Santa Clara University

SCU in the News--(April 28 - May 11, 2011)

SCU in the News--(April 28 - May 11, 2011)

Report Overview:
Total Clips (202)
Other (202)


Headline Date Outlet Links

Other (202)
#AA_Reality_Blogs Hyphen College Tour: Santa Clara University | Hyphen magazine ...: Just in case you're not cau... http://bit.ly/jyrR8D 05/11/2011 Twitter View Clip
Catholic Academics Challenge Boehner 05/11/2011 Investors Hub - Discussion Groups Text View Clip
Hey Santa Clara University students @SantaClaraUniv, we're @ yr campus tnite! Tell us what makes u Hyphen & win prizes: http://bit.ly/lUBBRu 05/11/2011 Twitter View Clip
Hyphen College Tour: Santa Clara University 05/11/2011 Hyphen Magazine - Online Text View Clip
Hyphen is coming to Santa Clara University tonight! Broncos, go to our link and tell us what makes you Hyphen to... http://fb.me/ZR2vwEAf 05/11/2011 Twitter View Clip
I'm at Santa Clara University - Benson (500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara) http://4sq.com/l0XAZU 05/11/2011 Twitter View Clip
I'm at Santa Clara University - Music and Dance Building (865 Franklin St., Layfayette, Santa Clara) http://4sq.com/lLWxWX 05/11/2011 Twitter View Clip
I'm at Santa Clara University (500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara) http://4sq.com/iSasXE 05/11/2011 Twitter View Clip
Rec program gives teens behind-the-scenes look at local businesses 05/11/2011 Turlock Journal - Online Text View Clip
Santa Clara University Names New Provost http://bit.ly/io8SG8 05/11/2011 Twitter View Clip
Santa Clara University, we're coming your way today at 5:30 pm at Williman Room! Thank you to McDonald's for... http://fb.me/Z4bL5uUI 05/11/2011 Twitter View Clip
SCU Luau 2011.MP4 05/11/2011 YouTube Text View Clip
See you at 5:30 pm today, Santa Clara University! http://fb.me/MxdLdtim 05/11/2011 Twitter View Clip
*Five tips to land a job (from a graduating senior who just found one) 05/10/2011 USA Today - Online Text View Clip
Charity looks beyond grades in distributing funds: Alex Cunny, a law student at Santa Clara University, talks to... http://bit.ly/mI4Xny 05/10/2011 Twitter View Clip
DAN MORAIN: Panetta's view of state a dire one 05/10/2011 Modesto Bee - Online, The Text View Clip
First health care reform appeals court arguments today before three judge panel, all Democratic appointees 05/10/2011 Senior Market Advisor - Online Text View Clip
Griffith is a professor of management at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, Calif 05/10/2011 Twitter View Clip
Griffith is a professor of management at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, Calif 05/10/2011 Twitter View Clip
Griffith is a professor of management at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, Calif 05/10/2011 Twitter View Clip
Just confirmed I'm teaching at Santa Clara university starting fall. I swear I don't get paid enough for this! 05/10/2011 Twitter View Clip
New showss http://www.facebook.com/40LoveMusic :: 5.12 Santa Clara University :: 5.20 @40Love @earshotent @levicemusic @A1_Emcee @elboroomSF 05/10/2011 Twitter View Clip
Santa Clara University Industrial Organizational Psychology Interview Part 1 http://goo.gl/fb/qTEjJ 05/10/2011 Twitter View Clip
School Board to announce district staff replacements tomorrow 05/10/2011 Paly Voice Text View Clip
Speakers Say Education in Administration And Design of Equity Pay Plans Is Needed 05/10/2011 Pension and Benefits Reporter Text
Speakers Say Education in Administration And Design of Equity Pay Plans Is Needed 05/10/2011 Pension & Benefits News Text
VP Dennis Jacobs appointed provost at Santa Clara University http://newsinfo.nd.edu/news/21876/ 05/10/2011 Twitter View Clip
BCD Semiconductor Manufacturing Limited Announces Financial Results for the Fiscal First Quarter of 2011 05/09/2011 Consumer Electronics Net Text View Clip
Health care hearing awaited 05/09/2011 Congress.org Text View Clip
Looking closer at utilities' energy efficiency programs 05/09/2011 KPCC-FM - Online Text View Clip
Mind Games: Lessons for the Irrational Investor 05/09/2011 SmartMoney - Online Text View Clip
Notre Dame Vice President Leaving For California 05/09/2011 INside Edge, The Text View Clip
Parsons sparkles at Virginia Tech 05/09/2011 Monterey County Herald Text
Santa Clara University names Dennis Jacobs provost 05/09/2011 BizJournals.com Text View Clip
The Market Vs. the Mind 05/09/2011 SmartMoney - Online Text View Clip
To avoid corruption by power, leaders need critics to steer them straight 05/09/2011 Las Vegas Business Press - Online Text View Clip
VP Dennis Jacobs appointed provost at Santa Clara University http://bit.ly/lPRu6t #notredame 05/09/2011 Twitter View Clip
Dan Morian: Panetta's view of state's woes should worry us 05/08/2011 Sacramento Bee, The Text
Knowing One's Environmental Footprint May Be Counterproductive 05/08/2011 Bloodthirsty Warmonger Text View Clip
The Greatest of All Internet Laws Turns 15 05/08/2011 Forbes - Online Text View Clip
*Diversity Leadership Conference 05/07/2011 KKGN-AM Text View Clip
Business Leadership Program 05/07/2011 College Discussion Text View Clip
Gay population at Santa Clara university 05/07/2011 College Discussion Text View Clip
Happy forward momentum, Mom 05/07/2011 Seattle Times Text
Philanthropist Baskin wins MPC President's Award 05/07/2011 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
The terminator 05/07/2011 Independent (UK) Text
*Influencing Doctors 05/06/2011 KQED-FM Forum Text View Clip
@iquit #entrepreneur Review by Terri Griffith, professor at Santa Clara University's Leavey Sc... http://bit.ly/kukG5g #business #travel 05/06/2011 Twitter View Clip
A lifesaver with strings 05/06/2011 Coeur D'Alene Press Text View Clip
All-American Jepsen Renews Love of the Game at CSM 05/06/2011 Burlingame Patch Text View Clip
CQ HEALTHBEAT 05/06/2011 CQ HealthBeat Text
CQ Today 05/06/2011 CQ Today Text
Happy forward momentum, Mom 05/06/2011 Seattle Times - Online Text View Clip
LaMond Pope | The Journal Gazette 05/06/2011 Journal Gazette - Online Bureau, The Text View Clip
Leon Panetta: The terminator 05/06/2011 The Independent - Online Text View Clip
Tips for Overcoming Music Performance Anxiety in Front of an Audience 05/06/2011 Associated Content Text View Clip
Want to Add To Congestion? Then It's Going To Cost You 05/06/2011 New York Times, The Text
*Commencement speakers at local universities 05/05/2011 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
A Companion to Hume 05/05/2011 Australian PC World Text View Clip
BRIEF: Former Supreme Court Justice Moreno to speak at SCU law school graduation 05/05/2011 California Chronicle Text View Clip
CA Do Good Docs 05 05 05/05/2011 Associated Press (AP) Text
COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS ANNOUNCED 05/05/2011 San Jose Mercury News Text
Commencement speakers at local universities 05/05/2011 Chico Enterprise Record - Online Text View Clip
Former Supreme Court Justice Moreno to speak at SCU law school graduation 05/05/2011 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Insider Fights Corruption 05/05/2011 Law Enforcement Corruption Text View Clip
Leadership tip: Master the art of listening 05/05/2011 HCPro.com Text View Clip
Pizarro: BAWSI honors Tara VanDerveer and Brandi Chastain 05/05/2011 San Gabriel Valley Tribune - Online Text View Clip
SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Career Navigation and Healthy Lifestyle Strategies (Part 1 of 4) 05/05/2011 YouTube Text View Clip
SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Career Navigation and Healthy Lifestyle Strategies (Part 2 of 4) 05/05/2011 YouTube Text View Clip
SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Career Navigation and Healthy Lifestyle Strategies (Part 3 of 4) 05/05/2011 YouTube Text View Clip
SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Career Navigation and Healthy Lifestyle Strategies (Part 4 of 4) 05/05/2011 YouTube Text View Clip
SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Changemakers: A Panel Discussion with Social Entrepreneurs (Part 4 of 4) 05/05/2011 YouTube Text View Clip
SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Critical Success Factors (Part 1 of 3) 05/05/2011 YouTube Text View Clip
SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Critical Success Factors (Part 2 of 3) 05/05/2011 YouTube Text View Clip
SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Critical Success Factors (Part 3 of 3).mov 05/05/2011 YouTube Text View Clip
SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Keynote Speaker: Maddy Dychtwald (Part 4 0f 4) 05/05/2011 YouTube Text View Clip
SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Make Your Money Last a Lifetime (Part 2 of 2) 05/05/2011 YouTube Text View Clip
Undergraduate and Graduate Dance Programs 05/05/2011 BackStage.com Text View Clip
Want to Add to Congestion? Then It's Going to Cost You 05/05/2011 New York Times - Online, The Text View Clip
What Good Do Faculty Unions Do? 05/05/2011 Chronicle of Higher Education - Online, The Text View Clip
Yes Takin A Field Trip To SJSU And Santa Clara University and the Tech Museum Any Kids GOing Tomarrow Hit Me Up 05/05/2011 Twitter View Clip
Angelo Ancheta: Appointed Member of the California Citizens Redistricting Commission 05/04/2011 Asian Journal - Online Text View Clip
Bloggers wary as law firm trolls for copyright violations 05/04/2011 International Herald Tribune Text
BusinessWire Santa Clara University Faculty Peter Kareiva Named to ...: BusinessWire Santa Clara University Facu... http://bit.ly/lPw7L2 05/04/2011 Twitter View Clip
Commencement speakers at local universities 05/04/2011 Contra Costa Times Text
Commencement speakers at local universities 05/04/2011 Argus, The Text
Commencement speakers at local universities 05/04/2011 Daily Review, The Text
Commencement speakers at local universities 05/04/2011 Alameda Times-Star Text
Fighting corruption as a public defender; Tim Pappas fights for the rights of defendants 05/04/2011 Record-Searchlight - Online Text View Clip
Investing in an ethical corporate culture 05/04/2011 Securities Docket Text View Clip
Judge weighing whether to dismiss copyright lawsuit 05/04/2011 Las Vegas Sun Text View Clip
Leon Panetta to head Pentagon 05/04/2011 Omaha World-Herald - Online Text View Clip
PointofLaw.com | PointOfLaw Forum: Pecora the Prosecutor 05/04/2011 PointOfLaw Forum Text View Clip
Righthaven engages ‘superstar’ attorney (against DU) in litigation campaign - Democratic Underground 05/04/2011 Democratic Underground Latest … Text View Clip
Righthaven engages 'superstar' attorney in litigation campaign 05/04/2011 Las Vegas Sun Text View Clip
San Mateo County Times, Calif., Glenn Reeves column 05/04/2011 American Chronicle Text View Clip
Santa Clara loses longtime athletics booster 05/04/2011 Daily News, The Text View Clip
Santa Clara University loses longtime athletics booster 05/04/2011 Palo Alto Daily News - Online Text View Clip
Stanford Debates R.O.T.C.'s Return 05/04/2011 At War Text View Clip
*California University Builds Eco-Friendly Apartments 05/03/2011 School Construction News - Online Text View Clip
*Top 10 Ethical Questions For Incoming Students 05/03/2011 Huffington Post, The Text View Clip
Enforcing Copyrights Online, for a Profit 05/03/2011 CNBC - Online Text View Clip
Enforcing copyrights, for a profit 05/03/2011 Bulletin, The Text View Clip
Enforcing Copyrights, For a Profit 05/03/2011 New York Times, The Text
How To Invest In An Ethical Corporate Culture 05/03/2011 Business Insider - Online, The Text View Clip
Santa Clara University Faculty Peter Kareiva Named to The National Academy of ... - Genetic Engineering News (pr... http://bit.ly/itjrL3 05/03/2011 Twitter View Clip
Seminar teaches parents about teen 'sexting' 05/03/2011 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Under Prop. 300, college just a dream for many illegal immigrants 05/03/2011 Arizona Capitol Times Text View Clip
Watch this whole Vid.Makes SENSE#420 http://www.gromasters.com/medical-marijuana-depression/santa-clara-university-medical-marijuana-policy/ 05/03/2011 Twitter View Clip
www.youtube.com Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t... Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4: Task Speed Test 05/03/2011 Facebook Text View Clip
www.youtube.com Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t... Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4: Task Speed Test 05/03/2011 Facebook Text View Clip
*Environmental Footprints May Produce Backlash 05/02/2011 Miller-McCune - Online Text View Clip
Campus visits: worth the trip 05/02/2011 Yakima Herald-Republic Text View Clip
Enforcing Copyrights Online, for a Profit 05/02/2011 New York Times - Online, The Text View Clip
Factbox: Five facts about CIA director Leon Panetta 05/02/2011 Thomson Reuters - UK - Online Text View Clip
Locals respond to death of bin Laden 05/02/2011 Petaluma360.com Text View Clip
Why Building a Culture of Trust Will Boost Employee Performance--and Maybe Even Save Your Company 05/02/2011 RISMedia Text View Clip
Why I am thinking of having a Windows Phone 7 www.youtube.com Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t... Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4 05/02/2011 Facebook Text View Clip
*AT DIVERSITY SUMMIT, A COMMON CAUSE FOUND 05/01/2011 San Jose Mercury News Text View Clip
*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU 05/01/2011 Whittier Daily News Text View Clip
*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU 05/01/2011 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU 05/01/2011 Contra Costa Times - Online Text View Clip
*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU 05/01/2011 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU 05/01/2011 Oakland Tribune Text
*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU 05/01/2011 Alameda Times-Star Text
*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU 05/01/2011 Tri-Valley Herald Text
*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU 05/01/2011 Daily Review, The Text
*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU 05/01/2011 San Mateo County Times Text
*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU 05/01/2011 Argus, The Text
*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU 05/01/2011 Contra Costa Times Text
'Trust Me, I'm a Leader' 05/01/2011 Hartford Business Journal - Online Text View Clip
Do universities discriminate? 05/01/2011 Tampa Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Get over the I.... www.youtube.com Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t... Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4: Task Speed Test 05/01/2011 Facebook Text View Clip
Good job all my little tinapays! (@ Santa Clara University - Mayer Theatre w/ @schnabes) http://4sq.com/mMCpxZ 05/01/2011 Twitter View Clip
Have You Earned the Right to Lead? Ten Deeply Destructive Mistakes That Suggest the Answer Is No (and How to Stop Making Them) 05/01/2011 SmartBusiness - Online Text View Clip
Jordan principal to move to district-wide post 05/01/2011 Palo Alto Weekly - Online Text View Clip
Mobile TV in Brazil and Latin America 05/01/2011 Connect-World Text View Clip
NOTHING COVERT ABOUT IT -- PANETTA IS DEDICATED 05/01/2011 San Jose Mercury News Text
Professionals Tap a Higher Power in the Workplace 05/01/2011 Workforce Management Text View Clip
Samantha and Her Subjects 05/01/2011 National Interest, The Text
Santa Clara University Sophomore Laura Snowden Receives Newman Civic Fellow ...: She is also a respected student... http://bit.ly/m4nTFw 05/01/2011 Twitter View Clip
Santa Clara University Sophomore Laura Snowden Receives Newman Civic Fellow Award for Helping to Rebuild New Orleans 05/01/2011 Twitter View Clip
Santa Clara University Sophomore Laura Snowden Receives Newman Civic Fellow Award for Helping to Rebuild New Orleans http://dlvr.it/QGy7H 05/01/2011 Twitter View Clip
Upland to decide fate of Quincey 05/01/2011 San Bernardino Sun - Online Text View Clip
Upland to decide fate of Quincey 05/01/2011 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Upland to decide fate of Quincey 05/01/2011 Inland Valley Daily Bulletin - Online Text View Clip
Upland to decide fate of Quincey 05/01/2011 Inland Valley Daily Bulletin Text
Upland to decide fate of Quincey 05/01/2011 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Upland to decide fate of Quincey 05/01/2011 Redlands Daily Facts Text View Clip
Upland to decide fate of Quincey 05/01/2011 Press-Telegram - Online Text View Clip
www.youtube.com Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t... Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4: Task Speed Test 05/01/2011 Facebook Text View Clip
*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU 04/30/2011 San Gabriel Valley Tribune - Online Text View Clip
*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU 04/30/2011 Press-Telegram - Online Text View Clip
Adobe Youth Voices Celebrates 5 Years in India 04/30/2011 IT News Online Text View Clip
BRIEF: Cal Poly Again Named Top Undergraduate Business College by Bloomberg Business Week 04/30/2011 HispanicBusiness.com Text View Clip
Cassidy: Silicon Valley's entrepreneurial spirit takes on world's vexing problems 04/29/2011 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Cassidy: Silicon Valley's entrepreneurial spirit takes on world's vexing problems 04/29/2011 Inland Valley Daily Bulletin - Online Text View Clip
ENTREPRENEURS FOR THE COMMON GOOD 04/29/2011 San Jose Mercury News Text
Have you earned the right to lead? 04/29/2011 Inside Business - Online Text View Clip
Nine skills required for great company leadership 04/29/2011 TechJournal South Text View Clip
Participants honor Hobbs through run 04/29/2011 Los Banos Enterprise Text View Clip
Reporter: IF STUDENT AT STANFORD WANT TO JOIN THE ROTC, THEY HAVE TO TRAVEL 16 MILES TO ATTEND CLASS AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY. 04/29/2011 This Week In Northern California - KQED-TV Text
ROTC gets thumbs up 04/29/2011 Daily News, The Text View Clip
Stanford campus leaders make peace with ROTC 04/29/2011 Los Angeles Times Text
STANFORD ENDORSES ROTC RETURN 04/29/2011 San Jose Mercury News Text
Stanford faculty vote to invite ROTC back to campus after four decades 04/29/2011 Los Angeles Times - Online Text View Clip
Stanford faculty votes to invite ROTC back 04/29/2011 Palo Alto Weekly - Online Text View Clip
Stanford's Faculty Senate votes to bring back ROTC 04/29/2011 Sacramento Bee - Online, The Text View Clip
The Historical Jesus for Dummies 04/29/2011 ARN - Online Text View Clip
Viewpoint: Supreme Court Turns Blind Eye to Prosecutorial Misconduct 04/29/2011 Cal Law Text View Clip
*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? 04/28/2011 Press-Telegram - Online Text View Clip
*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? 04/28/2011 San Gabriel Valley Tribune - Online Text View Clip
*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? 04/28/2011 San Jose Mercury News Text View Clip
*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? 04/28/2011 Contra Costa Times - Online Text View Clip
*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? 04/28/2011 Oakland Tribune Text
*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? 04/28/2011 Alameda Times-Star Text
*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? 04/28/2011 Tri-Valley Herald Text
*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? 04/28/2011 Daily Review, The Text
*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? 04/28/2011 San Mateo County Times Text
*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? 04/28/2011 Argus, The Text
*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? 04/28/2011 Contra Costa Times Text
*NOT SO DIVERSE AFTER ALL? EVENT TO EXPLORE REALITY 04/28/2011 San Jose Mercury News Text
Cassidy: Silicon Valley's entrepreneurial spirit takes on world's vexing problems 04/28/2011 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Cassidy: Silicon Valley's entrepreneurial spirit takes on world's vexing problems 04/28/2011 Contra Costa Times - Online Text View Clip
Cassidy: Silicon Valley's entrepreneurial spirit takes on world's vexing problems 04/28/2011 Argus, The Text
Cassidy: Silicon Valley's entrepreneurial spirit takes on world's vexing problems 04/28/2011 Alameda Times-Star Text
Cassidy: Silicon Valley's entrepreneurial spirit takes on world's vexing problems 04/28/2011 Daily Review, The Text
Cassidy: Silicon Valley's entrepreneurial spirit takes on world's vexing problems 04/28/2011 Contra Costa Times Text
CBO Offers Savings Estimate On GOP Plan To Repeal Health Law Provision 04/28/2011 Kaiser Health News Text View Clip
Cuts to California Universities Push More to Private Schools 04/28/2011 EducationNews.org Text View Clip
Leon Panetta to become defense secretary, sources say 04/28/2011 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
PANETTA TO BE NEXT DEFENSE SECRETARY 04/28/2011 San Jose Mercury News Text
Panetta to lead Pentagon, Petraeus CIA 04/28/2011 San Francisco Chronicle - Online Text View Clip
Panetta to take Pentagon helm at crucial time 04/28/2011 San Francisco Chronicle Text
Panetta will bring a lifetime of service to the Pentagon 04/28/2011 Fresno Bee - Online Text View Clip
Same-sex marriage filing issues 04/28/2011 Bankrate.com Text View Clip
Stanford committee recommends ROTC return, faculty vote on Thursday 04/28/2011 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Stanford considers ending ban on ROTC 04/28/2011 San Francisco Chronicle - Online Text View Clip
Stanford faculty vote to invite ROTC back to campus after four decades 04/28/2011 KTXL-TV - Online Text View Clip
Stanford's Faculty Senate votes to bring back ROTC 04/28/2011 Bellingham Herald - Online Text View Clip
State lawmakers praise Panetta's nomination as Secretary of Defense 04/28/2011 Salinas Californian - Online, The Text View Clip
The Historical Jesus for Dummies 04/28/2011 CIO Australia Text View Clip


Catholic Academics Challenge Boehner | View Clip
05/11/2011
Investors Hub - Discussion Groups

...& Outcomes Assessment National Catholic School of Social Service The Catholic University of America James A. McCann, Ph.D. Professor of Political Science Purdue University Visiting Fellow, Institute for Policy Research & Catholic Studies The Catholic University of America Chris Grech Associate Professor School of Architecture and Planning The Catholic University of America Ernest M. Zampelli, Ph.D. Ordinary Professor Department of Business and Economics The Catholic University of America David A Lipton Director, Securities Law Program School of Law The Catholic University of America Murry Sidlin Professor, School of Music The Catholic University of America John Sniegocki Associate Professor of Christian Ethics Xavier University Cincinnati, OH Kristin Suna-Koro, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Theology Xavier University Cincinnati, OH Jean Lim Visiting Professor, Theology Xavier University Cincinnati, OH Arthur T. Dewey Professor of Theology Xavier University Cincinnati, OH Edward P. Hahnenberg, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Theology Xavier University Cincinnati, OH Vincent J. Miller Gudorf Chair in Catholic Theology and Culture Department of Religious Studies University of Dayton Una M. Cadegan Associate Professor, Department of History University of Dayton Francis Xavier Doyle Former Associate General Secretary U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops Arturo Chavez, Ph.D. President and CEO Mexican American Catholic College Gary Macy John Nobili, S.J. Professor of Theology Santa Clara University Gerald J. Beyer Associate Professor of Christian Social Ethics Department of Theology and Religious Studies Saint Joseph's University Dr. Eugene J. Halus, Jr. Associate Professor of Politics Department of History and Politics Immaculata University Kristin Heyer Associate Professor Religious Studies Santa Clara University Bryan N. Massingale Associate Professor of Theological Ethics Marquette University Dolores L. Christie CTSA/John Carroll University Alex Mikulich, Ph.D. Research Fellow Jesuit Social Research Institute Loyola University New Orleans, LA Daniel K. Finn Professor of Theology and Clemens Professor of Economics St. John's University Collegeville, MN Terrence W. Tilley Avery Cardinal Dulles, S.J., Professor of Catholic Theology Chair, Theology Department President, Society for Philosophy of Religion Fordham University, Bronx, NY Thomas J. Reese, S.J. Senior Fellow Woodstock Theological Center Georgetown University Bruce T. Morrill, S.J. Professor, Theology Department Boston College Nancy Dallavalle Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Religious Studies Fairfield University Lisa Sowle Cahill Monan Professor of Theology Boston College Bradford Hinze Professor of Theology Fordham University Mary Ann Hinsdale Associate Professor of Theology Boston College Paul Lakeland Aloysius P. Kelley, S.J. Professor of Catholic Studies Director, Center for Catholic Studies Jeannine Hill Fletcher Associate Professor of Theology Faculty Director,...

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Hyphen College Tour: Santa Clara University | View Clip
05/11/2011
Hyphen Magazine - Online

Broncos, are you ready for Hyphen?

Time flies! We're already on our sixth stop, and this time, we're taking Hyphen to Santa Clara University, where I hear the weather is warm and beautiful.

The event will take place tonight at 5:30pm in Williman Room, and I will be there to meet with all of you. The presentation is co-sponsored by the Office for Multicultural Learning (OML), Ethnic Studies Program, Communication Department (Multicultural Journalism Series) and Asian Pacific-Islander Student Union (APSU).

Just in case you're not caught up, Hyphen has partnered up with I.W. Group and McDonald's in an effort to inform and empower campuses with its unique perspective on Asian American arts, culture and politics. With style, of course.

Now the important part: A contest!

This is specifically for the SCU students I will be mingling with tonight: Tell us what makes you Hyphen.

Let us know by submitting a comment. The best response will win a $50 McDonald's Arch Card and a fancy sweatshirt. If your response is not picked, don't fret. We'll have little giveaways for you too. All these goodies, plus free Hyphen issues, will be mailed out to you guys once Irene leaves.

Poems, pictures and any other creative responses are also welcome.

If you're interested in learning more about the Hyphen College Tour and bringing Hyphen to your campus, please contact our speaking engagement coordinator, Bena Li, at bena.li@hyphenmagazine.com.

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Rec program gives teens behind-the-scenes look at local businesses | View Clip
05/11/2011
Turlock Journal - Online

Nineteen local teens recently wrapped up a program where they explored career options with a behind-the-scenes look at many fields of work.

Teens in Action is a Turlock Recreation program which gives high school juniors and seniors the chance to see the daily operations of many local companies. The goal of the program is to keep teens in the Turlock area for college, or to draw them back to the area for career opportunities after college.

“We want them to come back and work here, and to raise families here when they reach that stage,” said Karen Packwood, Recreation supervisor with the City of Turlock.

Packwood said the program was similar to Leadership Turlock, a program where Turlock professionals learn more about local businesses and industries. The students had a competitive application process which included an in-person interview. Accepted students met once a month to learn about a local business. Activities included a tour of Gallo Winery, a healthcare day, and VIP tours of Frito-lay.

“We want to open their eyes to the different businesses within one business. There are a whole slew of careers in larger local companies,” Packwood said.

Natalie Dykezeul, a graduating senior who participated in Teens in Action two years ago, said she enjoyed the experience.

“You think that you want to go into one field, but realistically there are so many other options that you never considered,” Dykezeul said.

The senior is graduating in a few weeks and will attend Santa Clara University. She said she wants to go into the medical field, and one of her favorite Teens in Action events was healthcare day.

“It solidified my decision,” Dykzeul said.

Teens in Action will not be offered for the coming school year. Packwood said the program is going on a one-year hiatus while Turlock Recreation restructures the program.

“We received a lot of feedback from the participants that they thought Teens in Action should meet more than once a month. They really seemed to enjoy it,” Packwood said.

Information about the next Teens in Action program will be available in spring 2012. For more information about other teen programming, visit the Turlock Recreation Division website at www.turlock.ca.us/citydepartments/municipalservices/recreation/.

To contact Andrea Goodwin e-mail agoodwin@turlockjournal.com or call 634-9141 ext. 2003.

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SCU Luau 2011.MP4 | View Clip
05/11/2011
YouTube

2011 Santa Clara University Luau

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*Five tips to land a job (from a graduating senior who just found one) | View Clip
05/10/2011
USA Today - Online

As the end of senior year quickly approaches, many college students often find themselves questioning the likelihood of being able to secure a full-time job post-graduation. I graduated last month with a bachelor's degree in Operations & Management Information Systems at Santa Clara University, and I was fortunate to receive three competitive job offers after making a few significant alterations to both my attitude and job application habits. I offer these five tips to my fellow seniors who are scrambling to find their first job:

1. Set Goals for Yourself. Where will you be in five years, and how will you get there? This is a question that most interviewers ask their candidates, but it's actually a preliminary step towards successful career planning. Once you have a vision, map out the ideal position, titles, and industries in which you would like to work to help you achieve your goal. Create multiple plans in case one doesn't work out. Also, make a timeline. For example, “I will have submitted all my job applications for analyst roles by Friday, April 22 and plan to follow up with HR shortly after.” This will help you stay organized and will serve as a guideline throughout your application process.

2. Sculpt Your Resume. A resume is like a personal ad. You're selling yourself with words on a piece of paper. Capture the attention of an employer with a unique, well-formatted resume, and don't use templates. While an organized resume will help you get noticed, the content is what really counts. Explain the outcome of your work by using statements like, “I targeted my pitch towards group XYZ which led to an overall increase of 14% in sales.” Don't exaggerate or lie about the roles you held in your previous jobs, and remember to mention your qualifications. Just because you're a music major doesn't mean that you can only look for music jobs. If you led group projects, organized meetings, and analyzed data, those are skills you should include in your resume for jobs in almost any industry.

3. Be Proactive. University Resources Are the Key to Success! Your school may have websites where you can apply for jobs online and easily submit resumes. I've found that your chance of being considered is significantly higher if you use your school's resources. Also, building your network is important. Your professors and alumni are excellent resources, because they will be able to direct you to a point of contact who may be able to get you an interview.

4. Polish Your Interview Skills. Be a People Person. Practice interviewing with a friend or going to your school's career center to do mock interviews. First round of interviews are usually about yourself and your resume. Work on being able to explain your previous positions in detail and have answers ready for behavioral questions such as: “Tell me about a time when you worked with someone difficult; what did you do? Let's say you're assigned to a project that you know nothing about; what would you do?” Make sure to smile, be polite, have confidence, pay attention, and ask good questions. Remember, being smart isn't enough-your hiring manager wants to see how well you work in a collaborative environment.

5. Practice Saying Thank You. Make your thank you letters personal by writing about specific topics that were brought up during the interview. This shows you were paying attention, valued the information being discussed, and are genuinely interested in the job. Always emphasize how appreciative you are for having the opportunity to meet with them and learn about their company. This will make you stand out in the end.

These five suggestions in particular have led me towards a promising career path. Good luck class of 2011!

Tasha Mistry accepted a job at Adobe and will begin her career as a business analyst in June.

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DAN MORAIN: Panetta's view of state a dire one | View Clip
05/10/2011
Modesto Bee - Online, The

After accepting President Barack Obama's request that he serve as CIA director, Leon E. Panetta offered his friends out here a pithy and prescient view about the daunting task ahead.

He would be leaving his Carmel Valley home, various boards, an institute he and his wife founded, and an important post as co-chair of California Forward, a nonpartisan organization advocating for reforms of this state's dysfunctional government.

Why give that up? He was, after all, 70. Simple.

(Susan Walsh / The Associated Press) - Central Intelligence Agency Director nominee Leon Panetta testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 5, 2009, before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on his nomination.

" 'It may be easier to find Osama bin Laden than it is to fix California,' " James Mayer, California Forward's executive director, recalled Panetta telling board members as he wrapped up his duties in January 2009.

Turns out Panetta was right. For the past week, the nation has been riveted by everything bin Laden, beginning with Obama's address to the nation last Sunday in which he said that upon taking office, he told Panetta to "make the killing or capture of bin Laden the top priority of our war against al-Qaida."

Panetta's place as a national figure is solid, deservedly so. But take a look at where he has been. Then consider his view of the state of the state of California. It ought to alarm those of us still here.

The son of southern Italian immigrants, Panetta, 72, grew up in Monterey and Carmel Valley, long before Carmel became fancy. His parents ran Carmelo's Diner in Monterey and grew almonds.

After graduating from Santa Clara University law school and serving in the Army, Panetta worked for U.S. Sen. Thomas H. Kuchel, a California Republican in the moderate mold of Earl Warren, and one who fought to pass the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act in the middle 1960s.

After Kuchel lost the 1968 primary, Panetta joined the Nixon administration, becoming responsible for enforcing desegregation orders in Southern school districts. That placed him in direct conflict with Nixon's Southern strategy of winning over white voters. He resigned in 1970.

He became a Democrat, made his way home to Monterey, won a congressional seat in 1976, served eight terms and became House budget committee chairman.

In 1993, President Bill Clinton appointed him director of the Office of Management and Budget, and later chief of staff. In those roles, he helped balance the budget, surely among the reasons for the prosperity of the Clinton years.

Panetta returned to Monterey in 1998 and with his wife, Sylvia, founded the Panetta Institute, which is affiliated with California State University and encourages public service. He also started writing about California, like this article in 2003:

"There is no magic formula for dealing with deficits. You have to either raise taxes or cut spending, or do both. And yet, each time these difficult decisions must be made, both political parties fear for their survival and inevitably try to postpone the day of reckoning."

And this piece, also in 2003:

"For too many years, California has ignored the financial dilemma that resulted from an array of state initiatives that have reduced governmental discretion and moved decision making from the Legislature to the populace."

And this 2005 article:

"The Republicans seem hopelessly trapped by an ideological agenda and a growing arrogance of power. The Democrats seem afraid to advance any new or bold ideas about the future for fear of upsetting their political base and losing more power."

In January 2009, the day before Obama announced his nomination as CIA director, Panetta wrote for The Sacramento Bee newspaper: "California is in the worst fiscal and political crisis of its history. This crisis threatens the future of our economy, our education system, our infrastructure, and the promise that our children can have a better life."

He summed it up: Deficits, partisanship, government by initiative and financial crisis. What a mess. When he became co-chair of California Forward in 2008, he got a closer look at California's dysfunction.

California Forward board member Fred Keeley, a former assemblyman from Santa Cruz who has known Panetta since 1980, said Panetta witnessed a very basic problem. Promises made by California's elected leaders don't seem to mean much.

Panetta will remain in D.C. a little longer. His new task will be to serve as defense secretary. cutting defense spending. Panetta might offer another pithy comment, like it'd be easier to wrestle the military industrial complex than it would be to solve California's finances.

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First health care reform appeals court arguments today before three judge panel, all Democratic appointees | View Clip
05/10/2011
Senior Market Advisor - Online

A three-judge panel, all Democratic appointees, on Tuesday will hear the first appellate court arguments in a challenge to the health care reform law's individual mandate.

The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va. will hear arguments challenging the constitutionality of the federal health care reform law. The three judges hearing the case are Andre Davis and James Wynn, both appointed by President Obama, and Diana Gribbon Motz, appointed by former President Bill Clinton.

In December, U.S. District Judge Henry E. Hudson ruled in favor of Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, finding the individual mandate unconstitutional. However, given that all three judges in the appellate court are Democratic appointees, experts believe Hudson's ruling may be overturned.

“This could not have turned out much better for the United States and [U.S. Solicitor] General Katyal,” Brad Joondeph, law professor at Santa Clara University, wrote on his ACA Litigation blog.

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School Board to announce district staff replacements tomorrow | View Clip
05/10/2011
Paly Voice

Superintendent Kevin Skelly will recommend Michael Milliken for Director of Secondary Education for Palo Alto Unified School District and Magdalena Fittoria for Principal of Barron Park Elementary School to the Board of Education on May 10.

Milliken will be replacing Debbra Lindo, the newly appointed Superintendent of Emery Unified School District. Milliken, who has a B.A. in Political Science from Stanford University, as well as anM.A. and Ph.D. in Educational Administration, has been involved in public education since 1996.

He initially served as an elementary school teacher in San Diego, and later as a middle school math teacher in Maryland. In 2005, Milliken assumed a position as an elementary school Principal in Newark, and three years later in 2008 he was appointed as principal of Jordan Middle School.

“Dr. Milliken's background as a middle school leader and his research work on high schools will make our district office team stronger,” Skelly said.

Fittorria will be replacing Cathy Howard, who will be retiring this year. Fittorria began her career with the district in 1996 as well, initially working at Fairmeadow Elementary School with the Spanish Immersion program and later moving to Escondido Elementary School the following year.

Fittorria has served as the Math Resource Teacher at Escondido since 2007, and in 2010 assumed the position as the interim principal of Barron Park Elementary School.

Fittoria's background is, like Milliken's, impressive, Skelly noted. Fittoria holds both a B.A. in Anthropology and an M.A. in Social Science in Education from Stanford University, and from Santa Clara University she has an M.A. in Educational Administration.

“Ms. Fittoria has been an outstanding teacher leader and I am confident that she will continue her success in this new position,” Skelly said.

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Speakers Say Education in Administration And Design of Equity Pay Plans Is Needed
05/10/2011
Pension and Benefits Reporter

Source: Pension & Benefits Reporter: News Archive > 2011 > 05/10/2011 > News > Stock Options: Speakers
Say Education in Administration And Design of Equity Pay Plans Is Needed
38 BPR 898
Stock Options
Speakers Say Education in Administration
And Design of Equity Pay Plans Is Needed
Administrator and employee education is critical to the success of an employer's equity compensation
plan, certified equity professionals said May 5 during a webinar sponsored by BNA.
Emily Cervino, executive director of the Certified Equity Professional Institute, Santa Clara University,
Santa Clara, Calif., and Achaessa James, product manager at the National Center for Employee
Ownership, Oakland, Calif., said equity compensation is a critical component of pay for both
executives and lower-level employees. Studies have shown that companies with equity compensation
programs have improved productivity, and for start-ups and private companies, various forms of
equity compensation enable cash-short companies to compete for the best talent, the speakers said.
Equity compensation programs are complex and, whether in designing or administering such
programs, there are risks for the company unless the disparate internal and external parties involved
understand issues outside their own areas of expertise, Cervino said. Creative plan designs by
compensation consultants are translated by attorneys and then implemented by companies without
any understanding of the accounting, financial reporting, tax (both U.S. and international tax),
employee communication, and myriad other issues, the speakers said.
In addition, "one size does not fit all," Cervino said, and choosing the right vehicle is very important.
For example, she said, retirement eligibility affects outstanding and newly granted awards. Choice of
stock options or restricted stock often depends on whether the company is a new or mature company,
and while performance awards are often best for executives and key technical talent, employee stock
purchase plans offer opportunities to a broad group of employees to share in the company's success,
the speakers said.
"Administration and financial reporting shouldn't necessarily determine the right design for an equity
plan, but decisions around those plans should be made with full understanding of administrative and
financial reporting consequences," Cervino said. If an administrator is handed a plan design that
"doesn't fit into systems and support," the risks involved in keeping the plan in compliance increase
dramatically, she said.
Cervino reviewed accounting and legal issues, taxation to the employer and employee, and
operational, financial, and compliance risks surrounding:
• incentive and nonqualified stock options,
• performance awards,
• restricted stock and restricted stock units,
• dividends,
• next-day deposits, and
• accounting and tax issues involved in exporting U.S. plans to foreign jurisdictions.
Educated Administrator Needed to Educate Employees
Regarding employee education, James said executives have very technical needs, including tax,
reporting, and holdings by family members that may be considered holdings by the executive when
calculating the executive's ownership. For other employees, the needs are more basic; for example,
how to exercise options, how to pay taxes, she said. If incentive stock options are involved, even midlevel
employees may be drawn into the alternative minimum tax regime if they exercise options, she
said.
"Education begins with the plan administrator," James said. "It is impossible for one person to know it
all," she said in explaining why she believes designation as a certified equity professional is important
for its educational value and for networking possibilities. Having a professional network "is just as
important as substantive knowledge; knowing what questions to ask and how to ask them" are most
important to a plan administrator, she said.
Unless employees understand the employer's equity plan, it will not work as a motivating tool, James
said.
By Mary Hughes
For more information, contact Emily Cervino at ecervino@scu.edu orAchaessa James at
ajames@nceo.org. Webinar materials are available from LegalEdge at
http://www.legaledge.bna.com .
Contact

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Speakers Say Education in Administration And Design of Equity Pay Plans Is Needed
05/10/2011
Pension & Benefits News

Administrator and employee education is critical to the success of an employer's equity compensation
plan, certified equity professionals said May 5 during a webinar sponsored by BNA.
Emily Cervino, executive director of the Certified Equity Professional Institute, Santa Clara University,
Santa Clara, Calif., and Achaessa James, product manager at the National Center for Employee
Ownership, Oakland, Calif., said equity compensation is a critical component of pay for both
executives and lower-level employees. Studies have shown that companies with equity compensation
programs have improved productivity, and for start-ups and private companies, various forms of
equity compensation enable cash-short companies to compete for the best talent, the speakers said.
Equity compensation programs are complex and, whether in designing or administering such
programs, there are risks for the company unless the disparate internal and external parties involved
understand issues outside their own areas of expertise, Cervino said. Creative plan designs by
compensation consultants are translated by attorneys and then implemented by companies without
any understanding of the accounting, financial reporting, tax (both U.S. and international tax),
employee communication, and myriad other issues, the speakers said.
In addition, "one size does not fit all," Cervino said, and choosing the right vehicle is very important.
For example, she said, retirement eligibility affects outstanding and newly granted awards. Choice of
stock options or restricted stock often depends on whether the company is a new or mature company,
and while performance awards are often best for executives and key technical talent, employee stock
purchase plans offer opportunities to a broad group of employees to share in the company's success,
the speakers said.
"Administration and financial reporting shouldn't necessarily determine the right design for an equity
plan, but decisions around those plans should be made with full understanding of administrative and
financial reporting consequences," Cervino said. If an administrator is handed a plan design that
"doesn't fit into systems and support," the risks involved in keeping the plan in compliance increase
dramatically, she said.
Cervino reviewed accounting and legal issues, taxation to the employer and employee, and
operational, financial, and compliance risks surrounding:
• incentive and nonqualified stock options,
• performance awards,
• restricted stock and restricted stock units,
• dividends,
• next-day deposits, and
• accounting and tax issues involved in exporting U.S. plans to foreign jurisdictions.
Educated Administrator Needed to Educate Employees
Regarding employee education, James said executives have very technical needs, including tax,
reporting, and holdings by family members that may be considered holdings by the executive when
calculating the executive's ownership. For other employees, the needs are more basic; for example,
how to exercise options, how to pay taxes, she said. If incentive stock options are involved, even midlevel
employees may be drawn into the alternative minimum tax regime if they exercise options, she
said.
"Education begins with the plan administrator," James said. "It is impossible for one person to know it
all," she said in explaining why she believes designation as a certified equity professional is important
for its educational value and for networking possibilities. Having a professional network "is just as
important as substantive knowledge; knowing what questions to ask and how to ask them" are most
important to a plan administrator, she said.
Unless employees understand the employer's equity plan, it will not work as a motivating tool, James
said.
By Mary Hughes
For more information, contact Emily Cervino at ecervino@scu.edu orAchaessa James at
ajames@nceo.org. Webinar materials are available from LegalEdge at
http://www.legaledge.bna.com .

Return to Top



BCD Semiconductor Manufacturing Limited Announces Financial Results for the Fiscal First Quarter of 2011 | View Clip
05/09/2011
Consumer Electronics Net

(GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- BCD Semiconductor Manufacturing Limited ("BCD Semiconductor") (Nasdaq:BCDS), a leading analog integrated device manufacturer, or IDM, based in China, specializing in the design, manufacture and sale of power management integrated circuits, or ICs, today announced financial results for the fiscal first quarter ended March 31, 2011.

The results for the fiscal quarter ended March 31, 2011 are as follows:

Revenue was $31.0 million, a sequential decrease of 1.9% from $ 31.6 million for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2010, and an 8.2% increase from $28.6 million for the first quarter of fiscal year 2010.

Gross margin was 29.1%, compared to 31.8% for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2010 and 29.9% for the first quarter of fiscal year 2010.

Operating expenses were $6.0 million, compared to $5.9 million for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2010 and $4.8 million for the first quarter of fiscal year 2010. Operating expenses for the first quarter of fiscal year 2011 included share-based compensation expenses of $319 thousand, as compared to $508 thousand and $263 thousand for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2010 and for the first quarter of fiscal year 2010, respectively.

Operating profit was $3.0 million, or 9.6% of revenue, compared to $4.1 million, or 13% of revenue, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2010 and $3.7 million, or 13% of revenue, for the first quarter of fiscal year 2010.

Net income was $3.8 million, compared to $3.8 million for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2010 and $2.7 million for the first quarter of fiscal year 2010. Net income on a non-GAAP basis, or non-GAAP net income, was $3.5 million, compared to $4.5 million for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2010 and $3.8 million for the first quarter of fiscal year 2010.

"Demand for our power IC products in the first quarter tracked mostly in line with our expectations entering 2011," said Chieh Chang, Chief Executive Officer of BCD Semiconductor. "Our linear products performed slightly ahead of expectations while shipments of our AC/DC products were slightly below our expectations. In terms of gross margins, we fell below our target range mainly as a result of higher costs associated with the maintenance of our facility in Shanghai."

Business Outlook

Revenue for the second quarter of fiscal year 2011 is expected to be in the range of $36 to $38 million, representing growth of approximately 5.6% to 11.5% when compared to the second quarter of 2010 and growth of approximately 16.3% to 22.8% when compared to the first quarter of 2011. Gross margin on a non-GAAP basis is expected to be in the range of 30.0% to 31.0% for the second quarter of fiscal year 2011.

Appointment of New Executive Officers

BCD Semiconductor appointed two new executive officers effective April 29, 2011.

Mr. Ji Wei Sun, one of BCD Semiconductor's founders, was appointed President of BCD Semiconductor. Mr. Sun served as BCD Semiconductor's President of China Operations from July 2003 to October 2010. He also served as a member of BCD Semiconductor's board of directors from October 2000 to February 2001 and again from July 2004 to October 2006. Mr. Sun has over 45 years of experience in the semiconductor industry. Prior to joining BCD Semiconductor, Mr. Sun was the President of JSC KORONA Semiconductor in Moscow, Russia from 1996 to 2000. Mr. Sun received a B.S. in physics from the University of Science and Technology of China in Beijing, China.

Mr. Ernest Lin was appointed BCD Semiconductor's Senior Vice President of Worldwide Sales. From 1997 until he joined BCD Semiconductor, from 1997 onward, Mr. Lin served in senior management and sales positions with various semiconductor companies in Silicon Valley, California, including Vice President and General Manager, Asia Operations of iKoa Corporation, Corporate Vice President of Worldwide Sales of VeriSilicon, Inc., Senior Vice President of Worldwide Sales of Genesis Microchip Inc., Vice President of Worldwide Sales of NeoMagic Corporation and Executive Vice President of Business Operations of LinkUp System Corporation. From January 1985 to May 1997, Mr. Lin also held various engineering, sales and management positions with Cirrus Logic. Mr. Lin received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the National Taiwan University, a Master's Degree in Computer Science from the University of Utah and a Master's Degree in Business Administration from Santa Clara University.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements that are based on current expectations, estimates, forecasts and projections of future performance based on management's judgment, beliefs, current trends, and anticipated product performance. These forward-looking statements include, without limitation, projected revenues, gross margins on a non-GAAP basis and other statements under the section titled "Business Outlook." Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in the forward-looking statements. These factors include, but are not limited to, our ability to introduce or develop new and enhanced products that achieve market acceptance; the actual product performance in volume production; the quality and reliability of our product; our ability to achieve design wins; general business and economic conditions; our ability to identify and consummate strategic transactions; the state of the semiconductor industry and seasonality of our markets; and other risks and uncertainties as described in our filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"), including the registration statement on Form F-1 filed on January 27, 2011, as amended and supplemented, and other filings with the SEC. Other unknown or unpredictable factors or underlying assumptions subsequently proving to be incorrect could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, level of activity, performance, or achievements. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. All information provided in this press release is as of today's date, unless otherwise stated, and BCD Semiconductor undertakes no duty to update such information, except as required under applicable law.

Conference Call and Webcast

BCD Semiconductor plans to conduct an investor teleconference and live webcast to discuss the financial results for the fiscal first quarter ended March 31, 2011 and our outlook for the second quarter of 2011 and other business matters today, May 9th, 2011 at 2:00 pm PT / 5:00 pm ET. To participate in the live call, analysts and investors should dial 866-242-1388 (or +61 2 8823 6760 if dialing from outside the U.S.A.). The conference ID number is 55713466. A live webcast of the call will also be available in the "Event Calendar" section of the company's investor relations website, http://ir.bcdsemi.com/. The webcast replay will be available for seven days after the live call on the same website. To listen to the webcast replay, please dial 866-214-5335(or +61 2 8235 5000 if dialing from outside the U.S.A.) The conference ID number is 55713466.

Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures

To supplement our unaudited consolidated financial statements presented on a basis consistent with GAAP, we disclose certain non-GAAP financial measures, including non-GAAP net income. These supplemental measures exclude share-based compensation expenses that are non-cash charges and gain or loss on warrant valuation. We believe that non-GAAP financial measures can provide useful information to both management and investors by excluding certain non-cash expenses that are not indicative of our core operating results. In addition, our management uses non-GAAP measures to compare our performance relative to forecasts and to benchmark our performance externally against competitors. Our use of non-GAAP financial measures has certain limitations in that the non-GAAP financial measures we use may not be directly comparable to those reported by other companies. For example, the term used in this press release, non-GAAP net income, does not have a standardized meaning. Other companies may use the same or similarly named measures, but exclude different items, which may not provide investors with a comparable view of our performance in relation to other companies. We seek to compensate for this limitation by providing a detailed reconciliation of the non-GAAP financial measures to the most directly comparable GAAP measures in the tables attached to this press release. Investors are encouraged to review the related GAAP financial measures and the reconciliation of these non-GAAP financial measures to their most directly comparable GAAP financial measure.

About BCD Semiconductor

BCD Semiconductor Manufacturing Limited ("BCD Semiconductor") is a leading analog integrated device manufacturer, or IDM, based in China, specializing in the design, manufacture and sale of power management integrated circuits, or ICs. Our broad portfolio of power management ICs primarily targets rapidly growing, high volume markets such as mobile phones, LCD televisions and monitors, personal computers, adapters and chargers and other electronics products. As an IDM, BCD Semiconductor integrates product design and process technology to optimize product performance and cost. We offer system-level solutions with the quality, performance and reliability required by our customers. Our China-based operations provide proximity to the rapidly growing electronics industry in Asia, enabling us to align our product development effort with customers and market trends and to provide timely and effective technical support. For more information, please visit http://www.bcdsemi.com.

The following consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).

BCD Semiconductor Manufacturing Limited

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets - GAAP

(in thousands of US dollars)

March 31,

2010

December 31,

2010

March 31,

2011

CURRENT ASSETS

$ 29,539

$ 44,717

$ 81,751

Restricted cash

Account receivable, net

Excess value-added tax paid

Deferred offering expenses

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

Total current assets

PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, NET

LAND USE RIGHT, NET

INVESTMENT IN EQUITY SECURITIES

OTHER ASSETS

$ 100,963

$ 137,022

$ 178,797

LIABILITIES, CONVERTIBLE REDEEMABLE PREFERENCE SHARES AND

SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY

CURRENT LIABILITIES

Short-term bank loans

$ 4,917

$ 12,040

$ 6,101

Account payable

Note payable

Accrued expenses

Payable for purchase of property, plant and equipment

Withholding tax liability

Warrant Liability

Other current liabilities

Total current liabilities

OTHER LIABILITIES

Deferred rent-noncurrent

Performance obligation

Obligation under capital lease-noncurrent

Deferred grant-noncurrent

Total other liabilities

Total liabilities

CONVERTIBLE REDEEMABLE PREFERENCE SHARES

SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY (CAPITAL DEFICIENCY)

Ordinary shares

Additional paid-in capital

Accumulated other comprehensive income

Accumulated deficit

Total shareholders' equity (Capital deficiency)

$ 100,963

$ 137,022

$ 178,797

BCD Semiconductor Manufacturing Limited

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income - GAAP

(in thousands of US dollars, except percentages)

Three Months Ended

March 31,

2010

December 31,

2010

March 31,

2011

NET REVENUE

IC products

$ 26,665

$ 29,149

$ 28,446

Foundry services

Total net revenue

COST OF REVENUE

IC products

Foundry services

Total cost of revenue

GROSS PROFIT

OPERATING EXPENSES

Research and development

Selling and marketing

General and administrative

Total operating expenses

INCOME FROM OPERATIONS

OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)

Interest income and expenses

Other income (expenses), net

INCOME BEFORE INCOME TAX EXPENSE

INCOME TAX EXPENSE

NET INCOME

$ 2,668

$ 3,775

$ 3,825

BCD Semiconductor Manufacturing Limited

Reconciliation of GAAP to Non-GAAP Net Income and EPS

(in thousands of US dollars)

GAAP to Non-GAAP Net Income

Three Months Ended

March 31,

2010

December 31,

2010

March 31,

2011

GAAP net income

$ 2,668

$ 3,775

$ 3,825

Share-based compensation:

Cost of goods sold

Research and development

Selling, general and administrative

Total share-based compensation

Gain or loss on valuation of warrant liability

Non-GAAP net income

$ 3,757

$ 4,467

$ 3,448

EPS fully diluted, GAAP

($ 0.40)

EPS fully diluted, Non GAAP

$ 0.19

The primary difference between the GAAP loss per share of $(0.40) and the non-GAAP earnings per share of $0.19 is that under GAAP, the 5 million ordinary shares at a fair value of $9.1 million issued to the Series C preference shareholders upon the IPO completion were accounted for as a deemed dividend thereby reducing the earnings available to ordinary shareholders, whereas no dividend was reflected in the calculation of non-GAAP earnings per share.

CONTACT: Tom Krause

Investor Relations

IR@bcdsemi.com

Related Sites: CEN - Consumer Electronics Net , CEN - TVs , VideoBasedTutorials

Related Newsletters: Tutorial Finder , Review Seeker

Source:2011 GlobeNewswire, Inc. . All Rights Reserved

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Health care hearing awaited | View Clip
05/09/2011
Congress.org

House Republicans pushed forward last week with a targeted repeal of the health care law, voting to take away funding for state health exchanges and school-based health centers. This unfolded even though lawmakers know oral arguments in a federal courtroom two hours away in Richmond, Va., likely will hold far more influence over the fate of the health care overhaul.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit on Tuesday will hear two cases that challenge the constitutionality of the law's requirement that all Americans have health insurance. It's an important moment. The cases — one brought by Virginia and the other by Liberty University in Lynchburg — are the first to advance from federal district courts to the appeals level, possibly the last stop before the Supreme Court.

Experts predict the high court will likely accept one or both suits. Other strong candidates among the 20-plus suits challenging the law are one filed by 26 states, scheduled for oral arguments in June, and another by a conservative law center in Michigan.

Republicans know attempts to kill the overhaul (PL 11-148, PL 111-152) may make headlines, but without more Republican senators and control of the White House they can't finish the job.

There's an advantage for Republicans and their allies to cast the law as overreaching and unpopular. Research shows public opinion, who's in control of Congress and the White House and the private political leanings of justices are factors that bear on the ultimate outcome of cases the Supreme Court hears.

Public opinion is split on the law. Bradley Joondeph, a Santa Clara University law professor following the legal fight, says it matters how warmly Americans view the law.

“It's not one of these things where they are checking the public opinion polling on a regular basis,” says Joondeph, who clerked for former Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. But “as with all of us, it's impossible to be immune to the degree to which things are currently in favor or out of favor.” Justices are keenly aware of the perceptions of fellow jurists and the nation's legal elite, and it would be much easier for the high court to declare the law unconstitutional if several lower courts have made that ruling, he says. Two so far have done that; three have ruled the other way on the merits.

Ronald Pollack, executive director of Families USA and one of the law's most ardent supporters, says judges need to keep in mind that the law's provisions regulating the health insurance market already are in effect. Striking down the law would take those benefits away from consumers, he says. But Pollack, a one-time law school dean, acknowledged that “public opinion is a factor,” even if judges deny it. Families USA has coordinated multiple grass-roots events to build support for the law.

Members of Congress are closely monitoring the lawsuits. As House debate began last week on a bill (HR 1213) that would strip mandatory funding for health exchanges, Energy and Commerce Chairman Fred Upton, R-Mich., noted that state attorneys general have asked for an expedited judicial review of the law. But the Obama administration disagreed. The Supreme Court turned down Virginia Attorney General Kenneth Cuccinelli's request to skip the appeals courts and hear his state's case immediately; such requests are rarely granted.

“As a result, the future of the law remains murky,” Upton says. “Both supporters and opponents should be able to agree that resolving the case expeditiously in the courts, the Supreme Court, is in the best interest of the country. But in the interim, we should not be spending billions of dollars . . . on something that might never happen.”

House Majority Whip Eric Cantor, R-Va., also has decried the “years of litigation and uncertainty” at hand.

In the Senate, Kay Bailey Hutchison, R-Texas, is leading the effort to halt implementation until the high court weighs in.

Supporters respond by noting that the law's mandate that most Americans get health insurance — a pivotal constitutional question raised by the suits — doesn't take effect until 2014.

Democratic and Republican leaders have signed onto legal briefs filed in support and opposition to the lawsuits, as have dozens of groups representing business, patients, the elderly and the insurance industry — a sign of the widespread interest in the outcome.

The three-judge panel will hear arguments lasting about 40 minutes for each case. The panel is chosen at random and the identity of each judge will not be publicly known in advance. While the 4th Circuit used to be regarded as conservative, four of its judges were appointed by President Obama. Acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal will argue for the government, a sign of the importance the White House places on the case — the solicitor general rarely argues cases in lower federal courts.

Joondeph said 4th Circuit judges are known for their efficiency, meaning a ruling could come by August. This would allow the Supreme Court, if it decides to take the case, to consider an appeal in the court's next term in the fall and to issue a ruling in the heat of the 2012 presidential election campaign.

Jane Norman writes for CQ.

Health care hearing awaited

The U.S. Court of Appeals on Tuesday will hear two cases that challenge the constitutionality of the Democratic health care overhaul.

Senate Democrats are struggling to follow through on President Obama’s call to end tax breaks for the oil and gas industry.

Congress has been struggling for years with Latin America policy, and an emerging factor is adding a degree of urgency: China's needs.

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Looking closer at utilities' energy efficiency programs | View Clip
05/09/2011
KPCC-FM - Online

Not all energy efficiencies are created equal. At least, that's the argument of consumer and environmental groups lobbying the California Public Utilities Commission - and those advocates are increasingly frustrated with the quality of those programs at the investor owned utilities.

Back in December, PUC commissioners voted to give PG&E, SDG&E, and So Cal Edison 68 million dollars for energy efficiency programs the utilities ran between 2006 and 2008. That was on top of nearly 144 in incentives already paid to utilities for the same underperforming programs. And it was in direct opposition to an administrative law judge's ruling that not only did the utilities fail to meet their goals and should receive no payments, but that they should actually pay money back to consumers.

Actions like that have raised scrutiny on the state's energy efficiency programs - and all the savings they boast about.

"When ratepayers are asked to pay hundreds of millions of dollars in bonuses to the utilities, they ought to be getting what they paid for," said Joe Como, acting director of the commission's Division of Ratepayer Advocates. "That's simply not happening here."

The DRA - an office at the PUC that analyses rate hikes and other decisions for their consumer impact - worked with The Utility Reform Network (TURN), based in San Francisco, a consumer-advocacy watchdog group - to file an appeal to the 68 million dollar payout. PUC commission chair Michael Peevey has defended the programs.

"That's pure nonsense," Peevey said. "We've done a very, very good job. We've kept rates below the consumer price index. We've moved the state dramatically in such fields as energy efficiency and renewables. As a group, we've tried to do a good job in serving the interests of the people of our state."

But for some, the dispute functions as an indictment of the programs' usefulness - and if nothing else, an opportunity to wonder how real the savings is in the long run. The DRA has suggested that utilities should spend more time targeting big fish manufacturing and building, requiring more energy efficient buildings, improving heat and air conditioning units, financing solar units through property taxes and enforcing new land-use policies. DRA has also called attention to the fact that energy efficiency programs are often if not always run by outside companies that contract for the job.

Consumer groups are perhaps a little optimistic that Governor Brown's appointees to the California Public Utilities Commission could herald a different approach to regulating the investor-owned utilities in the state. Mike Florio was a lawyer for decades at . Catherine Sandoval has expertise in public interest and business issues (her bio from Santa Clara University's School of Law tells us). They joined the PUC in January. Mark Ferron - formerly of Deutchebank, now a senior partner at Silicon Valley Social Ventures - joined in March.

Still, the commission hasn't decided how to assess energy efficiency incentive programs for 2009-2011. That's next. As for the appeal of the rehearing for the 68 million - the bonuses paid in December - nothing more has happened with that. You get bills from your utility, laced with offers for refrigerator rebates and compact fluorescents - what do you want to see San Diego Gas & Electric, PG&E, SoCalGas, and Edison do about energy efficiency?

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energy efficiency, energy

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Looking closer at utilities' energy efficiency programs

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Mind Games: Lessons for the Irrational Investor | View Clip
05/09/2011
SmartMoney - Online

More than a quarter century after the accident, Dan Ariely, 44, a professor at Duke University, still struggles with typing. In a laboratory in Israel, where he grew up, he was standing near a magnesium flare when it exploded, inflicting burns over 70 percent of his body and leaving his right hand permanently disfigured. His long and painful recovery gave him time to observe and think about what drives human behavior—from why nurses ripped off bandages in the most painful way possible, to why people tripped all over themselves when it came to investing. After that watchful waiting, he says, "I have a different way of looking at the world." He became especially interested in areas where people made repeated mistakes—without seeming to learn from their experiences. It seemed so…irrational.

From that experience sprang a career in which Ariely has devoted his logical mind to parsing illogical behavior, taking on a leading role in one of the investing world's most fascinating niches. Though hardly a household name, he has parlayed his research into two doctorates (one in psychology, one in business), two top-selling nonfiction books and a second career as a must-see speaker, whether he's addressing gatherings of the business elite at the World Economic Forum in Davos or entrepreneurial hipsters at Burning Man. In the process, he's become the most accessible, ubiquitous expounder of the tenets of behavioral finance, a blend of psychology and economics that seeks to explain the unexplainable—why our collective hubris, fear and knee-jerk reactions keep steering the financial markets off course. "It's the most important body of work to influence our understanding of finance since modern portfolio theory," enthuses Allan Roth, a financial planner and blogger whose Colorado Springs, Colo., firm, Wealth Logic, has more than $1 billion under advisement.

In recent years interest in behavioral finance has steadily grown: It's equally valuable to retirees deciding whether to stick with their dividends or risk their savings in the currency markets, to a fund manager putting a good spin on a bad year, and to a brokerage redesigning its retirement accounts. And recently, of course, the stock market has given behavioral economists all the more to think about, as Main Street and Wall Street investors have pushed stock prices up and down in reaction to crises in Japan and the Middle East. To Ariely, when you buy a stock, "all that should count is whether you think this company will grow." But what his investing audiences value is his awareness of the constant tug of emotions. "We should be helping investors overcome emotional biases," says Mark Jamison, an executive at Capital One who has implemented ideas of Ariely's both there and in a previous job at brokerage Charles Schwab. "When more big financial institutions understand how deep these emotional issues run, they'll be all over it."

The academic clout of folks like Ariely, who's a prolific contributor to scholarly journals, has been on the rise since Princeton behavioral economist Daniel Kahneman won a Nobel Memorial Prize in 2002. (Two other Nobelists offered lavish praise for Ariely's first book, as did a slew of CEOs.) But Ariely's more notable success has come from being the guy who can talk about that research in plain English—and in entertaining videos in which he'll don, say, a purple caftan or a bee costume. The question that even admirers ask is, Does his gift for reaching audiences add up to a coherent strategy for investors and consumers? (Ariely says he's more interested in making people aware of their foibles than in writing a how-to.) And a few critics contend he's too pessimistic about the capacity of people to learn from mistakes. To which Ariely responds that optimism about any aspect of human decision making, investing included, is—you guessed it—irrational. "From a financial perspective," he says, "you want to be the objective person in a society of overly optimistic people."

In traditional economics,markets and the people who trade in them are rational, with buyers and sellers making well-informed decisions steered by laws of supply and demand. On paper, the rules of this system work out elegantly. The problem is, the real world tends to ignore them; a century's worth of bubbles and panics have demonstrated that emotion and ignorance can always trump reason and calculation. Beginning in the 1980s, behavioral economists set out to determine whether the impact of human impulse could be measured—whether people are, as the title of Ariely's first book puts it, "predictably irrational." Turns out, it could, and we are. The behavioral crowd's biggest contributions included proving the persistence of "loss aversion"—showing that the desire to minimize the pain of losing money leads people to forget about losses and overrate their own successes. (Indeed, repeated studies have shown that a majority of us think we're above-average investors.) Imbued with overconfidence, investors buy hot stocks high, certain they'll go higher; they sign on with fund managers who are on a winning streak, certain that the streak is skill and not luck; and they sell stocks when they dip, the quicker to put the painful past behind them.

Behavioral economists often point out that humans aren't biologically wired to be money smart; after all, financial-management skills were not crucial to a caveman's survival. For its part, the financial-services industry has taken cues from such research to save investors from their worst caveman impulses—with some success. Target-date mutual funds, which automatically spread investors' funds among stocks, bonds and other assets, were designed, in part, to keep investors from constantly moving money to chase hot performers; they've been quickly adopted by brokerages and investors alike, with $367 billion in assets to date, up 39 percent from a year ago. And more brokers and advisers are urging their clients to pen mission statements, in which they state their investment goals—and then asking the clients to reread them when their emotional reactions to the headlines tempt them to make a risky move.

It's all a far cry from what Ariely thought would be his life's work back in his college days. But he got hooked on financial decision making during graduate school, he says, when he worked on a study of what economists call anchoring. Business-school students were asked to write the last two digits of their Social Security numbers as a price next to various unrelated items (books, chocolate, computer keyboards). Later, the same students were asked to bid on those items, eBay style—and the ones who had higher Social Security numbers routinely bid higher. For Ariely, it was an epiphany: Consumers could anchor their decisions to prices that had nothing to do with the underlying value of what they bought. "Supply and demand are really not in play," Ariely says. "It's truly irrational."

More recently, Ariely's work has taken him where the dollar stakes are far higher, at the intersection of the financial-services industry and its customers. At a time when banks and brokers had turned free trades and checking into pillars of their marketing strategies, Ariely's research showed that free offers tended to lure customers into deals that were worse for them overall. And in 2008, just as questionable practices on Wall Street began to drag down the economy, he released a pivotal study on cheating: Most people, it turns out, are comfortable with a small amount of cheating; if the incentives are in place, they can bend the rules and still consider themselves "good people." That's one reason Ariely is disappointed but not surprised that high bonuses are back in the financial world. "If I pay people $5 million to view mortgage-backed securities as a good product, most people will believe [those securities] are good," says Ariely.

The idea that people are irrational has since become Ariely's brand and calling card. (He signs his e-mails "Irrationally yours.") In the eyes of some economists, that thesis is an overstatement. Even many behavioral-finance experts tend to think of people as rational beings who are prone to understandable errors. Investors who make unwise moves are "intelligent people who stepped on a banana," argues Meir Statman, an author and a professor of finance at Santa Clara University who has worked extensively in the behavioral field, and to call them irrational is to imply that they can't learn from those mistakes. Ariely says he sees the issue as less black-and-white: People can't train themselves to stop being irrational, but they can find ways to keep irrationality in check. That's why he's a big fan of lists, reminders and other tools for making money decisions. His corporate-consulting gigs have included work with Intuit, the creator of the financial-management software Quicken. "Some say he's a one-trick pony," says Intuit Chairman Scott Cook. "It's not true."

When we meet Ariely for coffee at a Four Seasons Hotel in Silicon Valley, he's not in his zany nonconformist mode, though he'll change into orange sneakers later that day, when he addresses a hedge-fund group. He tells us he's being besieged with angry phone calls from dentists, having asserted on NPR that tooth tenders have an incentive to give us fillings when we don't need them. But he doesn't characterize himself as a consumer-advocacy firebrand. "I don't like to annoy people," he says. "I see myself as a messenger of the data." Indeed, he's the type who can deliver criticism without too sharp a bite—he can coolly eviscerate the techniques and fees of financial planners, and then give an affable keynote address to the Financial Planning Association. Ariely has handed over his own investment reins to the pros. During the crash in 2008, he found himself tempted to sell his stocks and mutual funds in a panic. Instead, he deliberately typed the wrong password into his account several times so that it temporarily blocked his access. The principle he was trying to follow: Trade on what's right for the future, rather than being swayed by an emotional moment. Months later he hired an investment adviser. "It removed the emotional burden," he says.

It didn't remove his skepticism, however. Active fund managers have not compiled a great record of late—only 36 percent of large-cap U.S. mutual funds outperformed the S&P 500 in 2010, according to Morningstar. But investors are hardwired to trust authority, Ariely says, so they put up with the underperformance, along with the higher fees associated with active management. Even the 1 percent annual fee charged by many independent advisers seems out of proportion to Ariely, who feels that planners don't typically merit that kind of scratch unless they're very deeply involved in all aspects of their clients' decision making.

Here too, Ariely says, consumers are partly to blame: We're more tolerant of percentage-based fees than we are of being charged a specific dollar amount—we see red, for example, when we stand at the gas station and see the number tick upward. Think how things might be different, posits Ariely, if each morning you had to write a $30 check to your investment manager: "That would make it like the gas pump, and you would feel upset." That might also make investors demand more of their planners—a theme Ariely says he stressed in a recent address to a group of planners. (Richard Salmen, a past president of the Financial Planning Association, says that in some cases, a 1 percent management fee represents a discount from what an investor was paying to manage their own money; he adds that the value of a planner-client relationship is "hard to quantify.")

If Ariely ran the world, how would advisers behave? For starters, he might encourage them to approach retirement-planning with more nuance, treating it less like a race to a magic number. He says he dislikes the retirement calculators that many advisers use. "Enter five numbers and they tell you that you need to save $4.5 million," he says. "What do I do if I just get to $2 million? What sacrifices should I make for the future? How do I trade some of my quality of life for later?" He'd like to see the financial industry do more to help individuals prepare for the real consequences of their economic choices, in part by quantifying them. "If you buy a car, you are giving up 700 lattes, three vacations and some books," he says.

But as Ariely admits, such calculations seem simple to an outsider who isn't in the thick of things. (It's no accident that a research group he cofounded dubbed itself the Center for Advanced Hindsight.) He's been known to pull a gag on unsuspecting visitors, attaching a simple stick-and-string contraption to their shirt buttonholes. Unless you know the trick, it's hellishly difficult to remove. Once you do, it seems trivially easy. As Ariely says, "It's the curse of knowledge."

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Notre Dame Vice President Leaving For California | View Clip
05/09/2011
INside Edge, The

The vice president and associate provost for undergraduate studies at the University of Notre Dame is stepping down. Dennis Jacobs has been named provost and vice president for academic affairs at Santa Clara University. Jacobs has been a chemistry and biochemistry faculty member at Notre Dame since 1988 and served as vice president since 2004.

Santa Clara, Calif. -- Santa Clara University announced the selection of Dennis Jacobs as the new provost and vice president for academic affairs. He will begin his duties this summer.

Jacobs will be the chief academic officer of Santa Clara and provide leadership and management of all aspects of academic and student life programs, information services, and athletics. Jacobs, who comes to Santa Clara from the University of Notre Dame, where he served as vice president and associate provost for undergraduate studies since 2004, will report directly to University President Michael Engh, S.J.

“With enthusiasm I welcome Dennis Jacobs to Santa Clara University and look forward to working with him to advance the University and its strategic plan,” said Michael Engh, S.J. “His record of success augers well for continued and greater success here in the Silicon Valley.” At Notre Dame, Jacobs worked to implement the core curriculum, launched new study abroad programs, and established the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement to cultivate scholars and enhance research opportunities for students. He initiated a Residential Scholars program to help bridge the divide between academic and residential life. He also helped recruit a more diverse undergraduate student body through a variety of strategic initiatives including modifying Notre Dame’s financial aid packaging.

“I feel privileged to have this opportunity to be a part of the next exciting chapter at Santa Clara University,” said Jacobs. “Santa Clara has all the academic ingredients to make a significant and lasting impact here in the Silicon Valley and globally.”

Jacobs is drawn to Santa Clara’s holistic approach to education informed by its rich Jesuit and Catholic tradition. “The aim is to develop outstanding leaders and professionals who are committed to form a more humane, just and sustainable world,” said Jacobs. “Santa Clara is distinctive in the way it blends an ethical perspective and the principles of social justice with intellectual inquiry and technological innovation.”

In addition to guiding the vision of Notre Dame’s undergraduate program, Jacobs has been a chemistry and biochemistry faculty member at Notre Dame since 1988. His research has focused on studying reactions relevant to semiconductor processing in the microelectronics industry. For the past decade, he has taught a community-based learning course in which student teams visit families who live below the poverty level to test for lead contamination in their homes.

Jacobs has published extensively and received numerous grants and awards. Among his many accolades are the Kaneb Teaching Award at Notre Dame, Carnegie Scholar of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, and the prestigious Professor of the Year for Doctoral and Research Universities awarded by CASE, the Council for Advancement and Support of Education. The CASE award honors dedication to teaching, commitment to students and creative approaches to education. It is the only national award to acknowledge teaching excellence.

Jacobs, who played jazz piano in college, views his role at Santa Clara much like the director of a jazz band—one who inspires and draws upon the talents of each musician in the ensemble to create a unique composition. Jacobs reflected, “In order to bring coherence and vision to the university, the provost needs to recognize the diversity of strengths and talents across the campus, and leverage them strategically to advance programs in support of the university’s goals.”

After spending 23 years in Indiana, Jacobs is excited to return to California, where he was born and received his entire education. He earned his Ph.D. in chemistry from Stanford University and his bachelor’s degrees in chemistry and physics at the University of California at Irvine.

Jacobs is married with three children, two of whom are in college and the youngest in high school. His wife, Thea, is pursuing a teaching credential in elementary education.

About Santa Clara University

Santa Clara University, a comprehensive Jesuit, Catholic university located 40 miles south of San Francisco in California’s Silicon Valley, offers its more than 8,800 students rigorous undergraduate curricula in arts and sciences, business, theology, and engineering, plus master’s and law degrees and engineering Ph.D.s. Distinguished nationally by one of the highest graduation rates among all U.S. master’s universities, California’s oldest operating higher education institution demonstrates faith-inspired values of ethics and social justice. For more information, see www.scu.edu.

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Parsons sparkles at Virginia Tech
05/09/2011
Monterey County Herald

Add Joe Parsons to the list of local athletes who could hear their name called in June's Major League Baseball amateur draft.

The Virginia Tech senior hurler leads the team in wins and starts. Parsons, who prepped at Carmel, is 6-2 with a 3.10 earned run average.

The right-hander has 41 strikeouts in 61 innings. He has the team's only complete game this year, a shutout of Duke.

Blessed with a 90 plus mph fastball, the 6-foot-1 Parsons has the lowest earned run average among starters and has held opponents to a .235 batting average.

National judo champion

Janine Nakao won her third National Judo Championship, earning a spot on the U.S. team that will compete in the World Judo Championships on Aug. 23 in Paris.

A member of the Bojuka Ryu Martial Arts Club in Marina, Nakao has positioned herself for a spot on the U.S Olympic Judo team for 2012.

Training at the U.S. Judo National Training Center, Nakao was undefeated in the 63 kg (139 pounds) division at the nationals.

Power surge for Howell

A hot start at the plate for Trevor Howell has him leading Germany's top professional baseball league in four offensive categories.

Howell, an assistant coach in the spring for Monterey Peninsula College, has three home runs in his first eight games for the Dortmund Wanderers.

The right-hander has driven in 11 runs, has scored nine runs and sports a .733 slugging percentage. He is second on the team in stolen bases (4) and walks (5).

Milestone for Estrada

Diego Estrada turned in the second fastest 5,000 meter time in Northern Arizona history, clocking 13:26.94 at a meet at Stanford University.

Estrada's time is just six seconds under the U.S. Olympic Trials qualifying standard for 2012.

"There is no doubt in my mind that I could go for the Olympic qualifying mark," the Alisal High graduate said.

This is the third time Estrada has put his name in the Northern Arizona University record books, having set career marks in the 10,000 and 1,500.

Burr honored

Mississippi Valley State sophomore catcher Nicole Burr was named to the Southwestern Athletic Conference second team.

Burr, who also earned the Iron Woman award from Mississippi Valley State, is hitting .321 with five home runs and 38 runs batted in. She also scored 22 runs and has a .512 slugging percentage.

Starting 47 of the team's 48 games, Burr's play behind the plate solidified thes pitching staff.

Seaside's best

Behind the efforts of Chris Russo, Joseph Jakubowsky and Kyle Hieb, the 16-under basketball team is headed to the AAU Nationals July 24-30 in Florida.

The trio were outstanding in a tournament in Sacramento, helping Seaside's Finest post a 3-1 record to gather one of the three qualifying spots for the nationals.

Other members of the team include Matty McCarthy, Alex Klink, JonQuis Bouyea, Ryan Kausin, Hayden Wood and Matt DeVogelaere.

With Matthew Chodosh and Jesse Carrillo patrolling the paint and Justin Lagrimas running the floor, the 14-under team is also headed to the AAU Nationals.

Members of the team included Ryan Hawkins, Edric Gamble, Marques Cannon, Andrew Wooler, Derrick Villalobos, Kobe Russell, Connor Marden, Andrew Jakubowsky, Michael Adams and Miles Brown.

Hoopsters second in tournament

The Monterey Bay Hoopsters 14-under girls team finished second in a tournament in San Carlos, posting a 2-1 record.

Members of the team are Danielle Acuna, Shamani Anongchanya, MacKenzie Bell, Ali Briscoe, Maranda Cabanlit, Taliyah Crawford, Rebecca Interrante, Mahina Magallan and Jessica Matthews.

Kretchmer flourishes

Matt Kretchmer sparkled on the mound this spring for CSU San Marcos, compiling a 6-1 mark in 11 starts.

Kretchmer, who prepped at Carmel, struck out 55 hitters in 60 innings. His six wins was a team high. He recorded a 4.45 earned run average.

Marina baller

Playing for the Urban Ballers in Oakland, Jordan Eugenio helped lead his 13-under team to a spot in the AAU National qualifier in Memphis, Tenn.

Eugenio, who lives in Marina, is the point guard for the Ballers, who will also play in the West Coast Regionals in Las Vegas, Nev.

Big time goal for Shelling

Peter Shelling produced a clutch goal for the UC Santa Cruz men's soccer team in a 2-1 upset win over Santa Clara University.

UC Santa Cruz is a Division III program while Santa Clara is a Division I juggernaut. Shelling led Stevenson in goals in 2009.

Basketball clinic

A free youth basketball clinic will be held Sunday at San Benancio Middle School. Kindergarten through second grade is from noon to 1 p.m.; 3rd-5th will go from 1 to 2:15 p.m.; and 6th-8th from 2:30 to 4 p.m. There are no signups. Call Paul Alioto at 970-0780 or paul@1percentclub.org.

Golf tournament

The Hope for a Cure four person scramble golf tournament will be held May 20 at 1 p.m. at Laguna Seca Golf Ranch. Proceeds benefit the Relay for Life American Cancer Society. Fee is $150. Call 373-3701.

Hartnell summer camps

Hartnell College will host a number of summer youth camps, beginning June 20. Sports include baseball, softball, tennis, volleyball, basketball, football, track and soccer. Sign ups are being taken at the Physical Education Department. Call 755-6830.

Youth football

Signups for playing football or cheerleading for the Monterey Peninsula Pop Warner Jets will be held May 15 at Seaside City Hall from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Go to www.mppwjets.com.

