, ext. 2311; MFA in acting (with Asolo Repertory Theatre)

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

UCF Conservatory Theater, PO Box 162372, Orlando, FL, 32816. Earl Weaver, associate professor/program coordinator, eweaver@mail.ucf.edu; theatre@mail.ucf.edu; www.theatre.ucf.edu; 407-823-2862; MFA in acting, musical theater, design, theater for young audiences. M.A. in theater studies

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

School of Theater and Dance, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL, 32611. gradadmissions@arts.ufl.edu; www.arts.ufl.edu/theatreanddance; 352-273-0500 or 352-273-0501; MFA in acting

GEORGIA

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA

Department of Theatre and Film Studies, 203B Fine Arts Building, Athens, GA, 30602-3154. theatre@drama.uga.edu; www.drama.uga.edu; 706-542-2836; MFA in performance

HAWAII

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA

Kennedy Theater, Department of Theatre and Dance, 1770 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI, 96822. theatre@hawaii.edu; www.hawaii.edu/theatre; 808-956-7677; M.A., MFA, or Ph.D. in theater

IDAHO

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO

Department of Theater Arts, PO Box 442008, Corner of Sixth and Rayburn, Moscow, ID, 83844-2008. theatre@uidaho.edu; www.class.uidaho.edu/irt/; 208-885-6465; MFA in theater

ILLINOIS

DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

The Theatre School, 2135 N. Kenmore Ave., Chicago, IL, 60614. Jason Beck, director of admissions, theatreadmissions@depaul.edu; http://theatreschool.depaul.edu; 773-325-7999 or 800-4-DEPAUL, ext. 57999; MFA in acting, directing, or arts leadership

ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY

College of Fine Arts, School of Theater/Dance Program, Campus Box 5700, Normal, IL, 61790-5700. dlacasse@ilstu.edu; www.ilstu.edu; 309-438-8783; MFA, M.A., or M.S. in theater

NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY

School of Theatre and Dance, Stevens Building, DeKalb, IL, 60115-2854. Alexander Gelman, director, agelman@niu.edu; www.niu.edu/theatre; 815-753-1334 or 815-753-8253; MFA, M.A., or M.S. in theater

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

School of Communication, Department of Theater, 1949 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL, 60208. Rives Collins, dept. chair, r-collins@northwestern.edu, v-valliere@northwestern.edu; www.communication.northwestern.edu/theatre; 847-491-3170; MFA in design or directing; Ph.D. in theater and drama

ROOSEVELT UNIVERSITY/CHICAGO COLLEGE OF PERFORMING ARTS

The Theater Conservatory, 430 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL, 60605. Sean Kelley, assoc. dean/director, theatre@roosevelt.edu; www.roosevelt.edu/ccpa/admissions/theatreconservatoryadmissions.aspx; 312-341-6735; MA in directing (summers only)

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CARBONDALE

Department of Theatre, Mail Code 6608, Communications Building #1033, Carbondale, IL, 62901. Mark K. Varns, chair, varns@siu.edu; www.siu.edu; 618-453-5741; MFA in theater

WESTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre and Dance, Browne Hall 101, 1 University Circle, Macomb, IL, 61455. David E. Patrick, chair, theatre@wiu.edu; ca-winters-march@wiu.edu (dance); www.wiu.edu/theatre; 309-298-1543; MFA in acting, directing, lighting design, scenic design, or costume design

INDIANA

INDIANA UNIVERSITY, BLOOMINGTON

Department of Theater and Drama, 275 N. Jordan Ave., AD250, Bloomington, IN, 47405-1101. Charles Railsbeck, undergraduate advisor, theatre@indiana.edu; www.theatre.indiana.edu; 812-855-4342; M.A. or M.F.A. in acting, directing, playwriting, theater technogy, costume design, scenic design, or lighting design; Ph.D. in theater or drama

PURDUE UNIVERSITY

Division of Theater, Yue-Kong Pau Hall of Visual and Performing Arts, 552 W. Wood St., West Lafayette, IN, 47907-2002. theatre@purdue.edu; www.cla.purdue.edu/vpa/theatre; 765-494-3074; MFA in acting

IOWA

UNIVERSITY OF IOWA

Department of Theater Arts, 100 Theatre Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1795. theatre@uiowa.edu; www.uiowa.edu/~theatre/; 319-335-2700 or 800-553-IOWA; MFA in acting

KANSAS

KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication Studies, Theater, and Dance, 129 Nichols Hall, Manhattan, KS, 66506-2304. John Uthoff, director of theater, jsutd@ksu.edu; www.k-state.edu/theatre; 785-532-6875; M.A. in theater (also available with a concentration in drama therapy)

LOUISIANA

LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, 217 M & DA Building, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803. theatre@lsu.edu; www.lsu.edu; 225-578-4174; MFA in acting

LOUISIANA TECH UNIVERSITY

School of the Performing Arts, Stone Theater, PO Box 8608, Tech Station, Ruston, LA, 71272. lulu@latech.edu; http://performingarts.latech.edu; 318-257-2930; M.A. in speech (with a concentration in theater)

UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS

Department of Film, Theater, and Communication Arts, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, Performing Arts Center, New Orleans, LA, 70148. http://ftca.uno.edu; 504-280-6317; MFA in performance

MARYLAND

TOWSON UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater Arts, Center for the Arts, Room 3037, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD, 21252. theatre@towson.edu; www.towson.edu/theatre; 410-704-2792; MFA in theater

MASSACHUSETTS

AMERICAN REPERTORY THEATER

Institute for Advanced Theater Training at Harvard University, Loeb Drama Center, 64 Brattle St., Cambridge, MA, 02138. Scott Zigler, director, institute@amrep.org; www.amrep.org; 617-495-2668; MFA (from the Moscow Art Theater School)

THE BOSTON CONSERVATORY

Theater Division, 8 The Fenway, Boston, MA, 02215. Neil Donohoe, director, admissions@bostonconservatory.edu; www.bostonconservatory.edu; 617-912-9153 or 617-536-6340; M.A. in musical theater

BOSTON UNIVERSITY

College of Fine Arts, School of Theatre, 855 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA, 02215. Jim Petosa, director, theatre@bu.edu; pdifabio@bu.edu; www.bu.edu/cfa/theatre; 617-353-3390; MFA in directing, theater education, design, production, or management

BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater Arts, MS 072, PO Box 549110, Waltham, MA, 02454. theater@brandeis.edu; www.brandeis.edu; 781-736-3340; MFA in acting and design

EMERSON COLLEGE

Department of Performing Arts, 120 Boylston St., Boston, MA, 02116. Eric Weiss, performing arts admission coordinator, stagedoor@emerson.edu; www.emerson.edu; 617-824-8780; M.A. in theater education

MICHIGAN

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

Department of Communication and Theater Arts, 124 Quirk Building, Ypsilanti, MI, 48197. emu_theatre@emich.edu; www.emich.edu/cta; 734-487-3130; M.A. in theater arts, MFA in drama/theater for the young

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, 113 Auditorium Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824. theatre@msu.edu; www.theatre.msu.edu; 517-355-6690; MFA in acting and design

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN - FLINT

Department of Theater and Dance, Theatre 238, Flint, MI, 48502-1950. Lauren Friesen, chair, lfriesen@umflint.edu; www.umflint.edu/theatredance; 810-762-3230; M.A. in American theater or arts administration

WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, 4841 Cass Ave., Ste. 3225, Detroit, MI, 48202. theatre@wayne.edu; www.theatre.wayne.edu; 313-577-3508; M.A. in theater, MFA in theater administration, acting, scenic design, lighting design, costume design, or stage management, Ph.D. in theater

MINNESOTA

MINNESOTA STATE UNIVERSITY, MANKATO

Department of Theater and Dance, 201 Performing Arts Center, Mankato, MN, 56001. paul.hustoles@musu.edu; www.msutheatre.com; 507-389-2125 or 2118; M.A. or MFA in theater arts

MISSISSIPPI

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI

Department of Theater and Dance, 118 College Drive, Box 5052, Hattiesburg, MS, 39406-0001. theatre@usm.edu; www.usm.edu/theatre; 601-266-4994; MFA in performance, directing, or design/tech

MISSOURI

MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, 901 S. National Ave., Springfield, MO, 65897. theatreanddance@missouristate.edu; www.missouristate.edu; 417-836-4400; M.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI, COLUMBIA

Department of Theater, 129 Fine Arts Bldg., Columbia, MO, 65211. willisce@missouri.edu; theatre.missouri.edu; 573-882-2021; M.A. or PhD in theater

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI, KANSAS CITY

Department of Theater, 408 Performing Arts Center, Room 120, 4949 Cherry St., Kansas City, MO, 64110-2229. theatre@umkc.edu; www.umkc.edu/theatre; 816-235-2702; M.A. in theater, MFA in acting, costume design, lighting, scenery, sound design, stage management, or technical directing

MONTANA

UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA

Department of Drama/Dance & Montana Repertory Theater, PARTV Center Room 197, Missoula, MT, 59812-8136. umtheatredance@umontana.edu; www.sfa.umt.edu/drama; 406-243-4481; M.A. or MFA in theater

NEBRASKA

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA - LINCOLN

Johnny Carson School of Theater and Film, 215 Temple Bldg., Lincoln, NE, 68588-0201. theatrearts@unl.edu; www.unl.edu/theatrearts; 402-472-2072; MFA in directing, stage design, or costume design

NEVADA

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS

UNLV Department of Theater, Box 455036, 4505 S Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-5036. Brackley Frayer, dept. chair, nct@unlv.edu; http://theatre.unlv.edu/; 702-895-3666; MFA in directing or theater with emphasis on performance, design/technology, or stage management

NEW HAMPSHIRE

UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

Department of Theater and Dance, Paul Creative Arts Center, D-22, 30 College Road, Durham, NH, 03824. Chris Peabody, administrative assistant, c.peabody@unh.edu; www.unh.edu/theatre-dance; 603-862-2919; M.Ed. or MAT in theater

NEW JERSEY

MASON GROSS SCHOOL OF THE ARTS AT RUTGERS

33 Livingston Ave., New Brunswick, NJ, 08901. Mandy Feiler, admissions officer, mfelier@masongross.rutgers.edu; www.masongross.rutgers.edu; 732-932-9891; MFA in acting, directing, playwriting, design, and stage management

ROWAN UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, Bunce Hall, 201 Mullica Hill Road, Glassboro, NJ, 08028. Elisabeth Hostetter, advisement coordinator, hostetter@rowan.edu; www.rowan.edu/colleges/fpa/theatre_dance; 856-256-4030; M.A. in theater, MST in theater education

NEW MEXICO

UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO

Department of Theater and Dance, MSC04 2570, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001. theatre@unm.edu; dance@unm.edu; theatre.unm.edu; 505-277-4332 (theater); 505-277-3660 (dance); M.A. in theater education, MFA in dramatic writing

NEW YORK

BROOKLYN COLLEGE

Department of Theater, 317 Whitehead Hall, Brooklyn, NY, 11210-2889. Thomas Bullard, chair, tbullard@brooklyn.cuny.edu; www.brooklyn.cuny.edu; 718-951-5666; MFA in acting, directing, performing arts management, or design, M.A. in theater history and criticism

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

School of the Arts, Theatre Arts Program, 601 Dodge Hall, Mail Code 1807, New York, NY, 10027. Arnold Aronson, chair, theatre@columbia.edu; http://arts.columbia.edu/theatre-arts; 212-854-3408; MFA in theater arts, Ph.D. in theater

LONG ISLAND UNIVERSITY

C.W. Post Campus, Theatre, Film, Dance, & Arts Management, 720 Northern Blvd., Brookville, NY, 11548. Cara Gargano, cgargano@liu.edu; www.liu.edu; 516-299-2353; M.A. in theater

MANHATTAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC

120 Claremont Ave., New York, NY, 10027. www.msmnyc.edu; 212-749-2802; M.M. in voice; diploma

NEW ACTORS WORKSHOP

259 W. 30th St., 2nd floor, New York, NY, 10001. newactorsw@aol.com; www.newactorsworkshop.com; 212-947-1310; M.A. in theater (with Antioch University)

THE NEW SCHOOL UNIVERSITY

The New School for Drama, 151 Bank St., New York, NY, 10014. Robert Lupone, director; Linda Kleppinger, managing assistant to the director, kleppinl@newschool.edu (assistant to the director); www.drama.newschool.edu; 212-229-5859; MFA in acting

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

Tisch School of the Arts, Graduate Acting Program, 721 Broadway, 5th floor, New York, NY, 10003-6807. www.nyu.edu/tisch/acting2007; 212-998-1960; MFA in acting

PACE UNIVERSITY

Department of Performing Arts, One Pace Plaza, New York, NY, 10038. theater@pace.edu; www.pace.edu; 212-346-1352; MFA in acting

STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY, SUNY

Department of Theater Arts, Staller Center for the Arts, Stony Brook, NY, 11794-5450. amkuhn@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; www.stonybrook.edu/theatrearts; 631-632-7300; M.A. in theater, MFA in dramaturgy

NORTH CAROLINA

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT GREENSBORO

Department of Theater, PO Box 26170, Greensboro, NC, 27402-6170. Jim Fisher, head (theater), Katie Fennell (dance), nrshephe@uncg.edu (theater); dance@uncg.edu; www.uncg.edu/the (theater); www.uncg.edu/dce (dance); 336-334-4032 (theater); 336-334-5570 (dance); MFA in acting, theater design, directing, or theater for youth, M.Ed. in theater education; Dance: Department of Dance, 323 HHP Bldg., Greensboro, NC 27402-6170

NORTH DAKOTA

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA

Department of Theater Arts, PO Box 8136, University Station, Grand Forks, ND, 58202-8136. kathleen_mclennan@und.nodak.edu; arts-sciences.und.edu/theatre-arts; 701-777-3446; M.A. in theater arts

OHIO

BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Film, 338 South Hall, Bowling Green, OH, 43403. theatrefilm@bgnet.bgsu.edu; www.bgsu.edu; 419-372-2222; M.A. in theater

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106-7077. rgw4@case.edu; www.case.edu/artsci/thtr; 216-368-4868; MFA in acting (with the Cleveland Play House)

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

School of Theater and Dance, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001. Mark Monday, head graduate program, theatre@kent.edu; www.theatre.kent.edu; 330-672-2082; M.A. in theater studies, MFA in acting

MIAMI UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, 131 Center for Performing Arts, Oxford, OH, 45056. theatre@muohio.edu; www.fna.muohio.edu; 513-529-3053; M.A. in theater

THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theatre, Drake Performance and Event Center, 1849 Cannon Drive, Columbus, OH, 43210-1307. Damian Bowerman, graduate studies coordinator (theatre); Susan Van Pelt Petry, chair (dance), theatre@osu.edu; dance@osu.edu; www.theatre.osu.edu; www.dance.osu.edu; 614-292-5821 (theater); 614-292-7977 dance; MFA in acting or design; MA and Ph.D. in theater

OHIO UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, Kantner Hall, Athens, OH, 45701-2979. Madeleine Scott, interim director, theater@ohio.edu; www.finearts.ohio.edu/theater (theater); 740-593-4818 (theater); M.A. in dramatic writing; MFA in performance, directing, design/technology, or playwriting

UNIVERSITY OF AKRON

School of Dance, Theater, and Arts Administration, Akron, OH, 44325-1005. theatre@uakron.edu; www.uakron.edu/dtaa; 330-972-7890; M.A. in theater (for teachers) or arts administration

OKLAHOMA

OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY

2501 N. Blackwelder Ave., Oklahoma City, OK, 73106-1493. David Herendeen, director (music theater and theater); Melanie Shelley, associate dean (dance), dherendeen@okcu.edu (theater); mshelley@okcu.edu (dance); http://www.okcu.edu/theatre; www.okcu.edu/dance_amgt; 405-208-5710; M.A. in theater, theater for young audience, costume design, or scene design, M.M. in music theater

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater, 121 Seretean Center, Stillwater, OK, 74078-4076. drama@okstate.edu; http://theatre.okstate.edu; 405-744-6094; M.A. in theater

OREGON

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

Department of Theater Arts, 216 Villard Hall, 1231 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, 97403. theatre.uoregon.edu/theatre_department; 541-346-4171; M.A., MFA, or Ph.D. in theater arts

UNIVERSITY OF PORTLAND

Drama Program, Buckley Center 235, MSC 152, 5000 N. Willamette Blvd., Portland, OR, 97203. Larry Larsen, director, pfa@up.edu; www.up.edu; 503-943-7228; MFA in directing

PENNSYLVANIA

PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

School of Theater, 103 Arts Building, University Park, PA, 16802-1919. theatre@psu.edu; www.theatre.psu.edu; 814-865-7586; MFA in acting

POINT PARK UNIVERSITY

Conservatory of Performing Arts, Department of Theater, 201 Wood St., Pittsburgh, PA, 15222. John Shepard, chair (theater), www.pointpark.edu; 412-392-3450; MFA in acting

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

Theater Department, Tomlinson Theater, Room 210A, 1301 W. Norris St., Philadelphia, PA, 19122-6075. Roberta Sloan, chair (theater); Merian Soto, graduate program director (dance), theater@temple.edu; danceadm@temple.edu; www.temple.edu; 215-204-8414 (theater); 215-204-5169 (dance); MFA in acting

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

Department of Theatre Arts, 1617 Cathedral of Learning, Pittsburgh, PA, 15260. infothea@pitt.edu; www.play.pitt.edu; 412-624-6568; M.A. or Ph.D. in theater and performance studies, MFA in performance pedagogy

VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY

Theater Department, 800 Lancaster Ave., St. Augustine Center 205, Villanova, PA, 19085. annetta.stowman@villanova.edu; www.theatre.villanova.edu; 610-519-4760; M.A. in theater

RHODE ISLAND

BROWN/TRINITY REPERTORY

201 Washington St., Providence, RI, 02903. Jill Jann, program administrator, jjann@trinityrep.com; www.trinityrep.com or www.brown.edu; 401-521-1100, ext. 271; MFA in acting or directing; Ph.D. in theater arts and performance studies

SOUTH CAROLINA

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

Department of Theater and Dance, Longstreet Theater, Green and Sumpter Streets, Main Office, Rm. 402, Columbia, SC, 29208. Steven Pearson, graduate program, theatre@sc.edu; www.cas.sc.edu/thea; 803-777-4288 (theater); M.A. in theater, MFA in acting, scene design, costume design, or lighting design

SOUTH DAKOTA

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH DAKOTA

Department of Theater, 414 E. Clark St., Vermillion, SD, 57069-2390. Eric Hagen, chairperson, theatre@usd.edu; www.usd.edu/theatre; 605-677-5418; M.A. in theater, MFA in directing or design/tech

TENNESSEE

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE

Department of Theater, 206 McClung Tower, Knoxville, TN, 37996-0420. cbt@utk.edu; http://theatre.utk.edu; 865-974-6011; MFA in acting, costume design, scenic design, or lighting design

TEXAS

BAYLOR UNIVERSITY

Theater Arts Department, One Bear Place, Box 97262, Waco, TX, 76798. lisa_denman@baylor.edu; www.baylor.edu/theatre; 254-710-1861; MFA in directing; MA in theatre studies

SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY

Meadows School of the Arts, Division of Theater/Division of Dance, PO Box 750356, Dallas, TX, 75275-0356. Stan Wojewodski, chair (theater); Myra Woodruff, chair (dance), theatre@smu.edu; dance@smu.edu; www.smu.edu/meadows/areasofstudy/theatre.aspx; www.smu.edu/meadows/areasofstudy/dance.aspx; 214-768-2558; MFA in acting

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY - COMMERCE

Department of Mass Media, Communication & Theater, PO Box 3011, Commerce, TX, 75429-3011. www.tamu-commerce.edu/mmct; 903-886-5346; M.A. or M.S. in theater

TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY-SAN MARCOS

Department of Theater & Dance, 430 Moon St., San Marcos, TX, 78666-4616. John Fleming, chair (theater); LeAnne Smith, director (dance), jf18@txstate.edu; www.theatreanddance.txstate.edu; 512-245-2147; M.A. in theater

TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater and Dance, PO Box 42061, Lubbock, TX, 79409-2061. fred.christoffel@ttu.edu; www.ttu.edu; 806-742-3601; M.A. in theater arts, MFA in performance and pedagogy

TEXAS WOMAN'S UNIVERSITY

Department of Music and Drama, PO Box 425768, Denton, TX, 76204-4254. Sharon Benge, program director (drama); Dr. Penelope Hanstein, chair (dance), drama@twu.edu; dance@twu.edu; www.twu.edu/drama; www.twu.edu/dance; 940-898-2518 (drama); 940-898-2085 (dance); M.A. in drama

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

School of Theater and Dance, 133 CWM Center, Houston, TX, 77204-4016. jdemontm@central.uh.edu; www.theatredance.uh.edu; 713-743-3003; M.A. in theater or M.A. in theater for secondary educators. MFA in acting, directing, or design

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS - PAN AMERICAN

Communication Department, 1201 W. University Dr., Edinburg, TX, 78541. Timothy P. Mottet, chair, mottettp@utpa.edu; www.panam.edu; 956-665-3583; M.A. in theater

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

Department of Theater and Dance, College of Fine Arts, 1 University Station, D3900, Austin, TX, 78712-0362. inquiry@uts.cc.utexas.edu; www.finearts.utexas.edu/tad; 512-471-5793; M.A., MFA, or PhD in performance as public practice, MFA in acting, directing, drama theater for youth, playwriting, theater tech, or theatrical design

UTAH

UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY

Theater Arts Department, 4025 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322-4025. theatre@usu.edu; theatre.usu.edu; 435-797-3046; M.A. in general theater studies, MSA in design (with emphasis in scenery, costume, lighting, or advanced technical practice)

VIRGINIA

MARY BALDWIN COLLEGE

Department of Theater, Staunton, VA, 24401. tsouther@mbc.edu; www.mbc.edu; 540-887-7189; MLitt or MFA in Shakespeare in performance

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

Department of Drama, 109 Culbreth Road, PO Box 400128, Charlottesville, VA, 22904-4128. drama@virginia.edu; www.virginia.edu/drama/; 434-924-3326; MFA in acting

VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY

School of the Arts, Department of Theater, W.E. Singleton Center for Performing Arts, 922 Park Ave., Richmond, VA, 23284-2524. theatre@vcu.edu; www.vcu.edu/arts/theatre/dept; 804-828-1514; MFA in theater pedagogy or design/tech

WASHINGTON

CENTRAL WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

Department of Theater Arts, 400 E. University Way, MC 106 - MS 7460, Ellensburg, WA, 98926-7460. Scott Robinson, chair/director of summer institute; Nadine Pederson, graduate coordinator, pederson@cwu.edu; www.cwu.edu/~theatre; 509/963-1716 or 509/963-1273 (summer); M.A. in theater studies (academic year) or theater production (summer only)

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

School of Drama, Box 353950, Seattle, WA, 98195-1150. Shanga Parker, theater, uwdrama@washington.edu; depts.washington.edu/uwdrama; 206-543-5140; MFA in acting, directing, or design, PhD in theater history

WESTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

Theater Arts Department, 516 High St., Performing Arts Center 395, Bellingham, WA, 98225-9060. Deborah Greer Currier, theater arts chair, deb.currier@wwu.edu; www.wwu.edu; 360-650-3876; M.A. in theater arts

WEST VIRGINIA

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY

College of Creative Arts, Division of Theater & Dance, PO Box 6111, Morgantown, WV, 26506-6111. theatre@mail.wvu.edu; theatre.wvu.edu; 304-293-2020; MFA in acting or design/technology

WISCONSIN

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MADISON

Department of Theatre and Drama, 6173 Vilas Hall, 821 University Ave., Madison, WI, 53706-1497. Ann Archbold, chair, gradsec@theatre.wisc.edu; www.theatre.wisc.edu; 608-263-2329; MFA in acting, directing, costume design, lighting design, scene design, and theatre technology, M.A. and Ph.D. in theater research

INTERNATIONAL

NAROPA UNIVERSITY AND THE LONDON INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS

Unit 8 Latimer Road, London, W10 6RQ. inquiry@naropa.edu; www.naropa.edu or www.lispa.co.uk; +44 20 8964 9562 or 303-546-3582 (US); MFA in theater performance

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TaxProf Blog: Cain: Advice for Same-Sex Couples Filing Their 2010 Tax Returns | View Clip
03/03/2011
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© Copyright 2004-2009 by Law Professor Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved. « Rosenzweig Presents Thinking Outside the Tax Treaty Today at NYU
March 3, 2011

Cain: Advice for Same-Sex Couples Filing Their 2010 Tax Returns
The Tax Implications of Obama's Abandonment of the Defense of Marriage Act Patricia A. Cain (Santa Clara) offers her thoughts on how same-sex couples should file their 2010 tax returns in light of the DOJ's action:

Prof. Patricia Cain, Santa Clara University School of Law, said she is advising same-sex married couples who would benefit from joint filing to file original returns as "single" or "head of household" and then file amended tax returns using Forms 1040X as "married filing jointly," providing an explanation in the appropriate place on the form. Not only will that allow the taxpayers to take their case to court if their refund is denied or potentially speed up a refund if -- in the meantime -- section 3 of DOMA is held unconstitutional, but Cain said she knows of individuals in same-sex marriages in Oregon and California who have filed amended returns jointly and actually received refunds.

"I don't think anybody is looking very closely," Cain said. "The computer says everything checks out; they don't have gender-coded 1040s."

Cain said she thinks someone in the government should be considering the potential transition issues. "If all of a sudden [section 3 of DOMA] is struck down, then it means it was never constitutional," Cain said. "Only the people who will benefit will file an amended return. No one else will, and so it will be a revenue loss for the government." That is so even though the Congressional Budget Office found in 2004 that recognizing same-sex married couples as married for tax purposes would result in a net increase in federal revenue. [CBO,

The Potential Budgetary Impact of Recognizing Same-Sex Marriages (June 21, 2004).]

Cain said she believes that the Supreme Court will take up the issue and that Holder's announcement will fast-track one of the DOMA cases to the Court. The most likely candidate would be

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c4eab53ef014e8675fa18970d

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The Scroller by Peter Kavanagh | View Clip
03/03/2011
Catholic Register - Online

Peter Kavanagh has been a journalist for 25 years. He has written for the , Commonweal and The Tablet.

In a single week we watch as the Pope significantly eases an ancient antagonism and extremists escalating a deadly battle even higher.

In addition to being Pope, Benedict XVI isa noted and accomplished authorand thinker and if you thought his comments on condoms in a book length series of interviewspublished in January got people's attention that was nothing compared to the swarm of media attention he received when news was releasedthat volume 2 of his planned trilogy on the Life of Jesus of Nazarethwas to be released next week. As some like to say, the take away is that that the Jews can't be blamed for killing Christ.

It was big news and by all accountsa welcome development. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu personally wrote the Pope saying "I commend you for forcefully rejecting, in your recent book, a false charge that has been a foundation for the hatred of the Jewish people for many centuries." And Netanyahu wasn't alone in his enthusiasm or his praise. `` Elan Steinberg, vice president of the American Gathering of Holocaust Survivors and Their Descendants, said the pope's book marked "a landmark moment" in Catholic-Jewish relations. `` And The Anti-Defamation League issued a statement declaring the publication “an important and historic moment” that would ``build on Nostra Aetate``.

And there's the rub. As we all know, the Church had already spokenon the question of Jewish responsibility for the death of Christ, back in 1965 in a definitive statement flowing our of Vatican II. So, why the fuss? Father James Martin, former editor of America Magazine wrote in the “The importance, it seems to me, is fivefold.” It is worth taking the time to read, it clearly lays out why this Pope, at this time, has broken new ground in Catholic-Jewish relations. And as Martin notes, not the least of the reasons include the importance of re-iterating what we all should know and doing it in a manner, style and fashion that might be more accessible than a Vatican Document from 4 decades ago. Granted, not everyone is on board as to the import of the Papal writings. Andrew Sullivan of The Daily Dish, while acknowledging James Martin's argument, simply thinks it was the least that could be done and adds notthing to the realitionship between Jews and Catholics. But that is clearly a minority opinion.

But if the Pope was doing his bit this week for religious harmony, extremists in Pakistan went in an entirely different direction with the assasination of Shahbaz Bhatti. Bhatti was the only Christian minister in the Pakistani Cabinet and was a fierce critic of Pakistan's controversial Blasphemy law. (see the here)

World leaders, including Pope Benedict, were quick to condemn the assasination while Pakistani officialswas equally quick to suggest that this clearly religious murder “was not evidence of anti-Christian behviour” or even more strangely, suggesting the murder was actually the work of the CIAhoping to free an agent, "This murder seems to be a conspiracy of CIA and its agents to deviate the attention from the issues like Raymond Davis trial,” Hanif Jalandari, a senior official for the association of Pakistan's Islamic seminaries told Adnkronos Internationonal (AKI).”

Putting lie to the conspiracy theory were the very fears of Bhatti himself. MacLean's magazinehas an eerie account of meetings between Bhatti and Immigration Minister Jason Kenny during which Bhatti foresaw his own death and asked that Canada and other countries help his family in that eventuality. The New York Times isreporting that the State Department was so concerned that it had been trying for the past few weeks to arrange for an armoured vehicle to be put at Bhatti's disposal.

The continuing and escalating violence against Christians in Pakistan seems to have everyone outside of Pakistan on edge. The Economist Magazinethis week lays out that what's at stake is a fracturing society going down the road of Islamist fundamentalism. And the Guardianpoints out in its essay on the true nature of Blasphemy in Pakistan is now simply speaking out.

Written by Peter Kavanagh Wednesday, 23 February 2011 19:13

In three totally different arenas conversations and arguments about abortion and the way we talk about abortion are being vigorously being pursued.

The story of Linda Gibbons(see as well the most recent story in the) and the decision of the Supreme Court of Canada to hear arguments about the matter has the potential to bring one of the least talked about legal sagas of the age into public awareness. The facts are pretty straightforward. Long time pro-life activist Gibbons refuses to obey the bubble zone space around abortion clinics. Bubble Zones around abortion clinics havebeen argued in the courtsin Ontario and B.C. and are defended by pro-choice advocateson the grounds of a reasonable limit on free speech rights. For a decade and a half, this quiet spoken and seemingly harmless woman insists on her rights to free expression and has spent more than a half dozen years in total in jail as a consequence. This is a true hot button issue and the Supreme Court of Canada hearing has the potential to bring abortion once again into the mainstream public square. Ian Hunter, a former professor of law at the University of Western Ontario has written a truly fine pieceabout the Gibbons story that might make even strong individuals weep.

On a completely different note is the story of whether Canadian Pop Mega Star, Justin Bieberis pro-life. The whole ‘controversy' flows out of an interview in Rolling Stone Magazine. Bieber's thoughts  on sex without love, homosexuality and abortion are acquiring a gravitas normally reserved for philosophers such as Charles Taylor. Granted Rolling Stone magazinehas apologized for ‘editing' Bieber's comments on abortion incorrectly at least twice, but the upshot seems to be that the teen star is pro-life, even in the case of rape. This has led to some seriously interesting outbursts. Some, like John Hines, want to know why we ask Bieber tough questions (Hines' column is a hoot for a number of reasons especially his disbelief that Bieber might actually prefer Canada to the United States). Danny Groner, at figures the Rolling Stone Interview and the release of the Bieber movie is simply a good time to worry about what Bieber's fame says about society. And others just decided to nail the kid to the wall, Kathryn Olivarius of the Yale Daily Newsthinks Bieber's comments are dangerous, the Folks at The Viewsuggested that Bieber had no right to his opinions at all, and at the Toronto Star the attitude is just “leave him alone” he's a kid. The thought experiment the whole episode raises is…given how we expect celebrities to have opinions and have built an economic structure around celebrity influence in society, what is it about Bieber's views that has so many riled?