Maurice Mann Camp

The second Maurice Mann Performance 5 Training Camp for ages 13-18 is being extended to two days on May 20-21 at Monterey Peninsula College. Both days will start at 10 a.m. The camp will consist of technical drills, throwing, catching and running routes. Information can be obtained at p5elite.com.

Coaches needed

Notre Dame is in need of a varsity basketball coach. Call Terri Sonniksen at 757-3905.

John Devine can be reached at jdevine@montereyherad.com and 646-4405.

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All contents ©2011 MONTEREY COUNTY HERALD and may not be republished without written permission.

Copyright © 2011 The Monterey County Herald

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Santa Clara University names Dennis Jacobs provost | View Clip
05/09/2011
BizJournals.com

Courtesy photo, Chuck Barry.

Dennis Jacobs is leaving the University of Notre Dame to be new provost at Santa Clara University.

Dennis Jacobs, vice president and associate provost for undergraduate studies at the University of Notre Dame since 2004, has been named the new provost and vice president of academic affairs at Santa Clara University.

In his new post, Jacobs will become the top academic officer for Santa Clara, managing its academic, student life, information services and athletics programs.

He will report directly to Michael Engh, president of the Jesuit university with 8,800 graduate and undergraduate students. He will replace Don Dodson, who has been serving in the job on an interim basis for the past year. Dodson replaced Lucia Gilbert, who retired.

“I feel privileged to have this opportunity to be a part of the next exciting chapter at Santa Clara University,” Jacobs said in a statement. “Santa Clara has all the academic ingredients to make a significant and lasting impact here in the Silicon Valley and globally.”

Engh said he's enthusiastic about Jacobs coming to Santa Clara.

“His record of success augers well for continued and greater success here in the Silicon Valley,” Engh said in a statement.

During his Notre Dame tenure, Jacobs worked to implement the core curriculum, launched new study-abroad programs and established the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement, which expanded research opportunities for students. He also started a residential scholars program to help bridge the divide between academic and residential life. He also known for creating more diversity among the undergraduate student body. ...

Dennis Jacobs, vice president and associate provost for undergraduate studies at the University of Notre Dame since 2004, has been named the new provost and vice president of academic affairs at Santa Clara University.

In his new post, Jacobs will become the top academic officer for Santa Clara, managing its academic, student life, information services and athletics programs.

He will report directly to Michael Engh, president of the Jesuit university with 8,800 graduate and undergraduate students. He will replace Don Dodson, who has been serving in the job on an interim basis for the past year. Dodson replaced Lucia Gilbert, who retired.

“I feel privileged to have this opportunity to be a part of the next exciting chapter at Santa Clara University,” Jacobs said in a statement. “Santa Clara has all the academic ingredients to make a significant and lasting impact here in the Silicon Valley and globally.”

Engh said he's enthusiastic about Jacobs coming to Santa Clara.

“His record of success augers well for continued and greater success here in the Silicon Valley,” Engh said in a statement.

During his Notre Dame tenure, Jacobs worked to implement the core curriculum, launched new study-abroad programs and established the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement, which expanded research opportunities for students. He also started a residential scholars program to help bridge the divide between academic and residential life. He also known for creating more diversity among the undergraduate student body.

A native Californian, Jacobs said he is excited to return home after spending the past 23 years in Indiana. He earned a Ph.D. in chemistry from Stanford University and bachelor's degrees in chemistry and physics at the University of California, Irvine.

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The Market Vs. the Mind | View Clip
05/09/2011
SmartMoney - Online

If investors were truly rational, as traditional economics says they are, they'd never get caught in bubbles—or pay 2 percent a year in mutual fund fees, says Dan Ariely. His research and that of other behavioral economists suggests that investors are hardwired to make mistakes like these:

1Ignoring the drip-drip of fees. Consumers notice price increases at the gas pump or the grocery store, but they tend to passively accept investment fees, especially those that are automatically deducted from their accounts. Our tolerance for paying in percentages is much greater than that for being charged dollar amounts, according to Ariely.

2Being cocky. Most investors optimistically believe they're better at investing than they actually are. Research by behavioral-finance pioneers Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky shows that people place a high value on "loss aversion," which leads them to avoid thinking about—and learning from—their past mistakes.

3Clinging to losers. We hold on to investments that have lost value, like stocks or homes, even when selling them

would add to our wealth, clinging to the belief they'll regain their old value. "Realizing losses brings on the searing pain of regret," says Meir Statman, professor of finance at Santa Clara University and author of What Investors Really Want .

4Chasing the expert herd. Inclined to trust experts, many investors jump from stocks to bonds and back again trying to time the market, following the most convincing advice. But investors who hold their investments steadily for several years earn higher returns, according to research by Statman and money manager Kenneth Fisher.

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To avoid corruption by power, leaders need critics to steer them straight | View Clip
05/09/2011
Las Vegas Business Press - Online

In my work with business executives I have become aware of the truth of Lord Acton's famous quote: "Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." Here is what might be called the "7 A's" of temptations that can afflict people in power positions:

•Anger

•Arrogance

•Aloneness

•Affairs

•Addiction

•Above the law (think they are)

•Awareness of self (lack of)

Recently, I heard an excellent presentation on the topic of power by Dennis Moberg, a professor at Santa Clara University's Leavey School of Business. One of his insights expanded my awareness of the "7 A's" by pointing out that in communicating with subordinates powerful people tend to be uninhibited. Their messages are often too candid and could be inappropriate if, for example, they were leaked to the media. Moberg attributes this failure of leaders to act in their own best interests, and the best interests of their companies, to a lack of self-control. One might add a lack of self-awareness, blindness to one's foibles, or the illusion of invincibility.

How can we use this information to help leaders avoid being seduced by the power of their role in the organization?

We can institute the job of an "admonitor" for the one in charge. This is a time-honored tradition in the Jesuits (a Catholic religious order of men). The admonitor is another Jesuit who is appointed to warn the superior, in a confidential and kindly manner, when he is not acting in his own best interest or the interests of his community.

Enlist the skills of someone whose job it is to pop the illusory "balloons" of self-importance, feelings of entitlement, or illusions of grandeur of the leader when they appear.

Protect the leader from "yes" folks who deliver flattery rather than the truth when relating to the boss.

We all need loving critics, James Kouzes and Barry Posner write in their book, "A Leader's Legacy," but many leaders only want to hear glowing reports of how they are doing. Why are they reluctant? "... they are afraid of being exposed. Exposed as not being perfect, as not knowing everything, as not being as good at leadership as they should be, as not being up to the task" (page 31).

Occasionally we see a leader who avoids the common pitfalls of power. E. Parry Thomas is a good example. Thomas was the president of the Valley Bank of Nevada from the mid-1950s to 1992. He played a significant role in directing the growth and maturation of Las Vegas. He is admired for his honesty and for the high value he had in keeping all banking transactions confidential. Yet, on the subject of power, Steve Wynn relates: "Parry never, ever, had a sense of his own power. Never did anyone see him wearing the power that he wielded. He was always the most humble man and he never ever told anybody what to do." ("Quiet Kingmaker," by Jack Sheehan, page 217.)

Max Oliva is a Jesuit priest. He is the author of five books all of which are available on Amazon.com His latest is "Beatitudes for the Workplace." frmaxolivasj@yahoo.com.

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Dan Morian: Panetta's view of state's woes should worry us
05/08/2011
Sacramento Bee, The

After accepting President Barack Obama's request that he serve as CIA director, Leon E. Panetta offered his friends out here a pithy and prescient view about the daunting task ahead.

He would be leaving his Carmel Valley home, various boards, an institute he and his wife founded, and an important post as co-chair of California Forward, a nonpartisan organization advocating for reforms of this state's dysfunctional government.

Why give that up? He was, after all, 70. Simple.

" 'It may be easier to find Osama bin Laden than it is to fix California,' " James Mayer , California Forward's executive director, recalled Panetta telling board members as he wrapped up his duties in January 2009.

Turns out Panetta was right. For the past week, the nation has been riveted by everything bin Laden, beginning with Obama's address to the nation last Sunday in which he said that upon taking office, he told Panetta to "make the killing or capture of bin Laden the top priority of our war against al-Qaida."

So many details that have emerged are the stuff of history: how CIA agents located bin Laden, how Navy SEALs trained for the assault, how Obama and his advisers gathered in the Situation Room to watch as Panetta, in his office across the Potomac River in Langley, narrated real-time details of the assault on the Abbottabad compound and the terrorist's final moments.

Panetta's place as a national figure is solid, deservedly so. But take a look at where he has been. Then consider his view of the state of the state of California. It ought to alarm those of us still here.

The son of southern Italian immigrants, Panetta, 72, grew up in Monterey and Carmel Valley , long before Carmel became fancy. His parents ran Carmelo's Diner in Monterey and grew almonds.

After graduating from Santa Clara University law school and serving in the Army, Panetta worked for U.S. Sen. Thomas H. Kuchel, a California Republican in the moderate mold of Earl Warren , and one who fought to pass the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act in the middle 1960s.

After Kuchel lost the 1968 primary, Panetta joined the Nixon administration, becoming responsible for enforcing desegregation orders in Southern school districts. That placed him in direct conflict with Nixon's Southern strategy of winning over white voters. He resigned in 1970.

He became a Democrat, made his way home to Monterey, won a congressional seat in 1976, served eight terms and became House budget committee chairman.

In 1993, President Bill Clinton appointed him director of the Office of Management and Budget, and later chief of staff. In those roles, he helped balance the budget, surely among the reasons for the prosperity of the Clinton years.

Panetta returned to Monterey in 1998 and with his wife, Sylvia, founded the Panetta Institute , which is affiliated with California State University and encourages public service. He also started writing about California, like this article in 2003:

"There is no magic formula for dealing with deficits. You have to either raise taxes or cut spending, or do both. And yet, each time these difficult decisions must be made, both political parties fear for their survival and inevitably try to postpone the day of reckoning."

And this piece, also in 2003:

"For too many years, California has ignored the financial dilemma that resulted from an array of state initiatives that have reduced governmental discretion and moved decision making from the Legislature to the populace."

And this 2005 article:

"The Republicans seem hopelessly trapped by an ideological agenda and a growing arrogance of power. The Democrats seem afraid to advance any new or bold ideas about the future for fear of upsetting their political base and losing more power."

In January 2009, the day before Obama announced his nomination as CIA director, Panetta wrote for this newspaper:

"California is in the worst fiscal and political crisis of its history. This crisis threatens the future of our economy, our education system, our infrastructure, and the promise that our children can have a better life."

He summed it up: Deficits, partisanship, government by initiative and financial crisis. What a mess. When he became co-chair of California Forward in 2008, he got a closer look at California's dysfunction.

California Forward board member Fred Keeley , a former assemblyman from Santa Cruz who has known Panetta since 1980, said Panetta witnessed a very basic problem. Promises made by California's elected leaders don't seem to mean much.

" 'Yes,' 'no,' 'maybe' – those terms are not interchangeable," Keeley said. "What he was stunned by was that yes, no, maybe are interchangeable. He was very concerned about whether a government can function if yes, no and maybe are interchangeable."

Panetta will remain in D.C. a little longer. His new task will be to serve as defense secretary, cutting defense spending. Panetta might offer another pithy comment, like it'd be easier to wrestle the military industrical complex than it would be to solve California's finances.

Panetta seriously mulled running for governor once, in 1998, Sylvia Panetta told me last week, but thought better of it. Like many national figures, he is well-known inside the Beltway, but not among California voters.

Gray Davis became governor in 1998. That didn't work out so well. As I watched and read about Panetta this past week, I couldn't help but wonder: What if?

"It may be easier to find Osama bin Laden than it is to fix California."

Copyright © 2011 McClatchy-Tribune Information Services

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Knowing One's Environmental Footprint May Be Counterproductive | View Clip
05/08/2011
Bloodthirsty Warmonger

Here's an interesting observation from Miller-McCune: Measuring a person's ecological footprint or carbon footprint is a popular tool among environmentalists. Many see it as a way to educate people about the damage they inflict on the environment on an everyday basis — information that may prompt them to change their behavior. But newly published research suggests that for many people — perhaps most — the receipt of such data may produce the opposite result. In an experiment described in the journal Social Influence, “Only people who had invested their self-esteem in environmentalism — a strong form of commitment — reacted to negative environmental-footprint feedback by engaging in a pro-environment behavior,” writes Santa Clara University psychologist Amara Brook. “Others were less likely to engage in a pro-environmental behavior after negative feedback....”

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The Greatest of All Internet Laws Turns 15 | View Clip
05/08/2011
Forbes - Online

The “best Internet law” – the foundation of our Internet freedoms — celebrates its 15th anniversary this year, yet few people have even heard of it.

Many critics now want to gut this important law by “deputizing” online operators to more aggressively police — even censor — their sites for various types of potentially objectionable online content, including: defamation, privacy concerns, pornography, and more. If online intermediaries failed to engage in a more aggressive speech-policing role, they would open themselves up to lawsuits.

The law says “interactive computer services” are shielded from liability for information posted or published on their systems by users. This means online intermediaries have generous leeway to determine what content and commerce travels over their systems without the fear that they will be overwhelmed by lawsuits if other parties object to some of that content.

The law is an obscure provision of the Telecommunications Act of 1996: 47 U.S.C. §230, otherwise known as “Section 230” and it helped foster the abundance of informational riches that lies at our fingertips today:

• Message boards and specialized websites exist for practically every hobby or interest under the sun.

• Community forums help us connect with local schools, churches, or civic organizations.

• There are shopping sites, auction services, and online classifieds to satisfy our every desire.

• Social networking sites and messaging services allow us to keep up with friends and family or network with others.

• Finally, there exists a seemingly endless array of blogs and news sites delivering a daily deluge of information to us that has become overwhelming, but search engines help us sort through it.

There are many technological and economic reasons for this unprecedented explosion of speech and human interaction, but the primary legal reason lies with Sec. 230. If not for the immunities granted by Sec. 230, online speech and commerce would have been severely stifled because of the threat of legal action.

That explains why cyberlaw guru Eric Goldman of the Santa Clara University School of Law labels Sec. 230the “best Internet law” and “a big part of the reason why the Internet has been such a massive success.”

This important law is under attack from various academics and organizations who want it modified to address a variety of online problems. Some of those concerns are valid, but reopening Sec. 230 to address all of them would do far more harm than good.

If the threat of punishing liability is increased, the chilling effect on the free exchange of views and information would likely be quite profound. Many site administrators would immediately start removing massive amounts of content to avoid liability. More simply, they might just shut down any interactive features on their sites or limit service in other ways.

Consider Yelp, a popular site for finding and reviewing local businesses in many large cities. As of March 2011, the site hosted over 17 million user reviews, many of which were provided anonymously. Critical reviews probably anger some local businesses but are hugely beneficial to others in the community. In a world without Sec. 230, some businesses or organizations would incessantly petition sites like Yelp for removal of critical commentary about them.

Finding themselves in a legally precarious position, sites like Yelp might opt to play it safe by removing a great deal of content and communications that could have real social value. In the field of First Amendment jurisprudence, this is referred to as the “heckler's veto” problem.

This isn't just a problem for large sites like Yelp, Facebook, Twitter, or Craigslist. Smaller sites, including blogs, would face a far more formidable task since they lack the resources or legal counsel necessary to arbitrate the avalanche of takedown requests that would likely follow.

Alternative remedies are usually available to address many of these problems without resorting to the drastic step of revoking Sec. 230. The first and best solution is always more speech. People who don't like what they see or read online have many ways to respond.

Self-regulation, social norms, and public pressure can also help counter many problems without resorting to major changes in liability norms. The public can, and does, encourage responsible behavior and site moderation for particularly offensive online content or comments. Sites like Yelp and , for example, have clear content posting guidelines; they self-police and delete what they consider highly objectionable or clearly illegal content.

Companies can't attract a broad audience or create a sustainable business if they earn a bad reputation with consumers.

But policymakers would be opening a potential Pandora's box of legal problems if they reopened Sec. 230 to address the handful of bad apples that cause problems online. For consumers, a world without Sec. 230 could mean less site functionality, higher prices for online services if sites need to charge more to comply or insure themselves against increased lawsuits, or simply fewer sites and services in the aggregate. Most importantly, it could mean less-valuable informational inputs are available to them if online speech and expression is excessively chilled.

We should preserve and celebrate the Net's best law as a boon to online speech and commerce.

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*Diversity Leadership Conference | View Clip
05/07/2011
KKGN-AM

Presenters and attendees were interviewed at diversity in the media at the Diverstiy Leadership Conference, which was held at Santa Clara University.

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Business Leadership Program | View Clip
05/07/2011
College Discussion

Puma12 + MJH2010 how would u compare Puget Sounds business program to Santa Clara University program?

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Gay population at Santa Clara university | View Clip
05/07/2011
College Discussion

Edgar did u look into University of SF?

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Happy forward momentum, Mom
05/07/2011
Seattle Times

This Mother's Day, women have something to be excited about beyond greeting cards, flowers and chocolates. Yes, recent census figures show a continuing trend that should give women and men more to celebrate.

Census data released last week show women getting master's degrees for the first time in greater numbers than men. This trend is nothing new — women surpassed men in gaining bachelor's degrees in 1996 and the numbers have continued in that direction since.

On the other end of the spectrum, more men are taking on the role of the stay-at-home dad. It's estimated that one in five parents staying home with the kids is a father.

This is not quite a groundbreaking moment for gender equality, but it shows families adjusting to new circumstances — with the economy admittedly playing a big role. Nevertheless, this looks like a step toward a society where no one must assume a role simply because of gender.

It may be Mother's Day, but I think this is a reason for both women and men to be in good spirits. Children benefit immensely from their relationship with both parents.

Don't get me wrong — gender equality in the workplace is not where it should be. Women on average may be more educated than their male counterparts, but women still earn 77 cents to the average male-earned dollar. A woman with her master's degree gets less compensation than a man with only a bachelor's.

While this is a serious discrepancy that rightly frustrates all women in the work force, it's also true that education roughly correlates to earnings. So we should expect this trend to play a role in closing that pay gap.

Married women are also contributing more financially to their families than in the past. As more men lost their jobs in the recession, women are increasingly responsible for their household — taking the spot of the traditional breadwinner.

Yet, at home, progress is also lagging. Whether employed or not, women still do most of the work at home. Women spend 2.9 hours daily working around the house and caring for children, while men spend on average 1.7 hours daily, according to the 2008 American Time Use Survey.

But census data could be foreshadowing change in this realm, too.

"The notion that men just come home and read the paper, that woman are cleaning the house is changing more and more," said Nancy Unger, associate professor of history at Santa Clara University.

The traditional division of the American family is in flux because of education, the economy and other circumstances.

"Everyone's doing what is needed to be done," said Nick Senzee, a stay-at-home dad in Seattle. "I look at it as more of a return to a shared homestead point of view."

Not all women will perfectly fit the image of a homemaker, and many men may prefer to be the primary caretaker of their children.

"We are each better suited," said Senzee. "I'm better at home, you know what I'm saying."

To me, this looks just like progress. Families are embracing what works best, traditional gender roles brushed to the side. While enjoying the appreciation of their families this weekend, mothers across the nation can also celebrate female forward momentum

Stephannie Stokes is a senior at the University of Washington. Her columns appears occasionally on editorial pages of The Seattle Times. She can be reached at sstokes@seattletimes.com.

Copyright © 2011 Seattle Times Company, All Rights Reserved.

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Philanthropist Baskin wins MPC President's Award | View Clip
05/07/2011
InsideBayArea.com

The Monterey County Herald

Herald Staff Report

Peggy Downes Baskin, a professor and philanthropist with a long history at Monterey Peninsula College, was honored Friday with the MPC President's Award.

Baskin started her teaching career at MPC at age 31 and earned a doctorate in political science from Claremont Graduate School of Government at age 49. She has taught at MPC, Santa Clara University and UC Santa Cruz.

Over the years, she has promoted women in politics and education, working with the Women Supporting Women program for MPC's Re-Entry and Multicultural Center and creating a textbook lending program through the Peggy Downes Baskin Book Fund.

She founded an MPC lecture series on ethics that brought nationally renowned speakers to Monterey.

She and her husband, Jack, contributed to the success of the MPC Renaissance Campaign in 2002, and each year they award a $20,000 scholarship to a graduating female student from MPC, said Douglas Garrison, MPC president.

Through the MPC Foundation, she recently established a Dr. Peggy Downes Baskin Faculty Advancement Endowment to support the professional development of faculty members in the area of humanities.

Baskin accepted the award at the annual president's address Friday at the Monterey Conference Center.

Previous MPC President's Award recipients include Bert Cutino, Peggy Bates, Sherman Smith and Jim Tunney.

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The terminator
05/07/2011
Independent (UK)

Comment | Leon Panetta As America's spymaster-in-chief, he directed the counter-terrorism coup to end them all - killing Osama bin Laden. Now, at 73, he's taking on an even tougher job, running the US military machine. By Rupert Cornwell

You're almost 73. You've spent close on half a century in politics and government service, culminating with a spell as CIA director in which you've remade that discredited and deeply demoralised intelligence agency and pulled off the anti-terrorism coup to end them all. If ever there's a moment to pack your bags and ride off into the sunset, this surely is it. Not, though, if you're Leon Panetta. You agree to take on an even tougher job at the Pentagon, making you the oldest incoming Secretary of Defence in American history.

Victory has many fathers, and those basking in the glory of hunting down Osama bin Laden range from a Democratic President transformed from wimp and vacillator into a lion of national security, to the crack commando unit whose raid on the compound in Abbottabad adds yet more lustre to the legend of US special forces. But not least, this was Panetta's triumph.

His long career has led him in many directions: from Republican to Democrat, from civil rights enforcement to Congress, from running the US federal budget to a vital spell as White House chief of staff when he, more than anyone perhaps, put the disorderly Clinton presidency back on the rails.

Nothing, though, can have quite prepared him for the moment on 1 May as he talked Barack Obama and his national security team, assembled in the White House Situation Room, through the nail-biting climax of the operation. True, it was executed by Navy Seals, ultimately part of the Pentagon. But since that terrible day in September 2001, the search for Bin Laden was led by the CIA - and whether by dumb luck or perfect judgement, Panetta was the man in charge when everything finally came together.

If there is such a thing as "the American Dream", Panetta is a prime specimen. He was born to immigrants from Siderno in deepest Calabria (which should dispel any lingering belief that all those in the US of recent southern Italian extraction end up as opera singers or mobsters). In fact, his father ran a restaurant near Monterey in California before buying a walnut farm in the Carmel Valley nearby. The son still owns the same house, the same farm.

Few are more determined to get ahead than a first-generation American. Panetta excelled at school, took a law degree and served with distinction for two years in the US army. In 1966, he entered politics as a moderate Republican (yes, such creatures existed then), signing up as an aide for Senator Thomas Kuchel of California, a leading Republican supporter of LBJ's civil rights legislation.

It was a natural step, therefore, to switch to the incoming Nixon administration, and in 1970 Panetta was appointed head of the Office of Civil Rights, with the job of making sure the historic laws passed under Johnson were properly enforced. Then Nixon made the cynical move that would turn American politics on its head, by promising lawmakers from the South that he would go easy on enforcement in their states. Thus was born the "Southern Strategy" that transformed the old Confederacy from a Democratic to a Republican stronghold.

For Panetta it was too much. He decided to disobey Nixon's unspoken edict. In politics "there has to be a line beyond which you don't go", he said years later, "the line that marks the difference between right and wrong, what your conscience tells you is right". Panetta had no doubt where that line ran. In 1970, he resigned, and the following year, convinced the Republicans were moving too far to the right, he switched to the Democrats.

In 1973 Panetta was elected to Congress, representing his home turf of Monterey. On Capitol Hill, some in his new party were suspicious of the turncoat, but Panetta's charm and competence quickly won them over - indeed, to this day, it is hard to find a soul in Washington who personally dislikes him. Panetta is a straight shooter, with a slightly old-fashioned sense of morality. But he has an easy manner, an infectious laugh and a rare lack of self-importance.

He was also a pragmatist ready to work with Republicans, and as chairman of the powerful House Budget Committee had a big hand in the 1990 budget deal restoring the national finances. It was thus small surprise that Bill Clinton enlisted Panetta as his first federal budget director, but he stayed only a year. Panetta's managerial skills were urgently required as the president's chief of staff, to rescue a youthful White House beset by indiscipline and scandal and sinking beneath the weight of its own inexperience.

With Panetta, grown-ups took charge. Clinton regained his footing, and easily won re-election in 1996. After two and a half years in one of the most the most physically gruelling jobs in Washington, Panetta returned to California. His legacy included the federal budget surplus that emerged during the second Clinton term, and a solid reputation as a Democratic fixer and wise man. For a decade the contented elder statesman devoted himself to teaching, and the public policy institute he set up with his wife Sylvia in Monterey. From time to time, political opportunities arose, most notably in 2003 when Democrats desperately searched for a candidate to replace the doomed Governor Gray Davis. Panetta declined, arguing there was no time to raise money.

But in December 2008, President-elect Obama came calling, and this time Panetta could not refuse. The nomination as CIA director of a man with scant background in the spy business caused much surprise, even among fellow Democrats. "The agency is best served by having an intelligence professional in charge at this time," sniffed Dianne Feinstein, chairwoman of the powerful Senate Intelligence Committee.

How wrong she was. Long discredited by its failure to prevent the 9/11 attacks and its mistaken view of Saddam Hussein's WMD, the agency was also reviled for its sinister "black camps" and use of torture. On Capitol Hill, the CIA was a punchbag. Top employees had left, either in dismay or under a cloud. What it needed was a man with clean hands and powerful political connections. Panetta qualified on both counts.

He had made known his disgust at "enhanced interrogation techniques" in 2008, when he wrote that Americans had been transformed "from champions of human dignity ... into a nation of armchair torturers", and did not abandon that view when he moved to Langley. Nor did he need to. If waterboarding helped to lead the way to Bin Laden, that information had been extracted long before Panetta arrived in Langley.

Nor was he exactly a neophyte in the secret world. Crumpled and bespectacled, Panetta not only resembled a novelistic spymaster. He also knew the Washington system inside out, and as White House Chief of Staff he attended the daily presidential intelligence briefings, privy to many of the country's most sensitive covert programmes. Within the CIA he quickly impressed. Unlike some newly arrived predecessors, he took only one senior personal aide with him, and told The New Yorker magazine: "I'm going to give people the benefit of the doubt." There was no public witch-hunt of suspected torturers, while Panetta earned further respect from his staff by fighting the CIA's bureaucratic corner, resisting efforts to shift traditional agency powers to the recently formed Directorate of National Intelligence.

And now Bin Laden, and one mission accomplished. But at the Pentagon, an even tougher mission awaits. Panetta must tidy up in Iraq, sort out Libya and prevail in Afghanistan - even as he pushes through cuts in military spending begun under the outgoing Defence Secretary Robert Gates. In short, just what you look forward to when you're rising 73.

A life in brief

Born

28 June 1938, Monterey, California.

Education

Monterey High School. BA in political science and a doctorate in law from Santa Clara University.

Family

He and his wife Sylvia Marie have three children and five grandchildren.

Career

Was in US army from 1964-66, reaching rank of first lieutenant before discharge. Then began career in politics as legislative assistant to Republican Senator Thomas Kuchel. In 1969 he was appointed director of the Office for Civil Rights. In 1971 switched to Democrat Party and was elected to Congress where he was elected for nine terms, until appointed by Bill Clinton to be his chief of staff in 1994. Later nominated by Barack Obama for position of CIA director and was appointed in 2009.

He says

"The government obviously has been talking about how best to do this, but I don't think there was any question that ultimately a photograph [of Bin Laden] would be presented to the public."

They say

"Leon has great judgement, a great compass. He's a great manager, and he's trusted by both parties." Rahm Emanuel, former White House chief of staff to Barack Obama

Copyright © 2011 Independent News and Media Limited

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*Influencing Doctors | View Clip
05/06/2011
KQED-FM Forum

In recent years, hospitals and universities have tightened financial conflict-of-interest rules for physicians, cracking down on things like drug industry-funded speaking or consulting and kickbacks from device manufactures. But corporations still spend big bucks to sponsor medical society conventions. Santa Clara University's Kirk Hanson weighs in on whether this money improperly influences these associations and their members.

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A lifesaver with strings | View Clip
05/06/2011
Coeur D'Alene Press

Porter found himself by picking up guitar

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SHAWN GUST/Press Doug Porter, who has been playing guitar for more than 40 years, strums a tune in his Coeur d'Alene home.

A lifesaver with strings By NICK ROTUNNO/Staff writer The Coeur d' Alene Press | 0 comments

Somewhat mystically, Doug Porter tried to explain what it feels like to play guitar.

"When stuff is falling off my hands and working really good, it's hard to compare it with anything else," the Coeur d'Alene musician said. "It's like you're part of the universe. Just kind of flowing through you. It's a pretty fulfilling feeling."

A few minutes before, sitting on a couch in his living room, Porter had strummed a tricky composition on a beautiful Goodall guitar, his fingers pulling, plucking, brushing the long strings as he moved smoothly from note to note.

In a world all his own, he had stared at the wooden neck of the instrument, trancelike. Alone with his guitar, free of distractions, he had focused on the coursing rhythms, the liquid sounds.

The music had consumed him.

"When it comes together, it's delightful," said the 60-year-old Porter. "And when it comes together in front of an audience, it's like, 'Holy cow, this is magic.'"

Porter grew up in the Bay Area of California, a self-described hot-rodder and "gearhead." He listened to classic albums - George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue," The Kingston Trio.

"I've always loved music," Porter said. "I've been around music for a long time. It just kind of grabbed me."

His high school experience was not especially pleasant. He felt lost and alienated, and there were issues at home. Guitar, he said, "saved my life, essentially."

Senior year, Porter began taking lessons from Chuck Hofler, a masterful jazz guitarist who lived in Los Gatos, Calif. Hofler didn't spend much time on the hottest rock 'n' roll licks, Porter recalled.

Instead, he talked about theories, timing, arranging and melodies. He showed Porter how to read sheet music, a skill many guitarists never master.

Hofler, Porter said, was a remarkable individual. Porter once brought his teacher a certain piece of music, saying he wanted to put together an arrangement. Hofler glanced at the chords, messed with the melody lines, instinctual, spontaneous.

Then he played a wonderful piece.

"And it's beautiful. Just like that," Porter remembered. "He was a true, consummate musician."

Under Hofler's direction, Porter's own music flourished. He played in a jam band at Santa Clara University, where he earned a bachelor's degree. Jamming was fun, and the band wasn't bad, but Porter never considered turning his music into a full-time career.

It wasn't about money, or possible fame - he played guitar because he enjoyed it.

"I'm just kind of the guy, that basically was getting a college education and wanted to do it and had a girlfriend. Just a regular guy," Porter said. "It's something I've always done more for me than anything else."

After graduate school at Cal State-Hayward, he eventually made his way to Lewiston and the University of Idaho. He fell in love with his future wife, Barb, and followed her to Coeur d'Alene.

Thirty years later, the couple still live in the Lake City. Their two children are grown. Porter, now retired, worked 21 years in the Coeur d'Alene School District as a school psychologist. They're an active family, outdoorsy. Porter kayaks and sometimes runs whitewater rivers.

And he still plays guitar whenever he can, practicing at least two hours every day. It remains an ardent passion.

Back in Lewiston, Porter played with a couple of New Orleans artists in a trio called Moon Shadow. Later, he jammed with "Lonesome" Lyle Morse at venues in Spokane and across North Idaho. Today he plays local gigs at various venues - this summer, he will be performing at the Kootenai County Farmers Market on Wednesdays.

"We get together once in awhile. He's been playing guitar for a long time, and I've been playing drums for a long time," said Robert Brunn of Coeur d'Alene.

The two musicians like to improvise and experiment, blending their beats and chords. They're both jazz aficionados.

"(Porter) is pretty gifted," Brunn said. "He's very smooth; he knows all kinds of music. He's a very good guitar player. I have a blast every time we get together."

Porter will take the stage at the Dahmen Barn in Uniontown, Wash. at 7:30 p.m., this Saturday.

The guitar will sing.

"It's kind of like being there but not being there. I really try to empty my head of whatever else is going on, and just playing and letting it come," Porter said. "I really like playing guitar. It's part of me now. It's part of who I am."

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All-American Jepsen Renews Love of the Game at CSM | View Clip
05/06/2011
Burlingame Patch

Former Notre Dame prep standout Alyssa Jepsen raised eyebrows in local softball circles when she walked away from a commitment to play softball at Chico State on her high school graduation day.


After playing year-round for nearly 14 years, Jepsen said the desire that fueled her hard-nosed playing style was gone. The decision culminated a senior year in which she missed a month of the season with an illness, and experienced tragedy in her personal life when a close friend died.


Still, she could hear the whispers.


“Basically, people were saying I was a ‘flake,' that I was a ‘quitter,'” she said.


Jepsen has become a rock.


After a one-year hiatus, she returned to her roots, resurrecting a career many assumed was over at College of San Mateo. Jepsen, a sophomore who earlier this week made an oral commitment to Division I Santa Clara University, is putting the finishing touches on a brilliant Bulldogs career that she hopes will end with a deep postseason run.


CSM (26-11) opens a two-day best-of-three game series against Shasta at Shasta on Saturday at 2 p.m.


“I didn't love the game when I quit. Now I love the game again,” she said.


Jepsen was a junior when she helped lead Notre Dame to its first Central Coast Section title in 30 years in 2007, and then a share of its first West Catholic Athletic League title ever the next year.


Jepsen played shortstop last season, and is pitching regularly this season for the first time since she was 12 on the request of coach Nicole Borg.


Jepsen is 14-6 with a 1.98 ERA, and has hit .435 with five homers and 35 RBIs.


Her move to the pitcher's circle followed a freshman season when she was an all-state selection and the Coast Conference North Division's Player of the Year. This season, she barely missed out on POY honors, but was an All-American selection.


She's emerged as a team leader, mentoring less experienced players, Borg said, noting that Jepsen's willingness to pitch demonstrated her commitment to her teammates and her desire to win.


“Alyssa has always been willing to do whatever it takes to win and I know her teammates appreciate that, regardless of her honors,” Borg said.


Jepsen came to CSM after a year at Arizona State, where she turned down a late tryout offer a contact helped set up for her, a decision she now considers one of her biggest regrets.


“I'm the kind of person where if people push you to do something, you just kind of rebel,” she said. “I just didn't want to be out there.”


In CSM, Jepsen has found a place she wants to be.


Jepsen credits Borg with giving her a second chance after she'd admittedly arrived with some baggage. Jepsen's ultra-intense playing style rubbed many area coaches the wrong way.


She acknowledges checking out during parts of her senior year at Notre Dame when she was “uncoachable.”


When Jepsen arrived at CSM, Borg called her aside, promising her a clean slate.


“She told me, ‘I've heard a lot of things about you, and whether they're good or bad, I'm not going to judge you based on your past. I'm going to give you a fair shot.' ”


Jepsen has made the most of the opportunity.


“I needed to grow up and figure out what's important to me, and by her kind of investing her time and her energy and her in confidence in me meant the world to me,” Jepsen said.


Jepsen was still at Arizona State when she decided to go out for softball at CSM. She and a longtime friend, Caitlin Steele, a former Carlmont catcher who left San Diego State, agreed to go out for the team together. Steele's plans changed after she developed a shoulder injury.


“I always said that I just wanted to be a normal student, and that's just totally overrated,” Jepsen said. “I wanted to be part of a (team) and I want to be known as a student-athlete. I was missing the game, and this was my second chance.


“For me to say that I want to prove people wrong, yeah a little bit, but it's mainly for me, so that I not feel like a complete failure, and that I did everything in my power to live up to my potential,” Jepsen said.


“For being away for so long, I think I'm doing pretty well.”

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CQ HEALTHBEAT
05/06/2011
CQ HealthBeat

House Republicans pushed forward last week with a targeted repeal of the health care law, voting to take away funding for state health exchanges and school-based health centers. This unfolded even though lawmakers know oral arguments in a federal courtroom two hours away in Richmond, Va., likely will hold far more influence over the fate of the health care overhaul.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit on Tuesday will hear two cases that challenge the constitutionality of the law's requirement that all Americans have health insurance. It's a landmark moment. The cases -- one brought by Virginia and the other by Liberty University in Lynchburg -- are the first to advance from federal district courts to the appeals level, possibly the last stop before the Supreme Court.

Experts predict the high court will likely accept one or both suits. Other strong candidates among the 20-plus suits challenging the law are one filed by 26 states, scheduled for oral arguments in June, and another by a conservative law center in Michigan.

Republicans know attempts to kill the overhaul (PL 11-148, PL 111-152) may make headlines, but without more Republican senators and control of the White House they can't finish the job.

There's an advantage for Republicans and their allies to cast the law as overreaching and unpopular. Research shows public opinion, who's in control of Congress and the White House and the private political leanings of justices are factors that bear on the ultimate outcome of cases the Supreme Court hears.

Public opinion is split on the law. Bradley Joondeph, a Santa Clara University law professor following the legal fight, says it matters how warmly Americans view the law.

"It's not one of these things where they are checking the public opinion polling on a regular basis," says Joondeph, who clerked for former Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. But "as with all of us, it's impossible to be immune to the degree to which things are currently in favor or out of favor." High court justices are keenly aware of the perceptions of fellow jurists and the nation's legal elite, and it would be much easier for the high court to declare the law unconstitutional if several lower courts have made that ruling, he says. Two so far have done that.

Ronald Pollack, executive director of Families USA and one of the law's most ardent supporters, says judges need to keep in mind that the law's provisions regulating the health insurance market already are in effect. Striking down the law would take those benefits away from consumers, he says. But Pollack, a one-time law school dean, acknowledged that "public opinion is a factor," even if judges deny it. Families USA has coordinated multiple grass-roots events to build support for the law.

Members of Congress are closely monitoring the lawsuits. As House debate began last week on a bill (HR 1213) that would strip mandatory funding for health exchanges, Energy and Commerce Chairman Fred Upton, R-Mich., noted that state attorneys general have asked for an expedited judicial review of the law. But the Obama administration disagreed. The Supreme Court turned down Virginia Attorney General Kenneth Cuccinelli's request to skip the appeals courts and hear his state's case immediately; such requests are rarely granted.

"As a result, the future of the law remains murky," Upton says. "Both supporters and opponents should be able to agree that resolving the case expeditiously in the courts, the Supreme Court, is in the best interest of the country. But in the interim, we should not be spending billions of dollars . . . on something that might never happen."

House Majority Whip Eric Cantor, R-Va., also has decried the "years of litigation and uncertainty" at hand.

In the Senate, Kay Bailey Hutchison, R-Texas, is leading the effort to halt implementation until the high court weighs in.

Supporters respond by noting that the law's mandate that most Americans get health insurance -- a pivotal constitutional question raised by the suits -- doesn't take effect until 2014.

Democratic and Republican leaders have signed onto legal briefs filed in support and opposition to the lawsuits, as have dozens of groups representing business, patients, the elderly and the insurance industry -- a sign of the widespread interest in the outcome.

The three-judge panel will hear arguments lasting about 40 minutes for each case. The panel is chosen at random and the identity of each judge not be publicly known in advance. While the 4th Circuit used to be regarded as conservative, four of its judges were appointed by President Obama. Acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal will argue for the government, a sign of the importance the White House places on the case -- the solicitor general rarely argues cases at the appellate level.

Joondeph said 4th Circuit judges are known for their efficiency, meaning a ruling could come by August. This would allow the Supreme Court, if it decides to take the case, to consider an appeal in the court's next term in the fall and to issue a ruling in the heat of the 2012 presidential election campaign.

Source: CQ HealthBeat
Same-day coverage of the people and events shaping health care policy from Washington.
©2011 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2011 Congressional Quarterly

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CQ Today
05/06/2011
CQ Today

House Republicans pushed forward last week with a targeted repeal of the health care law, voting to take away funding for state health exchanges and school-based health centers. This unfolded even though lawmakers know oral arguments in a federal courtroom two hours away in Richmond, Va., likely will hold far more influence over the fate of the health care overhaul.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit on Tuesday will hear two cases that challenge the constitutionality of the law's requirement that all Americans have health insurance. It's an important moment. The cases -- one brought by Virginia and the other by Liberty University in Lynchburg -- are the first to advance from federal district courts to the appeals level, possibly the last stop before the Supreme Court.

Experts predict the high court will likely accept one or both suits. Other strong candidates among the 20-plus suits challenging the law are one filed by 26 states, scheduled for oral arguments in June, and another by a conservative law center in Michigan.

Republicans know attempts to kill the overhaul (PL 11-148, PL 111-152) may make headlines, but without more Republican senators and control of the White House they can't finish the job.

There's an advantage for Republicans and their allies to cast the law as overreaching and unpopular. Research shows public opinion, who's in control of Congress and the White House and the private political leanings of justices are factors that bear on the ultimate outcome of cases the Supreme Court hears.

Public opinion is split on the law. Bradley Joondeph, a Santa Clara University law professor following the legal fight, says it matters how warmly Americans view the law.

"It's not one of these things where they are checking the public opinion polling on a regular basis," says Joondeph, who clerked for former Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. But "as with all of us, it's impossible to be immune to the degree to which things are currently in favor or out of favor." Justices are keenly aware of the perceptions of fellow jurists and the nation's legal elite, and it would be much easier for the high court to declare the law unconstitutional if several lower courts have made that ruling, he says. Two so far have done that; three have ruled the other way on the merits.

Ronald Pollack, executive director of Families USA and one of the law's most ardent supporters, says judges need to keep in mind that the law's provisions regulating the health insurance market already are in effect. Striking down the law would take those benefits away from consumers, he says. But Pollack, a one-time law school dean, acknowledged that "public opinion is a factor," even if judges deny it. Families USA has coordinated multiple grass-roots events to build support for the law.

Members of Congress are closely monitoring the lawsuits. As House debate began last week on a bill (HR 1213) that would strip mandatory funding for health exchanges, Energy and Commerce Chairman Fred Upton, R-Mich., noted that state attorneys general have asked for an expedited judicial review of the law. But the Obama administration disagreed. The Supreme Court turned down Virginia Attorney General Kenneth Cuccinelli's request to skip the appeals courts and hear his state's case immediately; such requests are rarely granted.

"As a result, the future of the law remains murky," Upton says. "Both supporters and opponents should be able to agree that resolving the case expeditiously in the courts, the Supreme Court, is in the best interest of the country. But in the interim, we should not be spending billions of dollars . . . on something that might never happen."

House Majority Whip Eric Cantor, R-Va., also has decried the "years of litigation and uncertainty" at hand.

In the Senate, Kay Bailey Hutchison, R-Texas, is leading the effort to halt implementation until the high court weighs in.

Supporters respond by noting that the law's mandate that most Americans get health insurance -- a pivotal constitutional question raised by the suits -- doesn't take effect until 2014.

Democratic and Republican leaders have signed onto legal briefs filed in support and opposition to the lawsuits, as have dozens of groups representing business, patients, the elderly and the insurance industry -- a sign of the widespread interest in the outcome.

The three-judge panel will hear arguments lasting about 40 minutes for each case. The panel is chosen at random and the identity of each judge will not be publicly known in advance. While the 4th Circuit used to be regarded as conservative, four of its judges were appointed by President Obama. Acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal will argue for the government, a sign of the importance the White House places on the case -- the solicitor general rarely argues cases in lower federal courts.

Joondeph said 4th Circuit judges are known for their efficiency, meaning a ruling could come by August. This would allow the Supreme Court, if it decides to take the case, to consider an appeal in the court's next term in the fall and to issue a ruling in the heat of the 2012 presidential election campaign.

Source: CQ Today
Round-the-clock coverage of news from Capitol Hill.
©2011 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2011 Congressional Quarterly

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Happy forward momentum, Mom | View Clip
05/06/2011
Seattle Times - Online

It may be Mother's Day, but both men and women should be in good spirits. We're moving toward a society where no one must assume a role simply because of gender. Children benefit immensely from their relationship with both parents.

Seattle Times editorial columnist

This Mother's Day, women have something to be excited about beyond greeting cards, flowers and chocolates. Yes, recent census figures show a continuing trend that should give women and men more to celebrate.

Census data released last week show women getting master's degrees for the first time in greater numbers than men. This trend is nothing new — women surpassed men in gaining bachelor's degrees in 1996 and the numbers have continued in that direction since.

On the other end of the spectrum, more men are taking on the role of the stay-at-home dad. It's estimated that one in five parents staying home with the kids is a father.

This is not quite a groundbreaking moment for gender equality, but it shows families adjusting to new circumstances — with the economy admittedly playing a big role. Nevertheless, this looks like a step toward a society where no one must assume a role simply because of gender.

It may be Mother's Day, but I think this is a reason for both women and men to be in good spirits. Children benefit immensely from their relationship with both parents.

Don't get me wrong — gender equality in the workplace is not where it should be. Women on average may be more educated than their male counterparts, but women still earn 77 cents to the average male-earned dollar. A woman with her master's degree gets less compensation than a man with only a bachelor's.

While this is a serious discrepancy that rightly frustrates all women in the work force, it's also true that education roughly correlates to earnings. So we should expect this trend to play a role in closing that pay gap.

Married women are also contributing more financially to their families than in the past. As more men lost their jobs in the recession, women are increasingly responsible for their household — taking the spot of the traditional breadwinner.

Yet, at home, progress is also lagging. Whether employed or not, women still do most of the work at home. Women spend 2.9 hours daily working around the house and caring for children, while men spend on average 1.7 hours daily, according to the 2008 American Time Use Survey.

But census data could be foreshadowing change in this realm, too.

"The notion that men just come home and read the paper, that woman are cleaning the house is changing more and more," said Nancy Unger, associate professor of history at Santa Clara University.

The traditional division of the American family is in flux because of education, the economy and other circumstances.

"Everyone's doing what is needed to be done," said Nick Senzee, a stay-at-home dad in Seattle. "I look at it as more of a return to a shared homestead point of view."

Not all women will perfectly fit the image of a homemaker, and many men may prefer to be the primary caretaker of their children.

"We are each better suited," said Senzee. "I'm better at home, you know what I'm saying."

To me, this looks just like progress. Families are embracing what works best, traditional gender roles brushed to the side. While enjoying the appreciation of their families this weekend, mothers across the nation can also celebrate female forward momentum

Stephannie Stokes is a senior at the University of Washington. Her columns appears occasionally on editorial pages of The Seattle Times. She can be reached at sstokes@seattletimes.com.

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LaMond Pope | The Journal Gazette | View Clip
05/06/2011
Journal Gazette - Online Bureau, The

Andrew Werner was the TinCaps’ starting pitcher against Lansing on Thursday.

Chris Bisson tries unsuccessfully to bunt for a hit Thursday against Lansing at Parkview Field.

Tommy Medica primarily played the corner-outfield positions last year at Santa Clara University.

He served exclusively as a designated hitter with San Diego’s short-season team in Eugene (Ore.) later in the year.

This season with the TinCaps, Medica has been a designated hitter, played first and substituted for a couple innings behind the plate. He started at catcher for the first time this year in Thursday’s 12-4 victory over Lansing in front of 4,646 fans at Parkview Field.

“It felt good to be back there,” Medica said of starting at catcher for the first time in two years.

Emmanuel Quiles, Fort Wayne’s starting catcher, was out after getting his tooth pulled earlier in the day.

“It helps you stay in the whole game. And it’s great when you have pitchers like (Andrew) Werner and (Matt) Jackson. They make it easy to catch back there when they are hitting their spots.”

Medica drove in a run with a double and later scored during a seven-run sixth inning. The seven runs are the most Fort Wayne has scored in an inning this year.

“That’s one of the things that has been missing early this year, just putting some good at-bats together in one inning,” TinCaps manager Shawn Wooten said.

Eight of the nine TinCaps batters had at least one hit in the game. Medica and Jake Blackwood led Fort Wayne with three hits; two of Blackwood’s hits came in the sixth inning.

Just how rare was the offensive outburst for Fort Wayne? The team scored a combined seven runs in the previous three games.

The TinCaps averaged 2.9 runs in their previous 18 games, losing 14 times. Chris Bisson had three RBI Thursday, knocking in two during the sixth.

Medica also had three RBI while Blackwood drove in two runs.

“It’s starting to warm up a little bit and guys are getting around 75 or 100 at-bats and that’s when you start feeling more comfortable,” Wooten said. “Guys are going to start swinging the bat better. We’re putting up some good at-bats.”

Fort Wayne (11-17) rallied twice for the win. Lansing (17-10) led 3-0 after three. The TinCaps scored twice in the fourth (Rymer Liriano and Wes Cunningham tripled and scored in the inning). They added another run in the fifth to tie the game.

The Lugnuts reclaimed the lead when Jake Marisnick began the sixth with a home run to left off reliever Matt Jackson. That is the only mistake Jackson made. He retired the last 12 batters for the win.

Lansing’s bullpen wasn’t as reliable. Reliever Alex Pepe threw two wild pitches in the bottom of the sixth, bringing in two runs. Those runs were charged to starter Casey Lawrence, who surrendered five earned runs on seven hits in 5 1/3 innings. Pepe gave up four runs in one-third of an inning.

“Putting up that many runs against those guys and just getting our bats going is huge,” Medica said.

vs. Lansing

When: 7:05 p.m. today

TV: Comcast Cable 82

Radio: 1380 AM

Tickets: $12.50, $9, $8, $5 (lawn)

Information: TinCaps.com or 482-6400

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Leon Panetta: The terminator | View Clip
05/06/2011
The Independent - Online

You're almost 73. You've spent close on half a century in politics and government service, culminating with a spell as CIA director in which you've remade that discredited and deeply demoralised intelligence agency and pulled off the anti-terrorism coup to end them all.

If ever there's a moment to pack your bags and ride off into the sunset, this surely is it. Not, though, if you're Leon Panetta. You agree to take on an even tougher job at the Pentagon, making you the oldest incoming Secretary of Defence in American history.

Victory has many fathers, and those basking in the glory of hunting down Osama bin Laden range from a Democratic President transformed from wimp and vacillator into a lion of national security, to the crack commando unit whose raid on the compound in Abbottabad adds yet more lustre to the legend of US special forces. But not least, this was Panetta's triumph.

His long career has led him in many directions: from Republican to Democrat, from civil rights enforcement to Congress, from running the US federal budget to a vital spell as White House chief of staff when he, more than anyone perhaps, put the disorderly Clinton presidency back on the rails.

Nothing, though, can have quite prepared him for the moment on 1 May as he talked Barack Obama and his national security team, assembled in the White House Situation Room, through the nail-biting climax of the operation. True, it was executed by Navy Seals, ultimately part of the Pentagon. But since that terrible day in September 2001, the search for Bin Laden was led by the CIA – and whether by dumb luck or perfect judgement, Panetta was the man in charge when everything finally came together.

If there is such a thing as "the American Dream", Panetta is a prime specimen. He was born to immigrants from Siderno in deepest Calabria (which should dispel any lingering belief that all those in the US of recent southern Italian extraction end up as opera singers or mobsters). In fact, his father ran a restaurant near Monterey in California before buying a walnut farm in the Carmel Valley nearby. The son still owns the same house, the same farm.

Few are more determined to get ahead than a first-generation American. Panetta excelled at school, took a law degree and served with distinction for two years in the US army. In 1966, he entered politics as a moderate Republican (yes, such creatures existed then), signing up as an aide for Senator Thomas Kuchel of California, a leading Republican supporter of LBJ's civil rights legislation.

It was a natural step, therefore, to switch to the incoming Nixon administration, and in 1970 Panetta was appointed head of the Office of Civil Rights, with the job of making sure the historic laws passed under Johnson were properly enforced. Then Nixon made the cynical move that would turn American politics on its head, by promising lawmakers from the South that he would go easy on enforcement in their states. Thus was born the "Southern Strategy" that transformed the old Confederacy from a Democratic to a Republican stronghold.

For Panetta it was too much. He decided to disobey Nixon's unspoken edict. In politics "there has to be a line beyond which you don't go", he said years later, "the line that marks the difference between right and wrong, what your conscience tells you is right". Panetta had no doubt where that line ran. In 1970, he resigned, and the following year, convinced the Republicans were moving too far to the right, he switched to the Democrats.

In 1973 Panetta was elected to Congress, representing his home turf of Monterey. On Capitol Hill, some in his new party were suspicious of the turncoat, but Panetta's charm and competence quickly won them over – indeed, to this day, it is hard to find a soul in Washington who personally dislikes him. Panetta is a straight shooter, with a slightly old-fashioned sense of morality. But he has an easy manner, an infectious laugh and a rare lack of self-importance.

He was also a pragmatist ready to work with Republicans, and as chairman of the powerful House Budget Committee had a big hand in the 1990 budget deal restoring the national finances. It was thus small surprise that Bill Clinton enlisted Panetta as his first federal budget director, but he stayed only a year. Panetta's managerial skills were urgently required as the president's chief of staff, to rescue a youthful White House beset by indiscipline and scandal and sinking beneath the weight of its own inexperience.

With Panetta, grown-ups took charge. Clinton regained his footing, and easily won re-election in 1996. After two and a half years in one of the most the most physically gruelling jobs in Washington, Panetta returned to California. His legacy included the federal budget surplus that emerged during the second Clinton term, and a solid reputation as a Democratic fixer and wise man. For a decade the contented elder statesman devoted himself to teaching, and the public policy institute he set up with his wife Sylvia in Monterey. From time to time, political opportunities arose, most notably in 2003 when Democrats desperately searched for a candidate to replace the doomed Governor Gray Davis. Panetta declined, arguing there was no time to raise money.

But in December 2008, President-elect Obama came calling, and this time Panetta could not refuse. The nomination as CIA director of a man with scant background in the spy business caused much surprise, even among fellow Democrats. "The agency is best served by having an intelligence professional in charge at this time," sniffed Dianne Feinstein, chairwoman of the powerful Senate Intelligence Committee.

How wrong she was. Long discredited by its failure to prevent the 9/11 attacks and its mistaken view of Saddam Hussein's WMD, the agency was also reviled for its sinister "black camps" and use of torture. On Capitol Hill, the CIA was a punchbag. Top employees had left, either in dismay or under a cloud. What it needed was a man with clean hands and powerful political connections. Panetta qualified on both counts.

He had made known his disgust at "enhanced interrogation techniques" in 2008, when he wrote that Americans had been transformed "from champions of human dignity ... into a nation of armchair torturers", and did not abandon that view when he moved to Langley. Nor did he need to. If waterboarding helped to lead the way to Bin Laden, that information had been extracted long before Panetta arrived in Langley.

Nor was he exactly a neophyte in the secret world. Crumpled and bespectacled, Panetta not only resembled a novelistic spymaster. He also knew the Washington system inside out, and as White House Chief of Staff he attended the daily presidential intelligence briefings, privy to many of the country's most sensitive covert programmes. Within the CIA he quickly impressed. Unlike some newly arrived predecessors, he took only one senior personal aide with him, and told The New Yorker magazine: "I'm going to give people the benefit of the doubt." There was no public witch-hunt of suspected torturers, while Panetta earned further respect from his staff by fighting the CIA's bureaucratic corner, resisting efforts to shift traditional agency powers to the recently formed Directorate of National Intelligence.

And now Bin Laden, and one mission accomplished. But at the Pentagon, an even tougher mission awaits. Panetta must tidy up in Iraq, sort out Libya and prevail in Afghanistan – even as he pushes through cuts in military spending begun under the outgoing Defence Secretary Robert Gates. In short, just what you look forward to when you're rising 73.

A life in brief

Born: 28 June 1938, Monterey, California.

Education: Monterey High School. BA in political science and a doctorate in law from Santa Clara University.

Family: He and his wife Sylvia Marie have three children and five grandchildren.

Career: Was in US army from 1964-66, reaching rank of first lieutenant before discharge. Then began career in politics as legislative assistant to Republican Senator Thomas Kuchel. In 1969 he was appointed director of the Office for Civil Rights. In 1971 switched to Democrat Party and was elected to Congress where he was elected for nine terms, until appointed by Bill Clinton to be his chief of staff in 1994. Later nominated by Barack Obama for position of CIA director and was appointed in 2009.

He says: "The government obviously has been talking about how best to do this, but I don't think there was any question that ultimately a photograph [of Bin Laden] would be presented to the public."

They say: "Leon has great judgement, a great compass. He's a great manager, and he's trusted by both parties." Rahm Emanuel, former White House chief of staff to Barack Obama

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Tips for Overcoming Music Performance Anxiety in Front of an Audience | View Clip
05/06/2011
Associated Content

Do you frequently experience music performance anxiety in front of an audience? Are you unsure on how to overcome music performance anxiety? To help understand where music performance anxiety in front of an audience

comes from and for tips on overcoming music performance anxiety, I have interviewed psychologist Katheleen Avila, M.A.

Tell me a little about yourself.

"I am a licensed psychologist in Mpls./St. Paul, MN and have a private practice I call Integrative Mindfulness. I have a masters degree in counseling psychology and marriage, family, child therapy from Santa Clara University in California. Over my career I have worked with all age groups and various clinical settings. One of my specialty areas is performance psychology and I find performers are my favorite clients due to two primary things. First, I experience performers as very motivated and two; I know that the performance anxiety that 99.9% are presenting with can be successfully managed."

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Want to Add To Congestion? Then It's Going To Cost You
05/06/2011
New York Times, The

Jay Primus's small office at the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency could be mistaken for that of a science professor. The walls are covered with giant maps and colorful charts, all aimed at helping to illuminate one of the big mysteries in the life of any city dweller: how to find a parking space.

Mr. Primus runs SFPark, a recently launched experiment that seeks to eliminate congestion by changing the dynamics of parking. The approach is twofold: to change the price of a parking space according to demand and thereby keep spaces open on every block, and to lead drivers to open spaces using an array of sensors, eliminating congestion caused by circling drivers.

Mr. Primus is part of the vanguard of public officials around the Bay Area who are pushing sophisticated traffic and parking solutions built on the theory of congestion pricing. Though Mr. Primus and other traffic specialists sprinkle their conversations with jargon like ''availability targets'' and ''gradual periodic price change,'' the basic idea behind congestion pricing is a simple one: charge more to use streets and highways at the busiest times, and discourage those who don't want to pay a premium at peak hours.

Congestion pricing is already in place in cities including Singapore, London and Stockholm, but it has made few inroads in this country. An effort to charge motorists for driving into Manhattan, championed by Michael Bloomberg, the mayor of New York, failed in 2008 in the face of virulent opposition from legislators in the city's four other boroughs and the suburbs.

But the Bay Area is pushing ahead, albeit gradually. Last year, the toll on the Bay Bridge was raised to $6 from $4 during the rush hours in an effort to loosen congestion. In September, a toll lane whose price increases as traffic does was opened on Interstate 680, a historically jammed stretch for commuters heading from the East Bay to Silicon Valley.

More projects are on their way: toll lanes are slated for Highway 237 in the South Bay, and for Interstate 580 in the East Bay; higher tolls during peak hours are being considered for other bridges; and San Francisco officials have floated a plan to charge motorists driving into downtown San Francisco.

So far, the experiments have yielded mixed results.

Traffic on the Bay Bridge has dropped 2.35 percent during the morning commute and 3.45 percent in the afternoon since the toll was raised last July. Between 5 and 10 a.m., and 3 and 7 p.m. on weekdays the toll is $6 -- $2 more than the regular rate.

''I think that a small number of people who can do a time shift have done so -- they're either taking their trip earlier in the day or later in the day,'' said John Goodwin, spokesman for the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. ''The numbers are small, but just tinkering at the margins can have a significant effect on the commute traffic.''

The result, measured by the M.T.C., is that the time it takes to drive five miles from University Avenue in Berkeley to the Bay Bridge toll plaza has been cut by three minutes to an average of 24 minutes during the morning rush.

Fred Foldvary, a Santa Clara University professor who has studied congestion pricing, said the M.T.C. needs to crank up the Bay Bridge toll even more.

''They have to keep increasing the charge during the peak times, and maybe even reduce it at other times, to see a real change,'' Mr. Foldvary said.

The I-680 toll lane, stretching 14 miles between Highway 84 in Pleasanton and 237 in Milpitas, was designed to thin out what had been a traffic nightmare during the dot-com boom in the late 1990s. The toll has gone as high as $7 in heavy traffic; it bottoms out at 30 cents when there is no backup. The price is displayed on a sign, and the toll is charged through FasTrak.

So far, the toll lane has not had much of an effect, mainly because the traffic congestion it was supposed to address has largely been tamed by the economic slump, said Dave Hyams, a spokesman for the project. The average speed during peak hours in the non-toll lanes is 57 miles per hour, up from 56.9 m.p.h. since it opened. The toll lane averages a swifter 65.8 m.p.h. -- swifter even than the 65 m.p.h. speed limit.

A regular 680 commuter, Cheryl Cook-Kallio, a teacher and Pleasanton City Council member, said she has never used the new lane. ''I have yet to be on the freeway where the traffic has been so bad that I was tempted,'' she said, adding that the express lane also does not have access to her exit.

In San Francisco's new parking scheme, Mr. Primus and his colleagues will adjust the prices at 7,000 meters and 20 city-owned parking garages with the aim of keeping two spaces available on every block. Drivers could pay from 25 cents to $6 an hour depending on demand. Currently, rates run from $2 to $3.50 an hour.

''We believe that relatively small differences in price should be enough to park in a different location,'' Mr. Primus said. ''All we need is one person to notice that the price has changed. It's a subtle tool for managing congestion.''

Sensors on the street will feed into an as-yet-unfinished database. Parking prices will be raised -- no more than once a month -- when more than 85 percent of the spaces on a block are occupied. Prices will be lowered if less than 65 percent are full.

Drivers can keep track on a new iPhone app, which so far has been criticized for running slowly -- and being dangerous to use while driving. Drivers can pay with credit cards and re-up via cellphone.

David LaBua, who has written a book about San Francisco's secret parking spots called ''Finding the Sweet Spot,'' said he is not a fan of SFPark.

Mr. Labua said to he tried to use the new software to find parking in the Marina, but eventually gave up when the supposedly available spots evaporated before his arrival. Instead, he used his own method: look for orange and white construction markers that signal ''no parking,'' but whose date has expired.

''I think once the meter prices go up to $6, there is going to be critical mass of car drivers -- can you imagine that?'' said Mr. LaBua, making reference to the monthly bicyclists' demonstration that clogs downtown streets.

But Donald Shoup, a U.C.L.A. professor of urban planning whose influential book ''The High Cost of Free Parking'' inspired SFPark, said people will get used to the idea that ''it's fair that the very best spaces cost more.''

Mr. Shoup added that the parking program may be so successful in curbing traffic that the city won't need to pursue more controversial plans for raising the cost of driving.

''It's a lot harder to charge a moving car than it is charging a parked car, especially when people are already used to paying for parking,'' Mr. Shoup said.

In an echo of the bitter battle that broke out over the issue in New York, the San Francisco County Transportation Authority nearly touched off a border war with San Mateo County last year when it floated the idea of charging commuters from the Peninsula a toll to enter San Francisco. Assemblyman Jerry Hill even threatened to charge San Franciscans for driving into San Mateo County.

The idea of a border toll was scrapped in December, but the transportation authority is moving ahead and studying two plans that would charge drivers for entering downtown, the most congested part of the city.

Zabe Bent, a planner with the authority, said that any toll to drive downtown would be accompanied by an improvement in public transit to allay concerns about unfair impacts on commuters.

PHOTOS: Cars on a toll lane whiz past traffic on I-680 in Fremont. Above left, Kristin Malotke feeding a meter on the Embarcadero. The dynamics of parking are changing. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY NOAH BERGER/THE BAY CITIZEN)

Copyright © 2011 The New York Times Company

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*Commencement speakers at local universities | View Clip
05/05/2011
San Jose Mercury News - Online

Local universities have announced their 2011 commencement dates and speakers. They include:

National Hispanic University, Saturday May 14, 10 a.m., Bustos Family Plaza: José Hernández, former NASA astronaut.

San Jose State, Saturday May 28, 9:30 a.m., Spartan Stadium: James E. Thompson, SJSU alumnus and founder of the Crown Worldwide Group, the world's largest privately-held group of international moving companies.

Santa Clara University, Saturday, June 11, 8 a.m., Buck Shaw Stadium: Dr. Khaled Hosseini, physician, SCU alumnus and author of the book The Kite Runner.

University of California, Santa Cruz: Friday, Saturday and Sunday, June 10-12, various times and locations on ten college campuses: Tesla Motors CFO Deepak Ahuja; Bill Dickinson, founder of the Smith Renaissance Society; Assemblymember Bill Monning, and John Laird, California Secretary for Natural Resources, among others.

Stanford University, Sunday, June 12, 9:30 a.m., Stanford Stadium: Felipe Calderón Hinojosa, president of Mexico.

Contact Lisa M. Krieger at 408-920-5565.

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A Companion to Hume | View Clip
05/05/2011
Australian PC World

David Hume's revolutionary philosophies took an empirical approach to the study of human nature. Controversial in his time, he was accused of everything from atheism to moral corruption; he has since been recognized as one of the foremost thinkers of the late modern period, influencing the thought of nearly every philosopher in his wake. The arguments presented in his writings have survived three centuries of varying perspectives, and have had a lasting influence on the philosophy of mind, knowledge, religion, action, morality, economics, and politics.

is the ideal resource for the study of one of history's most remarkable thinkers, demonstrating the range of Hume's work and illuminating the ongoing debates that they have generated. Comprised of twenty-nine expertly commissioned essays addressing such expansive topics of knowledge, passion, morality, religion, economics, and politics, this collection examines the paradoxes of Hume's thought and his legacy, covering the methods, themes, and consequences of his contributions to philosophy.

Elizabeth S. Radcliffe is Professor of Philosophy at Santa Clara University. Her areas of specialization include Hume, ethical theory, motivational psychology, and seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophy. She is the author of On Hume (2000), editor of A Companion to Hume (Blackwell, 2007), and was co-editor of the journal Hume Studies from 2000 to 2005.

Table of Contents

Notes on Contributors.

Acknowledgments.

Note on Citations.

Introduction.

Hume's Context:.

1. Hume in the Enlightenment Tradition: Stephen Buckle (Australian Catholic University).

Part I: Mind and Knowledge:.

2. Hume's Theory of Ideas: Don Garrett (New York University).

3. Hume on Memory and Imagination: Saul Traiger (Occidental College).

4. Hume and the Origin of Our Ideas of Space and Time: Wayne Waxman (New York University, Visiting Professor).

5. Hume on the Relation of Cause and Effect: Francis Watanabe Dauer (Emeritus, University of California, Santa Barbara).

6. Inductive Inference in Hume's Philosophy: Louis E. Loeb (University of Michigan).

7. Hume on Belief in the External World: Michel Malherbe (University of Nantes).

8. Hume on Personal Identity: Donald C. Ainslie (University of Toronto).

Part II: Passions and Action:.

9. Hume's Indirect Passions: Rachel Cohon (New York University).

10. Hume on the Direct Passions and Motivation: Tito Magri (University of Rome).

11. Hume on Liberty and Necessity: John Bricke (University of Kansas).

Part III: Morality and Beauty:.

12. Hume on Moral Rationalism, Sentimentalism, and Sympathy: Charlotte R. Brown (Illinois Wesleyan University).

13. Sympathy and Hume's Spectator-centered Theory of Virtue: Kate Abramson (Indiana University).

14. Hume's Theory of Justice, or Artificial Virtue: Eugenio Lecaldano (University of Rome).

15. Hume on Beauty and Virtue: Jacqueline Taylor (University of San Francisco).

16. Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals: Incomparably the Best?: Annette C. Baier (Retired, University of Pittsburgh).

Part IV: Religion:.

17. Hume's Views on Religion: Intellectual and Cultural Influences: Terence Penelhum (University of Calgary).

18. Hume on the Nature and Existence of God: Martin Bell (Manchester Metropolitan University).

19. Hume on Miracles and Immortality: Michael P. Levine (University of Western Australia).

Part V: Economics, Politics, and History:.

20. Hume's Economic Theory: Tatsuya Sakamoto (Keio University).

21. "One of the Finest and Most Subtile Inventions": Hume on Government: Richard H. Dees (Rochester University).

22. "The Most Illustrious Philosopher and Historian of the Age": Hume's History of England: Mark Salber Phillips (Carleton University).

Part VI: Contemporary Themes:.

23. Hume's Naturalism and His Skepticism: Janet Broughton (University of California).

24. Is Hume a Realist or an Anti-realist?: P. J. E. Kail (University of Oxford).

25. Hume's Epistemological Legacy: William Edward Morris (Illinois Wesleyan University).

26. The Humean Theory of Motivation and Its Critics: Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (Santa Clara University).

27. The Sources of Normativity in Hume's Moral Theory: Tom L. Beauchamp (Georgetown University).

28. Hume's Metaethics: Is Hume a Moral Noncognitivist?: Nicholas L. Sturgeon (Cornell University).

Bibliography.

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BRIEF: Former Supreme Court Justice Moreno to speak at SCU law school graduation | View Clip
05/05/2011
California Chronicle

May 5--Former California Supreme Court Justice Carlos Moreno will give the commencement speech for Santa Clara University's law school on May 21, university officials announced Wednesday.

Moreno, 62, retired from the state's high court earlier this year after serving more than nine years as a Supreme Court justice. Moreno was the only Latino on the seven-member court, appointed by former Gov. Gray Davis in 2001 when he was a federal judge in Los Angeles.

Moreno is now affiliated with Irell & Manella, a Los Angeles-based law firm. He got his law degree from Stanford University.

"I'm pleased to speak to the graduates of Santa Clara law school," he said in a statement. "They have received a strong grounding in diversity and social justice, values that have been extremely important to me throughout my legal career."

Contact Howard Mintz at 408-286-0236

To see more of the San Jose Mercury News, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.mercurynews.com.

Copyright (c) 2011, San Jose Mercury News, Calif.

A service of YellowBrix, Inc.

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CA Do Good Docs 05 05
05/05/2011
Associated Press (AP)

STK

IN EDU FLM ENT

SU AWD

TO EDUCATION, ENTERTAINMENT, AND FILM EDITORS:

Top Films at SI DocFest 2011 Win $30,000+ in Awards

SAN JOSE, Calif., May 5, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Fourth Annual Bay

Area Social Issues Documentary Film Contest (SI DocFest) was held at

the Camera 12 Cinemas on Saturday, April 30, 2011. Awards totaling

$30,250, provided by sponsor and organizer Do Good Docs Corporation,

were shared by the top films, the high schools they represented, and

their selected nonprofit organizations. This total allowed Do Good

Docs to pass the $100,000 mark in cumulative donations to Bay Area

students, high schools and nonprofits in its four years of operating

the SI DocFest - a grand total of $114,250.

A panel of independent judges ranked the eleven semifinalist films and

their combined scores yielded the winners. These judges were Blanche

Araj-Shaheen, TV production professional and host of KTEH's "Video I;"

Dr. Felix Gutierrez, Professor of Journalism and Communication at the

University of Southern California's Annenberg School and a Bay Area

resident; and Michael Whalen, Assistant Professor of Communication at

Santa Clara University and independent television and film producer.

First place was awarded to "Watson," a film by Dereck Hoekstra, which

features a football camp for young men with Down syndrome. The $10,000

award was shared with Valley Christian High School and Football Camp

for the Stars, both of San Jose.

Second place winner was "Life Learning Academy," a film by Anya

Schultz that features an organization that provides education and a

key support system for at-risk youth. The $6,000 award was shared with

Mountain View/Los Altos High Schools' Freestyle Academy and Life

Learning Academy in San Francisco.

Third place winner was "Love In Action," a film by Anthony Delgado,

Silver Angeli and Mackenzie Thomas. This film features a safe shelter

for homeless and abused pregnant women. The $4,000 award was shared

with Lincoln Highs School and City Team Ministries' Heritage Home,

both of San Jose.

Additionally, $1,000 was awarded to the San Francisco Gay Men's

Chorus, the subject of "Man in the Mirror" by fourth place winners

Rachel Wood and Caillie Dick of Freestyle Academy. Fifth place "924

Gilman Street", by Olivia Gubser and Zooey Yi of Oakland School for

the Arts, won a $750 award for the Oakland non-profit of the same

name. Finally, $500 was awarded to Not For Sale Campaign in Half Moon

Bay, which was profiled by sixth place winner "Mission: Freedom" by

Aaron Rickel of Monte Vista Christian High School in Watsonville.

In recognition of their outstanding accomplishments, the other five

Semifinalists were awarded $300 each for their featured nonprofits.

Five Honorable Mention films won $200 for their nonprofits as well

(visit sidocfest.com for details).

Two new award categories were introduced this year. Asha DuMonthier of

Notre Dame High School in San Jose, won the Beyond the Bay Category

and a $2,000 cash scholarship for her film "Women and Children of El

Salvador". Rachel Wood won $2,000 for her school, Freestyle Academy,

for her win in the Flex Format category with the film "For Social

Good".

The Terry McElhatton Memorial Award recognizes the dedication of an

educator to the teaching of documentary filmmaking, as represented by

the number of films submitted to the SI DocFest. It is named after its

original winner and friend of the SI DocFest, the late Terry

McElhatton. The winner this year was Sue Kefauver of Freestyle

Academy, and a $1,500 award was presented to Freestyle Academy's video

production program in Sue's honor.

The event was hosted by SI DocFest co-founder, Monica Alba, a recent

graduate of the University of Southern California and soon to be

graduate student at Columbia University's School of Journalism.

Co-founder and traditional co-host, Loreli Alba, was absent for the

first time in four years due to her study-abroad program related to

her University of Southern California film studies. Camera Cinemas,

the leading independent movie theater company in the South Bay, was an

official sponsor and the host of the SI DocFest 2011.

Do Good Docs is a non-profit organization located in San Jose,

California. Its first project has been the sponsoring and organizing

of the Bay Area Social Issues Documentary Film Contest (SI DocFest),

while two more initiatives focused on socially responsible filmmaking

are in their early stages.

For nearly 35 years, Camera Cinemas has been presenting a wide variety

of well-made, intelligent films, from re-released classics to

independents, international to mainstream. With four distinct

locations, Camera Cinemas has become an important institution in the

local film community, making vital contributions to the cultural life

of the San Jose area and representing the best of what the South Bay

has to offer.

SOURCE Do Good Docs

-0- 05/05/2011

/CONTACT: Monica Alba, Do Good Docs, +1-408-294-1800, monica@dogooddocs.com

/ CO: Do Good Docs

ST: California

IN: EDU FLM ENT

SU: AWD

PRN

-- SF96124 --

0000 05/05/2011 09:00:00 EDT http://www.prnewswire.com

Copyright © 2011 The Associated Press

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COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS ANNOUNCED
05/05/2011
San Jose Mercury News

Local universities have announced their 2011 commencement dates and speakers. They include:

National Hispanic University, May 14, 10 a.m., Bustos Family Plaza: José Hernández, former NASA astronaut.

San Jose State, May 28, 9:30 a.m., Spartan Stadium: James E. Thompson, SJSU alumnus and founder of the Crown Worldwide Group, the world's largest privately held group of international moving companies.

Santa Clara University, June 11, 8 a.m., Buck Shaw Stadium: Dr. Khaled Hosseini, physician, SCU alumnus and author of "The Kite Runner."

UC Santa Cruz: June 10-12, various times and locations on 10 campuses: Tesla Motors CFO Deepak Ahuja; Bill Dickinson, founder of the Smith Renaissance Society; Assemblyman Bill Monning, and John Laird, state secretary for natural resources.

Stanford, June 12, 9:30 a.m., Stanford Stadium: Felipe Calderon Hinojosa, president of Mexico.

Copyright © 2011 San Jose Mercury News

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Commencement speakers at local universities | View Clip
05/05/2011
Chico Enterprise Record - Online

Local universities have announced their 2011 commencement dates and speakers. They include:

National Hispanic University, Saturday May 14, 10 a.m., Bustos Family Plaza: José Hernández, former NASA astronaut.

San Jose State, Saturday May 28, 9:30 a.m., Spartan Stadium: James E. Thompson, SJSU alumnus and founder of the Crown Worldwide Group, the world's largest privately-held group of international moving companies.

Santa Clara University, Saturday, June 11, 8 a.m., Buck Shaw Stadium: Dr. Khaled Hosseini, physician, SCU alumnus and author of the book The Kite Runner.

University of California, Santa Cruz: Friday, Saturday and Sunday, June 10-12, various times and locations on ten college campuses: Tesla Motors CFO Deepak Ahuja; Bill Dickinson, founder of the Smith Renaissance Society; Assemblymember Bill Monning, and John Laird, California Secretary for Natural Resources, among others.

Stanford University, Sunday, June 12, 9:30 a.m., Stanford Stadium: Felipe Calderón Hinojosa, president of Mexico.

Contact Lisa M. Krieger at 408-920-5565.

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Former Supreme Court Justice Moreno to speak at SCU law school graduation | View Clip
05/05/2011
San Jose Mercury News - Online

Former California Supreme Court Justice Carlos Moreno will give the commencement speech for Santa Clara University's law school on May 21, university officials announced Wednesday.

Moreno, 62, retired from the state's high court earlier this year after serving more than nine years as a Supreme Court justice. Moreno was the only Latino on the seven-member court, appointed by former Gov. Gray Davis in 2001 when he was a federal judge in Los Angeles.

Moreno is now affiliated with Irell & Manella, a Los Angeles-based law firm. He got his law degree from Stanford University.

"I'm pleased to speak to the graduates of Santa Clara law school," he said in a statement. "They have received a strong grounding in diversity and social justice, values that have been extremely important to me throughout my legal career."

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Insider Fights Corruption | View Clip
05/05/2011
Law Enforcement Corruption

... Advocacy off the clock Pappas said the county denied the request since he never wrote any documents or emails on behalf of the Tea Party using county resources. Pappas said he's refused a county-issued cellphone to avoid the temptation of using it for personal purposes. Efforts to reach Moscowitz to find out what groups she represents were unsuccessful. However, local union groups have been critics of what they call an effort by Tea Party members to push for a Redding city charter that would include an exemption from state prevailing wage laws. Pappas' boss, Gorder, said Pappas regularly checks in with him to update him on his outside legal work. Nothing he's done so far for the Tea Party has interfered with his criminal defense work, Gorder said. The county has no restrictions on an attorney with the public defender's or district attorney's offices doing free, outside legal work on their own time, said Michelle Schafer, the county's director of support services. Two legal and government ethics experts say that they don't have any concerns with Pappas' legal work for the Tea Party either. John Sprankling, a law professor who teaches ethics at University of the Pacific's McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento, said that as long as Pappas' Tea Party business doesn't interfere with the work he does for his regular clients, there's nothing unethical about it. Judy Nadler, a former city mayor and a senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University, agreed. She said government employees — even taxpayer-funded attorneys — have every right to advocate for a political cause or group off the clock. "As long as they (the Tea Party cases) don't have an impact the work he does, it's no different than a DA on the weekends walking precincts for someone else" in an election campaign, Nadler said. But that's not to say that all the extra legal work hasn't taken a toll. Pappas, who lives in Redding with his wife Shirlyn, said that some nights he's up well after midnight doing work for both his county clients and on his Tea Party cases. He said he owes it to them. He said his own experiences with corruption have helped him understand that everyone is entitled to ardent legal representation; something guaranteed them by the U.S. Constitution. "I'm going to do what I think is right. Period," Pappas said. www.Redding.com

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Leadership tip: Master the art of listening | View Clip
05/05/2011
HCPro.com

Medical Staff Leader Connection, May 5, 2011

Want to receive articles like this one in your inbox? Subscribe to Medical Staff Leader Connection!

Most great leaders are listeners. There is probably a reason we have one mouth and two ears. In my own personal experience, I have never learned anything when I am the one doing the speaking. Many of us associate leadership with great speeches, not the important connection that comes from listening. There is no better example of the importance of listening than the history and physical portion of a medical examination. If you listen long enough and ask the right questions, the patient will tell you what is wrong with him or her.

John Hamm, a leadership educator at Santa Clara University, says that leaders who think they have all the answers put themselves in “a very lonely, isolated position where information becomes unreliable and useful input is stifled. Effective leaders, by contrast, understand that their role is to bring out the answers in others. They do this very clearly and explicitly, seeking contributions, challenges, and collaboration from the people that report to them, using their positional power not to dominate the decision-making process.”

How many times in the healthcare field have you seen an edict delivered from above (i.e., The Joint Commission, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, or hospital administrators) that was not thought out completely and was not allowed to be changed by the frontline physicians, nurses, technicians, and unit secretaries?

When directives come from the top with little or no input from the individuals who are expected to carry them out, unintended consequences result and workarounds abound. If corporate leaders write a code of conduct for the medical staff to implement and follow without input, they invite conflict and disruption.

So what is so difficult about active listening? P. M. Forni, in his book Choosing Civility: The Twenty-Five Rules of Considerate Conduct (St. Martin's Griffin, 2003), states: “As listeners, we have an obligation to concentrate just on listening before doing anything else. Good listening has three basic components. When you are ready to listen: (1) plan your listening, (2) show that you are listening, nd] (3) be a cooperative listener.” Plan your listening by putting down what you are reading, putting your cell phone on vibrate, or closing the screen on your laptop and committing yourself to silence. Show the person who is speaking that you are listening by doing the following:

Face the person

Use eye-to-eye contact

Sit at the same level

Eliminate barriers, such as a desk, between you and the speaker

Manage your posture and facial expressions to demonstrate alertness

Most people know when others are not listening because they fail to do one or more of the above items listed (just ask your spouse). Lastly, cooperate when listening by doing the following:

Nod

Use terms such as “I see,” “I understand,” and “Okay”

Ask for clarification

Make statements that show that you are truly concerned, such as “I know how you feel,” “Could you elaborate on that more?” or “Why do you see the problem in that light?”

Using the communication tips above, leaders can impart empathy and sincerity, which are the keys to good communication, whether you are listening or speaking. Remember that as a leader, you are responsible for ensuring appropriate and thorough two-way communication.

The above is an excerpt from the new book Medical Staff Leadership Essentials: A Guide to Developing Leadership Skills and Recruiting the Next Generation, by R. Dean White, DDS, MS, available at hcmarketplace.com

Want to receive articles like this one in your inbox? Subscribe to Medical Staff Leader Connection!

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Pizarro: BAWSI honors Tara VanDerveer and Brandi Chastain | View Clip
05/05/2011
San Gabriel Valley Tribune - Online

Two powerful women in sports -- Stanford basketball coach Tara VanDerveer and soccer legend Brandi Chastain -- were honored Wednesday night by the Bay Area Women's Sports Initiative, the group Chastain co-founded.

BAWSI (pronounced "bossy") connects female athletes and coaches with programs that showcase the value of athletics and activity to women and girls. The program recently enrolled its 10,000th girl and started BAWSI Rollers, which provides services to boys and girls with physical and mental disabilities. And about 200 people -- men, women and children -- came to the Leavey Center at Santa Clara University for the inaugural event, Sportsapalooza, which included hands-on demonstrations of sports such as basketball, softball, soccer and fencing.

"I'm so amazed at the people in the room that you would come out and support girls and women in sports," Chastain said. The crowd also was cheered for its efforts by BAWSI CEO Marlene Bjornsrud and the evening's co-hosts, retired soccer star Julie Foudy and Pixar Animation Studios producer Darla Anderson.

Chastain's 4-year-old son, Jaden, got some applause. When technical issues delayed the playing of a video message from "Glee" actress Jane Lynch, Jaden filled in on stage with an a capella rendition of "Ain't No Mountain High Enough."

COMINGS AND GOINGS: Teresa Alvarado, who gave up her job as executive director of the Hispanic

Foundation of Silicon Valley to run for Santa Clara County supervisor last year, has landed at the Santa Clara Valley Water District. CEO Beau Goldie announced her appointment as the district's communications manager Wednesday.

And Charlene Archibeque, who came out of retirement to lead the choirs at San Jose State, will have a final concert Saturday at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Joseph in downtown San Jose. Tickets are $10 to $25. Get them at the door or by calling 408-924-4332.

CURTAIN RISES ON NEW GROUP: Barbara Christmann, the former education director for San Jose Jazz, has launched the Pacific Philharmonic, a new nonprofit dedicated to music education.

The group's teachers and workshop students will be featured Saturday at SpringFest, a chamber music concert and reception at the Los Gatos United Methodist Church that's being sponsored by Los Gatos Music & Arts. A donation of $15 is suggested for admission to the 4:30 p.m. event. For more information on the group or the concert, go to www.pacificphilharmonic.com.

Got a tip? Call Sal Pizarro at 408-627-0940 or e-mail him at spizarro@mercurynews.com.

Contact Sal Pizarro at spizarro@mercurynews.com or 408-627-0940.

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SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Career Navigation and Healthy Lifestyle Strategies (Part 1 of 4) | View Clip
05/05/2011
YouTube

9th Annual Santa Clara University WiB Conference 2011 Saturday, April 9, 2011 Brocade Communications San Jose Campus Session: Career Navigation and Healthy Lifestyle Strategies Speakers: Shelli Hendricks - Senior Consultant, Leadership and Organizational Development, McAfee Roberta (Bobbie) LaPorte - Founder and Principal, RAL Associates Barbara Massa - VP, Global Talent Aquisition, McAfee For more information about SCU's Women in Business network visit: www.scu.edu Thank you

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SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Career Navigation and Healthy Lifestyle Strategies (Part 2 of 4) | View Clip
05/05/2011
YouTube

9th Annual Santa Clara University WiB Conference 2011 Saturday, April 9, 2011 Brocade Communications San Jose Campus Session: Career Navigation and Healthy Lifestyle Strategies Speakers: Shelli Hendricks - Senior Consultant, Leadership and Organizational Development, McAfee Roberta (Bobbie) LaPorte - Founder and Principal, RAL Associates Barbara Massa - VP, Global Talent Aquisition, McAfee For more information about SCU's Women in Business network visit: www.scu.edu Thank you

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SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Career Navigation and Healthy Lifestyle Strategies (Part 3 of 4) | View Clip
05/05/2011
YouTube

9th Annual Santa Clara University WiB Conference 2011 Saturday, April 9, 2011 Brocade Communications San Jose Campus Session: Career Navigation and Healthy Lifestyle Strategies Speakers: Shelli Hendricks - Senior Consultant, Leadership and Organizational Development, McAfee Roberta (Bobbie) LaPorte - Founder and Principal, RAL Associates Barbara Massa - VP, Global Talent Aquisition, McAfee For more information about SCU's Women in Business network visit: www.scu.edu Thank you

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SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Career Navigation and Healthy Lifestyle Strategies (Part 4 of 4) | View Clip
05/05/2011
YouTube

9th Annual Santa Clara University WiB Conference 2011 Saturday, April 9, 2011 Brocade Communications San Jose Campus Session: Career Navigation and Healthy Lifestyle Strategies Speakers: Shelli Hendricks - Senior Consultant, Leadership and Organizational Development, McAfee Roberta (Bobbie) LaPorte - Founder and Principal, RAL Associates Barbara Massa - VP, Global Talent Aquisition, McAfee For more information about SCU's Women in Business network visit: www.scu.edu Thank you

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SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Changemakers: A Panel Discussion with Social Entrepreneurs (Part 4 of 4) | View Clip
05/05/2011
YouTube

9th Annual Santa Clara University WiB Conference 2011 Saturday, April 9, 2011 Brocade Communications San Jose Campus Session: Changemakers: A Panel Discussion with Social Entrepreneurs Moderator: Dr. Mary Furlong - CEO, Mary Furlong & Associates Dean's Executive Professor of Entrepreneurship at Santa Clara University Speakers: Christine Burroughs - CEO, InnVision Arlene Samen - Founder and President, One Heart World-Wide Audrey Seagraves - Executive Director, World of Good Development Organization For more information about SCU's Women in Business network visit: www.scu.edu Thank you

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SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Critical Success Factors (Part 1 of 3) | View Clip
05/05/2011
YouTube

9th Annual Santa Clara University WiB Conference 2011 Saturday, April 9, 2011 Brocade Communications San Jose Campus Session: Critical Success Factors for Building and Growing a Highly Profitable Business Speaker: Roslyn Jones - Senior Director Global Education Services, Brocade For more information about SCU's Women in Business network visit: www.scu.edu Thank you

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SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Critical Success Factors (Part 2 of 3) | View Clip
05/05/2011
YouTube

9th Annual Santa Clara University WiB Conference 2011 Saturday, April 9, 2011 Brocade Communications San Jose Campus Session: Critical Success Factors for Building and Growing a Highly Profitable Business Speaker: Roslyn Jones - Senior Director Global Education Services, Brocade For more information about SCU's Women in Business network visit: www.scu.edu Thank you

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SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Critical Success Factors (Part 3 of 3).mov | View Clip
05/05/2011
YouTube

9th Annual Santa Clara University WiB Conference 2011 Saturday, April 9, 2011 Brocade Communications San Jose Campus Session: Critical Success Factors for Building and Growing a Highly Profitable Business Speaker: Roslyn Jones - Senior Director Global Education Services, Brocade For more information about SCU's Women in Business network visit: www.scu.edu Thank you

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SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Keynote Speaker: Maddy Dychtwald (Part 4 0f 4) | View Clip
05/05/2011
YouTube

9th Annual Santa Clara University WiB Conference 2011 Saturday, April 9, 2011 Brocade Communications San Jose Campus Keynote Speaker: Maddy Dychtwald - Author, Age Wave co-founder, and leading expert on the changing demographic trends shaping the marketplace, the workplace and our lives. For more information about SCU's Women in Business network visit: www.scu.edu Thank you

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SCU WiB Conference 2011 - Make Your Money Last a Lifetime (Part 2 of 2) | View Clip
05/05/2011
YouTube

9th Annual Santa Clara University WiB Conference 2011 Saturday, April 9, 2011 Brocade Communications San Jose Campus Session: Make Your Money Last a Lifetime Speaker: Alma Guimarin - CFP, CIMA, Senior Vice President, Senior Portfolio Manager, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, LLC For more information about SCU's Women in Business network visit: www.scu.edu For more information about Alma Guimarin visit: fa.smithbarney.com Thank you

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Undergraduate and Graduate Dance Programs | View Clip
05/05/2011
BackStage.com

As part of our Spotlight on Dance and Movement, here is a list of undergraduate and graduate dance programs across the country.

Undergraduate Programs

ALABAMA

Auburn University

Department of Theatre, 211 Telfair B. Peet Theatre, Auburn, AL, 36849-5422; Dan LaRocque, chair, theatre@auburn.edu; media.cla.auburn.edu/theatre; 334-844-4748; Offers a minor in dance

The University of Alabama

Department of Theatre and Dance, Box 870239, 115 Rowand-Johnson Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL, 35487-0239; William Teague, chair; Christopher M. Montpetit, director, theatre management, theatre.dance@ua.edu; theatre.ua.edu; 205-348-5283; B.A. in dance

University of South Alabama

Department of Dramatic Arts, 5751 USA Dr. S, Rm. 1052, Mobile, AL, 36688-0002; Dr. Leon Van Dyke, chair; Janet Lambart, dept. secretary, lmiller@usouthal.edu; lvandyke@usouthal.edu; www.southalabama.edu/drama; 251-460-6305; Offers a minor in drama with a concentration in dance

ALASKA

University of Alaska, Anchorage

Department of Theatre and Dance, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK, 99508; Anna Owens, student info/front desk; Tom T. Skore, dept. chair; Jill Crosby, dance program coordinator, theatre@uaa.alaska.edu; theatre.uaa.alaska.edu/; 907-786-1792; B.A. in theater with a dance emphasis

ARIZONA

Arizona State University

School of Dance: Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, School of Dance, P.O. Box 870304, Tempe, AZ 85287-0304;; Simon Dove, director, School of Dance; jeanette.beck@asu.edu (dance); dance.asu.edu; 480-965-5029 (dance); BFA in dance

University of Arizona

School of Dance: P.O. Box 210093, 1713 E. University Blvd., Ina Gittings Bldg. Rm 121, Tucson, AZ 85721-0093; Jory Hancock, interim dean and director (dance); dance@email.arizona.edu; www.cfa.arizona.edu/dance; 520-621-4698 (dance); BFA in dance and minor in dance

ARKANSAS

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Theatre Arts and Dance Department, 2801 S. University Ave., Little Rock, AR, 72204; Jay E. Raphael, chair, jeraphael@ualr.edu; www.ualr.edu; 501-569-3291; BFA in dance

CALIFORNIA

California Institute of the Arts

School of Theater; Sharon Disney Lund School of Dance, 24700 McBean Parkway, Valencia, CA, 91355-2397; Travis Preston, dean (theater); Stephan Koplowitz, dean (dance), admissions@calarts.edu; www.calarts.edu; 661-253-7853; 661-253-7898 (dance); BFA in dance

California State University, Dominguez Hills

Department of Theater Arts and Dance, 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson, CA, 90747; Sydell Weiner, chair, theatrearts@csudh.edu; www.csudh.edu/theatre; 310-243-3588 or 310-243-3696; B.A. in theater arts with an option in dance

California State University, Fresno

Department of Theatre Arts, 5201 N. Maple Ave., M/S SA46, Fresno, CA, 93740-8027; Melissa Gibson, mgibson@csufresno.edu; pamd@csufresno.edu; www.csufresno.edu/theatrearts; 559-278-3987; Offers an option in dance

California State University, Fullerton

Department of Theatre and Dance, 800 N. State College Blvd., P.O. Box 6850, Fullerton, CA, 92834-6850; Bruce Goodrich, chair, bgoodrich@fullerton.edu; www.fullerton.edu/arts; 657-278-3628; B.A. in dance

California State University,

Los Angeles

Department of Theatre Arts and Dance, 5151 State University Dr., Los Angeles, CA, 90032; James Hatfield, dept. chair, tad@calstatela.edu; www.calstatela.edu/dept/theatre_dance/; 323-343-4110; B.A. in theater arts with an option in dance

California State University, Sacramento

Department of Theatre and Dance, 6000 J St., Shasta Hall, Sacramento, CA, 96819-6069; Linda S. Goodrich, chair, theatre.dance@csus.edu; achebe@csus.edu; www.csus.edu/dram; 916-278-6368; B.A. in dance

California State University,

San Bernardino

Department of Theater Arts, Performing Arts Building, Rm. 111, 5500 University Parkway, San Bernardino, CA, 92407-2397; Margaret Perry, acting dept. chair, moreinfo@csusb.edu; theatre.csusb.edu/; 909-537-5876; Offers dance emphasis

Humboldt State University

Department of Theatre, Film & Dance, 1 Harpst St., Arcata, CA, 95521; Margaret Kelso , dept. chair, theatre@humboldt.edu; www.humboldt.edu; 707-826-3566; B.A. in dance studies (interdisciplinary)

Loyola Marymount University

Department of Theatre Arts, One LMU Drive, Foley 308, Los Angeles, CA, 90045-8210; juribe@lmu.com (theater); lmcghee1@lmu.edu (dance); www.lmu.edu; 310-338-2839 or 310-338-5233 (dance); B.A. in dance

Pomona College

Department of Theatre and Dance, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont, CA, 91711; Arthur Horowitz, dept. chair, mtr04747@pomona.edu; theatre.pomona.edu; 909-621-8186; B.A. in dance

San Jose State University

School of Music and Dance, 1 Washington Square, San Jose, CA, 95192-0095; fmathews@email.sjsu.edu; www.music.sjsu.edu/dance; 408-924-5041; B.A. in dance, minor in dance

Santa Clara University

Department of Theatre and Dance, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA, 95053-0340; Barbara Murray, chair, bmurray@scu.edu; www.scu.edu/cas/theatre/index.cfm; 408-554-4989; B.A. in theater arts with an emphasis in dance

Sonoma State University

Department of Theater Arts and Dance, 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park, CA, 94928; Shelley Martin, performing arts program specialist, shelley.martin@sonoma.edu; www.sonoma.edu/performingarts/theatre/index.shtml; 707-664-2474; Offers concentration in dance

Stanford University

Department of Drama, Dance Division, Memorial Auditorium, Rm. 144, 551 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA, 94305-5010; radavies@stanford.edu; beedavid@stanford.edu (dance); www.stanford.edu/dept/drama; 650-723-2576; B.A. in drama, emphasis on dance

University of California, Berkeley

Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies, 101 Dwinelle Annex, Berkeley, CA, 94720-2560; Michael Mansfield, undergraduate advisor, tdps@berkeley.edu; tdps.berkeley.edu; 510-642-1677; B.A. in dance and performance studies

University of California, Los Angeles

Department of World Arts and Cultures, Glorya Kaufman Hall, 120 Westwood Plaza, Ste. 150, Box 951608, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1608; wacinfo@arts.ucla.edu; www.ucla.edu; 310-825-3951 or 310-206-1342; B.A. in world arts and cultures (concentration in dance)

University of California, Riverside

Department of Dance-109, Arts Building 121, 900 University Ave., Riverside, CA, 92521; Tracey J. Scholtemeyer, danceadvising@ucr.edu; dance.ucr.edu; 951-827-3944; B.A. in dance, minor in dance

University of California, San Diego

Department of Theater and Dance, 9500 Gilman Drive MC0344, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0344; lajimenez@ucsd.edu; www.theatre.ucsd.edu; 858-534-3791; B.A. in dance

University of California, Santa Barbara

Department of Theater and Dance, 552 University Road, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106-7060; Simon Williams, chair, theaterdance-ugradadv@theaterdance.ucsb.edu; www.theaterdance.ucsb.edu; 805-893-3241; B.A. or BFA in dance

COLORADO

University of Colorado

Department of Theatre and Dance, 261 UCB, Boulder, CO, 80309-0261; Kyle Neidt, academic advisor; Michelle Ellsworth, co-director (dance); Nada Diachenko, co-director (dance), michelle.ellsworth@colorado.edu; nada.diachenko@colorado.edu; www.colorado.edu/theatredance; 303-492-7355; B.A. or BFA in dance

University of Northern Colorado

School of Theatre and Dance, Frasier Hall 107, Campus Box 49, Greeley, CO, 80639; David Grapes, director, di.smice@unco.edu; www.arts.unco.edu; 970-351-2930; Offers a minor in dance

CONNECTICUT

Central Connecticut State University

Maloney Hall, 1615 Stanley St., New Britain, CT, 06050; Tom Callery Jr., chair, callery@ccsu.edu; www.theatre.ccsu.edu; 860-832-3150; B.A. in dance

Connecticut College

Department of Theater, Palmer Auditorium, 270 Mohegan Ave., New London, CT, 06320; Mary Lowe, admission@conncoll.edu; www.conncoll.edu; 860-439-2605; B.A. in dance

Trinity College

Department of Theater and Dance, 300 Summit St., Hartford, CT, 06106-3100; Patricia A. Kennedy, administrative assistant, pkennedy@trincoll.edu; www.trincoll.edu; 860-297-5122; B.A. in theater and dance

University of Hartford

Hartt School, 200 Bloomfield Ave., West Hartford, CT, 06117; coates@hartford.edu (theater); lesko@hartford.edu (dance); www.hartford.edu/hartt; 860-768-2462 (theater); 860-768-2478 (dance); BFA in dance performance or ballet pedagogy

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

American University

Department of Performing Arts, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. N.W., Washington, DC, 20016-8053; Caleen Jennings, co-chair, dpa@american.edu; www.american.edu/cas/performing-arts/theatre.cfm; 202-885-3414; Minor in dance

George Washington University

Department of Theatre & Dance, 800 21st St. N.W., Ste. 227, Washington, DC, 20052; Dana Tai Soon Burgess, dept. chair, onstage@gwu.edu; theatredance.gwu.edu; 202-994-8072; B.A. in dance

Howard University

Department of Theatre Arts, 2455 Sixth St. N.W., Washington, DC, 20059; Joe Selmon, interim chair, jselmon@howard.edu; www.coas.howard.edu/theatrearts/; 202-806-7050; BFA or minor in dance arts

FLORIDA

Florida School of the Arts

St. Johns River Community College, 5001 St. Johns Ave., Palatka, FL, 32177; Patti Cason, assistant to the dean, floarts@sjrcc.edu; www.floarts.org; 386-312-4300; A.A. in dance

Florida State University

Department of Dance, 201 Montgomery Gym, Tallahassee, FL, 32306-2120; dance-info@fsu.edu; dance.fsu.edu; 850-644-1023; BFA in dance

New World School of the Arts

Dance Division, 300 N.E. Second Ave., Miami, FL, 33132; dlewis@mdc.edu; www.mdc.edu; 305-237-3582; A.A. degree in dance

Palm Beach Atlantic University

School of Music and Fine Arts & Theatre Department, P.O. Box 24708, West Palm Beach, FL, 33416; Mr. Josué Léon, admissions counselor, josue_leon@pba.edu; www.pba.edu; 561-803-2104; B.A. in dance

Rollins College

Department of Theatre and Dance, 1000 Holt Ave., Box 2735, Winter Park, FL, 32789; Jennifer Jones Cavenaugh, dept. chair; Annie Russell, producing director (theater), jcavenaugh@rollins.edu; www.rollins.edu/theatre; 407-646-2501; Offers minor in dance

University of Central Florida

UCF Conservatory Theatre, P.O. Box 162372, Orlando, FL, 32816; Earl Weaver, associate professor/program coordinator, earl.weaver@ucf.edu; theatre@mail.ucf.edu; www.theatre.ucf.edu; 407-823-2862; Offers minor in dance

University of Florida

School of Theatre and Dance, P.O. Box 115900, Gainesville, FL, 32611; sotd@arts.ufl.edu; www.arts.ufl.edu/theatreanddance; 352-273-0500 or 352-273-0501; BFA in dance performance

University of South Florida

School of Theatre and Dance, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., TAR 230, Tampa, FL, 33620-7450; Merry Lynn Morris, theater and dance academic advisor, mmorris3@usf.edu; www.arts.usf.edu; 813-974-3867; B.A. in dance studies, BFA in dance performance

GEORGIA

Agnes Scott College

Department of Theater and Dance, 141 East College Ave., Decatur, GA, 30030-3797; Dudley Sanders, chair, dsanders@agnesscott.edu; www.agnesscott.edu; 404-471-6250; B.A. in dance

Atlanta Ballet Centre for Dance Education

1400 W. Peachtree St. N.W., Atlanta, GA, 30309; tekholm@atlantaballet.com; www.atlantaballet.com; 404-873-5811, ext. 310; Conservatory

Berry College

Department of Fine Arts, Theatre Program, 2277 Martha Berry Hwy NW, Mount Berry, GA, 30149-0309; Dr. John Countryman, jcountryman@berry.edu; www.berry.edu; 706-236-2289; Offers minor in dance

Brenau University

Department of Performing Arts, 500 Washington St. S.E., Gainesville, GA, 30501; Ann Demling, chair (theater); Vincas Greene, chair (dance), ademling@brenau.edu (theater); vgreene@brenau.edu (dance); www.brenau.edu; 770-534-6264 (theater); 770-534-6245 (dance); BFA in dance or dance education, B.A. in dance studies

Emory University

Theater Studies, Rich Memorial Building 230, 1602 Fishburne Drive, Atlanta, GA, 30322; Leslie Taylor, chair, jward03@emory.edu, dance@emory.edu; www.theater.emory.edu; 404-727-6751; B.A. in dance and movement studies

Kennesaw State University

Department of Theatre & Performance Studies, Wilson Building 31, Rm. 249, 1000 Chastain Rd., #3103, Kennesaw, GA, 30144-5591; Dr. John S. Gentile, chair, jgentile@kennesaw.edu; www.kennesaw.edu/theatre; 770-499-3123; B.A. in dance

Valdosta State University

Department of Communication Arts, College of the Arts, 1500 N. Patterson St., Valdosta, GA, 31698; Jacque Wheeler, jwheeler@valdosta.edu; www.valdosta.edu; 229-333-5820; BFA in dance

HAWAII

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Kennedy Theatre, Department of Theater and Dance, 1770 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI, 96822; Dennis Carroll, chair, theatre@hawaii.edu; carroll@hawaii.edu; www.hawaii.edu/theatre; 808-956-7677; B.A. or BFA in dance

IDAHO

Ballet Idaho Academy

501 S. Eighth St., Ste. A, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83702; info@balletidaho.org; www.balletidaho.org; 208-343-0556, ext. 22; Conservatory

Boise State University

Department of Theatre Arts, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725-1565; Carrie Applegate, administrative assistant/advising coordinator.; Marla Hansen, head of dance, theatre@boisestate.edu; mhansen@boisestate.edu (dance); theatre.boisestate.edu; 208-426-3957; Offers minor in dance

University of Idaho

Center for Dance, HPERD, P.O. Box 442401, Moscow, ID, 83844-2401; halloran@uidaho.edu; www.dance.uidaho.edu; 208-885-2184; B.A. in dance

ILLINOIS

Columbia College Chicago

Theater Department, 72 E. 11th St., Rm. 300, Chicago, IL, 60605; John Green, dept. chair, theatre@colum.edu; www.colum.edu; 312-369-6101; B.A. or BFA in dance

Illinois State University

College of Fine Arts, School of Theater/Dance Program, Campus Box 5700, Normal, IL, 61790-5700; ssemoni@ilstu.edu; www.ilstu.edu; 309-438-2850; 309-438-8021 (dance); B.A. or B.S. in dance performance or dance education

Loyola University Chicago

Department of Fine and Performing Arts, Mundelein Center Suite 1200, 1020 West Sheridan Rd., Chicago, IL, 60660; Mark E. Lococo, director of theatre, theatre-info@luc.edu; www.luc.edu/theatre; 773-508-3830 or 773-508-7511; Offers a minor in dance

Millikin University

Department of Theatre and Dance, 1184 W. Main St., Decatur, IL, 62522; Laura Ledford, Chair, www.millikin.edu; 217-424-6282; Offers minor in dance

Northern Illinois University

School of Theatre and Dance, Stevens Building, DeKalb, IL, 60115-2854; Alexander Gelman, director, agelman@niu.edu; www.niu.edu/theatre; 815-753-1334 or 815-753-8253; BFA in dance performance

Northwestern University

Dance Program, Department of Theater, 10 Arts Circle Dr., Evanston, IL, 60208; nu-dance@northwestern.edu; www.northwestern.edu; 847-491-3147; B.A. in dance

Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville

Department of Theater and Dance, Box 1777, Dunham Hall, SIUE, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1777; Peter Cocuzza, chair; J. Calvin Jarrell, head of dance, pcocuzz@siue.edu; osweeze@siue.edu; cjarrel@siue.edu (dance); www.siue.edu/artsandsciences/theater; 618-650-2773 or 618-650-2788; B.A. or B.S. in theater and dance

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Department of Theatre, 4-122 Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, 500 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL, 61801; David Swinford, admissions and records representative; Jan Erkert, dept. head of dance, theatre@uiuc.edu; dswinfor@illinois.edu; dance@illinois.edu; www.uic.edu/depts/adpa/welcome.htm; 217-333-2371; 217-333-1010 (dance); BFA in dance

Western Illinois University

Department of Theatre and Dance, Browne Hall 101, 1 University Circle, Macomb, IL, 61455; David E. Patrick, chair, theatre@wiu.edu; www.wiu.edu/theatre; 309-298-1543; Offers a comprehensive dance minor

INDIANA

Ball State University

Department of Theatre and Dance, AC 306, Muncie, IN, 47306-0415; Bill Jenkins, chair; Andrea Sadler, recruitment coordinator, amsadler@bsu.edu; wjenkins@bsu.edu; theatrestu@bsu.edu; www.bsu.edu/theatre; 765-285-8740; B.A. or B.S. in dance

Butler University

Jordan College of Fine Arts, Department of Theater, Lilly Hall, Rm. 152, 4600 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis, IN, 46208; William Fisher, dept. chair theater; Larry Attaway, dept. chair dance, ljcooper@butler.edu (theater); jggonzal@butler.edu (dance); www.butler.edu/theatre/; www.butler.edu/dance/; 317-940-9659 (theater); 800-368-6852 ext. 9346 (dance); B.A. or BFA in dance

Purdue University

Department of Theater, Patti and Rusty Rueff School of Visual and Performing Arts, PAO Hall, 552 W. Wood St., West Lafayette, IN, 47907-2002; Joel Ebarb, chair, theatre@purdue.edu; www.purdue.edu/theatre; 765-494-3074; Offers minor in modern dance

Vincennes University

Theatre/Speech/Dance & Music Department, Red Skelton Performing Arts Center, RSPAC-04/Room 105, Vincennes, IN, 47591; JoEllen Horne, performing arts secretary, jhorne@vinu.edu; www.vinu.edu; 812-888-5110; Certificate in dance

KANSAS

Kansas State University

Department of Communication Studies, Theater, and Dance, Nichols Hall 107, Manhattan, KS, 66506-2304; John Uthoff, director of theater, jsutd@ksu.edu; www.k-state.edu/theatre; 785-532-6864; B.A. or B.S. in theater (with a concentration in dance)

University of Kansas

Department of Theatre and Film, Murphy Hall, 1530 Naismith Drive, Lawrence, KS, 66045-3102; John Staniunas, chair, kuthf@ku.edu; kudance@ku.edu; www.theatre.ku.edu; dance.ku.edu; 785-864-3511; B.A. or BFA in dance

Wichita State University

School of Performing Arts, 1845 N. Fairmount St., Box 153, Wichita, KS, 67260-0153; Linda Starkey, chair; Nick Johnson, program director of dance, performingarts@wichita.edu; finearts.wichita.edu/performing/index.asp; 316-978-3368; BFA in dance

KENTUCKY

Northern Kentucky University

Department of Theatre and Dance, FA-205, Nunn Dr., Highland Heights, KY, 41099-1007; Ken Jones, chair, jonesk@nku.edu; www.nku.edu/~theatre/; 859-572-6362; BFA in dance

Western Kentucky University

Department of Theatre and Dance, Gordon Wilson Hall, 1906 College Heights Blvd., #71086, Bowling Green, KY, 42101-1086; Dr. David Young, dept. head, david.young@wku.edu; www.wku.edu/pcal/index.php?page=theatre-and-dance; 270-745-5845; B.A. in dance

LOUISIANA

Louisiana State University

Department of Theatre, 217 M & DA Building, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803; Kristin Sosnowsky, interim chair, theatre@lsu.edu; mtick1@lsu.edu; www.lsu.edu; 225-578-4174; Offers a minor in dance

Loyola University New Orleans

Department of Theatre Arts and Dance, 312 Marquette Hall, New Orleans, LA, 70118; Cheryl Conway, office manager, drama@loyno.edu; dance@loyno.edu; www.loyno.edu; 504-865-3840; Minor in ballet

Northwestern State University of Louisiana

School of Creative and Performing Arts, 150 Central Ave., Natchitoches, LA, 71497; Scott Burrell, coordinator of theater and dance, nfburrellc@nsula.edu; theatre.nsula.edu; 318-357-6891 or 318-357-4483; B.S. in theater (with concentration in dance)

Tulane University

Department of Theatre and Dance, 215 McWilliams Hall, New Orleans, LA, 70118; Marty Sachs, chair, msachs@tulane.edu; www.tulane.edu; 504-314-7760; B.A. or BFA in dance

University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Department of Performing Arts, McLaurin Hall, Room 109, P.O. Box 43690, Lafayette, LA, 70504-3690; Jennifer Potter, administrative assistant, performingarts@louisiana.edu; www.pfar.louisiana.edu; 337-482-6357; BFA in performing arts (with a concentration in dance)

MAINE

Bowdoin College

Department of Theater and Dance, 9100 College Station, Brunswick, ME, 04011-8491; Noma Petroff, dept. coordinator, theater-dance@bowdoin.edu; academic.bowdoin.edu/theaterdance; 207-725-3663; Minor in dance

MARYLAND

Goucher College

Department of Dance, 1021 Dulaney Valley Road, Baltimore, MD, 21204; Elizabeth Ahearn, chair; Sara Thomson, program assistant, goucherdance@goucher.edu; www.goucher.edu; 410-337-6390 or 800-468-2437; B.A. in dance (with tracks in performance, dance education, dance science, dance therapy, dance administration, choreography, dance history and criticism, dance and theater)

Towson University

Department of Dance, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD, 21252; dance@towson.edu; www.towson.edu; 410-704-2760; BFA and B.S, in dance

University of Maryland, College Park

School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, 2810 Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, College Park, MD, 20742-1610; Daniel MacLean Wagner, professor and director, tdps@umd.edu; www.tdps.umd.edu; 301-405-6676; B.A. in dance

MASSACHUSETTS

Amherst College

Department of Theater and Dance, 27 Webster Hall, Amherst, MA, 01002; Linda T. Celi, academic dept. coordinator, ltceli@amherst.edu; www.amherst.edu; 413-542-2411; B.A. in dance

The Boston Conservatory

Theater Division, 8 The Fenway, Boston, MA, 02215; Neil Donohoe, director, admissions@bostonconservatory.edu; www.bostonconservatory.edu; 617-912-9153 or 617-536-6340; BFA in dance

Emerson College

Department of Performing Arts, 120 Boylston St., Boston, MA, 02116; Eric Weiss, performing arts admission coordinator, stagedoor@emerson.edu; www.emerson.edu; 617-824-8780; Offers minor in dance

Mount Holyoke College

Department of Dance: 104 Kendall Sports & Dance Complex, South Hadley, MA, 01075; Terese Freedman, chair, dance@mtholyoke.edu; www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/dance; 413-538-2118; B.A. in dance

Smith College

Theatre Department, Mendenhall Center for Performing Arts, Northampton, MA, 01063; Ellen W. Kaplan, dept. chair, ekaplan@smith.edu; www.smith.edu; 413-585-3201; B.A. in dance

Tufts University

Department of Drama and Dance, Aidekman Arts Center, 40 Talbot Avenue, Medford, MA, 02155; Downing Cless, chair, downing.cless@tufts.edu; ase.tufts.edu/drama-dance; 617-627-3524; Offers minor in dance

MICHIGAN

Hope College

Department of Dance, 168 East 13th St., Holland, MI, 49423; M. Linda Graham, graham@hope.edu; www.hope.edu/academic/dance; 616-395-7700; B.A. in dance

Michigan State University

Department of Theatre, 113 Auditorium Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824; Dr. George F. Peters, dept. chair, theatre@msu.edu; www.theatre.msu.edu; 517-355-6690; Offers minor in dance

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

Department of Dance, 3501 Dance Bldg., 1310 University Court, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2217; Samantha Strayer, administrator, sstrayer@umich.edu; www.music.umich.edu/departments/dance; 734-763-7558; BFA in dance

University of Michigan - Flint

Department of Theater and Dance, Theatre 238, Flint, MI, 48502-1950; Lauren Friesen, chair, lfriesen@umflint.edu; www.umflint.edu/theatredance; 810-762-3230; B.A. in dance

Wayne State University

Department of Theater or Maggie Allesee Department of Dance, 4841 Cass Ave., Ste. 3225, Detroit, MI, 48202; theatre@wayne.edu; dance@wayne.edu; www.theatre.wayne.edu; www.dance.wayne.edu; 313-577-3508 (theater); 313-577-4273 (dance); BFA or B.S. in dance

MINNESOTA

Gustavus Adolphus College

Theater and Dance Department, 800 W. College Ave., St. Peter, MN, 56082-1498; aseham@gac.edu; www.gustavus.edu; 507-933-7353; B.A. in dance

Minnesota State University, Mankato

Department of Theater and Dance, 201 Performing Arts Center, Mankato, MN, 56001; Paul Hustoles, chair, www.msutheatre.com; 507-389-2125 or 2118; B.A. or BFA in dance

St. Olaf College

Department of Dance, 1520 St. Olaf Ave., Northfield, MN, 55057; jroberts@stolaf.edu; www.stolaf.edu; 507-786-3240; B.A. in dance

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Department of Theater Arts and Dance, Barbara Barker Center for Dance, 500 21st Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN, 55455-0480; umdance@umn.edu; dance.umn.edu; 612-624-5060; B.A. and BFA in dance

Winona State University

Theater and Dance Department, P.O. Box 5838, Winona, MN, 55987-5838; Gretchen Cohenour, dance director; Jim Williams, chair, gcohenour@winona.edu; www.winona.edu/thad/; 507-457-5230; Offers a minor in dance

MISSISSIPPI

University of Southern Mississippi

Department of Theater and Dance, 118 College Drive, Box 5052, Hattiesburg, MS, 39406-0001; theatre@usm.edu; dance@usm.edu; www.usm.edu/theatre; 601-266-4994 (theater); 601-266-4161 (dance); B.A. in dance

MISSOURI

Avila University

Department of Theater, 11901 Wornall Road, Kansas City, MO, 64145; Robert Foulk, robert.foulk@avila.edu; www.avila.edu; 816-501-2405; B.A. in dance

Lindenwood University

Fine & Performing Arts Division, 209 S. Kings Highway, St. Charles, MO, 63301; mparker@lindenwood.edu; www.lindenwood.edu; 636-949-4906; B.A. in dance

Missouri State University

Department of Theater and Dance, 901 S. National Ave., Springfield, MO, 65897; Mark Templeton, managing director, theatreanddance@missouristate.edu; www.theatreanddance.missouristate.edu; 417-836-4400; BFA in dance

Missouri Valley College

Division of Fine Arts, 500 E. College St., Marshall, MO, 65340; maland@moval.edu; www.moval.edu; 660-831-4215; B.A. in dance

Northwest Missouri State University

Department of Communication, Theater, and Languages, 148 Wells Hall, Maryville, MO, 64468; jkreizi@nwmissouri.edu; www.nwmissouri.edu/dept/ctl; 660-562-1172; Offers minor in dance

Southeast Missouri State University

Department of Theater and Dance, One University Plaza MS2800, Cape Girardeau, MO, 63701; theatreanddance@semo.edu; www.semo.edu; 573-651-2149

Stephens College

School of the Performing Arts, Theater Department, Box 2077, Columbia, MO, 65215; Beth Leonard, chair, bleonard@stephens.edu; www.stephens.edu; 573-876-7194

Washington University in St. Louis

Performing Arts Department, 1 Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1108, St. Louis, MO, 63130-4899; pad@artsci.wustl.edu; pad.artsci.wustl.edu; 314-935-5858; B.A. in dance

Webster University

Conservatory of Theatre Arts/Department of Dance, 470 E. Lockwood Ave., St. Louis, MO, 63119; Dottie Marshall Englis, chair (theater); Beckah Reed, chair (dance), marshado@webster.edu; voigtbe@webster.edu; www.webster.edu; www.webster.edu/dance; 314-968-6929; BFA in dance

MONTANA

The University of Montana

School of Theatre & Dance and Montana Repertory Theatre, PARTV Center Room 197, Missoula, MT, 59812-8136; umtheatredance@umontana.edu; www.umt.edu/theatredance; 406-243-4481; B.A. or BFA in dance

NEVADA

University of Nevada, Reno

Department of Theatre and Dance-228, Reno, NV, 89557; Rob Gander, chair, rgander@unr.edu; www.unr.edu/cla/theatredance; 775-784-6839; Offers minor in dance

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Keene State College

Department of Theater Arts and Dance, 229 Main St., Keene, NH, 03435-2407; Daniel L. Patterson, chair, naubrey@keene.edu; academics.keene.edu/tad; 603-358-2162; B.A. in dance

Plymouth State University

Department of Music, Theater, and Dance, MSC 37, 17 High St., Plymouth, NH, 03264-1595; Jonathan C. Santore, Ph.D., chair, mtd_dept@plymouth.edu; www.plymouth.edu/mtd; 603-535-2334; Offers minor in dance

University of New Hampshire

Department of Theatre and Dance, Paul Creative Arts Center, D-22, 30 College Rd., Durham, NH, 03824; Chris Peabody, administrative assistant, c.peabody@unh.edu; www.unh.edu/theatre-dance; 603-862-2919 or 603-862-0093; B.A. in dance

NEW JERSEY

Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers

33 Livingston Ave., New Brunswick, NJ, 08901; Mandy Feiler, admissions officer, mfelier@masongross.rutgers.edu; www.masongross.rutgers.edu; 732-932-9891 (theater); 732-932-8497 (dance); BFA or B.A. in dance

Montclair State University

College of the Arts, Department of Theater and Dance, Upper Montclair, NJ, 07043; Eric Diamond, dept. chair; Lori Ketterhenry, dance program coordinator, eric.diamond@montclair.edu; www.montclair.edu/arts; 973-655-7343 (Mr. Diamond); 973-655-7080 (Ms. Ketterhenry); B.A. in dance education, BFA in dance.

Rowan University

Department of Theater and Dance, Bunce Hall, 201 Mullica Hill Road, Glassboro, NJ, 08028; Elisabeth Hostetter, advisement coordinator, hostetter@rowan.edu; www.rowan.edu/colleges/fpa/theatre_dance; 856-256-4030; B.A. in theater with a concentration in dance

NEW MEXICO

University of New Mexico

Department of Theater and Dance, MSC04 2570, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001; theatre@unm.edu; dance@unm.edu; theatre.unm.edu; 505-277-4332 (theater); 505-277-3660 (dance); B.A. in dance

NEW YORK

Adelphi University

Performing Arts Center, Rm. 251, P.O. Box 701, Garden City, NY, 11530-0701; Nicholas Petron, chair (theater); Frank Augustyn, chair (dance), petron@adelphi.edu (theater); augustyn@adelphi.edu (dance); academics.adelphi.edu/artsci/pfa/acting/apply.php; 516-877-4930 (theater); 516-877-4250 (dance); BFA in dance

The Ailey School

The Joan Weill Center for Dance, 405 W. 55th St., New York, NY, 10019; bfa@alvinailey.org; www.theaileyschool.edu; 212-405-9000; BFA in dance (with Fordham University)

Alfred University

Division of Performing Arts/Theater, Miller Performing Arts Center, 1 Saxon Drive, Alfred, NY, 14802-1232; Dr. Lisa Lantz, division chair, performs@alfred.edu; las.alfred.edu/performing-arts; 607-871-2562; Offers minor in dance

American Musical and Dramatic Academy

211 W. 61st St., New York, NY, 10023; David Dent Martin, artistic director, info@amda.edu; www.amda.edu; 800-367-7908; Two-year conservatory program in dance

Bard College

Division of the Arts, Theater and Dance Program, P.O. Box 5000, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY, 12504; admission@bard.edu; dance@bard.edu; www.bard.edu; 845-758-7936; B.A. in dance

Barnard College

Columbia University, Department of Theatre, 5th Floor, Milbank Hall, 3009 Broadway, New York, NY, 10027; W.B. Worten, chair (theater); Mary Cochran, chair (dance);, mplacito@barnard.edu (theater dept. asst.); dance@barnard.edu; www.barnard.edu/theatre; www.barnard.edu/dance; 212-854-2080 (theater), 212-854-2995 (dance); B.A. in dance

Cornell University

Department of Theater, Film, and Dance, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, 430 College Ave., Ithaca, NY, 14850; theatre@cornell.edu; www.cornell.edu; 607-254-2700; B.A. in dance

Dance Theatre of Harlem School

466 W. 152nd St., New York, NY, 10031; Endalyn Taylor, school administrator, info@dancetheatreofharlem.org; nheyward@dancetheatreofharlem.org; www.dancetheatreofharlem.org; 212-690-2800; Conservatory

Hofstra University

Department of Drama and Dance, 112 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY, 11549-1120; David Henderson, chair; Rachel List, director of dance, rachel.list@hofstra.edu or anita.feldman@hofstra.edu; www.hofstra.edu; 516-463-5444; B.A. in dance, B.S. in dance education, or minor in dance

Hunter College

Dance Program, 695 Park Ave., THH 614, New York, NY, 10021; jfeinman@hunter.cuny.edu; www.hunter.cuny.edu/~dance; 212-772-5012; B.A. in dance

The Joffrey Ballet

434 Avenue of the Americas, 5th Fl., New York, NY, 10011; joffrey@joffreyballetschool.com; www.joffreyballetschool.com; 212-254-8520; Conservatory

The Juilliard School

Dance Division, 60 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY, 10023; Lawrence Rhodes, artistic director (dance); Sarah Adriance, administrative director (dance), www.juilliard.edu; 212-799-5000, ext. 255; BFA in dance

Long Island University

C.W. Post Campus, Theatre, Film, Dance, & Arts Management, 720 Northern Blvd., Brookville, NY, 11548; Cara Gargano, cgargano@liu.edu; www.liu.edu; 516-299-2353; BFA in dance

Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus

Department of Dance, 1 University Plaza, Brooklyn, NY, 11201-8423; jstuart@liu.edu; www.liu.edu; 718-488-1075; BFA in dance or performance and choreography, B.S. in dance or dance education

Martha Graham School of ContemPOrary Dance

316 E. 63rd St., New York, NY, 10021; info@marthagrahamdance.org; www.marthagraham.org/school; 212-838-5886; Non-degree program, conservatory

Merce Cunningham Studio

55 Bethune St., 11th floor, New York, NY, 10014; studio@merce.org; www.merce.org; 212-255-8240, ext. 30; Non-degree program

Nazareth College

Department of Theater Arts, 4245 East Ave., Rochester, NY, 14618; Lindsay Korth, chair, lkorth3@naz.edu; www.naz.edu; 595-389-2780; Offers minor in dance

New York University

Music and Performing Arts Professions, Dance Education Program, 35 W. Fourth St., Ste. 777, New York, NY, 10012; steinhardt.dance@nyu.edu; www.steinhardt.nyu.edu/music/dance; 212-998-5400; M.A. in dance education

Sarah Lawrence College

Theater Program/Dance Program, 1 Mead Way, Bronxville, NY, 10708-5999; Christine Farrell, director (theater), Sara Rudner, director (dance), pmcgrath@sarahlawrence.edu; cfarrell@sarahlawrence.edu; srudner@sarahlawrence.edu; www.slc.edu; 914-395-2614 (theater) or 914-395-2433 (dance); B.A. in liberal arts (dance)

SUNY BrockPOrt

Department of Theater, 1101 Tower Fine Arts Center, Brockport, NY, 14420; P. Gibson Ralph, chair (theater); Jacqueline Davis, interim chair (dance), theatre@brockport.edu; www.brockport.edu/theatre/; www.brockport.edu/dance; 585-395-2478 (theater); 585-395-2153 (dance); B.A., B.S., or BFA in dance

SUNY Fredonia

Department of Theater & Dance, 212 Rockefeller Arts Center, Fredonia, NY, 14063; theatre.dance@fredonia.edu; www.fredonia.edu/department/theatredance; 716-673-3596; B.A. in theater with a minor in dance

SUNY Geneseo

School of the Arts, One College Circle, Geneseo, NY, 14454; johnston@geneseo.edu; www.geneseo.edu; 585-245-5841; Minor in dance

University at Buffalo

College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Theater & Dance, 285 Alumni Arena, Buffalo, NY, 14260-5030; td-theatredance@buffalo.edu; www.theatredance.buffalo.edu; 716-645-6897; B.A. or BFA in dance

Wagner College

Theatre Department, One Campus Road, Staten Island, NY, 10301; fruff@wagner.edu; www.wagner.edu/departments/theatre; 718-390-3223; Offers minor in dance

NORTH CAROLINA

Appalachian State University

Department of Theater and Dance, P.O. Box 32123, Boone, NC, 28608-2123; asutheatre@appstate.edu; www.theatre.appstate.edu; 828-262-3028; B.A. in dance

East Carolina University

School of Theater & Dance, Messick Theatre Arts Center, 1001 E. 5th St., Greenville, NC, 27858; theatre@ecu.edu; www.theatre-dance.ecu.edu; 252-328-6390; B.A. in dance

Elon University

Department of Performing Arts, Campus Box 2800, Elon, NC, 27244; krippy@elon.edu; www.elon.edu/perarts; 336-278-5600; BFA in dance

Greensboro College

Theater Department, 815 W. Market St., Greensboro, NC, 27401; schramd@greensborocollege.edu; www.greensborocollege.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 243

Lees-McRae College

Division of Performing Arts, P.O. Box 128, Banner Elk, NC, 28604; Janet Barton Speer, speerj@lmc.edu; www.lmc.edu; 828-898-8721; B.A. in dance

University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Department of Theater, P.O. Box 26170, Greensboro, NC, 27402-6170; Jim Fisher, head, nrshephe@uncg.edu (theater); dance@uncg.edu; performingarts.uncg.edu; 336-334-4032 (theater); 336-334-5570 (dance); B.A. or BFA in dance; Dance: Department of Dance, 323 HHP Bldg., Greensboro, NC 27402-6170

Wake Forest University

Department of Theater & Dance, P.O. Box 7264, Winston-Salem, NC, 27109; theatre@wfu.edu; www.wfu.edu/theatre; 336-758-5294; Offers minor in dance

Western Carolina University

School of Stage and Screen, 246 Central Dr., ST233, Cullowhee, NC, 28723; Thomas Salzman, director, tmsalzman@wcu.edu; www.wcu.edu; 828-227-7491; Offers a minor in dance

OHIO

Kent State University

School of Theater and Dance, B 141 Music & Speech Ctr., Kent, OH, 44242-0001; Cynthia Stillings, director, theatre@kent.edu; dance@kent.edu; www.theatre.kent.edu; 330-672-2082 (theater); 330-672-2069 (dance); B.A. in dance

Oberlin College

Theater and Dance Program, 30 N. Professor St., Warner Center, Oberlin, OH, 44074; janice.sanborn@oberlin.edu; new.oberlin.edu/arts-and-sciences/departments/theater_dance; 440-775-8152; B.A. in dance

The Ohio State University

Department of Theatre, Drake Performance and Event Center, 1849 Cannon Drive, Columbus, OH, 43210-1266; Beth Josephsen Simon, coordinator (theater); Susan Van Pelt Petry, chair (dance), theatre-ugrad@osu.edu; dance@osu.edu; theatre.osu.edu; www.dance.osu.edu; 614-292-5821 (theater); 614-292-7977 (dance); BFA in dance

Ohio University

School of Dance, Putnam Hall 137, Athens, OH 45701-2979; dance@ohio.edu; www.finearts.ohio.edu/dance (dance); 740-593-1826 (dance); B.A. or BFA in dance

Otterbein University

Department of Theatre and Dance, 30 S. Grove St., Westerville, OH, 43081; jstefano@otterbein.edu; www.otterbein.edu/theatre; 614-823-1657; BFA in musical theater (with concentration in dance), minor in dance

University of Akron

School of Dance, Theatre, and Arts Administration, Akron, OH, 44325-1005; theatre@uakron.edu; www.uakron.edu/dtaa; 330-972-7890; B.A. or BFA in dance

University of Cincinnati College - Conservatory of Music

Division of Opera, Musical Theater, Drama, and Arts Administration (OMDA)/Division of Dance, P.O. Box 210003, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0003; Dr. Alan Yaffe (theater), Shellie Cash (dance), yaffea@ucmail.uc.edu (theater), cashsb@ucmail.uc.edu (dance); www.ccm.uc.edu; 513-556-5803; BFA in dance

Wright State University

Department of Theatre, Dance, and Motion Pictures, Dayton, OH, 45435; Stuart McDowell, stuart.mcdowell@wright.edu, victoria.oleen@wright.edu; www.wright.edu/academics/theatre; 937-775-3072; BFA in dance

Youngstown State University

Department of Theater and Dance, 1 University Plaza, Youngstown, OH, 44555-0002; facastronovo@ysu.edu; www.fpa.ysu.edu; 330-941-3000; B.A. in dance management, offers a minor in dance

OKLAHOMA

Oklahoma City University

2501 N. Blackwelder Ave., Oklahoma City, OK, 73106-1493; David Herendeen, director (music theater and theater); Melanie Shelley, associate dean; Jennifer Polvado, audition coordinator (dance), dherendeen@okcu.edu (theater); jpolvado@okcu.edu (dance); www.okcu.edu/theatre; www.okcu.edu/dance_amgt; 405-208-5710; 405-208-5644 (dance); BPA in performance or B.S. in dance management or American dance pedagogy

Oral Roberts University

Department of Communication, Arts and Media, 7777 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa, OK, 74171; lholland@oru.edu; amcintosh@oru.edu (dance); www.oru.edu; 918-495-6870; B.A. in dance performance

University of Central Oklahoma

Department of Theater Arts/Department of Dance, 100 N. University Dr., Box 86 (theater)/Box 189 (dance), Edmond, OK, 73034-5209; Daisy Nystul, chair (theater); Jamie Jacobson, chair (dance), dnystul@uco.edu (theater); jjacobson@uco.edu (dance); www.uco.edu; www.uco.edu/cfad/academics/dance; 405-974-5004 (theater); 405-974-5231 (dance); BFA in dance or B.A. Ed in dance education

University of Oklahoma

School of Dance, 560 Parrington Oval, Rm. 1000, Norman , OK 73019-0319; Mary Margaret Holt, director (dance), dance@ou.edu; finearts.ou.edu; 405-325-4051 (dance); BFA in dance

OREGON

Western Oregon University

Department of Theatre and Dance, 345 N. Monmouth Ave., Monmouth, OR, 97361; Lenore Eliassen, willisk@wou.edu; www.wou.edu; 503-838-8461; B.A. or B.S., offers a minor in dance

Willamette University

Department of Theatre, 900 State St., Salem, OR, 97301; scoromel@willamette.edu; www.willamette.edu; 503-370-6222; B.A. in theater with a dance emphasis

PENNSYLVANIA

California University of Pennsylvania

Department of Theater and Dance, 250 University Ave., Box 16, California, PA, 15419-1394; Michael J. Slavin, Chair, slavin@calu.edu, walmsley@calu.edu; www.calu.edu; 724-938-4220 or 4221; Offers a minor in dance

DeSales University

Department of Performing Arts, 2755 Station Ave., Center Valley, PA, 18034-9568; Dennis Razze, chair (theater); Tim Cowart, chair (dance), dennis.razze@desales.edu (theater); timothy.cowart@desales.edu (dance); www.desales.edu/arts; 610-282-1100; B.A. in dance

Dickinson College

Department of Theater & Dance, Carlisle, PA, 17013; Dr. Karen Kirkham, associate professor, theatre&dance@dickinson.edu; www.dickinson.edu/academics/programs/theatre-and-dance; 717-245-1239

Franklin and Marshall College

Department of Theatre, Dance & Film, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA, 17604-3003; admission@fandm.edu or jsimeral@fandm.edu; www.fandm.edu/theatre; 717-291-4017; B.A. in dance

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Department of Theater and Dance, 104 Waller Hall, 401 S. 11th St., Indiana, PA, 15705; brjones@iup.edu; www.arts.iup.edu/theater; 724-357-2965; B.A. in interdisciplinary fine arts (emphasis in dance)

Marywood University

Department of Communication Arts, 2300 Adams Ave., Scranton, PA, 18509; merchel@es.marywood.edu; www.marywood.edu; 570-348-6209; B.A. in dance

Muhlenberg College

Department of Theatre & Dance, Trexler Pavilion for Theatre & Dance, 2400 Chew St., Allentown, PA, 18104-5586; bien@muhlenberg.edu; www.muhlenberg.edu/theatre&dance; 484-664-3335; B.A. in dance

Point Park University

Conservatory of Performing Arts, Department of Theater or Department of Dance, 201 Wood St., Pittsburgh, PA, 15222; John Shepard, chair (theater); Susan Stowe, chair (dance), www.pointpark.edu; 412-392-3450; B.A. and BFA in dance

Seton Hill University

Theater and Dance Program, 1 Seton Hill Dr., Greensburg, PA, 15601-1599; cross@setonhill.edu; www.setonhilltheatre.edu; 724-552-2900; B.A. in dance

Slippery Rock University

Department of Theater or Department of Dance, Lang Performing Arts Center, 500 College Ave., Slippery Rock, PA, 16057; Rebecca Lindey, dept. secretary (theater); Lisa Smith, dept. secretary (dance); Ursula Payne, chair (dance), rebecca.lindey@sru.edu (theater); ursula.payne@sru.edu (dance); www.sru.edu; 724-738-2474 (theater); 724-738-2036 (dance); B.A. or minor in dance

Swarthmore College

Department of Theater or Department of Music and Dance, Lang Performing Arts Center, 500 College Ave., Swarthmore, PA, 19081; Allen Kuharski, chair (theater); Sharon E. Friedler, director of the dance program, jtierno1@swarthmore.edu (theater); dance@swarthmore.edu; www.swarthmore.edu; 610-328-8149 (theater); 610-328 -8227 (dance chair); B.A. in dance

Temple University

Theater Department, Tomlinson Theater, Room 210A, 1301 W. Norris St., Philadelphia, PA, 19122; Roberta Sloan, chair (theater); Philip Grosser, program director (dance), theater@temple.edu; boyer@temple.edu; www.temple.edu; 215-204-8414 (theater); 215-204-5169 (dance); BFA in dance

University of the Arts

Ira Brind School of Theater Arts or School of Dance, 320 S. Broad St., Philadelphia, PA, 19102; info@uarts.edu; www.uarts.edu/sota; 215-717-6049 admissions 215-717-6450 theater office; BFA in ballet, jazz, and modern dance

Wilkes University

Department of Visual & Performing Arts, Dorothy Dickson Darte Center, 84 W. South St., Wilkes-Barre, PA, 18766; Joseph C. Dawson, chair, joseph.dawson@wilkes.edu; www.wilkes.edu/pages/382.asp; 507-408-4417; Offers a minor in dance

York College of Pennsylvania

Department of English and Humanities, Theater Major, York, PA, 17405-7199; jmcghee@ycp.edu; www.ycp.edu; 717-815-1401; Offers a minor in dance

RHODE ISLAND

Brown University

Department of Theater, Speech, and Dance, P.O. Box 1897, 77 Waterman St., Providence, RI, 02912; taps@brown.edu; www.brown.edu; 401-863-3283; B.A. in dance

Providence College

Department of Theater, Dance & Film, 1 Cunningham Square, Providence, RI, 02918; jgarrity@providence.edu; www.providence.edu; 401-865-2327; B.A. in dance

Salve Regina University

Theater Arts Department, 100 Ochre Point Ave., Newport, RI, 02840-4192; Patricia Hawkridge, chair, www.salve.edu; 401-341-3163; B.A. in dance

SOUTH CAROLINA

Columbia College

Department of Theater or Department of Dance, 1301 Columbia College Dr., Columbia, SC, 29203; Dr. Helen Tate (theater); Wrenn Cook, chair (dance), www.columbiacollegesc.edu; 803-786-3749 (theater); 803-786-3749 (dance); B.A. in dance or dance education with certification, BFA in dance performance and choreography, and minor in dance

University of South Carolina

USC Dance Program, 324 Sumter St., Columbia SC 29208; Susan Anderson, director of dance, dance@sc.edu; www.cas.sc.edu/dance; 803-777-5636 (dance); B.A. in dance

Winthrop University

Department of Theater and Dance, 115 Johnson Hall, Rock Hill, SC, 29733; Andrew Vorder Bruegge, Ph.D., theaterdance@winthrop.edu; www.winthrop.edu/cvpa/theatredance/default.aspx; 803-323-2287; B.A. in dance

TENNESSEE

University of Memphis

Department of Theater and Dance, 144 Theater Communication Building, Memphis, TN, 38152-3150; kshupe@memphis.edu; www.memphis.edu; 901-678-2523; BFA in dance

TEXAS

Baylor University

Theater Arts Department, One Bear Place, Box 97262, Waco, TX, 76798; lisa_denman@baylor.edu; www.baylor.edu/theatre; 254-710-1861; Minor in dance

Houston Ballet Ben Stevenson Academy

601 Preston St., Houston, TX, 77002; Stanton Welch, artistic director, hbacademy@houstonballet.org; www.houstonballet.org; 713-523-6300; Conservatory

Sam Houston State University

Department of Theater and Dance, Box 2297, Huntsville, TX, 77341-2297; Penelope Hasekoester, chair (theater); Jennifer Pontius, coordinator (dance), theatre@shsu.edu; www.shsu.edu/~drm_www/; www.shsu.edu/~dnc_www/ (dance); 936-294-1329; BFA in dance

Southern Methodist University

Meadows School of the Arts, Division of Theater/Division of Dance, P.O. Box 750356, Dallas, TX, 75275-0356; Stan Wojewodski, Jr., chair; Kevin Paul Hofeditz, chair (dance), theatre@smu.edu; hguthrie@mail.smu.edu; www.smu.edu/meadows/areasofstudy/theatre.aspx; www.smu.edu/meadows/areasofstudy/dance.aspx; 214-768-2558; BFA in dance

Texas Christian University

Department of Theater, P.O. Box 297510, , Fort Worth, TX, 76129; Harry Parker, chair (theater); Ellen Page Shelton, chair (dance), theatre@tcu.edu; www.cfac.tcu.edu; www.dance.tcu.edu; 817-257-7625; BFA in ballet or modern dance

Texas State University -

San Marcos

Division of Dance, 178 Jowers Center, San Marcos, TX 78666; LeAnne Smith, director (dance), ls14@txstate.edu (dance); www.theatreanddance.txstate.edu; 512-245-2949 (dance); BFA in dance

Texas Tech University

Department of Theater and Dance, P.O. Box 42061, Lubbock, TX, 79409-2061; fred.christoffel@ttu.edu; www.ttu.edu; 806-742-3601; B.A. in dance

Texas Woman's University

Department of Music and Drama, P.O. Box 425768, Denton, TX, 76204-4254; dance@twu.edu; www.twu.edu/dance 940-898-2086; B.A. in dance

University of Texas at Austin

Department of Theatre and Dance, College of Fine Arts, 1 University Station, D3900, Austin, TX, 78712-0362; inquiry@uts.cc.utexas.edu; www.finearts.utexas.edu/tad; 512-471-5793; BFA in dance

University of Texas at El Paso

Department of Theater & Dance, 500 W. University Ave., FOX 371D, El Paso, TX, 79968-0549; Joel K. Murray, Ph.D, theater dept. chair; Lisa Smith, dance dept. head, www.theatredance.utep.edu; 915-747-5146; B.A. in dance with teaching certification, BFA in dance

UTAH

Brigham Young University

Department of Theater and Media Arts, D-581 Harris Fine Arts Center, Provo, UT, 84602-6405; Rodger Sorensen, chair (theater); Marilyn Berrett, chair (dance), tma_secretary@byu.edu (theater); dance@byu.edu; www.byu.edu; dance.byu.edu; 801-422-6645; 801-422-5086 (dance); B.A. in dance

Southern Utah University

Department of Theater Arts & Dance, 351 W. University Blvd., Cedar City, UT, 84720; marchantj@suu.edu; www.suu.edu; 435-586-7746; B.A. in dance performance or education

University of Utah

Department of Modern Dance, 330 South 1500 East, Rm. 106, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-0170; Stephen Koester, chair, stephen.koester@utah.edu; www.dance.utah.edu; 801-581-7327; BFA in dance, minor in dance

VERMONT

Bennington College

Dance/Drama Program, 1 College Drive, Bennington, VT, 05201; lhurley@bennington.edu; www.bennington.edu; 802-440-4547; B.A. in dance

Middlebury College

Department of Theatre and Dance, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury, VT, 05753; admissions@middlebury.edu; www.middlebury.edu; 802-443-5601; 802-443-5245 (dance); B.A. in dance

VIRGINIA

College of William and Mary

Department of Theatre, Speech, and Dance, P.O. Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA, 23187-8795; jsgava@wm.edu; www.wm.edu/theatre; 757-221-2660; B.A. in interdisciplinary studies (combining dance and theater)

James Madison University

School of Theater and Dance, 147 Warsaw Ave., MSC 5601, Harrisonburg, VA, 22807; William Buck, director (theater); Shane O'Hara, director (dance), theatredance@jmu.edu; www.jmu.edu/theatre; 540-568-6342; B.A. with concentration in dance

Radford University

Department of Theater and Cinema, P.O. Box 6969, Radford, VA, 24142; Carl H. Lefko (theater), Margaret Devaney (dance), clefko@radford.edu (theater); mdevaney@radford.edu (dance); theatre.asp.radford.edu/; www.radford.edu/dance; 540-831-5012; B.A. in dance

Shenandoah University

Shenandoah Conservatory, 1460 University Dr., Winchester, VA, 22601; conservatory@su.edu; www.su.edu; 540-665-4545 (theater); 540-665-4565 (dance); 540-665-4581 or 800-432-2266 (admissions); B.A. or BFA in dance

University of Richmond

Department of Theater & Dance, Modlin Center for the Arts, Richmond, VA, 23173; dmullin@richmond.edu; theatredance.richmond.edu; 804-289-8592; B.A. in dance

University of Virginia

Department of Drama, 109 Culbreth Road, P.O. Box 400128, Charlottesville, VA, 22904-4128; drama@virginia.edu; www.virginia.edu/drama; 434-924-3326; Offers a minor in dance

Virginia Commonwealth University

School of the Arts, Department of Dance and Choreography, P.O. Box 843007, 1315 Floyd Ave., Richmond, VA, 23284; Dr. James Frazier, chair, dance@vcu.edu; www.vcu.edu/arts/dance/dept; 804-828-1711; BFA in dance and choreography

WASHINGTON

Cornish College of the Arts

Theater Department or Dance Department, Main Campus Center, 1000 Lenora St., Seattle, WA, 98121; Richard E.T. White, chair (theater); Kitty Daniels, chair (dance), admissions@cornish.edu; www.cornish.edu; 206-726-5042 (theater), 206-726-5079 (dance); BFA in dance

Pacific Northwest Ballet School

301 Mercer St., 1000 Lenora St., Seattle, WA, 98109; Peter Boal, school director, pnbschool@pnb.org; www.pnb.org; 206-441-2435; Conservatory

University of Washington

Dance Program, Meany Hall, Box 351150, Seattle, WA, 98195-1150; Elizabeth Cooper, dance program director, uwdance@u.washington.edu; depts.washington.edu/uwdance; 206-543-9843; B.A. in dance

Western Washington University

Theatre & Dance Department, 516 High St., Performing Arts Center 395, Bellingham, WA, 98225-9060; Deborah Currier, chair; Cher Carnell, associated chair; Sherena Geariety, dance program coordinator, deb.currier@wwu.edu; cher.carnell@wwu.edu; sherena.geariety@wwu.edu ; www.wwu.edu/theatre; www.wwu.edu/dance; 360-650-3876; B.A., BFA, or minor in dance

WEST VIRGINIA

West Virginia University

College of Creative Arts, Division of Theater & Dance, P.O. Box 6111, Morgantown, WV, 26506-6111; Dr. Yoav Kaddar, director of dance, theatre@mail.wvu.edu; theatre.wvu.edu; 304-293-2020; Offers a minor in dance

West Virginia Wesleyan College

Department of Theater & Dance, 59 College Ave., WVWC MSC 72, Buckhannon, WV, 26201; Gregory Mach, dept. chair, mach@wvwc.edu; www.wvwc.edu; 304-473-8855; Offers a minor in dance

WISCONSIN

University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire

Department of Music and Theatre Arts, Haas Fine Arts Center 156, Eau Claire, WI, 54702-4004; musicandtheatre@uwec.edu; www.uwec.edu/mus-the; 715-836-4954; Offers a minor in dance

University of Wisconsin - Green Bay

Department of Theater and Dance, 2420 Nicolet Dr., Green Bay, WI, 54311-7001; Laura Riddle, riddle@uwgb.edu; www.uwgb.edu/performarts; 920-465-2348; Offers a minor in dance

University of Wisconsin - Madison

Dance Program, Lathrop Hall, 1050 University Ave., 821 University Ave., Madison, WI, 53706; uwdance@education.wisc.edu; www.dance.wisc.edu; 608-262-1691; BFA or B.S. in dance

University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Peck School of the Arts, Department of Theater or Department of Dance, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201; Leroy Stoner, chair (theater); Ed Burgess, chair (dance), theatreinfo@uwm.edu; danceinfo@uwm.edu; arts.uwm.edu/theatre; arts.uwm.edu/dance; 414-229-4947 (theater), 414-229-2571 (dance); B.A. in dance, early childhood through adolescence teacher certification; BFA in performance & choreography with tracks in African diaspora or contemporary dance

University of Wisconsin - River Falls

Department of Communication Studies and Theater Arts, College of Arts and Sciences, B24 Kleinpell Fine Arts Building, 410 Third St., River Falls, WI, 54022; kenneth.w.stofferahn@uwrf.edu; www.uwrf.edu; 715-425-3101; Offers a minor in dance

University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point

Department of Theatre & Dance, Noel Fine Arts Center, Room 161, 1800 Portage St., Stevens Point, WI, 54481; Stephen Trovillion Smith, acting program coordinator; Joan Karlen, dance program coordinator, theatre@uwsp.edu; dance@uwsp.edu; www.uwsp.edu/theatre-dance; 715-346-4429 (theater); 715-346-3982 (dance); B.A. or B.S. in dance

University of Wisconsin - Whitewater

Theatre/Dance Department, Greenhill Center of the Arts, 800 W. Main St., Whitewater, WI, 53190-1790; altermas@uww.edu; www.uww.edu/cac/theatre; 262-472-1566; Offers a minor in dance

WYOMING

Casper College

Department of Theater and Dance, 125 College Drive, Casper, WY, 82601; www.caspercollege.edu/theatre_dance/index.html; 307-268-2365; A.A. in dance

University of Wyoming

Department of Theater and Dance, Dept. 3951, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY, 82071-3951; jchapman@uwyo.edu; www.uwyo.edu/th&d; 307-766-2198; B.A. in dance performance; BFA in dance performance or dance science

Graduate Programs

ARIZONA

Arizona State University

Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, School of Dance, P.O. Box 870304, Tempe, AZ 85287-0304; Simon Dove, director, School of Dance, jeanette.beck@asu.edu (dance); dance.asu.edu; 480-965-5029 (dance); MFA in dance

University of Arizona

School of Dance: P.O. Box 210093, 1713 E. University Blvd., Ina Gittings Bldg. Rm 121, Tucson, AZ 85721-0093; Jory Hancock, interim dean and director (dance), dance@email.arizona.edu; www.cfa.arizona.edu/dance; 520-621-4698 (dance); MFA in dance

CALIFORNIA

California Institute of the Arts

School of Theater; Sharon Disney Lund School of Dance, 24700 McBean Pkwy., Valencia, CA, 91355-2397; Travis Preston, dean (theater); Stephan Koplowitz, dean (dance), admissions@calarts.edu; www.calarts.edu; 661-255-1050; MFA in dance

California State University, Long Beach

Dance Department, Long Beach, CA, 90840; Sylvia Rodriguez-Scholz, assistant to the chair, publicrelations@calrep.org; www.csulb.edu/depts/dance; 562-985-2024; M.A. or MFA in dance

University of California, Los Angeles

Department of World Arts and Cultures, Glorya Kaufman Hall, 120 Westwood Plaza, Ste. 150, Box 951608, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1608; Angelia Leung, chair, wacinfo@arts.ucla.edu; www.wac.ucla.edu/; 310-825-3951 or 310-206-1342; MFA in dance (world arts and culture)

University of California, Riverside

Department of Dance, 900 University Ave., 121 Arts Bldg., Riverside, CA, 92521; Tracey J. Scholtemeyer, danceadvising@ucr.edu; dance.ucr.edu; 951-827-3944; MFA or Ph.D. in dance

University of California, San Diego

Department of Theater and Dance, 9500 Gilman Drive MC0344, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0344; Allyson Green, dance dept. chair; Kyle Donnelly, head of acting, meward@ucsd.edu (graduate); lajimenez@ucsd.edu (undergraduate); www.theatre.ucsd.edu; 858-534-3791; MFA in dance theater

COLORADO

University of Colorado

Department of Theater and Dance, 261 UCB, Boulder, CO, 80309-0261; Michelle Ellsworth, co-director (dance); Nada Diachenko, co-director (dance), michelle.ellsworth@colorado.edu; nada.diachenko@colorado.edu; www.colorado.edu/theatredance; 303-492-7355; MFA in dance

HAWAII

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Kennedy Theater, Department of Theatre and Dance, 1770 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI, 96822; Dennis Carroll, chair, theatre@hawaii.edu; www.hawaii.edu/theatre; 808-956-7677; M.A. or MFA in dance

ILLINOIS

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Department of Dance, 907 1/2 West Nevada, Urbana, IL, 61801; Jan Erkert, dept. head, dance@illinois.edu; www.dance.illinois.edu; 217-333-1010; MFA in dance

MARYLAND

University of Maryland, College Park

School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, 2810 Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, College Park, MD, 20742-1610; Daniel MacLean Wagner, professor and director, tdps@umd.edu; www.tdps.umd.edu; 301-405-6676; MFA in dance

MASSACHUSETTS

Smith College

Dance Department, Mendenhall Center for Performing Arts, Northampton, MA, 01063; Susan Kay Waltner, director of MFA in dance, swaltner@smith.edu (Ms. Waltner); www.smith.edu; 413-585-3201; 413-585-3236 (director); MFA in dance

MICHIGAN

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

Department of Dance, 3501 Dance Bldg., 1310 University Court, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2217; Samantha Strayer, administrator, sstrayer@umich.edu; www.music.umich.edu/departments/dance; 734-763-7558; MFA in dance

NEW MEXICO

University of New Mexico

Department of Theater and Dance, MSC04 2570, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001; theatre@unm.edu; dance@unm.edu; theatre.unm.edu; 505-277-4332 (theater); 505-277-3660 (dance); M.A. in dance or dance history, MFA in choreography or performance

NEW YORK

Sarah Lawrence College

Theater Program, 1 Mead Way, Bronxville, NY, 10708-5999; Dan Hurlin, director, dhurlin@sarahlawrence.edu; www.slc.edu; 914-395-2433; MFA in dance

SUNY Brockport

Department of Dance, 350 New Campus Dr., Brockport, NY, 14420; Jacqueline Davis, interim chair, dance@brockport.edu; www.brockport.edu/dance; 585-395-2153; M.A. or MFA in dance

NORTH CAROLINA

University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Department of Dance, 323 HHP Bldg., Greensboro, NC 27402-6170; Jim Fisher, head; dance@uncg.edu; performingarts.uncg.edu; 336-334-5570 (dance); M.A. or MFA in dance

OHIO

Case Western Reserve University

Department of Dance, Mather Dance Center, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106-7113; Karen Potter, chair; Lori Waugh, department assistant, lny@case.edu or karen.potter@case.edu; dance.case.edu; 216-368-1491; M.A. and MFA in dance

The Ohio State University

Department of Theatre, Drake Performance and Event Center, 1849 Cannon Drive, Columbus, OH, 43210-1307; Damian Bowerman, graduate studies coordinator (theater); Susan Van Pelt Petry, chair (dance), theatre@osu.edu; dance@osu.edu; www.theatre.osu.edu; www.dance.osu.edu; 614-292-5821 (theater); 614-292-7977 dance; MFA and Ph.D. in dance

OKLAHOMA

Oklahoma City University

2501 N. Blackwelder Ave., Oklahoma City, OK, 73106-1493; David Herendeen, director (music theater and theater); Melanie Shelley, associate dean; Jennifer Polvado, audition coordinator (dance), dherendeen@okcu.edu (theater); jpolvado@okcu.edu (dance); www.okcu.edu/theatre; www.okcu.edu/dance_amgt; 405-208-5710; 405-208-5644 (dance); MFA in dance

PENNSYLVANIA

Temple University

Theater Department, Tomlinson Theater, Room 210A, 1301 W. Norris St., Philadelphia, PA, 19122-6075; Roberta Sloan, chair (theater); Merian Soto, graduate program director (dance), theater@temple.edu; boyer@temple.edu; www.temple.edu; 215-204-8414 (theater); 215-204-5169 (dance); MFA and Ph.D. in dance

TEXAS

Sam Houston State University

SHSU Dance Program, Box 2269, Huntsville, TX, 77341-2269; Jennifer Pontius, coordinator (dance), dance@shsu.edu; www.shsu.edu/~dnc_www/; 936-294-1875; MFA in dance

Southern Methodist University

Meadows School of the Arts, Division of Theater/Division of Dance, P.O. Box 750356, Dallas, TX, 75275-0356; Stan Wojewodski, Jr., chair; Kevin Paul Hofeditz, chair (dance), theatre@smu.edu; hguthrie@mail.smu.edu; www.smu.edu/meadows/areasofstudy/theatre.aspx; www.smu.edu/meadows/areasofstudy/dance.aspx; 214-768-2558; MFA in dance

Texas Christian University

School for Classical & Contemporary Dance, TCU Box 297550, Fort Worth, TX, 76129; Ellen Page Shelton, chair, cfagradinfo@tcu.edu; www.dance.tcu.edu; 817-257-7603; MFA in dance

Texas Woman's University

Department of Music and Drama, P.O. Box 425708, Denton, TX, 76204-5708; Dr. Penelope Hanstein, chair (dance), dance@twu.edu; www.twu.edu/dance; 940-898-2085; M.A., MFA, or Ph.D. in dance

University of Texas at Austin

Department of Theatre and Dance, College of Fine Arts, 1 University Station, D3900, Austin, TX, 78712-0362; inquiry@uts.cc.utexas.edu; www.finearts.utexas.edu/tad; 512-471-5793; MFA in dance

UTAH

University of Utah

Department of Modern Dance, 330 South 1500 East, Rm. 106, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-0170; Stephen Koester, chair, stephen.koester@utah.edu; www.dance.utah.edu; 801-581-7327; MFA in dance

WASHINGTON

University of Washington

Dance Program, Meany Hall, Box 351150, Seattle, WA, 98195-1150; Elizabeth Cooper, dance program director, uwdance@u.washington.edu; depts.washington.edu/uwdance; 206-543-9843; MFA in dance

WISCONSIN

University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Peck School of the Arts, Department of Dance, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201; Ed Burgess, chair; Simone Ferro, graduate program director, danceinfo@uwm.edu; arts.uwm.edu/dance; 414-229-2571; MFA in performing arts: dance

Undergraduate and Graduate Dance Programs

As part of our Spotlight on Dance and Movement, here is a list of undergraduate and graduate dance programs across the country.