If Justin Bieber raises hard issues about acceptable views on abortion and the Linda Gibbons case raises intriguing questions about free speech for all, including pro-life folks, the real tough philosophical quandary has been provoked by Live Action'svideo stings of Planned Parenthood operations in the United States.Lila Roseis an up and comer in the pro-life world. She and her truly youthful organization have been using undercover stings (you can see examples of the video at the organization's website) to expose egregious aspects of the world of Planned Parenthood and the procurement of abortions. Some of her team's workhas led to criminal investigations, employees getting fired and the cut-off of funds to Planned Parenthood. And LifeSiteNews has reported in the past that Lila Rose and Live Action are planning on coming to Canada.

But while many pro-life groups and activists were celebrating the work of Live Action a serious question about tactics and means was being raised. “Is Lying in the pursuit of a good end justifiable”. It has turned into a fascinating debate…conducted with true intellectual vigour on the web sitePublic Discourse, reflected on by Princeton Legal Scholar and Theological heavy weight Robert Georgein Mirror of Justice, debated thoroughly on theand responded to by the good folks at Live Action. Given the stakes, given the nature of the argument, it is a debate following and taking part in.

Written by Peter Kavanagh Saturday, 12 February 2011 17:53

Sometimes the media gets two or more kicks at the same can and that clearly is the case with the ‘Confession: A Roman Catholic App' developed for the iPhone and the iPad.

Earlier this week there was a flurry of stories detailinghow the Catholic Church had approved a ‘confession app'. Developed by Patrick Leinen of LittleiApps, the BBC reported that Bishop Kevin Rhoades of the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend had given his approval to the project.

What everyone seemed to miss was that no one ever actually said that the App replaced confession. That didn't stop people from proclaiming that ‘confession app brings the catholic church into the 21st century' nor confusing non-Catholics in numerous ways as noted by Joe Carterat First Things. Cathleen Falsani of Huffington Post on the other hand surveyed the muddy watersof serious vs comic confession apps (Confession is just one of a dozen apps available that touch on the subject of confession, expiation, and forgiveness) in her essay “iConfess: Apps for Coming Theologically Clean” which raises some intriguing issues about the increasing popularity of shortcuts to wiping the slate clean.

So after a flurry of cute, bizarre and just wrong stories theVatican issued a clarification. Which of course simply led to aflood of storieswith headlines such as “Vatican Says iPhone Apps Won't Forgive Your Sins”. This of course led to a series of ‘gentle chidings' of the Church suggesting that giving people an easy way to confess might be a service, asSholto Byrnes of the New Statesmanargued in his essay “The God App: Vatican Should Rethink its Ban” Note there are a number of misconceptions flooding the headline so don't be surprised that there are a few in the piece itself.

But a number of columnists actually decided to turn the whole story on its head and used the flurry of attention to raise an intriguing point about the age of twitter and the sense of the important. Nigel Farndale of the Daily Telegraphwonders if we have just lost our sense of the importance of certain rituals and ceremonies in his essay “The Confession App Tells Us Exactly Where We're Going Wrong”. And Elizabeth Drescher, a religion writer and scholar at Santa Clara University takes the matter to a whole different and important level when she ponders what effects technology might be having on our sense of the sacred in her essay “Confession Fail: iPhone Controversy Muddies Sacramental Waters”. Both are truly worth checking out and mulling over.

Written by Peter Kavanagh Monday, 01 November 2010 19:33

Tuesday is the big day and while most observers are obsessed withhow badthe Democrat debacle might be or which of the most extreme of Tea Party candidates might actually be sent to Congress, for many Catholics and many political junkies the real question is where will theCatholic Votego in 2010.

A new pollin the New York Times has many in the Catholic WebWorld abuzz simply because it suggests that the Catholic Vote is breaking Republican big time this time out. That's asignificant shift from just two years ago. What's not clear iswhat that means if anythingwith some speculatingthat Catholics are as troubled by bad economics as everyone else.

But even if no one can know for sure what will happen to the Catholic vote, the politicking for the Catholic vote is continuing right up to the last minute, especially among Catholics. Life issue Catholicsare making much of the push by some Bishopsto make abortion and life issues The Issue. Otherstout the USCCB and its broader list of issues to be taken into account. And some are disputingthe role of Bishops in the election all together.

One of the more interesting takes on the “Catholic Vote” which has been garnering a great deal of attention is that of Joseph Bottum, Editor of First Things, who in a recent essayin the Weekly Standard argues that there is no “Catholic Vote” but Catholic values have come to be the defining values in U.S. politics. Interestingly, Bottum made thefirst part of his argument, that there is no Catholic Vote back in 2004.

Your choices as to where to follow the election results are nearly inexhaustible but the more intriguing analysis will flow more slowly. One thing ironically is that regardless of how the vote flows, the result in the House of Representatives will be a continuing Catholic leadership: both Nancy Pelosi, the current Speaker of the House and the most possible or likely successor, John Boehner are Catholic.

Written by Peter Kavanagh Tuesday, 05 October 2010 20:18

Science and Religion collide a lot these days, though clearly the tension between what Stephen Jay Gouldreferred to, as the Two Non-Overlapping Magisteriums, has existed for centuries. When the collisions occur it is the result of conflicting values as well as on theological grounds. This was made abundantly clear this week with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Medicineto Dr. Robert Evans, one of the co-creators ofIn Vitro Fertilization. On the one hand reaction around the worldseemed of a note, sheer excitement and congratulation. On the other hand, Catholic teachings and the ‘wisdom' of the Nobel Committee slammed into each other. The Church's clear stance on IVF and Robert Evans socialist politics have both long been rumouredto being behind what many expected to be a much earlier awarding of the prize.

Clearly the Church is not indifferent to the pain experienced by couples incapable of conception but as the International Federation of Catholic Medical Associationmade clear “As Catholic doctors," we at FIAMC "recognize that pain that infertility brings to a couple, but equally we believe that the research and treatment methods needed to solve the problems of infertility have to be conducted within an ethical framework which respects the special dignity of the human embryo, which is no different from that of a mature adult with a brilliant mind."

None of this can be discussed without reference to the growing number of cases involving ‘mix-ups', mistakes or possibly worse when it comes to the identity of the babies born of IVF. Recent Canadian casesare making news in Ottawa, and the problem is clearly not confined to individual doctors or to Canada and the ethical problems of IVF are compounded by this growing list of ‘mistakes'.

Nor as even the Indian newspaper The Hindu reportsare the problems as simple as any of can imagine, “the widespread use of such methods has created new ethical issues. For example, ‘rent-a-womb tourism' has become a thriving business in India, with wealthy couples from abroad paying poor women large sums of money to carry IVF embryos to full term.”

As this report from ABC newsmakes clear that Catholics are not alone in considering the Nobel winning tachnology to be a win win: “The bewildering array of options due to the IVF revolution -- from the morality of making "designer babies" to exploitation of poor women as surrogate mothers -- has created much concern and many debates among secular ethicists as well.”

Arthur Caplan, a noted American Bioethicist told the "In exploring the fundamental mechanisms of how human reproduction actually works, Edwards unleashed a social, ethical and cultural tsunami that he could not have predicted and I don't think anyone at the time could have anticipated. It opened so many doors that I'm not sure we even fully appreciate it today."

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THE PROS SHOW HOW THEY LEARNED FROM THEIR MISTAKES
03/03/2011
Sun Sentinel

No one is born an investor. Even market pros have to learn how to buy stocks and bonds, and along the way they make plenty of mistakes.

Fortunately for us, a few of today's leading money minds, from financial advisers to behavioral finance experts, agreed to share stories of their personal investing gaffes. See if you've made some of the same errors yourself and what lessons you can learn from them.

Trying to outsmart the market

When Terrance Odean, a finance professor at University of California at Berkeley, began investing, he started by trading individual stocks.

"I thought that if you wanted to invest in the stock market, that's what you did," he said.

But this was before he began studying finance. "I had not read (Harry) Markowitz," the Nobel prize-winning economist known for his work on modern portfolio theory, he said.

He added with a laugh, "I hadn't read anything."

Instead, he did what many first-timers do: He put together a portfolio of stocks that "basically were attention-grabbing names," he said.

And not surprisingly, some of his picks didn't work out.

"I had never asked myself the really pertinent question," he said. "Even if this was a good company, was the (stock) price correct?"

He added: "And who was I betting against? In the U.S., odds are the person on the other side of the trade is a professional investor. What is the chance that you know more than a professional investor?"

The lesson: Beating the market is tough to do. Most investors will do better by taking a more passive approach and owning low-cost mutual funds, which is what Odean invests in now.

Making concentrated bets

Similarly, Meir Statman, a finance professor at Santa Clara University and author of "What Investors Really Want" (McGraw-Hill, $30) thought he could outsmart the market.

But he took a slightly different approach than Odean. In the early 1980s, Statman invested in three companies on Fortune magazine's survey of the least-admired companies.

His theory was that companies that are out of favor provide the highest rate of return to investors.

"But what I discovered," he said, "is that many of those dog stocks are deservedly dog stocks. And they go from being a dog to a dead dog."

The three stocks he chose turned out to be the dead-dog kind.

The lesson: Since it's hard to single out winners from losers in the market, you want to invest in a broad array of stocks.

"Now I know how important it is to diversify," Statman said. "Even if you're going to be right, you're only going to be right in, say, 52 percent of the cases. You can't put it all on red and expect to win. You have to spread it around."

Following the crowd

You also have to think for yourself.

In her mid-20s, Judith Ward landed an administrative job at T. Rowe Price, an investment-management company. When the company decided to go public in 1986, she jumped at the chance to buy shares.

But later that year, said Ward, now a certified financial planner at T. Rowe, "all the chatter was about how capital gains tax rates are going up. I had no idea what that meant to me personally, but the general advice was: Sell your stock."

For individual stocks, capital gains taxes are charged on the profit you earn when you sell the stock. Since Ward was young and investing for the long term, the jump in tax rates then would have had little or no effect on her.

But she sold the stock anyway and still regrets it.

"I had this great opportunity to buy stock in a company, and I just sold it because of what I heard other people saying that seemed important to them," she said. "I never took the time to ask, 'What does this mean personally for me?' "

The lesson: Do your homework. Make sure to investigate whether the latest trend will really benefit you.

E-mail Carolyn Bigda at< em style="b">yourmoney @tribune.com
.

COLUMN: CAROLYN BIGDA GETTING STARTED

Copyright © 2011 Sun-Sentinel

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Two identically named day spas are sparring in court...
03/03/2011
Warren's Washington Internet Daily

Two identically named day spas are sparring in court over the removal of one's Facebook fan page. In a lawsuit filed with U.S. District Court in Albany, N.Y., the plaintiff, Albany-based Complexions Inc., is asking the court to restore its Facebook page. Facebook removed the page after the Complexions Day Spa and Wellness Center Inc., of Seal Beach, Calif., claimed its trademark had been infringed. The Albany-based spa has a trademark under the name "Complexions," whereas the California spa has a trademark under the name "ComplexionsRX," according to the lawsuit. The Albany-based spa claims that the loss of the Facebook page has caused and continues to cause damages in lost sales and marketing potential.

Furthermore, the New York spa said the defendant intentionally tried to deceive and mislead customers to become fans of the California based spa's fan page. "To my knowledge, this is the first lawsuit battling over poached Facebook fans," wrote Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law, in his technology and law blog. "I'm sure it won't be the last."

Copyright © 2011 Warren Publishing, Inc.

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20-YEAR-OLD SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY STUDENT YASER AFIFI ARRIVED IN SAN JOSE LAST NIGHT AFTER BEING IN WASHINGTON, DCHE'S SUING THE FBI FOR VIOLATING HIS CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS.
03/03/2011
NBC Bay Area News at 5 AM - KNTV-TV

THANKS, MIKE. AN ARAB-AMERICAN COLLEGE STUDENT FIND A TRACKING DEVICE ON HIS CAR AND THIS MORNING HE IS SUING THE FBI AND SHARING HIS STORY EXCLUSIVELY WITH NBC BAY AREA. 20-YEAR-OLD SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY STUDENT YASER AFIFI ARRIVED IN SAN JOSE LAST NIGHT AFTER BEING IN WASHINGTON, DCHE'S SUING THE FBI FOR VIOLATING HIS CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS. HE SAYS A MECHANIC FOUND A TRACKING DEVICE ON HIS CAR DURING AN OIL CHANGE LAST FALL. AFTER POSTING A PICTURE OF THE DEVICE ON THE INTERNET, AFIFI SAYS FBI AGENTS KNOCKED ON HIS DOOR AND THREATENED HIM WITH FEDERAL CHARGES IF HE DIDN'T GIVE IT BACK. THEY CAME WITH SUVs AND DIDN'T COME KNOCKING ON THE DOOR NICELY. THEY WERE REALLY INTIMIDATING AND KEPT TELLING ME, OH, IF YOU DON'T GIVE THE DEVICE BACK WE'LL ARREST YOU AND WHATNOT. ONCE I LOCATED THE DEVICE AND FOUND OUT WHAT IT WAS, I WANTED TO SEIZE THE MOMENT AND SEE IF WE CAN FILE A LAWSUIT. AFIFI'S LAWYERS ARE AWARE OF SEVERAL INCIDENTS SIMILAR TO WHAT HAPPENED TO AFIFI. IN HIS LAWSUIT AFIFI IS ASKING FOR AN ORDER TO BAN THE FBI FROM BEING ABLE TO PLACE GPS DEVICES ON CARS WITHOUT SEARCH WARRANTS.

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Midweek briefing ... | View Clip
03/02/2011
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review - Online

There's a single common denominator in the split federal court rulings regarding ObamaCare, says Brad Joondeph, a tax and constitutional law professor at Santa Clara University. Not one of 'em agrees that the fine proposed for not having health insurance is a "tax." And that should sink ObamaCare when, as expected, it goes before the Supreme Court. ... A group of scientists says that while a "small nuclear war" would reduce rainfall for years and lead to widespread famine and disease, a nuclear confrontation between, say, India and Pakistan, could reverse global warming. Well, there you have it -- let's save the planet by blowing up parts of it. ... The Washington Times reminds that the heightened "bloodthirstiness" of today's pirates "has not emerged from the desperation of impoverished fishermen, but from the calculated ruthlessness of organized criminal gangs who see profits in piracy." Dare we say it, but it's exactly for whom high-powered rifles with long-range scopes were made. ... After a crazy last day of February -- strong thunderstorms and early-morning temperatures in the 60s -- March indeed came in like a lamb. And as lore goes, we should expect it to go out like a lion. Perhaps the economy will be revived by those purchasing the hardware necessary to batten down the hatches.

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Calif. attorney general pushes to let gays marry now | View Clip
03/02/2011
NorthJersey.com

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California Attorney General Kamala Harris asked Tuesday that a federal appeals court lift a stay on a judge's decision declaring a voter-approved same-sex marriage ban unconstitutional.

Last week, lawyers challenging Proposition 8 also asked the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to lift the stay and allow same-sex marriages to be performed.

Same-sex marriage advocates were encouraged last week when President Obama announced that his administration would no longer defend a federal law defining marriage as between a man and a woman.

Legal experts said the president's position could strengthen the case of same-sex marriage proponents challenging Proposition 8 in federal court.

Harris' predecessor as attorney general, Jerry Brown, now governor, had also opposed the 9th Circuit's stay of U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker's decision that Proposition 8 violated constitutional law.

"For 846 days, Proposition 8 has denied equality under the law to gay and lesbian couples," Harris said. "Each and every one of those days, same-sex couples have been denied their right to convene loved ones and friends to celebrate marriages sanctioned and protected by California law."

Having a statewide elected official take such a stand sends an important signal to supporters of same-sex marriage, said Santa Clara University School of Law assistant professor Pratheepan Gulasekaram.

Former Gov. Arnold Schwarze-negger and Brown have both declined to defend Proposition 8, which won 52 percent of voters' support in 2008.

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Opinion | View Clip
03/02/2011
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review - Online

The last time we checked, President Barack Obama was the president of the Union, not a union, and Hilda Solis was secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor, not the U.S. Department of Unions. But you wouldn't know that from their public pronouncements.

One word has become emblematic of the Obama administration's behavior in the debate over health care -- deceit.

There's a single common denominator in the split federal court rulings regarding ObamaCare, says Brad Joondeph, a tax and constitutional law professor at Santa Clara University. Not one of 'em agrees that the fine proposed for not having health insurance is a "tax." And that should sink ObamaCare when, as expected, it goes before the Supreme Court.

The anti-democratic methods President Obama's union allies are using in Wisconsin testify to the crucial character of the battle being fought.

Letters to the Editor

Featured Commentary

The Latin Beat

The imaginations of Latinos in the United States and others who have interests in Latin America have gone wild in the past few weeks. Could the infectiously inspiring protests in the Middle East spread to Latin America? Is there a new model for protest and revolution that is ideal for Latinos who have voiced their disdain for their political leaders to no avail? (2011-02-27)

He undoubtedly hoped Punxsutawney Phil was correct about this winter ending early. But when the worst storm of the season dumped as much of 10 inches of snow on the city Monday night, Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl finally was forced to make good on his Super Bowl bet with Green Bay Mayor Jim Schmitt. (2011-02-27)

From 1954 to 1962 Perkins Bass served as the Republican congressman from New Hampshire. Now 98, he's the oldest former congressional member, according to the U.S. Association of Former Members of Congress. He earned the nickname "Small Mouth Bass" because he didn't talk much. (2011-02-26)

Edward Glaeser's new "Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier and Happier" (The Penguin Press) is one book you can judge by its cover. The title and cover art -- a gleaming nighttime cityscape -- convey the author's enthusiasm for his topic. (2011-02-27)

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Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities | View Clip
03/02/2011
Contra Costa Times - Online

Religious and civic leaders are meeting in Santa Clara on Sunday to have a "community conversation" as they launch a new group, the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council.

The key question the group's leaders will be discussing is: "What role can and should our diverse religious communities play in shaping life in Silicon Valley?"

Much of the dialogue will also focus on the Knight Foundation's study of the "Soul of the Community," according to co-organizer Samina Sundas.

Speakers at the event will include: Chris Block, CEO of the American Leadership Forum; Fr. Jon Pedgo, pastor of St. Julie Billiart Catholic Parish; Feeza Mohamed, a junior at Notre Dame High School and GiveLight Foundation volunteer; Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens, chief philanthropic development officer at Silicon Valley Community Foundation; and Delorme McKee-Stovall, Santa Clara County director of Human Relations.

The event is Sunday from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Mission Room at the Benson Center at Santa Clara University.

For more information, e-mail info@sivicouncil.org or call 408-596-4166.

Contact Lisa Fernandez at 408-920-5002.

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Kamala Harris asks court to let gay marriages resume | View Clip
03/02/2011
Fresno Bee - Online

Posted at 12:12 AM on Wednesday, Mar. 02, 2011

Calif. AG latest to seek resumption of gay unions

Calif. AG latest to seek resumption of gay unions

Court asked to clear way for Calif gay marriages

Court asked to clear way for Calif gay marriages

Conservatives vow to make gay marriage 2012 issue

California Attorney General Kamala Harris requested Tuesday that a federal appeals court lift a stay on a judge's decision declaring a voter- approved ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional.

Last week, lawyers challenging Proposition 8 also asked the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to lift the stay and allow same-sex marriages to be performed while the court decides the matter.

Same-sex marriage advocates were encouraged last week when President Barack Obama announced that his administration would no longer defend a federal law defining marriage as between a man and a woman.

Legal experts said the president's position could strengthen the case of same-sex marriage proponents challenging Proposition 8 in federal court.

Harris' predecessor as attorney general, now-Gov. Jerry Brown, had also opposed the 9th Circuit's stay of U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker's decision that Proposition 8 violated constitutional law.

Call Jack Chang, Bee Capitol Bureau, (916) 326-5543.

"For 846 days, Proposition 8 has denied equality under the law to gay and lesbian couples," Harris said in a news release Tuesday. "Each and every one of those days, same-sex couples have been denied their right to convene loved ones and friends to celebrate marriages sanctioned and protected by California law."

UC Hastings College of the Law professor Rory Little said Harris' opposition would make little legal impact on the case.

"It's a political statement," Little said. "It's not a very important legal statement. Legally, the position is the same as it was under Brown."

Yet having a statewide elected official take such a stand sends an important signal to supporters of same-sex marriage, said Santa Clara University School of Law assistant professor Pratheepan Gulasekaram.

Former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Brown both declined to defend Proposition 8, which won 52 percent of voters' support in 2008.

"It suggests the state of California is not going to just be neutral in this case but will take a position," Gulasekaram said.

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Kamala Harris asks court to let gay marriages resume
03/02/2011
Sacramento Bee, The

California Attorney General Kamala Harris requested Tuesday that a federal appeals court lift a stay on a judge's decision declaring a voter- approved ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional.

Last week, lawyers challenging Proposition 8 also asked the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to lift the stay and allow same-sex marriages to be performed while the court decides the matter.

Same-sex marriage advocates were encouraged last week when President Barack Obama announced that his administration would no longer defend a federal law defining marriage as between a man and a woman.

Legal experts said the president's position could strengthen the case of same-sex marriage proponents challenging Proposition 8 in federal court.

Harris' predecessor as attorney general, now-Gov. Jerry Brown , had also opposed the 9th Circuit's stay of U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker's decision that Proposition 8 violated constitutional law.

"For 846 days, Proposition 8 has denied equality under the law to gay and lesbian couples," Harris said in a news release Tuesday. "Each and every one of those days, same-sex couples have been denied their right to convene loved ones and friends to celebrate marriages sanctioned and protected by California law."

UC Hastings College of the Law professor Rory Little said Harris' opposition would make little legal impact on the case.

"It's a political statement," Little said. "It's not a very important legal statement. Legally, the position is the same as it was under Brown."

Yet having a statewide elected official take such a stand sends an important signal to supporters of same-sex marriage, said Santa Clara University School of Law assistant professor Pratheepan Gulasekaram.

Former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Brown both declined to defend Proposition 8, which won 52 percent of voters' support in 2008.

"It suggests the state of California is not going to just be neutral in this case but will take a position," Gulasekaram said.

Copyright © 2011 McClatchy-Tribune Information Services

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Kamala Harris asks court to let gay marriages resume | View Clip
03/02/2011
Sacramento Bee - Online, The

California Attorney General Kamala Harris requested Tuesday that a federal appeals court lift a stay on a judge's decision declaring a voter- approved ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional.

Last week, lawyers challenging Proposition 8 also asked the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to lift the stay and allow same-sex marriages to be performed while the court decides the matter.

Same-sex marriage advocates were encouraged last week when President Barack Obama announced that his administration would no longer defend a federal law defining marriage as between a man and a woman.

Legal experts said the president's position could strengthen the case of same-sex marriage proponents challenging Proposition 8 in federal court.

Harris' predecessor as attorney general, now-Gov. Jerry Brown, had also opposed the 9th Circuit's stay of U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker's decision that Proposition 8 violated constitutional law.

"For 846 days, Proposition 8 has denied equality under the law to gay and lesbian couples," Harris said in a news release Tuesday. "Each and every one of those days, same-sex couples have been denied their right to convene loved ones and friends to celebrate marriages sanctioned and protected by California law."

UC Hastings College of the Law professor Rory Little said Harris' opposition would make little legal impact on the case.

"It's a political statement," Little said. "It's not a very important legal statement. Legally, the position is the same as it was under Brown."

Yet having a statewide elected official take such a stand sends an important signal to supporters of same-sex marriage, said Santa Clara University School of Law assistant professor Pratheepan Gulasekaram.

Former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Brown both declined to defend Proposition 8, which won 52 percent of voters' support in 2008.

"It suggests the state of California is not going to just be neutral in this case but will take a position," Gulasekaram said.

Call Jack Chang, Bee Capitol Bureau, (916) 326-5543.

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Ivi Seeks To Stay Shutdown Order | View Clip
03/02/2011
MediaPost.com

Online video distributor Ivi on Tuesday appealed an order directing it to immediately cease distributing streams of TV shows. Ivi also is asking for a stay of the order pending appeal.

Unless the preliminary injunction is suspended, Ivi "will be irreparably harmed, having to cease its service, end its primary means of income, and address dissatisfied subscribers whose service is summarily terminated," the company argues in its legal papers.

The online video distributor also says it is likely to win on appeal.

Ivi is appealing a preliminary injunction issued last week by U.S. District Court Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald in New York. She rejected Ivi's argument that it is a "cable system" and therefore entitled under federal copyright law to a mandatory license allowing it to stream TV shows.

Ivi streams TV shows as they are being shown over-the-air in four markets: New York, Seattle, Chicago and Los Angeles. The company, which launched in September, offers nationwide subscriptions to its streams for $5 a month.

Its debut spurred a coalition of broadcasters to complain that the company infringed their copyright because Ivi lacked permission to stream shows. The dispute landed in federal court in New York, where the broadcasters sought monetary damages and an injunction ordering Ivi to stop streaming TV shows.

Ivi unsuccessfully argued that the infringement claim should be dismissed because it's entitled to a license to stream shows, under the federal Copyright Act. That statute says that cable systems are entitled to compulsory retransmission licenses under copyright law, as long as they pay a fee of around $100 a year.

But Buchwald ruled that a "common sense approach" to the copyright law's mandatory retransmission provision shows that it was not intended to apply to companies that stream TV shows online.

In addition, a separate communications law provides that cable operators must obtain broadcasters' permission to retransmit. The broadcasters did not sue under that law, but it clearly influenced the judge's decision. She wrote that Congress enacted the Copyright Act's mandatory retransmission provisions "with an understanding that the cable systems it was granting a compulsory license to would also be subject to the regulations of the FCC."

In its legal battle, Ivi drew support from a coalition of digital rights groups, including Public Knowledge and the Electronic Frontier Foundation. They argued in a friend-of-the-court brief that the law should not favor "1970s-era cable operators" over companies that use new technology to offer similar services.

But copyright expert Tyler Ochoa, a law professor at Santa Clara University, says that Buchwald's decision was "well-reasoned and highly persuasive" because Ivi lacks two characteristics of cable systems. First, the company doesn't limit its retransmissions to a limited geographic area. Secondly, it doesn't have to comply with FCC rules governing cable operators.

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Facebook Dragged Into Spa's Trademark Dispute | View Clip
03/02/2011
MediaPost.com

Like many companies hoping to tap into social media, an Albany, N.Y.-based spa named Complexions created a Facebook page in fall 2008. By early this year, the company says its page had garnered around 1,000 fans.

In January, however, Facebook allegedly shut down the Albany spa's page because a different spa with a similar name -- Complexions Day Spa, based in Seal Beach, Calif. -- complained that its right to its name was being infringed.

Now the dispute between the two Complexions has landed in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of N.Y., where the Albany spa is seeking a court order allowing it to use the name it has operated under since 1987.

In an unusual twist, the Albany spa has sued Facebook and is seeking an injunction requiring the social networking site to restore the spa's page. The spa says in its court papers that losing its Facebook page has resulted in "lost sales and marketing potential."

And in what appears to be a first, the Albany Complexions also claims in court papers that the California spa engaged in false advertising because it allegedly sent "friend" requests to the Albany spa's Facebook fans. The California spa's actions "were deliberately calculated to deceive, mislead and confuse" the Albany spa's customers, the company alleges.

While trademark disputes between companies with the same name have resulted in litigation since the earliest days of the Internet, few if any prior cases involved social-networking sites. In addition, the allegation that one company tried to lure another's Facebook fans appears to be novel, according to Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman.

Goldman also says that even if the Albany Complexions is entitled to continue using its name, it isn't entitled to a court order requiring Facebook to restore its page. The social-networking service has a constitutional right to delete whatever pages it wishes. An order directing Facebook to bring back Complexions' page "would impermissbly circumscribe the service's freedom of speech and the press," Goldman says on his

blog.

A lawyer for the California Complexions said the company had not yet been served with the lawsuit. Facebook did not respond to messages seeking comment.

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Kamala Harris asks court to let gay marriages resume | View Clip
03/02/2011
American Chronicle

By Jack Chang, The Sacramento Bee, Calif.

March 02--California Attorney General Kamala Harris requested Tuesday that a federal appeals court lift a stay on a judge's decision declaring a voter- approved ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional.

Last week, lawyers challenging Proposition 8 also asked the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to lift the stay and allow same-sex marriages to be performed while the court decides the matter.

Same-sex marriage advocates were encouraged last week when President Barack Obama announced that his administration would no longer defend a federal law defining marriage as between a man and a woman.

Legal experts said the president's position could strengthen the case of same-sex marriage proponents challenging Proposition 8 in federal court.

Harris' predecessor as attorney general, now-Gov. Jerry Brown, had also opposed the 9th Circuit's stay of U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker's decision that Proposition 8 violated constitutional law.

"For 846 days, Proposition 8 has denied equality under the law to gay and lesbian couples," Harris said in a news release Tuesday. "Each and every one of those days, same-sex couples have been denied their right to convene loved ones and friends to celebrate marriages sanctioned and protected by California law."

UC Hastings College of the Law professor Rory Little said Harris' opposition would make little legal impact on the case.

"It's a political statement," Little said. "It's not a very important legal statement. Legally, the position is the same as it was under Brown."

Yet having a statewide elected official take such a stand sends an important signal to supporters of same-sex marriage, said Santa Clara University School of Law assistant professor Pratheepan Gulasekaram.

Former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Brown both declined to defend Proposition 8, which won 52 percent of voters' support in 2008.

"It suggests the state of California is not going to just be neutral in this case but will take a position," Gulasekaram said.

Call Jack Chang, Bee Capitol Bureau, (916) 326-5543.

To see more of The Sacramento Bee, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.sacbee.com/.

Copyright (c) 2011, The Sacramento Bee, Calif.

NYSE:HRS,

A service of YellowBrix, Inc.

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Atlantic Beach rejects inclusion in Jacksonville ethics panel and policies; Neptune Beach considering | View Clip
03/02/2011
Florida Times-Union - Online

The Atlantic Beach City Commission on Monday unanimously rejected any inclusion in Jacksonville's Ethics Commission and corresponding policies, and Neptune Beach City Council members also are backing away from the prospect.

Atlantic Beach passed a resolution that states the city "will not be under the control of Jacksonville's ethics code and commission but shall be governed by its own code of ethics policy." The measure came as Jacksonville considers removing the Ethics Commission from under the Jacksonville City Council's authority, making it an autonomous body.

Atlantic Beach City Commissioner John Fletcher, who drafted the resolution, said state law already has provisions for ethics policies and laws and the coastal community needs to maintain its autonomy from Jacksonville.

"I think we need to strengthen home rule," said Fletcher. "We can govern ourself."

The Jacksonville ethics panel and considerations would involve a charter amendment that's hung up on review by the state Legislature. Even if state lawmakers approve the separation of the Ethics Commission from Jacksonville council oversight, the city would still have to approve a charter amendment to finalize such a move.

Atlantic Beach City Attorney Alan Jensen said at this stage, it's not clear how Jacksonville's Ethics Commission could end up looking after the procedural approval needed to remove the panel from City Council authority.

Still, Atlantic Beach Commissioner Carolyn Woods said inclusion in Jacksonville's ethics code would make sense because it essentially serves all of Duval County, which includes Atlantic Beach. Woods also presented a video of a remedial introduction to ethical guidelines produced by Santa Clara University in California.

"I totally understand home rule," said Woods. "I think there are remedies out there that can strengthen our ethics education, the city's accountability to its citizens and still maintain home rule."

But other commissioners were swayed by the Beaches representative on the Jacksonville City Council, Dick Brown, who sent a letter to Atlantic Beach on Monday warning that if they were to join Jacksonville's ethics code, it "could come at a price tag."