Undergraduate Programs

ALABAMA

Auburn University

Department of Theatre, 211 Telfair B. Peet Theatre, Auburn, AL, 36849-5422; Dan LaRocque, chair, theatre@auburn.edu; media.cla.auburn.edu/theatre; 334-844-4748; Offers a minor in dance

The University of Alabama

Department of Theatre and Dance, Box 870239, 115 Rowand-Johnson Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL, 35487-0239; William Teague, chair; Christopher M. Montpetit, director, theatre management, theatre.dance@ua.edu; theatre.ua.edu; 205-348-5283; B.A. in dance

University of South Alabama

Department of Dramatic Arts, 5751 USA Dr. S, Rm. 1052, Mobile, AL, 36688-0002; Dr. Leon Van Dyke, chair; Janet Lambart, dept. secretary, lmiller@usouthal.edu; lvandyke@usouthal.edu; www.southalabama.edu/drama; 251-460-6305; Offers a minor in drama with a concentration in dance

ALASKA

University of Alaska, Anchorage

Department of Theatre and Dance, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK, 99508; Anna Owens, student info/front desk; Tom T. Skore, dept. chair; Jill Crosby, dance program coordinator, theatre@uaa.alaska.edu; theatre.uaa.alaska.edu/; 907-786-1792; B.A. in theater with a dance emphasis

ARIZONA

Arizona State University

School of Dance: Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, School of Dance, P.O. Box 870304, Tempe, AZ 85287-0304;; Simon Dove, director, School of Dance; jeanette.beck@asu.edu (dance); dance.asu.edu; 480-965-5029 (dance); BFA in dance

University of Arizona

School of Dance: P.O. Box 210093, 1713 E. University Blvd., Ina Gittings Bldg. Rm 121, Tucson, AZ 85721-0093; Jory Hancock, interim dean and director (dance); dance@email.arizona.edu; www.cfa.arizona.edu/dance; 520-621-4698 (dance); BFA in dance and minor in dance

ARKANSAS

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Theatre Arts and Dance Department, 2801 S. University Ave., Little Rock, AR, 72204; Jay E. Raphael, chair, jeraphael@ualr.edu; www.ualr.edu; 501-569-3291; BFA in dance

CALIFORNIA

California Institute of the Arts

School of Theater; Sharon Disney Lund School of Dance, 24700 McBean Parkway, Valencia, CA, 91355-2397; Travis Preston, dean (theater); Stephan Koplowitz, dean (dance), admissions@calarts.edu; www.calarts.edu; 661-253-7853; 661-253-7898 (dance); BFA in dance

California State University, Dominguez Hills

Department of Theater Arts and Dance, 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson, CA, 90747; Sydell Weiner, chair, theatrearts@csudh.edu; www.csudh.edu/theatre; 310-243-3588 or 310-243-3696; B.A. in theater arts with an option in dance

California State University, Fresno

Department of Theatre Arts, 5201 N. Maple Ave., M/S SA46, Fresno, CA, 93740-8027; Melissa Gibson, mgibson@csufresno.edu; pamd@csufresno.edu; www.csufresno.edu/theatrearts; 559-278-3987; Offers an option in dance

California State University, Fullerton

Department of Theatre and Dance, 800 N. State College Blvd., P.O. Box 6850, Fullerton, CA, 92834-6850; Bruce Goodrich, chair, bgoodrich@fullerton.edu; www.fullerton.edu/arts; 657-278-3628; B.A. in dance

California State University,

Los Angeles

Department of Theatre Arts and Dance, 5151 State University Dr., Los Angeles, CA, 90032; James Hatfield, dept. chair, tad@calstatela.edu; www.calstatela.edu/dept/theatre_dance/; 323-343-4110; B.A. in theater arts with an option in dance

California State University, Sacramento

Department of Theatre and Dance, 6000 J St., Shasta Hall, Sacramento, CA, 96819-6069; Linda S. Goodrich, chair, theatre.dance@csus.edu; achebe@csus.edu; www.csus.edu/dram; 916-278-6368; B.A. in dance

California State University,

San Bernardino

Department of Theater Arts, Performing Arts Building, Rm. 111, 5500 University Parkway, San Bernardino, CA, 92407-2397; Margaret Perry, acting dept. chair, moreinfo@csusb.edu; theatre.csusb.edu/; 909-537-5876; Offers dance emphasis

Humboldt State University

Department of Theatre, Film & Dance, 1 Harpst St., Arcata, CA, 95521; Margaret Kelso , dept. chair, theatre@humboldt.edu; www.humboldt.edu; 707-826-3566; B.A. in dance studies (interdisciplinary)

Loyola Marymount University

Department of Theatre Arts, One LMU Drive, Foley 308, Los Angeles, CA, 90045-8210; juribe@lmu.com (theater); lmcghee1@lmu.edu (dance); www.lmu.edu; 310-338-2839 or 310-338-5233 (dance); B.A. in dance

Pomona College

Department of Theatre and Dance, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont, CA, 91711; Arthur Horowitz, dept. chair, mtr04747@pomona.edu; theatre.pomona.edu; 909-621-8186; B.A. in dance

San Jose State University

School of Music and Dance, 1 Washington Square, San Jose, CA, 95192-0095; fmathews@email.sjsu.edu; www.music.sjsu.edu/dance; 408-924-5041; B.A. in dance, minor in dance

Santa Clara University

Department of Theatre and Dance, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA, 95053-0340; Barbara Murray, chair, bmurray@scu.edu; www.scu.edu/cas/theatre/index.cfm; 408-554-4989; B.A. in theater arts with an emphasis in dance

Sonoma State University

Department of Theater Arts and Dance, 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park, CA, 94928; Shelley Martin, performing arts program specialist, shelley.martin@sonoma.edu; www.sonoma.edu/performingarts/theatre/index.shtml; 707-664-2474; Offers concentration in dance

Stanford University

Department of Drama, Dance Division, Memorial Auditorium, Rm. 144, 551 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA, 94305-5010; radavies@stanford.edu; beedavid@stanford.edu (dance); www.stanford.edu/dept/drama; 650-723-2576; B.A. in drama, emphasis on dance

University of California, Berkeley

Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies, 101 Dwinelle Annex, Berkeley, CA, 94720-2560; Michael Mansfield, undergraduate advisor, tdps@berkeley.edu; tdps.berkeley.edu; 510-642-1677; B.A. in dance and performance studies

University of California, Los Angeles

Department of World Arts and Cultures, Glorya Kaufman Hall, 120 Westwood Plaza, Ste. 150, Box 951608, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1608; wacinfo@arts.ucla.edu; www.ucla.edu; 310-825-3951 or 310-206-1342; B.A. in world arts and cultures (concentration in dance)

University of California, Riverside

Department of Dance-109, Arts Building 121, 900 University Ave., Riverside, CA, 92521; Tracey J. Scholtemeyer, danceadvising@ucr.edu; dance.ucr.edu; 951-827-3944; B.A. in dance, minor in dance

University of California, San Diego

Department of Theater and Dance, 9500 Gilman Drive MC0344, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0344; lajimenez@ucsd.edu; www.theatre.ucsd.edu; 858-534-3791; B.A. in dance

University of California, Santa Barbara

Department of Theater and Dance, 552 University Road, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106-7060; Simon Williams, chair, theaterdance-ugradadv@theaterdance.ucsb.edu; www.theaterdance.ucsb.edu; 805-893-3241; B.A. or BFA in dance

COLORADO

University of Colorado

Department of Theatre and Dance, 261 UCB, Boulder, CO, 80309-0261; Kyle Neidt, academic advisor; Michelle Ellsworth, co-director (dance); Nada Diachenko, co-director (dance), michelle.ellsworth@colorado.edu; nada.diachenko@colorado.edu; www.colorado.edu/theatredance; 303-492-7355; B.A. or BFA in dance

University of Northern Colorado

School of Theatre and Dance, Frasier Hall 107, Campus Box 49, Greeley, CO, 80639; David Grapes, director, di.smice@unco.edu; www.arts.unco.edu; 970-351-2930; Offers a minor in dance

CONNECTICUT

Central Connecticut State University

Maloney Hall, 1615 Stanley St., New Britain, CT, 06050; Tom Callery Jr., chair, callery@ccsu.edu; www.theatre.ccsu.edu; 860-832-3150; B.A. in dance

Connecticut College

Department of Theater, Palmer Auditorium, 270 Mohegan Ave., New London, CT, 06320; Mary Lowe, admission@conncoll.edu; www.conncoll.edu; 860-439-2605; B.A. in dance

Trinity College

Department of Theater and Dance, 300 Summit St., Hartford, CT, 06106-3100; Patricia A. Kennedy, administrative assistant, pkennedy@trincoll.edu; www.trincoll.edu; 860-297-5122; B.A. in theater and dance

University of Hartford

Hartt School, 200 Bloomfield Ave., West Hartford, CT, 06117; coates@hartford.edu (theater); lesko@hartford.edu (dance); www.hartford.edu/hartt; 860-768-2462 (theater); 860-768-2478 (dance); BFA in dance performance or ballet pedagogy

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

American University

Department of Performing Arts, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. N.W., Washington, DC, 20016-8053; Caleen Jennings, co-chair, dpa@american.edu; www.american.edu/cas/performing-arts/theatre.cfm; 202-885-3414; Minor in dance

George Washington University

Department of Theatre & Dance, 800 21st St. N.W., Ste. 227, Washington, DC, 20052; Dana Tai Soon Burgess, dept. chair, onstage@gwu.edu; theatredance.gwu.edu; 202-994-8072; B.A. in dance

Howard University

Department of Theatre Arts, 2455 Sixth St. N.W., Washington, DC, 20059; Joe Selmon, interim chair, jselmon@howard.edu; www.coas.howard.edu/theatrearts/; 202-806-7050; BFA or minor in dance arts

FLORIDA

Florida School of the Arts

St. Johns River Community College, 5001 St. Johns Ave., Palatka, FL, 32177; Patti Cason, assistant to the dean, floarts@sjrcc.edu; www.floarts.org; 386-312-4300; A.A. in dance

Florida State University

Department of Dance, 201 Montgomery Gym, Tallahassee, FL, 32306-2120; dance-info@fsu.edu; dance.fsu.edu; 850-644-1023; BFA in dance

New World School of the Arts

Dance Division, 300 N.E. Second Ave., Miami, FL, 33132; dlewis@mdc.edu; www.mdc.edu; 305-237-3582; A.A. degree in dance

Palm Beach Atlantic University

School of Music and Fine Arts & Theatre Department, P.O. Box 24708, West Palm Beach, FL, 33416; Mr. Josué Léon, admissions counselor, josue_leon@pba.edu; www.pba.edu; 561-803-2104; B.A. in dance

Rollins College

Department of Theatre and Dance, 1000 Holt Ave., Box 2735, Winter Park, FL, 32789; Jennifer Jones Cavenaugh, dept. chair; Annie Russell, producing director (theater), jcavenaugh@rollins.edu; www.rollins.edu/theatre; 407-646-2501; Offers minor in dance

University of Central Florida

UCF Conservatory Theatre, P.O. Box 162372, Orlando, FL, 32816; Earl Weaver, associate professor/program coordinator, earl.weaver@ucf.edu; theatre@mail.ucf.edu; www.theatre.ucf.edu; 407-823-2862; Offers minor in dance

University of Florida

School of Theatre and Dance, P.O. Box 115900, Gainesville, FL, 32611; sotd@arts.ufl.edu; www.arts.ufl.edu/theatreanddance; 352-273-0500 or 352-273-0501; BFA in dance performance

University of South Florida

School of Theatre and Dance, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., TAR 230, Tampa, FL, 33620-7450; Merry Lynn Morris, theater and dance academic advisor, mmorris3@usf.edu; www.arts.usf.edu; 813-974-3867; B.A. in dance studies, BFA in dance performance

GEORGIA

Agnes Scott College

Department of Theater and Dance, 141 East College Ave., Decatur, GA, 30030-3797; Dudley Sanders, chair, dsanders@agnesscott.edu; www.agnesscott.edu; 404-471-6250; B.A. in dance

Atlanta Ballet Centre for Dance Education

1400 W. Peachtree St. N.W., Atlanta, GA, 30309; tekholm@atlantaballet.com; www.atlantaballet.com; 404-873-5811, ext. 310; Conservatory

Berry College

Department of Fine Arts, Theatre Program, 2277 Martha Berry Hwy NW, Mount Berry, GA, 30149-0309; Dr. John Countryman, jcountryman@berry.edu; www.berry.edu; 706-236-2289; Offers minor in dance

Brenau University

Department of Performing Arts, 500 Washington St. S.E., Gainesville, GA, 30501; Ann Demling, chair (theater); Vincas Greene, chair (dance), ademling@brenau.edu (theater); vgreene@brenau.edu (dance); www.brenau.edu; 770-534-6264 (theater); 770-534-6245 (dance); BFA in dance or dance education, B.A. in dance studies

Emory University

Theater Studies, Rich Memorial Building 230, 1602 Fishburne Drive, Atlanta, GA, 30322; Leslie Taylor, chair, jward03@emory.edu, dance@emory.edu; www.theater.emory.edu; 404-727-6751; B.A. in dance and movement studies

Kennesaw State University

Department of Theatre & Performance Studies, Wilson Building 31, Rm. 249, 1000 Chastain Rd., #3103, Kennesaw, GA, 30144-5591; Dr. John S. Gentile, chair, jgentile@kennesaw.edu; www.kennesaw.edu/theatre; 770-499-3123; B.A. in dance

Valdosta State University

Department of Communication Arts, College of the Arts, 1500 N. Patterson St., Valdosta, GA, 31698; Jacque Wheeler, jwheeler@valdosta.edu; www.valdosta.edu; 229-333-5820; BFA in dance

HAWAII

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Kennedy Theatre, Department of Theater and Dance, 1770 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI, 96822; Dennis Carroll, chair, theatre@hawaii.edu; carroll@hawaii.edu; www.hawaii.edu/theatre; 808-956-7677; B.A. or BFA in dance

IDAHO

Ballet Idaho Academy

501 S. Eighth St., Ste. A, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83702; info@balletidaho.org; www.balletidaho.org; 208-343-0556, ext. 22; Conservatory

Boise State University

Department of Theatre Arts, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725-1565; Carrie Applegate, administrative assistant/advising coordinator.; Marla Hansen, head of dance, theatre@boisestate.edu; mhansen@boisestate.edu (dance); theatre.boisestate.edu; 208-426-3957; Offers minor in dance

University of Idaho

Center for Dance, HPERD, P.O. Box 442401, Moscow, ID, 83844-2401; halloran@uidaho.edu; www.dance.uidaho.edu; 208-885-2184; B.A. in dance

ILLINOIS

Columbia College Chicago

Theater Department, 72 E. 11th St., Rm. 300, Chicago, IL, 60605; John Green, dept. chair, theatre@colum.edu; www.colum.edu; 312-369-6101; B.A. or BFA in dance

Illinois State University

College of Fine Arts, School of Theater/Dance Program, Campus Box 5700, Normal, IL, 61790-5700; ssemoni@ilstu.edu; www.ilstu.edu; 309-438-2850; 309-438-8021 (dance); B.A. or B.S. in dance performance or dance education

Loyola University Chicago

Department of Fine and Performing Arts, Mundelein Center Suite 1200, 1020 West Sheridan Rd., Chicago, IL, 60660; Mark E. Lococo, director of theatre, theatre-info@luc.edu; www.luc.edu/theatre; 773-508-3830 or 773-508-7511; Offers a minor in dance

Millikin University

Department of Theatre and Dance, 1184 W. Main St., Decatur, IL, 62522; Laura Ledford, Chair, www.millikin.edu; 217-424-6282; Offers minor in dance

Northern Illinois University

School of Theatre and Dance, Stevens Building, DeKalb, IL, 60115-2854; Alexander Gelman, director, agelman@niu.edu; www.niu.edu/theatre; 815-753-1334 or 815-753-8253; BFA in dance performance

Northwestern University

Dance Program, Department of Theater, 10 Arts Circle Dr., Evanston, IL, 60208; nu-dance@northwestern.edu; www.northwestern.edu; 847-491-3147; B.A. in dance

Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville

Department of Theater and Dance, Box 1777, Dunham Hall, SIUE, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1777; Peter Cocuzza, chair; J. Calvin Jarrell, head of dance, pcocuzz@siue.edu; osweeze@siue.edu; cjarrel@siue.edu (dance); www.siue.edu/artsandsciences/theater; 618-650-2773 or 618-650-2788; B.A. or B.S. in theater and dance

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Department of Theatre, 4-122 Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, 500 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL, 61801; David Swinford, admissions and records representative; Jan Erkert, dept. head of dance, theatre@uiuc.edu; dswinfor@illinois.edu; dance@illinois.edu; www.uic.edu/depts/adpa/welcome.htm; 217-333-2371; 217-333-1010 (dance); BFA in dance

Western Illinois University

Department of Theatre and Dance, Browne Hall 101, 1 University Circle, Macomb, IL, 61455; David E. Patrick, chair, theatre@wiu.edu; www.wiu.edu/theatre; 309-298-1543; Offers a comprehensive dance minor

INDIANA

Ball State University

Department of Theatre and Dance, AC 306, Muncie, IN, 47306-0415; Bill Jenkins, chair; Andrea Sadler, recruitment coordinator, amsadler@bsu.edu; wjenkins@bsu.edu; theatrestu@bsu.edu; www.bsu.edu/theatre; 765-285-8740; B.A. or B.S. in dance

Butler University

Jordan College of Fine Arts, Department of Theater, Lilly Hall, Rm. 152, 4600 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis, IN, 46208; William Fisher, dept. chair theater; Larry Attaway, dept. chair dance, ljcooper@butler.edu (theater); jggonzal@butler.edu (dance); www.butler.edu/theatre/; www.butler.edu/dance/; 317-940-9659 (theater); 800-368-6852 ext. 9346 (dance); B.A. or BFA in dance

Purdue University

Department of Theater, Patti and Rusty Rueff School of Visual and Performing Arts, PAO Hall, 552 W. Wood St., West Lafayette, IN, 47907-2002; Joel Ebarb, chair, theatre@purdue.edu; www.purdue.edu/theatre; 765-494-3074; Offers minor in modern dance

Vincennes University

Theatre/Speech/Dance & Music Department, Red Skelton Performing Arts Center, RSPAC-04/Room 105, Vincennes, IN, 47591; JoEllen Horne, performing arts secretary, jhorne@vinu.edu; www.vinu.edu; 812-888-5110; Certificate in dance

KANSAS

Kansas State University

Department of Communication Studies, Theater, and Dance, Nichols Hall 107, Manhattan, KS, 66506-2304; John Uthoff, director of theater, jsutd@ksu.edu; www.k-state.edu/theatre; 785-532-6864; B.A. or B.S. in theater (with a concentration in dance)

University of Kansas

Department of Theatre and Film, Murphy Hall, 1530 Naismith Drive, Lawrence, KS, 66045-3102; John Staniunas, chair, kuthf@ku.edu; kudance@ku.edu; www.theatre.ku.edu; dance.ku.edu; 785-864-3511; B.A. or BFA in dance

Wichita State University

School of Performing Arts, 1845 N. Fairmount St., Box 153, Wichita, KS, 67260-0153; Linda Starkey, chair; Nick Johnson, program director of dance, performingarts@wichita.edu; finearts.wichita.edu/performing/index.asp; 316-978-3368; BFA in dance

KENTUCKY

Northern Kentucky University

Department of Theatre and Dance, FA-205, Nunn Dr., Highland Heights, KY, 41099-1007; Ken Jones, chair, jonesk@nku.edu; www.nku.edu/~theatre/; 859-572-6362; BFA in dance

Western Kentucky University

Department of Theatre and Dance, Gordon Wilson Hall, 1906 College Heights Blvd., #71086, Bowling Green, KY, 42101-1086; Dr. David Young, dept. head, david.young@wku.edu; www.wku.edu/pcal/index.php?page=theatre-and-dance; 270-745-5845; B.A. in dance

LOUISIANA

Louisiana State University

Department of Theatre, 217 M & DA Building, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803; Kristin Sosnowsky, interim chair, theatre@lsu.edu; mtick1@lsu.edu; www.lsu.edu; 225-578-4174; Offers a minor in dance

Loyola University New Orleans

Department of Theatre Arts and Dance, 312 Marquette Hall, New Orleans, LA, 70118; Cheryl Conway, office manager, drama@loyno.edu; dance@loyno.edu; www.loyno.edu; 504-865-3840; Minor in ballet

Northwestern State University of Louisiana

School of Creative and Performing Arts, 150 Central Ave., Natchitoches, LA, 71497; Scott Burrell, coordinator of theater and dance, nfburrellc@nsula.edu; theatre.nsula.edu; 318-357-6891 or 318-357-4483; B.S. in theater (with concentration in dance)

Tulane University

Department of Theatre and Dance, 215 McWilliams Hall, New Orleans, LA, 70118; Marty Sachs, chair, msachs@tulane.edu; www.tulane.edu; 504-314-7760; B.A. or BFA in dance

University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Department of Performing Arts, McLaurin Hall, Room 109, P.O. Box 43690, Lafayette, LA, 70504-3690; Jennifer Potter, administrative assistant, performingarts@louisiana.edu; www.pfar.louisiana.edu; 337-482-6357; BFA in performing arts (with a concentration in dance)

MAINE

Bowdoin College

Department of Theater and Dance, 9100 College Station, Brunswick, ME, 04011-8491; Noma Petroff, dept. coordinator, theater-dance@bowdoin.edu; academic.bowdoin.edu/theaterdance; 207-725-3663; Minor in dance

MARYLAND

Goucher College

Department of Dance, 1021 Dulaney Valley Road, Baltimore, MD, 21204; Elizabeth Ahearn, chair; Sara Thomson, program assistant, goucherdance@goucher.edu; www.goucher.edu; 410-337-6390 or 800-468-2437; B.A. in dance (with tracks in performance, dance education, dance science, dance therapy, dance administration, choreography, dance history and criticism, dance and theater)

Towson University

Department of Dance, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD, 21252; dance@towson.edu; www.towson.edu; 410-704-2760; BFA and B.S, in dance

University of Maryland, College Park

School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, 2810 Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, College Park, MD, 20742-1610; Daniel MacLean Wagner, professor and director, tdps@umd.edu; www.tdps.umd.edu; 301-405-6676; B.A. in dance

MASSACHUSETTS

Amherst College

Department of Theater and Dance, 27 Webster Hall, Amherst, MA, 01002; Linda T. Celi, academic dept. coordinator, ltceli@amherst.edu; www.amherst.edu; 413-542-2411; B.A. in dance

The Boston Conservatory

Theater Division, 8 The Fenway, Boston, MA, 02215; Neil Donohoe, director, admissions@bostonconservatory.edu; www.bostonconservatory.edu; 617-912-9153 or 617-536-6340; BFA in dance

Emerson College

Department of Performing Arts, 120 Boylston St., Boston, MA, 02116; Eric Weiss, performing arts admission coordinator, stagedoor@emerson.edu; www.emerson.edu; 617-824-8780; Offers minor in dance

Mount Holyoke College

Department of Dance: 104 Kendall Sports & Dance Complex, South Hadley, MA, 01075; Terese Freedman, chair, dance@mtholyoke.edu; www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/dance; 413-538-2118; B.A. in dance

Smith College

Theatre Department, Mendenhall Center for Performing Arts, Northampton, MA, 01063; Ellen W. Kaplan, dept. chair, ekaplan@smith.edu; www.smith.edu; 413-585-3201; B.A. in dance

Tufts University

Department of Drama and Dance, Aidekman Arts Center, 40 Talbot Avenue, Medford, MA, 02155; Downing Cless, chair, downing.cless@tufts.edu; ase.tufts.edu/drama-dance; 617-627-3524; Offers minor in dance

MICHIGAN

Hope College

Department of Dance, 168 East 13th St., Holland, MI, 49423; M. Linda Graham, graham@hope.edu; www.hope.edu/academic/dance; 616-395-7700; B.A. in dance

Michigan State University

Department of Theatre, 113 Auditorium Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824; Dr. George F. Peters, dept. chair, theatre@msu.edu; www.theatre.msu.edu; 517-355-6690; Offers minor in dance

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

Department of Dance, 3501 Dance Bldg., 1310 University Court, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2217; Samantha Strayer, administrator, sstrayer@umich.edu; www.music.umich.edu/departments/dance; 734-763-7558; BFA in dance

University of Michigan - Flint

Department of Theater and Dance, Theatre 238, Flint, MI, 48502-1950; Lauren Friesen, chair, lfriesen@umflint.edu; www.umflint.edu/theatredance; 810-762-3230; B.A. in dance

Wayne State University

Department of Theater or Maggie Allesee Department of Dance, 4841 Cass Ave., Ste. 3225, Detroit, MI, 48202; theatre@wayne.edu; dance@wayne.edu; www.theatre.wayne.edu; www.dance.wayne.edu; 313-577-3508 (theater); 313-577-4273 (dance); BFA or B.S. in dance

MINNESOTA

Gustavus Adolphus College

Theater and Dance Department, 800 W. College Ave., St. Peter, MN, 56082-1498; aseham@gac.edu; www.gustavus.edu; 507-933-7353; B.A. in dance

Minnesota State University, Mankato

Department of Theater and Dance, 201 Performing Arts Center, Mankato, MN, 56001; Paul Hustoles, chair, www.msutheatre.com; 507-389-2125 or 2118; B.A. or BFA in dance

St. Olaf College

Department of Dance, 1520 St. Olaf Ave., Northfield, MN, 55057; jroberts@stolaf.edu; www.stolaf.edu; 507-786-3240; B.A. in dance

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Department of Theater Arts and Dance, Barbara Barker Center for Dance, 500 21st Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN, 55455-0480; umdance@umn.edu; dance.umn.edu; 612-624-5060; B.A. and BFA in dance

Winona State University

Theater and Dance Department, P.O. Box 5838, Winona, MN, 55987-5838; Gretchen Cohenour, dance director; Jim Williams, chair, gcohenour@winona.edu; www.winona.edu/thad/; 507-457-5230; Offers a minor in dance

MISSISSIPPI

University of Southern Mississippi

Department of Theater and Dance, 118 College Drive, Box 5052, Hattiesburg, MS, 39406-0001; theatre@usm.edu; dance@usm.edu; www.usm.edu/theatre; 601-266-4994 (theater); 601-266-4161 (dance); B.A. in dance

MISSOURI

Avila University

Department of Theater, 11901 Wornall Road, Kansas City, MO, 64145; Robert Foulk, robert.foulk@avila.edu; www.avila.edu; 816-501-2405; B.A. in dance

Lindenwood University

Fine & Performing Arts Division, 209 S. Kings Highway, St. Charles, MO, 63301; mparker@lindenwood.edu; www.lindenwood.edu; 636-949-4906; B.A. in dance

Missouri State University

Department of Theater and Dance, 901 S. National Ave., Springfield, MO, 65897; Mark Templeton, managing director, theatreanddance@missouristate.edu; www.theatreanddance.missouristate.edu; 417-836-4400; BFA in dance

Missouri Valley College

Division of Fine Arts, 500 E. College St., Marshall, MO, 65340; maland@moval.edu; www.moval.edu; 660-831-4215; B.A. in dance

Northwest Missouri State University

Department of Communication, Theater, and Languages, 148 Wells Hall, Maryville, MO, 64468; jkreizi@nwmissouri.edu; www.nwmissouri.edu/dept/ctl; 660-562-1172; Offers minor in dance

Southeast Missouri State University

Department of Theater and Dance, One University Plaza MS2800, Cape Girardeau, MO, 63701; theatreanddance@semo.edu; www.semo.edu; 573-651-2149

Stephens College

School of the Performing Arts, Theater Department, Box 2077, Columbia, MO, 65215; Beth Leonard, chair, bleonard@stephens.edu; www.stephens.edu; 573-876-7194

Washington University in St. Louis

Performing Arts Department, 1 Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1108, St. Louis, MO, 63130-4899; pad@artsci.wustl.edu; pad.artsci.wustl.edu; 314-935-5858; B.A. in dance

Webster University

Conservatory of Theatre Arts/Department of Dance, 470 E. Lockwood Ave., St. Louis, MO, 63119; Dottie Marshall Englis, chair (theater); Beckah Reed, chair (dance), marshado@webster.edu; voigtbe@webster.edu; www.webster.edu; www.webster.edu/dance; 314-968-6929; BFA in dance

MONTANA

The University of Montana

School of Theatre & Dance and Montana Repertory Theatre, PARTV Center Room 197, Missoula, MT, 59812-8136; umtheatredance@umontana.edu; www.umt.edu/theatredance; 406-243-4481; B.A. or BFA in dance

NEVADA

University of Nevada, Reno

Department of Theatre and Dance-228, Reno, NV, 89557; Rob Gander, chair, rgander@unr.edu; www.unr.edu/cla/theatredance; 775-784-6839; Offers minor in dance

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Keene State College

Department of Theater Arts and Dance, 229 Main St., Keene, NH, 03435-2407; Daniel L. Patterson, chair, naubrey@keene.edu; academics.keene.edu/tad; 603-358-2162; B.A. in dance

Plymouth State University

Department of Music, Theater, and Dance, MSC 37, 17 High St., Plymouth, NH, 03264-1595; Jonathan C. Santore, Ph.D., chair, mtd_dept@plymouth.edu; www.plymouth.edu/mtd; 603-535-2334; Offers minor in dance

University of New Hampshire

Department of Theatre and Dance, Paul Creative Arts Center, D-22, 30 College Rd., Durham, NH, 03824; Chris Peabody, administrative assistant, c.peabody@unh.edu; www.unh.edu/theatre-dance; 603-862-2919 or 603-862-0093; B.A. in dance

NEW JERSEY

Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers

33 Livingston Ave., New Brunswick, NJ, 08901; Mandy Feiler, admissions officer, mfelier@masongross.rutgers.edu; www.masongross.rutgers.edu; 732-932-9891 (theater); 732-932-8497 (dance); BFA or B.A. in dance

Montclair State University

College of the Arts, Department of Theater and Dance, Upper Montclair, NJ, 07043; Eric Diamond, dept. chair; Lori Ketterhenry, dance program coordinator, eric.diamond@montclair.edu; www.montclair.edu/arts; 973-655-7343 (Mr. Diamond); 973-655-7080 (Ms. Ketterhenry); B.A. in dance education, BFA in dance.

Rowan University

Department of Theater and Dance, Bunce Hall, 201 Mullica Hill Road, Glassboro, NJ, 08028; Elisabeth Hostetter, advisement coordinator, hostetter@rowan.edu; www.rowan.edu/colleges/fpa/theatre_dance; 856-256-4030; B.A. in theater with a concentration in dance

NEW MEXICO

University of New Mexico

Department of Theater and Dance, MSC04 2570, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001; theatre@unm.edu; dance@unm.edu; theatre.unm.edu; 505-277-4332 (theater); 505-277-3660 (dance); B.A. in dance

NEW YORK

Adelphi University

Performing Arts Center, Rm. 251, P.O. Box 701, Garden City, NY, 11530-0701; Nicholas Petron, chair (theater); Frank Augustyn, chair (dance), petron@adelphi.edu (theater); augustyn@adelphi.edu (dance); academics.adelphi.edu/artsci/pfa/acting/apply.php; 516-877-4930 (theater); 516-877-4250 (dance); BFA in dance

The Ailey School

The Joan Weill Center for Dance, 405 W. 55th St., New York, NY, 10019; bfa@alvinailey.org; www.theaileyschool.edu; 212-405-9000; BFA in dance (with Fordham University)

Alfred University

Division of Performing Arts/Theater, Miller Performing Arts Center, 1 Saxon Drive, Alfred, NY, 14802-1232; Dr. Lisa Lantz, division chair, performs@alfred.edu; las.alfred.edu/performing-arts; 607-871-2562; Offers minor in dance

American Musical and Dramatic Academy

211 W. 61st St., New York, NY, 10023; David Dent Martin, artistic director, info@amda.edu; www.amda.edu; 800-367-7908; Two-year conservatory program in dance

Bard College

Division of the Arts, Theater and Dance Program, P.O. Box 5000, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY, 12504; admission@bard.edu; dance@bard.edu; www.bard.edu; 845-758-7936; B.A. in dance

Barnard College

Columbia University, Department of Theatre, 5th Floor, Milbank Hall, 3009 Broadway, New York, NY, 10027; W.B. Worten, chair (theater); Mary Cochran, chair (dance);, mplacito@barnard.edu (theater dept. asst.); dance@barnard.edu; www.barnard.edu/theatre; www.barnard.edu/dance; 212-854-2080 (theater), 212-854-2995 (dance); B.A. in dance

Cornell University

Department of Theater, Film, and Dance, Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, 430 College Ave., Ithaca, NY, 14850; theatre@cornell.edu; www.cornell.edu; 607-254-2700; B.A. in dance

Dance Theatre of Harlem School

466 W. 152nd St., New York, NY, 10031; Endalyn Taylor, school administrator, info@dancetheatreofharlem.org; nheyward@dancetheatreofharlem.org; www.dancetheatreofharlem.org; 212-690-2800; Conservatory

Hofstra University

Department of Drama and Dance, 112 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY, 11549-1120; David Henderson, chair; Rachel List, director of dance, rachel.list@hofstra.edu or anita.feldman@hofstra.edu; www.hofstra.edu; 516-463-5444; B.A. in dance, B.S. in dance education, or minor in dance

Hunter College

Dance Program, 695 Park Ave., THH 614, New York, NY, 10021; jfeinman@hunter.cuny.edu; www.hunter.cuny.edu/~dance; 212-772-5012; B.A. in dance

The Joffrey Ballet

434 Avenue of the Americas, 5th Fl., New York, NY, 10011; joffrey@joffreyballetschool.com; www.joffreyballetschool.com; 212-254-8520; Conservatory

The Juilliard School

Dance Division, 60 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY, 10023; Lawrence Rhodes, artistic director (dance); Sarah Adriance, administrative director (dance), www.juilliard.edu; 212-799-5000, ext. 255; BFA in dance

Long Island University

C.W. Post Campus, Theatre, Film, Dance, & Arts Management, 720 Northern Blvd., Brookville, NY, 11548; Cara Gargano, cgargano@liu.edu; www.liu.edu; 516-299-2353; BFA in dance

Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus

Department of Dance, 1 University Plaza, Brooklyn, NY, 11201-8423; jstuart@liu.edu; www.liu.edu; 718-488-1075; BFA in dance or performance and choreography, B.S. in dance or dance education

Martha Graham School of ContemPOrary Dance

316 E. 63rd St., New York, NY, 10021; info@marthagrahamdance.org; www.marthagraham.org/school; 212-838-5886; Non-degree program, conservatory

Merce Cunningham Studio

55 Bethune St., 11th floor, New York, NY, 10014; studio@merce.org; www.merce.org; 212-255-8240, ext. 30; Non-degree program

Nazareth College

Department of Theater Arts, 4245 East Ave., Rochester, NY, 14618; Lindsay Korth, chair, lkorth3@naz.edu; www.naz.edu; 595-389-2780; Offers minor in dance

New York University

Music and Performing Arts Professions, Dance Education Program, 35 W. Fourth St., Ste. 777, New York, NY, 10012; steinhardt.dance@nyu.edu; www.steinhardt.nyu.edu/music/dance; 212-998-5400; M.A. in dance education

Sarah Lawrence College

Theater Program/Dance Program, 1 Mead Way, Bronxville, NY, 10708-5999; Christine Farrell, director (theater), Sara Rudner, director (dance), pmcgrath@sarahlawrence.edu; cfarrell@sarahlawrence.edu; srudner@sarahlawrence.edu; www.slc.edu; 914-395-2614 (theater) or 914-395-2433 (dance); B.A. in liberal arts (dance)

SUNY BrockPOrt

Department of Theater, 1101 Tower Fine Arts Center, Brockport, NY, 14420; P. Gibson Ralph, chair (theater); Jacqueline Davis, interim chair (dance), theatre@brockport.edu; www.brockport.edu/theatre/; www.brockport.edu/dance; 585-395-2478 (theater); 585-395-2153 (dance); B.A., B.S., or BFA in dance

SUNY Fredonia

Department of Theater & Dance, 212 Rockefeller Arts Center, Fredonia, NY, 14063; theatre.dance@fredonia.edu; www.fredonia.edu/department/theatredance; 716-673-3596; B.A. in theater with a minor in dance

SUNY Geneseo

School of the Arts, One College Circle, Geneseo, NY, 14454; johnston@geneseo.edu; www.geneseo.edu; 585-245-5841; Minor in dance

University at Buffalo

College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Theater & Dance, 285 Alumni Arena, Buffalo, NY, 14260-5030; td-theatredance@buffalo.edu; www.theatredance.buffalo.edu; 716-645-6897; B.A. or BFA in dance

Wagner College

Theatre Department, One Campus Road, Staten Island, NY, 10301; fruff@wagner.edu; www.wagner.edu/departments/theatre; 718-390-3223; Offers minor in dance

NORTH CAROLINA

Appalachian State University

Department of Theater and Dance, P.O. Box 32123, Boone, NC, 28608-2123; asutheatre@appstate.edu; www.theatre.appstate.edu; 828-262-3028; B.A. in dance

East Carolina University

School of Theater & Dance, Messick Theatre Arts Center, 1001 E. 5th St., Greenville, NC, 27858; theatre@ecu.edu; www.theatre-dance.ecu.edu; 252-328-6390; B.A. in dance

Elon University

Department of Performing Arts, Campus Box 2800, Elon, NC, 27244; krippy@elon.edu; www.elon.edu/perarts; 336-278-5600; BFA in dance

Greensboro College

Theater Department, 815 W. Market St., Greensboro, NC, 27401; schramd@greensborocollege.edu; www.greensborocollege.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 243

Lees-McRae College

Division of Performing Arts, P.O. Box 128, Banner Elk, NC, 28604; Janet Barton Speer, speerj@lmc.edu; www.lmc.edu; 828-898-8721; B.A. in dance

University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Department of Theater, P.O. Box 26170, Greensboro, NC, 27402-6170; Jim Fisher, head, nrshephe@uncg.edu (theater); dance@uncg.edu; performingarts.uncg.edu; 336-334-4032 (theater); 336-334-5570 (dance); B.A. or BFA in dance; Dance: Department of Dance, 323 HHP Bldg., Greensboro, NC 27402-6170

Wake Forest University

Department of Theater & Dance, P.O. Box 7264, Winston-Salem, NC, 27109; theatre@wfu.edu; www.wfu.edu/theatre; 336-758-5294; Offers minor in dance

Western Carolina University

School of Stage and Screen, 246 Central Dr., ST233, Cullowhee, NC, 28723; Thomas Salzman, director, tmsalzman@wcu.edu; www.wcu.edu; 828-227-7491; Offers a minor in dance

OHIO

Kent State University

School of Theater and Dance, B 141 Music & Speech Ctr., Kent, OH, 44242-0001; Cynthia Stillings, director, theatre@kent.edu; dance@kent.edu; www.theatre.kent.edu; 330-672-2082 (theater); 330-672-2069 (dance); B.A. in dance

Oberlin College

Theater and Dance Program, 30 N. Professor St., Warner Center, Oberlin, OH, 44074; janice.sanborn@oberlin.edu; new.oberlin.edu/arts-and-sciences/departments/theater_dance; 440-775-8152; B.A. in dance

The Ohio State University

Department of Theatre, Drake Performance and Event Center, 1849 Cannon Drive, Columbus, OH, 43210-1266; Beth Josephsen Simon, coordinator (theater); Susan Van Pelt Petry, chair (dance), theatre-ugrad@osu.edu; dance@osu.edu; theatre.osu.edu; www.dance.osu.edu; 614-292-5821 (theater); 614-292-7977 (dance); BFA in dance

Ohio University

School of Dance, Putnam Hall 137, Athens, OH 45701-2979; dance@ohio.edu; www.finearts.ohio.edu/dance (dance); 740-593-1826 (dance); B.A. or BFA in dance

Otterbein University

Department of Theatre and Dance, 30 S. Grove St., Westerville, OH, 43081; jstefano@otterbein.edu; www.otterbein.edu/theatre; 614-823-1657; BFA in musical theater (with concentration in dance), minor in dance

University of Akron

School of Dance, Theatre, and Arts Administration, Akron, OH, 44325-1005; theatre@uakron.edu; www.uakron.edu/dtaa; 330-972-7890; B.A. or BFA in dance

University of Cincinnati College - Conservatory of Music

Division of Opera, Musical Theater, Drama, and Arts Administration (OMDA)/Division of Dance, P.O. Box 210003, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0003; Dr. Alan Yaffe (theater), Shellie Cash (dance), yaffea@ucmail.uc.edu (theater), cashsb@ucmail.uc.edu (dance); www.ccm.uc.edu; 513-556-5803; BFA in dance

Wright State University

Department of Theatre, Dance, and Motion Pictures, Dayton, OH, 45435; Stuart McDowell, stuart.mcdowell@wright.edu, victoria.oleen@wright.edu; www.wright.edu/academics/theatre; 937-775-3072; BFA in dance

Youngstown State University

Department of Theater and Dance, 1 University Plaza, Youngstown, OH, 44555-0002; facastronovo@ysu.edu; www.fpa.ysu.edu; 330-941-3000; B.A. in dance management, offers a minor in dance

OKLAHOMA

Oklahoma City University

2501 N. Blackwelder Ave., Oklahoma City, OK, 73106-1493; David Herendeen, director (music theater and theater); Melanie Shelley, associate dean; Jennifer Polvado, audition coordinator (dance), dherendeen@okcu.edu (theater); jpolvado@okcu.edu (dance); www.okcu.edu/theatre; www.okcu.edu/dance_amgt; 405-208-5710; 405-208-5644 (dance); BPA in performance or B.S. in dance management or American dance pedagogy

Oral Roberts University

Department of Communication, Arts and Media, 7777 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa, OK, 74171; lholland@oru.edu; amcintosh@oru.edu (dance); www.oru.edu; 918-495-6870; B.A. in dance performance

University of Central Oklahoma

Department of Theater Arts/Department of Dance, 100 N. University Dr., Box 86 (theater)/Box 189 (dance), Edmond, OK, 73034-5209; Daisy Nystul, chair (theater); Jamie Jacobson, chair (dance), dnystul@uco.edu (theater); jjacobson@uco.edu (dance); www.uco.edu; www.uco.edu/cfad/academics/dance; 405-974-5004 (theater); 405-974-5231 (dance); BFA in dance or B.A. Ed in dance education

University of Oklahoma

School of Dance, 560 Parrington Oval, Rm. 1000, Norman , OK 73019-0319; Mary Margaret Holt, director (dance), dance@ou.edu; finearts.ou.edu; 405-325-4051 (dance); BFA in dance

OREGON

Western Oregon University

Department of Theatre and Dance, 345 N. Monmouth Ave., Monmouth, OR, 97361; Lenore Eliassen, willisk@wou.edu; www.wou.edu; 503-838-8461; B.A. or B.S., offers a minor in dance

Willamette University

Department of Theatre, 900 State St., Salem, OR, 97301; scoromel@willamette.edu; www.willamette.edu; 503-370-6222; B.A. in theater with a dance emphasis

PENNSYLVANIA

California University of Pennsylvania

Department of Theater and Dance, 250 University Ave., Box 16, California, PA, 15419-1394; Michael J. Slavin, Chair, slavin@calu.edu, walmsley@calu.edu; www.calu.edu; 724-938-4220 or 4221; Offers a minor in dance

DeSales University

Department of Performing Arts, 2755 Station Ave., Center Valley, PA, 18034-9568; Dennis Razze, chair (theater); Tim Cowart, chair (dance), dennis.razze@desales.edu (theater); timothy.cowart@desales.edu (dance); www.desales.edu/arts; 610-282-1100; B.A. in dance

Dickinson College

Department of Theater & Dance, Carlisle, PA, 17013; Dr. Karen Kirkham, associate professor, theatre&dance@dickinson.edu; www.dickinson.edu/academics/programs/theatre-and-dance; 717-245-1239

Franklin and Marshall College

Department of Theatre, Dance & Film, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA, 17604-3003; admission@fandm.edu or jsimeral@fandm.edu; www.fandm.edu/theatre; 717-291-4017; B.A. in dance

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Department of Theater and Dance, 104 Waller Hall, 401 S. 11th St., Indiana, PA, 15705; brjones@iup.edu; www.arts.iup.edu/theater; 724-357-2965; B.A. in interdisciplinary fine arts (emphasis in dance)

Marywood University

Department of Communication Arts, 2300 Adams Ave., Scranton, PA, 18509; merchel@es.marywood.edu; www.marywood.edu; 570-348-6209; B.A. in dance

Muhlenberg College

Department of Theatre & Dance, Trexler Pavilion for Theatre & Dance, 2400 Chew St., Allentown, PA, 18104-5586; bien@muhlenberg.edu; www.muhlenberg.edu/theatre&dance; 484-664-3335; B.A. in dance

Point Park University

Conservatory of Performing Arts, Department of Theater or Department of Dance, 201 Wood St., Pittsburgh, PA, 15222; John Shepard, chair (theater); Susan Stowe, chair (dance), www.pointpark.edu; 412-392-3450; B.A. and BFA in dance

Seton Hill University

Theater and Dance Program, 1 Seton Hill Dr., Greensburg, PA, 15601-1599; cross@setonhill.edu; www.setonhilltheatre.edu; 724-552-2900; B.A. in dance

Slippery Rock University

Department of Theater or Department of Dance, Lang Performing Arts Center, 500 College Ave., Slippery Rock, PA, 16057; Rebecca Lindey, dept. secretary (theater); Lisa Smith, dept. secretary (dance); Ursula Payne, chair (dance), rebecca.lindey@sru.edu (theater); ursula.payne@sru.edu (dance); www.sru.edu; 724-738-2474 (theater); 724-738-2036 (dance); B.A. or minor in dance

Swarthmore College

Department of Theater or Department of Music and Dance, Lang Performing Arts Center, 500 College Ave., Swarthmore, PA, 19081; Allen Kuharski, chair (theater); Sharon E. Friedler, director of the dance program, jtierno1@swarthmore.edu (theater); dance@swarthmore.edu; www.swarthmore.edu; 610-328-8149 (theater); 610-328 -8227 (dance chair); B.A. in dance

Temple University

Theater Department, Tomlinson Theater, Room 210A, 1301 W. Norris St., Philadelphia, PA, 19122; Roberta Sloan, chair (theater); Philip Grosser, program director (dance), theater@temple.edu; boyer@temple.edu; www.temple.edu; 215-204-8414 (theater); 215-204-5169 (dance); BFA in dance

University of the Arts

Ira Brind School of Theater Arts or School of Dance, 320 S. Broad St., Philadelphia, PA, 19102; info@uarts.edu; www.uarts.edu/sota; 215-717-6049 admissions 215-717-6450 theater office; BFA in ballet, jazz, and modern dance

Wilkes University

Department of Visual & Performing Arts, Dorothy Dickson Darte Center, 84 W. South St., Wilkes-Barre, PA, 18766; Joseph C. Dawson, chair, joseph.dawson@wilkes.edu; www.wilkes.edu/pages/382.asp; 507-408-4417; Offers a minor in dance

York College of Pennsylvania

Department of English and Humanities, Theater Major, York, PA, 17405-7199; jmcghee@ycp.edu; www.ycp.edu; 717-815-1401; Offers a minor in dance

RHODE ISLAND

Brown University

Department of Theater, Speech, and Dance, P.O. Box 1897, 77 Waterman St., Providence, RI, 02912; taps@brown.edu; www.brown.edu; 401-863-3283; B.A. in dance

Providence College

Department of Theater, Dance & Film, 1 Cunningham Square, Providence, RI, 02918; jgarrity@providence.edu; www.providence.edu; 401-865-2327; B.A. in dance

Salve Regina University

Theater Arts Department, 100 Ochre Point Ave., Newport, RI, 02840-4192; Patricia Hawkridge, chair, www.salve.edu; 401-341-3163; B.A. in dance

SOUTH CAROLINA

Columbia College

Department of Theater or Department of Dance, 1301 Columbia College Dr., Columbia, SC, 29203; Dr. Helen Tate (theater); Wrenn Cook, chair (dance), www.columbiacollegesc.edu; 803-786-3749 (theater); 803-786-3749 (dance); B.A. in dance or dance education with certification, BFA in dance performance and choreography, and minor in dance

University of South Carolina

USC Dance Program, 324 Sumter St., Columbia SC 29208; Susan Anderson, director of dance, dance@sc.edu; www.cas.sc.edu/dance; 803-777-5636 (dance); B.A. in dance

Winthrop University

Department of Theater and Dance, 115 Johnson Hall, Rock Hill, SC, 29733; Andrew Vorder Bruegge, Ph.D., theaterdance@winthrop.edu; www.winthrop.edu/cvpa/theatredance/default.aspx; 803-323-2287; B.A. in dance

TENNESSEE

University of Memphis

Department of Theater and Dance, 144 Theater Communication Building, Memphis, TN, 38152-3150; kshupe@memphis.edu; www.memphis.edu; 901-678-2523; BFA in dance

TEXAS

Baylor University

Theater Arts Department, One Bear Place, Box 97262, Waco, TX, 76798; lisa_denman@baylor.edu; www.baylor.edu/theatre; 254-710-1861; Minor in dance

Houston Ballet Ben Stevenson Academy

601 Preston St., Houston, TX, 77002; Stanton Welch, artistic director, hbacademy@houstonballet.org; www.houstonballet.org; 713-523-6300; Conservatory

Sam Houston State University

Department of Theater and Dance, Box 2297, Huntsville, TX, 77341-2297; Penelope Hasekoester, chair (theater); Jennifer Pontius, coordinator (dance), theatre@shsu.edu; www.shsu.edu/~drm_www/; www.shsu.edu/~dnc_www/ (dance); 936-294-1329; BFA in dance

Southern Methodist University

Meadows School of the Arts, Division of Theater/Division of Dance, P.O. Box 750356, Dallas, TX, 75275-0356; Stan Wojewodski, Jr., chair; Kevin Paul Hofeditz, chair (dance), theatre@smu.edu; hguthrie@mail.smu.edu; www.smu.edu/meadows/areasofstudy/theatre.aspx; www.smu.edu/meadows/areasofstudy/dance.aspx; 214-768-2558; BFA in dance

Texas Christian University

Department of Theater, P.O. Box 297510, , Fort Worth, TX, 76129; Harry Parker, chair (theater); Ellen Page Shelton, chair (dance), theatre@tcu.edu; www.cfac.tcu.edu; www.dance.tcu.edu; 817-257-7625; BFA in ballet or modern dance

Texas State University -

San Marcos

Division of Dance, 178 Jowers Center, San Marcos, TX 78666; LeAnne Smith, director (dance), ls14@txstate.edu (dance); www.theatreanddance.txstate.edu; 512-245-2949 (dance); BFA in dance

Texas Tech University

Department of Theater and Dance, P.O. Box 42061, Lubbock, TX, 79409-2061; fred.christoffel@ttu.edu; www.ttu.edu; 806-742-3601; B.A. in dance

Texas Woman's University

Department of Music and Drama, P.O. Box 425768, Denton, TX, 76204-4254; dance@twu.edu; www.twu.edu/dance 940-898-2086; B.A. in dance

University of Texas at Austin

Department of Theatre and Dance, College of Fine Arts, 1 University Station, D3900, Austin, TX, 78712-0362; inquiry@uts.cc.utexas.edu; www.finearts.utexas.edu/tad; 512-471-5793; BFA in dance

University of Texas at El Paso

Department of Theater & Dance, 500 W. University Ave., FOX 371D, El Paso, TX, 79968-0549; Joel K. Murray, Ph.D, theater dept. chair; Lisa Smith, dance dept. head, www.theatredance.utep.edu; 915-747-5146; B.A. in dance with teaching certification, BFA in dance

UTAH

Brigham Young University

Department of Theater and Media Arts, D-581 Harris Fine Arts Center, Provo, UT, 84602-6405; Rodger Sorensen, chair (theater); Marilyn Berrett, chair (dance), tma_secretary@byu.edu (theater); dance@byu.edu; www.byu.edu; dance.byu.edu; 801-422-6645; 801-422-5086 (dance); B.A. in dance

Southern Utah University

Department of Theater Arts & Dance, 351 W. University Blvd., Cedar City, UT, 84720; marchantj@suu.edu; www.suu.edu; 435-586-7746; B.A. in dance performance or education

University of Utah

Department of Modern Dance, 330 South 1500 East, Rm. 106, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-0170; Stephen Koester, chair, stephen.koester@utah.edu; www.dance.utah.edu; 801-581-7327; BFA in dance, minor in dance

VERMONT

Bennington College

Dance/Drama Program, 1 College Drive, Bennington, VT, 05201; lhurley@bennington.edu; www.bennington.edu; 802-440-4547; B.A. in dance

Middlebury College

Department of Theatre and Dance, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury, VT, 05753; admissions@middlebury.edu; www.middlebury.edu; 802-443-5601; 802-443-5245 (dance); B.A. in dance

VIRGINIA

College of William and Mary

Department of Theatre, Speech, and Dance, P.O. Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA, 23187-8795; jsgava@wm.edu; www.wm.edu/theatre; 757-221-2660; B.A. in interdisciplinary studies (combining dance and theater)

James Madison University

School of Theater and Dance, 147 Warsaw Ave., MSC 5601, Harrisonburg, VA, 22807; William Buck, director (theater); Shane O'Hara, director (dance), theatredance@jmu.edu; www.jmu.edu/theatre; 540-568-6342; B.A. with concentration in dance

Radford University

Department of Theater and Cinema, P.O. Box 6969, Radford, VA, 24142; Carl H. Lefko (theater), Margaret Devaney (dance), clefko@radford.edu (theater); mdevaney@radford.edu (dance); theatre.asp.radford.edu/; www.radford.edu/dance; 540-831-5012; B.A. in dance

Shenandoah University

Shenandoah Conservatory, 1460 University Dr., Winchester, VA, 22601; conservatory@su.edu; www.su.edu; 540-665-4545 (theater); 540-665-4565 (dance); 540-665-4581 or 800-432-2266 (admissions); B.A. or BFA in dance

University of Richmond

Department of Theater & Dance, Modlin Center for the Arts, Richmond, VA, 23173; dmullin@richmond.edu; theatredance.richmond.edu; 804-289-8592; B.A. in dance

University of Virginia

Department of Drama, 109 Culbreth Road, P.O. Box 400128, Charlottesville, VA, 22904-4128; drama@virginia.edu; www.virginia.edu/drama; 434-924-3326; Offers a minor in dance

Virginia Commonwealth University

School of the Arts, Department of Dance and Choreography, P.O. Box 843007, 1315 Floyd Ave., Richmond, VA, 23284; Dr. James Frazier, chair, dance@vcu.edu; www.vcu.edu/arts/dance/dept; 804-828-1711; BFA in dance and choreography

WASHINGTON

Cornish College of the Arts

Theater Department or Dance Department, Main Campus Center, 1000 Lenora St., Seattle, WA, 98121; Richard E.T. White, chair (theater); Kitty Daniels, chair (dance), admissions@cornish.edu; www.cornish.edu; 206-726-5042 (theater), 206-726-5079 (dance); BFA in dance

Pacific Northwest Ballet School

301 Mercer St., 1000 Lenora St., Seattle, WA, 98109; Peter Boal, school director, pnbschool@pnb.org; www.pnb.org; 206-441-2435; Conservatory

University of Washington

Dance Program, Meany Hall, Box 351150, Seattle, WA, 98195-1150; Elizabeth Cooper, dance program director, uwdance@u.washington.edu; depts.washington.edu/uwdance; 206-543-9843; B.A. in dance

Western Washington University

Theatre & Dance Department, 516 High St., Performing Arts Center 395, Bellingham, WA, 98225-9060; Deborah Currier, chair; Cher Carnell, associated chair; Sherena Geariety, dance program coordinator, deb.currier@wwu.edu; cher.carnell@wwu.edu; sherena.geariety@wwu.edu ; www.wwu.edu/theatre; www.wwu.edu/dance; 360-650-3876; B.A., BFA, or minor in dance

WEST VIRGINIA

West Virginia University

College of Creative Arts, Division of Theater & Dance, P.O. Box 6111, Morgantown, WV, 26506-6111; Dr. Yoav Kaddar, director of dance, theatre@mail.wvu.edu; theatre.wvu.edu; 304-293-2020; Offers a minor in dance

West Virginia Wesleyan College

Department of Theater & Dance, 59 College Ave., WVWC MSC 72, Buckhannon, WV, 26201; Gregory Mach, dept. chair, mach@wvwc.edu; www.wvwc.edu; 304-473-8855; Offers a minor in dance

WISCONSIN

University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire

Department of Music and Theatre Arts, Haas Fine Arts Center 156, Eau Claire, WI, 54702-4004; musicandtheatre@uwec.edu; www.uwec.edu/mus-the; 715-836-4954; Offers a minor in dance

University of Wisconsin - Green Bay

Department of Theater and Dance, 2420 Nicolet Dr., Green Bay, WI, 54311-7001; Laura Riddle, riddle@uwgb.edu; www.uwgb.edu/performarts; 920-465-2348; Offers a minor in dance

University of Wisconsin - Madison

Dance Program, Lathrop Hall, 1050 University Ave., 821 University Ave., Madison, WI, 53706; uwdance@education.wisc.edu; www.dance.wisc.edu; 608-262-1691; BFA or B.S. in dance

University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Peck School of the Arts, Department of Theater or Department of Dance, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201; Leroy Stoner, chair (theater); Ed Burgess, chair (dance), theatreinfo@uwm.edu; danceinfo@uwm.edu; arts.uwm.edu/theatre; arts.uwm.edu/dance; 414-229-4947 (theater), 414-229-2571 (dance); B.A. in dance, early childhood through adolescence teacher certification; BFA in performance & choreography with tracks in African diaspora or contemporary dance

University of Wisconsin - River Falls

Department of Communication Studies and Theater Arts, College of Arts and Sciences, B24 Kleinpell Fine Arts Building, 410 Third St., River Falls, WI, 54022; kenneth.w.stofferahn@uwrf.edu; www.uwrf.edu; 715-425-3101; Offers a minor in dance

University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point

Department of Theatre & Dance, Noel Fine Arts Center, Room 161, 1800 Portage St., Stevens Point, WI, 54481; Stephen Trovillion Smith, acting program coordinator; Joan Karlen, dance program coordinator, theatre@uwsp.edu; dance@uwsp.edu; www.uwsp.edu/theatre-dance; 715-346-4429 (theater); 715-346-3982 (dance); B.A. or B.S. in dance

University of Wisconsin - Whitewater

Theatre/Dance Department, Greenhill Center of the Arts, 800 W. Main St., Whitewater, WI, 53190-1790; altermas@uww.edu; www.uww.edu/cac/theatre; 262-472-1566; Offers a minor in dance

WYOMING

Casper College

Department of Theater and Dance, 125 College Drive, Casper, WY, 82601; www.caspercollege.edu/theatre_dance/index.html; 307-268-2365; A.A. in dance

University of Wyoming

Department of Theater and Dance, Dept. 3951, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY, 82071-3951; jchapman@uwyo.edu; www.uwyo.edu/th&d; 307-766-2198; B.A. in dance performance; BFA in dance performance or dance science

Graduate Programs

ARIZONA

Arizona State University

Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, School of Dance, P.O. Box 870304, Tempe, AZ 85287-0304; Simon Dove, director, School of Dance, jeanette.beck@asu.edu (dance); dance.asu.edu; 480-965-5029 (dance); MFA in dance

University of Arizona

School of Dance: P.O. Box 210093, 1713 E. University Blvd., Ina Gittings Bldg. Rm 121, Tucson, AZ 85721-0093; Jory Hancock, interim dean and director (dance), dance@email.arizona.edu; www.cfa.arizona.edu/dance; 520-621-4698 (dance); MFA in dance

CALIFORNIA

California Institute of the Arts

School of Theater; Sharon Disney Lund School of Dance, 24700 McBean Pkwy., Valencia, CA, 91355-2397; Travis Preston, dean (theater); Stephan Koplowitz, dean (dance), admissions@calarts.edu; www.calarts.edu; 661-255-1050; MFA in dance

California State University, Long Beach

Dance Department, Long Beach, CA, 90840; Sylvia Rodriguez-Scholz, assistant to the chair, publicrelations@calrep.org; www.csulb.edu/depts/dance; 562-985-2024; M.A. or MFA in dance

University of California, Los Angeles

Department of World Arts and Cultures, Glorya Kaufman Hall, 120 Westwood Plaza, Ste. 150, Box 951608, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1608; Angelia Leung, chair, wacinfo@arts.ucla.edu; www.wac.ucla.edu/; 310-825-3951 or 310-206-1342; MFA in dance (world arts and culture)

University of California, Riverside

Department of Dance, 900 University Ave., 121 Arts Bldg., Riverside, CA, 92521; Tracey J. Scholtemeyer, danceadvising@ucr.edu; dance.ucr.edu; 951-827-3944; MFA or Ph.D. in dance

University of California, San Diego

Department of Theater and Dance, 9500 Gilman Drive MC0344, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0344; Allyson Green, dance dept. chair; Kyle Donnelly, head of acting, meward@ucsd.edu (graduate); lajimenez@ucsd.edu (undergraduate); www.theatre.ucsd.edu; 858-534-3791; MFA in dance theater

COLORADO

University of Colorado

Department of Theater and Dance, 261 UCB, Boulder, CO, 80309-0261; Michelle Ellsworth, co-director (dance); Nada Diachenko, co-director (dance), michelle.ellsworth@colorado.edu; nada.diachenko@colorado.edu; www.colorado.edu/theatredance; 303-492-7355; MFA in dance

HAWAII

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Kennedy Theater, Department of Theatre and Dance, 1770 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI, 96822; Dennis Carroll, chair, theatre@hawaii.edu; www.hawaii.edu/theatre; 808-956-7677; M.A. or MFA in dance

ILLINOIS

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Department of Dance, 907 1/2 West Nevada, Urbana, IL, 61801; Jan Erkert, dept. head, dance@illinois.edu; www.dance.illinois.edu; 217-333-1010; MFA in dance

MARYLAND

University of Maryland, College Park

School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, 2810 Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, College Park, MD, 20742-1610; Daniel MacLean Wagner, professor and director, tdps@umd.edu; www.tdps.umd.edu; 301-405-6676; MFA in dance

MASSACHUSETTS

Smith College

Dance Department, Mendenhall Center for Performing Arts, Northampton, MA, 01063; Susan Kay Waltner, director of MFA in dance, swaltner@smith.edu (Ms. Waltner); www.smith.edu; 413-585-3201; 413-585-3236 (director); MFA in dance

MICHIGAN

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

Department of Dance, 3501 Dance Bldg., 1310 University Court, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2217; Samantha Strayer, administrator, sstrayer@umich.edu; www.music.umich.edu/departments/dance; 734-763-7558; MFA in dance

NEW MEXICO

University of New Mexico

Department of Theater and Dance, MSC04 2570, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001; theatre@unm.edu; dance@unm.edu; theatre.unm.edu; 505-277-4332 (theater); 505-277-3660 (dance); M.A. in dance or dance history, MFA in choreography or performance

NEW YORK

Sarah Lawrence College

Theater Program, 1 Mead Way, Bronxville, NY, 10708-5999; Dan Hurlin, director, dhurlin@sarahlawrence.edu; www.slc.edu; 914-395-2433; MFA in dance

SUNY Brockport

Department of Dance, 350 New Campus Dr., Brockport, NY, 14420; Jacqueline Davis, interim chair, dance@brockport.edu; www.brockport.edu/dance; 585-395-2153; M.A. or MFA in dance

NORTH CAROLINA

University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Department of Dance, 323 HHP Bldg., Greensboro, NC 27402-6170; Jim Fisher, head; dance@uncg.edu; performingarts.uncg.edu; 336-334-5570 (dance); M.A. or MFA in dance

OHIO

Case Western Reserve University

Department of Dance, Mather Dance Center, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106-7113; Karen Potter, chair; Lori Waugh, department assistant, lny@case.edu or karen.potter@case.edu; dance.case.edu; 216-368-1491; M.A. and MFA in dance

The Ohio State University

Department of Theatre, Drake Performance and Event Center, 1849 Cannon Drive, Columbus, OH, 43210-1307; Damian Bowerman, graduate studies coordinator (theater); Susan Van Pelt Petry, chair (dance), theatre@osu.edu; dance@osu.edu; www.theatre.osu.edu; www.dance.osu.edu; 614-292-5821 (theater); 614-292-7977 dance; MFA and Ph.D. in dance

OKLAHOMA

Oklahoma City University

2501 N. Blackwelder Ave., Oklahoma City, OK, 73106-1493; David Herendeen, director (music theater and theater); Melanie Shelley, associate dean; Jennifer Polvado, audition coordinator (dance), dherendeen@okcu.edu (theater); jpolvado@okcu.edu (dance); www.okcu.edu/theatre; www.okcu.edu/dance_amgt; 405-208-5710; 405-208-5644 (dance); MFA in dance

PENNSYLVANIA

Temple University

Theater Department, Tomlinson Theater, Room 210A, 1301 W. Norris St., Philadelphia, PA, 19122-6075; Roberta Sloan, chair (theater); Merian Soto, graduate program director (dance), theater@temple.edu; boyer@temple.edu; www.temple.edu; 215-204-8414 (theater); 215-204-5169 (dance); MFA and Ph.D. in dance

TEXAS

Sam Houston State University

SHSU Dance Program, Box 2269, Huntsville, TX, 77341-2269; Jennifer Pontius, coordinator (dance), dance@shsu.edu; www.shsu.edu/~dnc_www/; 936-294-1875; MFA in dance

Southern Methodist University

Meadows School of the Arts, Division of Theater/Division of Dance, P.O. Box 750356, Dallas, TX, 75275-0356; Stan Wojewodski, Jr., chair; Kevin Paul Hofeditz, chair (dance), theatre@smu.edu; hguthrie@mail.smu.edu; www.smu.edu/meadows/areasofstudy/theatre.aspx; www.smu.edu/meadows/areasofstudy/dance.aspx; 214-768-2558; MFA in dance

Texas Christian University

School for Classical & Contemporary Dance, TCU Box 297550, Fort Worth, TX, 76129; Ellen Page Shelton, chair, cfagradinfo@tcu.edu; www.dance.tcu.edu; 817-257-7603; MFA in dance

Texas Woman's University

Department of Music and Drama, P.O. Box 425708, Denton, TX, 76204-5708; Dr. Penelope Hanstein, chair (dance), dance@twu.edu; www.twu.edu/dance; 940-898-2085; M.A., MFA, or Ph.D. in dance

University of Texas at Austin

Department of Theatre and Dance, College of Fine Arts, 1 University Station, D3900, Austin, TX, 78712-0362; inquiry@uts.cc.utexas.edu; www.finearts.utexas.edu/tad; 512-471-5793; MFA in dance

UTAH

University of Utah

Department of Modern Dance, 330 South 1500 East, Rm. 106, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-0170; Stephen Koester, chair, stephen.koester@utah.edu; www.dance.utah.edu; 801-581-7327; MFA in dance

WASHINGTON

University of Washington

Dance Program, Meany Hall, Box 351150, Seattle, WA, 98195-1150; Elizabeth Cooper, dance program director, uwdance@u.washington.edu; depts.washington.edu/uwdance; 206-543-9843; MFA in dance

WISCONSIN

University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Peck School of the Arts, Department of Dance, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201; Ed Burgess, chair; Simone Ferro, graduate program director, danceinfo@uwm.edu; arts.uwm.edu/dance; 414-229-2571; MFA in performing arts: dance

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Want to Add to Congestion? Then It's Going to Cost You | View Clip
05/05/2011
New York Times - Online, The

Jay Primuss small office at the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency could be mistaken for that of a science professor. The walls are covered with giant maps and colorful charts, all aimed at helping to illuminate one of the big mysteries in the life of any city dweller: how to find a parking space. Mr. Primus runs SFPark, a recently launched experiment that seeks to eliminate congestion by changing the dynamics of parking. The approach is twofold: to change the price of a parking space according to demand and thereby keep spaces open on every block, and to lead drivers to open spaces using an array of sensors, eliminating congestion caused by circling drivers.

Mr. Primus is part of the vanguard of public officials around the Bay Area who are pushing sophisticated traffic and parking solutions built on the theory of congestion pricing. Though Mr. Primus and other traffic specialists sprinkle their conversations with jargon like availability targets and gradual periodic price change, the basic idea behind congestion pricing is a simple one: charge more to use streets and highways at the busiest times, and discourage those who dont want to pay a premium at peak hours.

Congestion pricing is already in place in cities including Singapore, London and Stockholm, but it has made few inroads in this country. An effort to charge motorists for driving into Manhattan, championed by Michael Bloomberg, the mayor of New York, failed in 2008 in the face of virulent opposition from legislators in the citys four other boroughs and the suburbs.

But the Bay Area is pushing ahead, albeit gradually. Last year, the toll on the Bay Bridge was raised to $6 from $4 during the rush hours in an effort to loosen congestion. In September, a toll lane whose price increases as traffic does was opened on Interstate 680, a historically jammed stretch for commuters heading from the East Bay to Silicon Valley.

More projects are on their way: toll lanes are slated for Highway 237 in the South Bay, and for Interstate 580 in the East Bay; higher tolls during peak hours are being considered for other bridges; and San Francisco officials have floated a plan to charge motorists driving into downtown San Francisco.

So far, the experiments have yielded mixed results.

Traffic on the Bay Bridge has dropped 2.35 percent during the morning commute and 3.45 percent in the afternoon since the toll was raised last July. Between 5 and 10 a.m., and 3 and 7 p.m. on weekdays the toll is $6 $2 more than the regular rate. I think that a small number of people who can do a time shift have done so theyre either taking their trip earlier in the day or later in the day, said John Goodwin, spokesman for the . The numbers are small, but just tinkering at the margins can have a significant effect on the commute traffic. The result, measured by the M.T.C., is that the time it takes to drive five miles from University Avenue in Berkeley to the Bay Bridge toll plaza has been cut by three minutes to an average of 24 minutes during the morning rush.

Fred Foldvary, a Santa Clara University professor who has studied congestion pricing, said the M.T.C. needs to crank up the Bay Bridge toll even more. They have to keep increasing the charge during the peak times, and maybe even reduce it at other times, to see a real change, Mr. Foldvary said.

The I-680 toll lane, stretching 14 miles between Highway 84 in Pleasanton and 237 in Milpitas, was designed to thin out what had been a traffic nightmare during the dot-com boom in the late 1990s. The toll has gone as high as $7 in heavy traffic; it bottoms out at 30 cents when there is no backup. The price is displayed on a sign, and the toll is charged through FasTrak.

So far, the toll lane has not had much of an effect, mainly because the traffic congestion it was supposed to address has largely been tamed by the economic slump, said Dave Hyams, a spokesman for the project. The average speed during peak hours in the non-toll lanes is 57 miles per hour, up from 56.9 m.p.h. since it opened. The toll lane averages a swifter 65.8 m.p.h. swifter even than the 65 m.p.h. speed limit.

A regular 680 commuter, Cheryl Cook-Kallio, a teacher and Pleasanton City Council member, said she has never used the new lane. I have yet to be on the freeway where the traffic has been so bad that I was tempted, she said, adding that the express lane also does not have access to her exit. In San Franciscos new parking scheme, Mr. Primus and his colleagues will adjust the prices at 7,000 meters and 20 city-owned parking garages with the aim of keeping two spaces available on every block. Drivers could pay from 25 cents to $6 an hour depending on demand. Currently, rates run from $2 to $3.50 an hour. We believe that relatively small differences in price should be enough to park in a different location, Mr. Primus said. All we need is one person to notice that the price has changed. Its a subtle tool for managing congestion. 1 2 zelinson@baycitizen.org

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What Good Do Faculty Unions Do? | View Clip
05/05/2011
Chronicle of Higher Education - Online, The

As unions that represent public-college professors have come under attack in state legislatures, the unions' leaders have fought back without being able to define what, exactly, they stand to lose if their right to collectively bargain goes away.

Many union leaders have declared that right essential if faculty members are to be paid adequately, treated fairly, and given a voice in their institutions' affairs. But the research that tests such assertions offers mixed findings. At most private colleges, as well as at public colleges where faculty members have chosen not to form unions or have been precluded from doing so by state law, many faculty members work without union contracts without feeling particularly exploited.

If anything, the research shows that the gains derived through collective bargaining are difficult to measure. Factors such as regional differences in the cost of living and market-related variations in what colleges are willing to pay their employees have confounded most attempts to determine whether faculty members with union contracts are better off than others. At four-year colleges, the financial payoffs from collective bargaining appear modest at best. At two-year colleges, such financial gains might be bigger, but they remain little studied and poorly defined.

The chief benefits of unionization appear to have less to do with getting faculty members more bread than in giving them some say over how it is sliced. Those who belong to collective-bargaining units have been found by researchers to have more say in the management of their institutions and how the faculty payroll is divvied up.

"At institutions where a substantial number of the faculty are represented in collective bargaining, you are much more likely to have a substantial faculty voice in governance," says Marc Bousquet, an associate professor of English at Santa Clara University, regular blogger for The Chronicle, and co-chairman of an American Association of University Professors committee on the working conditions of adjunct faculty members. "It is not necessarily the case that collective bargaining addresses governance procedures directly," he says, so much as it gives faculty members more power within their institutions than they might otherwise have.

"Across the broad spectrum of institutions of higher education, faculty unions do make a difference," says Philo Hutcheson, who has monitored research on faculty unionization as an associate professor of educational-policy studies at Georgia State University. While unions can bring about improvements in faculty members' pay and working conditions, he says, "they are far stronger, in general, in terms of protecting faculty members" from arbitrary management decisions.

It is common for state lawmakers to respond to economic downturns by calling on public employees to sacrifice pay or benefits to help close state budget gaps. This year, however, lawmakers in some states have gone beyond trying to extract financial concessions from unions and mounted all-out assaults on the unions themselves. Although the battles are hardly over, unions representing public-college faculty members are on the brink of being stripped of much of their power in Ohio and Wisconsin, and continue to face threats to their existence in Florida.

In Ohio, public employees' unions are urging voters to repeal a measure, signed into law by Gov. John R. Kasich in March, that would sharply limit the collective-bargaining rights of many state workers and specifically renders most public-college faculty members ineligible for union representation by reclassifying them as managerial employees. The campaign against the law has until late June to gather enough signatures to put a referendum to repeal it on the November ballot. If either the petition-gathering effort or the referendum fails, the new law will take effect.

Although the debate in Ohio has been highly partisan, pitting the state's Republican governor and lawmakers against Democrats and their union allies, the proposed reclassification came not from some conservative think tank, but from the Inter-University Council of Ohio, an association of the state's public universities. A similar provision was recently put forward by top Democratic lawmakers in Connecticut at the behest of the Democratic governor, Dannel P. Malloy, only to be killed by a legislative committee at the urging of groups representing public colleges' faculty members.

Faculty members and academic staff at the University of Wisconsin are denied the right to collectively bargain, under a law signed by Gov. Scott Walker, a Republican. The measure remains tied up in court, however, as a result of lawsuits alleging that a legislative committee violated the state's open-meeting laws in passing it. The Wisconsin chapter of the American Federation of Teachers is going ahead with union elections on the system's campuses, out of a belief—untested by any research—that such unions can be a major voice in their campuses' affairs even without collective-bargaining rights.

A bill pending before Florida's Legislature would revoke the certification of any public-college employee union that represents less than half of the workers eligible for membership unless those workers vote to recertify it by July 1. Union representatives have argued that the measure would stack the deck against them by affording little time for recertification votes and requiring the elections to be held during months when fewer faculty members are around.

Much of the research on the effects of such faculty unions was published in the 1970s and early 80s, and focused on the initial wave of unionization efforts made possible by states' adoption of laws letting public employees bargain collectively. In an exhaustive research review published in the journal Higher Education in 2008, Christine M. Wickens, then a graduate student at York University, in Toronto, cautioned that the research on fledgling unions from two or three decades ago might have little application to the current era, when faculty unions are more entrenched on college campuses and, at the same time, face comparatively more opposition from political conservatives.

In summing up the research to that point, Ms. Wickens said there was little consensus on the influence of unionization on college governance, and little evidence that unionization promoted academic freedom. She found a fair amount of agreement among researchers that faculty members believe they benefit from unionization when it comes to job security, tenure, promotion procedures, and due process. The research she cited included a 1999 article, in the Journal of Labor Research, which concluded, based on an analysis of data from seven of Ohio's public universities, that belonging to a union appeared to increase a faculty members' chances of earning tenure and rising to full professor.

More recently, however, a study of more than 340 four-year colleges, presented last fall at the annual conference of the Association for the Study of Higher Education, concluded that unionization did not appear to give faculty members significantly more power over tenure-and-promotion decisions, despite the attention given such issues by collective-bargaining agreements.

The paper nonetheless painted a fairly positive picture of unionization's effect on the working conditions of faculty members, finding that unionization "greatly increases faculty influence" over pay scales, the salaries of individual faculty, and the appointments of department heads and of members of institutionwide committees, and shows some signs of giving college faculty members more say over curriculum and faculty teaching loads.

Stephen R. Porter, an associate professor of research and evaluation at Iowa State University, and Clinton M. Stephens, a graduate student there, conducted the study by analyzing the results of a 2001 national survey of faculty-senate leaders and college presidents.

Efforts to measure the financial benefits that public colleges' faculty members derive from unionization are complicated by factors that invalidate dollar-for-dollar comparisons of pay packages.

Among the chief obstacles to salary comparisons is the geographic distribution of unionized campuses, which are concentrated in states with relatively high costs of living. About half of unionized faculty members work in California or New York, and most work at colleges in the mid-Atlantic, Midwest, and West, according to data compiled by the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions.

Where public colleges in such states are found to pay faculty members more, it is hard to tease out whether their doing so stems from collective bargaining or the need to offer more so that faculty members can afford to live there. Further complicating the picture, colleges do not operate in isolation but in labor markets where they compete for talent, so the gains made by unionized faculty members at one college through collective bargaining might then be offered by colleges without unions to keep their faculty members from being lured away.

Also confounding such studies is the chicken-and-egg problem of differentiating unionization's causes and effects. A finding that unionized faculties are paid less than nonunionized faculties, for example, might reflect that collective bargaining does little to improve wages, or it might reflect that frustration over low wages often leads to unionization.

In a paper published in April in Industrial and Labor Relations Review, four economists—David W. Hedrick and Charles S. Wassell Jr., of Central Washington University, and Steven E. Henson and John M. Krieg, of Western Washington University—describe how they fashioned a study of full-time faculty at four-year colleges that sought to account for the effects of unionization alone. They mathematically accounted for cost-of-living differences as well as other factors, such as professional background and institutional classification, that influence how much faculty members are paid, in analyzing data based on about 24,000 faculty members and 1,060 colleges collected from 1988 through 2004 as part of the National Study of Postsecondary Faculty. They concluded that the increase in wages associated with unionization was so small it was statistically insignificant.

The article, "Is There Really a Faculty Union Salary Premium?" cautions that "the weak effect that unions have on salaries does not necessarily indicate that they are ineffective advocates for their members," because it is entirely possible that unions win other gains, such as better benefits and improved working conditions.

Ronald G. Ehrenberg, a professor of industrial and labor relations and economics at Cornell University, says he is not surprised that the faculty members covered by the study did not reap significant financial gains from collective bargaining. Most states that let faculty members at public colleges engage in collective bargaining do not give them the right to go on strike or have salaries set through arbitration, and without either tool, he says, faculty members "have limited bargaining power."

Typically, Mr. Ehrenberg says, labor unions have won major wage gains for their members in industries that can tap into big profits—and state higher-education systems hardly fit such a bill.

Mr. Hedrick says he and the other authors of the paper on full-time faculty at four-year colleges are conducting similar studies looking at both two-year and four-year colleges and covering other types of faculty members, including adjuncts. They hope to publish results within a year.

Research on unionization's effects on two-year colleges is sparse, and the research on its effect on adjunct faculty is virtually nonexistent.

Full-time faculty members at community colleges in states that allow them to collectively bargain were found to earn substantially more than community-college faculty members elsewhere in a 2006 analysis of data from more than 1,000 institutions. The study was conducted by Jose F. Maldonado, then a doctoral student at the University of North Texas, with the assistance of David E. Hardy, an associate professor of higher education at the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, and Stephen G. Katsinas, a professor of higher education there.

The three researchers broke out their results, which they have presented at higher-education conferences but never published, by institution size and by whether colleges were rural, suburban, or urban. They found that the pay advantage for faculty members in collective-bargaining states ranged from 11 percent, or about $4,300, for full-time faculty members at small, rural community colleges to 48 percent, or about $20,200, for those at suburban community colleges that were not part of a system. On average, community-college faculty in states that allowed collective bargaining earned nearly $13,900, or about 32 percent, more than those who were in states that did not. Moreover, the community colleges in states that allowed collective bargaining spent an average of about $4,300, or nearly 50 percent, more per head on benefits for full-time faculty members.

The study only gathered raw numbers dealing with compensation and made no effort to account for cost-of-living differences or other factors that could have skewed its results. In a recent interview, Mr. Katsinas expressed doubt that any such factors could fully account for the pay differences that the study associates with laws allowing collective bargaining, but he acknowledged that such gaps cannot be attributed to collective-bargaining laws alone.

On the question of whether unionization has helped adjunct faculty members, Keith Hoeller, a longtime advocate for adjunct-faculty rights and a co-founder of the Washington Part-Time Faculty Association, is skeptical. Although unions that represent solely adjuncts have cropped up at many colleges, the chief national unions that they are affiliated with represent a mixture of adjuncts and tenured and tenure-track faculty members. Mr. Hoeller, who teaches in Washington State, complains that adjuncts have relatively little say in negotiations involving tenured and tenure-track faculty members, whose interests often are at odds with theirs. "When the dust settles," he says, "there are almost no gains for adjuncts from these bargaining teams."

Public-college faculty members are themselves hardly in agreement on unionization's benefits, as evidenced by the failure of some votes on unionization and the inability of faculty unions to gain much of a foothold among the nation's most prestigious universities.

"The best and the brightest of the faculty don't feel they need a labor union. They feel they are professionals. They feel they are competing in a national market. They don't want to get bogged down by collective bargaining," argues Richard K. Vedder, a Chronicle blogger who is director of the Center for College Affordability and Productivity and a professor of economics at Ohio University, one of three public universities in that state where faculty members never went the unionization route.

But Rudy H. Fichtenbaum, a professor of economics at Wright State University and a member of the board of the Ohio conference of the AAUP, says he is convinced that the state's faculty unions are worth fighting for.

"We can definitely point to a lot of tangible benefits from collective bargaining," he says. At Wright State, he argues, it has led to a fairer distribution of raises, clearer tenure requirements, faculty input on annual evaluation criteria, and better benefits for faculty members. "There is no question that this is a better place to work."

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Angelo Ancheta: Appointed Member of the California Citizens Redistricting Commission | View Clip
05/04/2011
Asian Journal - Online

California residents will be seeing a lot of Fil-Am Angelo Ancheta in the next coming months.

As an appointed member of the California Citizens Redistricting Commission, he is among the 14-members with the important task of remapping district lines in the entire state. The commission has already begun listening to residents on their thoughts of what is best for their own districts.

“The Commission will play a key role in defining the next decade's opportunities for civic engagement for candidates seeking office as well as for voters and residents,” said Ancheta in a news release from the California Citizens Redistricting Commission website. “Redistricting is a vitally important part of the democratic process, but it can be opaque to most citizens because it occurs every ten years, involves specialized procedures, and has, in the past, been the province of the legislature. Moving the process to the State's citizenry marks a significant change in power, but it is also an important shift in civic obligation that requires active participation and dedication from the voters.”

Ancheta, a democrat from San Francisco, was sworn in last February 11.

Ancheta is a law professor and legal scholar.

He is the director of the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center at the Santa Clara University School of Law. Prior to joining the law faculty at Santa Clara, Commissioner Ancheta was a lecturer at Harvard Law School, an adjunct professor at NYU School of Law, and taught at UCLA School of Law. Before starting his academic career, Commissioner Ancheta was a legal services and nonprofit executive director in both Northern and Southern California, specializing in immigration, voting rights, and constitutional law, according to his bio.

Ancheta holds degrees from UCLA, UCLA School of Law, and Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government.

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Bloggers wary as law firm trolls for copyright violations
05/04/2011
International Herald Tribune

When Brian Hill, a 20-year-old blogger from North Carolina, posted on his Web site last December a photograph of an airport security officer conducting a pat-down, a legal battle was the last thing he imagined.

A month later, Mr. Hill received an
e-mail from a reporter for The Las Vegas Sun who was looking into a Nevada company that files copyright lawsuits for newspapers. The e-mail informed Mr. Hill that he was one of those that the company, Righthaven, was suing. Though the airport photo had gone viral before Mr. Hill plucked it off the Web, it belonged to The Denver Post, where it had first appeared Nov. 18.

Mr. Hill took down the photo. He was too late. A summons was delivered to his house. The lawsuit sought statutory damages. It did not name a figure, but it accused Mr. Hill of "willful" infringement. Under U.S. copyright law, as much as $150,000 can be awarded in such cases.

"I was shocked," Mr. Hill said. "I thought maybe it was a joke or something to scare me. I didn't know the picture was copyrighted."

Over the past year, as newspapers have continued to grapple with the question of how to protect their online content, Righthaven has filed more than 200 similar lawsuits in Colorado and Nevada over material posted without permission from The Denver Post or The Las Vegas Review-Journal.

The company has business relationships with both newspapers. Like much of the industry, the papers see the appropriation of their work without permission as akin to theft and harmful to their business, and they are frustrated by unsuccessful efforts to stem the common practice, whether it is by a one-man operation like Mr. Hill's, or an established one like Matt Drudge's.

Sara Glines, a vice president for MediaNews Group, which owns The Denver Post, wrote in an e-mail that the pat-down photo had been used on more than 300 Web sites with no credit to The Post or the photographer.

"We have invested heavily in creating quality content in our markets," Ms. Glines wrote. "To allow others who have not shared in that investment to reap the benefit ultimately hurts our ability to continue to fund that investment at the same level."

Mark Hinueber, general counsel for Stephens Media, owner of The Review-Journal, said cutting and pasting of articles "steals the potential audience for our editorial material and traffic to our Web sites."

Some critics, however, contend that Righthaven's tactics are draconian and that the company hopes to extract swift settlements before it is clear that there has been a violation of U.S. copyright law. Typically, the suits have been filed without warning. Righthaven rarely sends out notices telling Web sites to take down material that does not belong to them before seeking damages and demanding forfeiture of the Web domain name.

Defendants in these cases run the gamut. They have included the white supremacist David Duke, the Democratic Party of Nevada and Mr. Drudge. But little-known Web sites, nonprofit groups and so-called mom-and-pop bloggers — people who blog as a hobby — are not exempt from Righthaven's legal actions.

According to some Internet legal experts who have been watching the cases with growing interest, the way it works is simple: Righthaven finds newspaper material that has been republished on the Web — usually an article, excerpts or a photograph — and obtains the copyrights. Then, the company sues.

Whether the defendant credits the original author or removes the material after being sued matters little. None of the cases have gone to trial yet, and many have been settled out of court. In two instances, judges have ruled against Righthaven in pretrial motions. According to The Las Vegas Sun, which has tracked the cases, the only two publicly disclosed settlements were for $2,185 and $5,000.

In describing his company's approach, Steven A. Gibson, Righthaven's chief executive, said that there had been "voluminous, almost incalculable infringement" since the advent of the Internet and that years of warning people to take down copyrighted content had not worked. Newspapers, he said, needed a new way to address the problem of people appropriating their material without permission.

Eric Goldman, director of the high-tech law institute at the Santa Clara University School of Law, in California, said reposting published material online could qualify as "fair use" if it did not diminish the market value of the original. Other critics of the suits contend that reposting material for the purposes of discussion does not constitute infringement.

"Many of the defendants are ill informed about copyright law," Mr. Goldman said. "They're not trying to compete with a newspaper. They just don't know the rules." Mr. Goldman informally advised a company that was sued by Righthaven and settled out of court.

In an amicus brief filed on behalf of the Media Bloggers Association regarding a Righthaven suit in Nevada, Marc J. Randazza, a lawyer specializing in First Amendment issues, accused the company of acquiring copyrights for the sole purpose of going after defendants who could not afford legal help.

Mr. Gibson denies that unwitting bloggers are a particular target and points to lawsuits like the one against Mr. Drudge. Righthaven accused Mr. Drudge of posting the airport pat-down photo on his Drudge Report site without permission. The suit was settled out of court, Mr. Gibson said.

Ms. Glines said that MediaNews "reviewed every violation and only approved actions against sites that carried advertising and were not charities."

Mr. Hill, the North Carolina blogger, has autism and diabetes and lives on disability checks with his mother. He said at that at one point Righthaven had offered to settle for $6,000, but he refused. A Colorado lawyer, David Kerr, has been defending him pro bono.

A judge presiding over the case criticized Righthaven last month, saying it used the courts to settle with defendants scared of the potential cost of litigation. Shortly afterward, Righthaven moved to drop the suit voluntarily, saying it had not been aware of Mr. Hill's health problems. But Righthaven also stated in court filings that a dismissal did not exonerate others it was suing and warned Mr. Hill against continuing to use copyrighted material.

Copyright © 2011 The New York Times

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Commencement speakers at local universities
05/04/2011
Contra Costa Times

Local universities have announced their 2011 commencement dates and speakers. They include:

National Hispanic University, Saturday May 14, 10 a.m., Bustos Family Plaza: José Hernández, former NASA astronaut.

San Jose State, Saturday May 28, 9:30 a.m., Spartan Stadium: James E. Thompson, SJSU alumnus and founder of the Crown Worldwide Group, the world's largest privately-held group of international moving companies.

Santa Clara University, Saturday, June 11, 8 a.m., Buck Shaw Stadium: Dr. Khaled Hosseini, physician, SCU alumnus and author of the book The Kite Runner.

University of California, Santa Cruz: Friday, Saturday and Sunday, June 10-12, various times and locations on ten college campuses: Tesla Motors CFO Deepak Ahuja; Bill Dickinson, founder of the Smith Renaissance Society; Assemblymember Bill Monning, and John Laird, California Secretary for Natural Resources, among others.

Stanford University, Sunday, June 12, 9:30 a.m., Stanford Stadium: Felipe Calderón Hinojosa, president of Mexico.

Contact Lisa M. Krieger at 408-920-5565.

Copyright © 2011 Contra Costa Times.

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Commencement speakers at local universities
05/04/2011
Argus, The

Local universities have announced their 2011 commencement dates and speakers. They include:

National Hispanic University, Saturday May 14, 10 a.m., Bustos Family Plaza: José Hernández, former NASA astronaut.

San Jose State, Saturday May 28, 9:30 a.m., Spartan Stadium: James E. Thompson, SJSU alumnus and founder of the Crown Worldwide Group, the world's largest privately-held group of international moving companies.

Santa Clara University, Saturday, June 11, 8 a.m., Buck Shaw Stadium: Dr. Khaled Hosseini, physician, SCU alumnus and author of the book The Kite Runner.

University of California, Santa Cruz: Friday, Saturday and Sunday, June 10-12, various times and locations on ten college campuses: Tesla Motors CFO Deepak Ahuja; Bill Dickinson, founder of the Smith Renaissance Society; Assemblymember Bill Monning, and John Laird, California Secretary for Natural Resources, among others.

Stanford University, Sunday, June 12, 9:30 a.m., Stanford Stadium: Felipe Calderón Hinojosa, president of Mexico.

Contact Lisa M. Krieger at 408-920-5565.

Copyright © 2011 The Argus. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Commencement speakers at local universities
05/04/2011
Daily Review, The

Local universities have announced their 2011 commencement dates and speakers. They include:

National Hispanic University, Saturday May 14, 10 a.m., Bustos Family Plaza: José Hernández, former NASA astronaut.

San Jose State, Saturday May 28, 9:30 a.m., Spartan Stadium: James E. Thompson, SJSU alumnus and founder of the Crown Worldwide Group, the world's largest privately-held group of international moving companies.

Santa Clara University, Saturday, June 11, 8 a.m., Buck Shaw Stadium: Dr. Khaled Hosseini, physician, SCU alumnus and author of the book The Kite Runner.

University of California, Santa Cruz: Friday, Saturday and Sunday, June 10-12, various times and locations on ten college campuses: Tesla Motors CFO Deepak Ahuja; Bill Dickinson, founder of the Smith Renaissance Society; Assemblymember Bill Monning, and John Laird, California Secretary for Natural Resources, among others.

Stanford University, Sunday, June 12, 9:30 a.m., Stanford Stadium: Felipe Calderón Hinojosa, president of Mexico.

Contact Lisa M. Krieger at 408-920-5565.

Copyright © 2011 The Daily Review. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Commencement speakers at local universities
05/04/2011
Alameda Times-Star

Local universities have announced their 2011 commencement dates and speakers. They include:

National Hispanic University, Saturday May 14, 10 a.m., Bustos Family Plaza: José Hernández, former NASA astronaut.

San Jose State, Saturday May 28, 9:30 a.m., Spartan Stadium: James E. Thompson, SJSU alumnus and founder of the Crown Worldwide Group, the world's largest privately-held group of international moving companies.

Santa Clara University, Saturday, June 11, 8 a.m., Buck Shaw Stadium: Dr. Khaled Hosseini, physician, SCU alumnus and author of the book The Kite Runner.

University of California, Santa Cruz: Friday, Saturday and Sunday, June 10-12, various times and locations on ten college campuses: Tesla Motors CFO Deepak Ahuja; Bill Dickinson, founder of the Smith Renaissance Society; Assemblymember Bill Monning, and John Laird, California Secretary for Natural Resources, among others.

Stanford University, Sunday, June 12, 9:30 a.m., Stanford Stadium: Felipe Calderón Hinojosa, president of Mexico.

Contact Lisa M. Krieger at 408-920-5565.

Copyright © 2011 Alameda Times-Star. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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Fighting corruption as a public defender; Tim Pappas fights for the rights of defendants | View Clip
05/04/2011
Record-Searchlight - Online

Posted May 3, 2011 at 11:16 p.m.

Tim Pappas, assistant public defender for Shasta County, also is a tea party advocate. He's been at the Shasta County Public Defenders Office since 2004.

When he was a young man in the mid-1980s, a rookie Torrance police officer named Tim Pappas watched two fellow officers kick and punch a handcuffed suspect.

When officers with the department's internal affairs office asked him what happened, he says he told the truth, that he thought the officers used excessive force.

"I didn't realize that from that point forward I was going to be considered a rat," Pappas, now Shasta County's assistant public defender, said recently over lunch.

Pappas, 49, said that for the next few years, his fellow officers shunned him. They vandalized his locker. No one wanted to be his partner. It took a couple of years for him to regain their trust, he said.

Then, in 1988, Pappas had his gun drawn, pointing at a motorcycle rider who had one arm pinned behind his back by another officer. Pappas says the suspect's free hand was on his head and he quickly dropped it toward his waistband, like he was reaching for a gun.

Pappas flinched. The gun fired.

The biker, a construction worker named Patrick J. Coyle, ended up partially paralyzed from the gunshot wound to the head, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Pappas said the shooting was an accident, and he would have most likely been cleared by his superiors had he simply told the truth. Instead, Pappas lied. He said he faced intense pressure from his fellow officers to say Coyle was reaching for a lug wrench he'd already dropped.

That lie had consequences. When the truth came out, the then 27-year-old Pappas was fired from the Torrance Police Department and ended up pleading no contest to a misdemeanor charge of making a false statement in a police report and obstructing an investigation.

He was sentenced to probation and fined.

"That was the biggest lesson," Pappas said. "Nothing in life — not gold, not money, not fame — is as important as your integrity and your name."

He said he's since become a staunch defender in the rights of criminal defendants, and recently, he started doing free legal work for local conservative tea party activists, whose Constitutionalist leanings fit well with his staunch small-government ideals.

As such, Pappas has become an outspoken figure in Shasta County political and legal circles. His work for the Tea Party also appears to have riled up local unions, whose lawyer has been probing whether Pappas' Tea Party work is happening on the taxpayers' dime.

A Tea Party advocate

Pappas said that after the shooting he decided to turn the lessons he learned into something positive.

In 1994, he was admitted to the bar after receiving his law degree from the University of Northern California Lorenzo Patino School of Law in Sacramento. He went into private practice and later worked as a prosecutor at the Siskiyou County District Attorney's Office. He's been at the Shasta County Public Defenders Office since 2004.

As a lawyer, Pappas says his experiences with the shooting made him a fierce advocate against government corruption. Recently, Pappas' legal work also has extended outside the criminal courtroom. In the last two months, Pappas has filed suits on behalf of two separate Tea Party groups who are challenging both the Shasta District Fair and the Redding Library for putting restrictions on leafleting and assembling on public property.

Shasta County Public Defender Jeff Gorder said Pappas remains just as passionate about defending the constitutional rights of his criminal clients.

He fired off a list of adjectives to describe his assistant: Hard working, passionate, indefatigable, tireless.

"He has an amazing amount of energy," Gorder said. "He is a very devoted advocate for the clients he works for."

At times that passion has raised the ire of some prosecutors in the rival Shasta County District Attorney's Office who get annoyed with Pappas' outspoken and often long-winded legal defense. But Erin Dervin, a deputy Shasta County district attorney, said she isn't one of them.

Dervin, who's faced Pappas dozens of times in court over the years, described him as a "true believer."

"Nobody can have him as a lawyer and not feel that they had a zealous, passionate, tough-as-nails defense," Dervin said. "If they come back and say they didn't, they're just wrong."

But Pappas' advocacy work for the Tea Party also has apparently come under the scrutiny of local public employee unions.

A union attorney has sought records trying to establish whether he's working for the conservative groups on the taxpayers' time, a claim that both Pappas and Gorder ardently deny.

Last month, Ellyn Moscowitz, an Oakland attorney whose law firm specializes in representing labor groups, filed a request under the California Public Records Act seeking copies of Pappas' emails, documents and phone records that would show any correspondence between him and various Tea Party leaders, building advocates and city officials who are "members of the Tea Party."

Advocacy off the clock

Pappas said the county denied the request since he never wrote any documents or emails on behalf of the Tea Party using county resources. Pappas said he's refused a county-issued cellphone to avoid the temptation of using it for personal purposes.

Efforts to reach Moscowitz to find out what groups she represents were unsuccessful. However, local union groups have been critics of what they call an effort by Tea Party members to push for a Redding city charter that would include an exemption from state prevailing wage laws.

Pappas' boss, Gorder, said Pappas regularly checks in with him to update him on his outside legal work. Nothing he's done so far for the Tea Party has interfered with his criminal defense work, Gorder said.

The county has no restrictions on an attorney with the public defender's or district attorney's offices doing free, outside legal work on their own time, said Michelle Schafer, the county's director of support services.

Two legal and government ethics experts say that they don't have any concerns with Pappas' legal work for the Tea Party either.

John Sprankling, a law professor who teaches ethics at University of the Pacific's McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento, said that as long as Pappas' Tea Party business doesn't interfere with the work he does for his regular clients, there's nothing unethical about it.

Judy Nadler, a former city mayor and a senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University, agreed. She said government employees — even taxpayer-funded attorneys — have every right to advocate for a political cause or group off the clock.

"As long as they (the Tea Party cases) don't have an impact the work he does, it's no different than a DA on the weekends walking precincts for someone else" in an election campaign, Nadler said.

But that's not to say that all the extra legal work hasn't taken a toll. Pappas, who lives in Redding with his wife Shirlyn, said that some nights he's up well after midnight doing work for both his county clients and on his Tea Party cases.

He said he owes it to them. He said his own experiences with corruption have helped him understand that everyone is entitled to ardent legal representation; something guaranteed them by the U.S. Constitution.

"I'm going to do what I think is right. Period," Pappas said.

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Investing in an ethical corporate culture | View Clip
05/04/2011
Securities Docket

Companies are starting to distinguish between non-financial and financial risks in order to continue improving their overall governance and business structures. But non-financial risks, such as ethics, still don't get the attention they deserve from industry experts…..

‘No company has found an effective way of evaluating and measuring non-financial risks,' says Kirk Hanson, executive director of the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University. ‘And ethics risk is one of the many forms of non-financial risk that has always been a concern.'

Read more: Investing in an ethical corporate culture — Corporate Secretary

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Judge weighing whether to dismiss copyright lawsuit | View Clip
05/04/2011
Las Vegas Sun

U.S. District Judge Philip Pro is weighing whether to dismiss on fair use grounds a copyright infringement lawsuit filed by Righthaven LLC against the man, Wayne Hoehn.

Righthaven is the copyright enforcement partner of the Las Vegas Review-Journal and the Denver Post that, since March 2010, has filed at least 265 lawsuits against website operators, bloggers and message board posters like Hoehn.

The Jan. 11 lawsuit against Hoehn was unusual for Righthaven in that it targeted him personally and did not name as a defendant the website where Hoehn admittedly posted the column.

The column was by then-Las Vegas Review-Journal Publisher Sherman Frederick. In it, Frederick complained about public employee pensions.

The website, madjacksports.com, had previously been sued and settled with Righthaven and it likely won't be sued again as it's posted a notice for receipt of takedown requests in compliance with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

Attorneys for Hoehn have asked Pro to throw the case out of court on fair use grounds and also filed a motion for dismissal saying that, under its newly-disclosed lawsuit contract with the Review-Journal, Righthaven doesn't have standing to sue.

During a hearing Tuesday, Pro focused on the fair use issue, as Righthaven hasn't yet responded to the motion for dismissal based on the standing issue.

Las Vegas attorney J. Malcolm DeVoy IV of Randazza Legal Group, representing Hoehn, told Pro that because Righthaven uses the copyrighted column at issue only for lawsuits, it can show no harm to the market for the copyright, and that's one reason Hoehn's post was protected by the fair use doctrine.

“The only way Righthaven uses these copyrights is not for a newspaper or online, but in these courtrooms,” DeVoy said.

DeVoy noted another Las Vegas federal judge, James Mahan, had dismissed another Righthaven case on fair use grounds largely because of Righthaven's use of the copyright for litigation purposes as opposed to the Review-Journal's initial use of the copyrighted material as a news story. That case involved the Portland, Ore., Center for Intercultural Organizing.

Even if the Review-Journal was the plaintiff in the suit against Hoehn, Hoehn's post of the story would have been protected by fair use, as Hoehn used it to encourage public discussion and debate, DeVoy said.

“He's using it in a discussion forum vs. the way the newspaper uses it to distribute facts and information,” DeVoy said.

Pro asked several questions about what the actual market for the copyright is.

“There is no market. Righthaven owns the copyright. It is an unlawful market solely for the purpose of lawsuits,” DeVoy said.

Hoehn used the story “in a market for discussion,” which did not put him in competition with the Review-Journal or Righthaven, DeVoy said.

Pro said it was clear that Hoehn received no financial gain by posting the column in a discussion forum and asked Shawn Mangano, a Las Vegas attorney representing Righthaven, “What's the harm here?”

And Pro indicated Righthaven's ownership of the copyright — as opposed to the Review-Journal's ownership — has complicated the analysis of harm.

“You're not having anybody access your website (to see copyrighted material Righthaven owns),” Pro said. “You're not commercially selling it. How does Righthaven suffer any conceivable harm as the owner of the copyright?”

Mangano said the column presenting an opinion with some creativity is deserving of greater copyright protection than a news story offering factual information. The story in the Intercultural Organizing case was factual and deserving of less copyright protection than a creative piece, Mahan ruled.

Mangano said the Review-Journal was harmed by Hoehn's post of Frederick's column because people reading the column on the madjacksports.com site would have no reason to go to the Review-Journal website to read the same column.

He noted Hoehn could have posted a short summary and linked to the R-J website but didn't do so.

And with Righthaven having the right to sue for infringements initially harming the Review-Journal, Righthaven is now suing over the harm to the Review-Journal, Mangano said.

“At the time of the infringement, the Review-Journal was the publisher of the work and the defendant was accused of taking it 100 percent without authorization,” Mangano said. “That's your act of infringement.”

Mangano said that under case law, copyright holders can sustain financial damages from infringement as well as damages to their goodwill and reputations.

“Where you have 100 percent unauthorized replication of an article, what you're essentially doing is taking that content and you are superseding the original market source. Mr. Hoehn has said his purpose in replicating this piece was for education, comment and criticism. This is the exact same purpose the work would be published on the R-J's website,” Mangano said.

DeVoy, however, retorted that Hoehn was using the column in a constitutionally-protected exercise of free speech to stimulate discussion about a matter of public interest.

His use was no different than if DeVoy had read the column aloud to colleagues at law school to stimulate debate, DeVoy said.

“Even Righthaven wouldn't sue me for that,” DeVoy said.

Pro didn't say when he would rule on the fair use issue but indicated he's going to study the motion for dismissal — based on the standing issue — and Righthaven's upcoming opposition to that motion.

In another Righthaven case, Mahan on Tuesday refused to dismiss a Righthaven lawsuit over the Review-Journal “Vdara death ray” graphic, giving Righthaven an initial boost in the case.

But defendants Azkar Choudhry and Pak.org also received a boost when Mahan refused to dismiss their counterclaim against Righthaven.

After he was sued by Righthaven over the graphic, an attorney for Choudhry fired back in court papers, saying that for technical reasons the image was never actually posted on his website and that Righthaven had actually sued over an “inline link” to the image on another website.

Noting he's not an expert in source-code related to linking, Mahan said factual issues need to be resolved in the case, making it ineligible for dismissal on legal arguments alone.

Mahan also found there were disputed factual issues about whether the lawsuit could be disposed of on fair use grounds — for instance, whether Choudhry's website is commercial or nonprofit.

Mahan also found that while the graphic “is an information work, it also displays elements of creativity, for example the title (death ray).”

Reiterating a point from his Intercultural Organizing ruling, Mahan wrote Tuesday that Righthaven can't show market harm for the copyright.

“Because Righthaven cannot claim the Las Vegas Review-Journal's market as its own and is not operating as a traditional newspaper, Righthaven has failed to show that there has been any harm to the value of the copyright,” Mahan wrote.

But he added that factor alone was not enough to rule definitively on fair use in the case at this point.

Also in his order Tuesday, Mahan became at least the second federal judge to reject Righthaven's standard lawsuit demand that the defendant's domain name be forfeited and transferred to Righthaven.

Everyone involved agrees such a remedy is not authorized by the Copyright Act, though Righthaven maintains it's available as a matter of equity.

Mahan wrote Tuesday: “The court finds that Righthaven's request for such relief fails as a matter of law.”

In seeking to have the counterclaim dismissed, Righthaven argued it was redundant as it covered the same issues in its lawsuit.

Mahan disagreed Tuesday.

“Defendants seek a declaration that would be substantially more detailed than a judgment on the claim of copyright infringement in the complaint. For example, defendants seek a declaration that the alleged infringement was actually an ‘inline link,' which would not necessarily be encompassed in a general judgment in defendant's favor,” Mahan wrote.

Mahan's ruling means the suit will continue unless it's settled.

Eric Goldman, director of the High Tech Law Institute at the Santa Clara University School of Law in California and a frequent Righthaven commentator, said the ruling overall was good for Choudhry.

“It reinforces three points that have been emerging from other rulings:

“1) Righthaven's demand for the defendant's domain name is lawless.

“2) The fourth factor of the fair use defense (the market effect) weighs in favor of the defense as a matter of law. The fourth factor is often viewed as the most important of the fair use factors. If it weighs against Righthaven in every case as a matter of law, Righthaven will have a tough time winning any of its cases.

“3) The defendant's counterclaims are independent of Righthaven's claims. Thus, even if Righthaven dismisses its lawsuit, the defendant still has ways to go on the offensive,” Goldman said.

Separately, Randazza Legal Group filed a motion in another Righthaven case asking that the court award it $3,815 in fees and expenses for its representation of defendant Michael Leon.

This appears to be the first time any of the federal judges hearing Righthaven cases have been asked to order Righthaven to pay the other side's fees, though the same thing is likely to happen in Righthaven's cases against blogger Brian D. Hill, which was dropped, and against the Democratic Underground, which is likely to win at least a fair use dismissal.

DeVoy represented Leon during an April 20 hearing in which U.S. District Judge Gloria Navarro dismissed the suit against him because he had not been served by the deadline.

In his motion for attorney's fees, DeVoy seeks payment for four hours of work for Leon, and nine to 10 hours he spent trying to resolve the attorney's fees issues with Righthaven and preparing the motion for fees filed Tuesday. Efforts to resolve the fee issue out of court were not successful, DeVoy said in his filing.

Also, U.S. Magistrate Judge George Foley Jr. on Tuesday set a June 2 hearing on the latest discovery dispute between Righthaven and the Democratic Underground.

Righthaven's suit against the Democratic Underground is over the posting of four paragraphs of a 34-paragraph Review-Journal story by a message-board poster — a post that linked back to the Review-Journal website.

Based on case law in the Righthaven litigation, the post likely was protected by fair use and now the Democratic Underground is countersuing Righthaven and Review-Journal owner Stephens Media LLC.

That countersuit resulted in the unsealing of the Righthaven-Stephens Media lawsuit contract and resulting charges by the Democratic Underground that Righthaven's Review-Journal lawsuits are based on “sham” copyright transfers.

Mahan, in another case, has said this agreement appears to show Righthaven doesn't have the right to sue — arguments Righthaven disputes.

In their latest court filing, attorneys for the Democratic Underground with the online freedom of speech group the Electronic Frontier Foundation said last week they're trying to show that the driving force behind the lawsuits is Stephens Media and that Righthaven is merely its agent.

Righthaven is half owned by an affiliate of Stephens Media.

“With this motion, defendants ask the court to compel documents that are directly relevant to Righthaven's standing. This includes documents about the formation of Righthaven and the assignment of the copyright at issue,” the attorneys said in a filing charging that Righthaven and Stephens Media have failed to turn over these documents during the discovery process.

The documents are relevant to the Democratic Underground case and “to the hundreds of other actions Righthaven has filed,” the Democratic Underground attorneys said.

They said the newly unsealed Strategic Alliance Agreement between Righthaven and Stephens Media provides “substantial evidence” that the copyrights assigned by Stephens Media to Righthaven are invalid; that Righthaven can suffer no harm by alleged infringements under a fair use analysis, because it has no real rights in the copyrights; that “Stephens Media is the real party in interest, engaging Righthaven as its agent to prosecute this action;” and that “Stephens Media retains the right to sue Democratic Underground under the agreement, thereby giving rise to a live and genuine controversy with Stephens Media.”

“Nonetheless, Stephens Media and Righthaven continue to assert that the assignment is valid, that the relationship between them is not merely an agency relationship, and that Righthaven has sufficient control and ownership to constitute standing under the Copyright Act,” the filing said.

“Therefore, Democratic Underground has a right to discovery of all documents that might bear on this supposed relationship, such as other communications about the assignment, communications leading to the formation of the Strategic Alliance Agreement and negotiation of its terms, communications regarding the effectuation of (copyright) assignment for the news article or the relationship between Stephens Media and Righthaven, and so on,” the filing said.

“A core issue in this action, and the hundreds of others filed by Righthaven, is whether or not the purported assignment to Righthaven is a sham and champertous. Democratic Underground believes that Righthaven was created as a tool to bring lawsuits on Stephens Media's behalf, without Stephens Media taking responsibility for them. Defendants assert that Stephens Media intentionally designed the relationship with Righthaven to skirt the copyright laws, create a patina of legitimacy for Righthaven, while providing nothing of value to Righthaven other than the right to sue people,” the filing said.

Stephens Media and Righthaven haven't yet responded to these assertions.

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Leon Panetta to head Pentagon | View Clip
05/04/2011
Omaha World-Herald - Online

Washington — Heading into an era of tighter Pentagon budgets, President Obama has chosen Leon Panetta as secretary of defense in a move that puts a former White House budget chief in charge of the sprawling military bureaucracy, administration officials said Wednesday.

Panetta, 73, was reluctant to leave his job as director of the Central Intelligence Agency, a senior administration official said. A budget expert who had little experience in intelligence before taking the job as spy chief, Panetta is credited with restoring morale and order after a period of turmoil over the agency's role in the torture and detention of terrorism suspects.

Obama personally asked Panetta to take the job, and after thinking about it, Panetta agreed at a meeting with Obama on Monday. With Senate confirmation all but assured, Panetta is scheduled to start his new job July 1.

The president is expected to announce the appointment today as part of a shuffling of his national security team set in motion by the retirement of Defense Secretary Robert Gates, who held the job under President George W. Bush.

In the shuffle, Gen. David Petraeus, the top commander in Afghanistan, will become director of the spy agency, Gen. John Allen will assume military command in Afghanistan and Bush veteran Ryan Crocker will become ambassador to Afghanistan.

Panetta, a fiscal hawk, former Army lieutenant in the Vietnam War and a committed moderate with deep roots in Northern California, brings a bird's-eye perspective on government finances that no previous defense chief has had.

In his nearly four decades in Washington, Panetta chaired the House Budget Committee and served as former President Bill Clinton's budget chief and White House chief of staff.

With Washington under intense deficit pressure, Panetta's budget experience was one reason for his appointment, the administration official said, adding that the belt-tightening that Gates began "will continue to intensify."

Larry Diamond, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution in Palo Alto, called Panetta a "superb choice."

''He may not be so instinctively reflexive as to defend every last Pentagon spending program as some previous defense secretaries have," Diamond said. "We are entering an era where everything has got to be on table in terms of U.S. government spending. You can't get there without putting the Pentagon budget on the table."

Panetta also will be Obama's top hand in managing a planned withdrawal from Afghanistan, where Obama's troop surge has produced mixed results and is scheduled to begin drawing down this summer.

Twice in his career, Panetta has been tapped by Democratic presidents to straighten out critical but dysfunctional bureaucracies, by Clinton at the White House and Obama at the spy agency. As Clinton's top negotiator in a 1996 showdown with Republicans over the budget, Panetta managed an earlier drawdown in Pentagon spending and helped position Clinton as a prudent fiscal steward.

His new appointment as head of the nation's most sprawling bureaucracy -- with a $720 billion annual budget that exceeds all domestic agency budgets combined and is nearly as much as Medicare and Medicaid combined -- drew lavish praise from Republicans and Democrats.

But Christopher Preble, director of foreign policy studies at the libertarian Cato Institute and an advocate of scaling back the U.S. military posture, said Panetta more than Gates "is really going to be the one on the hook to execute what I think will be real cuts" in the defense budget.

''My question is whether Panetta will be willing to revisit the Pentagon's roles and missions in a way Bob Gates was not, and if he's not, will Barack Obama do that."

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, a California Democrat and chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee who was initially skeptical of Panetta's CIA appointment given his lack of experience in intelligence at the time, on Wednesday called Panetta "the most skilled person in government."

Feinstein credited Panetta with restoring order at the agency, saying he has "shown himself to be able to handle anything that comes at him .... I can't think of a more capable person to take on the challenge of being Secretary of Defense at a time of war, unrest and conflict in the Middle East, an over-stretched military and the need to rein in Pentagon spending."

Feinstein was nearly dismissive, however, of the Petraeus appointment, saying the widely hailed general "has been a consumer of intelligence," a role that does not necessarily make him the best choice to lead the agency that produces it.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and a foreign policy hawk, called Panetta "an outstanding choice" who has a "good working relationship with Congress" and "will be prepared on day one."

A native of Monterey and the son of Italian immigrants, Panetta graduated from Santa Clara University and its law school. He began his career as a Republican, serving in the Nixon administration as director of the Office for Civil Rights, where he allegedly resisted pressure by Nixon to soft-pedal civil rights enforcement.

Panetta became a Democrat in 1971 and represented his Monterey-based district from 1977 to 1993, spearheading the creation of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

He returned to Monterey to found the Panetta Institute with his wife, Sylvia, in 1998. But he kept his hand in budget and national security issues in Washington, arguing for deficit reduction and serving on policy boards, including the Iraq Study Group, a bipartisan committee that assessed the war in Iraq.

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PointofLaw.com | PointOfLaw Forum: Pecora the Prosecutor | View Clip
05/04/2011
PointOfLaw Forum

Pecora the Prosecutor Erwin Chemerinsky, the Dean at UC Irvine Law School, had a piece in the National Law Journal the other day about prosecutorial misconduct. We've all heard about the high profile cases involving the Duke lacrosse team and the late Alaska senator, Ted Stevens. Chemerinsky's article, citing evidence from an Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law , suggests that misconduct (which can run the gamut from outright corruption and malfeasance to simple negligence) might be more widespread than many people realize. The article got me to thinking about what kind of prosecutor Ferdinand Pecora (the subject of my book The Hellhound of Wall Street) had been. Pecora was appointed as a deputy assistant district attorney in Manhattan in 1918, and he eventually became the number-two man in the office. During his twelve-year prosecutorial career Pecora was, in the words of his boss, an idealist with "an inveterate passion for justice." In one of his earliest cases, the junior lawyer was asked to cover a simple, one-day robbery trial for a sick colleague. Pecora easily won the conviction of a young black man named Malcolm Wright, but Wright continued to insist on his innocence. Most prosecutors probably would have ignored those claims, but Pecora had a "queer feeling" about the case. He investigated Wright's arrest and uncovered blatant police misconduct. Pecora presented the evidence to the judge and asked him to set aside the conviction and to order a new trial, at which Wright was acquitted. Pecora had no tolerance for prosecutorial misconduct either. Here's a brief excerpt from the book: As a result of his work on the Wright case, Pecora was assigned to investigate another potential wrongful prosecution, this one involving a New York poultry dealer...

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Righthaven engages ‘superstar’ attorney (against DU) in litigation campaign - Democratic Underground | View Clip
05/04/2011
Democratic Underground Latest …

Righthaven engages 'superstar' attorney (against DU) in litigation campaign Latest Breaking News Righthaven engages 'superstar' attorney (against DU) in litigation campaignSource: Vegas Inc (Las Vegas Sun) The owner of the Las Vegas Review-Journal and its copyright enforcement partner have enlisted one of the nation's top copyright attorneys to help defend their litigation campaign. Dale Cendali, a partner at the law firm Kirkland & Ellis LLP in New York, has been engaged by Stephens Media LLC, owner of the Review-Journal; and copyright enforcer Righthaven LLC, court records show. ... She's also expected to appear in Righthaven's no-warning lawsuit against the Democratic Underground, where Pulgram and other EFF attorneys are pursuing a counterclaim against Righthaven and Stephens Media. ... Eric Goldman, associate professor at California's Santa Clara University School of Law and director of its High Tech Law Institute, said the engagement of a high-priced New York attorney by Righthaven backs up his contention Righthaven's business model is not economically viable. Read more: http://www.vegasinc.com/news/2011/may/04/righthaven-eng... / Latest Breaking News

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Righthaven engages 'superstar' attorney in litigation campaign | View Clip
05/04/2011
Las Vegas Sun

The owner of the Las Vegas Review-Journal and its copyright enforcement partner have enlisted one of the nation's top copyright attorneys to help defend their litigation campaign.

Dale Cendali, a partner at the law firm Kirkland & Ellis LLP in New York, has been engaged by Stephens Media LLC, owner of the Review-Journal; and copyright enforcer Righthaven LLC, court records show.

Righthaven since March 2010 has filed 265 lawsuits against website operators, bloggers and message-board users claiming material from the Review-Journal and the Denver Post has been infringed on.

Cendali, described by legal website abovethelaw.com as a "bad-ass litigatrix" and a "superstar," is known for representing the likes of Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling and The Associated Press in copyright litigation.

Chambers USA, which ranks law firms and attorneys, says Cendali is a nationally-recognized leader in intellectual property litigation.

"Cendali is revered as an 'exceptionally gifted litigator; she's tenacious, hard-hitting and really cares about her clients,"' says a Chambers report on her.

Cendali is a graduate of Harvard Law School, where she is an adjunct professor teaching copyright and trademark litigation.

Observers say Righthaven hired her to beef up its outside counsel staff at a time when the copyright enforcement company faces several legal challenges:

• Attorneys affiliated with the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), including another superstar, Harvard Law graduate Laurence Pulgram of the San Francisco office of the firm Fenwick & West LLP, convinced a federal judge to unseal the lawsuit contract between Righthaven and Stephens Media.

The EFF says this contract shows Righthaven's lawsuits over Review-Journal material are based on sham copyright transfers and one of the federal judges hearing Righthaven cases has said it appears this contract does not give Righthaven the right to sue.

Righthaven disagrees and Cendali, in her representation, is expected to work to convince the judges to uphold Righthaven's right to sue.

• Two federal judges have ruled against Righthaven on fair use grounds and Cendali's expertise may be tapped in appeals of those rulings.

• Two federal judges have rejected Righthaven's standard lawsuit demand that defendants' website domain names be forfeited and transferred to Righthaven. It's unknown if Righthaven will appeal those rulings – if so Cendali's expertise may be useful.

• The lone judge in Colorado hearing all of the Righthaven cases there involving Denver Post material has expressed unhappiness with Righthaven's business model that he described as using the courts to gain settlements from defendants "cowed by the potential costs of litigation and liability."

Cendali's expertise in intellectual property law may come in handy in repairing relations with that judge, Senior U.S. District Judge John L. Kane, if Righthaven engages her in Colorado.

Cendali's first appearance for Righthaven came Wednesday in its lawsuit against the operator of the Pahrump Life blog – a case in which U.S. District Judge James Mahan has said Righthaven probably lacks standing to sue under its lawsuit contract with Stephens Media.

She's also expected to appear in Righthaven's no-warning lawsuit against the Democratic Underground, where Pulgram and other EFF attorneys are pursuing a counterclaim against Righthaven and Stephens Media.

In an opinion piece in 2009 in the Economist magazine, Cendali made it clear she's interested in protecting the rights of copyright holders.

"If copyright protection were reduced, then the incentives to innovate would also be reduced, undercutting the constitutional scheme. The scale, complexity and number of original works would likely drop," Cendali wrote in the post.

Eric Goldman, associate professor at California's Santa Clara University School of Law and director of its High Tech Law Institute, said the engagement of a high-priced New York attorney by Righthaven backs up his contention Righthaven's business model is not economically viable.

"Their model assumes lots of quick settlements, and their profit/loss projections may not have anticipated just how many -- and how hard -- defendants would fight back in court. I wouldn't be a bit surprised if Ms. Cendali's fees in this case end up being many multiples of the maximum damages that Righthaven could possibly hope to get from Pahrump Life ($150,000). That's hardly a path to riches for Righthaven," Goldman said.

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San Mateo County Times, Calif., Glenn Reeves column | View Clip
05/04/2011
American Chronicle

By Glenn Reeves, San Mateo County Times, Calif.

May 4--Peter Pappageorge had several options after leading the Coast Conference in scoring as a sophomore at Canada College.

Being a big fish in a small pond was one way to go. He had offers from schools such as Hawaii Pacific, Humboldt State, Chico State and Simon Fraser University, places where he would be pretty much assured of getting plenty of playing time and plenty of shots.

But Pappageorge had always wanted to play on the big stage like his father, Nick, who still has his name all over the record books at Saint Mary's College. And when it came down to a decision, Peter Pappageorge decided to continue his college career at Long Beach State, where Dan Monson recruited him as an invited walk-on. He also had an offer from Herb Sendek to walk on to Arizona State.

"It's good to finally make a decision," Pappageorge said. "I want to give the Division I route a shot, see how it goes. I think I can play."

The 49ers went 22-12 last season and played in the NIT.

"They're very good and have a lot of good athletes," Pappageorge said. "But the coach said they don't have the kind of pure shooter who can come in and be a threat. I think it will be a good opportunity for me."

Shooting is without a doubt the 6-foot-1 Pappageorge's strong suit. He made 110 3-pointers in 25 games for Canada last season while averaging 19.5 points per game. But shooting is not his only skill.

"He's much more than just a guy who can

hit open shots," said Peter Diepenbrock, his coach at Canada the last two years. "His feel for the game and decision making are real strengths. He's a smart basketball player. I'm excited over his decision to challenge himself. This will give him an opportunity over the next two years to raise his game."

JC baseball playoffs: The College of San Mateo baseball team (25-10) received the No. 7 seed and will host No. 10 College of the Sequoias (26-10) in a best-of-three series beginning at 2 p.m. Friday.

Canada (21-13) received the No. 14 seed and was set to play at No. 3 Solano, before Canada coach Tony Lucca learned Monday that his team may have to play No. 2 Diablo Valley instead, depending on the result of the Tuesday play-in game between No. 18 Fresno and No. 15 Cosumnes River. If Cosumnes River, a Big 8 Conference team like Diablo Valley, beats Fresno, then Canada would play at Diablo Valley, rather than Solano. Either way the Colts will be without Lucca, who received his second ejection of the season last weekend against Ohlone. Steve Hoff will manage Canada in Lucca's absence.

CSM advanced to the state championship game last year. Coach Doug Williams lost a lot of starters off that team, but has been pleased with how his pitching has come along.

"Josh Fredendall (3-0, 0.20) led the state in ERA and allowed one run all season," Williams said of the former Hillsdale High standout. "He has 24 strikeouts in 261/3 innings. He's down at University of San Diego right now on a visit. He's an outstanding student too and is being recruited by Michigan and Boston College. There's a lot of interest in him. He continues to throw in the upper 80s and lower 90s and has a nice slider

"We've had four pitchers step up for us, also Devin Bradley, Clay Bauer and Daniel Chavez. They've all done a super job on the mound."

JC softball playoffs: The CSM softball team (26-11) received the No. 10 seed and will play No. 7 Shasta (30-11), in a best-of-three series beginning at 2 p.m. Saturday.

CSM played Shasta early in the season, but that was before Alyssa Jepsen started pitching for the Bulldogs.

"She's athletic and can make adjustments faster than any athlete I've coached," CSM coach Nicole Borg said of Jepsen, who has accepted a scholarship offer from Santa Clara University. "She wants the ball in her hands.

"The way we look at it is we're .500 against the playoff teams (7-7) and we split with Shasta during the year. They have dangerous athletes and we have dangerous athletes. It will come down to who plays a better game. It's matter of playing catch, executing on defense and expecting to play our best softball all year. No matter who we play, if we play our best softball we can compete with anybody," Borg said.

County sports notes: Occidental's Kelly Young, formerly of Capuchino High and CSM, broke a 25-year-old Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference meet record Saturday in the women's shot put with a throw of 47 feet, 21/2 inches. Young also won the discus and the hammer at the meet. ... Aragon has hired Sam Manu as boys basketball coach, replacing Arjuna Manning-Laisne.

Contact Glenn Reeves at 650-348-4345 or greeves@bayareanewsgroup.com.

To see more of the San Mateo County Times or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to www.mercurynews.com/san-mateo-county.

Copyright (c) 2011, San Mateo County Times, Calif.

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Santa Clara loses longtime athletics booster | View Clip
05/04/2011
Daily News, The

The Santa Clara University athletics community is mourning the loss of Ed Kelly, a 1939 graduate who died Saturday after a recent surgery. Kelly was part of that community for 72 years and volunteered with the Broncos for more than 29 years, according to a release from the school.

A funeral mass will held Tuesday at 2 p.m. at SCU's Mission Church. It will be open to the public. “Kind, funny, a great dresser and always with a twinkle in his eye, Ed was the first person to greet you as you arrived at work,” Rusty Weekes, the foundation's director, said in the release. “Ed, as much as any athlete, represented what it means to be a Bronco. He loved it when his Broncos won. His attitude was always positive, and he had a good word for everybody he encountered. To say he will be missed is trite, to say he was beloved isn't enough.” Donations to a scholarship fund established in Kelly's name can be sent to The Bronco Bench Foundation, c/o Edward M. Kelly Scholarship Fund, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053

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Santa Clara University loses longtime athletics booster | View Clip
05/04/2011
Palo Alto Daily News - Online

The Santa Clara University athletics community is mourning the loss of Ed Kelly, a 1939 graduate who died Saturday after a recent surgery. Kelly was part of that community for 72 years and volunteered with the Broncos for more than 29 years, according to a release from the school.

A funeral mass will held Tuesday at 2 p.m. at SCU's Mission Church. It will be open to the public.

"Kind, funny, a great dresser and always with a twinkle in his eye, Ed was the first person to greet you as you arrived at work," Rusty Weekes, the foundation's director, said in the release. "Ed, as much as any athlete, represented what it means to be a Bronco. He loved it when his Broncos won. His attitude was always positive, and he had a good word for everybody he encountered. To say he will be missed is trite, to say he was beloved isn't enough."

Donations to a scholarship fund established in Kelly's name can be sent to The Bronco Bench Foundation, c/o Edward M. Kelly Scholarship Fund, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053

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Stanford Debates R.O.T.C.'s Return | View Clip
05/04/2011
At War

April 29, 10:18 a.m. | Vote Results After two hours of debate, the Stanford faculty senate voted to bring ROTC back on campus: 28 members voted for its return, 9 voted against it and 3 abstained. During the faculty senate meeting, Former Secretary of Defense William Perry discussed how bringing ROTC back to Stanford could help the military by providing better trained and educated leaders. Much of the debate was centered on the military's posture toward transgendered people and also on whether academic credit would be granted to ROTC courses. An amendment to the resolution of bringing ROTC back to campus was added that stated the faculty senate's objection concerning the military's treatment towards transgender people.

Since Congress voted to end the “don't ask, don't tell” law, several “elite” universities, including Harvard and Columbia, have decided to reinstate R.O.T.C. programs. Stanford might be next. Last week, an ad hoc R.O.T.C. committee at the university unanimously recommended that President John L. Hennessy invite the program back on campus. Today, the Stanford Faculty Senate is expected to support the idea as well.

R.O.T.C., the Reserve Officers Training Corps, is a program for college students. R.O.T.C. cadets supplement their undergraduate academic curriculum with military and leadership training. Upon graduating and successfully completing the program, college seniors are commissioned as second lieutenants. Roughly 60 percent of newly commissioned officers in the Army come from R.O.T.C. programs, and more than 40 percent of general officers in the Army are R.O.T.C. graduates. The military pays for many cadets' entire undergraduate education.

The attitude at Stanford toward reinstating R.O.T.C. has generally been positive. In this year's student elections, 44 percent of voters supported a return of R.O.T.C. while 17 percent opposed it. Also, both of the school's student-run newspapers supported bringing the program back.

Though R.O.T.C. has been away from Stanford for decades, the military is no stranger to the campus. Throughout this academic year, there have been military-themed lecture events. For example, a Military 101 seminar series was started by R.O.T.C. cadets and veterans to share with the greater Stanford community what military service entails. The speakers at these events have been senior active-duty officers from the Center for International Security and Cooperation and the Hoover Institution. Furthermore, Stanford is a veteran-friendly campus, with a vibrant veteran community at its graduate schools and a generous Post-9/11 G.I. Bill Yellow Ribbon Program. There are more student veterans on campus — upwards of 50 — than there are R.O.T.C. cadets. Perhaps as a result, the debate here has been civil and thought-provoking.

Now that “don't ask, don't tell” is ending, the military's rules prohibiting transgender people from serving and granting academic credit for R.O.T.C. courses are the two main obstacles to inviting R.O.T.C. back on campus. A law school classmate of mine, Jon Margolick, penned an essay to one of the school's newspapers, contending that although the concerns of transgender people were valid, the benefits associated with R.O.T.C. and public service outweighed the negatives.

The debate is not whether students can participate in R.O.T.C. but rather on whether the military can have R.O.T.C. cadres conducting training on Stanford's campus. There are currently 14 Stanford students who are R.O.T.C. cadets. But because Stanford does not openly allow R.O.T.C. instructors and training on campus, these cadets have to travel off campus to complete their training. The travel can be onerous. One Marine cadet remarked that he had spent countless hours on the road driving to the University of California at Berkeley to fulfill his R.O.T.C. training. He found it odd that Berkeley never eliminated its program even though it is considered one of the most liberal schools in the nation.

One of the greatest challenges to bringing R.O.T.C. back to universities like Stanford and Harvard is the cost of education at these schools. Given that taxpayers finance R.O.T.C. training, the military could probably produce two to three R.O.T.C. graduates from a less expensive school for the cost of every Stanford cadet. Although some proponents say that quality is more important than quantity, my experience has been that there is little difference in quality among commissioning sources. I believe this stems from the success of the military's officer basic training programs which establish a solid baseline for all R.O.T.C. graduates.

Both of my company commanders on active duty were R.O.T.C. graduates from small schools (Seattle University and Norwich). Both were considered among the best midlevel officers in the brigade, better than West Point graduates of the same year group or R.O.T.C. officers who had graduated from better-known schools. Moreover, unlike many of their peers, they are giving taxpayers a better return on their investment, because both officers plan on making the military a career.

With the federal government and military facing a constrained budget, the military will be looking to cut costs in all areas. Thus, the armed services may not immediately jump at an invitation to return to Stanford. And even if R.O.T.C. programs decide to return to elite campuses, there will be an issue of scale. Given the small number of R.O.T.C. cadets likely to be produced at a place like Stanford or Columbia, it might make little sense for the military to establish a large presence at those campuses.

Lacking sufficient instructors and resources on site, however, will only continue to dissuade prospective cadets from joining R.O.T.C. because the stresses associated with coordinating training and driving off campus for hours to attend mandatory training elsewhere. One Stanford cadet confided that he had contemplated transferring to West Point partly because of the stress associated with commuting to all of his military training requirements.

If the military really wants to grow its cadet population at elite schools, it will have to tailor its recruiting message. Some students will be interested in studying counterinsurgency, while others will be interested in the leadership training and still others in learning about weapons. Regardless, the military should develop a plan to single out talented college students who have options beyond the military, such as finance or consulting. The military should also focus on retaining these graduates once they become junior officers, where attrition rates have been high.

Despite any difficulties that might be associated with bringing R.O.T.C. back to campus, student veterans are optimistic that a move in this direction will help bridge a perceived civil-military divide between so-called elites and members of the military. Several Stanford cadets have told me that they deliberately conceal where they attend school during military training to avoid unnecessary attention. In an organization that emphasizes humility and teamwork, being a Stanford cadet could be difficult if fellow soldiers view him or her as pretentious.

In 1968, arsonists burned down Stanford's Navy R.O.T.C. building. More than 40 years later, the pendulum of history has shifted, and the notion of having R.O.T.C. on campus no longer seems foreign. Thus far, the R.O.T.C. debate on campus has been framed through the narrow prism of faculty and student opinions about the military. The bigger takeaway that many Vietnam veterans point to, though, is how American society has come to embrace the military since the Vietnam War.

This Memorial Day, Stanford's Graduate School of Business is hosting Paul Bucha at an event. Many students are looking forward to meeting Mr. Bucha, an alumnus of the Stanford business school and a Medal of Honor recipient for service in Vietnam. In a few years, a Stanford R.O.T.C. graduate, educated and trained on the Stanford campus, might be able to do the same for a new batch of young cadets.

Tim Hsia was the first soldier to contribute to the At War blog, after a chance meeting with the New York Times correspondent Stephen Farrell in 2008 in the Iraqi province of Diyala. A 2004 graduate of West Point and former Army infantry captain, he is now studying law at Stanford and is an R.O.T.C. instructor at Santa Clara University, which offers training for Stanford cadets.

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*California University Builds Eco-Friendly Apartments | View Clip
05/03/2011
School Construction News - Online

When completed this September, Santa Clara University will open its first eco-friendly student-housing complex — all part of its larger plan to attain net zero carbon emissions by 2015.

Designed by KTGY Architects, the new housing project is located on 5.18 acres — in both Santa Clara and San Jose — and will house 400 junior and senior students.

Situated next to SCU's Stephen Schott Stadium, the apartments allow for easy walking access to classes as well as rail transit. Designed under the Build It Green standards — a holistic approach to designing, constructing and operating — the new complex incorporates the latest in energy efficiency, indoor air quality, resource conservation and water conservation techniques.

“Santa Clara University is excited to have its first eco-friendly housing complex for students, especially since the university's mission is to become more sustainable and climate neutral,” says Joe Sugg, assistant vice president of university operations.

SCU was previously unable to meet the demand for on-campus apartment accommodations from junior and senior students. This created accommodations in the surrounding community with inflated prices, while the student density in the neighborhood was disruptive to permanent residents.

“These new apartments will allow our students an independent lifestyle in housing designed to meet their needs while staying connected to campus and enjoying a community of peers as neighbors,” says Sugg. “We also needed to expand and update our underclassmen housing, but could not do that without moving juniors and seniors currently living on campus over to these accommodations.”

KTGY began designing this project in mid 2009, just as the economy hit it lowest point during the recession.

“It was an alternative to previous solutions that didn't work in today's market or economy,” says David Obitz, KTGY principal and lead designer. “This was a classic example of retooling and simplifying projects to work for today.”

The university declined to release the total cost of the project, which includes 138 townhouse-style apartments in 11 three-story buildings with eight one-bedroom units, 64 two-bedroom suites, and 66 four-bedroom/two-bath two-story units. Each unit will have its own patio or balcony, laundry facility, granite counters, stainless steel appliances and cherry cabinetry. There will also be covered and uncovered parking and all apartments will be secured with electronic locks.

California and Italianate

Obitz says this new housing project and the 4,500-square-foot student services center, — which includes a large multipurpose event room with kitchen and support services, will mesh nicely with SCU's mix of Early California, Italianate and contemporary themes.

“The intent of the project theme is to relate to the context of the university's architectural heritage as well as provide a building design that is technologically advanced,” he says. “Early California to Italianate themes found on the SCU campus are reflected here but with a few cleaner lines that are not literal copies of history, but contemporary interpretations of traditional themes.”

The design concept and organization gathers the student housing around a series of greenbelt views, anchored by a central courtyard, Obitz says.

“The sequential spaces are activated by two volleyball courts, a bocce ball court, multiple outdoor kitchen/barbecue and seating areas and plazas,” he says “All ‘roads' lead to the hub of activity — the student services center.”

On Target

KTGY is also pleased to report that the project is on target, but like any campus housing project, having the units ready for occupancy at the beginning of the school year is critical.

“Missing by a day is like missing by a year,” Obitz says. “To meet the schedule, it took great efforts from the developer, The Sobrato Organization, and Santa Clara University, as well as the design and engineering consultants to coordinate their work product in a high effort so construction could begin and finish and meet the 2011 occupancy.”

Fortunately there have been few major obstacles to date. From a design and planning perspective, Obitz cites the biggest challenge as simplifying and downsizing the scope of the project and still achieving enough student housing units or density to satisfy the university and the city's requirements for a transit-oriented project.

“Our original expectation was a ‘podium' design with residential over a concrete garage at over 60 dwelling units per acre,” Obitz says. “Saving much cost and construction time, we eliminated the podium and provide the parking at grade towards the rear of the curvilinear property line.”

The team clustered three-story residential buildings together to form “outdoor rooms” with passive garden courts and active courtyards with recreational uses while maximizing student housing units with a three-story wood-framed structure, slab-on-grade at nearly 30 units per acre.

For the university, Sugg says the largest challenge was that the project straddled two municipalities — Santa Clara and San Jose.

“However, negotiations with both cities concluded an agreement on single jurisdiction for various elements of the project, such as fire code, building code and inspections,” Sugg says.

Climate Neutrality

While the project will not be LEED certified, many design features are consistent with LEED criteria. SCU is also committed to climate neutrality by 2015 — zero carbon emissions — and has implemented many energy-efficiency measures.

“It's a big challenge and one that we cannot reach without offsetting some of our energy demands with carbon credits,” he says. “Nevertheless, we have a full court press on reducing energy demand and acquiring alternate energy sources.”

This includes education, cultural change, energy system upgrades, striving for energy efficiency of 50 percent better than the California code, lighting upgrades, electric vehicles, 1.0 megawatt of solar PV panels, ongoing evaluation of a new wind turbine, new generation solar hot water panels for heating and cooking in the dining hall, and the pursuit of a campus smart micro-grid system to leverage its new distributed generation.

Other eco-friendly features include Energy Star-rated lighting and windows, Dark Sky compliant exterior lighting, water-saving bathroom fixtures, high-efficiency dual-flush toilets, and trash and recycling receptacles made from recycled materials.

“In the last five years, while increasing the campus building area by 15 percent, SCU has achieved an absolute energy reduction of 20 percent and a carbon reduction of 25 percent, as well,” Sugg says. “100 percent of the university's purchased electricity is green energy.”

Lisa Kopochinski is a freelance writer.

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*Top 10 Ethical Questions For Incoming Students | View Clip
05/03/2011
Huffington Post, The

You got your acceptance letter. You're breathing a sigh of relief, signing up for an orientation session, and starting to think about what “dorm in a bag” set to order. But there's another way to be prepared: Imagine what you will do when you face “The Top Ten Ethical Questions for Incoming Freshmen."

The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University gathered 130 stories from students in regards to ethical questions they faced in college. From these, they identified the top 10 ethical questions for students.

See more on their social media project, The Big Q, (Facebook: www.fb.com/mybigq and Blog: www.scu.edu/thebigq).

How do you react to these issues? Are there any ethical questions we missed? Let us know in the comments section.

Do My Parents Belong at College?

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Should your parents have a say in your choice of major? Do they have a right to see your grades? Can you ask them to call a teacher when you're having trouble in a class or contact a dean if you have a disciplinary problem? Many parents want to be involved (especially when they're paying the bill), but when is that reasonable guidance and when is it an intrusion? Now that you're 18, aren't you supposed to be an adult?

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Enforcing Copyrights Online, for a Profit | View Clip
05/03/2011
CNBC - Online

When Brian Hill, a 20-year-old blogger from North Carolina, posted on his Web site last December a photograph of an airport security officer conducting a pat-down, a legal battle was the last thing he imagined.

A month later, Mr. Hill received an e-mail from a reporter for The Las Vegas Sun who was looking into a Nevada company that files copyright lawsuits for newspapers. The e-mail informed Mr. Hill that he was one of those that the company, Righthaven, was suing. Though the airport photo had gone viral before Mr. Hill plucked it off the Web, it belonged to The Denver Post, where it first appeared on Nov. 18.

Howard Kingsnorth | Photodisc | Getty Images

Mr. Hill took down the photo. He was too late. A summons was delivered to his house. The lawsuit sought statutory damages. It did not name a figure, but accused Mr. Hill of “willful” infringement, and under federal copyright law up to $150,000 can be awarded in such cases.

“I was shocked,” Mr. Hill said. “I thought maybe it was a joke or something to scare me. I didn't know the picture was copyrighted.”

Over the last year, as newspapers continue to grapple with how to protect their online content, Righthaven has filed more than 200 similar federal lawsuits in Colorado and Nevada over material posted without permission from The Denver Post or The Las Vegas Review-Journal.

The company has business relationships with both newspapers. Like much of the industry, the papers see the appropriation of their work without permission as akin to theft and harmful to their business, and are frustrated by unsuccessful efforts to stem the common practice, whether it's by a one-man operation like Mr. Hill's, or an established one like Matt Drudge's.

Sara Glines, a vice president for the MediaNews Group, which owns The Denver Post, wrote in an e-mail that the pat-down photo had been used on more than 300 Web sites with no credit to The Post or the photographer.

“We have invested heavily in creating quality content in our markets,” Ms. Glines wrote. “To allow others who have not shared in that investment to reap the benefit ultimately hurts our ability to continue to fund that investment at the same level.”

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Mark Hinueber, general counsel for Stephens Media, owner of The Review-Journal, echoed Ms. Glines's concerns, saying that cutting and pasting articles “steals the potential audience for our editorial material and traffic to our Web sites.”

Some critics, however, contend that Righthaven's tactics are draconian, and that the company hopes to extract swift settlements before it is clear that there is a violation of federal copyright law. Typically, the suits have been filed without warning. Righthaven rarely sends out notices telling Web sites to take down material that does not belong to them before seeking damages and demanding forfeiture of the Web domain name.

Defendants in these cases run the gamut. They have included the white supremacist David Duke, the Democratic Party of Nevada and Mr. Drudge. But little known Web sites, nonprofit groups and so-called mom-and-pop bloggers — people who blog as a hobby — are not exempt from Righthaven's legal actions.

According to some Internet legal experts who have been watching the cases with growing interest, the way it works is simple: Righthaven finds newspaper material that has been republished on the Web — usually an article, excerpts or a photograph — and obtains the copyrights. Then, the company sues.

World

Politics

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Whether the defendant credits the original author or removes the material after being sued matters little. None of the cases have gone to trial yet, and many have been settled out of court. In two instances, judges have ruled against Righthaven in pretrial motions. According to The Las Vegas Sun, which has tracked the cases, the only two publicly disclosed settlements were for $2,185 and $5,000.

In describing his company's approach, Steve Gibson, Righthaven's chief executive, said that there has been “voluminous, almost incalculable infringement” since the advent of the Internet and that years of warning people to take down copyrighted content had not worked. Newspapers, he said, needed a new way to address the problem of people appropriating their material without permission.

Eric Goldman, director of the high-tech law institute at the Santa Clara University School of Law, said reposting published material online could qualify as “fair use” if it didn't diminish the market value of the original. Other critics of the suits contend that reposting material for the purposes of discussion does not constitute infringement.

CONTINUED: "Many of the defendants are ill-informed about copyright law..."

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Enforcing copyrights, for a profit | View Clip
05/03/2011
Bulletin, The

By Dan Frosch / New York Times News Service Published: May 03. 2011 4:00AM PST

Brian Hill, a 20-year-old blogger in Mayodan, N.C., is being sued for copyright infringement charges by Righthaven.

Carly Calhoun / New York Times News Service

DENVER — When Brian Hill, a 20-year-old blogger from North Carolina, posted on his website in December a photograph of an airport security officer conducting a pat-down, a legal battle was the last thing he imagined.

A month later, Hill received an e-mail from a reporter for The Las Vegas Sun who was looking into a Nevada company that files copyright lawsuits for newspapers. The e-mail informed Hill that he was one of those the company, Righthaven, was suing. Though the airport photo had gone viral before Hill plucked it off the Web, it belonged to The Denver Post, where it first appeared Nov. 18.

Hill took down the photo. He was too late. A summons was delivered to his house. The lawsuit sought statutory damages. It did not name a figure, but accused Hill of “willful” infringement, and under federal copyright law up to $150,000 can be awarded in such cases.

“I was shocked,” Hill said. “I thought maybe it was a joke or something to scare me. I didn't know the picture was copyrighted.”

Over the past year, as newspapers continue to grapple with how to protect their online content, Righthaven has filed more than 200 similar federal lawsuits in Colorado and Nevada over material posted without permission from The Denver Post or The Las Vegas Review-Journal.

The company has business relationships with both newspapers. Like much of the industry, the papers see the appropriation of their work without permission as akin to theft and harmful to their business, and are frustrated by unsuccessful efforts to stem the common practice, whether it's by a one-man operation like Hill's, or an established one like Matt Drudge's.

Sara Glines, a vice president for the MediaNews Group, which owns The Denver Post, wrote in an e-mail that the pat-down photo had been used on more than 300 websites with no credit to The Post or the photographer.

“We have invested heavily in creating quality content in our markets,” Glines wrote. “To allow others who have not shared in that investment to reap the benefit ultimately hurts our ability to continue to fund that investment at the same level.”

Heavy-handed?

Some critics, however, contend that Righthaven's tactics are draconian, and that the company hopes to extract swift settlements before it is clear that there is a violation of federal copyright law. Typically, the suits have been filed without warning. Righthaven rarely sends out notices telling websites to take down material that does not belong to them before seeking damages and demanding forfeiture of the Web domain name.

Defendants in these cases run the gamut. They have included the white supremacist David Duke, the Democratic Party of Nevada and Drudge. But little-known websites, nonprofit groups and mom-and-pop bloggers — people who blog as a hobby — are not exempt from Righthaven's legal actions.

According to some Internet legal experts who have been watching the cases with growing interest, the way it works is simple: Righthaven finds newspaper material that has been republished on the Web — usually an article, excerpts or a photograph — and obtains the copyrights. Then, the company sues.

Whether the defendant credits the original author or removes the material after being sued matters little. None of the cases has gone to trial yet, and many have been settled out of court. In two instances, judges have ruled against Righthaven in pretrial motions. According to The Las Vegas Sun, which has tracked the cases, the only two publicly disclosed settlements were for $2,185 and $5,000.

Defining the rules

In describing his company's approach, Steve Gibson, Righthaven's chief executive, said there has been “voluminous, almost incalculable infringement” since the advent of the Internet and that years of warning people to take down copyrighted content had not worked. Newspapers, he said, needed a new way to address the problem of people appropriating their material without permission.

Eric Goldman, director of the high-tech law institute at the Santa Clara University School of Law, said reposting published material online could qualify as “fair use” if it didn't diminish the market value of the original. Other critics of the suits contend that reposting material for the purposes of discussion does not constitute infringement.

In an amicus brief filed on behalf of the Media Bloggers Association regarding a Righthaven suit in Nevada, Marc Randazza, a lawyer specializing in First Amendment issues, accused the company of acquiring copyrights for the sole purpose of going after defendants who could not afford legal help.

“Nobody can seriously believe that Righthaven, which publishes nothing anywhere, has acquired the full ownership of the articles it sues upon,” wrote Randazza, whose legal group recently filed motions to dismiss two other Righthaven cases, accusing the company of making fraudulent copyright claims.

Gibson denies that unwitting bloggers are a particular target and points to lawsuits like the one against Drudge. Righthaven accused Drudge of posting the airport pat-down photo on his Drudge Report website without permission. The suit was settled out of court, Gibson said.

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Enforcing Copyrights, For a Profit
05/03/2011
New York Times, The

DENVER -- When Brian Hill, a 20-year-old blogger from North Carolina, posted on his Web site last December a photograph of an airport security officer conducting a pat-down, a legal battle was the last thing he imagined.

A month later, Mr. Hill received an e-mail from a reporter for The Las Vegas Sun who was looking into a Nevada company that files copyright lawsuits for newspapers. The e-mail informed Mr. Hill that he was one of those that the company, Righthaven, was suing. Though the airport photo had gone viral before Mr. Hill plucked it off the Web, it belonged to The Denver Post, where it first appeared on Nov. 18.

Mr. Hill took down the photo. He was too late. A summons was delivered to his house. The lawsuit sought statutory damages. It did not name a figure, but accused Mr. Hill of ''willful'' infringement, and under federal copyright law up to $150,000 can be awarded in such cases.

''I was shocked,'' Mr. Hill said. ''I thought maybe it was a joke or something to scare me. I didn't know the picture was copyrighted.''

Over the last year, as newspapers continue to grapple with how to protect their online content, Righthaven has filed more than 200 similar federal lawsuits in Colorado and Nevada over material posted without permission from The Denver Post or The Las Vegas Review-Journal.

The company has business relationships with both newspapers. Like much of the industry, the papers see the appropriation of their work without permission as akin to theft and harmful to their business, and are frustrated by unsuccessful efforts to stem the common practice, whether it's by a one-man operation like Mr. Hill's, or an established one like Matt Drudge's.

Sara Glines, a vice president for the MediaNews Group, which owns The Denver Post, wrote in an e-mail that the pat-down photo had been used on more than 300 Web sites with no credit to The Post or the photographer.

''We have invested heavily in creating quality content in our markets,'' Ms. Glines wrote. ''To allow others who have not shared in that investment to reap the benefit ultimately hurts our ability to continue to fund that investment at the same level.''

Mark Hinueber, general counsel for Stephens Media, owner of The Review-Journal, echoed Ms. Glines's concerns, saying that cutting and pasting articles ''steals the potential audience for our editorial material and traffic to our Web sites.''

Some critics, however, contend that Righthaven's tactics are draconian, and that the company hopes to extract swift settlements before it is clear that there is a violation of federal copyright law. Typically, the suits have been filed without warning. Righthaven rarely sends out notices telling Web sites to take down material that does not belong to them before seeking damages and demanding forfeiture of the Web domain name.

Defendants in these cases run the gamut. They have included the white supremacist David Duke, the Democratic Party of Nevada and Mr. Drudge. But little known Web sites, nonprofit groups and so-called mom-and-pop bloggers -- people who blog as a hobby -- are not exempt from Righthaven's legal actions.

According to some Internet legal experts who have been watching the cases with growing interest, the way it works is simple: Righthaven finds newspaper material that has been republished on the Web -- usually an article, excerpts or a photograph -- and obtains the copyrights. Then, the company sues.

Whether the defendant credits the original author or removes the material after being sued matters little. None of the cases have gone to trial yet, and many have been settled out of court. In two instances, judges have ruled against Righthaven in pretrial motions. According to The Las Vegas Sun, which has tracked the cases, the only two publicly disclosed settlements were for $2,185 and $5,000.

In describing his company's approach, Steve Gibson, Righthaven's chief executive, said that there has been ''voluminous, almost incalculable infringement'' since the advent of the Internet and that years of warning people to take down copyrighted content had not worked. Newspapers, he said, needed a new way to address the problem of people appropriating their material without permission.

Eric Goldman, director of the high-tech law institute at the Santa Clara University School of Law, said reposting published material online could qualify as ''fair use'' if it didn't diminish the market value of the original. Other critics of the suits contend that reposting material for the purposes of discussion does not constitute infringement.

''Many of the defendants are ill-informed about copyright law,'' Mr. Goldman said. ''They're not trying to compete with a newspaper. They just don't know the rules.'' Mr. Goldman informally advised a company that was sued by Righthaven and settled out of court.

In an amicus brief filed on behalf of the Media Bloggers Association regarding a Righthaven suit in Nevada, Marc J. Randazza, a lawyer specializing in First Amendment issues, accused the company of acquiring copyrights for the sole purpose of going after defendants who could not afford legal help.

''Nobody can seriously believe that Righthaven, which publishes nothing anywhere, has acquired the full ownership of the articles it sues upon,'' wrote Mr. Randazza, whose legal group recently filed motions to dismiss two other Righthaven cases, accusing the company of making fraudulent copyright claims.

Mr. Gibson denies that unwitting bloggers are a particular target and points to lawsuits like the one against Mr. Drudge. Righthaven accused Mr. Drudge of posting the airport pat-down photo on his Drudge Report Web site without permission. The suit was settled out of court, Mr. Gibson said.''The harm of viewer diversion has been achieved whether it is being shown on Momandpop.com or Chicagotribune.com,'' he said. ''If the accusation were true that we were just a purely greedy operation not advancing the interests of copyright law, then we wouldn't be addressing viewer diversion.''

Ms. Glines said that MediaNews ''reviewed every violation and only approved actions against sites that carried advertising and were not charities.''

Rachel Bjorklund wishes she had been sent a simple e-mail rather than slapped with a lawsuit. A stay-at-home mother in Oregon, Ms. Bjorklund was sued by Righthaven in March after she posted the airport pat-down photo on her blog, thoughtsfromaconservativemom.com.

''My reaction was, 'Why didn't you just contact me and ask me to take it down?' That would have been no problem,'' said Ms. Bjorklund, who plans to challenge the suit.

Mr. Hill, who suffers from autism and diabetes and lives on disability checks with his mother, said at that at one point Righthaven had offered to settle for $6,000, but he refused. A Colorado lawyer, David Kerr, has been defending him pro bono.

A federal judge presiding over the case criticized Righthaven last month for using the courts to settle with defendants scared of the potential cost of litigation. Shortly after, Righthaven moved to voluntarily drop the suit, saying it had not been aware of Mr. Hill's health problems. But Righthaven also stated in court filings that a dismissal did not exonerate others it was suing and warned Mr. Hill against continuing to use copyrighted material.

Mr. Hill recently decided to revive his Web site, uswgo.com, where he posts links to various political articles and his own musings, which he had taken down after being sued. On the site, there is a notice explaining Mr. Hill's belief that material posted there, even without permission, constitutes fair use. This time, though, Mr. Hill said he's steering clear of any image or story that could cause him trouble with Righthaven.

PHOTO: Brian Hill posted a newspaper's photo on his blog and was sued by Righthaven for infringement. (PHOTOGRAPH BY CARLY CALHOUN FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (B2)

Copyright © 2011 The New York Times Company

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How To Invest In An Ethical Corporate Culture | View Clip
05/03/2011
Business Insider - Online, The

Companies are starting to distinguish between non-financial and financial risks in order to continue improving their overall governance and business structures. But non-financial risks, such as ethics, still don't get the attention they deserve from industry experts.

And this could have real – and financial – implications for your company.

‘No company has found an effective way of evaluating and measuring non-financial risks,' says Kirk Hanson, executive director of the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University. ‘And ethics risk is one of the many forms of non-financial risk that has always been a concern.'

Remember that ethical shortfalls are what triggered a string of financial misdeeds, which led to insider trading probes, investigations and regulatory action. Several high-profile companies collapsed as a result, and some prominent executives remain in prison today.

Many businesses have relied on the same governance structures for decades but in response to the recent economic downfall followed by the passage of Dodd-Frank, some have started considering newer and more cutting-edge techniques to help better align their existing business model.

‘Dodd-Frank deals a lot with ethics,' notes Hanson, who also taught at Stanford Graduate School of Business for 23 years. ‘Companies should have a state-of-the-art ethics program in place, with risk management strategies to help achieve better business performance.'

As Dodd-Frank attempts to reinforce ethical practices at corporations and institutions, Hanson says companies should start to analyze ethical risks that previously eroded investor confidence.

Examples include the theft of intellectual property and proprietary information, especially in a highly competitive market. Additionally, in a geographically dispersed sales organization, ‘there can be sales people who engage in bribery or some other kind of improper inducement to make sales,' Hanson confirms. ‘This is one of the most ethically problematic areas companies face.'

With these cases in mind, Hanson suggests that firms should:

(i) Start designing training programs that not only address the company's code of conduct but also provide employees with guidance on specific issues the organization's risk management techniques identify. ‘Typical ethical training has been quite poor over the years. Too often it says, ‘We want you to obey our conduct rules or else you are fired,' Hanson explains. ‘Risk committees need to focus on the real ethics risk an organization can incur and move its employees in that direction.'

(ii) Having more frequent audits and risk assessments can help companies identify a weak ethical environment ahead of time. ‘Using this approach, employees can understand the standards of the firm and how they apply to their specific job,' Hanson says.

(iii) Frequent communication of the company's ethical expectations of employees is crucial. Hanson believes that, ‘in the case of protecting intellectual property, on a more regular basis teaching employees and co-workers how to respect your competitor's intellectual property and protect your own' will promote an ethical corporate culture.

‘There seems to be a pattern where there are ethical crises in businesses that recur in an eight or nine-year cycle,' Hanson adds. ‘How a company practices its non-financial risk management strategies remains a crucial responsibility for boards.'

For the latest finance news, visit Clusterstock. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

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Seminar teaches parents about teen 'sexting' | View Clip
05/03/2011
San Jose Mercury News - Online

For many parents, the only concern they have about their child's use of text messaging is the frequency and how it relates to their monthly phone bill. But there is another aspect to this popular form of communication that might be even more disturbing than the cost.

"Sexting," which means sending text messages with sexual content, has become a trend among teenagers, and many parents may find themselves at a loss as to how to handle it. In response to this modern dilemma, Westgate Community Church, in conjunction with Unplanned Good, invites parents and families to its upcoming Parent Recharge event on "Birds and Bees and Technology."

The May 5 event will focus on many issues surrounding sexting, including safeguards, guidelines, legalities, risks and what to do when children receive sexually explicit content on their phones. Randy Duke, a Silicon Valley technology veteran and founder of Pocket Truths, will lead the sexting portion of the event.

"The seminar is designed to level the playing field for parents and technologically savvy kids," Duke said. "What we do is provide tools and resources for parents. We talk about safeguards provided by carriers for parents and practical tips on what should be done and put in place in order to provide some protection."