In Neptune Beach, the City Council there reviewed the possibility of joining Jacksonville's ethics code during a workshop Monday. Mayor Harriet Pruette said it doesn't seem feasible.

"Jacksonville is so big and they are layered down with a lot of government. At this point, I don't know that we need to," said Pruette.

Home rule didn't really play much of a role in Neptune Beach's decision. But Pruette said improved training would likely be the way to go.

City Attorney Patrick Krechowski agreed to research improved ethical educational options, review improving ethics code and Neptune Beach would likely agree to training by Carla Miller, ethics officer for Jacksonville, Pruette said.

"I think that all of us could use more ethics training," Pruette said.

Drew Dixon can also be reached at (904) 249-4947, ext. 6313.

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Nancy C. Unger: Wisconsin leads nation -- for better or worse | View Clip
03/02/2011
Wisconsin State Journal

Wisconsin doesn't often provide political leadership at the national level, but when it does, it's like that old nursery rhyme about the little girl with the curl right in the middle of her forehead: When it's good it's very, very good, and when it's bad it's horrid.

For a couple weeks, Americans have been following the protests in Madison. Most of the protesters oppose the proposals of their newly elected governor, Scott Walker, to curtail the power of public employee unions. They share the view of New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, who says that Walker and his backers are trying to “make Wisconsin -- and eventually, America -- less of a functioning democracy and more of a Third World-style oligarchy.”

Walker is not without his defenders, who counter that, as Wisconsin's duly elected governor, Walker has the right and the obligation to do what it takes to rein in costs. They have little sympathy for unions, denigrating them as organizations concerned only with power and with pampering their members at the cost of the common good. Union leaders, however, have offered to make economic concessions in response to the need for shared sacrifice. They point out that stripping away their organizations' collective bargaining rights would add nothing to state coffers, whose depletion will be compounded when Walker's tax breaks for business begin to take hold on July 1.

It seems that Wisconsin will lead in one way or the other in this epic battle. Either Walker will triumph and unions will lose, or the protesters will prevail and unions will retain their collective bargaining power. Similar battles have begun in Ohio, Indiana and Michigan, but eyes are on the Wisconsin showdown.

During periods of crisis in the past, Wisconsin has provided some of nation's greatest leadership -- and some of its worst.

In his three terms as governor (1900-1906), saw big business threaten the foundation of democracy. He responded by making his state a leader in the burgeoning progressive reform movement. “Fighting Bob” sought to regulate business owners like George F. Baer, who scoffed at the need for labor unions, claiming that “the rights and interests of the laboring man will be protected and cared for -- not by the labor agitators, but by Christian men to whom God has given control of the property rights of the country.”

La Follette's reforms in Wisconsin were consistent with his ultimate goal: to distribute more equitably the nation's wealth and power. His reforms included regulation of railroads and other powerful utilities, civil service reform, regulation of lobbyists, resource conservation measures, tax reform, and candidate nomination by primary election. As a U.S. senator from 1906 until his death in 1925, he continued his efforts to prevent what he termed “the encroachment of the powerful few upon the rights of the many.” Jr. was elected as his father's successor in the Senate and continued Wisconsin's reform tradition for another 21 years.

Most Americans today don't know the name La Follette, but they immediately recognize the name of the man who in 1946 ended the family's 40-year reign in the Senate: Joseph McCarthy.

McCarthy, whose insistence that communists had infiltrated America's unions as well as the State Department and the Army, provided a very different kind of national leadership. In the early 1950s McCarthy enjoyed enormous popularity. He was hailed as a hero for his aggressive efforts to ferret out the internal communist menace. He was featured on the covers of Time and Newsweek magazines and celebrated by social and political organizations nationwide for displaying the kind of toughness the country needed in the crisis of the Cold War.

Despite his short-term popularity, McCarthy's aggressive crusade exacerbated rather than solved the nation's problems. Formally censured in 1954 for bringing “dishonor and disrepute” upon the U.S. Senate, McCarthy left in his wake broken careers and damaged lives. His leadership proved an international embarrassment.

After McCarthy, Wisconsin scrambled to regain its reputation as a pioneer in democratic reforms, becoming in 1959 the first state to grant public employees the right to bargain collectively.

Wisconsin is poised once again to lead the nation. In Madison on the second floor of the Capitol rotunda, a bust of looks out over the sea of protesters. With the state and the nation at a crossroads, Wisconsin is adding another crucial chapter to its history of leadership. That history shows just how good, or just how horrid, that leadership can be.

Nancy C. Unger is associate professor of history at Santa Clara University and author of “Fighting Bob La Follette: The Righteous Reformer.” This column was provided via History News Service.

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Chromasun helps SCU go carbon-neutral | View Clip
03/02/2011
Business Review - Online

Santa Clara University is looking within when it comes to being carbon neutral by 2016.

In the coming weeks, the school and San Jose-based Chromasun Inc. will be unveiling a 120-kilowatt solar thermal installation on the rooftop of its student union building, said Joe Sugg, the university's assistant vice president for university operations.

The installation is just one component of the university's plan to source its energy needs from renewables.

The company installed and tested its technology as part of the school's energy-efficient house that took third place in the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Decathlon in 2007.

Benson Memorial Center, on the southwest corner of the campus, is home to many student activities and the single largest place on campus where people go to eat, seating about 500 people in the cafeteria as well as a cafe, Sugg said.

The Chromasun installation will use solar thermal technology to replace and augment gas as a way to provide heating for the building, 200-degree hot water and cooking needs for the dining hall. The project, being financed under a 5-year lease, will allow the university to own the system at the end of the contract. The project has a 6-year payback, Sugg said, though financial details of the lease and the project cost were not disclosed.

“Right now, we don't know of anyone that has a solar panel that creates 200-degree hot water, other than Chromasun,” said Sugg.

Chromasun's Micro-Concentrator technology uses a solar collector that concentrates sunlight by 25 times using reflective aluminum mirrors, according to its website. Enclosed in a sealed canopy, the mirrors track the sun. Its technology can deliver high temperature solar thermal heat and solar electricity.

Sugg said the university is also looking at the company's technology for its air-conditioning needs, as it is designed to drive high performance air-conditioning absorption chillers. Chromasun CEO Peter Le Lievre declined to comment for this story.

The company raised $3 million last year in institutional funding from Danish investor VKR Holding A/S, co-investors GoGreen Capital and two unnamed U.S. investors. It was also awarded a $3.2 million applied research grant from the Australian Solar Institute in 2010.

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African American Students Recognized in District Awards Ceremony | View Clip
03/02/2011
Milpitas Patch

When Black History Month arrives each February, African American students in Milpitas public schools will have something special to look forward to–being recognized for their own achievements.


On Monday, nearly 60 students walked across the Milpitas High theatre stage under the bright lights. They were treated like dignitaries with family members cheering in the audience and an all-star cast to greet them on the stage.


Principals read the names and passed out awards. The superintendent and school board members shook the students' hands. And there were some special guests– Fire Chief Brian Sturdivant , Police Chief Dennis Graham , County Board of Education trustee Leon Beauchman –and the keynote address was delivered by Charles Gary, retired principal of Milpitas High and now a lecturer at Santa Clara University. 


There is something positive to be said about the African American students who are achieving, and they need to be recognized, said Cheryl Rivera, assistant principal at Milpitas High and co-advisor to the Black Student Union.


"I wanted to have something that had meaning mid-year and a connection to Black History Month," she said. In the past, parent-run FlameKeepers, led by Demetress Morris, held ceremonies at the end-of-the-school-year for African American high school students.


African Americans make up less than 5 percent of students in the district, and total 143 at Milpitas High this year. As a group, they tend to score lower than second-language students, or English language learners, in the district, according to Rivera.


Three years ago, Rivera helped start Dream Keepers as an academic program with a vision to get more African American students in accelerated classes at Milpitas High. Being recognized for high GPAs, standardized test scores, AP and honors classes is a part of bridging the achievement gap.


The awards recognizes students for academic achievement or outstanding accomplishment.


Sarina Bolden, a student at Russell Middle School received a certificate for outstanding academic achievement. Her father, aunt and grandfather were in the audience. 


"I'm really happy that this happened," said her father Robert Bolden.




Milpitas High
Outstanding Academic Achievement
Outstanding Accomplishment


Darrien Hamberry




Yohaness Estifanos




Sydnie Turner




Bryant Canada




Brianna Gay





Kennedy Kenney





Tyrell Kirk




Anthony Axanti




Beverly Windham





Michael Hopkins




Cal Hills




Jeremy Rushing




Shanika Hampton




Armani Boutte




Taylor Lane




Christopher Arnold




Dashawn Martin




Rancho Middle
Outstanding Academic Achievement
Outstanding Accomplishment


Nathan Hirpo




Isiah Rigamaiden-Daniels




Isaiah Scott




Ayesha Yusuf




Samrawit Estifanos




Roderick Jones




Aliza Muhammad




Russell Middle




Sarina Bolden




Shari Thompson




Daryon Baynard




Kiara Turner




Nebat Ali




Burnett Elementary
Outstanding Academic Achievement
Outstanding Accomplishment


Jasmine Carter




Samara Jones




Alyse Turner




Amir Davis




Dion Leonard




Curtner Elementary




Justine Malone




Damien Walker




Shalandra Stanberry




Stephanie Harris




Willie Marquice Wiley




Pomeroy Elementary




Nathan Mulugeta




Sarah Mulugeta




Natalie Penrose




Jalyn Boutte




Randall Elementary




Mariyah Banks




Emmanuel Hibbert




Jazmen Edwards




Rose Elementary




Brandy Redic




Sinnott Elementary




Bobby Banks




Cyann Anderson




Hibo Osmon




Spangler Elementary




Kianna Taylor




Reginald Barr




Weller Elementary




Allyah Villiados




Kareem Bailey-Longstreth




Tariq Bracey




Tyree Bracey




Zanker Elementary




Mary Tewelde




Helen Zewdu




Morgan Conyers


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This Was Printed From Silicon Valley / San Jose Business Journal | View Clip
03/02/2011
Business Review - Online

Santa Clara University is looking within when it comes to being carbon neutral by 2016. Read more

Shana Lynch

Assistant Managing Editor

Cinequest kicks off Tuesday. The two-week film festival is expected to draw about 90,000 people into downtown San Jose between March 1 and March 13. Read more

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Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities | View Clip
03/02/2011
San Jose Mercury News - Online

Religious and civic leaders are meeting in Santa Clara on Sunday to have a "community conversation" as they launch a new group, the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council.

The key question the group's leaders will be discussing is: "What role can and should our diverse religious communities play in shaping life in Silicon Valley?"

Much of the dialogue will also focus on the Knight Foundation's study of the "Soul of the Community," according to co-organizer Samina Sundas.

Speakers at the event will include: Chris Block, CEO of the American Leadership Forum; Fr. Jon Pedgo, pastor of St. Julie Billiart Catholic Parish; Feeza Mohamed, a junior at Notre Dame High School and GiveLight Foundation volunteer; Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens, chief philanthropic development officer at Silicon Valley Community Foundation; and Delorme McKee-Stovall, Santa Clara County director of Human Relations.

The event is Sunday from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Mission Room at the Benson Center at Santa Clara University.

For more information, e-mail info@sivicouncil.org or call 408-596-4166.

Contact Lisa Fernandez at 408-920-5002.

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Midweek briefing ...
03/02/2011
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

There's a single common denominator in the split federal court rulings regarding ObamaCare, says Brad Joondeph, a tax and constitutional law professor at Santa Clara University. Not one of 'em agrees that the fine proposed for not having health insurance is a "tax." And that should sink ObamaCare when, as expected, it goes before the Supreme Court. ... A group of scientists says that while a "small nuclear war" would reduce rainfall for years and lead to widespread famine and disease, a nuclear confrontation between, say, India and Pakistan, could reverse global warming. Well, there you have it -- let's save the planet by blowing up parts of it.

... The Washington Times reminds that the heightened "bloodthirstiness" of today's pirates "has not emerged from the desperation of impoverished fishermen, but from the calculated ruthlessness of organized criminal gangs who see profits in piracy." Dare we say it, but it's exactly for whom high-powered rifles with long-range scopes were made. ... After a crazy last day of February -- strong thunderstorms and early-morning temperatures in the 60s -- March indeed came in like a lamb. And as lore goes, we should expect it to go out like a lion. Perhaps the economy will be revived by those purchasing the hardware necessary to batten down the hatches.

Copyright © 2011 Tribune-Review Publishing Co.

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THIS 1 % OF WEALTHY ELITE AMERICANS LOBBYISTS HUSTLED AWAY $140 BILLION IN U.S. TAX ENTITLEMENT$ WHILE THE REST OF MIDDLE~CLASS AND POORER AMERICANS CAN ALL GO ..... | View Clip
03/02/2011
Boston Indpendent Media Center

SHAME ON THESE SELFISH WEALTHY ELITE AMERICAN'S WHO CONTINUE LOOKING PAST OUR OWN COUNTRIES BORDERS 2 ASSIST WITH U.$ TAX FREE $ ...

WHILE BILL GATES & WARREN BUFFET CURE POLIO & OTHER HEALTH ISSUES INTERNATIONALLY WITH THESE MULTI~BILLION$ TAX~FREE FOUNDATION$, middle~class & poorer little American's GO WITHOUT HEALTH~CARE, DENTAL CARE AND LEGAL PROTECTIONS..ETC..

EVERYDAY AMERICANS ACROSS OUR WEALTHY ELITE'S COUNTRY HEAR, SEE AND READ ABOUT ALL VARIOUS TYPES OF TELEVISION & NEWSPAPER REPORTS CONCERNING THE TREMENDOUS CURRENT FINANCIAL NEEDS THAT OUR USA MIDDLE~CLASS & POORER AMERICAN FAMILIES ARE IN NEED OF?

WE HEAR ABOUT THIS CURRENT WEALTHY ELITE RUN AND CONTROLLED GOVERNMENT THAT EVEN IS THREATENING TO SHUT OFF HEAT AND ELECTRIC FOR OUR POOREST little citizens THIS WINTER ?

CURRENTLY AMERICA STILL HAS THESE ELITE BILLIONAIRE SLU$H FOUNDATION ENTITLEMENT'S

THAT ARE TAKING AWAY HUNDREDS OF BILLION$ OF OUR U.S. TAX $$ OUT OF OUR COUNTRY FOR FAR

FAR AWAY LOCALS (AROUND THE WORLD) THAT ARE ONLY REPLICATING CHARITY WORK THAT OUR AMERICAN GOVERNMENT IS ALREADY DOING INTERNATIONALLY !!!

OBVIOUSLY BY THE ARTICLE WRITTEN BELOW, OUR COUNTRY OF THE WEALTHY ELITE'S ARE NOT ALL

ON THE SAME PAGE WITH THEY'RE COUNTRIES PRIORITIES IN VARIOUS AREAS ?

THE BILL AND MELINDA GATES FOUNDATION HAS PROMISED TO GIVE AWAY OVER 10 BILLION AMERICAN TAX FREE $$ TO THE INTERNATIONAL WORLD FOR THEIR HEATH CONCERNS,AND OUR

GOVERNMENT IS SHORT MONIES TO EVEN PROPERLY CONDUCT OUR INTERNATIONAL FOREIGN POLICY WORK ??

NO,THESE TAX FREE USA FOUNDATIONS ARE TAKING VALUABLE TAX FREE AMERICAN $$ OUT OF OUR BORDERS WHEN THESE TAX EXEMPT $$ SHOULD ONLY BE BEING USED WITHIN OUR COUNTRY FOR

ALL AMERICAN'S & THE GOVERNMENT TO BENEFIT FROM.

WE HAVE TENS OF MILLIONS OF OUR HURTING MIDDLE~CLASS & POORER USA FAMILIES THAT ARE JUST WANTING TO SURVIVE THIS WINTER AND BEYOND WHO SHOULD BE THE ONLY FOCUS TODAY

OF ALL OUR COUNTRIES VAST TAX~FREE NON~ PROFIT FOUNDATIONAL U.S. RESOURCES !!!

LAWYERS FOR POOR AMERICANS WILL CONTINUE SINGING OUT ABOUT THE BILL AND MELINDA GATES FOUNDATION AND ANY OTHER U.S.TAX FREE FOUNDATION'S FUTURE OUT OF THE COUNTRY

CHARITY WORK$ THAT CONTINUE REPLICATING OUR OWN GOVERNMENTS GENEROUS INTERNATIONAL CHARITY THAT DIRECTLY CHEAT OUR POORER CITIZENS OF VITAL NEEDED SERVICES ...

IF THESE BILLIONAIRE ELITE WANT TO OFFER THE INTERNATIONAL POOR COMMUNITY THEIR OWN TAXED BILLION$ INSTEAD OF OUR COUNTRIES TAX FREE AMERICAN $$, LAWYERS FOR POOR AMERICANS WILL APPLAUD THEIR EFFORTS !!!

BILL GATES AND WARREN BUFFETT ARE RUNNING AROUND THE WORLD ATTEMPTING TO GET OTHER ELITE BILLIONAIRES TO PROMISE TO GIVE AWAY THEIR VAST FORTUNES TO CHARITY WHEN THEY DIE,

AND THEY CONTINUE HUSTLING AWAY AMERICAN TAX FREE $$ OUT OF OUR AMERICAN poorest's USABILITY ???

LAWYERS FOR POOR AMERICANS WILL ALWAYS HAVE SERIOUS ISSUES WITH our little American TAX $$ THAT CONTINUE BEING LOST OUT OF COUNTRY WITH THESE TAX FREE SLU$H FUND FOUNDATION OPERATIONS ...

WE ALL HAVE TO JUST MARVEL AT THE BILL AND MELINDA GATES TAX FREE FOUNDATION'S INTEREST IN ASSISTING THE INTERNATIONAL WORLD'S NEEDS WITH ALL OUR AMERICAN TAX FREE $$, OVER THE DIRE NEEDS OF ALL OUR fellow little Americans NEEDS ???

THE REAL ISSUE HERE IS HOW THESE BILLIONAIRE USA ELITE WHO HAVE ACCUMULATED THESE VAST FORTUNE'S IN AMERICAN TAX FREE $$ CAN EVEN ATTEMPT TO GET ALL OF US little Americans TO BUY INTO THEIR VARIETY OF PHONEY EXCUSES FOR THIS OBVIOUS AND BLATANT LAPSE OF OUTRIGHT NEGLECT AND REAL CONCERN IN NOT DELEGATING ALL OF THEIR (U.S.) TAX~FREE FOUNDATIONS 2 IN COUNTRY CONTRIBUTION$ IN THIS TIME OF NATIONAL NEED ....

BOSTON GLOBE

KERRY SEEKS NEW MONEY FOR DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION IN MIDDLE EAST

By Farah Stockman, BOSTON GLOBE STAFF

Senator John Kerry today unveiled plans to offer financial assistance to promote democracy and reforms in the Arab world.

Although he did not put a dollar figure on the amount he is seeking, the Massachusetts Democrat called for "significant financial commitment" of new money to be earmarked for economists, election experts, and aid to people in the Arab world who are pushing for a historic transformation of their region.

“Events this powerful demand a response of equal power," Kerry said in remarks prepared for delivery in his capacity as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. "Our commitment now to the ordinary people who are risking their lives to win human rights and democracy will be remembered for generations in the Arab world. We have to get this moment right. We are working here in the Senate with colleagues on both sides of the aisle to create a package of financial assistance to help turn the new Arab awakening into a lasting rebirth."

Kerry was speaking at a hearing about the State Department's budget at a time when Republicans have vowed to cut foreign aid funding. But he said the aid package has bipartisan support.

"We have not worked out the numbers or the details yet, but I am convinced a significant financial commitment by the US to assist in this monumental and uplifting transformation is key to its long-term outcome and our relationship to it," he said. “I understand that we face a budget crisis in our own country. But we can either pay now to help brave people build a better, democratic future for themselves or we will certainly pay later with increased threats to our own national security."

But Kerry did not say how the new fund would relate to programs that are already in the State Department budget for promoting democracy and reform in the Middle East, such as the Middle East Partnership Initiative and contributions to the National Endowment for Democracy.

It is unclear what impact US aid will have at this stage on people who have already toppled governments of Tunisia and Egypt, and appear to be on the verge of driving Libya's Muammar Qaddafi from power.

Kerry spoke before Secretary of State Hillary Clinton defended the State Department's 2011 budget request.

Kerry also urged consideration of a no-fly zone over Libya, where Qaddafi has attacked protesters with militias backed by helicopters and warplanes.

LAWYERS FOR POOR AMERICANS IS A INDEPENDENT VOLUNTEER WWW LOBBY THAT SINGS OUT FOR OUR AMERICAN MIDDLE~CLASS & POORER AMERICANS LIVING IN OUR WEALTHY ELITE'S COUNTRY.

WE CAN BE FOUND WITH ANY WEB SEARCH ENGINE BY OUR NAME,TELEPHONE NUMBER OR E MAIL ADDRESS.

GOOGLE,YAHOO,AOL,MSN,BING..ETC..ALL CARRY OUR PREVIOUS WRITTEN COMMENTARY STUFF IN VARIOUS DIFFERENT LISTINGS.

WE ENJOY BRINGING ALL our fellow little people THE GOOD LIFE ON THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY OF THE WORLD'S WIDEST WEB.

lawyersforpooreramericans (at) blogspot.com

(OUR CURRENT BLOG HOME ON THE WWW)

424-247-2013

lawyersforpooreramericans (at) gmail.com

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INDEPENDENT AMERICAN VOTERS,

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JDHS grad places second in national poster contest | View Clip
03/02/2011
Capital City Weekly - Online

JUNEAU - Juneau-Douglas High School graduate Rachel Donohoe won second place in the national Engineering Education Service Center (EESC) fall 2010 poster contest. Donohoe is a freshman at Santa Clara University's Engineering School.

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Santa Clara University Professor Named Google Science Communication Fellow | View Clip
03/01/2011
EnvironmentalExpert.com

SANTA CLARA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Santa Clara University's Civil Engineering Associate Professor Edwin Maurer will join a world class team of scientists and educators at Google headquarters this summer to develop ways to communicate the science of climate change more effectively. Google selected Maurer to be one of the 21 Google Science Communication Fellows because of his extensive research on the impact of climate change on water resources.

Maurer joined Santa Clara University in 2003 and teaches courses including hydraulics, hydrology, and sustainable water resources development. He first studied climate change and sea level rise and impacts on the San Francisco Bay Area in 1989. During the past decade, most of his research has focused on translating global climate model output to local and regional scales, where Maurer assesses projected impacts on water resources. He also contributed dozens of projections of global climate change for a Web-based tool called Climate Wizard that provides the general public with simple analyses and innovative graphics that convey how climate has and is projected to change within specific geographic areas around the world.

In June, Maurer and the 20 other fellows will head to Google's campus in Mountain View, Calif. for a workshop, which will integrate hands-on training and brainstorming on topics of technology and science communication.

“I'm looking forward to meeting and working with such an interesting and diverse group of scientists to refine our skills for communicating the science related to climate change and its impacts in our classrooms and in our communities,” says Maurer.

Following the workshop, fellows will be given the opportunity to apply for grants to put their ideas into practice. Those with the most impactful projects will be given the opportunity to join a Linblad Expeditions & National Geographic trip to the Arctic, the Galapagos, or Antarctica as a science communicator. More information about the program can be found on Google's blog.

About Santa Clara University

Santa Clara University is a comprehensive Jesuit, Catholic university located 40 miles south of San Francisco in California's Silicon Valley. Santa Clara offers its more than 8,800 students rigorous undergraduate programs in arts and sciences, business, and engineering, plus master's degrees in a number of professional fields, law degrees, and engineering and theology doctorates. Distinguished by one of the highest graduation rates among all U.S. master's universities, Santa Clara educates leaders of competence, conscience, and compassion grounded in faith-inspired values. Founded in 1851, Santa Clara is California's oldest operating institution of higher education. For more information, see www.scu.edu.

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2011 California Lawyer Attorneys of the Year | View Clip
03/01/2011
California Lawyer

In naming the California Lawyer Attorneys of the Year, we recognize lawyers throughout the state whose outstanding work had a significant impact in 2010. They include state and federal government attorneys, law professors, public-interest lawyers, and attorneys from large international law firms. Their practice areas range from antitrust law and civil rights to intellectual property and transactional law. Their victories include: winning an appellate court ruling to zone land for affordable housing, achieving the first successful court challenge to the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy, and obtaining a $1.3 billion jury award in a copyright infringement case. The awards identify 27 achievements in 23 areas of legal practice, reflecting the breadth and depth of the work performed by California lawyers. Congratulations to all the winners.

Last July, Alioto won a unanimous decision by the state Supreme Court reversing the lower courts and narrowing the availability of the pass-on defense under California's antitrust law, the Cartwright Act. In

In addition, the court held that the pass-on defense did not defeat a claim under the Unfair Competition Law (UCL), which requires that plaintiffs must have lost money or property to have standing. Pfizer contended that the plaintiff pharmacies suffered no harm because they recovered any overcharges when they resold drugs to their customers. But Alioto argued successfully that whether the plaintiffs eventually recouped some or all of the money only reflected the scope of available remedies. Finally, the decision clarified that plaintiffs can seek an injunction under the UCL even if they aren't entitled to restitution, which had been an open question since voters amended the law in 2004. Consumer groups anticipate that the ruling will encourage more retailers in California to file price-fixing suits against manufacturers.

In August, Eisenberg and Motz won an important ruling by the Ninth Circuit that a profit-pooling scheme between three Southern California supermarket chains violated section 1 of the Sherman Act, and is not immunized by the nonstatutory labor exemption (

In a second case, initiated in 2009 by Foote and handled by Eisenberg, California alleged that a cosmetics company violated the state's antitrust law, the Cartwright Act, by forbidding resellers to sell its products below prices set by the manufacturer (

Even with 44 years in practice under his belt, 2010 stands out as a good year for Falk at the Ninth Circuit. In September on behalf of Autodesk, he won a major victory for copyright owners when the court held in

Civil Rights

Thomas Goldstein spent 24 years in prison for a murder he did not commit, a victim of Los Angeles County's infamous jailhouse informant scandal of the 1980s. A grand jury report in 1990 found that law enforcement throughout the county had provided incriminating information to numerous informants who used it to create stories of jailhouse confessions. But Goldstein's 2004 release from prison only began a new legal battle. Kaye and McLane brought a civil rights action on his behalf against Los Angeles County and the city of Long Beach. Litt signed on in 2008, lending his considerable civil rights experience to help craft a legal strategy for the postexoneration civil suit that succeeded where so many others fail: In June the city agreed to pay Goldstein $7.95 million, the largest pretrial settlement for wrongful imprisonment in state history. Along the way, the team persuaded a federal judge to give it unprecedented access to secret grand jury testimony to bolster Goldstein's case. The materials showed that the lone witness identifying Goldstein not only had recanted but also said that police pointed out Goldstein to him as the alleged murderer in a photo lineup. The attorneys are appealing Los Angeles County's dismissal from the matter.

In July 2008 Eisenberg won the first ruling in the nation against the federal government's secret domestic surveillance program, when District Judge Vaughn Walker decided that the state secrets privilege is preempted by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act

The case began in 2006 when Eisenberg agreed to represent two Oregon attorneys for the foundation who claimed that the government had illegally wiretapped them in 2003 and 2004 under the National Security Agency's then-secret Terrorist Surveillance Program. When Eisenberg filed the complaint, he included a copy of a top-secret document inadvertently turned over by the government; the plaintiffs argued that it proved the surveillance had been warrantless. But the document was sealed after the government asserted the state secrets privilege.

In March 2010 Walker ruled that the plaintiffs, using public information, had established standing on their FISA claim and a prima facie case of electronic surveillance. He granted their motion for summary judgment on the issue of liability, and nine months later awarded $40,800 in damages and $2.5 million in fees to their attorneys. Eisenberg, who worked more than 2,000 hours on the case, was awarded $1.24 million of that amount.

An eye-catching $203 million class action restitution award against Wells Fargo Bank capped two and a half years of litigation over manipulation of overdraft processing and fees. The bank created a bookkeeping practice that had what District Judge William Alsup called a "draconian impact" to "turn what would ordinarily be

Prosecuting what was, at the time, the largest single gang indictment in U.S. history took coordination, tenacity, and lots of oversight. Hernandez led a team that took on 102 defendants from the Florencia 13 gang over three years. Florencia allegedly controlled drug trafficking in areas south of Los Angeles, but gang members also were charged with making unprovoked attacks on African Americans seen in their neighborhoods. The case was later broken up into a series of six indictments and multiple trials, and two of those culminated in 2010 with the sentencing of more than a dozen defendants. Hernandez and Rosenberg led the prosecution of eleven defendants, joined by Assistant U.S. Attorney

Although hundreds of state and federal prosecutors were found by judges to have committed misconduct over a twelve-year period, only six were ever disciplined by the State Bar of California. Such findings in a landmark report produced last fall by the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law and the Veritas Initiative prompted the bar to undertake a thorough reexamination of the issue of prosecutorial misconduct. Ridolfi and Pulitzer Prizewinning reporter

Press accounts of prosecutorial misconduct in Santa Clara County preceded the report, but Ridolfi looked beyond the local issue. The report's power was its broad look at how misconduct allegations against prosecutors slip through the cracks statewide. The State Bar is currently reviewing allegations of misconduct against 130 prosecutors--both county and federal--identified in the report, according to Cydney Batchelor, deputy trial counsel for the bar. The bar plans to step up efforts to educate prosecutors about its discipline process, she says, and may change practices in the future.

Allen, Paradis, and Smith secured a $1.1 billion settlement--the largest of its kind in the nation--from the California Department of Transportation, pledged for upgrading access for people with disabilities. The settlement resolves two class actions against Caltrans alleging it denied effective access to 2,500 miles of sidewalk, overpasses and underpasses, and commuter parking facilities. Caltrans agreed to improve its sidewalks and facilities over the next 30 years by removing barriers, resurfacing uneven and broken pavement, and upgrading and installing curb ramps. Caltrans must also follow federal and state accessibility guidelines when undertaking new construction. The work on improvements began in July, with an initial funding of $25 million that will be stepped up over time. The trio of attorneys partnered on the settlement with the AARP Foundation, based in Washington, D.C.

Rhodes and Mintz brokered a record-breaking deal to resolve claims that CVS Pharmacy Inc. turned a blind eye to illegal repeat sales of a key ingredient used in methamphetamine production. Last year, the retail chain agreed to pay a $75 million penalty and forfeit $2.6 million in profits--the largest civil penalty ever obtained under the federal Controlled Substances Act. Mintz started an investigation of CVS based on arrests of "smurfers" (people who repeatedly bought small amounts of cold medicine containing pseudoephedrine, sometimes wiping the shelves clean) made by the Drug Enforcement Administration, the California Bureau of Narcotics Enforcement, and the Los Angeles Interagency Metropolitan Police Apprehension Crime Task Force. Mintz burrowed into the civil arm of the case, and Rhodes joined to handle the criminal investigation. They proved that smurfers specifically targeted CVS because of its lax selling practices. Under a nonprosecution agreement, CVS acknowledged criminal liability and agreed to change its tracking practices for drug sales nationwide.