Duke said that the national average of 10- to 14-year-olds with personal cell phones is 60 percent, and that the percentage jumps to 84 for 15- to 18-year-olds.

"In this

valley I'd argue that the numbers are significantly higher," he added.

Between the access to cell phones and social networking sites, Duke said the prevalence of sexually explicit messages is a real problem.

"We let parents check out the statistics for themselves," he said.

Duke has three talks this month at churches in the area, and he said that for the most part the information is well-received, although occasionally he hears some opposition.

"Sometimes we'll get comments from parents saying, 'You're just sheltering the kids.' But sheltering is a good thing and protection is a good thing," he said.

Marilyn Doyle, an assistant at Westgate Community Church, said the church has been hosting one or two Parent Recharge events a year for the past four years.

"We've covered various current parenting topics, and they're pretty well attended. We typically get about 100 people," Doyle said. "It's a time for parents to relax and get information, and it gives them a chance to talk among themselves and realize that they're not alone and other parents are going through the same things."

She said the church runs a junior high, high school and college age ministry and it is those members who create the recharge events.

"A lot of times people don't even realize students organize it," Doyle said.

She added that this is the first time the church is being aided by an outside organization. Unplanned Good is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting adoption as a result of unplanned pregnancy.

"They will talk at the end about what to do if you find yourself in that situation," she said.

Two MBA students from Santa Clara University's Net Impact Club, Nidhi Jetley and Ashwini Patil, are also working with Unplanned Good and Westgate to help organize the event.

The Parent Recharge event will be on May 5, 7 to 9 p.m., at Westgate Church, 1735 Saratoga Ave. in San Jose. The cost to attend is $5 in advance and $10 at the door. For more information and to pre-register online, visit www.westgatechurch.org.

Birds and Bees and Technology

The Parent Recharge event on sexting will be held on May 5, 7 to 9 p.m., at Westgate Church, 1735 Saratoga Ave. in San Jose. The cost to attend is $5 in advance and $10 at the door. For more information and to pre-register online, visit

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Under Prop. 300, college just a dream for many illegal immigrants | View Clip
05/03/2011
Arizona Capitol Times

Because she is in the U.S. illegally, Carina Montes, a high school junior with a 4.2 GPA, would have to pay out-of-state tuition to attend a public university or college due to Proposition 300. (Cronkite News Service Photo by Griselda Nevarez)

A 4.2 grade-point average and participation in activities such as Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps make Carina Montes an attractive candidate for scholarships as she plans to attend Arizona State University.

But scholarships may not be enough for Montes, a junior at Trevor G. Browne High School in west Phoenix: She faces having to pay out-of-state tuition and won't be eligible to receive state or federal financial aid because her parents brought her to the U.S. illegally when she was 2. As a result, she's scrambling to come up with money and private scholarships.

“Without a job, without scholarships and with my parents' poor economic salary … it's going to be a very complicated thing to do,” she said.

Montes' uncertainty stems from Proposition 300, a voter-approved law requiring students who can't prove citizenship to pay out-of-state tuition and denying them access to state and federal financial aid.

Nearly five years after Arizona voters overwhelmingly approved the measure, Claudia Gonzalez, whose mother brought her to the U.S. illegally when she was 8, is struggling to complete her associate degree at Mesa Community College because she wasn't able to come up with enough private scholarships to pay out-of-state tuition at a university. She has been limiting herself to six credits or fewer each semester to avoid a steep increase in community college out-of-state tuition that begins at seven credits.

“I want to climb the ladder and I want to be at the top, but it's going to take me longer,” said Gonzalez, who is studying to become a dental hygienist.

Now Maricopa Community Colleges is changing the way it handles out-of-state tuition for part-time students. This fall, Gonzalez will have to pay $317 per credit rather than the $96 she pays now.

Christian Lira of Phoenix, who came to the U.S. with a tourist visa when he was 10 and stayed illegally, earned a private scholarship that has helped him pay out-of-state tuition at ASU to pursue a degree in interdisciplinary studies with a concentration in design and architecture. But a year away from graduating, that scholarship fund has dried up, and he's uncertain whether he can afford to finish.

“I seriously don't know what I'm going to do if I don't get the funding for next semester,” he said.

Claudia Gonzalez's mother brought her to Arizona when she was 8. Her grades in high school would have qualified her for scholarships and financial aid available to Arizona residents. She is attending community college part time and hoping to eventually transfer to Northern Arizona University. (Cronkite News Service Photo by Griselda Nevarez)

Since the state began keeping such records in 2007, after Proposition 300 passed, the number of illegal immigrants attending state universities has fallen. At community colleges, enrollment of such students spiked initially but has dropped sharply since.

According to Joint Legislative Budget Committee records, the number of public university students who couldn't prove citizenship in spring 2007 was 1,524. But that number had dropped to 106 by the fall 2010 semester.

There were 1,470 students attending the state's community colleges couldn't prove citizenship in spring 2007. The number soared to 4,922 in spring 2008, but by fall 2010 it had dropped to 2,186.

Behind those numbers are stories of students such as Montes, Gonzalez and Lira, who, if they don't give up, struggle to cover out-of-state tuition at universities, head to community colleges or attend schools elsewhere.

Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina have gone further than Arizona, banning undocumented students from public universities and community colleges. State Senate President Russell Pearce, R-Mesa, pushed unsuccessfully this year for a bill that would have had Arizona follow suit.

“If you're ever going to stop that invasion across that border, and it is an invasion, you're going to have to quit rewarding people for breaking those laws,” he said during a hearing on SB 1611.

Sen. Steve Gallardo, D-Phoenix, who this year sponsored an unsuccessful resolution calling for voters to decide whether to repeal Proposition 300, said that because these students were brought to the U.S. as children they didn't break any laws and shouldn't be punished for something in which they had no say. Instead, he said, those who excel in high school should be rewarded for their efforts.

Christian Lira has been able to use private scholarship funds towards his degree, but one year away from graduation, those sources have dried up and he's unsure if he will be able to afford to finish. (Cronkite News Service Photo by Griselda Nevarez)

“If someone has been here for a long time and has been working hard, paying taxes and paying into the state university system, then I think they are entitled to in-state tuition just as state residents,” he said.

Struggles

When Proposition 300 took effect, ASU officials raised $6 million and formed a private scholarship through the ASU Foundation to help those affected. About 200 students who couldn't prove citizenship received the Sunburst Scholarship before it ran out of funds a year later.

Chicanos Por La Causa, a nonprofit that serves Arizona's Hispanic community, then stepped in to create the American Dream Fund, which raised $5 million to provide scholarships for Sunburst Scholarship recipients. But as those funds dwindled, fewer and fewer undocumented students were able to receive those scholarships.

One of about 20 students receiving the last of the scholarships in spring 2011 was Angelica Hernandez, who is scheduled to graduate in May with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering. Having graduated from Carl Hayden High School in 2007 with a 4.5 grade-point average, her high honors would have earned her a President's Scholarship from ASU providing full tuition and a stipend to help with other expenses, but because she came to the U.S. illegally as a child she wasn't able to do so.

“Year after year, it was that uncertainty of not knowing if I was going to be able to make it through the next year,” Hernandez said.

Angelica Hernandez, who will graduate from Arizona State University in May, would have qualified for a full-ride scholarship if she had been a legal resident. (Cronkite News Service Photo by Griselda Nevarez)

Attending a university was out of reach for Maxima Guerrero, who has been in Arizona illegally since she was 5. After graduating from South Mountain High School in 2008 with a 3.7 grade-point average, she found private scholarships and raised enough money to start at Phoenix College.

Like many other undocumented students, she has attended part time, paying about $600 for two classes to avoid having to pay about $1,600 more in out-of-state tuition if she takes just one more credit. Attending full time would cost over $4,000 a semester.

But even community college may now be out of reach for Guerrero. A recent vote by the Maricopa Community Colleges governing board requires out-of-students to pay $317 a credit regardless of how few credits they take.

“I am barely making ends meet and being able to afford $600 for both of the classes,” she said. “Now, paying almost $1,000 (for one class), I'm probably not going to be able to come back.”

Jose Rodrigo Dorado Madrigal, who came to the U.S. illegally as a child and from Brophy College Preparatory in 2008, decided that he'd be better off attending Santa Clara University in California, where a private scholarship covers his tuition.

“I saw that my options in Arizona were limited because of Prop. 300, so I chose to leave the state and go to a school that was willing to focus on my academic achievement rather than my legal status,” he said.

Viridiana Hernandez, who was brought to the U.S. illegally when she was 1, was accepted to all three state universities but wound up at private

Grand Canyon University, where a combination of scholarships from the school and private groups covers her tuition of $16,500 a year.

“In high school, I didn't know anyone who was undocumented and had gone to college, so to me it seemed impossible to go to college,” she said. “But eventually I found GCU and saw that I could go to college and get scholarships to help me pay for tuition.”

Daniel Rodriguez, a spokesman for the Arizona DREAM Act Coalition, a group that advocates for a federal law granting young illegal immigrants with no criminal records a pathway to citizenship through higher education or military service, said Proposition 300 makes it almost impossible for such students to attain a college education.

“For these students, making them pay out-of-state tuition is the same thing as taking their education away because they are low income; they don't have three times as much to pay in tuition,” he said.

Impact

Dean Martin, who as a state senator authored the legislation referring Proposition 300 to the ballot, said the law is having its intended effect by keeping taxpayers from having to invest money in students who aren't eligible to work in the U.S.

“If you're not here legally, the state shouldn't be spending resources that it doesn't have to subsidize your tuition because it doesn't make a lot of sense,” he said. “You're not going to be able to use that degree to do anything anyway.”

Many students in the U.S. illegally are hoping that Congress will pass legislation that would create a path to citizenship. But in December the so-called DREAM Act fell five votes short in the U.S. Senate after clearing the House, and with Republicans now a majority in the House prospects for such legislation are dim.

Ira Mehlman, a spokesman for the Federation for American Immigration Reform, a nonprofit group pushing for a moratorium on all immigration, said Proposition 300 is preventing illegal immigrants from taking seats from legal students.

“The fact that those seats are occupied by someone who is here illegally means that there are other people in Arizona who are going uneducated and are not being given a chance,” he said.

But James Rund, senior vice president for educational outreach and student services at ASU, said the notion that illegal immigrants were pushing out legal students is incorrect.

“We've made a commitment to the citizens of the state of Arizona that we will enroll all college-eligible students at the university,” Rund said. “Space or constraints on space has not been an issue for us.”

William Perez, who researches the social and psychological development of immigrant and Latino students as a professor at Claremont Graduate University in California, said that as fewer illegal immigrants pursue higher education the state's universities and community colleges are losing out on tuition they could be paying.

“Arizona is completely ignoring the fact that the state benefits from educating undocumented students,” he said.

Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez, an ASU professor and founding director of the School of Transborder Studies, said Proposition 300 is about more than taxpayers and classroom space. He said it's aimed at keeping the illegal immigrant population uneducated and unable to stand up for itself.

“It is a part of the general strategy of keeping people dumb and keeping people fearful,” he said.

Costs

While the stated intent of Proposition 300 is saving taxpayers money, it will lead to social and economic costs later, said Roberto Gonzales, who conducts research on young illegal immigrants as an assistant professor at the University of Washington's School of Social Work. He said the law is creating a class of uneducated young people.

“This law is doing nothing more than creating an underclass of disenfranchised young people,” he said. “It's economically unsound to put those barriers for students who have been through the education system and want to pursue higher education.”

Making it difficult for students to attain higher education leads to them not being as motivated to do well in high school and potentially dropping out and blending into the larger workforce of illegal immigrants, he said.

“These young people have been American-raised, have levels of education and English skills that far surpass their parents, yet they find themselves in the same narrowly circumscribed range of options as their parents,” Gonzales said. “These students could be making significant contributions but are instead living in the shadows and working minimum wage jobs.”

States that promote education for students in the U.S. illegally will fare better than Arizona if the federal government eventually offers them a path to citizenship, Gonzales said.

“They'll have the necessary structure via lower tuition and more opportunities to successfully push their students through college and graduate their students who then go into the high-skilled labor force, make more contributions and fill labor shortages,” he said.

Vélez-Ibáñez said that in the long run, assuming that comprehensive immigration reform is coming, Proposition 300 will make it difficult for students who are in the U.S. illegally to get educated and be able to become high-earning taxpayers and contributors to society.

“If you keep people ignorant and uneducated and only are able to make what a high school graduate makes, which at the max is maybe $30,000 a year, then your tax base remains flat or is reduced,” he said.

For now, Vélez-Ibáñez said, investing in the education of students in the U.S. illegally isn't a waste because even without a legal status there are ways they can still use their college degrees.

“There are areas of the private enterprise arena that don't require the kind of documentation that a lot of people need, so there are areas where people can work,” he said. “The tragedy is the limitations set up in this state.”

Celso Mireles, who was brought to the U.S. illegally when he was 3, has been able to use the business management degree he earned from ASU in 2009 to start businesses in which he repairs computers and gives guitar lessons.

“I'm trying to make it work and use what I learned,” he said.

Perseverance

The future is uncertain, but Claudia Gonzalez said she not only will graduate from Mesa Community College but move on to Northern Arizona University.

“It's going to be really really hard, but I have a goal and it doesn't matter how much it's going to cost me to get to that goal,” she said. “I have to get there.”

With one year to go to receive his degree from ASU, Christian Lira said he's determined to find private scholarships and raise money on his own.

“There's always a way for something, and I'm going to find a way to finish,” he said.

While she's still deciding whether to major in justice studies or engineering after graduating from high school next year, Carina Montes said she won't give up on her dream of a bachelor's degree.

“My parents said that if I ever wanted to be anyone or do anything, I had to work for it,” she said. “I think I've put a lot of work and effort to the stuff I'm doing, and I have hopes that someday all that will count.”

Unable to prove citizenship:

Public universities:

• Spring 2007: 1,524

• Fall 2007: 406

• Spring 2008: 198

• Fall 2008: 368

• Spring 2009: 304

• Fall 2009: 304

• Spring 2010: 248

• Fall 2010: 106

Source: Joint Legislative Budget Committee

Unable to prove citizenship:

Community colleges:

• Spring 2007: 1,470

• Fall 2007: 3,504

• Spring 2008: 4,922

• Fall 2008: 2,981

• Spring 2009: 3,420

• Fall 2009: 3,982

• Spring 2010: 1,962

• Fall 2010: 2,186

Source: Joint Legislative Budget Committee

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www.youtube.com Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t... Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4: Task Speed Test | View Clip
05/03/2011
Facebook

Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4: Task Speed Test
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Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t...

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www.youtube.com Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t... Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4: Task Speed Test | View Clip
05/03/2011
Facebook

Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4: Task Speed Test
www.youtube.com

Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t...

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*Environmental Footprints May Produce Backlash | View Clip
05/02/2011
Miller-McCune - Online

New research suggests being informed of one's environmental footprint can have the opposite of the intended effect.

Measuring a person's ecological footprint or carbon footprint is a popular tool among environmentalists. Many see it as a way to educate people about the damage they inflict on the environment on an everyday basis — information that may prompt them to change their behavior.

But newly published research suggests that for many people — perhaps most — the receipt of such data may produce the opposite result.

In an experiment described in the journal Social Influence, “Only people who had invested their self-esteem in environmentalism — a strong form of commitment — reacted to negative environmental-footprint feedback by engaging in a pro-environment behavior,” writes Santa Clara University psychologist Amara Brook. “Others were less likely to engage in a pro-environmental behavior after negative feedback.”

Given that “for most people in developed countries, environmental-footprint feedback is very negative,” Brook's study calls into question the wisdom of providing such information.

Two hundred and twelve students (median age 19) participated in the experiment, which was conducted over a two-week period. First, they answered a set of questions measuring their self-esteem level and the degree to which their self-worth was contingent upon a commitment to preserving the environment.

The following week, they completed a version of the standard environmental-footprint questionnaire, which was slightly adapted to apply to student life. (It covers such issues as the number of miles you drive per year and the amount of locally-grown food you consume.)

The students then received their “score.” In fact, they were randomly chosen to receive either a high number or a low one.

Those receiving negative feedback were informed that, “In comparison to previous studies we have done with University of Michigan students, your footprint measures 140.23 percent of the footprint of the average University of Michigan student.” Those receiving positive feedback were told their footprint was only 55 percent of the average Michigan undergrad.

Finally, after reading a newspaper article about the environmental impact of various behaviors, “participants were given the opportunity to write a letter to the state governor on any public policy issue of their choice.” Brook wanted to see how many of them would address that topic.

Just under 44 percent of them did so — not a surprising figure, given the fact the issue was on their minds. Those for whom environmentalism and self-esteem were closely linked were more likely to choose the topic — and if they received negative feedback on their environmental-footprint report, they were the most likely to do so.

But it was a different story for the others. Among the noncommitted, those told they had a heavy environmental footprint were less likely to write about that subject. Perhaps they were eager to shove uncomfortable feelings of guilt or complicity out of their minds by focusing on another issue.

“These results suggest that environmental-footprint feedback only promotes sustainable behavior for people who are already committed to environmentalism and may discourage sustainable behavior among people who are not already committed to environmentalism,” Brook concludes.

Granted, this is one small study, and one can question whether the subject of one's letter to the governor is a precise marker of environmental activism. (You could be pro-environment but still feel so strongly about another issue that you choose to focus on it in your plea to the state capital.)

But the findings track with those of an unpublished 2009 paper that found information regarding one's environmental footprint led to “reduced feelings of self-efficacy,” which in turn “predicted lower intentions to engage in behaviors that reduce global warming.”

“Some psychological theories suggest that instead of changing their environmentally damaging behavior to match their environmental goals, people may react to negative feedback by changing their environmental views to match their behavior,” she notes. Her study suggests this thesis has merit.

So the environmental-footprint concept may have to be rethought, or at least placed in a context where it doesn't lead to denial or despair. Brook suggests “giving specific, feasible recommendations” about how to live in a more environment-minded manner might produce more positive results.

That question awaits further research. What we know at this point is that encouraging environmentally friendly behavior remains a tricky, problematic endeavor. It seems admonishing someone for their large footprint can produce a big backlash.

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Campus visits: worth the trip | View Clip
05/02/2011
Yakima Herald-Republic

Hannah Besso

I can't believe it. In a little more than a year, I will be moving out of the house I've lived in for 12 years and starting a new life away from home. I will say goodbye to my parents and my friends, and head off for the next four years of my life. All right, I'll admit it: I'm scared. But I'm excited, too. Excited by all the colleges I have to choose from, by the majors and minors I could have, and by the connections I will make along the way. All these can be overwhelming, though, especially the first step: picking and applying to a college. This is why this year during spring break, I toured college campuses with my dad and a friend in California. To help us remember which colleges we liked and why, we brought a notebook and pen on each tour and jotted down pros and cons of each school. At first, we didn't really know what kinds of questions to ask. But after a couple of colleges, we got a better sense of what to look for.

Hannah Besso and Sandia Kim, both 17-year-old juniors at Davis High School, pose in front of a fountain at Loyola-Marymount University during a spring break college touring trip.

Here are the top 10 things we focused on: • Average class size. • Student-to-professor ratio. • Whether an applicant's financial situation is considered in the admission decision. • What kind of merit and financial aid scholarships are available and to what percentage of the students they were given. • The meal plan (buffet style or individual purchase) and quality of the food. • Most common majors. • Size of dorm rooms. • The social life and feel of the campus. • Attractiveness of the campus (whether it has palm trees). • Proximity to a city (or a beach). We visited 10 schools, ranging from large public state universities to small private liberal arts colleges. Throughout the process of touring and learning about each one, we found talking to students helps immensely in determining whether we wanted to go to that college. We also found schools that looked great according to statistics turned out to feel oppressive and disconnected, while some that looked mediocre on paper had great vibes and beautiful locations.

A student of Stanford University leads a tour group around the campus, answering questions about academics, campus life, dorm living, and club activities.

At each school, students who led tours told us how great their school was and why we should apply there. But if we learned one thing, it was that choosing a college is a totally personal choice. Statistics and reputations only go so far, and in the end YOU must decide what is best for YOU. On our trip, I found I prefer smaller colleges in a warm environment with a wide range of class options, including the sciences and social work. I can now narrow down my college search based on this information, which is a helpful first step and a good focus for a junior in high school. This will limit the number of applications and essays needed, since most schools require supplements to the common application. Each one looks at applications differently, and the acceptance process can be arbitrary and random. A well-rounded, involved student can be rejected from or accepted to almost any college. Some of the best advice I heard on the trip was from an admissions counselor at the University of Santa Clara. She advised my friend and me not to mold our application to what we think a specific college would want in a student, but to apply to schools where we would feel most comfortable with being ourselves. Now we just have to figure out who “we” really are.

• Hannah Besso is a junior at Davis High School and a member of the Herald-Republic's Unleashed journalism program for high school students.

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Enforcing Copyrights Online, for a Profit | View Clip
05/02/2011
New York Times - Online, The

DENVER When Brian Hill, a 20-year-old blogger from North Carolina, posted on his Web site last December a photograph of an airport security officer conducting a pat-down, a legal battle was the last thing he imagined. A month later, Mr. Hill received an e-mail from a reporter for The Las Vegas Sun who was looking into a Nevada company that files copyright lawsuits for newspapers. The e-mail informed Mr. Hill that he was one of those that . Though the airport photo had gone viral before Mr. Hill plucked it off the Web, it belonged to The Denver Post, where it first appeared on Nov. 18.

Mr. Hill took down the photo. He was too late. A summons was delivered to his house. The lawsuit sought statutory damages. It did not name a figure, but accused Mr. Hill of willful infringement, and under federal copyright law up to $150,000 can be awarded in such cases. I was shocked, Mr. Hill said. I thought maybe it was a joke or something to scare me. I didnt know the picture was copyrighted. Over the last year, as newspapers continue to grapple with how to protect their online content, Righthaven has filed more than 200 similar federal lawsuits in Colorado and Nevada over material posted without permission from The Denver Post or The Las Vegas Review-Journal.

The company has business relationships with both newspapers. Like much of the industry, the papers see the appropriation of their work without permission as akin to theft and harmful to their business, and are frustrated by unsuccessful efforts to stem the common practice, whether its by a one-man operation like Mr. Hills, or an established one like Matt Drudges. Sara Glines, a vice president for the MediaNews Group, which owns The Denver Post, wrote in an e-mail that the pat-down photo had been used on more than 300 Web sites with no credit to The Post or the photographer. We have invested heavily in creating quality content in our markets, Ms. Glines wrote. To allow others who have not shared in that investment to reap the benefit ultimately hurts our ability to continue to fund that investment at the same level. Mark Hinueber, general counsel for Stephens Media, owner of The Review-Journal, echoed Ms. Gliness concerns, saying that cutting and pasting articles steals the potential audience for our editorial material and traffic to our Web sites. Some critics, however, contend that Righthavens tactics are draconian, and that the company hopes to extract swift settlements before it is clear that there is a violation of federal copyright law. Typically, the suits have been filed without warning. Righthaven rarely sends out notices telling Web sites to take down material that does not belong to them before seeking damages and demanding forfeiture of the Web domain name.

Defendants in these cases run the gamut. They have included the white supremacist David Duke, the Democratic Party of Nevada and Mr. Drudge. But little known Web sites, nonprofit groups and so-called mom-and-pop bloggers people who blog as a hobby are not exempt from Righthavens legal actions. According to some Internet legal experts who have been watching the cases with growing interest, the way it works is simple: Righthaven finds newspaper material that has been republished on the Web usually an article, excerpts or a photograph and obtains the copyrights. Then, the company sues.

Whether the defendant credits the original author or removes the material after being sued matters little. None of the cases have gone to trial yet, and many have been settled out of court. In two instances, judges have ruled against Righthaven in pretrial motions. According to The Las Vegas Sun, which has tracked the cases, the only two publicly disclosed settlements were for $2,185 and $5,000.

In describing his companys approach, Steve Gibson, Righthavens chief executive, said that there has been voluminous, almost incalculable infringement since the advent of the Internet and that years of warning people to take down copyrighted content had not worked. Newspapers, he said, needed a new way to address the problem of people appropriating their material without permission.

Eric Goldman, director of the high-tech law institute at the Santa Clara University School of Law, said reposting published material online could qualify as fair use if it didnt diminish the market value of the original. Other critics of the suits contend that reposting material for the purposes of discussion does not constitute infringement. 1 2

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Factbox: Five facts about CIA director Leon Panetta | View Clip
05/02/2011
Thomson Reuters - UK - Online

WASHINGTON | Wed Apr 27, 2011 3:05pm BST

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama will nominate CIA director Leon Panetta as the next defense secretary, officials said Wednesday.

Here are five facts about Panetta.

* Panetta, 72, is a long-standing Democrat who made his mark in Washington with success in cutting the federal budget deficit during the 1990s. As chairman of the House of Representatives Budget Committee, his negotiations with the White House in 1990 forced Republican President George H.W. Bush to violate his "read my lips, no new taxes" pledge. This budget deal is credited with helping catapult Bill Clinton, a Democrat, to the White House in 1992.

* Panetta became Obama's director of the CIA in February 2009. He pushed forward with the drone strikes against militant suspects in tribal areas along Pakistan's border with Afghanistan that started in the George W. Bush administration. As spy chief he traveled to more than 30 countries.

* Clinton appointed him to head the Office of Management and Budget where he helped shape Clinton's 1993 budget agreement that raised taxes and moved the country on track to balance the budget. He took over as Clinton's White House chief of staff, and in 1996 helped negotiate a deal ending the shutdown of the federal government that resulted from a budget impasse many blamed on overly eager Republicans in Congress. He left the White House before the president got embroiled in an impeachment fight with Congress.

* Panetta was educated at Santa Clara University and its law school. After serving a stint in the Army he went to work for a series of moderate or liberal Republicans.

* President Richard Nixon appointed him director of the Office of Civil Rights, which he left due to disagreement with the Republican White House over civil rights enforcement. He quit the Republican party and became a Democrat in 1971 and was elected to his first term in Congress in 1976, representing a district near San Francisco.

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Locals respond to death of bin Laden | View Clip
05/02/2011
Petaluma360.com

Windsor Fire Chief Ron Collier, pictured above outside the Windsor Fire Station during a Sept. 11 commemoration in 2008, said there is satisfaction with the death of Osama bin Laden, but "9/11 will never ever ever be put to bed."

Jim Connolly

Jim Connolly got the news of Osama bin Laden's death from an Army buddy of his son, Sgt. Ryan James Connolly, who was killed in Afghanistan nearly three years ago.

“I'm glad we got him. I'm glad he's dead,” Connolly, a Santa Rosa mortgage broker, said Monday, recalling his first reaction. “He got what he deserved.”

Ryan Connolly, a 24-year-old Piner High School graduate born and raised in Santa Rosa, joined the Army in December 2005. He was killed by a bomb blast with 14 days remaining in his combat tour.

The death of the al-Qaida leader, Connolly said, may bring him some relief from the loss of his son.

“I am hoping it will make a difference and help bring about closure,” he said. “I haven't found closure.”

Jack Grandcolas

Jack Grandcolas of San Rafael, who lost his wife, Lauren, in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, said the death of bin Laden brought a sense of relief.

“It's another chapter of closure,” said Grandcolas, 48, a mobile software entrepreneur. “You live each day and you try to walk on and heal. You always live with the scar. The scar is there every day.”

Lauren Grandcolas, 38, was three months pregnant with the couple's first child when she boarded United Airlines Flight 93 on Sept. 11, 2001. The San Francisco-bound flight would eventually crash in Pennsylvania after the heroic efforts of passengers to subdue the hijackers.

Jack Grandcolas said he, like other relatives of those killed by the al-Qaida terrorists, had faith that bin Laden ultimately would be captured or killed.

“We had hope,” he said. “Obviously it took a lot longer than many of us had expected.

“The hard part was knowing he was living every day, enjoying a breath every day for nine years,” Grandcolas said. He called the al-Qaida leader's death “a solemn victory.”

Sandy McLaughlin

Sandy McLaughlin of Santa Rosa found little solace in the death of Osama bin Laden. Her husband, James, an Army Reserve lieutenant colonel working in Afghanistan as a U.S. civilian consultant to the Afghan Air Force, was shot to death along with eight U.S. troops by an Afghan soldier.

“My husband would be very, very happy knowing the military had finally gotten the man who caused so much despair and pain,” she said Monday. “It doesn't make any difference to me. My husband is gone. He's not coming back.”

Gary Medvigy

Gary Medvigy, an Army Reserve brigadier general and Sonoma County Superior Court judge who has commanded units in the Mideast since 9/11, said he was “ecstatic” about bin Laden's death.

Medvigy said Muslims should “rejoice that a great stain has been lifted from their religion.”

“I think this is absolutely a great day for humanity,” Medvigy said Monday. “And I think it's a chance for a new start for Islam.”

Diane Bruce

When TV newscasters interrupted “60 Minutes” late Sunday to announce the news of bin Laden's death, all the old grief came rushing back to Diane Bruce of Windsor.

Her son, Mark Bruce, was working for an investment banking firm on the 104th floor of Tower Two when two planes crashed into the World Trade Center.

“I'm pleased it happened before our tenth anniversary and that he was found by American troops,” Bruce said. “It's just a hard day.”

Bruce and her two surviving sons donated an 1887 bronze bell to a Windsor fire house on River Road to honor firefighters and Mark Bruce. On Monday, Diane Bruce took solace in volunteer work at a Kaiser hospital.

“You just go on and do what you do,” Bruce said. “I keep busy and deal with it.”

Ron Collier

News of the death of bin Laden at the hands of Navy Seals left Windsor Fire Chief Ron Collier subdued and thoughtful.

Collier has strong feelings about the death of thousands on Sept. 11, 2001. Each year since, Collier has held a ceremony at the Fire Department to remember and honor those who died. On a personal level, he had a tattoo inked onto one shoulder of an eagle rising from the tops of the World Trade Center twin towers.

“In a way, I'm satisfied we've met the goal. But in a way, I don't think we should celebrate,” said Collier.

“It's a success. The U.S. went out there and did it. I'm as red, white and blue as anybody,” he said. “But I didn't jump up and down.”

Walt and Sandra Bodley

“I'm quite pleased that we finally got the guy. He's been a killer for decades,” said Walt Bodley of Sebastopol.

Walt and Sandra Bodley lost their 20-year-old niece, Deora Bodley, on Sept. 11. The Santa Clara University student was killed on Flight 93.

A phone call Sunday night alerted the Bodleys to the news of bin Laden's death. They turned on their TV and caught President Barack Obama's speech.

“We were very proud of him in that he made it very clear this was not a war against Muslims. It was a war against al-Quaida. I think he set a very good tone and offered an opportunity for a united front against terrorism,” Walt Bodley said.

Jim Wood

Healdsburg dentist Jim Wood volunteered at Ground Zero for several days, helping identify bodies by comparing their teeth to dental records.

It was an emotional, grim task that put him close to the shock and death of the scene of the terrorist attack in New York.

Sunday night's startling news brought back memories and emotions from those 12-hour night shifts, trying to put a name to a body and bring closure to a family.

“You always hoped this day was going to come. As time marched on, would he ever be captured? Would he ever be killed?”

“I'm relieved,” Wood said Monday. “I'm extremely happy he'd been taken, whether alive or dead I really didn't care.”

Jackie Ganiy and Ibrahim Ibrahim

Jackie Ganiy of Santa Rosa said she was elated by the news of bin Laden's death but sobered by reports of an anti-Muslim hate crime on Monday in Portland, Maine.

News reports said the walls of the largest mosque in the city of 66,000 were spray-painted with several phrases, including: “Osama today, Islam tomorow (sic).”

Ganiy, 50, an American who converted to Islam three decades ago, said the episode underscores an impression — invalid but, nonetheless, widely held, she said — that associates Islam with terrorist violence.

“It is simply not the case,” said Ganiy, a member of the Islamic Society of Santa Rosa.

Ibrahim Ibrahim, coordinator of the society, which has about 75 member families, said the prejudice against Muslims fostered by bin Laden is unlikely to be undone any time soon.

Islam does not condone the death of innocent people, Ibrahim said. “Anyone who follows him (bin Laden) has been brainwashed.”

Ganiy characterized bin Laden's motivation for the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks as political, not religious, based largely on his opposition to the presence of U.S. forces in his Saudi Arabian homeland.

Ganiy said she was “ecstatic” on learning of bin Laden's killing by U.S. commandos in Pakistan, describing him as a “monster who put Muslims in this country through hell.”

Staff Writers Randi Rossmann, Guy Kovner and Julie Johnson contributed to this report.

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Why Building a Culture of Trust Will Boost Employee Performance--and Maybe Even Save Your Company | View Clip
05/02/2011
RISMedia

RISMEDIA, May 3, 2011—Do your employees trust you? The brutal truth is probably not. It may not be fair, and you may not want to hear it, but chances are that previous leaders have poisoned the ground on which you're trying to grow a successful business. Make no mistake: Unless you and all the leaders in your organization can gain the trust of your employees, performance will suffer. And considering how tough it is to survive in today's business environment, that's very bad news for your company.

Why is trust so pivotal? According to John Hamm, author of Unusually Excellent: The Necessary Nine Skills Required for the Practice of Great Leadership, it's a matter of human nature: When employees don't trust their leaders, they don't feel safe. And when they don't feel safe, they don't take risks—and where there is no risk taken, there is less innovation, less “going the extra mile,” and therefore, very little unexpected upside.

“Feeling safe is a primal human need,” says Hamm. “When that need isn't met, our natural response is to focus energy toward a showdown with the perceived threat.

“Our attention on whatever scares us increases until we either fight or run in the other direction, or until the threat diminishes on its own,” he adds. “Without trust, people respond with distraction, fear, and, at the extreme, paralysis. And that response is hidden inside ‘business' behaviors—sandbagging quotas, hedging on stretch goals, and avoiding accountability or commitment.”

Hamm calls trustworthiness “the most noble and powerful of all the attributes of leadership.” He says leaders become trustworthy by building a track record of honesty, fairness, and integrity. For Hamm, cultivating this trust isn't just a moral issue; it's a practical one.

Hamm has spent his career studying the practitioners of great leadership via his work as a CEO, venture capitalist, board member, high-level consultant, and professor of leadership at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University. In his new book, he shares what he has learned and brings those lessons to life with real-world stories.

Unusually Excellent is a powerful back-to-basics reference book that offers both seasoned and aspiring leaders a framework for understanding and a guide for applying the battle-tested fundamentals of leadership at every stage of their careers.

In his book Hamm explains that most employees have been hurt or disappointed, at some point in their careers, by the hand of power in an organization. That's why nine times out of ten leaders are in “negative trust territory” before they make their first request of an employee to do something. Before a team can reach its full potential, leaders must act in ways that transcend employees' fears of organizational power.

The first step starts with you, Hamm notes. As a leader, you must “go first”—and model trustworthiness for everyone else. Being trustworthy creates trust, yes. But beyond that, there are very specific things you can do to provide unusually excellent, trust-building leadership at your organization:

First, realize that being trustworthy doesn't mean you have to be a Boy Scout. You don't even have to be a warm or kind person, says Hamm. On the contrary, history teaches us that some of the most trustworthy people can be harsh, tough, or socially awkward—but their promises must be inviolate and their decisions fair.

“You can be tough. You can be demanding. You can be authentically whoever you really are,” says Hamm. “But as long as you are fair, as long as you do what you say consistently, you will still be trusted.”

Look for chances to reveal some vulnerability. We trust people we believe are real and also humanly imperfect and flawed—just like us. And that usually means allowing others to get a glimpse of our personal vulnerability—some authentic weakness or fear or raw emotion that allows others to see us as like them, and therefore relate to us at the human level.

No matter how tempted you are, don't lie to your employees. Tell the truth, match your actions with your words, and match those words with the truth we all see in the world: no spin, no fancy justifications or revisionist history—just tell the truth.

“Telling the truth when it is not convenient or popular, or when it will make you look bad, can be tough,” admits Hamm. “Yet, it's essential to your reputation.”

Never, ever make the “adulterer's guarantee.” This happens when you say to an employee, in effect, “I just lied to (someone else), but you can trust me because I'd never lie to you.” When an employee sees you committing any act of dishonesty or two-facedness, they'll assume that you'll do the same to them.

Don't punish “good failures.” This is one of the stupidest things an organization can do—yet it happens all the time. A “good failure” is a term used in Silicon Valley to describe a new business start-up or mature company initiative that, by most measures, is well planned, well run, and well organized—yet for reasons beyond its control (an unexpected competitive product, a change in the market or economy) it fails. In other words, “good failures” occur when you play well, but still lose. When they're punished, you instill a fear of risk-taking in your employees, and with that you stifle creativity and innovation.

Don't squelch the flow of “bad” news. Do you—or others under you—shoot the messenger when she brings you bad news? If so, you can be certain that the messenger's priority is not bringing you the information you need: It's protecting her own hide. That's why in most organizations good news zooms to the top, while bad news—data that reveals goals missed, problems lurking, or feedback that challenges or defeats your strategy—flows uphill like molasses in January.

“Unusually excellent leaders build a primary and insatiable demand for the unvarnished facts, the raw data, the actual measurements, the honest feedback, the real information,” he adds. “Very few efforts will yield the payback associated with improving the speed and accuracy of the information you need most to make difficult or complex decisions.”

Constantly tap into your “fairness conscience.” Precise agreements about what is fair are hard to negotiate, because each of us has our own sense of fairness. But at the level of general principle, there is seldom any confusion about what fair looks like. Just ask yourself: Would most people see this as fair or unfair?

“If you treat your followers fairly, and do so consistently, you will set a pattern of behavior for the entire organization,” says Hamm.

For more information visit www.unusuallyexcellent.com.

Have you heard about RISMedia's Real Estate Information Network® (RREIN)? RREIN is an elite network of leading real estate companies dedicated to providing consumers and their agents with leading real estate information, and committed to the belief that Information Share Equals Market Share. Having only launched this past June 2010, the RREIN network is already comprised of 40 leading brokerages, which make up 575 offices, 30,000 agents, 167,000 closings and represents over $41 billion in transactions. How can RREIN help your recruiting efforts and differentiate your company today? For more information, email rrein@rismedia.com.

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Why I am thinking of having a Windows Phone 7 www.youtube.com Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t... Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4 | View Clip
05/02/2011
Facebook

Why I am thinking of having a Windows Phone 7
Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4: Task Speed Test
www.youtube.com

Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t...

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*AT DIVERSITY SUMMIT, A COMMON CAUSE FOUND | View Clip
05/01/2011
San Jose Mercury News

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch, respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked.

Organizer Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies such as hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that though there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish, and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. Although girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

Copyright © 2011 San Jose Mercury News

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*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU | View Clip
05/01/2011
Whittier Daily News

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch, respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked.

Organizer

Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies such as hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that though there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish, and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. Although girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

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*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU | View Clip
05/01/2011
San Jose Mercury News - Online

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch, respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked.

Organizer

Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies such as hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that though there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish, and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. Although girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

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*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU | View Clip
05/01/2011
Contra Costa Times - Online

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch, respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked. Organizer Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies such as hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that though there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish, and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. Although girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

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*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU | View Clip
05/01/2011
InsideBayArea.com

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch, respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked.

Organizer

Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies such as hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that though there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish, and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. Although girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

Return to Top



*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU
05/01/2011
Oakland Tribune

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch, respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked.

Organizer Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies such as hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that though there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish, and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. Although girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

Copyright © 2011 The Oakland Tribune. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU
05/01/2011
Alameda Times-Star

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch, respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked.

Organizer Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies such as hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that though there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish, and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. Although girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

Copyright © 2011 Alameda Times-Star. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU
05/01/2011
Tri-Valley Herald

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch, respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked.

Organizer Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies such as hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that though there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish, and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. Although girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

Copyright © 2011 Tri-Valley Herald. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU
05/01/2011
Daily Review, The

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch, respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked.

Organizer Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies such as hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that though there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish, and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. Although girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

Copyright © 2011 The Daily Review. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU
05/01/2011
San Mateo County Times

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch, respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked.

Organizer Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies such as hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that though there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish, and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. Although girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

Copyright © 2011 San Mateo County Times. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU
05/01/2011
Argus, The

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch, respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked.

Organizer Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies such as hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that though there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish, and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. Although girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

Copyright © 2011 The Argus. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU
05/01/2011
Contra Costa Times

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch, respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked.

Organizer Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies such as hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that though there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish, and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. Although girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

Copyright © 2011 Contra Costa Times.

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'Trust Me, I'm a Leader' | View Clip
05/01/2011
Hartford Business Journal - Online

FOCUS ON HUMAN RESOURCES

Why building a culture of trust will boost employee performance

Do your employees trust you?

The brutal truth is probably not. It may not be fair, and you may not want to hear it, but chances are that previous leaders have poisoned the ground on which you're trying to grow a successful business. Make no mistake: Unless you and all the leaders in your organization can gain the trust of your employees, performance will suffer. And considering how tough it is to survive in today's business environment, that's very bad news for your company.

Why is trust so pivotal? It's a matter of human nature: When employees don't trust their leaders, they don't feel safe. And when they don't feel safe, they don't take risks — and where there is no risk taken, there is less innovation, less “going the extra mile,” and therefore, very little unexpected upside.

Feeling safe is a primal human need. When that need isn't met, our natural response is to focus energy toward a showdown with the perceived threat.

Our attention on whatever scares us increases until we either fight or run in the other direction, or until the threat diminishes on its own. Without trust, people respond with distraction, fear, and, at the extreme, paralysis. And that response is hidden inside “business” behaviors — sandbagging quotas, hedging on stretch goals, and avoiding accountability or commitment.

Trustworthiness is the most noble and powerful of all the attributes of leadership. Leaders become trustworthy by building a track record of honesty, fairness, and integrity. Cultivating this trust isn't just a moral issue; it's a practical one.

Trust is the currency you will need when the time comes for you to make unreasonable performance demands on your teams. And when you're in that tight spot, it's quite possible that the level of willingness your employees have to meet those demands could make or break your company.

Most employees have been hurt or disappointed, at some point in their careers, by the hand of power in an organization. That's why nine times out of 10 leaders are in “negative trust territory” before they make their first request of an employee to do something. Before a team can reach its full potential, leaders must act in ways that transcend employees' fears of organizational power.

The first step starts with you. As a leader, you must “go first” — and model trustworthiness for everyone else. Being trustworthy creates trust, yes. But beyond that, there are very specific things you can do to provide trust-building leadership at your organization:

• First, realize that being trustworthy doesn't mean you have to be a Boy Scout.

You don't even have to be a warm or kind person. On the contrary, history teaches us that some of the most trustworthy people can be harsh, tough, or socially awkward — but their promises must be inviolate and their decisions fair.

As anachronistic as it may sound in the 21st century, men and women whose word is their honor, and who can be absolutely trusted to be fair, honest, and forthright, are more likely to command the respect of others than, say, the nicest guy in the room. You can be tough. You can be demanding. You can be authentically whoever you really are. But as long as you are fair, as long as you do what you say consistently, you will still be trusted.

• Look for chances to reveal some vulnerability.

We trust people we believe are real and also human (imperfect and flawed) — just like us. And that usually means allowing others to get a glimpse of our personal vulnerability — some authentic (not fabricated) weakness or fear or raw emotion that allows others to see us as like them, and therefore relate to us at the human level.

• No matter how tempted you are, don't bullsh*t your employees.

Tell the truth, match your actions with your words, and match those words with the truth we all see in the world: no spin, no BS, no fancy justifications or revisionist history — just tell the truth.

Telling the truth when it is not convenient or popular — or when it will make you look bad — can be tough. Yet, it's essential to your reputation. Your task as a leader is to be as forthright and transparent as is realistically possible. Strive to disclose the maximum amount of information appropriate to the situation. When you feel yourself starting to bend what you know is the truth or withhold the bare facts, find a way to stop, reformat your communication, and tell the truth.

• Never, ever make the “adulterer's guarantee.”

This happens when you say to an employee, in effect, “I just lied to (someone else), but you can trust me because I'd never lie to you.” When an employee sees you committing any act of dishonesty or two-facedness, they'll assume that you'll do the same to them. They'll start thinking back through all of their conversations with you, wondering what was real and what was disingenuous.

• Don't punish “good failures.”

This is one of the stupidest things an organization can do — yet it happens all the time. A “good failure” is a term used in Silicon Valley to describe a new business start-up or mature company initiative that, by most measures, is well planned, well run, and well organized — yet for reasons beyond its control (an unexpected competitive product, a change in the market or economy) it fails. In other words, “good failures” occur when you play well, but still lose. When they're punished, you instill a fear of risk-taking in your employees, and with that you stifle creativity and innovation. Instead, you should strive to create a “digital camera” culture.

There is no expense associated with an imperfect digital photograph — financial or otherwise. You just hit the “delete” button, and it disappears. No wasted film, slides, or prints. And we are aware of this relationship between mistakes and the consequences when we pick up the camera — so we click away, taking many more photos digitally than we would have in a world of costly film. Because we know failure is free, we take chances, and in that effort we often get that one amazing picture that we wouldn't have if we were paying a price for all the mistakes.

• Don't squelch the flow of “bad” news.

Do you (or others under you) shoot the messenger when she brings you bad news? If so, you can be certain that the messenger's priority is not bringing you the information you need: It's protecting her own hide. That's why in most organizations good news zooms to the top of the organization, while bad news — data that reveals goals missed, problems lurking, or feedback that challenges or defeats your strategy — flows uphill like molasses in January.

We must install a confidence and a trust that leaders in the organization value the facts, the truth, and the speed of delivery, not the judgments or interpretations of “good” or “bad,” and that messengers are valued, not shot. Make it crystal clear to your employees that you expect the truth and nothing but the truth from them. And always, always hold up your end of that deal. Don't ever shoot the messenger and don't ever dole out some irrational consequence.

• Constantly tap into your “fairness conscience.”

Precise agreements about what is fair are hard to negotiate, because each of us has our own sense of fairness. But at the level of general principle, there is seldom any confusion about what fair looks like. Just ask yourself: Would most people see this as fair or unfair? You'll know the answer (indeed, as a leader, you're paid to know it).

If you treat your followers fairly, and do so consistently, you will set a pattern of behavior for the entire organization. This sense of fairness, critical to the creation of a safe environment, can be reinforced not only by complimenting fair practices but also by privately speaking to — or if necessary, censuring — subordinates who behave unfairly to others in the organization.

• Don't take shortcuts.

Every organization wants to succeed. That's why, inevitably, there is a constant pressure to let the end justify the means. This pressure becomes especially acute when either victory or failure is in immediate sight. That's when the usual ethical and moral constraints are sometimes abandoned — always for good reasons, and always “just this once” — in the name of expediency.

Sometimes this strategy even works. But it sets the precedent for repeatedly using these tactics at critical moments — not to mention a kind of “mission creep” by which corner-cutting begins to invade operations even when they aren't at a critical crossroads.

Plus, when employees see you breaking the “code” of organizational honor and integrity to which your company is supposed to adhere, they lose trust in you.

Betray your organization's stated values when you're feeling desperate — by lying to clients or “spinning” the numbers to get out of trouble with your boss — and you devalue the importance of trust and honesty in their eyes. After all, if the client or the company's executive suite can't trust you, why should they?

• Separate the bad apples from the apples who just need a little direction.

The cost of untruths to an organization can be huge in terms of time, money, trust, and reputation. As a leader, you have to recognize that you are not going to be able to “fix” a thief, a pathological liar, or a professional con artist — all of these must go, immediately.

In my coaching practice, there are three failure modes that I will decline to coach: integrity, commitment, and chronic selfishness, that is, manipulating outcomes for individual gain at the expense of the larger opportunity. These are character traits, not matters of skill, practice, knowledge, or experience.

That said, one huge mistake leaders make is to doubt or distrust someone because their work or performance disappoints us. Performance problems should be managed fairly and with little judgment of the person's underlying character, unless that is the issue at the root of the trouble. Ultimately, unlike my failure modes, improving performance is often merely a matter of feedback, course correction, and some coaching.

Trustworthiness is never entirely pure. Everyone fails to achieve perfection. So the goal for a leader is to make those wrong choices as rarely as possible; admit them quickly, completely, and with humility; fix them as quickly as you can; and make full recompense when you cannot.

Trust is the most powerful, and most fragile, asset in an organization, and it is almost exclusively created, or hampered, by the actions of the senior leader on the team.

A working environment of trust is a place where teams stay focused, give their utmost effort, and in the end do their best work. It's a place where we can trust ourselves, trust others, trust our surroundings, or — best of all — trust all three.

John Hamm teaches leadership at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University. He has been a venture capitalist, a CEO, a board member at more than 30 companies, and an executive coach to senior leaders at companies such as Documentum, Cisco, Hewlett-Packard, TaylorMade-adidas Golf and McAfee. He is the author of a new book, Unusually Excellent: The Necessary Nine Skills Required for the Practice of Great Leadership (Jossey-Bass/A Wiley Imprint).

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Do universities discriminate? | View Clip
05/01/2011
Tampa Tribune - Online

Do universities discriminate? Yes! Absolutely! Without any doubt!

Universities, which portray themselves as bastions of diversity when it comes to race and gender, have fallen far short of achieving even minimal diversity with respect to the ideological leanings of their faculty. Ask yourself, your children or your grandchildren how many conservative faculty they encountered during their university experience. If they are like most students, they will have been exposed to only a few or none at all.

This article is not a diatribe against liberals. Most of my best university friends were liberals. Of course, it is not like I had any choice.

Discrimination against conservatives

As we will see, liberals heavily outnumber conservative faculty in American universities, and in massive numbers. You will still find a token conservative who snuck through the gauntlet or had credentials that were too overwhelming to ignore. Even the Ivy Leagues have Harvey Mansfield at Harvard, Robert George at Princeton and Donald Kagan at Yale.

How did I manage to get hired and survive 35 years at the University of South Florida if there is such bias against conservatives? I believe it was because when I was hired by USF I had spent the previous year as a National Teaching Fellow at Florida A&M. Anyone who taught at an all-black institution had to be a liberal. In addition, my dissertation was on black mayors in America. Anyone interested in the politics of African-Americans had to be liberal.

Some years after I was hired, one of the local papers identified me as a Republican. When one of my colleagues read that I was a Republican she came to me and said, "You're one of them!" She said it in a tone that made it apparent that I had leprosy or some fatal disease. When I later became a fellow at the Heritage Foundation, another colleague said he never knew I was a Nazi. Being a conservative on a college campus is like being the Maytag repairman — it's very lonely.

Over the years, I have been interviewed more than 7,000 times by the print and broadcast media. I like to think it is because I have something interesting to say and say it well. I also realize it is because if the media wants a Republican or conservative academic to comment on an issue they have very few choices. Conservative professors are closer to extinction than the Florida panther.

Why are there so few conservatives in academia? Alan Kors, a conservative professor at Penn, says that conservative students face "entering hostile and discriminatory territory." Many conservative students are advised to keep quiet rather than engage liberal faculty. If conservative students manage to get a Ph.D they will have a hard time getting a job and an even harder time of earning tenure. When Harvard's government department recently reviewed the placement of its doctoral students, the only two without jobs were students of conservative professor Harvey Mansfield.

George Lakoff, a linguistics professor at Berkeley and a favorite of Democratic politicians, argues that there is no discrimination against conservative professors. He contends that the disparity is because conservatives are not interested in academic careers. Liberals seek academic careers because, "unlike conservatives, they believe in working for the public good and social justice." Well, that certainly explains everything. As someone who taught Southern politics for 35 years, Lakoff's argument sounds very similar to what white Southerners said when asked why so few blacks were voting in the South. Their usual response was that blacks were simply not that interested in politics. It had nothing to do with discrimination.

Neither Lakoff's explanation nor that of white Southerners has much credibility.

Liberals and conservatives

Endless studies have demonstrated the lack of conservative professors in higher education and the liberal ideology of the faculty.

According to the Georgetown Law Journal, 81 percent of professors at the top 21 law schools gave to Democrats; 15 percent gave to Republicans.

At Harvard, Yale and Stanford, the percentages were 91 percent, 92 percent and 94 percent.

The American Enterprise examined the political leanings of humanities and social science professors and found that Cornell had 166 liberals and six conservatives; Stanford had 151 liberals and 17 conservatives; Colorado had 116 liberals and five conservatives, and UCLA had 141 liberals and nine conservatives.

Daniel Klein, an economics professor at Santa Clara University, studied 1,000 professors around the nation and found that Democrats outnumbered Republicans 7 to 1 in the humanities and social sciences. In anthropology and sociology the margin was 30 Democrats for every Republican.

The Center for the Study of Popular Culture found Ivy League professors voted 9 to 1 for Gore over Bush in 2000. The results were more Democratic in the 2004 and 2008 elections.

The 1999 North American Academic Study Survey (NAASS) sampled 1,643 faculty from 183 universities. The study found a strong leftward tilt of American faculty in the 1980s and 1990s: 72 percent of professors in the survey identified themselves as left or liberals, compared to 15 percent who called themselves right or conservatives.

During the same year, the Harris Poll found that only 18 percent of Americans called themselves liberals and 37 percent considered themselves conservatives.

The NAASS study found 81 percent of humanities professors and 75 percent of social science faculty were liberals. Even in supposedly traditionally conservative enclaves, liberals outnumbered conservatives by 51 percent to 19 percent in engineering and 49 percent to 39 percent in business.

Philosophy, political science, religion, fine arts, psychology, performing arts and English faculty were all 80 percent or more liberal. My discipline, political science, was 80 percent liberal and 2 percent conservative.

The case for ideological diversity

We need ideological diversity for the same reason that we need racial and gender diversity.

Supreme Court Justice Louis Powell argued in a 1978 case that diversity is essential to the mission of the university. The more diverse the faculty and student body, the more robust is the exchange of ideas.

Peter Schuck, a Yale law professor and author of "Diversity in America," contends that faculty have "a higher responsibility to our students, ourselves and our disciplines that our preference for ideological homogeneity and faculty-lounge echo chambers betray."

Echoing that sentiment, John McGinnis of Northwestern Law School writes that "liberal ideas might well be strengthened and made more effective if liberals had to run a more conservative gauntlet among their own colleagues when developing them."

I do not agree with all of the policy ideas of conservatives regarding education, but it should not surprise anyone in Florida or across the nation that much of the attack on education is directly related to what is perceived to be the overwhelming dominance of liberals in higher education.

Why would conservatives want to increase funding for an institution that they believe is pushing a liberal/left agenda?

Why would any group provide financial support to an organization that is perceived to be the enemy?

A little ideological diversity in higher education would go a long way in improving legislators' perception of and financial support for education.

Ending ideological bias

Solutions to the lack of ideological diversity include "conservative coming-out days," such as have been done at Harvard, Penn State, the University of Texas and many other universities. Some state legislators are so upset at the imbalance in faculties that they have adopted or are considering the adoption of "An Academic Bill of Rights."

Others, mostly liberals, have suggested that affirmative action be extended to ideology. No thanks. The University of Colorado, affectionately known as "Tofu U" by conservatives, is creating an endowed chair in Conservative Thought and Policy.

Once again, no thanks. Who would want to be the monkey in the cage to be looked at as a curiosity by the liberal left?

Others have suggested that money talks. Conservative donors, after listening to the wonderful reports about how the university has exceeded its affirmative action goals, should announce they are withholding their financial contributions until the university seriously undertakes as a goal the creation of a more ideologically balanced faculty.

Money, or the lack of it, always seems to put the fear of God in university administrators. However, since most of these administrators are liberal and secular, the fear of God may not be sufficient to move them to action.

The bottom line is that universities need to seriously undertake a program to correct the ideological imbalance. How can universities have a real clash of ideas if one side is missing in action? How can universities cultivate and promote diversity in race, ethnicity, gender and sexual preference, yet ignore it when it comes to ideology?

Ideological diversity will benefit the universities intellectually, as well as financially.

It is time to end the ideological homogeneity which is pervasive in higher education and put an end to what George Orwell called "smelly little orthodoxies."

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Get over the I.... www.youtube.com Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t... Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4: Task Speed Test | View Clip
05/01/2011
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Get over the I....
Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4: Task Speed Test
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Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t...

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Have You Earned the Right to Lead? Ten Deeply Destructive Mistakes That Suggest the Answer Is No (and How to Stop Making Them) | View Clip
05/01/2011
SmartBusiness - Online

There are people in every organization you know whose titles indicate they are leaders. Often, and unfortunately, their employees beg to differ. Oh, they don't say it directly, not to the boss's face, anyway. They say it with their ho-hum performance, their games of avoidance, their dearth of enthusiasm. Leaders — real leaders who have mastered their craft — don't preside over such lackluster followers. If reading this makes you squirm with recognition, you may have a problem lurking.

You're really just masquerading. You haven't yet earned the right to lead.

When times are good, not-so-great leaders can get by. They're cushioned by a surplus of cash, and their missteps are covered up by the thrill of top-line growth, which hides a multitude of sins. But when the cloak of prosperity falls away, their mediocrity is ruthlessly exposed.

Real leadership equity is only earned, not bestowed. Just because you have been granted authority doesn't mean you're getting the full, collaborative engagement of your employees. You may have their bodies and time forty or fifty hours a week, but until you earn the privilege, from their point of view, you'll never have their hearts and minds.

I've spent my career studying the practitioners of great leadership via my work as a venture capitalist, board member, high-level consultant, and professor of leadership at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University. In Unusually Excellent, my new book, I share what I've learned and bring those lessons to life with real-world stories.

Unusually Excellent is a back-to-basics reference book that offers both seasoned and aspiring leaders a framework for understanding and a guide for applying the battle-tested fundamentals of leadership at every stage of their careers.

These aren't radically new ideas. Human nature hasn't changed that much over the millennia, so neither have the core laws of leadership. It's just that in the heat of the day-to-day battle, leaders inevitably lose their grip on the basic principles of leadership. In other cases, they never learned these fundamentals or mastered them earlier in their career. And finally, sad to say, some people just aren't cut out to lead and need to understand why.

“Normal” leadership is a complex system of behaviors that can tolerate a lot of little mistakes. Extraordinary leadership cannot.

Think about it this way: Anyone can snap a photo that looks okay or cook a meal that satiates hunger. However, when an award-winning photographer takes the picture, or a five-star chef prepares dinner, anyone can tell a master has been at work. The same is true of leadership. The small deficiencies in how the novice leads, as opposed to the unusually excellent professional, create a radical difference in the outcome.

So how can you tell whether you really are a great leader in the minds of your employees — or whether, to paraphrase the old television commercial, you're just playing one on TV? Unfortunately, the depth and breadth of the mistakes you make often tell the true tale.

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Jordan principal to move to district-wide post | View Clip
05/01/2011
Palo Alto Weekly - Online

Magdalena Fittora named principal of Barron Park as Jordan searches for new leader

Jordan Middle School Principal Michael Milliken has been named director of secondary education for the Palo Alto school district, replacing Debbra Lindo, who will leave in June to head a school district in the East Bay.

Math resource teacher Magdalena Fittoria will become principal of Barron Park Elementary School, replacing the retiring Cathy Howard. Fittoria served as acting principal at Barron Park last year, while Howard was on medical leave for several months.

Both announcements were made Thursday by Palo Alto School Superintendent Kevin Skelly.

"I am pleased to recommend Dr. Milliken and Ms. Fittoria to the (school) board," Skelly said.

"Dr. Milliken's background as a middle school leader and his research work on high schools will make our District Office team stronger.

"Ms. Fittoria has been an outstanding teacher leader and I am confident that she will continue her success in this new position."

Milliken, who holds a bachelor's degree in political science as well as a PhD in educational administration from Stanford University, came to Palo Alto in 2008 as principal of Jordan.

He began his public-education career in 1996 as an elementary teacher in San Diego, later moving to Maryland where he taught elementary school as well as middle school math. In 2005 he became principal of an elementary school in Newark.

Fittoria, who earned a bachelor's and master's degree from Stanford as well as an additional master's from Santa Clara University, joined the district in 1996 as a teacher in the Spanish Immersion Program, then at Fairmeadow School.

Except for her time as acting principal at Barron Park in 2010, she has been the district's elementary math resource teacher since 2007.

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Mobile TV in Brazil and Latin America | View Clip
05/01/2011
Connect-World

Written by Alon Ironi

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Topic: Mobile TV in Brazil and Latin America

Author: Alon Ironi

Title: CEO & President (Co-founder)

Organisation: Siano Mobile Silicon (Service Provider: Mobile TV)

PDF size: 140KB

About author

Alon Ironi is the Co-founder, CEO & President of Siano Mobile Silicon. He formerly served as CEO of Emblaze Semiconductor Ltd., Entrepreneur in Residence at Concord VC, General Manager of Zoran Israel and VP Engineering of Zoran Corporation, in charge of the overall engineering activity of Zoran worldwide. Mr. Ironi has 15 years of experience in ‘fabless' integrated circuit management. product roadmap definition and strategy, SoC architecture and design and more. Alon Ironi holds a BSEE (Cum Laude) from the Technion and completed the MSEE program in Santa Clara University (CA, USA).

Brazil and other Latin American countries have an enormous potential for successful mobile TV deployment. With a unified standard, and content hungry populations, there is no limit for mobile TV in Brazil and in the greater Latin American region. Brazil's adoption of mobile digital TV cannot be overstated. It is the test bed and trial for the industry in Latin America. Success in Brazil, and the lessons learned there, will pave the way for a mobile TV revolution throughout the continent.

Football crazy You've seen the photos. During the World Cup this summer, millions of fans in Brazil and around the world were glued to their television sets at home, in the office, or at their local café or bar to follow their favourite stars. If there is one thing that major sports events such as this show us, it's the power of TV to attract and maintain viewer attention - and it goes beyond just sports. Whether we are tuning in to watch our favourite TV show, or the latest breaking news items, TV has a unique power to serve as a window to the world and helps us see beyond ourselves. In Brazil, and in Latin America as a whole, the way people will be able to view TV is undergoing a dramatic transformation. According to analysts, Mobile Digital TV - a family of technologies for delivering a live broadcast TV signal optimized for mobile handheld devices - has a high potential to be successful in Latin America. The ability of users to watch television on mobile devices, which include cellular phones, PDAs, portable media players, laptops, netbooks, portable navigation systems, portable game consoles and portable DVD players, among others, will really revolutionize the way in which people watch TV on-the-go, on the street, at a shopping mall, restaurant, hairdresser or even at home. Dr Windsor Holden, Principal Analyst at Juniper Research, commented recently on the potential of mobile TV in Brazil: “Sports broadcasting and the evolution of mobile TV go hand-in-hand. Given the football-mad Brazilians and the World Cup in 2010, and with Brazil also hosting the 2016 Olympic Games, there's fertile ground for mobile TV to really take-off. With the help of major sporting events in the coming years, Brazil could prove the first market in South America to make mobile TV a success.” Mobile Digital TV (MDTV) services are already available in more than 40 cities in Brazil, covering a population of more than 70 million. These services are being offered for free, with concrete plans to introduce advanced data and interactive services in 2011, creating exciting new revenue generation possibilities for the various players involved. Mobile TV is expected to be a boom for the telco and consumer electronics industries in Brazil. A BRIC country with a stable political infrastructure and a flourishing economy, the dynamic Brazilian market represents huge potential for MDTV. With the third highest television revenues in the world, a 189 million strong nation of sport lovers and phenomenal recent growth of the mobile communications industry - much fertile ground exists for the burgeoning MDTV market. Coupled with the favourable economic foundations, the Brazilian government is mandating an analogue-switch-off and an extremely attractive business model of free-to-the-users services, aimed at delivering a new TV experience to the Brazilian people. Key statistics and the big picture It goes further. The numbers tell a clear story. Almost 93 per cent of Brazilians 14 years old or over watch television and nearly 43 per cent spend more than three hours a day in front of a TV. Almost 95 per cent of Brazilian homes have at least one TV set. Brazil has the third-highest television revenues in the world. The number of cell phones in Brazil is already very close to surpassing the rate of one phone per person, according to recent data. These statistics show that the convergence between TV and mobile devices is bound to happen within a short period of time. The successful growth of mobile TV will completely change the way television content is absorbed. In addition to widely expanding the option of when and where viewers can watch TV, it would also mean the rise of a new reality for advertising agencies and advertisers, who will be able to reach their audiences no matter where they are. It's worth noting that Brazil is the world's third fastest growing country in TV advertising, paving the way for mobile TV broadcasts to penetrate this market. Furthermore, as the early bird and catalyst for adoption of new technologies in Latin America, Brazil will be the blueprint for the successful rollout of mobile digital TV services throughout the entire Latin American market. Having recently debuted MDTV services in Argentina and Chile, other countries are very likely to join, including Uruguay, Peru, Venezuela, Bolivia and Paraguay. These countries are expected to launch services within the next year. Overall, this has the potential to generate one of the largest unified Mobile DTV markets worldwide, totalling more than 300 million potential viewers. How will it work? Mobile TV is generally speaking a joint venture between broadcasters - and mobile operators. Typically, the infrastructure is laid by a broadcaster, and the service is then offered by a the broadcasters themselves as a free-to-air, dedicated service and by the mobile operator – as part of the rich media bouquet offered on the carrier's mobile phones. In most cases the content will be regular TV content such as sports, news, soap operas, talk shows and adult entertainment, with the exception of movie channels. In the case of mobile phones, obviously a phone maker manufacturers the actual device, which is then marketed, by the mobile operator, and then the end user can experience the programming. To give an actual example, earlier this year Vivo began marketing a 3G data card designed by ZTE. The data card enables viewing of 13 DTV channels comprised of Sports, News and Entertainment. The end user can insert the card into any standard notebook, netbook, or desktop PC to enjoy the mobile TV viewing experience. On the consumer electronics part of the market, manufactures that produce PND's (portable navigation devices), PMP's (portable media players) - and other such devices that are able to receive the broadcast signal freely - can simply design and market such devices directly to the consumer via retail stores. To further increase the potential in broadcast TV, Brazil has also chosen a mobile TV business model that has proven successful in other regions around the world, The service in Brazil will be free of charge - at least for the first couple of years, as in Korea and Japan where mobile TV has been most successful. _________________________ Brazil has a very significant and fast-growing market for TV-ads, a huge and enthusiastic base of TV consumers, and a phenomenal growing market for mobile subscribers. With a flourishing economy and a rapidly growing number of mobile phone and portable computer users, Brazil is fertile ground for a rapidly expanding mobile TV market. Beyond Brazil, other Latin American countries also have a quite high potential for successful mobile TV deployment. With a unified standard, and with content hungry populations, the sky is the limit for mobile TV in Brazil and in the greater Latin American region. The country's adoption of mobile digital TV cannot be overstated. It is the test bed and the crucible for the industry in Latin America. Success in Brazil, and the lessons learned there, will pave the way for the mobile TV revolution throughout the continent.

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NOTHING COVERT ABOUT IT -- PANETTA IS DEDICATED
05/01/2011
San Jose Mercury News

IA always knew that CIA Director Leon Panetta, President Barack Obama's pick to replace U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates, was a hard worker and an extremely devout Catholic. So we weren't surprised with some of the Panetta stories making the rounds in Washington this week.

U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer, the New York Democrat, told MSNBC that he and Panetta were roommates for 10 years when both were congressmen. Schumer remembered how he, Panetta and his other roomies would go to dinner every weekday night. Afterward, while Schumer and his other roommates would head home to watch a ballgame and yack, Panetta would go back to work in his congressional office until about 2 a.m., Schumer said. Panetta would then get back up at 6 every morning to go to Mass before heading back to work, Schumer said.

It reminded IA of a conversation we had with the CIA chief last summer just before the death of the Rev. Paul Locatelli, the former Santa Clara University president. Panetta had reminisced about their budding friendship while both were students at SCU and how they seemed to be following similar paths. But eventually Locatelli ended up in the seminary, Panetta in Congress.

"Paul was someone who really did believe as a Catholic that you have a responsibility to give back to the community, to give back to the nation, and he felt that public service was a really important component of being a good Catholic and a good citizen," Panetta told IA.

That might explain why the 72-year-old Panetta is now preparing to take one of the hardest jobs in Washington at a time when he'd probably rather be doting over his grandchildren at his Carmel Valley home.

DEAR NORMAN MINETA, PICK UP THE PHONE!

His name hangs on San Jose's struggling airport, some would say like an anvil. But Norman Y. Mineta, former San Jose mayor, congressman and U.S. transportation secretary, keeps ducking IA's calls about tweaking SJC's official title to make it more catchy. IA has spent weeks phoning and emailing Mineta, now a Washington, D.C., consultant for Hill and Knowlton, the public relations giant.

No reply. Staffers say he's too busy. C'mon, Norm. What gives? OK, we're not Mayor Chuck Reed, apparently the only person who elicited Mineta's feelings on the matter. Reed said Mineta told him in a phone call that he was OK with adding "Silicon Valley" to SJC's handle. Airlines, whose business San Jose desperately needs, say that would help market it as a destination.

But branding experts and others we spoke with say adding Silicon Valley to Norman Y. Mineta San Jose International Airport is too unwieldy. Simple sells, they say. If "Silicon Valley" is in, something's got to go.

And let's face it, the obvious choice is Norman Y. Mineta. After all, it was just a decade ago that city leaders added Mineta's name in a move many, including Reed, opposed on grounds that the airport should simply bear San Jose's identity.

But city leaders dread the thought of slighting Mineta, who remains locally popular, at least with those whose calls he returns. Reed never mentioned removing some or all of Mineta's name in their recent conversation, saying he didn't think it necessary.

Others disagree. Local branding consultant Marc Rudov had suggested something bold and simple: "Silicon Valley Airport." That's a lot like the most popular serious suggestion from IA's readers: "Silicon Valley International Airport." Airport director Bill Sherry likes "San Jose Silicon Valley Mineta International Airport," a nudge toward verbal economy that still honors Mineta. What does Norm think? We're still waiting. Norman Y. Mineta, phone home!

LOBBYISTS ON MEDICAL POT: CALL US SWITZERLAND

Medical marijuana clubs may be a lucrative business for some operators, not to mention the throng of attorneys, consultants and other professionals the clubs hire. But over the past year, San Jose lobbyists Tom Saggau and Dustin DeRollo have politely declined overtures to ease the pot clubs' plight, which recently worsened when the City Council decided to reduce the number of clubs from about 125 to 10.

Turns out the two partners have some conflicts of interest and some questions of conscience. For starters, the firm represents the Santa Clara County Government Attorneys' Association, which includes county prosecutors, as well as the union that represents retired police and firefighters.

"It appeared to us that any Joe Blow could just pop open a place and start selling marijuana, and we just didn't want a part of that," Saggau told IA, adding that police raids of clubs further cemented their decision.

Saggau said real estate consultant and friend Jerry Strangis, who is representing eight medical marijuana collectives in San Jose, had asked his buddies if they wanted to get involved with the issue. But, Strangis said, "it didn't go very far."

Saggau, who lives in Gilroy with his family, said he's noticed young kids riding bikes and skateboards going into the pot club near a coffee shop he frequents. While he said he supports the use of medicinal marijuana for patients with legitimate needs and prescriptions for the drugs, "it's just not a good fit for us."

C'MON, NEWSOM, TELL US WHAT YOU REALLY THINK

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom was looking awfully candidate-ish as he made the rounds at the Democratic Party convention in Sacramento on Friday. You had to pry him away from activists, who flocked to him with the zeal of autograph hounds.

And no matter how much he tried to avoid straying from the party line, Newsom, whose hair was coifed up to standard and whose teeth looked extra-whitened, cut his own swath on a couple of issues.

When asked to opine on Gov. Jerry Brown's insistence on holding an election for new taxes, Newsom said, "I'm going to support our governor. That's the commitment he made; he's holding strong to that, and I respect that."

But ... "At the same time, there may come a time where even the best intentions need to be reassessed because the state will be put in a cash crisis (if the budget isn't resolved) in a number of months. It would be perfectly acceptable if Gov. Brown says, 'OK, I've done everything I can. I've agreed to all these concessions, but I still can't get their (Republicans') support. I'm not going to watch higher education get devastated.'"?"

At what point should the governor pull the trigger and drop his plan to seek a vote of the people, Newsom was asked.

"If we start pulling out IOUs, it's certainly self-evident. If there's a certain point where we have a crisis of confidence. If we get close to that date, clearly something will have to give. But this should be resolved well before that."

Speaking of the convention, for an event that was supposed to be bereft of drama, it's been quite a carnival, especially if you count state party Chairman John Burton's remark that Brown should "try shooting" a Republican to get GOP lawmakers to OK taxes.

LATEST LINE: WHO'S UP & DOWN

LEON KEEPS RISING - Arrow up

Our own Leon Panetta is being promoted from Head Spook to Defense Chief. Who said nice guys finish last?

NO MORE PARADE - Arrow down

The American GI Forum, which sponsored the Cinco de Mayo parade in San Jose, says it just can't afford to stage it anymore after three decades. So there will be no parade this year.

LOSING SOME OF SAN JOSE'S FINEST - Arrow sideways

San Jose police agreed Friday to take a 10 percent pay cut for a year. But it probably won't be enough to avoid the layoff of more than 100 cops -- the first such layoff in the city's history.

THEY SAID IT

"Ready, shoot, aimis the apparent form of government we are under."

-- Robert Sapien, president of the San Jose firefighters' union, commenting on a proposed ballot measure targeting abuses in the San Jose's disability retirement system

Internal Affairs is an offbeat look at state and local politics. This week's items were written by Tracy Seipel, John Woolfolk, Steven Harmon, Lisa Fernandez and Paul Rogers. Send tips to internalaffairs@mercurynews.com, or call 408-920-5552.

Copyright © 2011 San Jose Mercury News

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Professionals Tap a Higher Power in the Workplace | View Clip
05/01/2011
Workforce Management

Among best practices recommended by the EEOC: Be cautious. In the move to accommodate religious diversity, employers should avoid letting workers proselytize or infringe on another person's beliefs.

When requested, employers must consider making reasonable accommodations for an employee to observe religious beliefs, unless the accommodation would cause the employer to suffer an undue hardship.

Imane Boudlal filed a religious discrimination complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Disney decided to fight it rather than depart from its long-standing policy requiring cast members to appear in regulation costumes on stage.

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Professionals Tap a Higher Power in the Workplace

Although religion remains a taboo topic at some companies, more employers are allowing workers to embrace their spiritual beliefs while on the job.

ew employees at Tyson Foods Inc. sit through much the same orientation about policies and procedures as new hires at any other company. But they hear from someone most employees don't: a chaplain.

One of the company's 120 chaplains gives a short lecture on the spiritual leaders' role at Tyson, which several years ago rewrote its mission statement to include the words “faith-friendly” and “God.” “Primarily, we are here to demonstrate to all our people how deeply we care for them,” says Richard McKinnie, Tyson's head chaplain. “Just as we have nurses who take care of the physical parts of our employees' lives, we are here to help with the spiritual component of their lives.”

McKinnie's chaplain program serves as an employee resource to help people deal with issues such as work-life balance, a divorce, or a death or sickness in the family. The chaplains are quite visible as they walk the floors of the company's plants and offices every day listening to people's concerns and sometimes praying with them. On plant floors, chaplains wear workplace smocks or hard hats with their name and the word “chaplain” written on the front.

“We're not about religion; it's not about Christianity or Islam. It's the spiritual side of what people are,” McKinnie says. “This may surprise some, but in the course of my day I can't think of a time I've ever uttered a word of scripture from the Bible.”

McKinnie believes the return on the investment in the chaplain program goes beyond employees' spiritual health. “We've come to realize that the investment brings us increased productivity and has increased worker safety,” he says. “When people come to work with burdens—they've had a spat with their spouse or the teenagers have acted up—that can take their mind off their work.”

While chaplains remain a rarity in corporate America, employees' religious and spiritual affiliations—like race, gender and sexual orientation before them—are an increasingly important part of a diverse workplace. “Religion is the next big frontier in which companies will have to shape policies that engage the whole person,” says David Miller, director of the Faith & Work Initiative at Princeton University, who has consulted with Tyson and other companies on incorporating faith into the workplace. “Religion and spiritual belief may be a deeply private matter for some employees, but it is a part of who they are.” Historically, a person's religious beliefs were considered private. But the private has become public and the personal has become professional, Miller says. “In the old business model, you were at a job to work. In the new model, people want to balance their whole life.”

Newfound faith

This new attitude has prompted some companies to support employees' religious practices such as daily prayers and to extend the number of days off from work to accommodate more religions' holidays. Under federal laws, including Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, companies are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of religion. The law also requires employers to accommodate religious practices as long as they don't cause undue hardship for the company.

But some organizations have gone far beyond what the law requires. Like Tyson, they may proclaim their workplaces “faith-friendly,” or they may adopt specific traditions that are consistent with the religions of their leaders. For instance, the U.S. Army requires soldiers to take a “spiritual fitness test,” which doesn't mention specific religions but does place an emphasis on having religious or spiritual beliefs. An Army sergeant, Justin Griffith, took issue with the test because he is an atheist. He says he is considering suing, arguing that the test violates his constitutional rights.

Some companies try to show employees that religious diversity is not only acceptable, but also welcome in the workplace. According to the magazine DiversityInc's 2011 Top 50 Companies for Diversity list, 28 percent report having faith-based employee resource groups, up from 10 percent in 2006. At Ford Motor Co., for instance, which came in at No. 47 on the list, the Ford Interfaith Network includes several hundred employees and supports all religious groups. American Airlines Inc. even uses its employees' faiths to help understand its diverse consumers.

At Tyson, the shift to a more “faith-friendly” workplace came after John Tyson, the grandson of the founder, took over the leadership of the company in 2000. The appointment surprised some people who followed the company because he had been known for his past drug and alcohol abuse. And when he was president of the company's beef and pork division, he was named as an unindicted co-conspirator in a prosecution against Mike Espy, the former secretary of Agriculture. Espy was accused, but then acquitted of, accepting gifts and favors from Tyson and other large corporations. When John Tyson and his new leadership team took over the company, they decided that “our people shouldn't have to check their spirituality at the door when they came to work,” Tyson spokesman Gary Mickelson says in an email.

John Tyson experienced what he called a “spiritual awakening” before becoming chief executive. He came to believe that faith had literally saved his life, says Judi Neal, the director of the Tyson Center for Faith and Spirituality in the Workplace at the University of Arkansas. The Tyson company and Wal-Mart's Walton family gave $2 million each to create the center four years ago.

“Religion and faith are essential parts of who we are,” Neal says. “But there are good ways and bad ways of expressing those issues. The good way is exploratory, offering open dialogue that leads to growth. A bad way is to give people a list of churches that they should attend.” While it may seem hard to believe, Neal says she has known companies—most often private companies with specific religious affiliations—to offer such lists to their employees.

Although all of Tyson's chaplains are of Christian faiths, McKinnie says he has created an 80-page manual that goes into detail about how to be accepting of all faiths. “When I am recruiting, if I have the least little doubt that a chaplain won't be respectful of all faiths, I won't hire them,” he says. One time, McKinnie says, he found a chaplain who had a Christian cross on his hard hat. “The cross was gone by the end of the day,” he says. “I asked him how he thought one of our Muslim employees would feel if he had to stare at that cross.”

Still sensitive

Religion clearly remains a sensitive topic in the workplace. Consider the case of Jack Griffin, the head of Time Warner Inc.'s magazine division who was dismissed in February after just six months on the job. The company's chairman and CEO, Jeff Bewkes, wrote in an internal memo that Griffin's leadership style did not mesh with the company, but news reports said references Griffin made to his religion—Roman Catholicism—in business meetings also might have been a factor in his departure. According to the “Media Decoder” blog at the New York Times, executives whose identities were not revealed said Bewkes had asked Griffin to tone down his religious remarks. For example, the executives said, Griffin had compared Time Inc. to the Vatican.