In July Crowley, Needham, Healy, and Thamer won a $676.8 million jury award against a nursing home chain by arguing that residents there simply didn't get what they paid for: quality care (

The complicated six and a half month trial included 129 motions, twelve writs, and two appeals. It highlighted evidence that state inspectors had found Skilled Healthcare deficient in 84 surveys, below the minimum staffing level on more than 500 days, and responsible for at least 1.2 million violations--at a potential cost of $500 each in statutory fines. Two months after the verdict, Skilled Healthcare agreed to pay $50 million in cash settlements, along with the $12.8 million cost of complying with an earlier injunction. The agreement helps the company avoid bankruptcy and continue to provide housing for its residents. A third-party monitor will ensure that the facilities' staffing levels meet the mandated minimum, as ordered by the court at the urging of Humboldt County District Attorney

In his second big win before the U.S. Supreme Court, Richland defended a city's right to monitor racy text messages sent by its police officers over city-issued pagers--even though the police department had, on an informal basis, allowed officers to send personal messages (

Last fall, in what the Hollywood Reporter described as the largest judgment ever obtained in a "Hollywood accounting" lawsuit, Conn and Silberfeld won a $269.4 million jury verdict--plus $50 million in prejudgment interest--against Walt Disney Co. on behalf of a British production company. In March 1999 Celador International agreed to share with Disney and its subsidiaries--ABC Television, Buena Vista Television, and Valleycrest Productions--half of whatever U.S. profits were made from the hit TV game show

In one of the year's most closely watched environmental decisions, the California Supreme Court struck down an air district's 2004 approval of a plan to retool an oil refinery in Wilmington, a small town in Los Angeles County. The decision is likely to have ramifications reaching far beyond Southern California, since

It's a rare case that attracts amicus briefs on behalf of nearly 50 law firms, but that's what happened in

Although the State Bar had proposed changes in the Rules of Professional Conduct to deal with discipline in this area, after this ruling last April it backed off--effectively leaving it to the courts to refine the standards for ethical screens. Given the frequent movement of lawyers between law firms and from government to private practice, the

Liebert, chief counsel of The Assembly Judiciary Committee , and Gershenzon, staff counsel for the group, accomplished a rare feat last year when, in just a few months, they turned a set of task force recommendations into meaningful legislation. Their marching orders came from the Elkins Family Law Task Force, 38 legal experts from the bench and bar who were charged with proposing ways to make family court proceedings more efficient, fair, and accessible to litigants as directed by an earlier California Supreme Court decision (

Liebert and Gershenzon then worked quickly with legislators and staff as well as representatives of various affected groups to develop and pass a key bill to codify revolutionary changes for family law practice in the state. AB 939, enacted in September, for the first time provides family law litigants with a meaningful right to present live testimony; establishes procedures allowing judges to control the manner and pace of family law cases; and makes critical changes in the award of attorneys fees. Liebert and Gershenzon also helped formulate AB 1050, passed in August, which allows children age 14 and older to testify in custody and visitation proceedings.

Clements won a unanimous ruling from the California Supreme Court that allows local governments to hire private counsel on a contingency basis to pursue complex litigation (

In November, Schulman and Weng-Gutierrez won a unanimous ruling at the state Supreme Court for their successful defense of a law that allows undocumented immigrant students to pay lower, in-state tuition fees at public colleges and universities if they have attended a California high school for three years. The plaintiffs--42 out-of-state students who are U.S. citizens--argued that the three-year attendance rule in the California Immigrant Higher Education Act (Cal. Gov. Code § 68130.5) is really just a substitute residency requirement that favors undocumented students. Furthermore, they said, it violates a federal prohibition on postsecondary educational benefits for undocumented immigrants in some cases. But Schulman and Weng-Gutierrez maintained that California's education law did not violate the rights of nonresidential students under the privileges or immunities clause of the 14th Amendment, nor was the statute preempted by federal law (

After an epic struggle as dramatic as the final day of golf's Ryder Cup, Bunsow and his team from Howrey ended a lengthy patent fight on behalf of client Acushnet Co. over its Titleist ProV1 ball, used by golfers around the world. Brought into the case in 2009 after a jury verdict in favor of rival firm Callaway Golf Co., Bunsow first persuaded the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit to send the case back for a retrial in Delaware. There he prevailed after a five-day district court trial in March that could have cost Acushnet $250 million in damages. The jury found for Acushnet, concluding that the patents owned by Callaway were invalid. The victory was a welcome relief to Joseph J. Nauman, Acushnet's general counsel. "It wasn't an easy case to present to the jury," he says. Bunsow also notched a second win of note in 2010 when he successfully defended DuPont Air Products NanoMaterials in a patent dispute with Cabot Microelectronics Corp. over materials used in making semiconductors. Bunsow shared lead trial counsel duties in that case with

Howard and New York – based

Last November, Faer, Parks, and Rosenbaum secured a landmark settlement in a class action alleging that youths detained at a complex of six Los Angeles County probation camps were denied a constitutionally adequate education. The suit alleged that teachers at Camp Challenger were unqualified and frequently missing in action; that many teens who graduated were still unable to read or write; and that some detainees were confined to solitary cells with no meaningful instruction, not even textbooks. According to the complaint, the teens were punished when they asked for educational help or textbooks.

With assistance from

Last spring Marcantonio won a major victory for affordable housing advocates when an Alameda County Superior Court judge struck down the city of Pleasanton's voter-approved housing cap. The win puts local governments on notice that their development strategies must comply with the state's affordable housing law. Marcantonio argued that the East Bay community's flat cap of 29,000 housing units violated California's requirement that the city build its "fair share" of affordable housing. The severe imbalance between commercial development and affordable housing forces tens of thousands of Pleasanton workers to commute by car from outlying areas, exacerbating the city's greenhouse gas emissions.

Marcantonio filed suit in 2006 on behalf of the environmental advocacy group Urban Habitat and a local schoolteacher, after the city reneged on its promise to zone land for new low-income units. In 2009 Attorney General Jerry Brown intervened, citing concerns over the strict nature of the ban and its environmental implications, in what appears to be the first time the AG's office has stepped in to enforce the state's affordable housing statute. In July, Pleasanton agreed to revoke the cap, implement a plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and zone land near the city's BART station for new affordable housing units. The case was proved with the help of new research on the need for conveniently located low- and middle-income housing, conducted by Marcantonio and his colleague

After 15 years on the case, Leighton won what is believed to be the first settlement ever in a lawsuit challenging the state secrets privilege. In 1994 Leighton filed suit on behalf of a former agent of the Drug Enforcement Administration, alleging violation of his Fourth Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure (

A federal court dismissed the case in 2004; but after three years the Court of Appeals reinstated claims against one defendant, ruling that Horn had alleged sufficient facts to survive a motion to dismiss even without the classified documents. Although the DOJ reasserted the state secrets privilege, in March 2010 it finalized an agreement to settle the case for $3 million.

Working with Public Counsel's

Last October, LAUSD broadened the settlement class to protect students at up to 45 schools that the district determines would be disproportionately harmed by teacher layoffs. The superior court finalized the landmark agreement in January; United Teachers Los Angeles filed a notice of appeal in February. Members of the MoFo team include associates

Six years of pro bono work paid off for Woods and the team of attorneys he led to win the first case facially challenging the constitutionality of the "don't ask, don't tell" act banning gays and lesbians from serving openly in the military (

Arguing before the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, Leyton successfully defended a critical district court ruling that halted state plans to cut the wages of Medicaid caregivers providing in-home services for elderly and disabled Californians (

In one fell swoop last summer, Intel Corp. filled two gaping holes in its business model by acquiring Infineon Technologies' wireless chip unit and McAfee Inc., one of the world's leading Internet security companies. Morrison & Foerster's Townsend was at the helm as chief negotiator for Intel on these deals, which gave the Santa Clarabased company mobile connectivity tools and the software to make them safe. Some observers believed Intel, despite its status as the world's largest chip manufacturer, had fallen behind in these key technology areas as its core semiconductor business slowed.

Structuring those acquisitions--which were among the year's biggest at about $1.4 billion (for Infineon's Wireless Solutions Business Unit) and $7.68 billion (for McAfee)--required Townsend to coordinate dozens of Morrison & Foerster attorneys over just a few weeks in a variety of practices, including corporate and securities, employee benefits and competition, real estate, tax, intellectual property, and antitrust law.

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Editor's Note | View Clip
03/01/2011
California Lawyer

Lawyers mess up all the time. And if the mess-up is big enough or dramatic enough or stupid enough, chances are you'll read about it--if not here, then in some other publication. (Meanwhile, for garden-variety blunders, check out our Discipline--a.k.a. Schadenfreude--section, which our reader surveys tell us remains extremely popular.)

However, once every twelve months when we select our lawyers of the year winners, we give ourselves permission to speak only about the triumphs of the legal profession. And when we do, we feel better for it.

This is our 15th annual California Lawyer Attorneys of the Year Awards issue, and this time around we reviewed more than 200 nominations, ultimately singling out 45 lawyers in 23 practice areas. As our managing editor,

Rigorous fact checking is, of course, essential. But every year it seems there's at least one case we can't possibly ignore. This year it was Oracle's software piracy suit against SAP AG, which drew a mind-boggling $1.3 billion jury verdict. We're also fond of Davids who go up against Goliaths, and in that category the clear winner in 2011 is Brian C. Leighton, a sole practitioner out of Clovis who persevered for 15 years to reach the first-ever settlement with the federal government in a state secrets case. (The story behind that litigation ["The Coffee Table with Ears"] made its way onto our July cover.) And then there are the lawyers we recognize whose work went largely unheralded--lawyers like Drew Liebert and Leora Gershenzon. As attorneys for the State Assembly's Judiciary Committee in Sacramento, they helped turn a set of task force recommendations into laws that promise to revolutionize the way California's family courts operate. (We'll run a feature story on that topic later this year.)

Congratulations to these and to the rest of our 2011 CLAY Award winners!

Also this month, Santa Clara University School of Law professor

Such vignettes hardly reinforce the celebratory tone of our CLAY Awards issue. But that's OK, because after you read all the nice things we have to say about our winners, we don't want you to think we've lost our edge.

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George Watkins: Palma to take SCCAL challenge | View Clip
03/01/2011
Salinas Californian - Online, The

Think what you might about the Santa Cruz Coast Athletic League but it has been, and probably still is, best known for boys basketball.

It's a league full of dominating basketball teams, standout players, rich history and legendary coaches.

There was the Bill Warmerdam coached-Aptos teams of the 1980s (the Mariners reached the state title game in 1986), the Pete Newell Jr. Santa Cruz High powerhouses of the 1990s, including his state championship team (35-1) in 2005, and the Mike Gruber-coached Harbor squads covering most of the past three decades, including a 28-0 regular-season record in 1993.

Palma will get a chance to test that SCCAL tradition tonight at 5:30 p.m. when it faces SCCAL champion Santa Cruz at Menlo School in affluent Atherton

(hometown of Willie Mays) in a Central Coast Section Division IV semifinal.

The Chieftains have fared well against SCCAL schools since those heated conflicts with Aptos during the 1980s, and particularly in CCS playoff contests.

Palma is 7-0 against SCCAL schools in the playoffs since 1991.

The last time the Chieftains lost to an SCCAL team in post-season was to Aptos in 1987.

Not sure if that was the famous confetti throwing incident where the wife of a former Palma coach threw a fistful of confetti at one of the officials after the game (it was caught on tape and shown on the evening news for days) or not, but it gives you an indication how seriously basketball was taken back then.

Maybe a bit too seriously.

Palma, meanwhile, is well-prepared to face whatever the CCS playoffs throws its way.

"We're the only D-IV team to play in a D-I league," Palma coach Paul Alioto noted.

His point being that Palma plays against schools with nearly three times the enrollment of the Chieftains on a regular basis.

And unlike football that created an Open Division for powerhouse teams to opt up and play in, there is no opting up in basketball.

The system places teams in the five divisions based strictly on enrollment.

Public schools might counter with the fact that even though Palma's enrollment is smaller its boundary is, well, there is no boundary.

"But we also come from the smallest county in the section," Alioto said.

Enrollment notwithstanding, Palma teams in just about every high-profile sport load up pre-season schedules with big-school opponents.

"The kids get excited when they play in big games," Alioto said. "Those are the kind of games we try to schedule. It's not only a great experience for the players, but you're able to see exactly where you stand."

And where Palma usually ends up standing is in pretty good shape. It may not be much of a stretch to say the weakest part of Palma's schedule is the CCS playoffs.

Not only do the Chieftains play in a D-I league, but here is who they played in pre-season;

>Mitty: 25-2 and the CCS No. 1 seed in D-II.

>Piedmont Hills: (25-3), CCS No. 1 seed in D-I.

>St. Francis: 14-12, CCS No. 2 seed in D-II.

>St. Mary's Berkeley: 20-9, No. 2 seed in D-IV North Coast Section playoffs.

>Colfax: 19-9: No. 3 seed in Sac-Joaquin Section D-IV.

>Gunn of Palo Alto: 15-10, CCS No. 8 seed in D-I.

>San Leandro: 16-11, No. 7 seed in NCS D-I.

"If you develop relationships with these schools they will play you here in town," Alioto said. "It makes us mentally tougher and physically stronger."

That stuff comes in handy this time of year.

Carmel

Speaking of knocking off SCCAL teams, the Padres did twice this year. Both times against Harbor. Both times by one point.

The Padres will try for their 18th straight win tonight when they face D-IV top-seed Sacred Heart Prep (22-2) right after the Palma-Santa Cruz game.

Carmel's current 17-game win streak is tied for the 12th longest by a Monterey County team in the last 30 years.

The Padres can jump into a tie for ninth should they make it 18 in a row.

The longest win streak of the last 30 years is 28 straight by Alisal High from 1971 to 1972.

Next longest is 24 by Seaside in 1992 and North Salinas in 1985.

Carmel's 21 wins this year equals that of its 21-4 team in 1990. The most wins in a single season by a Carmel team is 23 in 2000.

The winner's of tonight's D-IV semis meet for the title Friday at 4:45 p.m. at Santa Clara University.

> GEORGE WATKINS is a sports writer for The Salinas Californian. Contact him by e-mail at gwatkins@thecalifornian.com or by phone at (831) 754-4264.

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Have You Earned the Right to Lead? Ten Deeply Destructive Mistakes That Suggest the Answer Is No | View Clip
03/01/2011
American Surveyor - Online, The

John Hamm, author of the new book Unusually Excellent, explains why your employees may not see you as a leader…and what you can do to change their hearts and minds.

San Francisco, CA (February 2011)—There are people in every organization you know whose titles indicate they are leaders. Often, and unfortunately, their employees beg to differ. Oh, they don’t say it directly, not to the boss’s face, anyway. They say it with their ho-hum performance, their games of avoidance, their dearth of enthusiasm. Leaders—real leaders who have mastered their craft—don’t preside over such lackluster followers. If reading this makes you squirm with recognition, leadership expert John Hamm says you may have a problem lurking.

You’re really just masquerading. You haven’t yet earned the right to lead.

“When times are good, not-so-great leaders can get by,” says Hamm, author of Unusually Excellent: The Necessary Nine Skills Required for the Practice of Great Leadership (Jossey-Bass/A Wiley Imprint, February 2011, ISBN: 978-0-47092843-1, $24.95, www.unusuallyexcellent.com). “They’re cushioned by a surplus of cash, and their missteps are covered up by the thrill of top-line growth, which hides a multitude of sins. But when the cloak of prosperity falls away, their mediocrity is ruthlessly exposed.

“Real leadership equity is only earned, not bestowed,” he adds. “Just because you have been granted authority doesn’t mean you’re getting the full, collaborative engagement of your employees. You may have their bodies and time forty or fifty hours a week, but until you earn the privilege, from their point of view, you’ll never have their hearts and minds.”

Hamm has spent his career studying the practitioners of great leadership via his work as a venture capitalist, board member, high-level consultant, and professor of leadership at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University. In his new book, he shares what he has learned and brings those lessons to life with real-world stories.

Unusually Excellent is a powerful back-to-basics reference book that offers both seasoned and aspiring leaders a framework for understanding and a guide for applying the battle-tested fundamentals of leadership at every stage of their careers.

“These aren’t radically new ideas,” asserts Hamm. “Human nature hasn’t changed that much over the millennia, so neither have the core laws of leadership. It’s just that in the heat of the day-to-day battle, leaders inevitably lose their grip on the basic principles of leadership. In other cases, they never learned these fundamentals or mastered them earlier in their career. And finally, sad to say, some people just aren’t cut out to lead and need to understand why.”

“Normal” leadership is a complex system of behaviors that can tolerate a lot of little mistakes, explains Hamm. Extraordinary leadership cannot.

Think about it this way: Anyone can snap a photo that looks okay or cook a meal that satiates hunger. However, when an award-winning photographer takes the picture, or a five-star chef prepares dinner, anyone can tell a master has been at work. The same is true of leadership. The small deficiencies in how the novice leads, as opposed to the unusually excellent professional, create a radical difference in the outcome.

So how can you tell whether you really are a great leader in the minds of your employees—or whether, to paraphrase the old television commercial, you’re just playing one on TV? Unfortunately, the depth and breadth of the mistakes you make often tell the true tale.

Below, excerpted from Unusually Excellent, Hamm reveals ten of the most common, deeply destructive mistakes organizational leaders make:

MISTAKE #1: “Role playing” authenticity rather than living it. Authenticity is about owning your failures and shortcomings. It’s about allowing others to really know you, vulnerabilities, warts, and all. It’s about having the guts to seek feedback from others in a sincere and genuine fashion. And it’s about being able to maintain your authentic self in a situation of meaningful consequence—where your decisions affect others, sometimes on a grand scale and sometimes in very personal or dramatic ways.

Knowing who you really are and holding true to yourself in the most difficult moments is the “ground zero” of leadership credibility. It’s the only way to create the trusted connections you need to lead with real influence. Unfortunately, leaders stumble for a variety of reasons: They get scared and veer away at the last moment, or they sacrifice the truth on the altar of protecting other people’s feelings, or they simply seek to avoid the pain of conflict.

“When we make the decision to compromise our authenticity, we end up delivering a message that may feel ‘easier’ but that isn’t truly what we want or need to say,” explains Hamm. “Deception conspires with fear and seduces us down a dark road of believing we can ‘fake it,’ just this one time and it will all be okay.

“But the downstream impact of making such a choice in a moment of stress or carelessness can be devastating,” he adds. “For one thing, it compromises the integrity of that all-important communications channel between leader and follower by changing expectations about the behavior of both. Worse, it sets a precedent for this type of authentic behavior that over time can trap a leader into an expectation or pattern of always behaving that way—and over the course of years this is a soul-destroying situation.”

MISTAKE #2: Underestimating the impact of small acts of dishonesty. In his book, Hamm describes an incident that took place at a famous, fast-growing technology company. A young, inexperienced, but talented associate had what he thought was a plan for a powerful new marketing initiative. So he asked the CMO to broker a meeting with the CEO to make a presentation on the subject. The CMO agreed, and the meeting took place.

During the presentation the CEO was polite, if noncommittal. He gave the presenter a sort of passively accepting feedback—“Nice point,” “Interesting,” and so on—and wrapped up the meeting quickly, thanking the presenter for his initiative. But the CMO could sense a duplicity in the CEO’s behavior and attitude as the parties all headed back to their respective offices. Then, ten minutes after the meeting, the CEO called the CMO into his office and said, in essence, “That presentation was absolutely terrible. That guy’s an idiot. I want you to fire him, today.”

“The story of the firing spread (as it always does) throughout the company, morale slipped, and the CMO never completely trusted his boss again,” writes Hamm. “The CEO’s reputation for trustworthiness had been wounded forever. The wreckage from one seemingly small act of dishonesty was strewn all over the company and could never be completely cleaned up.”

MISTAKE #3: Being two-faced (and assuming others won’t notice). In another scenario from Hamm’s book, a CEO had one executive on his team whom he really trusted and in whom he could confide. One day, a couple of other members of that company’s executive team made a presentation at a board meeting that didn’t go so well. Later, as they were walking down a hallway, the CEO turned to his trusted executive and said, “We need to get rid of those guys. They were a disaster at the board meeting—they embarrassed me.”

But then nothing happened. Life at the company went on as before, and the targeted executives remained in their jobs. In the months that passed, the trusted executive found himself in meetings attended by both the CEO and the targeted executives. And it was as if the whole incident had never happened. The CEO joked with the men, complimented them on their work, and treated them as long-term team members.

As the trusted executive watched this, he asked himself: Did the boss mean what he said? Does he ever mean what he says? Did he change his mind—and when did that happen? Or is he too gutless to follow through with his plans? And if he’s willing to stab those guys in the back and then pretend to be their trusting partner, how do I know he hasn’t been doing the same thing with me? Just how duplicitous is this guy?

“Such are the dangers of shooting from the hip without realizing that a communication such as the one just described does not qualify as a ‘casual’ comment—once said, it must be resolved, and if it is not, there is a lingering odor that in one way or another, will remain smelly until fixed,” writes Hamm.

MISTAKE #4: Squelching the flow of bad news. Do you (or others under you) shoot the messenger when she brings you bad news? If so, you can be certain that the messenger’s priority is not bringing you the information you need: It’s protecting her own hide. That’s why in most organizations good news zooms to the top, while bad news—data that reveals goals missed, problems lurking, or feedback that challenges or defeats our strategy—flows uphill like molasses in January.

Unusually excellent leaders understand this reality, says Hamm. To combat it they work hard to build a primary and insatiable demand for the unvarnished facts, the raw data, the actual measurements, the honest feedback, the real information.

“We must install a confidence and a trust that leaders in the organization value the facts, the truth, and the speed of delivery, not the judgments or interpretations of ‘good’ or ‘bad,’ and that messengers are valued, not shot,” writes Hamm. “If we can do this then the entire behavior pattern of performance information flow will change for the better…Very few efforts will yield the payback associated with improving the speed and accuracy of the information you need most to make difficult or complex decisions.”

MISTAKE #5: Punishing “good failures.” Great organizations encourage risk-taking. Why? Because innovation requires it. There can be no reward without risk. But if your employees take a risk and fail, and you come down on them like a hammer, guess what? They’ll never risk anything again. Unusually excellent leaders deliberately create high-risk, low-cost environments—a.k.a. cultures of trust—where people don’t live in fear of the consequences of failure.

Hamm says a digital camera is the perfect analogy to the kind of culture you want to create.

“There is no expense associated with a flawed digital photograph—financial or otherwise,” he explains. “You just hit the ‘delete’ button, and it disappears. No wasted film, slides, or prints. And we are aware of this relationship between mistakes and consequences when we pick up the camera—so we click away, taking many more photos digitally than we would have in a world of costly film. Because we know failure is free, we take chances, and in that effort we often get that one amazing picture that we wouldn’t have if we were paying for all the mistakes.”

MISTAKE #6: Letting employee enthusiasm fizzle. A big part of a leader’s job is to be compelling. That means you must recruit “A players” through a big vision of the future and a personal commitment to a mission. But it’s not enough to recruit once and then move on. Never assume “once enrolled, always enrolled.” Even the best followers need to be reminded again and again how fun, rewarding, and meaningful their work is.

In other words, when people seem to be losing their spark, they need to become “born again” employees. (Time to put on your evangelist cloak!)

“Enthusiasm is a renewable resource,” says Hamm. “Part of being compelling is reminding yourself that people want and need to be reenrolled all the time. This message doesn’t have to be over the top to be compelling. It may just entail reminding your team, once per quarter, why you come to the office every day, and letting them reflect on the reason they do the same.”

MISTAKE #7: Refusing to deal with your “weakest links.” Chronic underperformers spoil things for everyone else. They create resentment among employees who are giving it their all, and they drag down productivity. Leaders must have a plan for getting these problem children off the playground—and they must act on that plan without procrastination.

“The worst scenario of all is to have a plan for dealing with underperformers, to identify who those individuals are, and then not pull the trigger on the announced consequences, for reasons of sentimentality, weakness, or favoritism—or worst of all, an attempt to preserve leadership popularity,” writes Hamm.

Nothing can be more damaging to the morale and esprit de corps of a team than that kind of leadership. It destroys your authenticity, your trustworthiness, and your ability to compel others to act. It is the end of you as a leader. Indeed, it is better to have no weakest-link plan at all than one with obvious liabilities.

MISTAKE #8: Allowing people to “fail elegantly.” There are two basic operating modes for organizations under high-stakes execution pressure, writes Hamm. One is the mentality of winning, which we know about; the other, less obvious to the untrained eye, the disease of failing elegantly, is a very sophisticated and veiled set of coping behaviors by individuals, the purpose of which is to avoid the oncoming train of embarrassment when the cover comes off the lousy results that we’d prefer no one ever sees.

Essentially, when people stop believing they can win, some then devote their energy to how best to lose. This fancy losing often manifests as excuse-making, blaming, tolerating cut corners, and manipulating and editorializing data. Unusually excellent leaders know how to recognize these symptoms and intervene with urgency and strength of conviction to get everyone on the high road—a.k.a., the winner’s mindset.

“Passive acceptance of failure, and the rationalization that always goes with it, is a cancer that can begin anywhere in the organization, then metastasize to every office, including your own,” says Hamm. “You can prevent it by setting clear and precise standards of behavior for everyone on the team, as well as clear consequences for the violation of those standards. And you can control it through continuous and open communication with every member of your team (some who will spot the problem before you do) and, where necessary, redundant processes and systems.

“Most of all, you can cure the acceptance of failure by setting yourself as an example of zero tolerance (along with a welcome for honest admissions of error), of precision and care in all of your work, a clear-eyed focus on unvarnished results, and most of all, an unyielding and unwavering commitment to your success.”

MISTAKE #9: Delaying decisions until it’s too late. Not making a decision is almost always worse than making a bad decision, says Hamm. As long as they aren’t utterly ill-advised and catastrophic, bad decisions at least keep the organization moving in pace with changing events—and thus can often be rectified by a course correction.

Not making a decision at all, although it may seem the safe choice—because, intellectually, it positions you to make the right move when the reality of the situation is more revealed—actually strips your organization of its momentum, stalling it at the starting line, and makes it highly unlikely that you can ever get up to speed in time to be a serious player.

“Unusually excellent leaders don’t just make decisions; they pursue them,” writes Hamm. “Because the speed of the organization is often its destiny—and because that speed directly correlates with the speed with which its decisions are made or not made—these leaders are haunted by the fear that somewhere in the organization a critical decision is being left orphaned and unmade.”

MISTAKE #10: Underestimating the weight your words—and your moods—carry. Hamm tells the story of John Adler, who, prior to his CEO tenure at Adaptec, was a senior vice president at Amdahl, one of the pioneering computer companies of Silicon Valley. One morning as he was walking down the long hallway to his office, he encountered some maintenance guys who were doing repairs. He greeted them cheerfully and then, just to make conversation, mentioned how difficult it must be to work in such a dark hallway.

The next morning when Adler came to work, he was surprised to find five maintenance men all carefully replacing every light bulb in the hallway. When he questioned the flurry of activity, the men said, “We’re replacing the light bulbs, boss. You said it was too dark in here.” Hamm says this story illustrates why leaders need to think carefully about every word they say—because others certainly will.

“Every conversation with, and every communication from, a leader carries added weight because of the authority of the position behind it,” writes Hamm. “Have a bad day and snap at one of your subordinates, and that person may go back to a cramped cubicle and start updating his résumé, or go out and get drunk, or miss a night’s sleep. Your momentary bad day could be his nightmare—and something he will remember forever. Your mood matters; don’t make it your employees’ problem.”

So if you recognize any of these mistakes in yourself, are you forever doomed as a leader? Of course not, says Hamm. We’re all human, and we can all learn from our errors and redeem ourselves. And yet, he adds, there is no shame in realizing that leadership is not for everyone—or in declining to lead if it’s not for you. (In your heart you probably already know.)

“Leadership is a choice,” he says. “It is a deep, burning desire to engage with people and rally a community to achieve greatness. Leadership can be difficult, thankless, frustrating, maddening work at times. It is only the passion of leading on the field—the thrill of looking other human beings in the eyes and seeing their energy, willingness, trust, and commitment—that makes it all worthwhile, in a very quiet, private way.”

About the Author:

John Hamm is one of the top leadership experts in Silicon Valley. He was named one of the country’s Top 100 venture capitalists in 2009 by AlwaysOn and has led investments in many successful high-growth companies as a partner at several Bay Area VC firms. Hamm has also been a CEO, a board member at over thirty companies, and a CEO adviser and executive coach to senior leaders at companies such as Documentum, Cisco, Hewlett-Packard, TaylorMade-adidas Golf and McAfee. John teaches leadership at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University.

About the Book:

Unusually Excellent: The Necessary Nine Skills Required for the Practice of Great Leadership (Jossey-Bass/A Wiley Imprint, February 2011, ISBN: 978-0-47092843-1, $24.95, www.unusuallyexcellent.com) is available at bookstores nationwide and from major online booksellers.

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Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities | View Clip
03/01/2011
Tri-Valley Herald

Religious and civic leaders are meeting in Santa Clara on Sunday to have a "community conversation" as they launch a new group, the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council.

The key question the group's leaders will be discussing is: "What role can and should our diverse religious communities play in shaping life in Silicon Valley?"

Much of the dialogue will also focus on the Knight Foundation's study of the "Soul of the Community," according to co-organizer Samina Sundas.

Speakers at the event will include: Chris Block, CEO of the American Leadership Forum; Fr. Jon Pedgo, pastor of St. Julie Billiart Catholic Parish; Feeza Mohamed, a junior at Notre Dame High School and GiveLight Foundation volunteer; Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens, chief philanthropic development officer at Silicon Valley Community Foundation; and Delorme McKee-Stovall, Santa Clara County director of Human Relations.

The event is Sunday from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Mission Room at the Benson Center at Santa Clara University.

For more information, e-mail info@sivicouncil.org or call 408-596-4166.

Contact Lisa Fernandez at 408-920-5002.

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Governor Fights Attorney General Over Health Reform in Washington State | View Clip
03/01/2011
ABC News - Online

ABC News' Ariane de Vogue reports:

So what do you do if you are the Governor of a state and you support the Obama administration's health care law, but the Attorney General of your state is fighting it cats and dogs in federal court?

Ask Washington State.

Late last night Governor Chris Gregoire aired her state's dirty laundry in a federal court filing  arguing that Washington's  Attorney General, Rob McKenna, is pursuing a lawsuit that will be “extremely disruptive” to the state government.

Gregoire, a democrat, supports the Affordable Care Act (ACA), while McKenna, a republican, has joined other states seeking to have the law overturned. McKenna so far prevailed in federal court in January when one federal judge,  Roger Vinson, struck down the health care law. Vinson is currently considering whether to rule that the provisions of the law that are now in effect  must be immediately halted.

“The split in Washington demonstrates, quite clearly, the sort of unintended consequences that can occur when these powers are split at the state level. “ says law professor Bradley Joondeph of Santa Clara University. “The attorney general can take litigating positions that arguably create a raft of complications for the executive branch in the state's implementation of a complex law. But these are problems over which the attorney has no responsibility. He can leave them for others to deal with.”

In a legal brief filed with Judge Vinson , Governor Gregoire says that she, not McKenna, is in charge of the administration of state government. Gregoire argues that her state would be “severely harmed” if the federal government  was forced to immediately stop implementing provisions of ACA that are currently in effect.

The Governor highlights some of the current provisions of the law affecting her state:  Washington has applied for and received Medicaid waivers to receive federal assistance; seniors are no longer required to pay a co-pay for preventative health services; and the state has been awarded $82.9 million in new grant funding.

Attorney General McKenna “does not represent the governor or other state officials” Gregoire argues, and says the lawsuit should not “constrain the benefits Washington state government are currently receiving under the ACA.”

Joondeph says the controversy reminds him of the days when states sued the tobacco industry: “This split between Gregoire and McKenna is reminiscent of that between Mississippi attorney general Mike Moore and Mississippi governor Kirk Fordice in the 1990s over that state's lawsuit against the tobacco industry--a suit initiated by Moore but bitterly opposed by Fordice.”

Oh and one other thing:  McKenna is reportedly considering a run for Governor in 2012.