Employers often struggle to find the right fit for religion in their culture. Doug Hicks, professor of leadership studies and religion at the University of Richmond in Virginia, suggests there are four basic approaches: maintaining a secular culture; adopting a generic spirituality that acknowledges religious beliefs; endorsing an official religion, as a Catholic hospital does, for instance; or creating a workplace that puts a high value on a diversity of religions.

“There is a place between dry secularism,” he says, “and privileging your world view over others.” Yet achieving that balance can be difficult, as evidenced by religious discrimination statistics from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Since 1992, the federal agency has seen almost a doubling of religious discrimination charges, which accounted for about 4 percent of all charges in fiscal 2010. That's up from about 1.5 percent two decades ago.

“The American population is increasingly religiously diverse and people are coming into contact with religions they may be unfamiliar with,” says Jeanne Goldberg, a senior attorney adviser with the EEOC, in explaining why she believes religious discrimination cases are on the rise. “Plus we live in a 24/7 economy where we need employees all days of the week and that may lead to more potential for conflict.” Fridays and Saturdays—not just Sundays—are days of worship, and religious holidays fall throughout the calendar and may include special requirements, such as when Muslims fast during Ramadan.

The so-called “9-11 backlash” has been another factor in the rise in EEOC complaints about religious discrimination, Goldberg says. Since 2001, more employees may have felt they were being discriminated against because they were, for example, Muslim or Sikh.

The EEOC even issued a fact sheet in late 2001, outlining what companies could do when faced with specific issues regarding religious dress and prayer practices they weren't familiar with. The fact sheet gave examples of why a Sikh, whose religion requires men to wear a turban, could not be refused employment if he refused to take off his turban. It also offered guidance on how to accommodate requests for prayer rooms because Muslim employees were increasingly lodging complaints that they had to pray at their desks or that they were being fired because of their requests to pray a few times a day.

EEOC complaints range from people claiming they weren't hired because of their religion to employees asking that they be allowed to wear religious attire at work, including the recent case of Walt Disney Co. restaurant hostess Imane Boudlal. She filed a complaint in 2010 when the company wouldn't let her wear a hijab, or head scarf, because it conflicted with Disney's dress code. Disney spokeswoman Suzi Brown says Boudlal hasn't accepted the company's proposed accommodations—including wearing the hijab, just not in a customer-facing job. The complaint is still pending with the EEOC. Boudlal couldn't be reached for comment.

Few charges of religious discrimination turn into full-fledged lawsuits because issues typically can be resolved through open discussions, Goldberg says. But some cases do end up in court, including Myra Jones-Abid's complaint. She was fired in 2008 by Belk Inc., a department store company, after she refused to wear a Santa hat and apron while she wrapped Christmas presents. Jones-Abid is a Jehovah's Witness and doesn't celebrate holidays. The company dismissed her, and now the EEOC is seeking back pay, reinstatement, compensatory and punitive damages, and injunctive relief.

Christmas and other religious holidays can indeed be problematic. American Airlines, for instance, allows employees to put up public displays in company offices during religious holidays. “We do make certain they aren't offensive. You can be you, but not at the expense of someone else being themselves,” says Michael Collins, managing director of diversity strategies.

But a couple of years ago, the company received its first complaints about an Easter display, which featured a cross and biblical information. “We had used it for a decade or more, but this person complained that they were being proselytized to,” Collins says. The company took another look at the display and ended up removing some information—although the cross remained—and offering employee contact names in the Christian resource group to anyone who had questions.

Andre Delbecq, a professor at Santa Clara University in California, says studies show that a significant majority of Americans—more than 80 percent—consider themselves religious or spiritual. People who attend his workshops on spirituality come for different reasons, but one theme does dominate, he says. “Workers expect that they will bring their imagination, their intellect, their emotion to work. If they can't integrate deeper meaning in their work, then they may feel they are doing hard time.”

Delbecq says there is an evolving area of scientific study that maintains religion and spirituality are key parts of one's humanity, and that people with strong beliefs handle stress better, for example. Still, companies must be cautious and not assign more value to one religion over another. “It's the subtleties where companies can get into difficulty,” says Liz Denton, author of A Spiritual Audit of Corporate America. “For example, you can offer places for prayer, but the issue can be more difficult when you approach the issues of group prayer,” such as prayer before meetings.

Ford has come a long way from its early days when founder Henry Ford's Dearborn Independent newspaper published a series called “The International Jew: The World's Problem,” which claimed, among other things, that Jewish people were schemers plotting to control the world. Today, however, Ford is a good model for companies that aim to be truly inclusive. Muslims may pray two out of the five prayer times a day at work, while other employees meet each week for group prayer and Bible study. Employees may put up religious items in their cubicles and offices. And the company's Interfaith Network, which serves as an umbrella organization for employee religious groups, sponsors activities ranging from Diwali dinners to celebrate the Hindu religious holiday to lectures to introduce people to different religions and their traditions.

“If you came in my cubicle, you would see a framed picture of my family that has the ‘proclamation of the family,' Mormon tradition that proclaims the family as ordained by God], a statement that intersects with my religion's beliefs in the family,” says Daniel Dunnigan, who helped form the company's religious network and is serving as its chairman. “But the most common way I think we express our religions is in the way we conduct ourselves and how we treat others.”

The network, which dates back to the late 1990s, grew out of some employees' desire to make more formal what had been informal prayer and Bible study groups, Dunnigan says. But Ford executives were concerned that a focus on any one religion could create a feeling of exclusion as opposed to inclusion.

Instead of having religious employee resource groups organize separately as they do at some companies, Ford decided to create an umbrella group to represent many religions at a corporate level. “Individual faiths retain their identity,” Dunnigan says, “but they organize under the interfaith group.”

The network operates through a board on which eight different religions have a seat. Dunnigan notes that the board chair doesn't get a vote in the meetings about the network's activities, “so the person can't influence the board with his or her religious beliefs.” The network has evolved over the years to take advantage of online communication, including sending inspirational messages to an opt-in email list. It also operates an intranet for the approximately 4,000 people on its distribution list, offering a place for discussion of religions that may not have an established resource group. “We cover everything from A to Zoroastrianism,” Dunnigan says.

With so many different faiths represented, employees realize their common values as well as their differences, Dunnigan adds. “Different faiths will have different doctrinal values, but the values of faith, prayer, unselfishness, honesty, aren't the purview of any one faith exclusively.”

Vijay Patel, who is part of the Hindu religious group within the Interfaith Network, says being part of the group has helped him engage in Hinduism. “I was born and raised in India, but I hadn't really taken part in my own religion,” he says. “It was a great opportunity for me to learn about my own religion and about other religions.”

Whatever route companies take in dealing with religion in the workplace, they can expect unexpected outcomes. When American Airlines announced that it was opening a route between Chicago and New Delhi, Nisha Pasha had suggestions for her employer on educating workers on Indian cultural and religious traditions they may never have encountered.

But she hadn't imagined that the company would reach out to her and others who had formed Muslim and Indian religious and cultural employee groups. Yet, that's exactly what happened. “We wanted to help out and we were ready to offer our suggestions, but then the departments started reaching out to us for ideas,” says Pasha, manager of strategic alliances at American's headquarters in Dallas-Fort Worth. “It became a two-way conversation about food and language.” And religion.

Pasha says the resource groups offered advice on how to approach customers about major Hindu and Islamic holidays, including Ramadan. “The Muslim employees explained to flight attendants that some people may ask for their meals a half-hour later or that they would be saying their prayers as the sun was going down,” she says. Accommodating these and other requests, the employees explained, would go a long way in helping Muslim passengers feel comfortable on flights.

For Pasha, however, the discussions struck at a deeper issue. She says it helped employees feel that their religious and cultural traditions were valued by the company, not just that the airline adhered to government rules that require accommodation of employees' religious needs.

Indeed, American Airlines requires that its religious groups focus on business goals. “While the resource groups are employee initiated, they have guidelines that they have to follow. They must identify managers and executive sponsors to make sure that what they do is tied to the business,” says Collins, the managing director of diversity strategies.

“The resource groups have to be seen as business partners and supporters. They aren't just social clubs.”

Workforce Management, April 2011, pgs. 20-22, 24-25 --

Fara Warner is a writer based in Ann Arbor, Michigan. To comment, email editors@workforce.com.

Next Article: 1. Some Salvation From Lawsuits

Among best practices recommended by the EEOC: Be cautious. In the move to accommodate religious diversity, employers should avoid letting workers proselytize or infringe on another person's beliefs.

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Samantha and Her Subjects
05/01/2011
National Interest, The

Humanitarian intervention - the conviction that American presidents must act, preemptively if necessary, to avert the massacre of innocents abroad - is steadily acquiring a new prominence in the Obama administration. For Americas foreign-policy elite, it is a precept that provides a way to expiate the sins of the past, either bellicose action (Vietnam) or complacent inaction (Rwanda). It not only holds out the expectation of protecting endangered civilians but also the promise of acting multilaterally to uphold international laws.

Yet the consequences of such intervention have rarely been more vexing. As the world's leading military power - it devotes more to defense than the next ten biggestspending countries combined - America finds itself lurching from conflict to conflict, often with little idea of how they will end, other than the hope that the forces of righteousness will prevail, even as Washington becomes progressively more enmeshed in local disputes. In its quixotic quest to create a global and irenic order by force, it is flouting Shakespeare's admonition that it is best to "fling away ambition: By that sin fell the angels."

This is particularly so in the Middle East, where the Obama administration and, to a lesser degree, Europe face nothing less than a potential cataclysm of engagements, until the entire region is in tumult. The result is a self-reinforcing doctrine of permanent revolution. In creating, or abetting, chaotic conditions, it becomes necessary to intervene again and again, all in the name of averting further chaos.

These incursions embrace the idea - some more, some less - of humanitarian intervention. The conceit is that when America intervenes, it is not doing so on the basis of sordid national interests but, rather, on the grounds of self-evidently virtuous human rights or, in its most extreme case, to prevent genocide. This development - to call it a mere trend would be to trivialize its true import - has been a long time in the making.

Indeed, in an essay published in The National Interest (now reprinted in The Neoconservative Persuasion), Irving Kristol contended that human rights had become a kind of unquestioned ideology. Kristol traced its origins back to the debates between William Gladstone and Benjamin Disraeli over intervention in the Balkans, when the Turks massacred some twelve thousand Bulgarians. The realist Disraeli, who sought to check Russia, was unmoved by Gladstone's humanitarian appeals to endorse self-determination for the Balkan states. But perhaps an even earlier instance came in the lead-up to British involvement in the Crimean War, revolving as it did around the "Eastern Question"; the Turks and Russians could fight it out for influence in the Mediterranean - and the French could get in their squabble over Catholics, without much bother to the Brits. As liberal politician John Bright argued on March 31, 1854, in his great speech to Parliament against squandering power in foolish adventures abroad:

How are the intetests of England involved in this question? ... it is not on a question of sympathy that I dare involve this country, or any country, in a war which must cost an incalculable amount of treasure and of blood. It is not my duty to make this country the knight-errant of the human race, and to take upon herself the protection of the thousand millions of human beings who have been permitted by the Creator of all things to people this planet.

Transforming the United States into a knight-errant, though, is at the heart of liberal internationalism. As in nineteenthcentury Britain, so in modern America; just as with Gladstone, the current manifestation of this impulse first became apparent in the Balkans, when nato established a no-fly zone there, during the bombings of 1995. And so a new generation of liberal hawks emerged, overcoming the discomfiture associated with the use of force in Vietnam, seeing themselves as divine intervenors for mistreated ethnic minorities abroad. It amounted, in some ways, to a multicultural foreign policy, or at least one that sees America as key to creating a new democratic order. Madeleine Albright, for example, announced during the Clinton administration, "If we have to use force, it is because we are America. We are the indispensable nation. We stand tall, and we see further than other countries into the future."

The hubris of ascribing a unique percipience to the United States was hardly confined to Albright. It also amounted a fortiori to the credo of the George W Bush administration, which witnessed a fusion of neoconservatives and liberal hawks. "Damn the doves," Christopher Hitchens announced in the conservative London Spectator in 2001 as the United States readied to topple Saddam Hussein. While in Dissent, Michael Walzer declared that the Left was being "stupid, overwrought, grossly inaccurate" and should accept America's imperial status, modeling any opposition to the Iraq invasion on the Little Englanders during the Boer War.

Then, as the insurgency developed, the alliance melted away. A notable defector was Peter Beinart, who first wrote a book calling for a nationalistic Democratic Party, then issued a second one taking it all back.

Now the alliance between liberal hawks and neocons is returning, epitomized in an open letter sent to the White House in February 201 1 by the Foreign Policy Initiative (successor to the Project for the New American Century), demanding that President Obama act to avoid a humanitarian disaster in Libya. Signed by Paul Wolfowitz and William Kristol as well as Martin Peretz and Leon Wieseltier, the old gang was back together again. Robert Kagan declared Obama's speech on Libya to be "Keiinedyesque," the ultimate term of neocon approbation. Intellectuals as a class have become habituated to demanding military action to make up for America's failure to prevent various atrocities and genocides. As David Rieff observed with vexation:

This war - let us call it by its right name, fot once - will be remembered to a considerable extent as a war made by intellectuals, and cheered on by intellectuals. The main difference this time is that, particularly in the United States, these intellectuals largely come from the liberal rather than the conservative side.

No doubt the Obama team was itself torn on the issue of intervention. It entered office emphasizing realist tenets. Now it is jettisoning them. The intellectual incoherence of the White House was epitomized by a statement from Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes:

What we are doing is enforcing a resolution that has a very clear set of goals, which is protecting the Libyan people, averting a humanitarian crisis, and setting up a no-fly zone. Obviously that involves kinetic military action, particularly on the front end.

But Washington is not "getting into an open-ended war, a land invasion in Libya."

The plan, however, seems to be for America to act as an arsenal of freedom rather than to promote its own domestic welfare. Today this Wilsonian doctrine is sold as a form of atonement for past wrongdoings - that, unless we intervene decisively in what is often a civil war to tip the balance of the scales to one side, America will once again have blood on its hands. Never again, in other words, will become ever again.

It would be hard to think of a more ardent promoter of this doctrine than Samantha Power. Power is not just an advocate for human rights. She is an outspoken crusader against genocide. She has referred self-deprecatingly to herself as the "genocide chick." She has made it her life's mission to shame American statesmen into action and to transform U.S. foreign policy. And as she seeks to create a new paradigm, she is becoming a paradigmatic figure. She is a testament to the collapse of the old foreign-policy establishment and the rise of a fresh elite. This elite is united by a shared belief that American foreign policy must be fundamentally transformed from an obsession with national interests into a broader agenda that seeks justice for women and minorities, and promotes democracy whenever and wherever it can - at the point of a cruise missile if necessary. The same century-long progressive expansion of the democratic franchise that has taken place at home is also supposed to occur abroad. She is, you could say, the prophet armed.

Along with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and un Ambassador Susan Rice, Power has become closely - and publicly - identified as one of the advisers most responsible for pushing Obama to intervene in Libya. It is a stunning turnabout. Power served then-Senator Obama as a top aide on foreign policy, taking a leave of absence from the Kennedy School at Harvard. But during the presidential campaign, Power announced that Hillary Clinton (not yet in Barack's employ), who had been relentlessly bashing her boss, was a "monster." A furor erupted. Power resigned. Her career with Obama was over.

Only it wasn't. The late diplomat Richard Holbrooke, a close friend, called her "mesmerizing." Once Obama was elected, she landed a post as a senior adviser on the National Security Council, where she has become an increasingly influential and distinctive voice. Her rise there is even more astonishing given that National Security Adviser Tom Donilon was a deputy to Warren Christopher in the Clinton administration - and Power bitterly assailed that secretary of state for his dithering over Bosnia.

Power, unlike many liberal hawks, was an opponent of the Iraq War. When I hosted a panel with her in 2004 at ucla that included journalist James Mann and scholar Chalmers Johnson, I asked how she was able to reconcile her espousal of humanitarian intervention with failing to put a stop to Saddam Hussein's depredations. Her response? The Bush administration was not acting multilaterally and Saddam's actions, at that point, didn't meet the definition of genocide even if they had in the past. It is an answer that I never found fully satisfactory, at least for someone who was otherwise championing the cause of stopping mad and bad dictators around the world.

Indeed, absent Power, Obama may not have intervened in Libya. Obama now uses arguments to justify the intervention that are somewhat redolent of Bush's about Iraq. Power has almost single-handedly revived the alliance between liberal hawks and neocons; as one of the chief promoters of the Iraq War, Fouad Ajami, declared in the Wall Street Journal:

In Bosnia, as in Libya a generation later, the standatd-bearer of American power had a stark choice: It was either rescue or calamity. Benghazi would have been Barack Obama's Srebrenica, the town that the powers had left to the mercy of [General] Ratko Mladic.

An icon among the human-rights lobby, she has made it her personal crusade to ensure that American presidents act decisively to forestall, impede or halt the murder of civilians abroad. When President Obama gave his speech at the National Defense University in March, he explained military action in Libya protected the innocent; he was channeling Power:

To lend some perspective on how rapidly this military and diplomatic response came together, when people were being brutalized in Bosnia in the 1990s, it took the international community mote than a year to intervene with air power to protect civilians.

In fact, a few hours before Obama's speech, Power herself told an audience at Columbia University, in words that anticipated Obama's, that "in the Balkans it took three years for the international community to use air power to prevent heavy weapons from firing on civilians. In Libya it took a little more than a month."

The invocation of Bosnia was not adventitious. It has become the siren song of liberal interventionists. Part of the legend of Power is her first mission to Bosnia, where she filed reports for the Boston Globe and other publications about Serbian belligerence and Western inaction. Power became the anti-Rebecca West - where West lionized the Serbs standing up to fascism in the 1930s in her book Black Lamb and Grey Fakon, Power became a heroine chastising America and Europe for their lassitude in confronting contemporary fascist impulses from West's former freedom fighters. This was, at bottom, a new Spanish Civil War for Power and her cohort - a chance to choose sides, to experience good and evil, not vicariously but up close, and to denounce it. It is important to remember that when Power traveled to Bosnia, she frequendy met with and chastised government officials, including Ambassador Peter Galbraith, for not doing more against Serbian iniquities (a favor he returned as Obama hesitated about intervention in Libya). Not for her the Weberian Wertfreiheit, or objectivity, that American newspapers inculcate. Power epitomizes an older model - the crusading journalist.

But Power's journalistic triumphs were a dress rehearsal for her next career as a professor and author of "A Problem From Hell": America and the Age of Genocide, which won a Pulitzer Prize.

It is a bold effort. Stylishly written, packed with vignettes and sharp portraits, it essentially rewrites much of twentieth-century American history in the shadow of genocide. She observes that, again and again, Western powers looked away from massacre. The problem, she famously declared, wasn't that America's policy failed. It was that it worked. Reticence about protesting mass murder was a constituent part of America's hard-nosed, realist approach to foreign affairs. What is missing from Power's work, however, is a political context. There seems to be the assumption that Washington can always be on the right side of history - that American presidents can ignore domestic and international considerations simply to plunge into conflicts on the side of the beleaguered whenever they feel like it.

It is also notable that Power, in her extended case studies of genocide, ignores some of the biggest examples of the past century. There is no mention of Stalin's man-made Ukrainian famine. There is no mention of Mao's Cultural Revolution, which killed tens of millions.

Perhaps this is because these cases don't quite fit with her theory that the American government's deliberate indifference has invariably been key in the failure to stop mass deaths. Rather, many on the American and British left were bedazzled by what they saw as Communist dictatorships gready leaping forward, whatever the human toll might be. It was active blindness on the part of these intellectuals, a shameful historical legacy that nothing can efface. As Saul Bellow once observed, "A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep."

The true strength of Power's book is as a literary work, a ringing and idealistic call to arms. It does not merely recount. It instructs its reader what is to be done. Power's work begins with a bang - -the 1921 assassination in Berlin of Mehmed Talat, the former Turkish interior minister who presided over the massacre of Armenians. It was one of the few actions, as Power notes, taken to punish the Turks. Woodrow Wilson, eager to remain neutral in World War I, had resisted the calls of his ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, Henry Morgenthau, to protest the killings of Armenians. Power castigates Wilson for refusing to "declare war on or even break off relations with the Ottoman Empire." She would have taken America onto the European battlefields - and into the bloodbath - far earlier. In going to war against Germany, Wilson told Congress, "it seems to me that we should go only where immediate and practical considerations lead us and not heed any others." According to Power, "America's nonresponse to the Turkish horrors established patterns that would be repeated."

What Power does not discuss is Wilson's conduct of the war, namely his decision to intervene after he had promised Americans he would not. If anything, Wilson, who promised the war to end wars, was wildly idealistic, anything but a hardened realist, someone who was bamboozled during the Paris peace negotiations by his French and British counterparts, the champion of the League of Nations, whose headquarters in Geneva became a testament to fecklessness during the 1930s. It seems peculiar to condemn Wilson for not having been idealistic enough.

When it comes to World War II, Power has a far stronger case to make. The wartime Allies, confronted with the crime of the century, focused on battling Nazism rather than exposing its genocidal campaign against the Jews and other ethnic and religious minorities. Her hero is the PolishJewish lawyer Raphael Lemkin who invented the neologism "genocide." He was pivotal to the new United Nations' adoption of a convention declaring genocide a violation of international law, though America refused to sign it for four decades. Now it provides a basis for military intervention.

Which returns us to Bosnia yet again. Power does an excellent job of limning the reluctance of the George H. W Bush administration to intervene. As then-Secretary of State James Baker famously put it, "We don't have a dog in this fight." Instead, to quell charges of its heartlessness, the White House sent American troops to Somalia in a humanitarian venture - a disastrous decision that got -America bogged down in a bloody civil war. Next, the Clinton administration came under fire for doing the same sort of hand-wringing over Bosnia as its realist predecessor - surely the Left could be counted on for compassion? Yet then it remained reticent about Rwanda, allowing the Hutus to conduct mass killings of hundreds of thousands of Tutsis.

Power's verdict is withering:

The real reason the United States did not do what it could and should have done to stop genocide was not a lack of knowledge or influence but a lack of will. Simply put, American leaders did not act because they did not want to. They believed that genocide was wtong, but they were not prepared to invest the military, financial, diplomatic, ot domestic political capital needed to stop it.

Power hopes to once and for all turn the tide against American lassitude, against the Democratic slogan propounded by presidential hopeful George McGovern in the 1972 campaign - "Come Home, America." Liberals were then opposed to Ronald Reagan's support for the Nicaraguan contras, even though he portrayed that partly as a humanitarian venture, pointing to the human-rights abuses perpetrated by the Sandinistas. Reagan, for all the bellicosity, was loath to send American troops into combat, withdrawing them from Lebanon after the bombing of the Marine Corps barracks in 1983. What Power overlooks, or minimizes, is the political context of a country in which the term "no more Vietnams" carried, and continues to carry, great political weight. It is these old thought patterns that Power wants to refashion, turning the United States into a nation that wields force wherever it deems fit - not for security, but for the betterment of others, secure we will not squander resources because of the justness of our cause.

Power has a penchant for dramatizing history through people rather than considering broader forces. She states in the acknowledgments to "A Problem From Hell" that a friend from Hollywood advised her to create a drama by telling the story through characters. And that is what she did.

As her other tome about the United Nations official Sergio Vieira de Mello - Chasing the Fhme: One Man's Fight to Save the World - makes clear, however, Power champions her own kind of great-man history in which a lonely hero stands up for truth, justice and the international way. She produces a morality play rather than a conventional history. In a sense, Power, you could argue, is addicted to hero worship, beginning with Raphael Lemkin and ending with Obama. In fact, in her acknowledgments, she observes that she offered "whatever help I could to Barack Obama, the person whose rigor and compassion bear the closest resemblance to Sergio's that I have ever seen."

This seems excessive. Vieira de Mello was a Brazilian United Nations bureaucrat. He served the un in a number of hot spots - East Timor, Rwanda, Cyprus, Cambodia, Lebanon and the Balkans (where Power first met him in her capacity as a journalist). He was a un high commissioner for human rights and was murdered along with twenty other members of his staff in August 2003 when he was the secretary-general's special representative in Iraq. He served bravely. Perhaps he would have become secretary-general. But to elevate him, as Power does, into the stuff of legend defies credulity. For her Vieira de Mello serves as a beacon, a symbol of what true internationalism might accomplish.

As Power portrays it, Vieira de Mello is everything the United States was not under George W. Bush - dignified, restrained, attentive to local conditions, eager to negotiate with foreign tyrants. His death in the bombed-out Canal Hotel serves as a sign of the blundering malignancy of the land of the free. Obama, like Vieira de Mello, is supposed to personify the better side of America. He represents patience and understanding, and a readiness to negotiate with authoritarian leaders when necessary rather than refusing to deal with them at all.

But as Michael Massing observed in an incisive review in the June 9, 2008, issue of the Nation, Vieira de Mello actually reflected many of the worst traits of the un. According to Massing:

While she presents him as embodying the un system at its best - its dedication to humanitarianism, multilateralism and dialogue - a strong case can be made, based on the evidence she presents, that he represented the un system at its worst - its timidity, mediocrity and zeal for self-protection.

Instead of being a crusader, Vieira de Mello was ready to compromise. For example, Power writes that when it came to protecting the rights of Vietnamese boat people,

he could have gone to greater lengths to use his pulpit at [the un's refugee agency] unhcr to try to ensure that the Vietnamese were more fairly screened in the camps and were better treated en toute back to Vietnam. This was the first of several prominent instances in his career in which he would downplay his and the un's obligation to try to shape the preferences of governments. By the 1980s he had come to see himself as a un man, but since the organization was both a body of self-interested governments and a body of ideals, he did not seem sure yet whether serving the UN meant doing what states demanded or pressing for what refugees needed.

Such tentative statements, as Massing observes, are acutely at odds with the firebreathing Power of "A Problem From Hell. " There she denounced statesmen for doing what Vieira de Mello did. This raises the question of whether Power is willing to make any accommodation necessary to cater to her own new boss.

Nor did the role that Vieira de Mello played in Bosnia turn out any better. It's hardly a secret that the un disgraced itself in the Balkans, where it served as a de facto accomplice to the Serbs. Power recounts that Vieira de Mello was touring the former Soviet Union while Serbian General Ratko Mladic

presided over the systematic slaughter of every Bosnian man and boy in his custody, some eight thousand in all. When the Setb mass graves were discovered six weeks later, Vieita de Mello was stunned. "I never thought Mladic was this stupid," he said, projecting his own reverence for reason onto one who clearly observed different notms. "The massacte was totally unnecessary."

(What massacre, incidentally, is necessary?) In this telling, Vieira de Mello, who sought to curry favor with leading Serbs, sounds less like an international statesman than a gullible technocrat. Power's implicit criticisms of Vieira de Mello suggest, as Michael Massing notes, that she is wrestling with the contradictions of espousing an idealistic credo and implementing a policy. (Such would seem to be the case, for example, when she defends Obama administration policy on Guantánamo Bay, wildly at variance as it is with the president's promises circa 2008 to shutter the detention facility promptly.)

Power recounts other less-than-inspiriting episodes. She notes that in 1999, after the Washington Post reported that several un weapons inspectors in Iraq were sending information to the Clinton administration, Vieira de Mello almost resigned. Fabrizio Hochschild, his special assistant, thought that some kind of démarche to Richard Butler, the head of the un inspections team, was required. But he was, Power reports, "taken aback when he saw Vieira de Mello greet Butler on his next visit as if nothing had happened. No matter how great his outrage, Hochschild noted, Vieira de Mello remained as reluctant as ever to make an enemy." There can be no doubting that Vieira de Mellos extensive experience in war zones would have made him a valuable adviser, if the Bush administration had been disposed to listen to his advice, which it was not. He had, as Power observes, frequently "watched as promising postwar transitions collapsed because of a failure to fill the security void."

Power's assumption appears to be that given the right approach, Iraq might not have degenerated into sectarian warfare. There can be no doubting that the Bush administration botched the occupation. But it is unclear such interventions ever turn out well. It is not just the hubristic evildoers on the right who fail to build up new and better societies in the wake of war; incursions of this sort may simply be doomed. Doesn't Iraq, in fact, cast further doubt on the efficacy of so-called humanitarian ventures?

Now Power is behind the rush to fill the security void in Libya. As Secretary Clinton told abc News in March:

We learned a lot in the 1990s. We saw what happened in Rwanda. It took a long time in the Balkans, in Kosovo to deal with a tyrant. But I think . . . what has happened since March 1st, and we're not even done with the month, demonsttates really remarkable leadership.

Power provided the tutorials these past years, both to Obama and to an entire class of liberal hawks. She may be the most influential journalist-turned-presidential-adviser since a young Walter Lippmann drafted the Fourteen Points for Woodrow Wilson, only to become a chastened realist after the Treaty of Versailles made a mockery of Wilsonianism and the internationalist dream.

Perhaps Power's next destination is to become United Nations ambassador. Maybe she will follow in the footsteps of Madeleine Albright and ultimately become secretary of state. In his memoir, The Audacity of Hope, Obama observed that Power "combed over each chapter." Now she has begun to exercise the same influence over his approach to foreign affairs. Obama entered office, like George W Bush, promising to repudiate the arrogance of his predecessor, only to be seduced by the lure of militant democracy.

Power's argument that there is a coincidence between humanitarian intervention and American national interests marks a profound shift in justification for military action. Rhetorically, she espouses a move away from fighting Islamic terrorism to battling aggressors under the banner of humanitarian intervention. This is supposed to mark a fundamental break with the Bush administration, whose approach to confronting terrorism she denounced in a lengthy essay in the New York Times in 2007. Whether it amounts to one in practice is another matter.

Even Obama didn't try to argue that genocide was taking place in Libya. Instead, this was a preemptive strike (ah, how redolent again of the 2003 Iraq invasion) against a potential massacre, one that would have profound implications for the region. It was in America's national interest to intervene. And so he plunged the United States into a new conflict. Where does Power draw the line? The bar for preventing genocide may well have been set too high in the past, as she argues. But she, in turn, may be setting it too low, providing an ideological smokescreen for the use of American military force in dubious circumstances, something she never adequately addresses. She runs the risk of exposing America to the charge of hypocrisy for not intervening in countries where brutal mistreatment of the local population is taking place, as in Zimbabwe, while providing a validating and dangerously palatable logic for American overextension. Power's solution to the conundrum that has bedeviled the Democratic Party since Vietnam - when to sanction the use of force abroad - is to support wars of national liberation. This is likely not a solution at all.

In a speech in 2006, Power told graduating students at Santa Clara University Law School "to demand that our representatives are attentive to the human consequences of their decision making." The new round of engagements abroad by the Obama administration may well come to be seen as the last glimmerings of American hubris. "Kings can have subjects," George F. Kennan once observed, "it is a question whether a republic can."

It would be no small irony if, in her zeal to reshape American foreign policy in the image of liberal internationalism, Power were to usher in its demise.

SIDEBAR

Power is not just an advocate for human rights. She is an outspoken crusader against genocide. She is, you could say, the prophet armed.

SIDEBAR

Obama entered office, like George W. Bush, promising to repudiate the arrogance of hü predecessor, only to be seduced by the lure of militant democracy.

SIDEBAR

Power has almost single-handedly revived the alliance between liberal hawks and neocons.

AUTHOR_AFFILIATION

Jacob Heilbrunn is a senior editot at The National Interest.

Copyright © 2011 National Interest, Inc.

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Upland to decide fate of Quincey | View Clip
05/01/2011
San Bernardino Sun - Online

City manager on paid leave

UPLAND - The City Council on Wednesday could be making a half-million-dollar decision on the city manager during a special closed session.

The council has a couple of narrowly defined options for terminating City Manager Robb Quincey, according to his contract. Termination without cause could be the most costly.

Firing Quincey without cause would cost the city more than $570,000 in severance pay.

He has been on paid leave of absence since Jan. 4 and has continued to cost the city about $38,000 a month in salary and benefits.

Severance pay would include 12 months of base compensation, cafeteria benefit, vacation, life insurance, automobile allowance, deferred compensation, payroll taxes, California Public

Quincey

Employees' Retirement System contribution and any other benefits specifically identified in his employment agreement - which would appear to include his $3,000 monthly housing allowance.

The council is required to give 90 days notice of his termination without cause, or can terminate him immediately and add 90 days of pay and benefits to his severance package.

Quincey received more than $200,000 - nearly $140,000 take-home - in March for 1,600 hours of accumulated leave time. The city has not revealed how many hours of accumulated leave Quincey has remaining, citing personnel privacy.

It is common for a city to offer a city manager six to 18 months of severance pay, said Bill Garrett, executive director of the California City Management Association.

"However, sometimes the severance is for salary only, but there are some obviously that include salary and benefits and so everything runs for another year, but I would say there's a real mix on that."

There is the possibility of negotiating Quincey's resignation with him, which likely would involve a severance package decided as part of the deal.

The cheapest way for the city to end Quincey's employment would be to terminate him with cause. Cause is defined in his employment contract as either conviction of a crime or willful failure to follow specific council direction.

If the city fired him with cause, it would not owe Quincey severance pay or any other payment except for then-due wages and benefits.

Councilman Gino L. Filippi said that Quincey would need to be convicted of a crime related to his duties as city manager, not as a private citizen.

He said did not want to comment on whether the council has cause to fire Quincey.

In January 2010, Quincey settled a claim from an Upland police sergeant that stemmed from a domestic dispute Quincey had with an ex-fiancee. The sergeant said he was passed over for promotion because he had investigated the incident.

He was promoted to lieutenant as part of the settlement deal arranged by Quincey. A police union attorney also received $50,000 in two installments, which he said was for two separate complaints.

It is possible for city councils and city managers to prefer to reach a settlement with a confidential or nondisclosure agreement for the peace of the community and to avoid litigation, but it is best to have transparency, said Judy Nadler, senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University.

The council has not commented on Quincey's future with the city in order to avoid litigation, council members say.

The council has not been able to terminate Quincey due to a clause in the Municipal Code that prohibits the removal of a city manager within 180 days of an election if a new council member is elected or appointed.

Filippi was elected on Nov.2. The period of 180 days ends today.

The council has scheduled a special closed session meeting Wednesday to discuss Quincey's employment status. The time of the meeting has not been announced.

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Upland to decide fate of Quincey | View Clip
05/01/2011
InsideBayArea.com

City manager on paid leave

UPLAND - The City Council on Wednesday could be making a half-million-dollar decision on the city manager during a special closed session.

The council has a couple of narrowly defined options for terminating City Manager Robb Quincey, according to his contract. Termination without cause could be the most costly.

Firing Quincey without cause would cost the city more than $570,000 in severance pay.

He has been on paid leave of absence since Jan. 4 and has continued to cost the city about $38,000 a month in salary and benefits.

Severance pay would include 12 months of base compensation, cafeteria benefit, vacation, life insurance, automobile allowance, deferred compensation, payroll taxes, California Public

Quincey

Employees' Retirement System contribution and any other benefits specifically identified in his employment agreement - which would appear to include his $3,000 monthly housing allowance.

The council is required to give 90 days notice of his termination without cause, or can terminate him immediately and add 90 days of pay and benefits to his severance package.

Quincey received more than $200,000 - nearly $140,000 take-home - in March for 1,600 hours of accumulated leave time. The city has not revealed how many hours of accumulated leave Quincey has remaining, citing personnel privacy.

It is common for a city to offer a city manager six to 18 months of severance pay, said Bill Garrett, executive director of the California City Management Association.

"However, sometimes the severance is for salary only, but there are some obviously that include salary and benefits and so everything runs for another year, but I would say there's a real mix on that."

There is the possibility of negotiating Quincey's resignation with him, which likely would involve a severance package decided as part of the deal.

The cheapest way for the city to end Quincey's employment would be to terminate him with cause. Cause is defined in his employment contract as either conviction of a crime or willful failure to follow specific council direction.

If the city fired him with cause, it would not owe Quincey severance pay or any other payment except for then-due wages and benefits.

Councilman Gino L. Filippi said that Quincey would need to be convicted of a crime related to his duties as city manager, not as a private citizen.

He said did not want to comment on whether the council has cause to fire Quincey.

In January 2010, Quincey settled a claim from an Upland police sergeant that stemmed from a domestic dispute Quincey had with an ex-fiancee. The sergeant said he was passed over for promotion because he had investigated the incident.

He was promoted to lieutenant as part of the settlement deal arranged by Quincey. A police union attorney also received $50,000 in two installments, which he said was for two separate complaints.

It is possible for city councils and city managers to prefer to reach a settlement with a confidential or nondisclosure agreement for the peace of the community and to avoid litigation, but it is best to have transparency, said Judy Nadler, senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University.

The council has not commented on Quincey's future with the city in order to avoid litigation, council members say.

The council has not been able to terminate Quincey due to a clause in the Municipal Code that prohibits the removal of a city manager within 180 days of an election if a new council member is elected or appointed.

Filippi was elected on Nov.2. The period of 180 days ends today.

The council has scheduled a special closed session meeting Wednesday to discuss Quincey's employment status. The time of the meeting has not been announced.

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Upland to decide fate of Quincey | View Clip
05/01/2011
Inland Valley Daily Bulletin - Online

City manager on paid leave

Created: 04/30/2011 08:50:21 PM PDT

UPLAND - The City Council on Wednesday could be making a half-million-dollar decision on the city manager during a special closed session.

The council has a couple of narrowly defined options for terminating City Manager Robb Quincey, according to his contract. Termination without cause could be the most costly.

Firing Quincey without cause would cost the city more than $570,000 in severance pay.

He has been on paid leave of absence since Jan. 4 and has continued to cost the city about $38,000 a month in salary and benefits.

Severance pay would include 12 months of base compensation, cafeteria benefit, vacation, life insurance, automobile allowance, deferred compensation, payroll taxes, California Public

Quincey

Employees' Retirement System contribution and any other benefits specifically identified in his employment agreement - which would appear to include his $3,000 monthly housing allowance.

The council is required to give 90 days notice of his termination without cause, or can terminate him immediately and add 90 days of pay and benefits to his severance package.

Quincey received more than $200,000 - nearly $140,000 take-home - in March for 1,600 hours of accumulated leave time. The city has not revealed how many hours of accumulated leave Quincey has remaining, citing personnel privacy.

It is common for a city to offer a city manager six to 18 months of severance pay, said Bill Garrett, executive director of the California City Management Association.

"However, sometimes the severance is for salary only, but there are some obviously that include salary and benefits and so everything runs for another year, but I would say there's a real mix on that."

There is the possibility of negotiating Quincey's resignation with him, which likely would involve a severance package decided as part of the deal.

The cheapest way for the city to end Quincey's employment would be to terminate him with cause. Cause is defined in his employment contract as either conviction of a crime or willful failure to follow specific council direction.

If the city fired him with cause, it would not owe Quincey severance pay or any other payment except for then-due wages and benefits.

Councilman Gino L. Filippi said that Quincey would need to be convicted of a crime related to his duties as city manager, not as a private citizen.

He said did not want to comment on whether the council has cause to fire Quincey.

In January 2010, Quincey settled a claim from an Upland police sergeant that stemmed from a domestic dispute Quincey had with an ex-fiancee. The sergeant said he was passed over for promotion because he had investigated the incident.

He was promoted to lieutenant as part of the settlement deal arranged by Quincey. A police union attorney also received $50,000 in two installments, which he said was for two separate complaints.

It is possible for city councils and city managers to prefer to reach a settlement with a confidential or nondisclosure agreement for the peace of the community and to avoid litigation, but it is best to have transparency, said Judy Nadler, senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University.

The council has not commented on Quincey's future with the city in order to avoid litigation, council members say.

The council has not been able to terminate Quincey due to a clause in the Municipal Code that prohibits the removal of a city manager within 180 days of an election if a new council member is elected or appointed.

Filippi was elected on Nov.2. The period of 180 days ends today.

The council has scheduled a special closed session meeting Wednesday to discuss Quincey's employment status. The time of the meeting has not been announced.

Return to Top



Upland to decide fate of Quincey
05/01/2011
Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

May 01--UPLAND -- The City Council on Wednesday could be making a half-million-dollar decision on the city manager during a special closed session.

The council has a couple of narrowly defined options for terminating City Manager Robb Quincey, according to his contract. Termination without cause could be the most costly.

Firing Quincey without cause would cost the city more than $570,000 in severance pay.

He has been on paid leave of absence since Jan. 4 and has continued to cost the city about $38,000 a month in salary and benefits.

Severance pay would include 12 months of base compensation, cafeteria benefit, vacation, life insurance, automobile allowance, deferred compensation, payroll taxes, California Public

Employees' Retirement System contribution and any other benefits specifically identified in his employment agreement -- which would appear to include his $3,000 monthly housing allowance.

The council is required to give 90 days notice of his termination without cause, or can terminate him immediately and add 90 days of pay and benefits to his severance package.

Quincey received more than $200,000 -- nearly $140,000 take-home -- in March for 1,600 hours of accumulated leave time. The city has not revealed how many hours of accumulated leave Quincey has remaining, citing personnel privacy.

It is common for a city to offer a city manager six to 18 months of severance pay, said Bill Garrett, executive director of the California City Management Association.

"However, sometimes the severance is for salary only, but there are some obviously that include salary and benefits and so everything runs for another year, but I would say there's a real mix on that."

There is the possibility of negotiating Quincey's resignation with him, which likely would involve a severance package decided as part of the deal.

The cheapest way for the city to end Quincey's employment would be to terminate him with cause. Cause is defined in his employment contract as either conviction of a crime or willful failure to follow specific council direction.

If the city fired him with cause, it would not owe Quincey severance pay or any other payment except for then-due wages and benefits.

Councilman Gino L. Filippi said that Quincey would need to be convicted of a crime related to his duties as city manager, not as a private citizen.

He said did not want to comment on whether the council has cause to fire Quincey.

In January 2010, Quincey settled a claim from an Upland police sergeant that stemmed from a domestic dispute Quincey had with an ex-fiancee. The sergeant said he was passed over for promotion because he had investigated the incident.

He was promoted to lieutenant as part of the settlement deal arranged by Quincey. A police union attorney also received $50,000 in two installments, which he said was for two separate complaints.

It is possible for city councils and city managers to prefer to reach a settlement with a confidential or nondisclosure agreement for the peace of the community and to avoid litigation, but it is best to have transparency, said Judy Nadler, senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University.

The council has not commented on Quincey's future with the city in order to avoid litigation, council members say.

The council has not been able to terminate Quincey due to a clause in the Municipal Code that prohibits the removal of a city manager within 180 days of an election if a new council member is elected or appointed.

Filippi was elected on Nov.2. The period of 180 days ends today.

The council has scheduled a special closed session meeting Wednesday to discuss Quincey's employment status. The time of the meeting has not been announced.

Copyright © 2011 Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, Calif.

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Upland to decide fate of Quincey | View Clip
05/01/2011
San Jose Mercury News - Online

City manager on paid leave

UPLAND - The City Council on Wednesday could be making a half-million-dollar decision on the city manager during a special closed session.

The council has a couple of narrowly defined options for terminating City Manager Robb Quincey, according to his contract. Termination without cause could be the most costly.

Firing Quincey without cause would cost the city more than $570,000 in severance pay.

He has been on paid leave of absence since Jan. 4 and has continued to cost the city about $38,000 a month in salary and benefits.

Severance pay would include 12 months of base compensation, cafeteria benefit, vacation, life insurance, automobile allowance, deferred compensation, payroll taxes, California Public

Quincey

Employees' Retirement System contribution and any other benefits specifically identified in his employment agreement - which would appear to include his $3,000 monthly housing allowance.

The council is required to give 90 days notice of his termination without cause, or can terminate him immediately and add 90 days of pay and benefits to his severance package.

Quincey received more than $200,000 - nearly $140,000 take-home - in March for 1,600 hours of accumulated leave time. The city has not revealed how many hours of accumulated leave Quincey has remaining, citing personnel privacy.

It is common for a city to offer a city manager six to 18 months of severance pay, said Bill Garrett, executive director of the California City Management Association.

"However, sometimes the severance is for salary only, but there are some obviously that include salary and benefits and so everything runs for another year, but I would say there's a real mix on that."

There is the possibility of negotiating Quincey's resignation with him, which likely would involve a severance package decided as part of the deal.

The cheapest way for the city to end Quincey's employment would be to terminate him with cause. Cause is defined in his employment contract as either conviction of a crime or willful failure to follow specific council direction.

If the city fired him with cause, it would not owe Quincey severance pay or any other payment except for then-due wages and benefits.

Councilman Gino L. Filippi said that Quincey would need to be convicted of a crime related to his duties as city manager, not as a private citizen.

He said did not want to comment on whether the council has cause to fire Quincey.

In January 2010, Quincey settled a claim from an Upland police sergeant that stemmed from a domestic dispute Quincey had with an ex-fiancee. The sergeant said he was passed over for promotion because he had investigated the incident.

He was promoted to lieutenant as part of the settlement deal arranged by Quincey. A police union attorney also received $50,000 in two installments, which he said was for two separate complaints.

It is possible for city councils and city managers to prefer to reach a settlement with a confidential or nondisclosure agreement for the peace of the community and to avoid litigation, but it is best to have transparency, said Judy Nadler, senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University.

The council has not commented on Quincey's future with the city in order to avoid litigation, council members say.

The council has not been able to terminate Quincey due to a clause in the Municipal Code that prohibits the removal of a city manager within 180 days of an election if a new council member is elected or appointed.

Filippi was elected on Nov.2. The period of 180 days ends today.

The council has scheduled a special closed session meeting Wednesday to discuss Quincey's employment status. The time of the meeting has not been announced.

Return to Top



Upland to decide fate of Quincey | View Clip
05/01/2011
Redlands Daily Facts

City manager on paid leave

UPLAND - The City Council on Wednesday could be making a half-million-dollar decision on the city manager during a special closed session.

The council has a couple of narrowly defined options for terminating City Manager Robb Quincey, according to his contract. Termination without cause could be the most costly.

Firing Quincey without cause would cost the city more than $570,000 in severance pay.

He has been on paid leave of absence since Jan. 4 and has continued to cost the city about $38,000 a month in salary and benefits.

Severance pay would include 12 months of base compensation, cafeteria benefit, vacation, life insurance, automobile allowance, deferred compensation, payroll taxes, California Public

Quincey

Employees' Retirement System contribution and any other benefits specifically identified in his employment agreement - which would appear to include his $3,000 monthly housing allowance.

The council is required to give 90 days notice of his termination without cause, or can terminate him immediately and add 90 days of pay and benefits to his severance package.

Quincey received more than $200,000 - nearly $140,000 take-home - in March for 1,600 hours of accumulated leave time. The city has not revealed how many hours of accumulated leave Quincey has remaining, citing personnel privacy.

It is common for a city to offer a city manager six to 18 months of severance pay, said Bill Garrett, executive director of the California City Management Association.

"However, sometimes the severance is for salary only, but there are some obviously that include salary and benefits and so everything runs for another year, but I would say there's a real mix on that."

There is the possibility of negotiating Quincey's resignation with him, which likely would involve a severance package decided as part of the deal.

The cheapest way for the city to end Quincey's employment would be to terminate him with cause. Cause is defined in his employment contract as either conviction of a crime or willful failure to follow specific council direction.

If the city fired him with cause, it would not owe Quincey severance pay or any other payment except for then-due wages and benefits.

Councilman Gino L. Filippi said that Quincey would need to be convicted of a crime related to his duties as city manager, not as a private citizen.

He said did not want to comment on whether the council has cause to fire Quincey.

In January 2010, Quincey settled a claim from an Upland police sergeant that stemmed from a domestic dispute Quincey had with an ex-fiancee. The sergeant said he was passed over for promotion because he had investigated the incident.

He was promoted to lieutenant as part of the settlement deal arranged by Quincey. A police union attorney also received $50,000 in two installments, which he said was for two separate complaints.

It is possible for city councils and city managers to prefer to reach a settlement with a confidential or nondisclosure agreement for the peace of the community and to avoid litigation, but it is best to have transparency, said Judy Nadler, senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University.

The council has not commented on Quincey's future with the city in order to avoid litigation, council members say.

The council has not been able to terminate Quincey due to a clause in the Municipal Code that prohibits the removal of a city manager within 180 days of an election if a new council member is elected or appointed.

Filippi was elected on Nov.2. The period of 180 days ends today.

The council has scheduled a special closed session meeting Wednesday to discuss Quincey's employment status. The time of the meeting has not been announced.

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Upland to decide fate of Quincey | View Clip
05/01/2011
Press-Telegram - Online

City manager on paid leave

UPLAND - The City Council on Wednesday could be making a half-million-dollar decision on the city manager during a special closed session.

The council has a couple of narrowly defined options for terminating City Manager Robb Quincey, according to his contract. Termination without cause could be the most costly.

Firing Quincey without cause would cost the city more than $570,000 in severance pay.

He has been on paid leave of absence since Jan. 4 and has continued to cost the city about $38,000 a month in salary and benefits.

Severance pay would include 12 months of base compensation, cafeteria benefit, vacation, life insurance, automobile allowance, deferred compensation, payroll taxes, California Public

Quincey

Employees' Retirement System contribution and any other benefits specifically identified in his employment agreement - which would appear to include his $3,000 monthly housing allowance.

The council is required to give 90 days notice of his termination without cause, or can terminate him immediately and add 90 days of pay and benefits to his severance package.

Quincey received more than $200,000 - nearly $140,000 take-home - in March for 1,600 hours of accumulated leave time. The city has not revealed how many hours of accumulated leave Quincey has remaining, citing personnel privacy.

It is common for a city to offer a city manager six to 18 months of severance pay, said Bill Garrett, executive director of the California City Management Association.

"However, sometimes the severance is for salary only, but there are some obviously that include salary and benefits and so everything runs for another year, but I would say there's a real mix on that."

There is the possibility of negotiating Quincey's resignation with him, which likely would involve a severance package decided as part of the deal.

The cheapest way for the city to end Quincey's employment would be to terminate him with cause. Cause is defined in his employment contract as either conviction of a crime or willful failure to follow specific council direction.

If the city fired him with cause, it would not owe Quincey severance pay or any other payment except for then-due wages and benefits.

Councilman Gino L. Filippi said that Quincey would need to be convicted of a crime related to his duties as city manager, not as a private citizen.

He said did not want to comment on whether the council has cause to fire Quincey.

In January 2010, Quincey settled a claim from an Upland police sergeant that stemmed from a domestic dispute Quincey had with an ex-fiancee. The sergeant said he was passed over for promotion because he had investigated the incident.

He was promoted to lieutenant as part of the settlement deal arranged by Quincey. A police union attorney also received $50,000 in two installments, which he said was for two separate complaints.

It is possible for city councils and city managers to prefer to reach a settlement with a confidential or nondisclosure agreement for the peace of the community and to avoid litigation, but it is best to have transparency, said Judy Nadler, senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University.

The council has not commented on Quincey's future with the city in order to avoid litigation, council members say.

The council has not been able to terminate Quincey due to a clause in the Municipal Code that prohibits the removal of a city manager within 180 days of an election if a new council member is elected or appointed.

Filippi was elected on Nov.2. The period of 180 days ends today.

The council has scheduled a special closed session meeting Wednesday to discuss Quincey's employment status. The time of the meeting has not been announced.

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www.youtube.com Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t... Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4: Task Speed Test | View Clip
05/01/2011
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Windows Phone vs. iPhone 4: Task Speed Test
www.youtube.com

Microsoft Student Partner Phillip Bach: Santa Clara University I placed a Windows Phone and my buddy's iPhone 4 side by side to see which one could achieve t...

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*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU | View Clip
04/30/2011
San Gabriel Valley Tribune - Online

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked.

Organizer

Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies like hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that while there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. While girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

Contact John Woolfolk at 408-975-9346.

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*Hundreds gather for diversity conference at SCU | View Clip
04/30/2011
Press-Telegram - Online

De Anza College student Marlene Vazquez was drawn to a workshop on racial and gender representation in television and movies. Gio Bui, assistant principal at John Muir Middle School in San Jose, was fascinated by a Google presentation on the search giant's efforts to diversify its workforce.

They were among more than 300 scholars, students and community activists from throughout California who gathered Saturday for a sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University, which featured a series of workshops exploring issues surrounding cultural diversity.

"We need to get more TV shows out there with diverse people," Vazquez, who is studying criminal justice, said after an afternoon workshop on "how media shapes identity and self." She was surprised to learn that most entertainment media are owned by three major companies, General Electric, Walt Disney and News Corporation. It was noted in the workshop that their top leaders, Jeff Immelt, Robert Iger and Rupert Murdoch respectively, are all white men.

When workshop leaders Jesse Lieberman and Damaris Nielsen of St. Mary's College in Moraga asked the dozen students in the room to name female action heroes or Latino leading men, the crowd agreed that few names readily came to mind.

Uma Thurman and Angelina Jolie. Antonio Banderas.

Nielsen challenged her audience to think of ways they might change that. "Do we need to write the producers?" she asked.

Organizer

Lester Deanes said that just because Silicon Valley is one of the most racially and culturally diverse places on the planet doesn't mean there's little need to talk about diversity.

"We haven't gone far enough," Deanes said. "It's a conversation that doesn't end. It's not just about numbers. It's about quality interactions with each other."

Sarah Stuart, Google's global diversity and programs manager, said tech companies like hers see diversity as a critical tool to reach consumers in a global marketplace.

"A lot of times we talk about diversity from the perspective that it's the right thing to do," Stuart said. "We believe it makes us a better business."

She pointed out that while there are 49 million Latinos in the U.S., only 8 percent of daily searches are done in Spanish and that "lack of Spanish content" is cited as a hurdle to Internet use.

Stuart also noted that women are underrepresented in technology fields, and that the trend begins in school. While girls account for more than half of advance placement test takers, she said, they're just 15 percent of those testing in computer science.

"This is determining what the technology industry is going to look like in the future," Stuart said. "It's important to us that our products and services serve a diverse world."

Her Mountain View company has fostered numerous employee networks, including Black Googlers and Gayglers to promote diversity issues.

The Black Googlers have made trips to hurricane-ravaged New Orleans to help rebuild and promote entrepreneurship. And in response to concerns raised by gay employees, Google agreed to cover the extra taxes gay couples pay on their benefits because the federal government doesn't recognize same-sex marriages.

Still, she acknowledged that issues surrounding diversity remain a challenge.

"Not every employee says the perfect thing all the time," Stuart said. "It's about that open discussion."

Bui, 34, told Stuart later that he was surprised to "come to a diversity conference and be most educated by Google."

Said Bui: "It blows my mind that this is what you guys are doing."

Contact John Woolfolk at 408-975-9346.

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Adobe Youth Voices Celebrates 5 Years in India | View Clip
04/30/2011
IT News Online

Adobe Youth Voices (AYV), the global philanthropic initiative by Adobe Foundation, announced the completion of its fifth successful year of celebrating young talent and creativity in India. Adobe Youth Voices provides an opportunity for underserved middle and high school youth to communicate their concerns, aspirations and vision using digital media.

The AYV program, which is implemented by American Indian Foundation, runs across 43 schools in India. Seeing the encouraging response and far-reaching impact of the program, Adobe also announced the extension of AYV program for next five years till 2016.

Over 150,000 youth and 7,000 educators have been empowered globally through AYV initiative in its first five years. The program now aims to reach 1,000,000 youth and 50,000 educators around the world by 2016. In India, over 4,000 students have been impacted through this program and Adobe expects to expand this reach to cover over 8,500 youth and 400+ educators in the course of next five years.

Adobe also announced setting up of scholarships worth Rs. 1,25,000/- for meritorious and needy AYV students. The scholarships which will be provided to AYV students in Delhi and Bangalore is meant to provide financial support for those pursuing multimedia/DTP courses, general media courses and courses in mass communication and electronic media.

"Embedding digital creativity in education has been a key objective for Adobe Youth Voices, Adobe's flagship CSR program and it gives us immense pleasure to get together every year and celebrate creativity. It is indeed a proud moment for all those who have been involved in AYV as we announce not only the successful completion of the first five years of this program, but also announce its extension for next five years," said Tridib Roy Chowdhury, Senior Director - Products, Adobe Systems.

"It is encouraging to see how our efforts have resulted in broadening the horizons of the youth of today and how they use digital technologies to develop and express their views on community issues," added Chowdhury.

"Adobe has been a great partner in taking the AYV program to the next level. The kind of impact the American India Foundation and Adobe have made in terms of reaching out to the youth and educators has been truly encouraging. Through AYV, youth are leveraging digital media for social change and highlighting the issues that are important to them and their communities. We hope to continue our efforts in this direction with more zeal and anticipation to touch the lives of the community as a whole," said J. Sundara Krishnan, Director, American India Foundation.

This year three AYV Schools have also been selected to represent India during the Global AYV Summit 2011 being held in U.S. in August. These are Rani Dutta Arya Vidyalaya in Delhi and Christel House and APSA (Association for Promoting Social Action) in Bangalore. One educator and two students from each of the three schools will showcase their talent and improve their skills at the summit at Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California, U.S. from 2nd - 7th August, 2011.

One of the five films submitted by the Adobe Youth Voices (AYV) schools at the 16th All India Children's Educational Audio Video Festival as part of NCERT's Golden Jubilee Festival 2011, has been awarded the Best Puppetry Video. The immensely creative and inspiring video ‘Save Petrol' made by students of Jamia Middle School (Delhi) was given the award in the Puppetry category. The winning movie can be viewed at http://tv.adobe.com/watch/adobe-youth-voices/save-petrol/.

Adobe also felicitated the India winners of the APAC School Innovation Awards during its AYV five-year anniversary celebration. Brother duo Suyash Gupta and Vaibhav Gupta became first Indians to have a winning entry in Adobe Asia Pacific School Innovation Award 2010. They were honored with this award for designing a Web site on "Incredible India".

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BRIEF: Cal Poly Again Named Top Undergraduate Business College by Bloomberg Business Week | View Clip
04/30/2011
HispanicBusiness.com

For the third consecutive year, Cal Poly's Orfalea College of Business has been named to Bloomberg Business Week magazine's list of the nation's top undergraduate business colleges, according to university officials.

This year, Cal Poly was ranked 73rd and was one of only three public universities in California to be included on the list.

A total of six California business colleges made the cut for 2011: UC Berkeley (13), USC (34), Santa Clara University (35), University of San Diego (36), Cal Poly San Luis Obispo (73); and UC Riverside (113).

Bloomberg Business Week bases its rankings on student survey scores, recruiter survey scores, median starting salaries for graduates, the number of graduates admitted to 35 top MBA programs, and an academic-quality measure that consists of SAT/ACT test scores, faculty-student ratios, average size of core classes, percentage of students with internships and the number of hours students spend preparing for class each week. The magazine ranked 113 schools.

Source: Copyright (c) 2011, The Tribune, San Luis Obispo, Calif.

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Cassidy: Silicon Valley's entrepreneurial spirit takes on world's vexing problems | View Clip
04/29/2011
InsideBayArea.com

Mercury News Columnist

Raghavan Anand, left, and Chandan Mishra, right are two Silicon Valley engineers who met in the Wharton School San Francisco MBA program. They also hooked up with a professor who was working on a non-profit scheme to keep vaccine cold in developing countries by using excess electricity from cell phone towers. They had an informal meeting at the Santa Clara apartment of Anand on Tuesday, April 26, 2011.(Karen T. Borchers/Mercury News)

To be honest, Silicon Valley has always been pretty big on itself.

You know the spiel: This is a place packed with driven people who work 24/7. A place that believes all things are possible and that anyone who thinks otherwise is inferior. A place where every person in the room is the smartest person in the room.

Yes, the brimming self-confidence can get annoying. But those same high-octane attributes are among the reasons the valley has produced technological wonders that have changed the world. Much of the time this world-changing has to do with making money -- lots of it. But an argument can be made that increasingly valley brainiacs are employing these same characteristics to go out and do good.

I started thinking about all this after talking to Raghavan Anand and Chandan Mishra -- two MBA students in Silicon Valley. OK, MBA students and high-tech workers. Well, two MBA students and high-tech workers and serious volunteers with an outfit that is trying to save hundreds of thousands of children's lives in the developing world.

Anand, a software engineer at Blue Jeans Network, and Mishra, a software development manager at Cisco Systems (CSCO), struck me as emblematic of the best of Silicon Valley.

"I've always had some kind of nonprofit running in the background

at any job," Anand says. "It's been about managing time between the nonprofit and the job."

Anand's latest crusade involves a project launched by University of Pennsylvania professor Harvey Rubin, a medical doctor who came up with an ingenious solution to a deadly problem in the developing world. In short, lifesaving vaccines to prevent diseases like polio and measles need to be kept cool to remain effective. The lack of electricity in rural areas of India, Africa and elsewhere makes refrigeration all but impossible in vast regions of the world.

But Rubin and others with Energize the Chain (as in distribution chain), have an idea. Stick with me here: It turns out that the mobile revolution is racing across the developing world. In countries with limited land-line service, cellphones represent a reasonably inexpensive leap forward. In remote areas, cell towers come with their own power sources -- diesel generators, wind, solar. Each produces more power than is typically required for cell service. Energize the Chain, a nonprofit effort, would literally tap into that excess power and use it to refrigerate vaccines in the same remote areas where the towers are being built.

"This is a solution that could be put in place essentially immediately and would have an overwhelming impact on the health of kids," Rubin says.

It is the sort of vision that is evident in a growing social entrepreneur sector -- a space made up of companies created to improve health and daily life in some of the world's poorest places. A recent J.P. Morgan analysis predicted that over the next 10 years the potential for investment in social enterprises will reach between $400 billion and $1 trillion in the areas of housing, women's health, primary education and financial services.

Al Hammond, a serial startup guy who regularly advises social entrepreneurs at an annual global conference at Santa Clara University, says such do-gooder enterprises could form the next big thing in Silicon Valley.

"They're driven primarily by a philanthropic urge," says Hammond, who's running a telemedicine startup to deliver affordable health services to remote parts of India. —‰'I'm going to do something.' That's the kind of entrepreneurial urge that I think is typically valley -- not unique to the valley, but you'll certainly find it there."

It is not unusual, Hammond says, for pet projects of the entrepreneurially-inclined to grow into self-sustaining enterprises that are for-profit and for the greater good.

"They want to do something in their spare time," he says of those starting projects with social benefits. "Then it gets so interesting they want to do it full time. It's starting to happen in a fairly large way."

Neither Anand nor Mishra is thinking about going full time. But Anand says that down the line he might explore commercial opportunities related to vaccine delivery. For now, though, there is plenty to do -- lobbying for grants, navigating government agencies, coordinating with cell carriers -- to keep them both busy in their nonprofit roles.

Sometimes even the most ambitious have to take it one step at a time.

Contact Mike Cassidy at mcassidy@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5536. Follow him at Twitter.com/mikecassidy.

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Cassidy: Silicon Valley's entrepreneurial spirit takes on world's vexing problems | View Clip
04/29/2011
Inland Valley Daily Bulletin - Online

Created: 04/28/2011 12:21:42 PM PDT

Click photo to enlarge

Raghavan Anand, left, and Chandan Mishra, right are two Silicon Valley engineers who met in the Wharton School San Francisco MBA program. They also hooked up with a professor who was working on a non-profit scheme to keep vaccine cold in developing countries by using excess electricity from cell phone towers. They had an informal meeting at the Santa Clara apartment of Anand on Tuesday, April 26, 2011.(Karen T. Borchers/Mercury News)

To be honest, Silicon Valley has always been pretty big on itself.

You know the spiel: This is a place packed with driven people who work 24/7. A place that believes all things are possible and that anyone who thinks otherwise is inferior. A place where every person in the room is the smartest person in the room.

Yes, the brimming self-confidence can get annoying. But those same high-octane attributes are among the reasons the valley has produced technological wonders that have changed the world. Much of the time this world-changing has to do with making money -- lots of it. But an argument can be made that increasingly valley brainiacs are employing these same characteristics to go out and do good.

I started thinking about all this after talking to Raghavan Anand and Chandan Mishra -- two MBA students in Silicon Valley. OK, MBA students and high-tech workers. Well, two MBA students and high-tech workers and serious volunteers with an outfit that is trying to save hundreds of thousands of children's lives in the developing world.

Anand, a software engineer at Blue Jeans Network, and Mishra, a software development manager at Cisco Systems (CSCO), struck me as emblematic of the best of Silicon Valley.

"I've always had some kind of nonprofit running in the background

at any job," Anand says. "It's been about managing time between the nonprofit and the job."

Anand's latest crusade involves a project launched by University of Pennsylvania professor Harvey Rubin, a medical doctor who came up with an ingenious solution to a deadly problem in the developing world. In short, lifesaving vaccines to prevent diseases like polio and measles need to be kept cool to remain effective. The lack of electricity in rural areas of India, Africa and elsewhere makes refrigeration all but impossible in vast regions of the world.

But Rubin and others with Energize the Chain (as in distribution chain), have an idea. Stick with me here: It turns out that the mobile revolution is racing across the developing world. In countries with limited land-line service, cellphones represent a reasonably inexpensive leap forward. In remote areas, cell towers come with their own power sources -- diesel generators, wind, solar. Each produces more power than is typically required for cell service. Energize the Chain, a nonprofit effort, would literally tap into that excess power and use it to refrigerate vaccines in the same remote areas where the towers are being built.

"This is a solution that could be put in place essentially immediately and would have an overwhelming impact on the health of kids," Rubin says.

It is the sort of vision that is evident in a growing social entrepreneur sector -- a space made up of companies created to improve health and daily life in some of the world's poorest places. A recent J.P. Morgan analysis predicted that over the next 10 years the potential for investment in social enterprises will reach between $400 billion and $1 trillion in the areas of housing, women's health, primary education and financial services.

Al Hammond, a serial startup guy who regularly advises social entrepreneurs at an annual global conference at Santa Clara University, says such do-gooder enterprises could form the next big thing in Silicon Valley.

"They're driven primarily by a philanthropic urge," says Hammond, who's running a telemedicine startup to deliver affordable health services to remote parts of India. —‰'I'm going to do something.' That's the kind of entrepreneurial urge that I think is typically valley -- not unique to the valley, but you'll certainly find it there."

It is not unusual, Hammond says, for pet projects of the entrepreneurially-inclined to grow into self-sustaining enterprises that are for-profit and for the greater good.

"They want to do something in their spare time," he says of those starting projects with social benefits. "Then it gets so interesting they want to do it full time. It's starting to happen in a fairly large way."

Neither Anand nor Mishra is thinking about going full time. But Anand says that down the line he might explore commercial opportunities related to vaccine delivery. For now, though, there is plenty to do -- lobbying for grants, navigating government agencies, coordinating with cell carriers -- to keep them both busy in their nonprofit roles.

Sometimes even the most ambitious have to take it one step at a time.

Contact Mike Cassidy at mcassidy@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5536. Follow him at Twitter.com/mikecassidy.

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ENTREPRENEURS FOR THE COMMON GOOD
04/29/2011
San Jose Mercury News

To be honest, Silicon Valley has always been pretty big on itself.

You know the spiel: This is a place packed with driven people who work 24/7. A place that believes all things are possible and that anyone who thinks otherwise is inferior. A place where every person in the room is the smartest person in the room.

Yes, the brimming self-confidence can get annoying. But those same high-octane attributes are among the reasons the valley has produced technological wonders that have changed the world. Much of the time this world-changing has to do with making money -- lots of it. But an argument can be made that increasingly valley brainiacs are employing these same characteristics to go out and do good.

I started thinking about all this after talking to Raghavan Anand and Chandan Mishra -- two MBA students in Silicon Valley. OK, MBA students and high-tech workers. Well, two MBA students and high-tech workers and serious volunteers with an outfit that is trying to save hundreds of thousands of children's lives in the developing world.

Anand, a software engineer at Blue Jeans Network, and Mishra, a software development manager at Cisco Systems, struck me as emblematic of the best of Silicon Valley.

"I've always had some kind of nonprofit running in the background at any job," Anand says. "It's been about managing time between the nonprofit and the job."

Anand's latest crusade involves a project launched by University of Pennsylvania professor Harvey Rubin, a medical doctor who came up with an ingenious solution to a deadly problem in the developing world. In short, lifesaving vaccines to prevent diseases like polio and measles need to be kept cool to remain effective. The lack of electricity in rural areas of India, Africa and elsewhere makes refrigeration all but impossible in vast regions of the world.

But Rubin and others with Energize the Chain (as in distribution chain), have an idea. Stick with me here: It turns out that the mobile revolution is racing across the developing world. In countries with limited land-line service, cellphones represent a reasonably inexpensive leap forward. In remote areas, cell towers come with their own power sources -- diesel generators, wind, solar. Each produces more power than is typically required for cell service. Energize the Chain, a nonprofit effort, would literally tap into that excess power and use it to refrigerate vaccines in the same remote areas where the towers are being built.

"This is a solution that could be put in place essentially immediately and would have an overwhelming impact on the health of kids," Rubin says.

It is the sort of vision that is evident in a growing social entrepreneur sector -- a space made up of companies created to improve health and daily life in some of the world's poorest places. A recent J.P. Morgan analysis predicted that over the next 10 years the potential for investment in social enterprises will reach between $400 billion and $1 trillion in the areas of housing, women's health, primary education and financial services.

Al Hammond, a serial startup guy who regularly advises social entrepreneurs at an annual global conference at Santa Clara University, says such do-gooder enterprises could form the next big thing in Silicon Valley.

"They're driven primarily by a philanthropic urge," says Hammond, who's running a telemedicine startup to deliver affordable health services to remote parts of India. -- 'I'm going to do something.' That's the kind of entrepreneurial urge that I think is typically valley -- not unique to the valley, but you'll certainly find it there."

It is not unusual, Hammond says, for pet projects of the entrepreneurially-inclined to grow into self-sustaining enterprises that are for-profit and for the greater good.

"They want to do something in their spare time," he says of those starting projects with social benefits. "Then it gets so interesting they want to do it full time. It's starting to happen in a fairly large way."

Neither Anand nor Mishra is thinking about going full time. But Anand says that down the line he might explore commercial opportunities related to vaccine delivery. For now, though, there is plenty to do -- lobbying for grants, navigating government agencies, coordinating with cell carriers -- to keep them both busy in their nonprofit roles.

Sometimes even the most ambitious have to take it one step at a time.

Contact Mike Cassidy at mcassidy@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5536. Follow him at Twitter.com/mikecassidy.

Copyright © 2011 San Jose Mercury News

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Have you earned the right to lead? | View Clip
04/29/2011
Inside Business - Online

There are people in every organization you know whose titles indicate they are leaders. Often, and unfortunately, their employees beg to differ. Oh, they don't say it directly, not to the boss's face, anyway. They say it with their ho-hum performance, their games of avoidance, their dearth of enthusiasm. Leaders - real leaders who have mastered their craft - don't preside over such lackluster followers. If reading this makes you squirm with recognition, you may have a problem lurking.

You're really just masquerading. You haven't yet earned the right to lead.

When times are good, not-so-great leaders can get by. They're cushioned by a surplus of cash, and their missteps are covered up by the thrill of top-line growth, which hides a multitude of sins. But when the cloak of prosperity falls away, their mediocrity is ruthlessly exposed.

Real leadership equity is only earned, not bestowed. Just because you have been granted authority doesn't mean you're getting the full, collaborative engagement of your employees. You may have their bodies and time 40 or 50 hours a week, but until you earn the privilege, from their point of view, you'll never have their hearts and minds.

I've spent my career studying the practitioners of great leadership via my work as a venture capitalist, board member, high-level consultant and professor of leadership at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University.

Human nature hasn't changed that much over the millennia, so neither have the core laws of leadership. It's just that in the heat of the day-to-day battle, leaders inevitably lose their grip on the basic principles of leadership. In other cases, they never learned these fundamentals or mastered them earlier in their career. And finally, sad to say, some people just aren't cut out to lead and need to understand why.

"Normal" leadership is a complex system of behaviors that can tolerate a lot of little mistakes. Extraordinary leadership cannot.

Think about it this way: Anyone can snap a photo that looks OK or cook a meal that satiates hunger. However, when an award-winning photographer takes the picture, or a five-star chef prepares dinner, anyone can tell a master has been at work. The same is true of leadership. The small deficiencies in how the novice leads, as opposed to the unusually excellent professional, create a radical difference in the outcome.

So how can you tell whether you really are a great leader in the minds of your employees - or whether, to paraphrase the old television commercial, you're just playing one on TV? Unfortunately, the depth and breadth of the mistakes you make often tell the true tale.

Here are the 10 most common, deeply destructive mistakes organizational leaders make:

1. "Role playing" authenticity rather than living it. Authenticity is about owning your failures and shortcomings. It's about allowing others to really know you, vulnerabilities, warts and all. It's about having the guts to seek feedback from others in a sincere and genuine fashion. And it's about being able to maintain your authentic self in a situation of meaningful consequence - where your decisions affect others, sometimes on a grand scale and sometimes in very personal or dramatic ways.

Knowing who you really are and holding true to yourself in the most difficult moments is the "ground zero" of leadership credibility. It's the only way to create the trusted connections you need to lead with real influence. Unfortunately, leaders stumble for a variety of reasons: They get scared and veer away at the last moment, or they sacrifice the truth on the altar of protecting other people's feelings, or they simply seek to avoid the pain of conflict.

When we make the decision to compromise our authenticity, we end up delivering a message that may feel "easier" but that isn't truly what we want or need to say. Deception conspires with fear and seduces us down a dark road of believing we can "fake it," just this one time and it will all be OK.

But the downstream impact of making such a choice in a moment of stress or carelessness can be devastating. For one thing, it compromises the integrity of that all-important communications channel between leader and follower by changing expectations about the behavior of both. Worse, it sets a precedent for this type of authentic behavior that over time can trap a leader into an expectation or pattern of always behaving that way - and over the course of years this is a soul-destroying situation.

2. Underestimating the impact of small acts of dishonesty. In my book, I recount an incident that took place at a famous, fast-growing technology company. A young, inexperienced, but talented associate had what he thought was a plan for a powerful new marketing initiative. So he asked the CMO to broker a meeting with the CEO to make a presentation on the subject. The CMO agreed, and the meeting took place.

During the presentation the CEO was polite, if noncommittal. He gave the presenter a sort of passively accepting feedback - "Nice point," "Interesting " and so on - and wrapped up the meeting quickly, thanking the presenter for his initiative. But the CMO could sense a duplicity in the CEO's behavior and attitude as the parties all headed back to their respective offices. Then, 10 minutes after the meeting, the CEO called the CMO into his office and said, in essence, "That presentation was absolutely terrible. That guy's an idiot. I want you to fire him, today."

The story of the firing spread (as it always does) throughout the company, morale slipped, and the CMO never completely trusted his boss again. The CEO's reputation for trustworthiness had been wounded forever. The wreckage from one seemingly small act of dishonesty was strewn all over the company and could never be completely cleaned up.

3. Being two-faced (and assuming others won't notice). In another scenario, a CEO had one executive on his team whom he really trusted and in whom he could confide. One day, a couple of other members of that company's executive team made a presentation at a board meeting that didn't go so well. Later, as they were walking down a hallway, the CEO turned to his trusted executive and said, "We need to get rid of those guys. They were a disaster at the board meeting - they embarrassed me."

But then nothing happened. Life at the company went on as before, and the targeted executives remained in their jobs. In the months that passed, the trusted executive found himself in meetings attended by both the CEO and the targeted executives. And it was as if the whole incident had never happened. The CEO joked with the men, complimented them on their work, and treated them as long-term team members.

As the trusted executive watched this, he asked himself: Did the boss mean what he said? Does he ever mean what he says? Did he change his mind - and when did that happen? Or is he too gutless to follow through with his plans? And if he's willing to stab those guys in the back and then pretend to be their trusting partner, how do I know he hasn't been doing the same thing with me? Just how duplicitous is this guy?

Such are the dangers of shooting from the hip without realizing that a communication such as the one just described does not qualify as a "casual" comment - once said, it must be resolved, and if it is not, there is a lingering odor that in one way or another, will remain smelly until fixed.

4. Squelching the flow of bad news. Do you (or others under you) shoot the messenger when she brings you bad news? If so, you can be certain that the messenger's priority is not bringing you the information you need: It's protecting her own hide. That's why in most organizations good news zooms to the top, while bad news - data that reveals goals missed, problems lurking, or feedback that challenges or defeats our strategy - flows uphill like molasses in January.

Unusually excellent leaders understand this reality. To combat it, they work hard to build a primary and insatiable demand for the unvarnished facts, the raw data, the actual measurements, the honest feedback, the real information.

We must install a confidence and a trust that leaders in the organization value the facts, the truth and the speed of delivery, not the judgments or interpretations of "good" or "bad," and that messengers are valued, not shot. If we can do this then the entire behavior pattern of performance information flow will change for the better. Very few efforts will yield the payback associated with improving the speed and accuracy of the information you need most to make difficult or complex decisions.

5. Punishing "good failures." Great organizations encourage risk-taking. Why? Because innovation requires it. There can be no reward without risk. But if your employees take a risk and fail, and you come down on them like a hammer, guess what? They'll never risk anything again. Unusually excellent leaders deliberately create high-risk, low-cost environments, aka cultures of trust, where people don't live in fear of the consequences of failure.

A digital camera is the perfect analogy to the kind of culture you want to create. There is no expense associated with a flawed digital photograph - financial or otherwise. You just hit the "delete" button, and it disappears. No wasted film, slides or prints. And we are aware of this relationship between mistakes and consequences when we pick up the camera - so we click away, taking many more photos digitally than we would have in a world of costly film. Because we know failure is free, we take chances, and in that effort we often get that one amazing picture that we wouldn't have if we were paying for all the mistakes.

6. Letting employee enthusiasm fizzle. A big part of a leader's job is to be compelling. That means you must recruit "A players" through a big vision of the future and a personal commitment to a mission. But it's not enough to recruit once and then move on. Never assume "once enrolled, always enrolled." Even the best followers need to be reminded again and again how fun, rewarding and meaningful their work is.

In other words, when people seem to be losing their spark, they need to become "born again" employees. (Time to put on your evangelist cloak!)

Enthusiasm is a renewable resource. Part of being compelling is reminding yourself that people want and need to be re-enrolled all the time. This message doesn't have to be over the top to be compelling. It may just entail reminding your team, once per quarter, why you come to the office every day, and letting them reflect on the reason they do the same.

7. Refusing to deal with your "weakest links." Chronic underperformers spoil things for everyone else. They create resentment among employees who are giving it their all, and they drag down productivity. Leaders must have a plan for getting these problem children off the playground - and they must act on that plan without procrastination.

The worst scenario of all is to have a plan for dealing with underperformers, to identify who those individuals are and then not pull the trigger on the announced consequences, for reasons of sentimentality, weakness or favoritism - or worst of all, an attempt to preserve leadership popularity.

Nothing can be more damaging to the morale and esprit de corps of a team than that kind of leadership. It destroys your authenticity, your trustworthiness and your ability to compel others to act. It is the end of you as a leader. Indeed, it is better to have no weakest-link plan at all than one with obvious liabilities.