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Calif. attorney general asks appeals court to lift stay on same-sex marriage ruling | View Clip
03/01/2011
Sacramento Bee - Online, The

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- California Attorney General Kamala Harris requested Tuesday that a federal appeals court lift a stay on a judge's decision declaring a voter-approved same-sex marriage ban unconstitutional.

Last week, lawyers challenging Proposition 8 also asked the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to lift the stay and allow same-sex marriages to be performed while the court decides the matter.

Same-sex marriage advocates were encouraged last week when President Barack Obama announced that his administration would no longer defend a federal law defining marriage as between a man and a woman.

Legal experts said the president's position could strengthen the case of same-sex marriage proponents challenging Proposition 8 in federal court.

Harris' predecessor as attorney general, now-Gov. Jerry Brown, had also opposed the 9th Circuit's stay of U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker's decision that Proposition 8 violated constitutional law.

"For 846 days, Proposition 8 has denied equality under the law to gay and lesbian couples," Harris said in a news release Tuesday. "Each and every one of those days, same-sex couples have been denied their right to convene loved ones and friends to celebrate marriages sanctioned and protected by California law."

University of California Hastings College of the Law professor Rory Little said Harris' opposition would make little legal impact on the case.

"It's a political statement," Little said. "It's not a very important legal statement. Legally, the position is the same as it was under Brown."

Yet having a statewide elected official take such a stand sends an important signal to supporters of same-sex marriage, said Santa Clara University School of Law assistant professor Pratheepan Gulasekaram.

Former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Brown have both declined to defend Proposition 8, which won 52 percent of voters' support in 2008.

"It suggests the state of California is not going to just be neutral in this case but will take a position," Gulasekaram said.

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Jerry Brown | View Clip
03/01/2011
Silicon Alley Insider

Edmund Gerald "Jerry" Brown, Jr. is an American politician, and the 39th and current Governor of the state of California. He previously served as Attorney General of California, Mayor of Oakland and two terms as the state's 34th Governor, from 1975 to 1983. He is the son of Pat Brown, the 32nd Governor of California (1959–1967).

At the time of his election to a third, non-consecutive term as governor, on November 2, 2010, Brown was serving as the 31st Attorney General of California, an elected position. Brown was formally inaugurated as governor on January 3, 2011, the 28th anniversary of the end of his last term. During his first term (as California's 34th Governor), he was the sixth-youngest Governor of that state. Upon his inauguration as California's 39th Governor, he became its oldest serving governor. At the age of 72, Brown is also the oldest currently serving governor in the United States.

Both before and after his first two terms as governor, Brown was elected to a number of state, local and party offices, including the Los Angeles Community College District Board of Trustees (1969–1971), California Secretary of State (1971–1975), chairman of the California Democratic Party (1989–1991), Mayor of Oakland (1999–2007), and California Attorney General (2007–2011).

Brown sought the Democratic nominations for President of the United States in 1976, 1980, and 1992, as well as the United States Senate in 1982 but was unsuccessful in these attempts.

Early life and education

Brown was born in San Francisco, California, the only son of four siblings born to Bernice Layne Brown and former San Francisco lawyer, district attorney and later California governor Edmund G. "Pat" Brown, Sr. Jerry Brown has Irish ancestry through his paternal grandfather and German ancestry through his paternal grandmother. He graduated from St. Ignatius High School in 1955 and studied at Santa Clara University. In 1956, he entered Sacred Heart Novitiate, a Jesuit seminary, intending to become a Catholic priest. However, Brown left the seminary and entered University of California, Berkeley, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Classics in 1961. Brown went on to Yale Law School and graduated with a Juris Doctor in 1964.

After law school, Brown worked as a law clerk for Supreme Court of California Justice Mathew Tobriner and studied in Mexico and Latin America.

Legal career and entrance into politics

Returning to California, Brown took the state bar exam and passed on his second attempt. Brown then settled in Los Angeles, California and joined the law firm of Tuttle & Taylor. In 1969, he ran for the newly created Los Angeles Community College Board of Trustees, which oversaw community colleges in the city, and placed first in a field of 124.

In 1970 Brown was elected California Secretary of State. He argued before the California Supreme Court and won against Standard Oil of California, International Telephone and Telegraph, Gulf Oil, and Mobil for election law violations (Brown vs. Superior Court). In addition Brown forced legislators to comply with campaign disclosure laws. While holding this office, he discovered the use of falsely notarized documents to earn a tax deduction by then-President Richard Nixon. Brown also drafted and helped to pass the California Fair Political Practices Act which established the California Fair Political Practices Commission.

Governor of California (1975–1983)

First term

In 1974, Brown was in a three-person primary race with Speaker of the California Assembly Bob Moretti and San Francisco Mayor Joseph L. Alioto. Alioto had support in Northern California and Moretti in Southern California. Brown had the name recognition of his father, Pat Brown, whom Democrats fondly remembered for his progressive administration. Brown won the primary, and in the General Election on November 5, 1974, Brown was elected Governor of California over California State Controller Houston I. Flournoy. Republicans ascribed the loss to anti-Republican feelings from Watergate, the election being held only ninety days after President Richard Nixon resigned from office. Brown succeeded Republican Governor Ronald Reagan, who had planned on retiring from office after serving two terms. Eight years after his father left Sacramento in 1967, Jerry Brown took office on January 6, 1975.

Upon taking office, Brown gained a reputation as a fiscal conservative. The American Conservative later noted he was "much more of a fiscal conservative than Governor Reagan." His fiscal restraint resulted in one of the biggest budget surpluses in state history, roughly $5 billion. For his personal life, Brown refused many of the privileges and perks of the office, forgoing the newly constructed governor's residence and instead renting a modest apartment at the corner of 14th and N Streets, adjacent to Capitol Park in downtown Sacramento. Instead of riding as a passenger in a chauffeured limousine as previous governors had done, Brown drove to work in a Plymouth Satellite sedan.

During his two-term, eight-year governorship, Brown had a strong interest in environmental issues. Brown appointed J. Baldwin to work in the newly created California Office of Appropriate Technology, Sim Van der Ryn as State Architect, and Stewart Brand as Special Advisor. He appointed John Bryson, later the CEO of Southern California Edison Electric Company and a founding member of the Natural Resources Defense Council, chairman of the California State Water Board in 1976. Brown also reorganized the California Arts Council, boosting its funding by 1300 percent and appointing artists to the council and appointed more women and minorities to office than any other previous California governor. In 1977 he sponsored the "first-ever tax incentive for rooftop solar" among many environmental intiatives. In 1975, Brown obtained the repeal of the "depletion allowance", a tax break for the state's oil industry, despite the efforts of the lobbyist Joe Shell, a former intraparty rival to Richard M. Nixon.

Like his father, Brown strongly opposed the death penalty and vetoed it as Governor, which the legislature overrode in 1977. He also appointed judges who opposed capital punishment. One of these appointments, Rose Bird as the Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court, was recalled in 1986 by voters angry at her opposition to the death penalty. She and two other Brown appointed justices were the first such removals in California history. In 1960, he had lobbied his father, then Governor, to spare the life of Caryl Chessman and reportedly won a 60-day stay for him.

He was both in favor of a Balanced Budget Amendment and opposed to Proposition 13, the latter of which would decrease property taxes and greatly reduce revenue to cities and counties. When Proposition 13 passed in June 1978, he heavily cut state spending and, along with the Legislature, spent much of the $5 billion surplus to meet the proposition's requirements and help offset the revenue losses which made cities, counties and schools more dependent on the state. His actions in response to the proposition earned him praise from Proposition 13 author Howard Jarvis who went as far to make a television commercial for Brown just before his successful reelection bid in 1978.

The controversial proposition immediately cut tax revenues and required a two-thirds supermajority to raise taxes. Proposition 13 "effectively destroyed the funding base of local governments and school districts, which thereafter depended largely on Sacramento for their revenue". Max Neiman, a professor at the Institute of Government Studies at University of California, Berkeley, credited Brown in "bailing out local government and school districts" but felt it was harmful "because it made it easier for people to believe that Proposition 13 wasn't harmful."

Second term

On November 7, 1978, Jerry Brown was re-elected governor. The Republican candidate was state Attorney General Evelle J. Younger, (1918–1989) a former Los Angeles County District Attorney. Jerry Brown had the attention of the state, national and international media.

Brown was responsible for appointing the first openly gay judge in United States when he named Stephen Lachs to serve on the Los Angeles County Superior Court in 1979. In 1981, he also appointed the first openly lesbian judge in the United States, Mary C. Morgan of the San Francisco Municipal Court. Brown completed his second term having appointed a total of five openly gay judges, including Rand Schrader and Jerold Krieger. Brown had completed his first term as governor without appointing any openly gay people to any position, but he cited the failed 1978 Briggs Initiative, which sought to ban homosexuals from working in California's public schools, for his increased support of gay rights.

Brown proposed the establishment of a state space academy and the purchasing of a satellite that would be launched into orbit to provide emergency communications for the state —- a proposal similar to one that was indeed eventually adopted. In 1979, an out-of-state columnist, Mike Royko, then at the Chicago Sun-Times, picked up on the nickname from Brown's girlfriend at the time, Linda Ronstadt, who was quoted in a 1978 Rolling Stone magazine interview humorously calling him "Moonbeam". A year later Royko expressed his regret for publicizing the nickname,[34] and in 1991 Royko disavowed it entirely, proclaiming Brown to be just as serious as any other politician.

Brown chose not to run for a third term in 1982 and instead ran for the United States Senate, but lost to then San Diego mayor Pete Wilson. He was succeeded as governor by George Deukmejian, then the Attorney General of California, in 1983.

This page has been adapted from the Wikipedia entry of March 1, 2011.

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Calif. Attorney General Asks Appeals Court to Lift Stay on Same-sex Marriage Ruling | View Clip
03/01/2011
Hispanic Business - Online

California Attorney General Kamala Harris requested Tuesday that a federal appeals court lift a stay on a judge's decision declaring a voter-approved same-sex marriage ban unconstitutional.

Last week, lawyers challenging Proposition 8 also asked the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to lift the stay and allow same-sex marriages to be performed while the court decides the matter.

Same-sex marriage advocates were encouraged last week when President Barack Obama announced that his administration would no longer defend a federal law defining marriage as between a man and a woman.

Legal experts said the president's position could strengthen the case of same-sex marriage proponents challenging Proposition 8 in federal court.

Harris' predecessor as attorney general, now-Gov. Jerry Brown, had also opposed the 9th Circuit's stay of U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker's decision that Proposition 8 violated constitutional law.

"For 846 days, Proposition 8 has denied equality under the law to gay and lesbian couples," Harris said in a news release Tuesday. "Each and every one of those days, same-sex couples have been denied their right to convene loved ones and friends to celebrate marriages sanctioned and protected by California law."

University of California Hastings College of the Law professor Rory Little said Harris' opposition would make little legal impact on the case.

"It's a political statement," Little said. "It's not a very important legal statement. Legally, the position is the same as it was under Brown."

Yet having a statewide elected official take such a stand sends an important signal to supporters of same-sex marriage, said Santa Clara University School of Law assistant professor Pratheepan Gulasekaram.

Former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Brown have both declined to defend Proposition 8, which won 52 percent of voters' support in 2008.

"It suggests the state of California is not going to just be neutral in this case but will take a position," Gulasekaram said.

Source: (c) 2011, The Sacramento Bee (Sacramento, Calif.). Distributed by Mclatchy-Tribune News Service.

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Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities
03/01/2011
San Mateo County Times

Religious and civic leaders are meeting in Santa Clara on Sunday to have a "community conversation" as they launch a new group, the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council.

The key question the group's leaders will be discussing is: "What role can and should our diverse religious communities play in shaping life in Silicon Valley?"

Much of the dialogue will also focus on the Knight Foundation's study of the "Soul of the Community," according to co-organizer Samina Sundas.

Speakers at the event will include: Chris Block, CEO of the American Leadership Forum; Fr. Jon Pedgo, pastor of St. Julie Billiart Catholic Parish; Feeza Mohamed, a junior at Notre Dame High School and GiveLight Foundation volunteer; Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens, chief philanthropic development officer at Silicon Valley Community Foundation; and Delorme McKee-Stovall, Santa Clara County director of Human Relations.

The event is Sunday from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Mission Room at the Benson Center at Santa Clara University.

For more information, e-mail or call 408-596-4166.

Contact Lisa Fernandez at 408-920-5002.

Copyright © 2011 San Mateo County Times. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities
03/01/2011
Oakland Tribune

Religious and civic leaders are meeting in Santa Clara on Sunday to have a "community conversation" as they launch a new group, the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council.

The key question the group's leaders will be discussing is: "What role can and should our diverse religious communities play in shaping life in Silicon Valley?"

Much of the dialogue will also focus on the Knight Foundation's study of the "Soul of the Community," according to co-organizer Samina Sundas.

Speakers at the event will include: Chris Block, CEO of the American Leadership Forum; Fr. Jon Pedgo, pastor of St. Julie Billiart Catholic Parish; Feeza Mohamed, a junior at Notre Dame High School and GiveLight Foundation volunteer; Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens, chief philanthropic development officer at Silicon Valley Community Foundation; and Delorme McKee-Stovall, Santa Clara County director of Human Relations.

The event is Sunday from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Mission Room at the Benson Center at Santa Clara University.

For more information, e-mail or call 408-596-4166.

Contact Lisa Fernandez at 408-920-5002.

Copyright © 2011 The Oakland Tribune. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities
03/01/2011
Daily Review, The

Religious and civic leaders are meeting in Santa Clara on Sunday to have a "community conversation" as they launch a new group, the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council.

The key question the group's leaders will be discussing is: "What role can and should our diverse religious communities play in shaping life in Silicon Valley?"

Much of the dialogue will also focus on the Knight Foundation's study of the "Soul of the Community," according to co-organizer Samina Sundas.

Speakers at the event will include: Chris Block, CEO of the American Leadership Forum; Fr. Jon Pedgo, pastor of St. Julie Billiart Catholic Parish; Feeza Mohamed, a junior at Notre Dame High School and GiveLight Foundation volunteer; Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens, chief philanthropic development officer at Silicon Valley Community Foundation; and Delorme McKee-Stovall, Santa Clara County director of Human Relations.

The event is Sunday from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Mission Room at the Benson Center at Santa Clara University.

For more information, e-mail or call 408-596-4166.

Contact Lisa Fernandez at 408-920-5002.

Copyright © 2011 The Daily Review. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities
03/01/2011
Argus, The

Religious and civic leaders are meeting in Santa Clara on Sunday to have a "community conversation" as they launch a new group, the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council.

The key question the group's leaders will be discussing is: "What role can and should our diverse religious communities play in shaping life in Silicon Valley?"

Much of the dialogue will also focus on the Knight Foundation's study of the "Soul of the Community," according to co-organizer Samina Sundas.

Speakers at the event will include: Chris Block, CEO of the American Leadership Forum; Fr. Jon Pedgo, pastor of St. Julie Billiart Catholic Parish; Feeza Mohamed, a junior at Notre Dame High School and GiveLight Foundation volunteer; Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens, chief philanthropic development officer at Silicon Valley Community Foundation; and Delorme McKee-Stovall, Santa Clara County director of Human Relations.

The event is Sunday from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Mission Room at the Benson Center at Santa Clara University.

For more information, e-mail or call 408-596-4166.

Contact Lisa Fernandez at 408-920-5002.

Copyright © 2011 The Argus. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities
03/01/2011
Alameda Times-Star

Religious and civic leaders are meeting in Santa Clara on Sunday to have a "community conversation" as they launch a new group, the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council.

The key question the group's leaders will be discussing is: "What role can and should our diverse religious communities play in shaping life in Silicon Valley?"

Much of the dialogue will also focus on the Knight Foundation's study of the "Soul of the Community," according to co-organizer Samina Sundas.

Speakers at the event will include: Chris Block, CEO of the American Leadership Forum; Fr. Jon Pedgo, pastor of St. Julie Billiart Catholic Parish; Feeza Mohamed, a junior at Notre Dame High School and GiveLight Foundation volunteer; Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens, chief philanthropic development officer at Silicon Valley Community Foundation; and Delorme McKee-Stovall, Santa Clara County director of Human Relations.

The event is Sunday from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Mission Room at the Benson Center at Santa Clara University.

For more information, e-mail or call 408-596-4166.

Contact Lisa Fernandez at 408-920-5002.

Copyright © 2011 Alameda Times-Star. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Santa Clara University to host dialogue on diverse communities
03/01/2011
Contra Costa Times

Religious and civic leaders are meeting in Santa Clara on Sunday to have a "community conversation" as they launch a new group, the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council.

The key question the group's leaders will be discussing is: "What role can and should our diverse religious communities play in shaping life in Silicon Valley?"

Much of the dialogue will also focus on the Knight Foundation's study of the "Soul of the Community," according to co-organizer Samina Sundas.

Speakers at the event will include: Chris Block, CEO of the American Leadership Forum; Fr. Jon Pedgo, pastor of St. Julie Billiart Catholic Parish; Feeza Mohamed, a junior at Notre Dame High School and GiveLight Foundation volunteer; Mari Ellen Reynolds Loijens, chief philanthropic development officer at Silicon Valley Community Foundation; and Delorme McKee-Stovall, Santa Clara County director of Human Relations.

The event is Sunday from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Mission Room at the Benson Center at Santa Clara University.

For more information, e-mail info@sivicouncil.org or call 408-596-4166.

Contact Lisa Fernandez at 408-920-5002.

Copyright © 2011 Contra Costa Times.

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READERS' LETTERS
03/01/2011
San Jose Mercury News

HOLD PUBLIC LEADERS TO A HIGHER STANDARD

When San Mateo Superior Court Judge Lisa Novak evaluates the proper sentence for a politician convicted of unethical felony conduct, I hope the judge considers the public service of the convict not as a mitigating circumstance deserving a lesser sentence, but as an aggravating factor deserving extra punishment for the violation of public trust by an elected official. We elect politicians to lead us and set an example of proper behavior; they should be held to a higher standard.

Former Daly City Mayor Margarita Gomez committed workers' compensation fraud, claiming to be disabled so she could receive taxpayer money for two years. Even though her fraud conviction was not in connection with her elected job it shows a willful disregard of the citizens who elected her.

I can imagine her lawyer arguing for reduced jail time due to her years of public service, when in my mind, that is a great reason to throw the book at her.

Marc Weissman

Foster City

LOOK TO TEXAS FOR MODEL DEATH PENALTY

If the Mercury News (Editorial, Feb. 20) was genuinely interested in addressing the escalating costs of implementing the death penalty in California, it would have strongly proposed that we replace the cumbersome and ineffective laws and procedures with those that are used in Texas. In Texas, the average stay on death row is three years, the average cost is $200,000 and the families of victims are most likely to experience closure in their lifetimes. One of the most revealing articles on the death penalty I have ever seen included the results of interviews with death row inmates in California, Texas, Florida, Illinois and several other states. Of the 18 inmates interviewed in California, none believed that they would ever be executed. In the other states, almost all of the inmates interviewed believed that they would be executed. This is the reason why the death penalty is not a deterrent in California.

Steven Stark

Cupertino

A BOLD GOVERNOR MAY END EXECUTIONS

So the Mercury News (Editorial, Feb. 21) trumps every humane, ethical, moral, religious and even economic argument to end the death penalty in California by seizing the opportune moment to suggest that the governor commute death sentences to life imprisonment without parole, and effect a reduction of the haunting state budget deficit. "Bravo!" for a brilliant appeal to the governor, although really aimed to garner support from taxpayers who vote their pocketbooks. Our governor has common sense, is steeped in diverse spiritualities, and could be the brave leader who will act on your suggestion, ending executions in our state. It is time to invest our hard-earned gold in other matters and reinvest our efforts in endeavors worthy of the human spirit, with renewed hearts of gold.

Richard Hilliard

Sunnyvale

AIRPORT NEEDS BETTER MARKETING CAMPAIGN

I do agree with San Jose City Councilman Sam Liccardo that the words "Silicon Valley" have global cachet, but burying them in an already-convoluted moniker will do little to improve the reach of the San Jose airport brand. For that, they need a well-designed and executed marketing program. If you insist on changing the name when we can't afford other essentials, then at least take a page out of Oakland's or San Francisco's playbook and KISS--"keep it simple, stupid." Call it Silicon Valley International Airport. Name a terminal after Norm Mineta. He gets his recognition, and we get a marketable name with global reach for the airport.

Angela K. Schultz

San Jose

AIRPORT STATUE WOULD BE A FITTING TRIBUTE

Norman Y. Mineta San Jose/Silicon Valley International Airport, the proposed name for the San Jose airport is much worse than what it is now because it is a tongue-twister (Editorial, Feb 28). Why not simply rename the airport San Jose Silicon Valley Mineta International Airport and have a statue of Mineta at the entrance with the full name inscribed?

Subru Bhat

Union City

UNFAIR FOR VTA BOARD TO IGNORE SOUTH S.J.

I was disheartened by the news that the VTA proposes shutting down all stations south of Diridon to address Caltrain's budget crisis. Why shut out a region that needs a connection to the Bay Area the most? Reported passenger ridership rankings distract readers from understanding the source of a budget problem rooted in San Mateo County. Caltrain's budget is not dependent on fare revenue. Besides, Santa Clara County's VTA has the cash to contribute its share to Caltrain, but it must decrease its contribution because of SamTrans' shortcomings. Shutting down stations south of Diridon disproportionately impacts rural areas that host significant low-income populations within generally smaller economies. Access to livelihood via a semipublic good must be part of the discussion in considering solutions, not ridership figures.

Perlita R. Dicochea

Professor of Ethnic Studies

Santa Clara University

Copyright © 2011 San Jose Mercury News

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Wisconsin: A History of Leading the Nation for Better or Worse | View Clip
02/28/2011
History News Network

Nancy C. Unger is associate professor of History at Santa Clara University and author of Fighting Bob La Follette: The Righteous Reformer. Attribution to the History News Service and the author is required for reprinting and redistribution of this article.

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The next frontier: behavioural finance | View Clip
02/28/2011
Globe and Mail - Online, The

TRACY TJADEN

From Friday's Globe and Mail Last updated Monday, Feb. 28, 2011 6:51AM EST

The founder of one of Canada's top independent investment firms has a curious piece of advice for investors this RRSP season: If it's hot, don't touch.

Charlie Spiring is the founder and chief executive officer of Winnipeg-based Wellington West Holdings Inc., which has $10-billion in assets under administration, with 56 per cent in fee-based business.

One of the few independents in an industry dominated by the big banks, Wellington West logged revenue of $200-million in the year ending June, 2010, with 82,000 clients and offices in 53 Canadian cities.

In a recent chat, Mr Spiring, 54, talked about the importance of behavioural finance. In short, it's where psychology meets investing. It involves using psychological theories and principles to explain why people make the investing decisions they make, and therefore why the stock market does what it does.

What lesson should investors take from the 2008-2009 financial crisis?

Timing the market is a difficult thing. I look at people who went through it and came out the back end in good shape, people who used balanced portfolio management and not a lot of leverage. And then I look at the more aggressive people with high leverage who made decisions because they had margin calls and were forced to get out of the market.

Balanced portfolio management has worked forever and it held up the best during that period.

How did you react personally at the height of the meltdown?

I'm a bear market baby – I thrive in a bear market. I went into action. My best work happens in those times. I started in this business in 1981 when the markets were in rough shape and it forced me to learn during tough times.

What did – or should – the global financial sector take from the experience?

Stuff was going on that board members didn't understand, and now people can see that it's incumbent on those board members to teach themselves – and not just collect fees.

You saw that more so in the U.S. than Canadian banks.

Have we slipped back into our old ways?

You're seeing that a bit. But the majority of people are doing the right thing, which is ensuring they have a balanced portfolio. That's the way you protect yourself.

Would you like to see one national regulator in Canada?

Yes, I am a big fan of the idea of a national regulator that would have a better set of eyes on the industry and provide consistency.

Some have said the recession sparked a global financial power shift, away from the U.S. and Europe and toward the BRIC countries – Brazil, Russia, India and China. Do you concur?

Yes, I totally believe that. The shift is moving toward the BRICs, and that will make the markets more volatile.

America doesn't work when America is not working – and at 10 per cent unemployment they are not working. I think we'll see over the next decade America continuing to lose a lot of its lustre and power.

The fortuitous part for us in Canada is that we are closely tied to these emerging markets with the mining and energy sectors.

What we're going to lose in the States we will pick up in the BRIC countries – as the U.S. becomes less significant to us in the next decade. It's a brutal reality but good for Canada in the long run. It's not perfect but it's a better diversification for sure.

What is the biggest challenge the industry will face in 2011?

Getting more and more bogged down in regulation that will not provide any actual help. More regulation sounds good but it won't achieve what it is supposed to achieve, and the greatest impact will be on the micro-businesses.

How so?

Costs will kill or maim the small micros. I know because I used to be one of them.

What's the biggest challenge facing individual investors?

Finding what works for them, having a plan in place and then sticking to it. Investors lose their discipline all the time. There's a lot more do-it-yourselfers out there now and they are their own worst enemies.

How would you describe investor appetite now?

A lot of them have lost faith. But that is why rational behavioural theory is important. We have hired [Santa Clara University professor and behavioural finance guru] Meir Statman to guide us on this. He is brilliant and he gives us guidance that our brokers then pass on to our retail clients. Behavioural finance is a monster part of the whole discussion around returns.

What should investors be thinking now?

I always caution against what's hot. You should have a heavy energy weighting in your portfolio – we are not going to replace oil and gas for decades, so that will go higher.

People should also be buying bank stocks and insurance companies.

What is the future for Canada's remaining independent investment firms? Could they one day be squeezed out?

Success for the super-independents will likely mean two or three mergers to create two or three powerful independents to take on the banks head to head.

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Professor Statman Says 'Luck Predominates' in Investment: Video | View Clip
02/28/2011
Bloomberg News - Online

Feb. 28 (Bloomberg) -- Meir Statman, a professor at Santa Clara University and author of "What Investors Really Want: Know What Drives Investor Behavior and Make Smarter Financial Decisions," and Dennis Hynes, chief market strategist at RW Pressprich & Co., talk about investment strategies. They speak with Pimm Fox on Bloomberg Television's "Taking Stock." (Source: Bloomberg)

Meir Statman, a professor at Santa Clara University and author of "What Investors Really Want: Know What Drives Investor Behavior and Make Smarter Financial Decisions," and Dennis Hynes, chief market strategist at RW Pressprich & Co., talk about investment strategies.

They speak with Pimm Fox on Bloomberg Television's "Taking Stock." (Source: Bloomberg)

-0- Feb/28/2011 23:37 GMT

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Santa Clara University Professor Named Google Science Communication Fellow | View Clip
02/28/2011
Fort Worth Star-Telegram - Online

SANTA CLARA, Calif. —

Santa Clara University's Civil Engineering Associate Professor Edwin Maurer will join a world class team of scientists and educators at Google headquarters this summer to develop ways to communicate the science of climate change more effectively. Google selected Maurer to be one of the 21 Google Science Communication Fellows because of his extensive research on the impact of climate change on water resources.

Maurer joined Santa Clara University in 2003 and teaches courses including hydraulics, hydrology, and sustainable water resources development. He first studied climate change and sea level rise and impacts on the San Francisco Bay Area in 1989. During the past decade, most of his research has focused on translating global climate model output to local and regional scales, where Maurer assesses projected impacts on water resources. He also contributed dozens of projections of global climate change for a Web-based tool called Climate Wizard that provides the general public with simple analyses and innovative graphics that convey how climate has and is projected to change within specific geographic areas around the world.

In June, Maurer and the 20 other fellows will head to Google's campus in Mountain View, Calif. for a workshop, which will integrate hands-on training and brainstorming on topics of technology and science communication.

“I'm looking forward to meeting and working with such an interesting and diverse group of scientists to refine our skills for communicating the science related to climate change and its impacts in our classrooms and in our communities,” says Maurer.

Following the workshop, fellows will be given the opportunity to apply for grants to put their ideas into practice. Those with the most impactful projects will be given the opportunity to join a

Linblad Expeditions & National Geographic trip to the Arctic, the Galapagos, or Antarctica as a science communicator. More information about the program can be found on Google's blog.

About Santa Clara University

Santa Clara University is a comprehensive Jesuit, Catholic university located 40 miles south of San Francisco in California's Silicon Valley. Santa Clara offers its more than 8,800 students rigorous undergraduate programs in arts and sciences, business, and engineering, plus master's degrees in a number of professional fields, law degrees, and engineering and theology doctorates. Distinguished by one of the highest graduation rates among all U.S. master's universities, Santa Clara educates leaders of competence, conscience, and compassion grounded in faith-inspired values. Founded in 1851, Santa Clara is California's oldest operating institution of higher education. For more information, see

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Santa Clara University Professor Named Google Science Communication Fellow | View Clip
02/28/2011
UPI.com

Santa Clara University's Civil Engineering Associate Professor Edwin Maurer will join a world class team of scientists and educators at Google headquarters this summer to develop ways to communicate the science of climate change more effectively. Google selected Maurer to be one of the 21 Google Science Communication Fellows because of his extensive research on the impact of climate change on water resources.

Maurer joined Santa Clara University in 2003 and teaches courses including hydraulics, hydrology, and sustainable water resources development. He first studied climate change and sea level rise and impacts on the San Francisco Bay Area in 1989. During the past decade, most of his research has focused on translating global climate model output to local and regional scales, where Maurer assesses projected impacts on water resources. He also contributed dozens of projections of global climate change for a Web-based tool called Climate Wizard that provides the general public with simple analyses and innovative graphics that convey how climate has and is projected to change within specific geographic areas around the world.

In June, Maurer and the 20 other fellows will head to Google's campus in Mountain View, Calif. for a workshop, which will integrate hands-on training and brainstorming on topics of technology and science communication.

“I'm looking forward to meeting and working with such an interesting and diverse group of scientists to refine our skills for communicating the science related to climate change and its impacts in our classrooms and in our communities,” says Maurer.

Following the workshop, fellows will be given the opportunity to apply for grants to put their ideas into practice. Those with the most impactful projects will be given the opportunity to join a Linblad Expeditions & National Geographic trip to the Arctic, the Galapagos, or Antarctica as a science communicator. More information about the program can be found on Google's blog.

About Santa Clara University

Santa Clara University is a comprehensive Jesuit, Catholic university located 40 miles south of San Francisco in California's Silicon Valley. Santa Clara offers its more than 8,800 students rigorous undergraduate programs in arts and sciences, business, and engineering, plus master's degrees in a number of professional fields, law degrees, and engineering and theology doctorates. Distinguished by one of the highest graduation rates among all U.S. master's universities, Santa Clara educates leaders of competence, conscience, and compassion grounded in faith-inspired values. Founded in 1851, Santa Clara is California's oldest operating institution of higher education. For more information, see www.scu.edu.

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Santa Clara University Professor Named Google Science Communication Fellow | View Clip
02/28/2011
Centre Daily Times - Online

SANTA CLARA, Calif. — Santa Clara University's Civil Engineering Associate Professor Edwin Maurer will join a world class team of scientists and educators at Google headquarters this summer to develop ways to communicate the science of climate change more effectively. Google selected Maurer to be one of the 21 Google Science Communication Fellows because of his extensive research on the impact of climate change on water resources.

Maurer joined Santa Clara University in 2003 and teaches courses including hydraulics, hydrology, and sustainable water resources development. He first studied climate change and sea level rise and impacts on the San Francisco Bay Area in 1989. During the past decade, most of his research has focused on translating global climate model output to local and regional scales, where Maurer assesses projected impacts on water resources. He also contributed dozens of projections of global climate change for a Web-based tool called Climate Wizard that provides the general public with simple analyses and innovative graphics that convey how climate has and is projected to change within specific geographic areas around the world.

In June, Maurer and the 20 other fellows will head to Google's campus in Mountain View, Calif. for a workshop, which will integrate hands-on training and brainstorming on topics of technology and science communication.

“I'm looking forward to meeting and working with such an interesting and diverse group of scientists to refine our skills for communicating the science related to climate change and its impacts in our classrooms and in our communities,” says Maurer.

Following the workshop, fellows will be given the opportunity to apply for grants to put their ideas into practice. Those with the most impactful projects will be given the opportunity to join a Linblad Expeditions & National Geographic trip to the Arctic, the Galapagos, or Antarctica as a science communicator. More information about the program can be found on Google's blog.

About Santa Clara University

Santa Clara University is a comprehensive Jesuit, Catholic university located 40 miles south of San Francisco in California's Silicon Valley. Santa Clara offers its more than 8,800 students rigorous undergraduate programs in arts and sciences, business, and engineering, plus master's degrees in a number of professional fields, law degrees, and engineering and theology doctorates. Distinguished by one of the highest graduation rates among all U.S. master's universities, Santa Clara educates leaders of competence, conscience, and compassion grounded in faith-inspired values. Founded in 1851, Santa Clara is California's oldest operating institution of higher education. For more information, see www.scu.edu.

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Why Are We More Future-Focused When We Are in a Happy Mood? | View Clip
02/28/2011
Science + Religion Today

Why Are We More Future-Focused When We Are in a Happy Mood?

The psychological literature discusses two reasons why we might be more future-focused when we are in a happier mood. First, it is well established that our cognitive flexibility increases when we are put in a happier mood, broadening our focus and attention, promoting openness to information, and enabling improved integration of information. Thus, the increase in future-focus may result from a more thorough consideration of broader (including future) net benefits of a decision. Second, it has been shown that when we are put in a happier mood, our willpower is replenished. Thus, the increase in future-focus may result from increased willpower.

John Ifcher and Homa Zarghamee are professors of economics at Santa Clara University.

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Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? | View Clip
02/27/2011
InsideBayArea.com

Are you there God? It's me, twitter.com/mikecassidy.

Maybe it's no surprise that we've reached the point where, rather than looking to the heavens to find God, we're looking to the cloud. It's where we live now, with iPods, iPads, Android gizmos, social networks. The town square, complete with steepled church, has become a digital rectangle that we carry in our pockets.

I've been thinking about this since the recent excitement over "Confession: A Roman Catholic App," an iPhone application that offers Catholics a nifty way to prepare for the sacrament of confession.

Never mind that any Catholic could use help. When I was a kid, I constantly worried that I didn't have enough sins to recite to the priest. So, I'd make up a few extras, and essentially lie to a priest, which of course meant another transgression and another trip to confession.

As of last week, the app, which provides a digital inventory of bad acts, was the sixth-most-popular in Apple's lifestyle category, which in a bit of iLife synergy puts it right behind the iKamasutra.

Some of the buzz around the confession app was due to the fact that it was sanctioned by a Catholic bishop -- a sign the church was ready to meet congregants in the century in which they are residing. It also held the delicious juxtaposition of modern technology aiding in an ancient rite. And it provided plenty of material for snickering

about impure thoughts and various other sins described in stilted ways.

But the truth is there are hundreds, if not thousands, of apps out there that guide those seeking guidance through big spiritual questions -- Bible apps, inspirational apps, Islamic apps that point to Mecca, Jewish apps that prompt prayers for travelers. And churches and religions have been turning to digital delivery since the dawn of the Internet.

But Web 2.0 has changed everything. The social Web has empowered people in the face of institutions -- governments, big businesses and old-line religions -- in ways the early Web did not. No longer do pronouncements come down digitally from on high, as if delivered on stone tablets. The Web is democratic now. We are creating the content we want to consume. The masses, if you will, are creating the Masses.

"There are all of these ways that people are sharing spiritual wisdom with one another," says Elizabeth Drescher, a lecturer in Santa Clara University's Religious Studies Department.

The Vatican acknowledged as much last month when Pope Benedict XVI issued an encyclical inviting Christians to participate in social networks, pointing out that "this network is an integral part of human life."

In other words, Drescher says, "People use this stuff in their lives, while they're talking, while they're having coffee, while they're having lunch. They're not holed up in a cubby looking at the computer."

So naturally, social networks are incorporating all aspects of life and the afterlife. Drescher sees examples every day.

The "Holy Roller" app is one of her favorites. "You decide you want some Biblical advice on the basis of a burden or a blessing. You pick one, shake it, and you get a Bible verse."

But it doesn't stop there. Once you have your verse, you tweet it or post it on Facebook and a discussion breaks out. Not only that, but the app designer encourages users to send him examples of blessings, burdens and, of course, favorite Bible verses.

"This is now a very bottom-up, grass-roots way of saying, 'Hey, here is a way to approach your spirituality. No church authority," Drescher says.

Drescher has been focused on digital media and spirituality for years. She just finished a book on the subject, "Tweet if You „¢ Jesus," which is due out in May. And she has little doubt that the ways of creating communion are evolving with technology.

Last spring Drescher and a graduate student created a Facebook prayer session called "Tweet-ecost," a play on the Christian holy day of Pentecost. They invited Facebook users around the world to post a prayer at 6 p.m. according to their local time. They created a communal prayer that rolled through the globe's time zones.

"By the end of that 24-hour period, thousands of people had participated in that prayer service," she says. "It was an idea that we literally had over a glass of wine one evening."

And while studying spontaneous spirituality is work for Drescher, who describes herself as a "fairly meat-and-potatoes Episcopalian," she is sometimes moved by its unexpected nature.

One day, Drescher came across a post from a Facebook friend who was starting a prayer of intercession, in which those gathered together pray for people who've touched their lives.

"People started listing prayer concerns," she says. "It was a deeply moving experience to see people responding to that, kind of lifting up in prayer in that context, and being aware that it really had meaning."

Meaning that in fact was as genuine as a message from your lips to God's ear.

Contact Mike Cassidy at mcassidy@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5536. Follow him at Twitter.com/mikecassidy.

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Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? | View Clip
02/27/2011
SiliconValley.com

Are you there God? It's me, twitter.com/mikecassidy.

Maybe it's no surprise that we've reached the point where, rather than looking to the heavens to find God, we're looking to the cloud. It's where we live now, with iPods, iPads, Android gizmos, social networks. The town square, complete with steepled church, has become a digital rectangle that we carry in our pockets.

I've been thinking about this since the recent excitement over "Confession: A Roman Catholic App," an iPhone application that offers Catholics a nifty way to prepare for the sacrament of confession.

Never mind that any Catholic could use help. When I was a kid, I constantly worried that I didn't have enough sins to recite to the priest. So, I'd make up a few extras, and essentially lie to a priest, which of course meant another transgression and another trip to confession.

As of last week, the app, which provides a digital inventory of bad acts, was the sixth-most-popular in Apple's lifestyle category, which in a bit of iLife synergy puts it right behind the iKamasutra.

Some of the buzz around the confession app was due to the fact that it was sanctioned by a Catholic bishop -- a sign the church was ready to meet congregants in the century in which they are residing. It also held the delicious juxtaposition of modern technology aiding in an ancient rite. And it provided plenty of material for snickering

about impure thoughts and various other sins described in stilted ways.

But the truth is there are hundreds, if not thousands, of apps out there that guide those seeking guidance through big spiritual questions -- Bible apps, inspirational apps, Islamic apps that point to Mecca, Jewish apps that prompt prayers for travelers. And churches and religions have been turning to digital delivery since the dawn of the Internet.

But Web 2.0 has changed everything. The social Web has empowered people in the face of institutions -- governments, big businesses and old-line religions -- in ways the early Web did not. No longer do pronouncements come down digitally from on high, as if delivered on stone tablets. The Web is democratic now. We are creating the content we want to consume. The masses, if you will, are creating the Masses.

"There are all of these ways that people are sharing spiritual wisdom with one another," says Elizabeth Drescher, a lecturer in Santa Clara University's Religious Studies Department.

The Vatican acknowledged as much last month when Pope Benedict XVI issued an encyclical inviting Christians to participate in social networks, pointing out that "this network is an integral part of human life."

In other words, Drescher says, "People use this stuff in their lives, while they're talking, while they're having coffee, while they're having lunch. They're not holed up in a cubby looking at the computer."

So naturally, social networks are incorporating all aspects of life and the afterlife. Drescher sees examples every day.

The "Holy Roller" app is one of her favorites. "You decide you want some Biblical advice on the basis of a burden or a blessing. You pick one, shake it, and you get a Bible verse."

But it doesn't stop there. Once you have your verse, you tweet it or post it on Facebook and a discussion breaks out. Not only that, but the app designer encourages users to send him examples of blessings, burdens and, of course, favorite Bible verses.

"This is now a very bottom-up, grass-roots way of saying, 'Hey, here is a way to approach your spirituality. No church authority," Drescher says.

Drescher has been focused on digital media and spirituality for years. She just finished a book on the subject, "Tweet if You „¢ Jesus," which is due out in May. And she has little doubt that the ways of creating communion are evolving with technology.

Last spring Drescher and a graduate student created a Facebook prayer session called "Tweet-ecost," a play on the Christian holy day of Pentecost. They invited Facebook users around the world to post a prayer at 6 p.m. according to their local time. They created a communal prayer that rolled through the globe's time zones.

"By the end of that 24-hour period, thousands of people had participated in that prayer service," she says. "It was an idea that we literally had over a glass of wine one evening."

And while studying spontaneous spirituality is work for Drescher, who describes herself as a "fairly meat-and-potatoes Episcopalian," she is sometimes moved by its unexpected nature.

One day, Drescher came across a post from a Facebook friend who was starting a prayer of intercession, in which those gathered together pray for people who've touched their lives.

"People started listing prayer concerns," she says. "It was a deeply moving experience to see people responding to that, kind of lifting up in prayer in that context, and being aware that it really had meaning."

Meaning that in fact was as genuine as a message from your lips to God's ear.

Contact Mike Cassidy at mcassidy@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5536. Follow him at Twitter.com/mikecassidy.

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Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? | View Clip
02/27/2011
San Jose Mercury News - Online

Are you there God? It's me, twitter.com/mikecassidy.

Maybe it's no surprise that we've reached the point where, rather than looking to the heavens to find God, we're looking to the cloud. It's where we live now, with iPods, iPads, Android gizmos, social networks. The town square, complete with steepled church, has become a digital rectangle that we carry in our pockets.

I've been thinking about this since the recent excitement over "Confession: A Roman Catholic App," an iPhone application that offers Catholics a nifty way to prepare for the sacrament of confession.

Never mind that any Catholic could use help. When I was a kid, I constantly worried that I didn't have enough sins to recite to the priest. So, I'd make up a few extras, and essentially lie to a priest, which of course meant another transgression and another trip to confession.

As of last week, the app, which provides a digital inventory of bad acts, was the sixth-most-popular in Apple's lifestyle category, which in a bit of iLife synergy puts it right behind the iKamasutra.

Some of the buzz around the confession app was due to the fact that it was sanctioned by a Catholic bishop -- a sign the church was ready to meet congregants in the century in which they are residing. It also held the delicious juxtaposition of modern technology aiding in an ancient rite. And it provided plenty of material for snickering

about impure thoughts and various other sins described in stilted ways.

But the truth is there are hundreds, if not thousands, of apps out there that guide those seeking guidance through big spiritual questions -- Bible apps, inspirational apps, Islamic apps that point to Mecca, Jewish apps that prompt prayers for travelers. And churches and religions have been turning to digital delivery since the dawn of the Internet.

But Web 2.0 has changed everything. The social Web has empowered people in the face of institutions -- governments, big businesses and old-line religions -- in ways the early Web did not. No longer do pronouncements come down digitally from on high, as if delivered on stone tablets. The Web is democratic now. We are creating the content we want to consume. The masses, if you will, are creating the Masses.

"There are all of these ways that people are sharing spiritual wisdom with one another," says Elizabeth Drescher, a lecturer in Santa Clara University's Religious Studies Department.

The Vatican acknowledged as much last month when Pope Benedict XVI issued an encyclical inviting Christians to participate in social networks, pointing out that "this network is an integral part of human life."

In other words, Drescher says, "People use this stuff in their lives, while they're talking, while they're having coffee, while they're having lunch. They're not holed up in a cubby looking at the computer."

So naturally, social networks are incorporating all aspects of life and the afterlife. Drescher sees examples every day.

The "Holy Roller" app is one of her favorites. "You decide you want some Biblical advice on the basis of a burden or a blessing. You pick one, shake it, and you get a Bible verse."

But it doesn't stop there. Once you have your verse, you tweet it or post it on Facebook and a discussion breaks out. Not only that, but the app designer encourages users to send him examples of blessings, burdens and, of course, favorite Bible verses.

"This is now a very bottom-up, grass-roots way of saying, 'Hey, here is a way to approach your spirituality. No church authority," Drescher says.

Drescher has been focused on digital media and spirituality for years. She just finished a book on the subject, "Tweet if You „¢ Jesus," which is due out in May. And she has little doubt that the ways of creating communion are evolving with technology.

Last spring Drescher and a graduate student created a Facebook prayer session called "Tweet-ecost," a play on the Christian holy day of Pentecost. They invited Facebook users around the world to post a prayer at 6 p.m. according to their local time. They created a communal prayer that rolled through the globe's time zones.

"By the end of that 24-hour period, thousands of people had participated in that prayer service," she says. "It was an idea that we literally had over a glass of wine one evening."

And while studying spontaneous spirituality is work for Drescher, who describes herself as a "fairly meat-and-potatoes Episcopalian," she is sometimes moved by its unexpected nature.

One day, Drescher came across a post from a Facebook friend who was starting a prayer of intercession, in which those gathered together pray for people who've touched their lives.

"People started listing prayer concerns," she says. "It was a deeply moving experience to see people responding to that, kind of lifting up in prayer in that context, and being aware that it really had meaning."

Meaning that in fact was as genuine as a message from your lips to God's ear.

Contact Mike Cassidy at mcassidy@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5536. Follow him at Twitter.com/mikecassidy.

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The pros show how they learned from their mistakes | View Clip
02/27/2011
Chicago Tribune Collections

No one is born an investor. Even market pros have to learn how to buy stocks and bonds, and along the way they make plenty of mistakes.

Fortunately for us, a few of today's leading money minds, from financial advisers to behavioral finance experts, agreed to share stories of their personal investing gaffes. See if you've made some of the same errors yourself and what lessons you can learn from them.

Trying to outsmart the market

When Terrance Odean, a finance professor at University of California at Berkeley, began investing, he started by trading individual stocks.

"I thought that if you wanted to invest in the stock market, that's what you did," he said.

But this was before he began studying finance. "I had not read (Harry) Markowitz," the Nobel prize-winning economist known for his work on modern portfolio theory, he said.

He added with a laugh, "I hadn't read anything."

Instead, he did what many first-timers do: He put together a portfolio of stocks that "basically were attention-grabbing names," he said.

And not surprisingly, some of his picks didn't work out.

"I had never asked myself the really pertinent question," he said. "Even if this was a good company, was the (stock) price correct?"

He added: "And who was I betting against? In the U.S., odds are the person on the other side of the trade is a professional investor. What is the chance that you know more than a professional investor?"

The lesson: Beating the market is tough to do. Most investors will do better by taking a more passive approach and owning low-cost mutual funds, which is what Odean invests in now.

Making concentrated bets

Similarly, Meir Statman, a finance professor at Santa Clara University and author of "What Investors Really Want" (McGraw-Hill, $30) thought he could outsmart the market.

But he took a slightly different approach than Odean. In the early 1980s, Statman invested in three companies on Fortune magazine's survey of the least-admired companies.

His theory was that companies that are out of favor provide the highest rate of return to investors.

"But what I discovered," he said, "is that many of those dog stocks are deservedly dog stocks. And they go from being a dog to a dead dog."

The three stocks he chose turned out to be the dead-dog kind.

The lesson: Since it's hard to single out winners from losers in the market, you want to invest in a broad array of stocks.

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Telling A Lie; How Unethical? | View Clip
02/27/2011
Modernghana.com

Recently, I read an article titled: “Lying and Ethic”. Having seen some people who could nearly roast others simply because they have told a lie, I have to read this article with a keen interest.

From the article by Tim C. Mazur, Santa Clara University are the following extracts. The first is from the middle of the argument and the second from the concluding part.

“Though the nature of virtue ethics makes it difficult to assess the morality of individual acts, those who advocate this theory generally consider lying wrong because it opposes the virtue of honesty. There is some debate whether a lie told in pursuit of another virtue (e.g., compassion: the brother's lie to his sister's drunken husband is motivated by compassion for her physical safety) is right or wrong

Clearly, lying is an issue worth examining, as many people believe it is a bigger problem today than it has ever been... More likely, the problem is that too few persons adequately consider any ethical perspective when facing a situation that tempts a lie. Either way, it seems that the solution to our dissatisfaction begins with acknowledging the value of ethical reasoning and ends with a commitment to follow through with what we determine is the right thing to do”.

Since the day I first read this article, I have been wondering if the term “ethic” is not a linguistic confusion or better still a poor word, which cannot explain itself beyond what has been attributed to it, so it can exist.

I do not know about you, but I think any fast individual can go away with the view that the rule of ethic is not written on a stone. In fact, the term ethic might only be relevant within the ambit of acceptability and necessity in the society that defines it.

Talking about what is necessary and acceptable, anything as simple as making an armed person, in the case of a soldier, to shoot another person just because the victim has been defined as an enemy to a society or a system can be quite valid. Otherwise, what is even ethical in the job of killing people?

I am going to tell you a story you probably already know.

Two daughters thought it was right to have sex with their father in order to raise children. This is the biblical account of Lot and his daughters, (Genesis 19:30-38). To you, maybe, this can be unethical, but come to think of it. These victims were only trying to save their continuity as a people; therefore the question of being or non-ethical was irrelevant. Also because it was unnecessary at the circumstance they found themselves.

This can even further be expanded. Assuming that the above case was to be real in the 21st century, the said decision will still be more relevant. This is because the ethics and the codes of conduct of a people are created for the good of the same people, not the other way round. This is why any law, no matter how rigid and ancient must be destroyed and recreated if it is so considered to be in the best interest of the society or a system for which the said laws is existing.

Let's get more serious.

If you like, you can boast that you have never told a lie in your life, but let me tell you that you just might have succeeded in telling one today by your claim.

Lie in the Longman dictionary of English and culture was defined as “an untrue statement purposely made to deceive”. If I must add something here, that the word “deceive” was used in Longman dictionary does not necessarily translate the act of lying to be evil, instead the lie that was told should also be understood within the motive behind it.

In Esan, south of Nigeria, it is said that a man who loses the ability to lie is as good as doomed. And this is very easy to understand because one of the reasons for telling a lie is to find a solution to a problematic situation, not just for the purpose of deceiving people.

Of course, there are some individuals who just like the deception; they often tell their lies in order to harm their victims. Even then, it is still very important to consider the motive for the lie; else, telling a lie “to save a victim” and telling a lie “to harm a victim” is always what it is, “telling a lie”. In that case, the lie that was told should be less important compared to the motive for which it was told.

In more than 2000 years ago according to a biblical account, there was a great famine in the Middle East. The famine created a situation of migration and one of the people who migrated from the Middle East to Africa was Abraham and his wife, Sarah. They had gotten nearer to their destination when they realised that there was another situation. Sarah was a beautiful woman and that was a trap for Abraham. So he tried to resolve the immediate situation by telling the lie as followed: “and there Abraham said of his wife Sarah, "She is my sister". Then Abimelech king of Gerar sent for Sarah and took her,” Genesis 20:2 (New International Version).

I'm quite sure that the writer of the book of genesis did not call the above account a lie and that does not mean that what Abraham had said was a true statement. Therefore, what really matter is not the fact that a lie has been told; it is whether the lie itself is justifiable within the given situation.

For example, if the biblical Abraham has not said that his wife was his sister, he would most probably be killed, so it was very important to weigh the option of ethic and necessity at the circumstance. And when it comes to ethic, the situation should not be misleading.

Not until an ethic leads to the good of the given people and promotes their continuity, it might not truly be qualified to exist. Also because, a people first need to exist in order to have a conviction or define their own wrongs or rights.

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Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page? | View Clip
02/27/2011
Inland Valley Daily Bulletin - Online

Created: 02/24/2011 04:29:05 PM PST

Are you there God? It's me, twitter.com/mikecassidy.

Maybe it's no surprise that we've reached the point where, rather than looking to the heavens to find God, we're looking to the cloud. It's where we live now, with iPods, iPads, Android gizmos, social networks. The town square, complete with steepled church, has become a digital rectangle that we carry in our pockets.

I've been thinking about this since the recent excitement over "Confession: A Roman Catholic App," an iPhone application that offers Catholics a nifty way to prepare for the sacrament of confession.

Never mind that any Catholic could use help. When I was a kid, I constantly worried that I didn't have enough sins to recite to the priest. So, I'd make up a few extras, and essentially lie to a priest, which of course meant another transgression and another trip to confession.

As of last week, the app, which provides a digital inventory of bad acts, was the sixth-most-popular in Apple's lifestyle category, which in a bit of iLife synergy puts it right behind the iKamasutra.

Some of the buzz around the confession app was due to the fact that it was sanctioned by a Catholic bishop -- a sign the church was ready to meet congregants in the century in which they are residing. It also held the delicious juxtaposition of modern technology aiding in an ancient rite. And it provided plenty of material for snickering

about impure thoughts and various other sins described in stilted ways.

But the truth is there are hundreds, if not thousands, of apps out there that guide those seeking guidance through big spiritual questions -- Bible apps, inspirational apps, Islamic apps that point to Mecca, Jewish apps that prompt prayers for travelers. And churches and religions have been turning to digital delivery since the dawn of the Internet.

But Web 2.0 has changed everything. The social Web has empowered people in the face of institutions -- governments, big businesses and old-line religions -- in ways the early Web did not. No longer do pronouncements come down digitally from on high, as if delivered on stone tablets. The Web is democratic now. We are creating the content we want to consume. The masses, if you will, are creating the Masses.

"There are all of these ways that people are sharing spiritual wisdom with one another," says Elizabeth Drescher, a lecturer in Santa Clara University's Religious Studies Department.

The Vatican acknowledged as much last month when Pope Benedict XVI issued an encyclical inviting Christians to participate in social networks, pointing out that "this network is an integral part of human life."

In other words, Drescher says, "People use this stuff in their lives, while they're talking, while they're having coffee, while they're having lunch. They're not holed up in a cubby looking at the computer."

So naturally, social networks are incorporating all aspects of life and the afterlife. Drescher sees examples every day.

The "Holy Roller" app is one of her favorites. "You decide you want some Biblical advice on the basis of a burden or a blessing. You pick one, shake it, and you get a Bible verse."

But it doesn't stop there. Once you have your verse, you tweet it or post it on Facebook and a discussion breaks out. Not only that, but the app designer encourages users to send him examples of blessings, burdens and, of course, favorite Bible verses.

"This is now a very bottom-up, grass-roots way of saying, 'Hey, here is a way to approach your spirituality. No church authority," Drescher says.

Drescher has been focused on digital media and spirituality for years. She just finished a book on the subject, "Tweet if You „¢ Jesus," which is due out in May. And she has little doubt that the ways of creating communion are evolving with technology.

Last spring Drescher and a graduate student created a Facebook prayer session called "Tweet-ecost," a play on the Christian holy day of Pentecost. They invited Facebook users around the world to post a prayer at 6 p.m. according to their local time. They created a communal prayer that rolled through the globe's time zones.

"By the end of that 24-hour period, thousands of people had participated in that prayer service," she says. "It was an idea that we literally had over a glass of wine one evening."

And while studying spontaneous spirituality is work for Drescher, who describes herself as a "fairly meat-and-potatoes Episcopalian," she is sometimes moved by its unexpected nature.

One day, Drescher came across a post from a Facebook friend who was starting a prayer of intercession, in which those gathered together pray for people who've touched their lives.

"People started listing prayer concerns," she says. "It was a deeply moving experience to see people responding to that, kind of lifting up in prayer in that context, and being aware that it really had meaning."

Meaning that in fact was as genuine as a message from your lips to God's ear.

Contact Mike Cassidy at mcassidy@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5536. Follow him at Twitter.com/mikecassidy.

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A Companion to Early Modern Philosophy | View Clip
02/27/2011
ARN - Online

is a comprehensive guide to the most significant philosophers and philosophical concepts of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe.

Provides a comprehensive guide to all the important modern philosophers and modern philosophical movements.

Spans a wide range of philosophical areas and problems, including metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of science, ethics, political philosophy and aesthetics.

Written by leading scholars in the field.

Represents the most up-to-date research in the history of early modern philosophy.

Serves as an excellent supplement to primary readings.

Steven Nadler is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he is also the director of the Center for the Humanities. He is author of Arnauld and the Cartesian Philosophy of Ideas (1989), Malebranche and Ideas (1992), Spinoza: A Life (1999), and Spinoza's Heresy (2002).

Table of Contents

List of Contributors.

1. Introduction: Steven Nadler (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

Part I: The Seventeenth Century: The Continent:

2. Aristotelianism and Scholasticism in Early Modern Philosophy: M. W. F. Stone (King's College, London).

3. Platonism and Philosophical Humanism on the Continent: Christia Mercer (Columbia University).

4. The New Science: Kepler, Galileo, Mersenne: Brian Baigrie (University of Toronto).

5. René Descartes: Michael Della Rocca (Yale University).

6. Pierre Gassendi: Margaret J. Osler (University of Calgary).

7. Blaise Pascal: Graeme Hunter (University of Ottawa).

8. Antoine Arnauld: Elmar J. Kremer (University of Toronto).

9. Johannes Clauberg: Jean-Christophe Bardout (Université de Brest).

10. Occasionalism: La Forge, Cordemoy, Geulincx: Jean-Christophe Bardout (Université de Brest).

11. Nicolas Malebranche: Tad M. Schmaltz (Duke University).

12. Dutch Cartesian Philosophy: Theo Verbeek (University of Utrecht).

13. Cartesian Science: Régis and Rohault: Dennis Des Chene (Emory University).

14. Robert Desgabets: Patricia A. Easton (Claremont Graduate University).

15. Grotius and Pufendorf: N. E. Simmonds (Corpus Christi College, Cambridge).

16. Baruch Spinoza: Steven Nadler (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

17. Pierre Bayle: Todd Ryan (Trinity College, CT).

18. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz: R. S. Woolhouse (University of York).

Part II: The Seventeenth Century: Great Britain:

19. British Philosophy Before Locke: Jill Kraye (Warburg Institute, London).

20. Francis Bacon: Stephen Gaukroger (University of Sydney).

21. The Cambridge Platonists: Sarah Hutton (Middlesex University).

22. Thomas Hobbes: Tom Sorrell (University of Essex).

23. Robert Boyle: Lisa Downing (University of Illinois-Chicago).

24. John Locke: Edwin McCann (University of Southern California).

25. The English Malebrancheans: Stuart Brown (Open University).

26. Isaac Newton: Peter Kail (University of Edinburgh).

27. Women Philosophers in Early Modern England: Margaret Atherton (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee).

Part III: The Eighteenth Century: Great Britain:

28. Earl of Shaftesbury: Gideon Yaffe (University of Southern California).

29. George Berkeley: Charles McCracken (Michigan State University).

30. Frances Hutcheson: Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (Santa Clara University).

31. Bernard Mandeville: Harold J. Cook (University College, London).

32. David Hume: Marina Frasca-Spada (St. Catherine's College, Cambridge).

33. Adam Smith: Samuel Fleischacker (University of Illinois-Chicago).

34. Thomas Reid: Ronald E. Beanblossom (Ohio Northern University).

Part IV: The Eighteenth Century: The Continent:

35. German Philosophy After Leibniz: Martin Schönfeld (University of South Florida).

36. Giambattista Vico: Donald Phillip Verene (Emory University).

37. Aesthetics Before Kant: Ted Kinnaman (George Mason University).

38. Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Patrick Riley (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

39. Voltaire: Gary Gutting (University of Notre Dame).

40. Moses Mendelssohn: Daniel O. Dahlstrom (Boston University).

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Controversial cardinal's legacy still being written
02/27/2011
Ventura County Star - Sacramento Bureau

Feb. 27--It seemed a strange question to ask a man pledged to serve God. But as Manny Vega met with Cardinal Roger Mahony to explain the pain of being molested by a priest and return a Bible and crucifix because they made him feel uncomfortable, it was what he wanted to know.

"I sat there across the table from him and I asked him 'What do you think is going to happen when you make your way to the pearly gates? What do you think St. Peter is going to say?'" said Vega, a retired police detective from Oxnard.

"He sat there and looked at me and said, 'I'll leave that up to the grace of God.'"

Today, on his 75th birthday, Mahony retires as leader of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, a region that includes more than 5 million Catholics in the largest diocese nationwide. The first Los Angeles native to lead the diocese will be succeeded by Jose Gomez, formerly of San Antonio, the first Latino archbishop to lead a region that includes Ventura, Santa Barbara and Los Angeles counties.

Mahony will leave as the son of a chicken rancher who grew into a champion of immigration reform and social justice. Friends point to his work in pushing the diocese to embrace its diversity, fighting for the poor and building a $189 million cathedral, once dubbed the Rog Mahal, now celebrated as a Los Angeles landmark.

He is, depending on who is asked, a personable and sharp-witted leader, a guarded administrator focused on the image of the church and a man ready to leave behind administrative and financial weights so he can return to being a simple priest.

To Vega and many others, he's defined at least in part by the clergy abuse scandal and the once common practice of sending priests accused of molestation to therapy and then allowing them to continue ministry. They cite the record-setting $660 million settlement in 2007 with about 500 victims of abuse. They point to the ongoing process, designed as part of the settlement, to release personnel records of accused priests.

"To this day, they're still fighting tooth and ... nail not to let those records go," said Vega, abused as an altar boy at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in Oxnard. "It's never enough until the church becomes open and transparent about what they knew."

Archdiocese spokesman Tod Tamberg said the archdiocese is not blocking the release of records. He said the documents have been reviewed by a judge charged with determining what can be released.

"That is absolutely incorrect," he said of the assertion made by Vega and repeated by lawyers representing victims.

Judging Mahony

The fairness of judging Mahony's tenure through the lens of clergy abuse is debated. The inevitability of that judgment is not.

"It's sort like a wartime cardinal," said Tom Plante, a psychology professor at Santa Clara University, referring to the turbulence of the molestation scandal that exploded nationwide nine years ago. "It's sort of like whether you like or don't like (President George W.) Bush during those eight years, you have to talk about 9/11 and what happened after 9/11."

Mahony's legacy stretches back to North Hollywood where as a tall, skinny kid he peddled Sunday newspapers in front of St. Charles Borromeo Church. He worked at his father's poultry processing plant, learning to speak Spanish from the other workers.

"I was there one day when we had this raid by the Border Patrol," he said in a 5-year-old interview with CNN. "And these guys come flying in the doors with guns out. I had no idea what was happening, and (it) terrified all of us something awful. And I just never got that feeling or that image out of my mind ever."

On a path to become a priest since at least high school, he ended up at St. John's Seminary College in Camarillo, where he and others would visit labor camps. Sometimes, they would entertain the farm workers with music.

"He could not sing," said Monsignor Bob Gibson of Pasadena, a lifelong friend and a fellow student at the seminary. "He had many, many other attributes but singing was not one of the gifts that God gave him."

As a priest in Fresno, Mahony became friends with labor leader Cesar Chavez and mediated negotiations between farm workers and their employers. That passion to represent the vulnerable traces his career as archbishop.

He fought against measures blocking illegal immigrants from social services and joined demonstrations that turned downtown Los Angeles into one massive march of people chanting "Si Se Puede." He continues to advocate for reform that provides a pathway to legal status.

"He's always been one of the people," said Juvenal Centeno of Oxnard after a Monday morning Mass at Our Lady of Guadalupe. And when the cardinal comes to the parish, he speaks to the people directly in Spanish.

"He doesn't have anyone in between, saying what he's saying," Centeno said.

A Filipino woman at St. Anthony's Church in Oxnard showered the cardinal with similar praise. After she left, another parishioner who had been listening said she didn't want to offer any judgment but what she'd heard about the cardinal was mostly negative.

Champions and critics

He has his champions and others who say that after 26 years as archbishop they still aren't sure they really know him.

"I surely would not want to step in his shoes," said Ventura parishioner Ofelia Haynes, offering an assessment that seems a consensus.

Priests describe him as personable bordering on gregarious. But Mahony has long guarded what he says to the media, often rejecting requests for interviews including one made for this story. That too is part of the job, say his friends.

"He's trained as a bishop," said Monsignor Peter Nugent of St. John Eudes Church in Chatsworth who has known Mahony since high school. "Whatever you say in public, you're held to."

Priests point to changes Mahony made in the liturgy of the church and organizational reform that sectioned the massive diocese into regions. Scholars point to his focus on groups often marginalized by the church including women and gays.

Sheila Briggs, religion professor at USC, points at the 156-foot-tall bell tower and the mass of alabaster windows at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles.

Before the cathedral opened in 2002, debate focused on its price tag and whether the money should be spent elsewhere. It has become, said Briggs, a Catholic centerpiece -- a place where income, social status and ethnicity don't matter.

"At a period when Los Angeles got a lot of grand buildings, this is the one building where the poor are welcome," she said. "You don't see poor folks in the Disney Concert Hall.

Briggs described Mahony as a man of vision who grasps social justice issues but has also acted to protect the church.

"He's California," she said. "He's concerned with image and he's concerned with the image of the church."

That perception of Catholicism nationwide was rocked by the clergy abuse scandal that exploded in 2002. In the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, more than 600 people said they were abused by more than 240 priests or other religious leaders. Dozens of the priests served in Ventura County at some point in their careers.

Nearly all of the abuse predated Mahony's tenure as cardinal but records show instances on his watch where priests with known histories of abuse were allowed to stay in ministry.

Critics say the actions showed an archdiocese acting to protect itself by moving accused priests elsewhere. Defenders say the movement of priests -- replaced after the scandal broke by a policy of removing accused people from ministry -- reflected the belief that therapy could cure abusers.

An unsettled legacy

The scandal brought a $660 million settlement in 2007. Earlier, programs designed to protect children were adopted throughout the parish. The church has issued reports naming the accused abusers with some details of the events. A March 10 hearing will be held over the release of personnel records.

"The legacy is one that is not settled," said Tom Roberts, editor-at-large for the National Catholic Reporter. "What's in those documents and what's happened in his watch is surely going to be part of (Mahony's) story."

A federal grand jury investigation of Mahony's role in dealing with clergy abuse also was reported two years ago. Federal authorities won't comment on any aspect of the investigation.

Critics accuse Mahony of obstructing justice. Mahony's defenders praise the cardinal for dealing with an impossible situation.

"Those things weren't dealt with in the church or anywhere else for decades," said Nugent. "He had to deal with that. It kind of crashed in on him, most of which was not his doing."

Though he has reached the age of retirement, Mahony is stepping down by choice. He asked the pope to choose his successor, leading to the appointment of Gomez last April.

Friends say Mahony will live in the cathedral and focus on working for immigration reform. They say he already seems more lighthearted and talks of traveling to different parishes, sitting in for priests on vacation or sick leave.

"I think he's really looking forward to being just a simple priest again," said Gibson.

Vega has his own worries about the retirement. He is one of 20 altar boys at Our Lady of Guadalupe who say they were abused in the 1970s and 1980s by an associate pastor at the church, the Rev. Fidencio Silva.

He sees the personnel records as a way to reveal exactly what happened in the abuse scandal and the cardinal's role in dealing with it.

Now a private investigator whose case load includes clergy abuse, Vega worries people will see the cardinal's retirement as the end of the saga. They'll forget about it.

"People are going to say it's over and done," he said. "I can't let that happen."

Copyright © 2011 Ventura County Star, Calif.

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Apple's latest demand may backfire
02/27/2011
San Francisco Chronicle

Apple's recent decision to push for a 30 percent cut of subscription sales on its iPhone and iPad devices reportedly inspired a fresh round of inquiries from federal antitrust regulators. But the Cupertino tech giant's move may prove more of a strategic blunder than a legal one.

One of Apple's biggest advantages in the mobile-device market, the one people frequently cite in rationalizing their decision to go with its assorted iGadgets, is the wide lead it holds in applications.

The fact that publishers like the New York Times and Wired and subscription services like Netflix or Rhapsody feel compelled to build mobile apps first or exclusively for Apple devices is a powerful and sustaining differentiator. It's far more important than superior technology or a more intuitive user interface, gaps that appear to be closing.

Yet with the latest move, Apple has given publishers and other application developers an enormous financial incentive to rethink the advantage they've so far granted the company.

In addition to the 30 percent off the top of any subscription purchase in the iTunes Store, the new policies prevent publishers from linking to outside sites where customers could buy the content and require that prices in its store are the same or lower than those offered elsewhere.

Businesses are incredibly loath to publicly criticize Apple, so the strongly worded responses in the days after the release of these terms were glaring indications of the level of frustration.

"Before we cool down and come to our senses, we might as well share how we're feeling right now: we believe that your new policy smacks of greed," wrote Rich Ziade, the creator of Readability, a news aggregation app.

Jon Irwin, president of music subscription service Rhapsody, said in a statement the company will work with others on a "legal and business response," stressing that: "An Apple-imposed arrangement that requires us to pay 30 percent of our revenue to Apple ... is economically untenable."

Let's be clear. Today, Apple holds an overwhelming lead in the sale of tablets, the platform on which this debate will increasingly center, with about a 75 percent share of the global market.

Publishers and other subscription-service companies need to go where the audience is, and right now that's indisputably Apple. So there's not likely to be an exodus anytime soon.

But these are early days in the tablet market. The iPad isn't even a year old. Real alternatives are emerging, many publishers are in the thick of important decisions about their digital futures, and some believe Apple's policies could inadvertently hand away some critical momentum.

"Last week's announcement appeared to be a step too far," said Ned May, vice president at media research firm Outsell. "By Apple playing so tough, they're forcing the market to adopt other approaches, to work with other partners."

Google's One PassThe day after Apple's Feb. 15 announcement, Google finally offered up details on its own long-discussed service allowing publishers to sell content online and over mobile devices for a 10 percent cut of transactions. The service, called One Pass, also more readily grants publishers access to customer information, like the ZIP codes and e-mail addresses the industry relies on to tailor ads to users and cross-sell other products. Apple hangs onto that information itself unless consumers opt to have it shared.

Similarly, PayPal used the public flap over Apple's subscription announcement to remind the publishing world that its digital content checkout product charges just 5 percent plus 5 cents of the sales price.

Meanwhile, late last week the much-anticipated Motorola Xoom went on sale, allowing consumers to purchase the first tablet running a version of Google's Android operating system optimized for the devices. It's earned fairly positive initial reviews, including from The Chronicle. Dozens of other non-Apple tablets are on the way, including Research In Motion's PlayBook and Hewlett-Packard's TouchPad.

The difficulty has been for developers to make money on platforms created by anyone other than Apple, which is expected to reveal its next version of the iPad this week. The publisher frustrations could represent a golden opportunity for Google and others to prove they can. Of course, it's also possible that Apple will simply adjust its rates, if it concludes it has alienated too many potential partners.

We are already seeing Apple's stranglehold loosen. From the third quarter to the fourth, its worldwide tablet market share slipped from 95.5 percent to 75.3 percent, according to Strategy Analytics. Separately, while Apple boasts far more apps than Google's Android operating system, the latter has the momentum.

Closing the gapSince August, the number of Android apps leaped by 127 percent, compared with Apple's 44 percent, according to Lookout Inc. of San Francisco.

So this is shaping up to be a more competitive market, offering a growing number of reasons for businesses to consider developing for various platforms - and for Apple to not take developers for granted.

"It raises the stakes for Apple," said Eric Goldman, director of the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University. "The more people they (upset), the closer they get to that critical tipping point."

It's this perceived pliability of the market, among other reasons, that he and other attorneys said there's far from a slam-dunk antitrust case here.

Tim Bajarin of Creative Strategies shot down the very notion and argued that Apple's fees are reasonable, given the high cost print publications have long paid for distribution and the high value of appearing on Apple's gadgets.

"You're getting a targeted audience of 14 or 15 million iPad users, growing to another 30 to 35 million at the end of the calendar year," he said, citing his firm's estimates.

But amid the breathless critical praise, snaking launch day lines and soaring stock price, it's easy to understand how Apple can lose sight of an important fact: It needs software developers and content producers nearly as much as they need Apple.

Almost half of iPad owners say they use the devices to read newspapers and magazines, according to a not-yet-published survey from Forrester Research.

The iPhone and iPad wouldn't be anywhere near the consumer breakthroughs they've become, had Apple stuck to its original tack of not allowing third-party software on the devices. Of course, it would have cranked out popular software of its own, but no one company could have ever generated the varied brilliance on display in the App Store today: from Shazam to Pandora to iFart.

Apple, as the world's second-largest company, may appear bulletproof today. But seemingly impenetrable tech armor has been pierced before.

Several observers drew parallels to Apple's early history, when it created another revolutionary device, the Macintosh. It was elegant and technologically superior - and quickly overshadowed by the rise of Windows PCs that were easier and more lucrative to create software for.

"Apple certainly knows the risks," Goldman said. "It has to keep developers happy."

Copyright © 2011 San Francisco Chronicle

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The pros show how they learned from their mistakes
02/27/2011
Chicago Tribune

No one is born an investor. Even market pros have to learn how to buy stocks and bonds, and along the way they make plenty of mistakes.

Fortunately for us, a few of today's leading money minds, from financial advisers to behavioral finance experts, agreed to share stories of their personal investing gaffes. See if you've made some of the same errors yourself and what lessons you can learn from them.

Trying to outsmart the market

When Terrance Odean, a finance professor at University of California at Berkeley, began investing, he started by trading individual stocks.

"I thought that if you wanted to invest in the stock market, that's what you did," he said.

But this was before he began studying finance. "I had not read (Harry) Markowitz," the Nobel prize-winning economist known for his work on modern portfolio theory, he said.

He added with a laugh, "I hadn't read anything."

Instead, he did what many first-timers do: He put together a portfolio of stocks that "basically were attention-grabbing names," he said.

And not surprisingly, some of his picks didn't work out.

"I had never asked myself the really pertinent question," he said. "Even if this was a good company, was the (stock) price correct?"

He added: "And who was I betting against? In the U.S., odds are the person on the other side of the trade is a professional investor. What is the chance that you know more than a professional investor?"

The lesson: Beating the market is tough to do. Most investors will do better by taking a more passive approach and owning low-cost mutual funds, which is what Odean invests in now.

Making concentrated bets

Similarly, Meir Statman, a finance professor at Santa Clara University and author of "What Investors Really Want" (McGraw-Hill, $30) thought he could outsmart the market.

But he took a slightly different approach than Odean. In the early 1980s, Statman invested in three companies on Fortune magazine's survey of the least-admired companies.

His theory was that companies that are out of favor provide the highest rate of return to investors.

"But what I discovered," he said, "is that many of those dog stocks are deservedly dog stocks. And they go from being a dog to a dead dog."

The three stocks he chose turned out to be the dead-dog kind.

The lesson: Since it's hard to single out winners from losers in the market, you want to invest in a broad array of stocks.

"Now I know how important it is to diversify," Statman said. "Even if you're going to be right, you're only going to be right in, say, 52 percent of the cases. You can't put it all on red and expect to win. You have to spread it around."

Following the crowd

You also have to think for yourself.

In her mid-20s, Judith Ward landed an administrative job at T. Rowe Price, an investment-management company. When the company decided to go public in 1986, she jumped at the chance to buy shares.

But later that year, said Ward, now a certified financial planner at T. Rowe, "all the chatter was about how capital gains tax rates are going up. I had no idea what that meant to me personally, but the general advice was: Sell your stock."

For individual stocks, capital gains taxes are charged on the profit you earn when you sell the stock. Since Ward was young and investing for the long term, the jump in tax rates then would have had little or no effect on her.

But she sold the stock anyway and still regrets it.

"I had this great opportunity to buy stock in a company, and I just sold it because of what I heard other people saying that seemed important to them," she said. "I never took the time to ask, 'What does this mean personally for me?' "

The lesson: Do your homework. Make sure to investigate whether the latest trend will really benefit you.

----------

E-mail Carolyn Bigda at yourmoney@tribune.com

Photo (color): (Eraser)

COLUMN: Getting Started

Copyright © 2011 Chicago Tribune Company

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Nevada's budget shortfall is nothing new to lobbyist
02/27/2011
Las Vegas Review-Journal

By JOHN G. EDWARDS

LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL

For lobbyist Sean Higgins, the 2011 Nevada Legislative session will be like déjà vu.

It's the second time in recent years that Higgins has lobbied a Legislature struggling to make up a huge shortfall and balance the budget.

In 2003, Higgins and his client did their part to help then-Gov. Kenny Guinn resolve a budget stalemate between people advocating for state programs and people advocating for low taxes.

Higgins learned how to play offense and defense long before he became a lawyer or lobbyist. He played as a lineman for Bishop Gorman High School and for one season at Claremont McKenna College in California before a leg injury ended his football career.

In addition to handling governmental affairs for law firm Gordon Silver, he owns two bars — Three Angry Wives Pub and Tomfoolery Pub & Eatery. If you are a longtime Las Vegan who frequents the bars, Higgins probably knows your name.

Question: This isn't the first time you've watched a Nevada legislative session decide whether to raise taxes or cut government. Didn't you represent the Herbst family businesses, which own a slot route, during the 2003 legislative session?

Answer: Yes. I came up with an agreement for a tax increase on slot machines. It's called compromise. Did they want to spend that money? No. But the fact of the matter is they were a business based in Nevada that understood that they needed to step up and help at that time.

Gov. Guinn was masterful. He got input from both sides. He got input from all the business leaders.

This time, the No. 1 issue is going to be the budget and how we're going to fix this shortfall, whether it is $1 billion or $3 billion. That shortfall is going to affect every single business in Nevada. If you can't compromise, you'll get a stalemate.

Question: How tough are the challenges for lawmakers this year?

Answer: We're facing an unprecedented hard time in the state of Nevada. Because of that, you've got to work harder.

It will probably make me unpopular with Republicans, but, with that kind of a deficit, I think that (taxes) might have to be part of the solution. I want to do what's best for residents of the state of Nevada.

Question: What would you like to see the Legislature do this year?

Answer: Let's put a budget process together that can sustain the state, not just for the next two years but for quite some time whereby we aren't coming back to fix the taxes every two to four years.

We should have a priority-based budget, which means you set priorities for expenditures. You budget it from top to bottom and some of the programs don't make it.

Question: How far back do you trace your roots in Las Vegas?

Answer: I was born in Chicago but my family has lived here since I was 5. My father (Dr. Gerald Higgins) still practices as an orthopedic surgeon. My nine brothers and sisters all grew up here and have called this home other than for college and law school. We all graduated from Bishop Gorman High School, as have at least 10 of my nieces and nephews. My children attend there as well.

Through my parents, I knew almost every person who ran a resort on the Strip. I have known Mr. (Jerry) Herbst since I was single digits, probably 6 or 7, and have played football with his sons all the way through high school.

When I got out of law school, they were one of my biggest clients. I did a lot of their licensing for their service stations throughout the valley. I appeared regularly before the Clark County Commission, Henderson and Las Vegas city councils. Their sons had a slot route. So I started appearing before the Gaming Control Board and commission. I started representing slot route operators in government affairs.

Question: Do lobbyists actually write legislation sometimes? Do lawmakers need the expertise of a lobbyist to deal with complicated business issues?

Answer: Sometimes lobbyists help with writing bills. There are many times that the legislators rely on the Legislative Counsel Bureau to draft bills on their behalf. On the national level in Washington, it's the same way. It's probably happened since the inception of the United States of America.

Question: May Southern Nevada get more representation in the state Legislature because of rapid population growth?

Answer: Yes. One of the issues that you've seen floating around is adding seats to the Assembly or the Senate. What you do is allow truly rural districts to remain rural. But the cons are you're adding costs to government. Some people will argue there's no reason to add those extra people and those extra costs.

Question: What is key to being a successful lobbyist?

Answer: Legislators and the other lobbyists you deal with have to trust you even if you're on the other side of an issue.

Contact reporter John G. Edwards at jedwards@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-0420.

NEVADAN AT WORK

Name: Sean Higgins

Age: 46

Occupation: Of counsel, Gordon Silver.

Quotable: “It will probably make me unpopular with Republicans, but with that kind of a deficit, I think that (taxes) might have to be part of the solution. I want to do what's best for residents of the state of Nevada.”

VITAL STATISTICS

Name: Sean Higgins.

Position: Of counsel, Gordon Silver.

Family: Wife, Lynn; children, Samantha and Connor.

Education: Graduate of Bishop Gorman High School in Las Vegas; bachelor's of business administration from Southern Methodist University in Dallas; Santa Clara University School of Law in California.

Work history: Associate counsel at Cohen, Lee & Johnson from 1990 to 1993; general counsel for Herbst Gaming Inc. and head of government affairs for gasoline retailer Terrible Herbst Inc. from 1993 to July 2010; of counsel at Gordon Silver since July.

Hobbies: Skiing, riding Harley-Davidson motorcycle, watching his children play soccer and football.

Favorite book: History books, including Shelby Foote's Civil War trilogy and “His Excellency: George Washington” by Joseph Ellis.

Hometown: Las Vegas.

In Las Vegas since: 1969.

Gordon Silver is at 3960 Howard Hughes Parkway and can be reached at 796-5555.

Copyright © 2011 Las Vegas R-J. All rights reserved.

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DIGITAL SPIRITUALITY
02/27/2011
San Jose Mercury News

Are you there God? It's me, twitter.com/mikecassidy.

Maybe it's no surprise that we've reached the point where, rather than looking to the heavens to find God, we're looking to the cloud. It's where we live now, with iPods, iPads, Android gizmos, social networks. The town square, complete with steepled church, has become a digital rectangle that we carry in our pockets.

I've been thinking about this since the recent excitement over "Confession: A Roman Catholic App," an iPhone application that offers Catholics a nifty way to prepare for the sacrament of confession.

Never mind that any Catholic could use help. When I was a kid, I constantly worried that I didn't have enough sins to recite to the priest. So, I'd make up a few extras, and essentially lie to a priest, which of course meant another transgression and another trip to confession.

As of last week, the app, which provides a digital inventory of bad acts, was the sixth-most-popular in Apple's lifestyle category, which in a bit of iLife synergy puts it right behind the iKamasutra.

Some of the buzz around the confession app was due to the fact that it was sanctioned by a Catholic bishop -- a sign the church was ready to meet congregants in the century in which they are residing. It also held the delicious juxtaposition of modern technology aiding in an ancient rite. And it provided plenty of material for snickering about impure thoughts and various other sins described in stilted ways.

But the truth is there are hundreds, if not thousands, of apps out there that guide those seeking guidance through big spiritual questions -- Bible apps, inspirational apps, Islamic apps that point to Mecca, Jewish apps that prompt prayers for travelers. And churches and religions have been turning to digital delivery since the dawn of the Internet.

But Web 2.0 has changed everything. The social Web has empowered people in the face of institutions -- governments, big businesses and old-line religions -- in ways the early Web did not. No longer do pronouncements come down digitally from on high, as if delivered on stone tablets. The Web is democratic now. We are creating the content we want to consume. The masses, if you will, are creating the Masses.

"There are all of these ways that people are sharing spiritual wisdom with one another," says Elizabeth Drescher, a lecturer in Santa Clara University's Religious Studies Department.

The Vatican acknowledged as much last month when Pope Benedict XVI issued an encyclical inviting Christians to participate in social networks, pointing out that "this network is an integral part of human life."

In other words, Drescher says, "People use this stuff in their lives, while they're talking, while they're having coffee, while they're having lunch. They're not holed up in a cubby looking at the computer."

So naturally, social networks are incorporating all aspects of life and the afterlife. Drescher sees examples every day.

The "Holy Roller" app is one of her favorites. "You decide you want some Biblical advice on the basis of a burden or a blessing. You pick one, shake it, and you get a Bible verse."

But it doesn't stop there. Once you have your verse, you tweet it or post it on Facebook and a discussion breaks out. Not only that, but the app designer encourages users to send him examples of blessings, burdens and, of course, favorite Bible verses.

"This is now a very bottom-up, grass-roots way of saying, 'Hey, here is a way to approach your spirituality. No church authority," Drescher says.

Drescher has been focused on digital media and spirituality for years. She just finished a book on the subject, "Tweet if You ?¢ Jesus," which is due out in May. And she has little doubt that the ways of creating communion are evolving with technology.

Last spring Drescher and a graduate student created a Facebook prayer session called "Tweet-ecost," a play on the Christian holy day of Pentecost. They invited Facebook users around the world to post a prayer at 6 p.m. according to their local time. They created a communal prayer that rolled through the globe's time zones.

"By the end of that 24-hour period, thousands of people had participated in that prayer service," she says. "It was an idea that we literally had over a glass of wine one evening."

And while studying spontaneous spirituality is work for Drescher, who describes herself as a "fairly meat-and-potatoes Episcopalian," she is sometimes moved by its unexpected nature.

One day, Drescher came across a post from a Facebook friend who was starting a prayer of intercession, in which those gathered together pray for people who've touched their lives.

"People started listing prayer concerns," she says. "It was a deeply moving experience to see people responding to that, kind of lifting up in prayer in that context, and being aware that it really had meaning."

Meaning that in fact was as genuine as a message from your lips to God's ear.

Contact Mike Cassidy at mcassidy@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5536. Follow him at Twitter.com/mikecassidy.

Copyright © 2011 San Jose Mercury News

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Upcoming Parent Ed Speaker -- Dr. Jerry Shapiro | View Clip
02/26/2011
Menlo Park Patch

Location: 1895 Oak Knoll Ln, Menlo Park, CA 94025 When:
March 2, 2011
Time: 7:30pm–9:00pm


Major periodicals, including Time and Newsweek, sport headlines suggesting there may be a "Boy Crisis."  Whether it's a full-blown crisis or not, there is no doubt that boys are falling behind girls in school.  Come listen to Dr. Shapiro explore these issues for boys and offer a host of solutions.  Topics will include:


 


          how to better talk so boys will listen


          how to provide more boy-centered learning experiences


          how to avoid gender stereotyping


          how boys learn best


          myths of boyhood


 


Dr. Shapiro has been working with parents and families for four decades.  He is aLicensed Clinical Psychologist and is the Professor of Counseling Psychology at Santa Clara University.  He is the author of nine books, including  The Measure of a Man: Becoming the Father You Wish Your Father Had Been .  He has appeared in national broadcast and print media including  The Oprah Winfrey Show  and the  CBS Morning Show .




 
Website: http://www.oakknollschool.com/calendars/

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March Cultural Events; BAY AREA | View Clip
02/26/2011
India Currents

Cinequest Film Festival 21, a dynamic thirteen-day event of over 200 international films=. Over 10,000 artists have attended Cinequest Film Festival to date. Exhibiting unique social and artistic visions from around the globe, Cinequest's dynamic festival engages audiences in thought-provoking dialogue, giving film artists and film lovers alike an opportunity to connect. Furthermore, Cinequest provides cutting edge technology and moviemaking forums to empower professionals and students. The festival will feature four Indian/Indian-themed films. Tuesday, March 1-Sunday, March 13. The California Theatre, The San Jose Repertory Theatre and Camera 12 Cinemas. $10 general; $7 matinee; $7 seniors; $5 students. (408) 295-FEST (3378). www.cinequest.org. (See story.)

Mahashivaratri Classical Dance Celebration. Dance schools representing several classical styles come together on Mahashivaratri each year to pay homage to the God of Dance, Shiva/Nataraja. Anuradha Prabhashanker, the creator of this volunteer-run event. In the past, the event has featured stalwarts such as Mythili Kumar, Nirmala Madhava, Vidhya Subramanian, and Vishnu Tattva Das presenting their own and their gurus' legendary works. The program typically starts with bhajans and instrumental music, followed by dance presentations. This year's lineup promises five dance styles and a large group item. 6:30 p.m. Unitarian Universalist Church, Main Hall, 505 E. Charleston Road, Palo Alto. Free. RSVP: (408) 252-6046; or anuradhap@sbcglobal.net.

From There to Here: Modern and Contemporary Art from India, presentation by Kristen Evangelista, associate curator, San Jose Museum of Art, and Betty Seid, independent curator. 5:15 p.m. Cummings Art Building, AR2, Stanford University, Palo Alto. southasia@lists.stanford.edu.

Words of Wisdom: Transparent Images Lyrical Arabic, calligraphy and images by Indian artist Salma Arastu. Final part of ICCNC Series Women and the Word: Muslim Women Artists Explore Spiritual Calligraphy. March 4, 7-9 p.m. opening reception. Exhibit runs until Tuesday, March 29, 12-5 p.m., or by appointment: (510) 832-7600. ICCNC, 1433 Madison St., Oakland. (510) 868-4398. www.salmaarastu.com.

Dancing Kashi: Discovering the Sacred City Through Words, Movement and Image. A solo odissi dance piece that explores the holy city of Banaras in its modern and ancient manifestations. This is the culminating performance of a research project by Stanford junior Hannah Kopp-Yates, under the guidance of Jyoti Rout. Join in a pilgrimage to India's pulsing spiritual heart. March 4-5, 8 p.m. Roble Theater, 374 Santa Teresa Street, Stanford University, Palo Alto. Free. Register: http://bit.ly/fYNMAJ. (510) 289-6169. hannahky@stanford.edu

Global Walk for India's Missing Girls, an event to protest the daily murder of over 7,000 baby girls in India and to create awareness and remember the victims of genocide. Featuring speakers Harmesh Kumar, Manju Seal, Baljit Sandhu, and Sudha Reddy. 11 a.m. San Francisco City Hall, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlet Place, San Francisco. walkindiasf@gmail.com. www.petalsinthedust.com.

India Literacy Project Fest 2011. India Literacy Project (ILP), a non-profit organization striving towards a fully literate India, invites you to join its annual music festival. The music festival will feature performances by prominent Bay Area artists in Indian Classical and Bollywood music. Program Highlights: Jugalbandhi (Indian classical) by Srikanth Chary (veena), Prasad Jogalekar (sitar), Bollywood music performance by Jigary, a popular Bay Area Indian band. 6-9 p.m. Foothill College, Smithwick Theatre, 12345 El Monte Ave., Los Altos Hills. $15 general; $10 child. Tickets: www.ilpnet.org/ilpfest/PurchaseTickets. ilpfest@ilpnet.org. www.ilpnet.org/ilpfest.

2011 Winter Concert Series with Ashish Tare (tabla solo), Sumita Chatterji (vocal), Brad Van Cleave (tabla), Mindia Devi Klein (flute), Brad Van Cleave (tabla), Mallar Bhattacharya (sarod), and Nilan Chaudhuri (tabla). Presented by the Ali Akbar College of Music. 7 p.m. 215 West End Ave., San Rafael. $15 general; $12 members/seniors/students. (415) 454-6372. www.aacm.org.

Grounding Kashmir: Experience and Everyday Life on Both Sides of the Line of Control, a symposium sponsored by The Center for South Asia and the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies at Stanford University. Disputed between India and Pakistan since 1947, the border region of Kashmir has tragically become the most contested and militarized zone in the world today. Research on this enduring South Asian conflict has been over-determined by a myopic security perspective, which centers on the changing contours of “Kashmir policy,” interstate rivalries, and local insurgencies. But how has ordinary life, relationships between generations, and life prospects been shaped by decades of insecurity, violence, and dispossession? How can we make sense of the multiple lineages of the dispute, and the different ways in which it has imposed itself on political subjectivities in the affected regions? The presentations at the symposium will collectively illuminate the diverse trajectories of the Kashmir dispute through a historical, ethnographic, and literary lens, focusing on social imaginaries, everyday realities, and cultural politics. March 5-6. Stanford Humanities Center, 424 Santa Teresa St., Stanford. Registration: www.stanford.edu/group/ica/groundingkashmirregistration.fb. http://southasia.stanford.edu/conferences/grounding_kashmir_symposium.

Food for Education Benefit Event, featuring keynote speaker Deepak Chopra, world-renowned author and speaker. Presented by Akshaya Patra. 5:30 p.m. India Community Center, 525 Los Coches St., Milpitas. $140. (408) 505-9416. wwwfoodforeducation.org.

Jis Lahore Nai Dekhya O Jamyai Nai, a play by Asghar Wajahat in Hindi/Urdu with English subtitles. Directed by Monica Mehta Chitkara and produced by Manjusha Gangadharan, Naatak's 35th production is the story of a Muslim family that migrates from Lucknow to Lahore in 1947 and is allotted a haveli vacated by a departing Hindu family. Drama ensues when they find an old Hindu woman living in the haveli. Asghar Wajahat's classic was first performed by Naya Theatre under the direction of Habib Tanvir, who took the play to Karachi, Lahore, Sydney, New York, Dubai, and all over India. The play has also been performed by Ank Theatre group under the direction of Dinesh Thakur and by several others in Indian regional languages. Sunday, March 6, 5 p.m.; Friday, March 11, 8 p.m.; and Sunday, March 12, 5 p.m. Cubberley Theater, 4000 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. $20. Tickets and info: 408-596-3074; tickets@naatak.com; www.naatak.com.

Shorelines: Space and Rights in South Asia, talk by Ajantha Subramanian. 5-7 p.m. Building 50, Room 51, Stanford University, Palo Alto. southasia@lists.stanford.edu.

Maitri's 20th Anniversary and Open House. Location and details TBA. www.maitri.org.

Youth Producing Change, featuring short films created by teens showcased in Adobe Youth Voices and Human Rights Watch's yearlong global film festival. Their film topics include some of the most pressing human rights and social issues of our time, including environmental contamination, land and water rights, child labor, LGBT acceptance, political asylum, national identity, refugee life, and ethnic persecution. This year's festival will present films from youth in India, Afghanistan, Australia, Democratic Republic of Congo, and the U.S. Come meet the teen filmmakers and watch their work that has been featured by The Wall Street Journal, World News, CNN, Channel One, The Leonard Lopate Show, and more. Screening, Q&A, Reception: Thursday, March 10, 7 p.m. Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, 701 Mission St., San Francisco. $8 general; $6 YBCA member/student/senior/teacher. www.ybca.org. Box office: (415) 978-2787. TV Broadcast: Tuesday, March 15, 8 p.m. Link TV. www.linktv.org/reception. Video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=cK-ID5JlK4s. www.hrw.org/iff. (See story.)

Bharatanatyam Arangetram of Krishnapriya Somasekharan, student of Indumathy Ganesh, artistic director of Nrithyollasa Dance Academy. Accompanied by Indumathy Ganesh (nattuvangam), Asha Ramesh (vocal), N. Narayan (mridangam), Shanthi Narayan (violin), and Ashwin Krishnakumar (flute). 4 p.m. Jackson Theater, Ohlone College. 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont. Free. (925) 485-1766. info@nldance.com. www.nldance.com.

Scarlet Night: An Affair of the Heart? An entertainment extravaganza featuring a fashion show, casino, and a banquet. The South Asian Heart Center, the first nonprofit committed to reducing the incidence of heart disease, is emerging as a center of excellence in preventive care. Organized by South Asian Heart Center, El Camino Hospital. 6-11:30 p.m. San Jose Convention Center, 150 W. San Carlos St., San Jose. Tickets $125, $200.650 940-7242. scarlet@southasianheartcenter.org. www.southasianheartcenter.org/scarlet2011. Register: www.regonline.com/scarlet2011. (See story.)

Holi 2011 with many colors, music, and food, and music by DJ Shem. Presented by Janyaa. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Library field, 10800 Torre Ave., Cupertino. $7; children under 5 free. http://janyaa/holievent_reg.

Karnatik Vocal Concert with Anil Narasimha (vocal) accompanied by Ajay Narasimha (violin), followed by a vocal concert with Carnatica Brothers K.N. Shashikiran and Chitravina P. Ganesh. Organized by

South India Fine Arts. 1 p.m. India Community Center, 525 Los Coches St., Milpitas. marketing@southindiafinearts.org. www.southindiafinearts.org

Civility at the Limits of the Political: India, Europe and the Spirit, lecture. March 16-17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Stanford Humanities Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto. southasia@lists.stanford.edu.

Meditation Is Medication: the Physiology of Stress and Stress Reduction, part of the Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes Lecture Series. Organized by ICC and the South Asian Heart Center. 7 p.m. India Community Center, 525 Los Coches St., Milpitas. Free; registration required. (408) 934-1130. www.indiacc.org.

Upaj: Improvise, a special presentation for the opening night San Francisco Interntaional Asian Film Festival screening followed with Chitresh Das and Jason Samuels Smith, and conversation with the filmmakers. Special dance performance by Chhandam Youth Group. Gala follows. Organized by San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival. 7 p.m. screening; 9 p.m. gala. Screening/performance: Montgomery Theater, 271 S. Market St., San Jose; Gala: San Jose Museum of Art, 110 S. Market St., San Jose. $30 screening; $50 screening and gala. www.caamedia.org.

BollywoodSF, featuring Bollywood and reggae floor. Presented by DJPrecautionSF. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Mist Nightclub, 316 11th St., San Francisco. (415) 552-MIST. www.djprecautionsf.com. www.mistsf.com.

Insights on the Middle East at WorldAffairs 2011, with featured keynote speakers Fareed Zakaria, host of “Fareed Zakaria GPS” on CNN, editor-at-large for TIME magazine, and columnist for The Washington Post; and James Zogby, founder and president of The Arab American Institute. Zakaria has been conducting key interviews and tracking the situation as it unfolds on the ground in Egypt. Zogby is a major pollster in the Arab world, will bring years of detailed statistical insight into the trends and conditions leading up to these historic events in the Middle East. Presented by the World Affairs Council. March 18-19. The St. Regis, 125 3rd St., San Francisco. (415) 293.4600. info@wacsf.org. www.itsyourworld.org.

Silicon Valley Reads, talk and book signing with Michelle Richmond, author of The Year of Fog. There will be a panel discussion afterward. Co-sponsored by Indian Business & Professional Women (IBPW). 2 p.m. India Community Center, 525 Los Coches St., Milpitas. www.IBPW.net. www.indiacc.org.

Classical Hindustani Concert, with Shaunak Abhishekhi (cocal), Harshad Kanetkar (tabla), and Uday Kulkarni (harmonium). Organized by Basant Bahar. 5:30 p.m. Jain Temple, 722 S. Main St., Milpitas. $25 general; members free. (408) 390-7094. contact@basantbahar.org. www.basantbahar.org.

10th Annual Unity Dinner, featuring prominent leaders from Indian and other immigrant communities, along with local and state government representatives. Keynote speaker Mohammad H. Qayoumi, president, California State University, East Bay; emcee Jim Wieder, former Channer 4 anchor; 10th anniversary honorees: Ro Khanna and Ash Kalra (rising stars of Indo-American community); India Currents (Vandana Kumar) for Excellence in Journalism. Entertainment will be provided by Dance Identity, and dancing and music by DJ Bitzy.6:15-11:30 p.m. Fremont Marriott, 46100 Landing Parkway, Fremont. $85. jeevanzutshi@aol.com. www.indocommunity.us. (See story.)

Tales of Temple Dance, a dance-drama depicting the evolution of bharatanatyam from the heavens to stage. Concept, choreography, and artistic direction by Sundara Swaminathan. Presented by Kala Vandana Dance Company. Saturday, March 26, 6 p.m., and Sunday, March 27, 2 p.m. Mayer Theater, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara. $15 general; $12 student/senior. (408) 238-8321. Info and tickets: www.kalavandana.org.

Sri Ramaarpanam, a bharatanatyam recital with Shilpa Torvi. Presented by Shri Krupa Dance Company. 4 p.m. 4450 McCoy Ave,, San Jose. Tickets: ayodhyecha.raja@yahoo.com. www.shrikrupa.org. (See story.)

Swan Lake, an enthralling mohiniattam ballet by Vijayalakshmi of New Delhi, performed with live orchestra. Organized by South India Fine Arts. 3:30 p.m. Venue TBA. marketing@southindiafinearts.org. www.southindiafinearts.org.

ICC Kids Art Contest, for children ages 3-12. This year's theme is “Images of India”; children will be asked to create pictures showing their favorite images of India. 3 p.m. India Community Center, 525 Los Coches St., Milpitas. $5 per child; ICC members free. (408) 934-1130. www.indiacc.org.

Sriyah: Dance Performance by The Nrityagram Dance Ensemble, regarded as one of the foremost dance companies in India. Since 1996, the year of their life-changing New York debut, they have toured the U.S. annually and performed in Denmark, Portugal, the Middle East, Singapore, Japan, and elsewhere. “Sriyah” is a selection of works created over a decade by artistic director Surupa Sen. Nrityagram's creative journey started in 2000 with the piece, “Sri in Search of the Goddess.” It was followed by “Ansh” (2004), “Sacred Space” (2006), and “Pratima: Reflection” (2008). “Sriyah” will include dances from each of these works. The New Yorker listed Vibhakta from Pratima: Reflection in “The 10 best dance performances of 2008.” Presented by the California Institute of Integral Studies, Public Programs. 8-11 p.m. Palace of Fine Arts Theatre, 3301 Lyon St., San Francisco. www.palaceoffinearts.org. $25, $35, $50. (415) 575-6175. publicprograms@ciis.edu. www.ciis.edu/publicprograms.

Pandit Habib Khan Day, Hindustani classical music presented by The Children of Gurukul, with chief guests Madhusudan Borde and Usha Borde. 7 a.m. Kumar residence, 2759 Gold Meadow Court, San Jose. (408) 528-0786. habibkhan@comcast.net. www.habibkhan.com.

Asha Holi 2011, colors, bhangra, hip hop, games, food, kids corner, and special dance performances. Proceeds go toward funding primary education for underprivileged children in India. Organized by Asha-Stanford. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sanhill fields, Stanford University, Palo Alto. Tickets: www.ashanet.org/stanford/events/holi2011.

2011 Spring Recital, featuring 80 Abhinaya students in a medley of traditional pieces. Presented by Abhinaya Dance Company of San Jose. 4 p.m. Louis B. Mayer Theater, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara. $15 general; $10 student/senior; members free. (408) 871-5959. www.abhinaya.org.

Spring Faire and Open House, a day of multicultural entertainment, games, crafts, and classroom visits of Njeri's Morning Glory School. The entertainment will reflect the school's dynamic community, with its faculty, staff, and families hailing from the Americas, Africa, Europe, and across Asia. Featuring sitar performance by Pandit Habib Khan, an accomplished composer and vocalist, who is as much at ease with light classical and devotional music as he is with pure classical renderings of ragas. His talent further extends beyond the traditional genres of India to embrace a highly creative exploration of Eastern/Western modes of music. Organized by Njeri's Morning Glory School. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 4250 Latimer Ave., San Jose. Free. (408) 255-5520. admin@njerismorningglory.com. njerismorningglory.com. habibkhan.com.

The 30th Annual Northern California Book Awards presenting the Fred Cody Award for Lifetime Achievement to Tamim Ansary, winner of last year's nonfiction book award for Destiny Disrupted. Ansary is also the author of West of Kabul, East of New York: An Afghan American Story and a great many books for children. He was born in Afghanistan and lived there until high school when he won a scholarship to Colorado Rocky Mountain School. Ansary also edited and published a group of essays by young Afghans entitled Snapshots: This Afghan American Life. He moderates the San Francisco Writers Workshop. Also awarded will be the Special Recognition Award to Indivisible: An Anthology of Contemporary South Asian American Poetry, edited by Neelanjana Banerjee, Summi Kaipa, and Pireeni Sundaralingam. 1-2:30 p.m. Koret Auditorium, San Francisco Public Library's Main Branch, 100 Larkin St., San Francisco. Free. A book signing and reception with the authors will follow in the Latino/Hispanic Room, 2:30-4:00 p.m. (510) 525-5476. www.poetryflash.org.

Violin Recital with world renowned violin duo Ganesh and Kumaresh. Organized by South India Fine Arts. 3:30 p.m. India Community Center, 525 Los Coches St., Milpitas. marketing@southindiafinearts.org. www.southindiafinearts.org.

Vocal Concert with living legend of Karnatik music R.K.Srikantan, accompanied by R.S. Ramakanth (vocal). Organized by South India Fine Arts. 7 p.m. India Community Center, 525 Los Coches St., Milpitas. marketing@southindiafinearts.org. www.southindiafinearts.org.

Sarod Concert with Amjad Ali Khan. When Khan was 6 years old when he gave his first recital of sarod. Taught by his father and guru, Haafiz Ali Khan of Gwalior, Amjad Ali Khan was born to the illustrious Bangash lineage rooted in the Senia Bangash School of music. Today he shoulders the sixth generation inheritance of this legendary lineage. After his debut, the career graph of this musical legend took the speed of light, and on its way the Indian classical music scene was witness to regular and scintillating bursts of raga supernovas. And thus, the world saw the sarod being given a new and yet timeless interpretation. Khan will be joined by his two sons, Amaan Ali Khan and Ayaan Ali Khan. Presented by California Institute of Integral Studies, Public Programs. 8-11 p.m. Palace of Fine Arts Theatre, 3301 Lyon St., San Francisco. www.palaceoffinearts.org. $25, $35, $50, $65. (415) 575-6175. publicprograms@ciis.edu. www.ciis.edu/publicprograms.

Maestro Ali Akbar Khan's Annual Birthday Celebration featuring Aashish Khan, Shujaat Khan, Swapan Chaudhuri, Alam Khan, and many others. Freight and Salvage, 2020 Addison St., Berkeley. Free afternoon programs; ticketed evening programs. (510) 644-2020. info@freightandsalvage.org. www.aacm.org.

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Controversial cardinal's legacy still being written | View Clip
02/26/2011
Ventura County Star - Online

Ventura County Star

Jason Redmond / Star staff Los Angeles 5/10/06: Cardinal Roger Mahony gives a blessing as he presides over a Mexican Mother's Day mass at Our Lady of Angels Cathedral in Los Angeles on Wednesday, May 10.

It seemed a strange question to ask a man pledged to serve God. But as Manny Vega met with Cardinal Roger Mahony to explain the pain of being molested by a priest and return a Bible and crucifix because they made him feel uncomfortable, it was what he wanted to know.

"I sat there across the table from him and I asked him 'What do you think is going to happen when you make your way to the pearly gates? What do you think St. Peter is going to say?'" said Vega, a retired police detective from Oxnard.

"He sat there and looked at me and said, 'I'll leave that up to the grace of God.'"

Today, on his 75th birthday, Mahony retires as leader of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, a region that includes more than 5 million Catholics in the largest diocese nationwide. The first Los Angeles native to lead the diocese will be succeeded by José Gomez, formerly of San Antonio, the first Latino archbishop to lead a region that includes Ventura, Santa Barbara and Los Angeles counties.

Mahony will leave as the son of a chicken rancher who grew into a champion of immigration reform and social justice. Friends point to his work in pushing the diocese to embrace its diversity, fighting for the poor and building a $189 million cathedral, once dubbed the Rog Mahal, now celebrated as a Los Angeles landmark.

He is, depending on who is asked, a personable and sharp-witted leader, a guarded administrator focused on the image of the church and a man ready to leave behind administrative and financial weights so he can return to being a simple priest.

To Vega and many others, he's defined at least in part by the clergy abuse scandal and the once common practice of sending priests accused of molestation to therapy and then allowing them to continue ministry. They cite the record-setting $660 million settlement in 2007 with about 500 victims of abuse. They point to the ongoing process, designed as part of the settlement, to release personnel records of accused priests.

"To this day, they're still fighting tooth and ... nail not to let those records go," said Vega, abused as an altar boy at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in Oxnard. "It's never enough until the church becomes open and transparent about what they knew."

Archdiocese spokesman Tod Tamberg said the archdiocese is not blocking the release of records. He said the documents have been reviewed by a judge charged with determining what can be released.

"That is absolutely incorrect," he said of the assertion made by Vega and repeated by lawyers representing victims.

Judging Mahony

The fairness of judging Mahony's tenure through the lens of clergy abuse is debated. The inevitability of that judgment is not.

"It's sort like a wartime cardinal," said Tom Plante, a psychology professor at Santa Clara University, referring to the turbulence of the molestation scandal that exploded nationwide nine years ago. "It's sort of like whether you like or don't like (President George W.) Bush during those eight years, you have to talk about 9/11 and what happened after 9/11."

Mahony's legacy stretches back to North Hollywood where as a tall, skinny kid he peddled Sunday newspapers in front of St. Charles Borromeo Church. He worked at his father's poultry processing plant, learning to speak Spanish from the other workers.

"I was there one day when we had this raid by the Border Patrol," he said in a 5-year-old interview with CNN. "And these guys come flying in the doors with guns out. I had no idea what was happening, and (it) terrified all of us something awful. And I just never got that feeling or that image out of my mind ever."

On a path to become a priest since at least high school, he ended up at St. John's Seminary College in Camarillo, where he and others would visit labor camps. Sometimes, they would entertain the farm workers with music.

"He could not sing," said Monsignor Bob Gibson of Pasadena, a lifelong friend and a fellow student at the seminary. "He had many, many other attributes but singing was not one of the gifts that God gave him."

As a priest in Fresno, Mahony became friends with labor leader Cesar Chavez and mediated negotiations between farm workers and their employers. That passion to represent the vulnerable traces his career as archbishop.

He fought against measures blocking illegal immigrants from social services and joined demonstrations that turned downtown Los Angeles into one massive march of people chanting "Si Se Puede." He continues to advocate for reform that provides a pathway to legal status.

"He's always been one of the people," said Juvenal Centeno of Oxnard after a Monday morning Mass at Our Lady of Guadalupe. And when the cardinal comes to the parish, he speaks to the people directly in Spanish.

"He doesn't have anyone in between, saying what he's saying," Centeno said.

A Filipino woman at St. Anthony's Church in Oxnard showered the cardinal with similar praise. After she left, another parishioner who had been listening said she didn't want to offer any judgment but what she'd heard about the cardinal was mostly negative.

Champions and critics

He has his champions and others who say that after 26 years as archbishop they still aren't sure they really know him.

"I surely would not want to step in his shoes," said Ventura parishioner Ofelia Haynes, offering an assessment that seems a consensus.

Priests describe him as personable bordering on gregarious. But Mahony has long guarded what he says to the media, often rejecting requests for interviews including one made for this story. That too is part of the job, say his friends.

"He's trained as a bishop," said Monsignor Peter Nugent of St. John Eudes Church in Chatsworth who has known Mahony since high school. "Whatever you say in public, you're held to."

Priests point to changes Mahony made in the liturgy of the church and organizational reform that sectioned the massive diocese into regions. Scholars point to his focus on groups often marginalized by the church including women and gays.

Sheila Briggs, religion professor at USC, points at the 156-foot-tall bell tower and the mass of alabaster windows at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles.

Before the cathedral opened in 2002, debate focused on its price tag and whether the money should be spent elsewhere. It has become, said Briggs, a Catholic centerpiece — a place where income, social status and ethnicity don't matter.

"At a period when Los Angeles got a lot of grand buildings, this is the one building where the poor are welcome," she said. "You don't see poor folks in the Disney Concert Hall.

Briggs described Mahony as a man of vision who grasps social justice issues but has also acted to protect the church.

"He's California," she said. "He's concerned with image and he's concerned with the image of the church."

That perception of Catholicism nationwide was rocked by the clergy abuse scandal that exploded in 2002. In the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, more than 600 people said they were abused by more than 240 priests or other religious leaders. Dozens of the priests served in Ventura County at some point in their careers.

Nearly all of the abuse predated Mahony's tenure as cardinal but records show instances on his watch where priests with known histories of abuse were allowed to stay in ministry.

Critics say the actions showed an archdiocese acting to protect itself by moving accused priests elsewhere. Defenders say the movement of priests — replaced after the scandal broke by a policy of removing accused people from ministry — reflected the belief that therapy could cure abusers.

An unsettled legacy

The scandal brought a $660 million settlement in 2007. Earlier, programs designed to protect children were adopted throughout the parish. The church has issued reports naming the accused abusers with some details of the events. A March 10 hearing will be held over the release of personnel records.

"The legacy is one that is not settled," said Tom Roberts, editor-at-large for the National Catholic Reporter. "What's in those documents and what's happened in his watch is surely going to be part of (Mahony's) story."

A federal grand jury investigation of Mahony's role in dealing with clergy abuse also was reported two years ago. Federal authorities won't comment on any aspect of the investigation.

Critics accuse Mahony of obstructing justice. Mahony's defenders praise the cardinal for dealing with an impossible situation.

"Those things weren't dealt with in the church or anywhere else for decades," said Nugent. "He had to deal with that. It kind of crashed in on him, most of which was not his doing."

Though he has reached the age of retirement, Mahony is stepping down by choice. He asked the pope to choose his successor, leading to the appointment of Gomez last April.

Friends say Mahony will live in the cathedral and focus on working for immigration reform. They say he already seems more lighthearted and talks of traveling to different parishes, sitting in for priests on vacation or sick leave.

"I think he's really looking forward to being just a simple priest again," said Gibson.

Vega has his own worries about the retirement. He is one of 20 altar boys at Our Lady of Guadalupe who say they were abused in the 1970s and 1980s by an associate pastor at the church, the Rev. Fidencio Silva.

He sees the personnel records as a way to reveal exactly what happened in the abuse scandal and the cardinal's role in dealing with it.

Now a private investigator whose case load includes clergy abuse, Vega worries people will see the cardinal's retirement as the end of the saga. They'll forget about it.

"People are going to say it's over and done," he said. "I can't let that happen."

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The pros show how they learned from their mistakes | View Clip
02/26/2011
Chicago Tribune - Online

No one is born an investor. Even market pros have to learn how to buy stocks and bonds, and along the way they make plenty of mistakes.

Fortunately for us, a few of today's leading money minds, from financial advisers to behavioral finance experts, agreed to share stories of their personal investing gaffes. See if you've made some of the same errors yourself and what lessons you can learn from them.

Trying to outsmart the market

When Terrance Odean, a finance professor at University of California at Berkeley, began investing, he started by trading individual stocks.

"I thought that if you wanted to invest in the stock market, that's what you did," he said.

But this was before he began studying finance. "I had not read (Harry) Markowitz," the Nobel prize-winning economist known for his work on modern portfolio theory, he said.

He added with a laugh, "I hadn't read anything."

Instead, he did what many first-timers do: He put together a portfolio of stocks that "basically were attention-grabbing names," he said.

And not surprisingly, some of his picks didn't work out.

"I had never asked myself the really pertinent question," he said. "Even if this was a good company, was the (stock) price correct?"

He added: "And who was I betting against? In the U.S., odds are the person on the other side of the trade is a professional investor. What is the chance that you know more than a professional investor?"

The lesson: Beating the market is tough to do. Most investors will do better by taking a more passive approach and owning low-cost mutual funds, which is what Odean invests in now.

Making concentrated bets

Similarly, Meir Statman, a finance professor at Santa Clara University and author of "What Investors Really Want" (McGraw-Hill, $30) thought he could outsmart the market.

But he took a slightly different approach than Odean. In the early 1980s, Statman invested in three companies on Fortune magazine's survey of the least-admired companies.

His theory was that companies that are out of favor provide the highest rate of return to investors.

"But what I discovered," he said, "is that many of those dog stocks are deservedly dog stocks. And they go from being a dog to a dead dog."

The three stocks he chose turned out to be the dead-dog kind.

The lesson: Since it's hard to single out winners from losers in the market, you want to invest in a broad array of stocks.

"Now I know how important it is to diversify," Statman said. "Even if you're going to be right, you're only going to be right in, say, 52 percent of the cases. You can't put it all on red and expect to win. You have to spread it around."

Following the crowd

You also have to think for yourself.

In her mid-20s, Judith Ward landed an administrative job at T. Rowe Price, an investment-management company. When the company decided to go public in 1986, she jumped at the chance to buy shares.

But later that year, said Ward, now a certified financial planner at T. Rowe, "all the chatter was about how capital gains tax rates are going up. I had no idea what that meant to me personally, but the general advice was: Sell your stock."

For individual stocks, capital gains taxes are charged on the profit you earn when you sell the stock. Since Ward was young and investing for the long term, the jump in tax rates then would have had little or no effect on her.

But she sold the stock anyway and still regrets it.

"I had this great opportunity to buy stock in a company, and I just sold it because of what I heard other people saying that seemed important to them," she said. "I never took the time to ask, 'What does this mean personally for me?'"

The lesson: Do your homework. Make sure to investigate whether the latest trend will really benefit you.

E-mail Carolyn Bigda at yourmoney@tribune.com

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Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page?
02/26/2011
Tri-Valley Herald

Are you there God? It's me, .

Maybe it's no surprise that we've reached the point where, rather than looking to the heavens to find God, we're looking to the cloud. It's where we live now, with iPods, iPads, Android gizmos, social networks. The town square, complete with steepled church, has become a digital rectangle that we carry in our pockets.

I've been thinking about this since the recent excitement over "Confession: A Roman Catholic App," an iPhone application that offers Catholics a nifty way to prepare for the sacrament of confession.

Never mind that any Catholic could use help. When I was a kid, I constantly worried that I didn't have enough sins to recite to the priest. So, I'd make up a few extras, and essentially lie to a priest, which of course meant another transgression and another trip to confession.

As of last week, the app, which provides a digital inventory of bad acts, was the sixth-most-popular in Apple's lifestyle category, which in a bit of iLife synergy puts it right behind the iKamasutra.

Some of the buzz around the confession app was due to the fact that it was sanctioned by a Catholic bishop -- a sign the church was ready to meet congregants in the century in which they are residing. It also held the delicious juxtaposition of modern technology aiding in an ancient rite. And it provided plenty of material for snickering about impure thoughts and various other sins described in stilted ways.

But the truth is there are hundreds, if not thousands, of apps out there that guide those seeking guidance through big spiritual questions -- Bible apps, inspirational apps, Islamic apps that point to Mecca, Jewish apps that prompt prayers for travelers. And churches and religions have been turning to digital delivery since the dawn of the Internet.

But Web 2.0 has changed everything. The social Web has empowered people in the face of institutions -- governments, big businesses and old-line religions -- in ways the early Web did not. No longer do pronouncements come down digitally from on high, as if delivered on stone tablets. The Web is democratic now. We are creating the content we want to consume. The masses, if you will, are creating the Masses.

"There are all of these ways that people are sharing spiritual wisdom with one another," says Elizabeth Drescher, a lecturer in Santa Clara University's Religious Studies Department.

The Vatican acknowledged as much last month when Pope Benedict XVI issued an encyclical inviting Christians to participate in social networks, pointing out that "this network is an integral part of human life."

In other words, Drescher says, "People use this stuff in their lives, while they're talking, while they're having coffee, while they're having lunch. They're not holed up in a cubby looking at the computer."

So naturally, social networks are incorporating all aspects of life and the afterlife. Drescher sees examples every day.

The "Holy Roller" app is one of her favorites. "You decide you want some Biblical advice on the basis of a burden or a blessing. You pick one, shake it, and you get a Bible verse."

But it doesn't stop there. Once you have your verse, you tweet it or post it on Facebook and a discussion breaks out. Not only that, but the app designer encourages users to send him examples of blessings, burdens and, of course, favorite Bible verses.

"This is now a very bottom-up, grass-roots way of saying, 'Hey, here is a way to approach your spirituality. No church authority," Drescher says.

Drescher has been focused on digital media and spirituality for years. She just finished a book on the subject, "Tweet if You ™ Jesus," which is due out in May. And she has little doubt that the ways of creating communion are evolving with technology.

Last spring Drescher and a graduate student created a Facebook prayer session called "Tweet-ecost," a play on the Christian holy day of Pentecost. They invited Facebook users around the world to post a prayer at 6 p.m. according to their local time. They created a communal prayer that rolled through the globe's time zones.

"By the end of that 24-hour period, thousands of people had participated in that prayer service," she says. "It was an idea that we literally had over a glass of wine one evening."

And while studying spontaneous spirituality is work for Drescher, who describes herself as a "fairly meat-and-potatoes Episcopalian," she is sometimes moved by its unexpected nature.

One day, Drescher came across a post from a Facebook friend who was starting a prayer of intercession, in which those gathered together pray for people who've touched their lives.

"People started listing prayer concerns," she says. "It was a deeply moving experience to see people responding to that, kind of lifting up in prayer in that context, and being aware that it really had meaning."

Meaning that in fact was as genuine as a message from your lips to God's ear.

Contact Mike Cassidy at or 408-920-5536. Follow him at .

Copyright © 2011 Tri-Valley Herald. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page?
02/26/2011
San Mateo County Times

Are you there God? It's me, .

Maybe it's no surprise that we've reached the point where, rather than looking to the heavens to find God, we're looking to the cloud. It's where we live now, with iPods, iPads, Android gizmos, social networks. The town square, complete with steepled church, has become a digital rectangle that we carry in our pockets.

I've been thinking about this since the recent excitement over "Confession: A Roman Catholic App," an iPhone application that offers Catholics a nifty way to prepare for the sacrament of confession.

Never mind that any Catholic could use help. When I was a kid, I constantly worried that I didn't have enough sins to recite to the priest. So, I'd make up a few extras, and essentially lie to a priest, which of course meant another transgression and another trip to confession.

As of last week, the app, which provides a digital inventory of bad acts, was the sixth-most-popular in Apple's lifestyle category, which in a bit of iLife synergy puts it right behind the iKamasutra.

Some of the buzz around the confession app was due to the fact that it was sanctioned by a Catholic bishop -- a sign the church was ready to meet congregants in the century in which they are residing. It also held the delicious juxtaposition of modern technology aiding in an ancient rite. And it provided plenty of material for snickering about impure thoughts and various other sins described in stilted ways.

But the truth is there are hundreds, if not thousands, of apps out there that guide those seeking guidance through big spiritual questions -- Bible apps, inspirational apps, Islamic apps that point to Mecca, Jewish apps that prompt prayers for travelers. And churches and religions have been turning to digital delivery since the dawn of the Internet.

But Web 2.0 has changed everything. The social Web has empowered people in the face of institutions -- governments, big businesses and old-line religions -- in ways the early Web did not. No longer do pronouncements come down digitally from on high, as if delivered on stone tablets. The Web is democratic now. We are creating the content we want to consume. The masses, if you will, are creating the Masses.

"There are all of these ways that people are sharing spiritual wisdom with one another," says Elizabeth Drescher, a lecturer in Santa Clara University's Religious Studies Department.

The Vatican acknowledged as much last month when Pope Benedict XVI issued an encyclical inviting Christians to participate in social networks, pointing out that "this network is an integral part of human life."

In other words, Drescher says, "People use this stuff in their lives, while they're talking, while they're having coffee, while they're having lunch. They're not holed up in a cubby looking at the computer."

So naturally, social networks are incorporating all aspects of life and the afterlife. Drescher sees examples every day.

The "Holy Roller" app is one of her favorites. "You decide you want some Biblical advice on the basis of a burden or a blessing. You pick one, shake it, and you get a Bible verse."

But it doesn't stop there. Once you have your verse, you tweet it or post it on Facebook and a discussion breaks out. Not only that, but the app designer encourages users to send him examples of blessings, burdens and, of course, favorite Bible verses.

"This is now a very bottom-up, grass-roots way of saying, 'Hey, here is a way to approach your spirituality. No church authority," Drescher says.

Drescher has been focused on digital media and spirituality for years. She just finished a book on the subject, "Tweet if You ™ Jesus," which is due out in May. And she has little doubt that the ways of creating communion are evolving with technology.

Last spring Drescher and a graduate student created a Facebook prayer session called "Tweet-ecost," a play on the Christian holy day of Pentecost. They invited Facebook users around the world to post a prayer at 6 p.m. according to their local time. They created a communal prayer that rolled through the globe's time zones.

"By the end of that 24-hour period, thousands of people had participated in that prayer service," she says. "It was an idea that we literally had over a glass of wine one evening."

And while studying spontaneous spirituality is work for Drescher, who describes herself as a "fairly meat-and-potatoes Episcopalian," she is sometimes moved by its unexpected nature.

One day, Drescher came across a post from a Facebook friend who was starting a prayer of intercession, in which those gathered together pray for people who've touched their lives.

"People started listing prayer concerns," she says. "It was a deeply moving experience to see people responding to that, kind of lifting up in prayer in that context, and being aware that it really had meaning."

Meaning that in fact was as genuine as a message from your lips to God's ear.

Contact Mike Cassidy at or 408-920-5536. Follow him at .

Copyright © 2011 San Mateo County Times. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Cassidy: Does God have a Facebook page?
02/26/2011
Oakland Tribune

Are you there God? It's me, .

Maybe it's no surprise that we've reached the point where, rather than looking to the heavens to find God, we're looking to the cloud. It's where we live now, with iPods, iPads, Android gizmos, social networks. The town square, complete with steepled church, has become a digital rectangle that we carry in our pockets.

I've been thinking about this since the recent excitement over "Confession: A Roman Catholic App," an iPhone application that offers Catholics a nifty way to prepare for the sacrament of confession.

Never mind that any Catholic could use help. When I was a kid, I constantly worried that I didn't have enough sins to recite to the priest. So, I'd make up a few extras, and essentially lie to a priest, which of course meant another transgression and another trip to confession.

As of last week, the app, which provides a digital inventory of bad acts, was the sixth-most-popular in Apple's lifestyle category, which in a bit of iLife synergy puts it right behind the iKamasutra.

Some of the buzz around the confession app was due to the fact that it was sanctioned by a Catholic bishop -- a sign the church was ready to meet congregants in the century in which they are residing. It also held the delicious juxtaposition of modern technology aiding in an ancient rite. And it provided plenty of material for snickering about impure thoughts and various other sins described in stilted ways.

But the truth is there are hundreds, if not thousands, of apps out there that guide those seeking guidance through big spiritual questions -- Bible apps, inspirational apps, Islamic apps that point to Mecca, Jewish apps that prompt prayers for travelers. And churches and religions have been turning to digital delivery since the dawn of the Internet.

But Web 2.0 has changed everything. The social Web has empowered people in the face of institutions -- governments, big businesses and old-line religions -- in ways the early Web did not. No longer do pronouncements come down digitally from on high, as if delivered on stone tablets. The Web is democratic now. We are creating the content we want to consume. The masses, if you will, are creating the Masses.

"There are all of these ways that people are sharing spiritual wisdom with one another," says Elizabeth Drescher, a lecturer in Santa Clara University's Religious Studies Department.

The Vatican acknowledged as much last month when Pope Benedict XVI issued an encyclical inviting Christians to participate in social networks, pointing out that "this network is an integral part of human life."

In other words, Drescher says, "People use this stuff in their lives, while they'