8. Allowing people to "fail elegantly." There are two basic operating modes for organizations under high-stakes execution pressure. One is the mentality of winning, which we know about; the other, less obvious to the untrained eye, the disease of failing elegantly, is a very sophisticated and veiled set of coping behaviors by individuals, the purpose of which is to avoid the oncoming train of embarrassment when the cover comes off the lousy results that we'd prefer no one ever sees.

Essentially, when people stop believing they can win, some then devote their energy to how best to lose. This fancy losing often manifests as excuse-making, blaming, tolerating cut corners, and manipulating and editorializing data. Unusually excellent leaders know how to recognize these symptoms and intervene with urgency and strength of conviction to get everyone on the high road, aka, the winner's mindset.

Passive acceptance of failure, and the rationalization that always goes with it, is a cancer that can begin anywhere in the organization, then metastasize to every office, including your own.

You can prevent it by setting clear and precise standards of behavior for everyone on the team, as well as clear consequences for the violation of those standards. And you can control it through continuous and open communication with every member of your team (some who will spot the problem before you do) and, where necessary, redundant processes and systems.

Most of all, you can cure the acceptance of failure by setting yourself as an example of zero tolerance (along with a welcome for honest admissions of error), of precision and care in all of your work, a clear-eyed focus on unvarnished results, and most of all, an unyielding and unwavering commitment to your success.

9. Delaying decisions until it's too late. Not making a decision is almost always worse than making a bad decision. As long as they aren't utterly ill-advised and catastrophic, bad decisions at least keep the organization moving in pace with changing events - and thus can often be rectified by a course correction.

Not making a decision at all, although it may seem the safe choice - because, intellectually, it positions you to make the right move when the reality of the situation is more revealed - actually strips your organization of its momentum, stalling it at the starting line, and makes it highly unlikely that you can ever get up to speed in time to be a serious player.

Unusually excellent leaders don't just make decisions; they pursue them. Because the speed of the organization is often its destiny - and because that speed directly correlates with the speed with which its decisions are made or not made - these leaders are haunted by the fear that somewhere in the organization a critical decision is being left orphaned and unmade.

10. Underestimating the weight your words - and your moods - carry. Consider the story of John Adler, who, prior to his CEO tenure at Adaptec, was a senior vice president at Amdahl, one of the pioneering computer companies of Silicon Valley. One morning as he was walking down the long hallway to his office, he encountered some maintenance guys who were doing repairs. He greeted them cheerfully and then, just to make conversation, mentioned how difficult it must be to work in such a dark hallway.

The next morning when Adler came to work, he was surprised to find five maintenance men all carefully replacing every light bulb in the hallway. When he questioned the flurry of activity, the men said, "We're replacing the light bulbs, boss. You said it was too dark in here." This story illustrates why leaders need to think carefully about every word they say - because others certainly will.

Every conversation with, and every communication from, a leader carries added weight because of the authority of the position behind it. Have a bad day and snap at one of your subordinates, and that person may go back to a cramped cubicle and start updating his résumé, or go out and get drunk, or miss a night's sleep. Your momentary bad day could be his nightmare - and something he will remember forever. Your mood matters; don't make it your employees' problem.

So if you recognize any of these mistakes in yourself, are you forever doomed as a leader? Of course not. We're all human, and we can all learn from our errors and redeem ourselves. And yet, there is no shame in realizing that leadership is not for everyone - or in declining to lead if it's not for you. (In your heart you probably already know.)

Leadership is a choice. It is a deep, burning desire to engage with people and rally a community to achieve greatness.

Leadership can be difficult, thankless, frustrating, maddening work at times.

It is only the passion of leading on the field - the thrill of looking other human beings in the eyes and seeing their energy, willingness, trust and commitment - that makes it all worthwhile, in a very quiet, private way.

John Hamm was named one of the country's Top 100 venture capitalists in 2009 by AlwaysOn. He has led investments in high-growth companies as a partner at several Silicon Valley and Bay Area VC firms. Hamm has also been a CEO, a board member and adviser at companies such as Documentum, Cisco, Hewlett-Packard, TaylorMade-adidas Golf and McAfee. For information about him and his book "Unusually Excellent: The Necessary Nine Skills Required for the Practice of Great Leadership," visit www.unusuallyexcellent.com.

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Nine skills required for great company leadership | View Clip
04/29/2011
TechJournal South

Do your employees trust you? The brutal truth is probably not. It may not be fair, and you may not want to hear it, but chances are that previous leaders have poisoned the ground on which you're trying to grow a successful business.

Make no mistake: Unless you and all the leaders in your organization can gain the trust of your employees, performance will suffer. And considering how tough it is to survive in today's business environment, that's very bad news for your company.

Why is trust so pivotal? According to John Hamm, it's a matter of human nature: When employees don't trust their leaders, they don't feel safe. And when they don't feel safe, they don't take risks—and where there is no risk taken, there is less innovation, less “going the extra mile,” and therefore, very little unexpected upside.

“Feeling safe is a primal human need,” says Hamm, author of Unusually Excellent: The Necessary Nine Skills Required for the Practice of Great Leadership (Jossey-Bass/A Wiley Imprint, February 2011, ISBN: 978-0-47092843-1, $24.95, www.unusuallyexcellent.com). “When that need isn't met, our natural response is to focus energy toward a showdown with the perceived threat.

“Our attention on whatever scares us increases until we either fight or run in the other direction, or until the threat diminishes on its own,” he adds. “Without trust, people respond with distraction, fear, and, at the extreme, paralysis. And that response is hidden inside ‘business' behaviors—sandbagging quotas, hedging on stretch goals, and avoiding accountability or commitment.”

Hamm calls trustworthiness “the most noble and powerful of all the attributes of leadership.” He says leaders become trustworthy by building a track record of honesty, fairness, and integrity. For Hamm, cultivating this trust isn't just a moral issue; it's a practical one.

“Trust is the currency you will need when the time comes for you to make unreasonable performance demands on your teams,” he explains. “And when you're in that tight spot, it's quite possible that the level of willingness your employees have to meet those demands could make or break your company.”

Hamm has spent his career studying the practitioners of great leadership via his work as a CEO, venture capitalist, board member, high-level consultant, and professor of leadership at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University. In his new book, he shares what he has learned and brings those lessons to life with real-world stories.

In his book Hamm explains that most employees have been hurt or disappointed, at some point in their careers, by the hand of power in an organization. That's why nine times out of ten leaders are in “negative trust territory” before they make their first request of an employee to do something. Before a team can reach its full potential, leaders must act in ways that transcend employees' fears of organizational power.

The first step starts with you, Hamm notes. As a leader, you must “go first”—and model trustworthiness for everyone else. Being trustworthy creates trust, yes. But beyond that, there are very specific things you can do to provide Unusually Excellent, trust-building leadership at your organization:

First, realize that being trustworthy doesn't mean you have to be a Boy Scout. You don't even have to be a warm or kind person, says Hamm. On the contrary, history teaches us that some of the most trustworthy people can be harsh, tough, or socially awkward—but their promises must be inviolate and their decisions fair.

“As anachronistic as it may sound in the twenty-first century, men and women whose word is their honor, and who can be absolutely trusted to be fair, honest, and forthright, are more likely to command the respect of others than, say, the nicest guy in the room,” says Hamm. “You can be tough. You can be demanding. You can be authentically whoever you really are. But as long as you are fair, as long as you do what you say consistently, you will still be trusted.”

Look for chances to reveal some vulnerability. We trust people we believe are real and also human (imperfect and flawed)—just like us. And that usually means allowing others to get a glimpse of our personal vulnerability—some authentic (not fabricated) weakness or fear or raw emotion that allows others to see us as like them, and therefore relate to us at the human level.

Hamm offers Carl, a self-made success and CEO of a venture-backed software company, as a great example. Carl had a Ph.D. and held senior management positions at several large IT companies. But he came from a family with humble roots. In fact, he was the first kid in his family to go to college. The stories Carl used when leading his team came from his own rural upbringing.

He told them from the heart and with great humility. He would emphasize a point not by reference to some academic theory, but rather with a story about working in the corn fields. His team not only trusted him more because he wasn't afraid to show that side of himself, but they loved him for it.

“Carl knew that if he was authentic, it would be much easier for him to earn his team's trust,” says Hamm. “The best leaders consciously present themselves as accessible and open and vulnerable—that is, they talk about their fears, challenges, and failures with humility, candor, and at times even some humor—so as to break down the barriers with those whom they wish to know. They know this does not threaten their power, but, rather, increases their influence.”

No matter how tempted you are, don't bullsh*t your employees. Tell the truth, match your actions with your words, and match those words with the truth we all see in the world: no spin, no BS, no fancy justifications or revisionist history—just tell the truth.

“Telling the truth when it is not convenient or popular, or when it will make you look bad, can be tough,” admits Hamm. “Yet, it's essential to your reputation. Your task as a leader is to be as forthright and transparent as is realistically possible. Strive to disclose the maximum amount of information appropriate to the situation.

When you feel yourself starting to bend what you know is the truth or withhold the bare facts, find a way to stop, reformat your communication, and tell the truth.”

Never, ever make the “adulterer's guarantee.” This happens when you say to an employee, in effect, “I just lied to (someone else), but you can trust me because I'd never lie to you.” When an employee sees you committing any act of dishonesty or two-facedness, they'll assume that you'll do the same to them. They'll start thinking back through all of their conversations with you, wondering what was real and what was disingenuous.

In his book, Hamm describes an incident that took place at a famous, fast-growing technology company. A young, inexperienced, but talented associate had what he thought was a plan for a powerful new marketing initiative. So he asked the CMO to broker a meeting with the CEO to make a presentation on the subject. The CMO agreed, and the meeting took place.

During the presentation the CEO was polite, if noncommittal. He gave the presenter a sort of passive accepting feedback—“Nice point,” “Interesting,” and so on—and wrapped up the meeting quickly, thanking the presenter for his initiative. But the CMO could sense a duplicity in the CEO's behavior and attitude as the parties all headed back to their respective offices.

Then, ten minutes after the meeting, the CEO called the CMO into his office and said, in essence, “That presentation was absolutely terrible. That guy's an idiot. I want you to fire him, today.”

“The story of this harsh and unjust firing spread (as it always does) throughout the company, morale slipped, and the CMO never completely trusted his boss again,” writes Hamm. “The CEO's reputation for trustworthiness had been wounded forever. The wreckage from one seemingly small act of dishonesty was strewn all over the company and could never be completely cleaned up.”

Don't punish “good failures.” This is one of the stupidest things an organization can do—yet it happens all the time. A “good failure” is a term used in Silicon Valley to describe a new business start-up or mature company initiative that, by most measures, is well planned, well run, and well organized—yet for reasons beyond its control (an unexpected competitive product, a change in the market or economy) it fails.

In other words, “good failures” occur when you play well, but still lose. When they're punished, you instill a fear of risk-taking in your employees, and with that you stifle creativity and innovation. Instead, says Hamm, you should strive to create a “digital camera” culture.

“There is no expense associated with an imperfect digital photograph—financial or otherwise,” he explains. “You just hit the ‘delete' button, and it disappears. No wasted film, slides, or prints. And we are aware of this relationship between mistakes and the consequences when we pick up the camera—so we click away, taking many more photos digitally than we would have in a world of costly film.

Because we know failure is free, we take chances, and in that effort we often get that one amazing picture that we wouldn't have if we were paying a price for all the mistakes.”

Don't squelch the flow of “bad” news. Do you (or others under you) shoot the messenger when she brings you bad news? If so, you can be certain that the messenger's priority is not bringing you the information you need: It's protecting her own hide. That's why in most organizations good news zooms to the top of the organization, while bad news—data that reveals goals missed, problems lurking, or feedback that challenges or defeats your strategy—flows uphill like molasses in January.

“We must install a confidence and a trust that leaders in the organization value the facts, the truth, and the speed of delivery, not the judgments or interpretations of ‘good' or ‘bad,' and that messengers are valued, not shot,” says Hamm. “Make it crystal clear to your employees that you expect the truth and nothing but the truth from them. And always, always hold up your end of that deal. Don't ever shoot the messenger and don't ever dole out some irrational consequence.

“Unusually excellent leaders build a primary and insatiable demand for the unvarnished facts, the raw data, the actual measurements, the honest feedback, the real information,” he adds. “Very few efforts will yield the payback associated with improving the speed and accuracy of the information you need most to make difficult or complex decisions.”

Constantly tap into your “fairness conscience.” Precise agreements about what is fair are hard to negotiate, because each of us has our own sense of fairness. But at the level of general principle, there is seldom any confusion about what fair looks like. Just ask yourself: Would most people see this as fair or unfair? You'll know the answer (indeed, as a leader, you're paid to know it).

“If you treat your followers fairly, and do so consistently, you will set a pattern of behavior for the entire organization,” says Hamm. “This sense of fairness, critical to the creation of a safe environment, can be reinforced not only by complimenting fair practices but also by privately speaking to—or if necessary, censuring—subordinates who behave unfairly to others in the organization.”

Don't take shortcuts. Every organization wants to succeed. That's why, inevitably, there is a constant pressure to let the end justify the means. This pressure becomes especially acute when either victory or failure is in immediate sight. That's when the usual ethical and moral constraints are sometimes abandoned—always for good reasons, and always “just this once”—in the name of expediency.

“Sometimes this strategy even works,” says Hamm. “But it sets the precedent for repeatedly using these tactics at critical moments—not to mention a kind of ‘mission creep' by which corner-cutting begins to invade operations even when they aren't at a critical crossroads.”

Plus, when employees see you breaking the “code” of organizational honor and integrity to which your company is supposed to adhere, they lose trust in you.

“Betray your organization's stated values when you're feeling desperate—by lying to clients or ‘spinning' the numbers to get out of trouble with your boss—and you devalue the importance of trust and honesty in their eyes,” adds Hamm. “They see you breaking your own rules and suddenly they see you as less trustworthy. After all, if the client or the company's executive suite can't trust you, why should they?”

Separate the bad apples from the apples who just need a little direction. The cost of untruths to an organization can be huge in terms of time, money, trust, and reputation. As a leader, you have to recognize that you are not going to be able to “fix” a thief, a pathological liar, or a professional con artist—all of these must go, immediately.

“In my coaching practice, there are three failure modes that I will decline to coach: integrity, commitment, and chronic selfishness, that is, manipulating outcomes for individual gain at the expense of the larger opportunity,” says Hamm. “These are character traits, not matters of skill, practice, knowledge, or experience.

“That said, one huge mistake leaders make is to doubt or distrust someone because their work or performance disappoints us,” he adds. “Performance problems should be managed fairly and with little judgment of the person's underlying character, unless that is the issue at the root of the trouble. Ultimately, unlike my failure modes, improving performance is often merely a matter of feedback, course correction, and some coaching.”

“Trustworthiness is never entirely pure,” says Hamm. “Everyone fails to achieve perfection. So the goal for a leader is to make those wrong choices as rarely as possible; admit them quickly, completely, and with humility; fix them as quickly as you can; and make full recompense when you cannot. Trust is the most powerful, and most fragile, asset in an organization, and it is almost exclusively created, or hampered, by the actions of the senior leader on the team.

“A working environment of trust is a place where teams stay focused, give their utmost effort, and in the end do their best work,” he concludes. “It's a place where we can trust ourselves, trust others, trust our surroundings, or—best of all—trust all three.”

John Hamm is one of the top leadership experts in Silicon Valley. He was named one of the country's Top 100 venture capitalists in 2009 by AlwaysOn and has led investments in many successful high-growth companies as a partner at several Bay Area VC firms. Hamm has also been a CEO, a board member at over thirty companies, and a CEO adviser and executive coach to senior leaders at companies such as Documentum, Cisco, Hewlett-Packard, TaylorMade-adidas Golf and McAfee. John teaches leadership at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University.

© 2011, TechJournal South. All rights reserved.

Tags: best practices, Business advice, , Unusually Excellent, Viewpoint

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Participants honor Hobbs through run | View Clip
04/29/2011
Los Banos Enterprise

Annual event raises scholarship money

The Dustin Hobbs Memorial Run will reach its fifth anniversary Sunday at Pacheco State Park.

Tim McNally, a Los Banos High social studies teacher, said the run that honors the late Los Banos High School teacher Dustin Hobbs isn't a run at all for more than half of the participants.

"They walk it," McNally said. "Some don't even walk it; they just (sit) out and have a good time."

The event raises money for a scholarship named for Hobbs, who died of leukemia five years ago at age 32.

"I tell my kids all the time I wish they could have had him," McNally said. "He was so good."

McNally said the number of run participants has increased every year.

McNally said Hobbs was integral in the formation of the Los Banos High School History Society. He said Hobbs was sending out e-mails regarding the society the day before he died.

"Literally, from his deathbed," McNally said.

Students who have received scholarships in the past have gone to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Santa Clara University, University of California at Santa Cruz and Fresno State.

Part of this year's proceeds will also go to the Frank Cambra Memorial Scholarship. Cambra was another teacher at Los Banos High who, at 59, died of leukemia.

For Los Banos High senior Jasmyn Caredio, last year's run was a moving experience. Jasmyn said she was touched by how highly others spoke of Hobbs.

"We heard about Mr. Hobbs before, but actually hearing from a student instead of Mr. McNally was like a totally different experience."

Stephanie Camacho, president of the society, explained that the club chose to hold a run, as opposed to another type of event, because of its symbolic meaning.

"Well, because [in] a run you have to push yourself, and that's what you do in life," Camacho said.

This year's Hobbs Run will take place on top of Pacheco Pass at Pacheco State Park on Sunday at 9 a.m. The entry fee is $15 and includes a memorial T-shirt. Courses of differing length and difficulty are available, including one designed for elementary school children.

For more information, contact Michael Stagnaro or McNally at 209- 826-6033.

Enterprise reporter Thaddeus Miller can be reached at 209-388-6562 or by e-mail at tmiller@losbanos

enterprise.com.

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Reporter: IF STUDENT AT STANFORD WANT TO JOIN THE ROTC, THEY HAVE TO TRAVEL 16 MILES TO ATTEND CLASS AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY.
04/29/2011
This Week In Northern California - KQED-TV

SO THAT THAT PARTICULAR PHONE IS UNIQUE IN THE WORLD. SO, YOU CAN TIE A UNIQUE IDENTIFIER TO THE LOCATION. SO YOU KNOW PRECISELY WHERE A PRECISE PHONE HAS BEEN. IN MANY CASES YOU'RE USING SERVICES WHERE THEY KNOW THINGS ABOUT YOU. LIKE, YOU MIGHT HAVE A FACEBOOK APP ON YOUR PHONE. WELL, FACEBOOK KNOWS WHO YOU ARE, WHERE YOU LIVE, KNOWS YOUR PHONE NUMBER. THAT TYPE OF INFORMATION CAN ALL BE TIED TOGETHER. Belva: PERSONAL COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY COLUMNIST HERE, YOU PROBABLY KNEW THAT'S WHAT HE WAS GOING TO SAY. IT'S TIME FOR THIS INTERESTING CONVERSATION. TO MOVE ON, BUT IT IS INTERESTING. WE'D LIKE TO HAVE YOU BACK AGAIN TO FIND OUT MORE OF WHAT WE DON'T KNOW. OH, DEAR. Belva: WELL THE ROTC, RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORP, WAS BANNED FROM STANFORD UNIVERSITY CAMPUS DURING THE VIETNAM WAR BUT THERE IS A CONTROVERSIAL MOVE TO BRING THAT PROGRAM BACK AS "NEWSHOUR" CORRESPONDENT SPENCER MICHELS. Reporter: IF STUDENT AT STANFORD WANT TO JOIN THE ROTC, THEY HAVE TO TRAVEL 16 MILES TO ATTEND CLASS AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY. CARRY ON. CARRY ON. Reporter: STANFORD, LIKE MANY PRIVATE SCHOOLS, SEVERED TIES WITH ROTC 40 YEARS AGO. PUSHING IT OFF KAM PASSCAMPUS. A SITUATION THAT COULD BE ABOUT TO CHANGE. IF YOU ARE AN ARMY OFFICER YOU HAVE A TYPE "A" PERSONALITY SO YOU'RE ALL LEADERS. Reporter: IN THE 1960s WITH THE VIETNAM WAR RAGING, STUDENTS AND FACULTY AT UTE UNIVERSITIES ACROSS THE COUNTRY MADE CAMPUS ROTC PROGRAMS THE TARGET OF DEMONSTRATIONS. THE MOOD WAS ANTIWAR AND ANTIMILITARY. AT STANFORD THE ROTC BUILDING WAS BURNED DOWN. ANN THOMP THOMPSON IS A STANFORD SISTER AND COMMANDER IN ROTC. I THINK A LOT OF THE REASONS IT WASN'T REALLY POPULAR IN THE VIETNAM ERA, AREN'T REALLY APPLICABLE TO THE DEBATE TODAY. Reporter: THE SEVEN STANFORD CADETS AT SANTA CLARA GET NO CREDIT FOR ROTC CLASSES BUT MOST GET THEIR TUITION PAID, PLUS A MONTHLY STIPEND AND TRANSPORTATION BETWEEN CAMPUSES. NATIONALLY NEARLY 500 ROTC UNITS HAVE CROSS-TOWN ARRANGEMENTS WITH NEARBY UNIVERSITIES BUT THOSE ARRANGEMENTS DISTURB. IT PRECLUDES SO MANY FROM PARTICIPATING. YOU COULD SET UP Reporter: ONE REASON STANFORD KEPT MILITARY TRAINING OFF KAM PA WAS THE MILITARY BAN ON GAYS. THEN IN 1993 DON'T ASK, DON'T TELL, BARRED OPENLY GAY PEOPLE FROM MILITARY SERVICE, INCLUDING ROTC. NOW WITH ITS REPEAL, ALTHOUGH STILL NOT IMPLEMENTED, THE DEBATE HAS RETURNED. HARVARD WAS THE FIRST PRIVATE UNIVERSITY TO REVERSE POLICIES THAT KEPT ROTC OFF CAMPUS. STANFORD AND OTHER PRIVATE COLLEGES ARE DEBATING THE ISSUES. PUBLIC UNIVERSITY DID NOT BAN ROTC, FEARFUL OF LOSING FEDERAL FUNDS. AT STANFORD THE DEBATE HAS BEEN INTENSE BUT UNLIKE THE '60s, POLITE. IT BEGAN WHEN FORMER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE WILLIAM PERRY, WHO NOW TEACHES AT STANFORD, AND OTHERS PROPOSED MOVING ROTC BACK INTO THE ACADEMIC FOLD. HAVING A MIXTURE OF ROTC STUDENTS WITH REST OF THE STUDENTS WAS A GOOD THING, I THOUGHT. IT WAS IMPORTANT FOR THE STANFORD STUDENTS TO BE EXPOSED TO THE PEOPLE WHO ARE GOING TO BE OUR FUTURE MILITARY LEADERS. Reporter: WITH THE USMILITARY ENGAGE IN AT LEAST TWO WARS, PERRY IS CONCERNED THAT STUDENTS AT ELITE UNIVERSITIES HAVE BECOME ISOLATED FROM THE MEN AND WOMEN DOING THE FIGHTING. MERELY A HANDFUL OF STANFORD STUDENTS HAVE ENROLLED IN THE MILITARY IN THE LAST FEW YEARS.

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ROTC gets thumbs up | View Clip
04/29/2011
Daily News, The

\\◾◾ Military program absent from campus since 1968 could be re-established

Bay Area News Group

More than four decades after arsonists burned Stanford's ROTC building to the ground, the university voted overwhelmingly Thursday to support efforts to bring the military group back.

The historic vote by the Faculty Senate — 28 to 9, with three abstentions— could re-establish ROTC's formal presence on campus, introducing such courses as Military History and Leadership and narrowing a culture gap between one of the nation's most prestigious universities and the U.S. armed forces.

“What's changed is the recognition of importance of great leadership in the military, to grapple with complex issues ... such as Libya, Afghanistan, Iran,” said Stanford President John Hennessy. “Things are no longer as black and white as they once were,” he said referring to the polarization of the angry years of Vietnam War protests on U.S. campuses.

“It will provide more opportunity for dialogue, and that dialogue is critically important,” the university's president added.

Stanford will insist that any ROTC courses be open to non-ROTC students, and would retain control over whether ROTC courses would earn academic credit or not. Instruction of some courses might be shared between Stanford and ROTC professors.

The Faculty Senate, the faculty's governing body, also added formal language opposing the military's exclusion of transgender people and urged a change to policy.

The vote does not immediately open doors to the Reserve Officer Training Corps. Rather, it instructs Hennessy to extend an invitation to the U.S. military, absent on campus since 1968.

The Pentagon has a decision to make, too. It needs to evaluate whether enough Stanford students would enlist to make it worth its investment. Two branches, the Army and Air Force, have expressed interest; two others, the Navy and Marine Corps, have not yet responded.

“Whether they actually want to come here, we don't know,” said professor of education Eamonn Callan, a member of

ROTC, page A6

Bay Area News Group file

Stanford students participating in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps Jimmy Ruck, left, and Oliver Ennis perform their morning workout at CobbTrack and Angell Field on Jan. 19. Currently, Stanford students must take part in formal training at other college campuses, but that could soon change, thanks to a vote by the Faculty Senate in favor of bringing the ROTC back.

ROTC

From page A1

a faculty committee that recommended ROTC's return.

Currently, 15 Stanford students have entered into “cross-enrollment agreements” with ROTC programs at UC-Berkeley, San Jose State and Santa Clara University. The number of ROTC members could double, if it is re-established on campus, Hennessy estimated.

The vote came after lengthy and heated debate. Last week, the Ad Hoc Committee on ROTC concluded with a report that asserted that Stanford undergraduates, both military and civilian, would benefit by sharing their educational experiences.

A survey of the student body showed that 40 percent supported it, 40 percent abstained and 20 percent opposed its return. Student leader Angelina Cardona, former president of Associated Students, opposed ROTC's return due to its prohibition of transsexuals.

“Rejection of ROTC is a rejection of exclusion,” she said.

Divisive issue

Another student, Imani Franklin, urged its return, saying “To disengage is morally wrong. ... We would be able to put a face to those who fight our wars. ROTC would greatly improve my civic education and allow me to graduate with a broader perspective on the world.”

Geophysics graduate student Justin Brown noted, “I have never seen the student body so divisive.”

Renowned computer science professor Eric Roberts argued against its return, worrying about oversight of ROTC academics and the possibility that the military's recently loosened policy on allowing gays to serve could be reversed.

But Pulitzer Prize-winning professor David M. Kennedy, history professor emeritus, welcomed ROTC's return.

“We are well-positioned to contribute to the education of the officers' corps,” he said, “and contribute to the proper decision-making in senior military ranks through the values this institution stands for.”

Bay Area News Group file

Stanford students participating in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps Krista Fryauff, foreground to background, Lillian McBee and Chloe Taub perform their morning workout at Cobb Track and Angell Field on Jan. 19.

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Stanford campus leaders make peace with ROTC
04/29/2011
Los Angeles Times

Stanford University's Faculty Senate voted Thursday to invite the Reserve Officer Training Corps back to the campus for the first time since the Vietnam War era, a turnaround prompted by the end of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy against gays serving openly in the military.

Stanford's President John L. Hennessy said he would soon start discussions with the military branches to return ROTC to the university, joining other elite schools in welcoming back the officer training units that had been pushed off campus or denied academic standing during the antiwar movement of the 1970s. Columbia University took similar steps last week, Harvard did so last month and several others are considering the actions.

Offering the military a bigger role on campus, Hennessy said after the vote, "would provide more opportunity for dialogue, and I think that dialogue is critically important in a democracy." He said it was too early to say which ROTC units might reopen or how soon.

The Faculty Senate approved the change, 28 to 9 with three abstentions, after an emotional two-hour debate. Much of the discussion focused on the ban against transgender people serving in the armed forces, even after the congressional vote in December to lift the 17-year-old "don't ask" rules that prevented gays from serving openly. Critics said allowing ROTC on campus would be discriminatory against transgender students.

About 40 Stanford students who opposed the program's return demonstrated outside the meeting and yelled, "Shame on you," as the faculty departed.

Among the protesters was sophomore Thomas Joseph, 20, of Portland, Ore., who said he opposed the American interventions in Iraq and Afghanistan and any Stanford involvement with the military. "I'm tired of it," the chemical engineering student said of the wars, "and I'm not for a bigger military."

The faculty vote came a week after a campus commission report that said ROTC's return to Stanford would contribute to a better-educated officer corps, one more able to make judgments with "a high sense of moral principle and secure commitment to the rule of law."

Commission Chairman Ewart Thomas, a psychology professor, told Thursday's meeting that having ROTC on campus would bring more diverse points of view and trigger discussions about the military, history and leadership. "That's something from which all our students would benefit," he said.

Under ROTC, students receive scholarships in return for agreeing to military service after graduation. The Army, Navy and Air Force run separate programs for new officers.

Stanford has had a traumatic history with ROTC. In 1968, the Naval ROTC building on campus was destroyed in an arson fire. With antiwar sentiment high, the on-campus programs were phased out in the early 1970s, but the university later allowed students to take ROTC classes at other schools in the region. Fourteen Stanford students currently participate in the programs at UC Berkeley, San Jose State and Santa Clara University, but do not receive academic credit for them at Stanford.

The Stanford resolution approved Thursday would require close oversight by the university of ROTC courses as well as an effort to have the classes, which include military history and leadership training, open to all Stanford students, not just those in the program. Military and ROTC officials said they were unsure whether those issues could delay the program's return.

Stanford law professor Lawrence Marshall said he struggled with his decision to vote yes.

He said he believes that the military wrongly discriminates against transgender people but that having future military leaders meet such students on campus would eventually lead to the end of that policy.

"The answer is exposure to diversity," he said. Marshall proposed and won support for a faculty statement urging the military to change its transgender policy.

Earlier this month, a non-binding student election showed divisions, with 2,406 voting for ROTC's return to Stanford, 929 opposing it and 2,117 abstaining. Some ROTC opponents had urged students to abstain.

--

larry.gordon@latimes.com

PHOTO: EXERCISE: ROTC members work out at Stanford. The university has let students take ROTC classes at other schools in the region, and 14 currently do. But they don't get Stanford academic credit for the courses.

PHOTOGRAPHER:Michael Macor The Chronicle

PHOTO: FITNESS: Ernest Haleck, an ROTC member from Stanford, runs stairs to work out. The university is joining other elite schools in welcoming ROTC back.

PHOTOGRAPHER:Michael Macor The Chronicle

Copyright © 2011 Los Angeles Times

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STANFORD ENDORSES ROTC RETURN
04/29/2011
San Jose Mercury News

More than four decades after arsonists burned Stanford's ROTC building to the ground, the university voted overwhelmingly Thursday to support efforts to bring the military group back.

The historic vote by the Faculty Senate -- 28 to 9, with three abstentions -- could re-establish ROTC's formal presence on campus, introducing such courses as Military History and Leadership and narrowing a culture gap between one of the nation's most prestigious universities and the U.S. armed forces.

"What's changed is the recognition of the importance of great leadership in the military, to grapple with complex issues ... such as Libya, Afghanistan, Iran," said Stanford President John Hennessy. "Things are no longer as black and white as they once were," he said referring to the polarization of the angry years of Vietnam War protests on U.S. campuses.

"It would provide more opportunity for dialogue, and I think that dialogue is critically important in a democracy," the university's president added.

Stanford will insist that any ROTC courses be open to non-ROTC students, and would retain control over whether ROTC courses would earn academic credit or not. Instruction of some courses might be shared between Stanford and ROTC professors.

The Faculty Senate, the faculty's governing body, also added formal language opposing the military's exclusion of transgender people and urged a change to policy.

The vote does not immediately open doors to the Reserve Officer Training Corps. Rather, it instructs Hennessy to extend an invitation to the U.S. military, absent on campus since 1973.

The Pentagon has a decision to make, too. It needs to evaluate whether enough Stanford students would enlist to make it worth its investment. Two branches, the Army and Air Force, have expressed interest; two others, the Navy and Marine Corps, have not yet responded.

"Whether they actually want to come here, we don't know," said professor of education Eamonn Callan, a member of a faculty committee that recommended ROTC's return.

Currently, 15 Stanford students have entered into "cross-enrollment agreements" with ROTC programs at UC Berkeley, San Jose State and Santa Clara University. The number of ROTC members could double, if it is re-established on campus, Hennessy estimated.

The vote came after lengthy and heated debate. Last week, the Ad Hoc Committee on ROTC concluded with a report that asserted that Stanford undergraduates, both military and civilian, would benefit by sharing their educational experiences.

A survey of the student body showed that 40 percent supported it, 40 percent abstained and 20 percent opposed its return. Student leader Angelina Cardona, former president of Associated Students, opposed ROTC's return due to its prohibition of transsexuals. "Rejection of ROTC is a rejection of exclusion," she said.

Another student, Imani Franklin, urged its return, saying "To disengage is morally wrong. ... We would be able to put a face to those who fight our wars. ROTC would greatly improve my civic education and allow me to graduate with a broader perspective on the world."

Geophysics graduate student Justin Brown noted, "I have never seen the student body so divisive."

Renowned computer science professor Eric Roberts argued against its return, worrying about oversight of ROTC academics and the possibility that the military's recently loosened policy on allowing gays to serve could be reversed.

But Pulitzer Prize-winning professor David M. Kennedy, history professor emeritus, welcomed ROTC's return.

"We are well-positioned to contribute to the education of the officers' corps," he said, "and contribute to the proper decision-making in senior military ranks through the values this institution stands for."

Contact Lisa M. Krieger at 408-920-5565.

Copyright © 2011 San Jose Mercury News

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Stanford faculty vote to invite ROTC back to campus after four decades | View Clip
04/29/2011
Los Angeles Times - Online

Stanford University's faculty voted Thursday evening to invite the Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) back to the campus for the first time since the antiwar movement of the early 1970s, a controversial turnaround prompted by the recent end of the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy against homosexuals in the military.

Stanford's President John L. Hennessy said he would soon seek to start negotiations with the military branches that could return ROTC to the university, joining other elite schools in welcoming back the military training units that had been pushed off campus or denied academic standing during the Vietnam War. Columbia University took similar pro-ROTC steps last week, Harvard did so last month and several others are considering the actions.

The Stanford faculty voted 28 to 9 with three abstentions after an emotional, two-hour debate. Much of the discussion focused on the ban against transgender people serving in the armed forces, even after the 17-year-old "Don't Ask" rule against homosexuals serving openly in the military was lifted in December. Critics said allowing ROTC on campus would be discriminatory against transgender students.

About 40 Stanford students demonstrated outside the meeting and promised to protest again if ROTC offices open on campus. Among them was chemical engineering sophomore Thomas Joseph, 20, of Portland, Ore., who said he opposed the American interventions in Iraq and Afghanistan and didn't want Stanford to be involved in the military.

"I'm tired of it," he said of the wars, "and I'm not for a bigger military."

The move came a week after the release of a campus commission report that said the return of ROTC would contribute to a better educated officer corps, one more able to make judgments with "a high sense of moral principle and secure commitment to the rule of law."

Commission Chairman Ewart Thomas, a psychology professor, told Thursday's meeting that having ROTC on campus would bring more diverse points of view to campus and trigger discussions about the military, history and leadership. "That's something from which all our students would benefit," he said.

Under ROTC, students receive scholarships in exchange for agreeing to military service after graduation. The Army, Navy and Air Force run separate programs for new officers.

Stanford has a particularly traumatic history with ROTC. In May 1968, the Naval ROTC building on campus was destroyed in an arson fire. Over the next couple of decades, the school agreed to allow students to take ROTC classes at three other schools in the region -- Naval ROTC at UC Berkeley, Air Force at San Jose State and Army at Santa Clara University. Currently, 14 Stanford students are in those programs, but do not receive academic credit for them at Stanford.

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Stanford faculty votes to invite ROTC back | View Clip
04/29/2011
Palo Alto Weekly - Online

Prompted by 'Don't Ask Don't Tell' repeal, professors say university should train future officers

Palo Alto Weekly Staff

On an issue that has sharply divided Stanford students, the university's Faculty Senate Thursday voted decisively to invite the Reserve Officers' Training Corps back onto campus for the first time since the 1970s.

On a vote of 28 to 9 with 3 abstentions, the elected faculty representatives backed the return of the officers' training program under supervision by a faculty committee, stipulating that the military classes must be open to all Stanford students -- not just ROTC candidates.

"Our country needs innovative, broadly educated military leaders and we believe that Stanford -- as one of the nation's leading universities -- has a responsibility to help prepare them," Stanford President John Hennessy said in a statement after the vote.

The return of ROTC also will benefit Stanford by giving all students "opportunities for discussion about civic responsibility, human rights and the role of the military," Hennessy added.

The vote affirmed the unanimous recommendation of a committee, composed of seven professors and two undergraduates, to investigate "Stanford's role in preparing students for leadership in the military." The committee was convened following last year's repeal of the Defense Department's "Don't Ask Don't Tell" policy.

This year's campus debate over ROTC, which dominated a recent student government election, has been a far cry from antiwar fervor of 1970, when the Faculty Senate voted 36 to 8 to terminate academic credit for ROTC.

This time, the major stated objection to ROTC was not opposition to war but to military policies that ROTC opponents said amount to discrimination against transgendered recruits, not covered under the repeal of Don't Ask Don't Tell.

"I ask you to vote against ROTC, not as a statement against the military and against war, but as a statement for justice and for our community," said Michael Cruz, a Stanford junior recently elected to head student government next year.

"As an Asian-American student, 60 years ago I would not have been allowed to join ROTC due to my race," Cruz said, asking the faculty to extend the same protections to transgendered students it extends to gay and minority students.

Besides the transgender points, professors skeptical of ROTC questioned the degree of Stanford oversight and critical rigor of prospective courses offered through ROTC, as well as how Stanford would measure success or failure of the program.

But the faculty appeared more persuaded by the arguments of Stanford sophomore Imani Franklin, one of the student members of the committee recommending the return of ROTC.

Imani argued in favor of the "civic education" that ROTC would contribute to campus.

"Right now, wars are happening and someone has to fight them," Franklin said.

"Every single one of us in this room benefits from the military.... To support ROTC is to support exposing our community to that entire segment of this country ... and engage us in these hard conversations around military service that this community needs to have," she said.

Former U.S. Defense Secretary William Perry, a retired Stanford professor of management science and engineering, was a key player in the move to consider a return of ROTC to Stanford.

Perry said educated military leaders contribute to enlightened military policies, noting that top generals including former Joint Chiefs Chairman John Shalikashvili and former Defense Secretary Colin Powell -- as well as he himself -- are ROTC graduates.

"Stanford does have an opportunity to help create the military leaders who will make enlightened decisions of the future," said Perry, who served in the Clinton administration.

"Bringing ROTC back is the single most important opportunity you will have at Stanford to seize that opportunity," he told the faculty.

Another organizer behind the debate, retired history professor David Kennedy, told the faculty Thursday, "The military provides us all with a public service and a public good -- it's called national security.

"We'd have a high argument to maintain that Stanford should continue to be a free rider ... particularly when, as an institution, we're so well-positioned to contribute to the education of the officers corps," Kennedy said.

Thursday's vote formally instructed Hennessy to begin conversations with military branches about the process for re-establishing ROTC at Stanford.

The 15 or so Stanford students who currently participate in ROTC must travel to Santa Clara University, San Jose State University or the University of California at Berkeley -- depending on their service branch -- to attend classes and drills.

Posted by Good job, Faculty Senate!, a resident of the Palo Verde neighborhood, 1 hour ago

The Stanford Faculty Senate got this one right.

If we don't want to relinquish this country to the ignorant, then we must educate. It will be better for everyone to have Stanford liberally educated officers in our military. It will be better for the LGBT community in the long rung. We need military officers who lived in a dorm with a wide range of citizens and who learned from top notch professors, who were encouraged to THINK during their time in college. Other Stanford students will also benefit from an expanded education that includes knowledge about our country's military.

Good decision, Stanford!!

Posted by Embarrassing, a resident of the Midtown neighborhood, 1 hour ago

That there were nine dissenting votes.

As to the opponents, Sorry that you feel protecting our country should take second place to identity politics. Guess you probably wouldn’t have supported our military against the Nazis in WWII then. We didn’t let in women, had blatant racial discrimination, and the thought of gays serving openly would have been inconceivable

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Stanford's Faculty Senate votes to bring back ROTC | View Clip
04/29/2011
Sacramento Bee - Online, The

PALO ALTO, Calif -- PALO ALTO, Calif. - Stanford University's Faculty Senate voted Thursday to invite the Reserve Officer Training Corps back to the campus for the first time since the Vietnam War era, a turnaround prompted by the end of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy against gays serving openly in the military.

Stanford's President John L. Hennessy said he will soon start discussions with the military branches to return ROTC to the university, joining other elite schools in welcoming back the officer training units that had been pushed off campus or denied academic standing during the anti-war movement of the 1970s. Columbia University took similar steps last week, Harvard did so last month and several others are considering the actions.

Offering the military a bigger role on campus, Hennessy said after the vote, "would provide more opportunity for dialogue and I think that dialogue is critically important in a democracy." He said it was too early to say which ROTC units might reopen and how soon.

The Faculty Senate approved the change, 28-9 with three abstentions, after an emotional, two-hour debate. Much of the discussion focused on the ban against transgender people serving in the armed forces, even after the congressional vote in December to lift the 17-year-old "don't ask" rules that prevented gays from serving openly. Critics said allowing ROTC on campus would be discriminatory against transgender students.

About 40 Stanford students who opposed the program's return demonstrated outside the meeting and yelled "shame on you" as the faculty exited.

Among the protesters was chemical engineering sophomore Thomas Joseph, 20, of Portland, Ore., who said he opposed the American interventions in Iraq and Afghanistan and any Stanford involvement with the military. "I'm tired of it," he said of the wars, "and I'm not for a bigger military."

The faculty vote came a week after a campus commission report that said ROTC's return to Stanford would contribute to a better educated officer corps, one more able to make judgments with "a high sense of moral principle and secure commitment to the rule of law."

Commission chairman Ewart Thomas, a psychology professor, told Thursday's meeting that having ROTC on campus would bring more diverse points of view and trigger discussions about the military, history and leadership. "That's something from which all our students would benefit," he said.

Under ROTC, students receive scholarships in return for agreeing to military service after graduation. The Army, Navy and Air Force run separate programs for new officers.

Stanford has had a traumatic history with ROTC. In 1968, the Naval ROTC building on campus was destroyed in an arson fire. With anti-war sentiment high, the on-campus programs were phased out in the early 1970s, but the university later allowed students to take ROTC classes at other schools in the region. Fourteen Stanford students currently participate in the programs at the University of California, Berkeley, San Jose State and Santa Clara University, but do not receive academic credit for them at Stanford.

The Stanford resolution approved Thursday would require close oversight by the university of ROTC courses and instructors as well as an effort to have the courses open to all Stanford students, not just those in the program. Military and ROTC officials said they were unsure whether those issues could delay the program's return.

Stanford law professor Lawrence Marshall said he struggled with his decision to vote yes. He said he believes the military wrongly discriminates against transgender people but that having future military leaders meet such students on campus would eventually lead to the end of that policy. "The answer is exposure to diversity," he said. Marshall proposed and won support for a faculty statement urging the military to change its transgender policy.

Earlier this month, a non-binding student election showed divisions, with 2,406 voting for ROTC's return to Stanford, 929 opposing it and 2,117 abstaining. Some ROTC opponents had urged students to abstain.

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The Historical Jesus for Dummies | View Clip
04/29/2011
ARN - Online

Was Jesus of Nazareth a real person? Did all of the events described in the gospels really happen? How was the world Jesus lived in different from our own? In The Historical Jesus For Dummies, you'll discover the answers to these questions and hundreds more.

This accessible, plain-English guide to the life and times of Jesus paints a vibrant picture of his world, examining records in the New Testament and Roman history as well as recent archeological finds that shed new light on his life. You'll find informative explanations of Jesus's birth, infancy, and childhood; meet his followers and enemies; learn about his teachings and miracles, and discover how modern scholars and historians have arrived at these conclusions. This fascinating primer to the real-life Jesus explores:

The different stories of Jesus in the gospels

The three quests for the historical Jesus

The miracles of Jesus

Jewish society and the influence of Rome in Jesus's time

The Roman practice of crucifixion

The politics of Roman-occupied Judea

What people though of Jesus when he was alive

The Gnostic gospels and other non-biblical texts of the time

The top controversies surrounding Jesus

Portrayals of Jesus in art and film

Complete with a concise account of the spread of Christianity throughout the world, The

Historical Jesus For Dummies puts you in touch with the human Jesus who walked the earth and whose teachings changed the world.

Dr. Catherine Murphy is Associate Professor of New Testament at Santa Clara University, where she teaches courses on the Bible, the historical Jesus, gender in early Christianity, and apocalyptic literature. She earned her doctorate in New Testament and early Christianity from the University of Notre Dame, where she worked on the Dead Sea Scrolls publication team. She has traveled frequently to Israel, Greece, Turkey, and Europe and has written two books, Wealth in the Dead Sea Scrolls and in the Qumran Community (2002) and John the Baptist: Prophet of Purity for a New Age (2003). She also gives frequent talks on the Bible, the historical Jesus, Mary Magdalene, and Jesus in film.

Table of Contents

Part I: Piecing Together the Jesus Story.

Chapter 1: Meeting the Manfrom Nazareth.

Chapter 2: Comparing the Gospels: A Biblical Biography of Jesus.

Chapter 3: Pursuing the Historical Jesus in the Gospels.

Chapter 4: Sharing in the Quests: Appreciating Modern Scholars' Efforts.

Chapter 5: Checking the Sources for Evidence of Jesus.

Part II: Reconstructing the World of Jesus.

Chapter 6: Introducing the Great and Powerful Rome.

Chapter 7: Taking a Snapshot of Jewish Society in Jesus's Time.

Chapter 8: Feeling Rome's Influence.

Part III: Exploring the Life of Jesus the Jew.

Chapter 9: Examining Jesus's Family and Early Life.

Chapter 10: Starting a New Movement.

Chapter 11: Teaching Wisdom and Telling Tales.

Chapter 12: Working Miracles and Confounding Crowds.

Part IV: Witnessing Jesus's Execution and Resurrection.

Chapter 13: Scouting the Competition: Jesus's Opponents.

Chapter 14: Examining Jesus's Crucifixion.

Chapter 15: The Resurrection: From the Messiah to the Son of God.

Part V: Experiencing Christ in Culture.

Chapter 16: A Western Savior Goes Global.

Chapter 17: From Graffiti to the Guggenheim: Jesus in Art.

Chapter 18: The Reel Jesus.

Part VI: The Part of Tens.

Chapter 19: Top Ten Historical Controversies about Jesus.

Chapter 20: Top Ten Pilgrimage Sites Associated with Jesus.

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Viewpoint: Supreme Court Turns Blind Eye to Prosecutorial Misconduct | View Clip
04/29/2011
Cal Law

The is oblivious to a serious problem in the American legal system: prosecutorial misconduct. Study after study has demonstrated serious prosecutorial misconduct at both the federal and state levels. For example, early this month, the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law released a study in which it documented 102 California cases, and 31 from Los Angeles County, in which prosecutors engaged in misconduct. Egregious prosecutorial misconduct has occurred in high-publicity cases, such as the prosecution of the Duke University lacrosse players and the conviction of the now-deceased Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens.

Unfortunately, the Supreme Court has not gotten the message. Twice in the past three years the court has considered lawsuits by innocent individuals who were convicted and spent years in prison because of prosecutorial misconduct. In both instances, the court held that the victims could not recover. Together, these cases send a disturbing message that the court is shielding prosecutors from liability. The result is no compensation for wronged individuals and a lack of adequate deterrence of prosecutorial misconduct.Two years ago, in , 555 U.S. 335 (2009), the court dismissed a suit against prosecutors by a man who spent 24 years in prison for a murder that he did not commit. Tommy Lee Goldstein was convicted of murder even though there was no physical evidence linking him to the crime, no eyewitness and no confession. The key evidence against Goldstein was the testimony of two witnesses who said that they heard him admit to the killing. One later recanted.

The other, the key witness, was a jailhouse informant, Edward Fink, who had a long history of making deals with prosecutors to get a reduction in charges and punishments in exchange for giving testimony against other inmates. Fink claimed that Goldstein made incriminating statements when they shared a jail cell together. The prosecutors never disclosed Fink's history to Goldstein's lawyers nor the discussions about the benefits Fink would receive for testifying against Goldstein.

After Goldstein prevailed in his habeas corpus petition and was exonerated, he sued the then-district attorney for failing to institute a policy of disclosing such information to criminal defendants, as is required by the U.S. Constitution. The Supreme Court unanimously held that Goldstein's civil suit had to be dismissed because of absolute prosecutorial immunity.

ABSOLUTE VS. QUALIFIED IMMUNITY

The Supreme Court has held that prosecutors have absolute immunity for their prosecutorial acts, but only qualified immunity for their administrative and investigative acts. See, e.g., Imbler v. Pachtman, 424 U.S. 409 (1976). Goldstein argued that his suit was based on the administrative failure of the district attorney, including the failure to adequately train and supervise district attorneys on the need to disclose impeachment material. The Supreme Court rejected this argument and declared: "[W]e conclude that prosecutors involved in such supervision or training or information-system management enjoy absolute immunity from the kind of legal claims at issue here."On March 29, in , 2011 WL 1119022 (U.S.), the court ruled against a man who was convicted and spent 18 years in prison, and 14 years on death row, because of prosecutorial misconduct. One month before he was to be executed, John Thompson's defense lawyers found blood evidence that prosecutors possessed, but did not disclose, that exonerated him for an armed robbery for which he had been convicted and that greatly affected his murder trial.

Two days before Thompson's trial, the assistant district attorney received the crime lab's report, which stated that the perpetrator had blood type B. The defense was not told of this, not at the trial and not until the report was discovered shortly before Thompson's scheduled execution. Thompson has type O blood.

The district attorney conceded that it violated its obligations under Brady v. Maryland, 373 U.S. 83 (1963), in not turning over the blood evidence. Thompson sued for prosecutorial misconduct, and a jury awarded him $14 million. But the Supreme Court reversed, in a 5-4 decision, and held that the city could not be held liable for the prosecutorial misconduct. Justice Clarence Thomas, writing for the court, said that a single instance of prosecutorial misconduct was not enough to show sufficient deliberate indifference to allow the city to be sued.

But as Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg pointed out in her dissenting opinion, this was not a single instance of misconduct. She wrote: "Throughout the pretrial and trial proceedings against Thompson, the team of four engaged in prosecuting him for armed robbery and murder hid from the defense and the court exculpatory information Thompson requested and had a constitutional right to receive. The prosecutors did so despite multiple opportunities, spanning nearly two decades, to set the record straight. ... What happened here, the court's opinion obscures, was no momentary oversight, no single incident of a lone officer's misconduct. Instead, the evidence demonstrated that misperception and disregard of Brady's disclosure requirements were pervasive in Orleans Parish."These two cases share much in common. Both involved innocent men convicted and imprisoned for a long period of time because of prosecutors' failure to comply with the constitutional duty to turn material over to the defense. It is exactly the kind of misconduct that studies show happens with alarming frequency. In both cases, the court rejected claims that constitutional violations occurred because prosecutors were inadequately trained and instructed as to their constitutional duty to disclose exculpatory and impeachment material.

Most importantly, in both cases, the court ruled against the innocent victims of prosecutorial misconduct. In doing so, the court has made it much harder to hold prosecutors accountable and has sent a disturbing message that it just doesn't realize that there is a serious problem that infects our criminal justice system.

Erwin Chemerinsky is dean and distinguished professor of law at UC-Irvine School of Law. This article originally appeared in , a Recorder affiliate.

The Recorder welcomes submissions to Viewpoint. Contact Sheela Kamath at skamath@alm.com.

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*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? | View Clip
04/28/2011
Press-Telegram - Online

Click photo to enlarge

Pictured is Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker at the Diversity Leadership Conference to be hosted this weekend at Santa Clara University. Credit: Courtesy Santa Clara University.

A few years ago, Laurie Jones Neighbors wanted to know whether the Bay Area's rich cultural diversity was reflected on local boards and commissions, the sort that deal with apartment rents, public buses, air pollution and other realities of everyday urban life.

"There was very little representation of people of color and low-income people," she said after canvassing dozens of agencies. "We're not going to arrive at a just society that way."

The nonprofit organization she works for, Urban Habitat, won a grant to recruit and train low-income minorities and get them appointed. Two years later, the Oakland-based group has placed all of its first class of 26 on local boards and has another group in the pipeline.

Jones Neighbors will tell this story at the sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference on Saturday at Santa Clara University. More than 300 scholars, students and community activists will explore the region's cultural diversity, especially how it plays out in local government, education, race relations and the cultural politics of race and immigration.

"People think the Bay Area doesn't have a lot of work to do because it's so diverse, but the contrary is true," said Lester Deanes, assistant dean for student life at Santa Clara University and a co-organizer of the conference.

Speakers from at least 15 campuses, including San Jose State, Stanford University, UC Berkeley and De Anza College, will lead discussions at

40 workshops. A panel by Google, the conference's main sponsor, will explore the "opportunities and challenges of diversity" in the technology industry.

Ten years after Asians, Latinos and other minorities became the majority in much of Silicon Valley, scholars and other observers say these groups still lack political power, which can't be explained by the natural lag time associated with first-generation immigrants. For example, a recent report by this newspaper based on 2010 U.S. census results revealed that minorities now outnumber whites almost 2-to-1 in Santa Clara County, but whites still hold three-quarters of the seats on town and city councils. The city of Santa Clara, home to Santa Clara University and the conference, has one of the county's four all-white councils.

In a reflection of the topic's heat, the conference sold out weeks in advance.

Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker, said he will touch on the vexing inequality in a relatively rich, economically healthy region. A journalist and music critic on hip-hop and American culture, his "Can't Stop, Won't Stop," won an American Book Award in 2005.

"We've gone backwards in a lot of ways," Chang said by telephone, pointing to one of his themes, the resegregation of public schools.

Among the workshops, one stands out for a unique and provocative approach to a touchy subject: white privilege and racism.

Nancy Arvold, a San Mateo County social worker with a doctorate in white studies, will describe how even liberal whites fail to recognize the privileges they have enjoyed without knowing it, or subtle racial prejudices and stereotypes they may harbor. "We white people need to do some deep work," Arvold said.

Tickets for the Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University on Saturday have sold out. For the list of workshops and information about future events, go to www.scu.edu/oml/dlc.

Return to Top



*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? | View Clip
04/28/2011
San Gabriel Valley Tribune - Online

Pictured is Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker at the Diversity Leadership Conference to be hosted this weekend at Santa Clara University. Credit: Courtesy Santa Clara University.

A few years ago, Laurie Jones Neighbors wanted to know whether the Bay Area's rich cultural diversity was reflected on local boards and commissions, the sort that deal with apartment rents, public buses, air pollution and other realities of everyday urban life.

"There was very little representation of people of color and low-income people," she said after canvassing dozens of agencies. "We're not going to arrive at a just society that way."

The nonprofit organization she works for, Urban Habitat, won a grant to recruit and train low-income minorities and get them appointed. Two years later, the Oakland-based group has placed all of its first class of 26 on local boards and has another group in the pipeline.

Jones Neighbors will tell this story at the sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference on Saturday at Santa Clara University. More than 300 scholars, students and community activists will explore the region's cultural diversity, especially how it plays out in local government, education, race relations and the cultural politics of race and immigration.

"People think the Bay Area doesn't have a lot of work to do because it's so diverse, but the contrary is true," said Lester Deanes, assistant dean for student life at Santa Clara University and a co-organizer of the conference.

Speakers from at least 15 campuses, including San Jose State, Stanford University, UC Berkeley and De Anza College, will lead discussions at

40 workshops. A panel by Google, the conference's main sponsor, will explore the "opportunities and challenges of diversity" in the technology industry.

Ten years after Asians, Latinos and other minorities became the majority in much of Silicon Valley, scholars and other observers say these groups still lack political power, which can't be explained by the natural lag time associated with first-generation immigrants. For example, a recent report by this newspaper based on 2010 U.S. census results revealed that minorities now outnumber whites almost 2-to-1 in Santa Clara County, but whites still hold three-quarters of the seats on town and city councils. The city of Santa Clara, home to Santa Clara University and the conference, has one of the county's four all-white councils.

In a reflection of the topic's heat, the conference sold out weeks in advance.

Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker, said he will touch on the vexing inequality in a relatively rich, economically healthy region. A journalist and music critic on hip-hop and American culture, his "Can't Stop, Won't Stop," won an American Book Award in 2005.

"We've gone backwards in a lot of ways," Chang said by telephone, pointing to one of his themes, the resegregation of public schools.

Among the workshops, one stands out for a unique and provocative approach to a touchy subject: white privilege and racism.

Nancy Arvold, a San Mateo County social worker with a doctorate in white studies, will describe how even liberal whites fail to recognize the privileges they have enjoyed without knowing it, or subtle racial prejudices and stereotypes they may harbor. "We white people need to do some deep work," Arvold said.

Tickets for the Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University on Saturday have sold out. For the list of workshops and information about future events, go to www.scu.edu/oml/dlc.

Return to Top



*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? | View Clip
04/28/2011
San Jose Mercury News

A few years ago, Laurie Jones Neighbors wanted to know whether the Bay Area's rich cultural diversity was reflected on local boards and commissions, the sort that deal with apartment rents, public buses, air pollution and other realities of everyday urban life.

"There was very little representation of people of color and low-income people," she said after canvassing dozens of agencies. "We're not going to arrive at a just society that way."

The nonprofit organization she works for, Urban Habitat, won a grant to recruit and train low-income minorities and get them appointed. Two years later, the Oakland-based group has placed all of its first class of 26 on local boards and has another group in the pipeline.

Jones Neighbors will tell this story at the sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference on Saturday at Santa Clara University. More than 300 scholars, students and community activists will explore the region's cultural diversity, especially how it plays out in local government, education, race relations and the cultural politics of race and immigration.

"People think the Bay Area doesn't have a lot of work to do because it's so diverse, but the contrary is true," said Lester Deanes, assistant dean for student life at Santa Clara University and a co-organizer of the conference.

Speakers from at least 15 campuses, including San Jose State, Stanford University, UC Berkeley and De Anza College, will lead discussions at

40 workshops. A panel by Google, the conference's main sponsor, will explore the "opportunities and challenges of diversity" in the technology industry.

Ten years after Asians, Latinos and other minorities became the majority in much of Silicon Valley, scholars and other observers say these groups still lack political power, which can't be explained by the natural lag time associated with first-generation immigrants. For example, a recent report by this newspaper based on 2010 U.S. census results revealed that minorities now outnumber whites almost 2-to-1 in Santa Clara County, but whites still hold three-quarters of the seats on town and city councils. The city of Santa Clara, home to Santa Clara University and the conference, has one of the county's four all-white city councils.

In a reflection of the topic's heat, the conference sold out weeks in advance.

Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker, said he will touch on the vexing inequality in a relatively rich, economically healthy region. A journalist and music critic on hip-hop and American culture, his "Can't Stop, Won't Stop," won an American Book Award in 2005.

"We've gone backwards in a lot of ways," Chang said by telephone, pointing to one of his themes, the resegregation of public schools.

Among the workshops, one stands out for a unique and provocative approach to a touchy subject: white privilege and racism.

Nancy Arvold, a San Mateo County social worker with a doctorate in white studies, will describe how even liberal whites fail to recognize the privileges they have enjoyed without knowing it, or subtle racial prejudices and stereotypes they may harbor.

"We white people need to do some deep work," Arvold said.

Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767.

DIVERSITY CONFERENCE

Tickets for the Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University on Saturday have sold out. For the list of workshops and information about future events, go to www.scu.edu/oml/dlc.

Return to Top



*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be? | View Clip
04/28/2011
Contra Costa Times - Online

A few years ago, Laurie Jones Neighbors wanted to know whether the Bay Area's rich cultural diversity was reflected on local boards and commissions, the sort that deal with apartment rents, public buses, air pollution and other realities of everyday urban life.

"There was very little representation of people of color and low-income people," she said after canvassing dozens of agencies. "We're not going to arrive at a just society that way."

The nonprofit organization she works for, Urban Habitat, won a grant to recruit and train low-income minorities and get them appointed. Two years later, the Oakland-based group has placed all of its first class of 26 on local boards and has another group in the pipeline.

Jones Neighbors will tell this story at the sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference on Saturday at Santa Clara University. More than 300 scholars, students and community activists will explore the region's cultural diversity, especially how it plays out in local government, education, race relations and the cultural politics of race and immigration.

"People think the Bay Area doesn't have a lot of work to do because it's so diverse, but the contrary is true," said Lester Deanes, assistant dean for student life at Santa Clara University and a co-organizer of the conference.

Speakers from at least 15 campuses, including San Jose State, Stanford University, UC Berkeley and De Anza College, will lead discussions at 40 workshops. A panel by Google, the conference's main sponsor, will explore the "opportunities and challenges of diversity" in the technology industry.

Ten years after Asians, Latinos and other minorities became the majority in much of Silicon Valley, scholars and other observers say these groups still lack political power, which can't be explained by the natural lag time associated with first-generation immigrants. For example, a recent report by this newspaper based on 2010 U.S. census results revealed that minorities now outnumber whites almost 2-to-1 in Santa Clara County, but whites still hold three-quarters of the seats on town and city councils. The city of Santa Clara, home to Santa Clara University and the conference, has one of the county's four all-white city councils.

In a reflection of the topic's heat, the conference sold out weeks in advance.

Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker, said he will touch on the vexing inequality in a relatively rich, economically healthy region. A journalist and music critic on hip-hop and American culture, his "Can't Stop, Won't Stop," won an American Book Award in 2005.

"We've gone backwards in a lot of ways," Chang said by telephone, pointing to one of his themes, the resegregation of public schools.

Among the workshops, one stands out for a unique and provocative approach to a touchy subject: white privilege and racism.

Nancy Arvold, a San Mateo County social worker with a doctorate in white studies, will describe how even liberal whites fail to recognize the privileges they have enjoyed without knowing it, or subtle racial prejudices and stereotypes they may harbor.

"We white people need to do some deep work," Arvold said.

Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767.

Return to Top



*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be?
04/28/2011
Oakland Tribune

A few years ago, Laurie Jones Neighbors wanted to know whether the Bay Area's rich cultural diversity was reflected on local boards and commissions, the sort that deal with apartment rents, public buses, air pollution and other realities of everyday urban life.

"There was very little representation of people of color and low-income people," she said after canvassing dozens of agencies. "We're not going to arrive at a just society that way."

The nonprofit organization she works for, Urban Habitat, won a grant to recruit and train low-income minorities and get them appointed. Two years later, the Oakland-based group has placed all of its first class of 26 on local boards and has another group in the pipeline.

Jones Neighbors will tell this story at the sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference on Saturday at Santa Clara University. More than 300 scholars, students and community activists will explore the region's cultural diversity, especially how it plays out in local government, education, race relations and the cultural politics of race and immigration.

"People think the Bay Area doesn't have a lot of work to do because it's so diverse, but the contrary is true," said Lester Deanes, assistant dean for student life at Santa Clara University and a co-organizer of the conference.

Speakers from at least 15 campuses, including San Jose State, Stanford University, UC Berkeley and De Anza College, will lead discussions at 40 workshops. A panel by Google, the conference's main sponsor, will explore the "opportunities and challenges of diversity" in the technology industry.

Ten years after Asians, Latinos and other minorities became the majority in much of Silicon Valley, scholars and other observers say these groups still lack political power, which can't be explained by the natural lag time associated with first-generation immigrants. For example, a recent report by this newspaper based on 2010 U.S. census results revealed that minorities now outnumber whites almost 2-to-1 in Santa Clara County, but whites still hold three-quarters of the seats on town and city councils. The city of Santa Clara, home to Santa Clara University and the conference, has one of the county's four all-white city councils.

In a reflection of the topic's heat, the conference sold out weeks in advance.

Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker, said he will touch on the vexing inequality in a relatively rich, economically healthy region. A journalist and music critic on hip-hop and American culture, his "Can't Stop, Won't Stop," won an American Book Award in 2005.

"We've gone backwards in a lot of ways," Chang said by telephone, pointing to one of his themes, the resegregation of public schools.

Among the workshops, one stands out for a unique and provocative approach to a touchy subject: white privilege and racism.

Nancy Arvold, a San Mateo County social worker with a doctorate in white studies, will describe how even liberal whites fail to recognize the privileges they have enjoyed without knowing it, or subtle racial prejudices and stereotypes they may harbor.

"We white people need to do some deep work," Arvold said.

Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767.

DIVERSITY CONFERENCE

Tickets for the Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University on Saturday have sold out. For the list of workshops and information about future events, go to .

Copyright © 2011 The Oakland Tribune. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be?
04/28/2011
Alameda Times-Star

A few years ago, Laurie Jones Neighbors wanted to know whether the Bay Area's rich cultural diversity was reflected on local boards and commissions, the sort that deal with apartment rents, public buses, air pollution and other realities of everyday urban life.

"There was very little representation of people of color and low-income people," she said after canvassing dozens of agencies. "We're not going to arrive at a just society that way."

The nonprofit organization she works for, Urban Habitat, won a grant to recruit and train low-income minorities and get them appointed. Two years later, the Oakland-based group has placed all of its first class of 26 on local boards and has another group in the pipeline.

Jones Neighbors will tell this story at the sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference on Saturday at Santa Clara University. More than 300 scholars, students and community activists will explore the region's cultural diversity, especially how it plays out in local government, education, race relations and the cultural politics of race and immigration.

"People think the Bay Area doesn't have a lot of work to do because it's so diverse, but the contrary is true," said Lester Deanes, assistant dean for student life at Santa Clara University and a co-organizer of the conference.

Speakers from at least 15 campuses, including San Jose State, Stanford University, UC Berkeley and De Anza College, will lead discussions at 40 workshops. A panel by Google, the conference's main sponsor, will explore the "opportunities and challenges of diversity" in the technology industry.

Ten years after Asians, Latinos and other minorities became the majority in much of Silicon Valley, scholars and other observers say these groups still lack political power, which can't be explained by the natural lag time associated with first-generation immigrants. For example, a recent report by this newspaper based on 2010 U.S. census results revealed that minorities now outnumber whites almost 2-to-1 in Santa Clara County, but whites still hold three-quarters of the seats on town and city councils. The city of Santa Clara, home to Santa Clara University and the conference, has one of the county's four all-white city councils.

In a reflection of the topic's heat, the conference sold out weeks in advance.

Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker, said he will touch on the vexing inequality in a relatively rich, economically healthy region. A journalist and music critic on hip-hop and American culture, his "Can't Stop, Won't Stop," won an American Book Award in 2005.

"We've gone backwards in a lot of ways," Chang said by telephone, pointing to one of his themes, the resegregation of public schools.

Among the workshops, one stands out for a unique and provocative approach to a touchy subject: white privilege and racism.

Nancy Arvold, a San Mateo County social worker with a doctorate in white studies, will describe how even liberal whites fail to recognize the privileges they have enjoyed without knowing it, or subtle racial prejudices and stereotypes they may harbor.

"We white people need to do some deep work," Arvold said.

Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767.

DIVERSITY CONFERENCE

Tickets for the Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University on Saturday have sold out. For the list of workshops and information about future events, go to .

Copyright © 2011 Alameda Times-Star. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be?
04/28/2011
Tri-Valley Herald

A few years ago, Laurie Jones Neighbors wanted to know whether the Bay Area's rich cultural diversity was reflected on local boards and commissions, the sort that deal with apartment rents, public buses, air pollution and other realities of everyday urban life.

"There was very little representation of people of color and low-income people," she said after canvassing dozens of agencies. "We're not going to arrive at a just society that way."

The nonprofit organization she works for, Urban Habitat, won a grant to recruit and train low-income minorities and get them appointed. Two years later, the Oakland-based group has placed all of its first class of 26 on local boards and has another group in the pipeline.

Jones Neighbors will tell this story at the sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference on Saturday at Santa Clara University. More than 300 scholars, students and community activists will explore the region's cultural diversity, especially how it plays out in local government, education, race relations and the cultural politics of race and immigration.

"People think the Bay Area doesn't have a lot of work to do because it's so diverse, but the contrary is true," said Lester Deanes, assistant dean for student life at Santa Clara University and a co-organizer of the conference.

Speakers from at least 15 campuses, including San Jose State, Stanford University, UC Berkeley and De Anza College, will lead discussions at 40 workshops. A panel by Google, the conference's main sponsor, will explore the "opportunities and challenges of diversity" in the technology industry.

Ten years after Asians, Latinos and other minorities became the majority in much of Silicon Valley, scholars and other observers say these groups still lack political power, which can't be explained by the natural lag time associated with first-generation immigrants. For example, a recent report by this newspaper based on 2010 U.S. census results revealed that minorities now outnumber whites almost 2-to-1 in Santa Clara County, but whites still hold three-quarters of the seats on town and city councils. The city of Santa Clara, home to Santa Clara University and the conference, has one of the county's four all-white city councils.

In a reflection of the topic's heat, the conference sold out weeks in advance.

Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker, said he will touch on the vexing inequality in a relatively rich, economically healthy region. A journalist and music critic on hip-hop and American culture, his "Can't Stop, Won't Stop," won an American Book Award in 2005.

"We've gone backwards in a lot of ways," Chang said by telephone, pointing to one of his themes, the resegregation of public schools.

Among the workshops, one stands out for a unique and provocative approach to a touchy subject: white privilege and racism.

Nancy Arvold, a San Mateo County social worker with a doctorate in white studies, will describe how even liberal whites fail to recognize the privileges they have enjoyed without knowing it, or subtle racial prejudices and stereotypes they may harbor.

"We white people need to do some deep work," Arvold said.

Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767.

DIVERSITY CONFERENCE

Tickets for the Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University on Saturday have sold out. For the list of workshops and information about future events, go to .

Copyright © 2011 Tri-Valley Herald. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be?
04/28/2011
Daily Review, The

A few years ago, Laurie Jones Neighbors wanted to know whether the Bay Area's rich cultural diversity was reflected on local boards and commissions, the sort that deal with apartment rents, public buses, air pollution and other realities of everyday urban life.

"There was very little representation of people of color and low-income people," she said after canvassing dozens of agencies. "We're not going to arrive at a just society that way."

The nonprofit organization she works for, Urban Habitat, won a grant to recruit and train low-income minorities and get them appointed. Two years later, the Oakland-based group has placed all of its first class of 26 on local boards and has another group in the pipeline.

Jones Neighbors will tell this story at the sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference on Saturday at Santa Clara University. More than 300 scholars, students and community activists will explore the region's cultural diversity, especially how it plays out in local government, education, race relations and the cultural politics of race and immigration.

"People think the Bay Area doesn't have a lot of work to do because it's so diverse, but the contrary is true," said Lester Deanes, assistant dean for student life at Santa Clara University and a co-organizer of the conference.

Speakers from at least 15 campuses, including San Jose State, Stanford University, UC Berkeley and De Anza College, will lead discussions at 40 workshops. A panel by Google, the conference's main sponsor, will explore the "opportunities and challenges of diversity" in the technology industry.

Ten years after Asians, Latinos and other minorities became the majority in much of Silicon Valley, scholars and other observers say these groups still lack political power, which can't be explained by the natural lag time associated with first-generation immigrants. For example, a recent report by this newspaper based on 2010 U.S. census results revealed that minorities now outnumber whites almost 2-to-1 in Santa Clara County, but whites still hold three-quarters of the seats on town and city councils. The city of Santa Clara, home to Santa Clara University and the conference, has one of the county's four all-white city councils.

In a reflection of the topic's heat, the conference sold out weeks in advance.

Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker, said he will touch on the vexing inequality in a relatively rich, economically healthy region. A journalist and music critic on hip-hop and American culture, his "Can't Stop, Won't Stop," won an American Book Award in 2005.

"We've gone backwards in a lot of ways," Chang said by telephone, pointing to one of his themes, the resegregation of public schools.

Among the workshops, one stands out for a unique and provocative approach to a touchy subject: white privilege and racism.

Nancy Arvold, a San Mateo County social worker with a doctorate in white studies, will describe how even liberal whites fail to recognize the privileges they have enjoyed without knowing it, or subtle racial prejudices and stereotypes they may harbor.

"We white people need to do some deep work," Arvold said.

Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767.

DIVERSITY CONFERENCE

Tickets for the Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University on Saturday have sold out. For the list of workshops and information about future events, go to .

Copyright © 2011 The Daily Review. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be?
04/28/2011
San Mateo County Times

A few years ago, Laurie Jones Neighbors wanted to know whether the Bay Area's rich cultural diversity was reflected on local boards and commissions, the sort that deal with apartment rents, public buses, air pollution and other realities of everyday urban life.

"There was very little representation of people of color and low-income people," she said after canvassing dozens of agencies. "We're not going to arrive at a just society that way."

The nonprofit organization she works for, Urban Habitat, won a grant to recruit and train low-income minorities and get them appointed. Two years later, the Oakland-based group has placed all of its first class of 26 on local boards and has another group in the pipeline.

Jones Neighbors will tell this story at the sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference on Saturday at Santa Clara University. More than 300 scholars, students and community activists will explore the region's cultural diversity, especially how it plays out in local government, education, race relations and the cultural politics of race and immigration.

"People think the Bay Area doesn't have a lot of work to do because it's so diverse, but the contrary is true," said Lester Deanes, assistant dean for student life at Santa Clara University and a co-organizer of the conference.

Speakers from at least 15 campuses, including San Jose State, Stanford University, UC Berkeley and De Anza College, will lead discussions at 40 workshops. A panel by Google, the conference's main sponsor, will explore the "opportunities and challenges of diversity" in the technology industry.

Ten years after Asians, Latinos and other minorities became the majority in much of Silicon Valley, scholars and other observers say these groups still lack political power, which can't be explained by the natural lag time associated with first-generation immigrants. For example, a recent report by this newspaper based on 2010 U.S. census results revealed that minorities now outnumber whites almost 2-to-1 in Santa Clara County, but whites still hold three-quarters of the seats on town and city councils. The city of Santa Clara, home to Santa Clara University and the conference, has one of the county's four all-white city councils.

In a reflection of the topic's heat, the conference sold out weeks in advance.

Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker, said he will touch on the vexing inequality in a relatively rich, economically healthy region. A journalist and music critic on hip-hop and American culture, his "Can't Stop, Won't Stop," won an American Book Award in 2005.

"We've gone backwards in a lot of ways," Chang said by telephone, pointing to one of his themes, the resegregation of public schools.

Among the workshops, one stands out for a unique and provocative approach to a touchy subject: white privilege and racism.

Nancy Arvold, a San Mateo County social worker with a doctorate in white studies, will describe how even liberal whites fail to recognize the privileges they have enjoyed without knowing it, or subtle racial prejudices and stereotypes they may harbor.

"We white people need to do some deep work," Arvold said.

Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767.

DIVERSITY CONFERENCE

Tickets for the Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University on Saturday have sold out. For the list of workshops and information about future events, go to .

Copyright © 2011 San Mateo County Times. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be?
04/28/2011
Argus, The

A few years ago, Laurie Jones Neighbors wanted to know whether the Bay Area's rich cultural diversity was reflected on local boards and commissions, the sort that deal with apartment rents, public buses, air pollution and other realities of everyday urban life.

"There was very little representation of people of color and low-income people," she said after canvassing dozens of agencies. "We're not going to arrive at a just society that way."

The nonprofit organization she works for, Urban Habitat, won a grant to recruit and train low-income minorities and get them appointed. Two years later, the Oakland-based group has placed all of its first class of 26 on local boards and has another group in the pipeline.

Jones Neighbors will tell this story at the sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference on Saturday at Santa Clara University. More than 300 scholars, students and community activists will explore the region's cultural diversity, especially how it plays out in local government, education, race relations and the cultural politics of race and immigration.

"People think the Bay Area doesn't have a lot of work to do because it's so diverse, but the contrary is true," said Lester Deanes, assistant dean for student life at Santa Clara University and a co-organizer of the conference.

Speakers from at least 15 campuses, including San Jose State, Stanford University, UC Berkeley and De Anza College, will lead discussions at 40 workshops. A panel by Google, the conference's main sponsor, will explore the "opportunities and challenges of diversity" in the technology industry.

Ten years after Asians, Latinos and other minorities became the majority in much of Silicon Valley, scholars and other observers say these groups still lack political power, which can't be explained by the natural lag time associated with first-generation immigrants. For example, a recent report by this newspaper based on 2010 U.S. census results revealed that minorities now outnumber whites almost 2-to-1 in Santa Clara County, but whites still hold three-quarters of the seats on town and city councils. The city of Santa Clara, home to Santa Clara University and the conference, has one of the county's four all-white city councils.

In a reflection of the topic's heat, the conference sold out weeks in advance.

Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker, said he will touch on the vexing inequality in a relatively rich, economically healthy region. A journalist and music critic on hip-hop and American culture, his "Can't Stop, Won't Stop," won an American Book Award in 2005.

"We've gone backwards in a lot of ways," Chang said by telephone, pointing to one of his themes, the resegregation of public schools.

Among the workshops, one stands out for a unique and provocative approach to a touchy subject: white privilege and racism.

Nancy Arvold, a San Mateo County social worker with a doctorate in white studies, will describe how even liberal whites fail to recognize the privileges they have enjoyed without knowing it, or subtle racial prejudices and stereotypes they may harbor.

"We white people need to do some deep work," Arvold said.

Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767.

DIVERSITY CONFERENCE

Tickets for the Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University on Saturday have sold out. For the list of workshops and information about future events, go to .

Copyright © 2011 The Argus. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.

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*Is Bay Area diversity all it's cracked up to be?
04/28/2011
Contra Costa Times

A few years ago, Laurie Jones Neighbors wanted to know whether the Bay Area's rich cultural diversity was reflected on local boards and commissions, the sort that deal with apartment rents, public buses, air pollution and other realities of everyday urban life.

"There was very little representation of people of color and low-income people," she said after canvassing dozens of agencies. "We're not going to arrive at a just society that way."

The nonprofit organization she works for, Urban Habitat, won a grant to recruit and train low-income minorities and get them appointed. Two years later, the Oakland-based group has placed all of its first class of 26 on local boards and has another group in the pipeline.

Jones Neighbors will tell this story at the sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference on Saturday at Santa Clara University. More than 300 scholars, students and community activists will explore the region's cultural diversity, especially how it plays out in local government, education, race relations and the cultural politics of race and immigration.

"People think the Bay Area doesn't have a lot of work to do because it's so diverse, but the contrary is true," said Lester Deanes, assistant dean for student life at Santa Clara University and a co-organizer of the conference.

Speakers from at least 15 campuses, including San Jose State, Stanford University, UC Berkeley and De Anza College, will lead discussions at 40 workshops. A panel by Google, the conference's main sponsor, will explore the "opportunities and challenges of diversity" in the technology industry.

Ten years after Asians, Latinos and other minorities became the majority in much of Silicon Valley, scholars and other observers say these groups still lack political power, which can't be explained by the natural lag time associated with first-generation immigrants. For example, a recent report by this newspaper based on 2010 U.S. census results revealed that minorities now outnumber whites almost 2-to-1 in Santa Clara County, but whites still hold three-quarters of the seats on town and city councils. The city of Santa Clara, home to Santa Clara University and the conference, has one of the county's four all-white city councils.

In a reflection of the topic's heat, the conference sold out weeks in advance.

Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker, said he will touch on the vexing inequality in a relatively rich, economically healthy region. A journalist and music critic on hip-hop and American culture, his "Can't Stop, Won't Stop," won an American Book Award in 2005.

"We've gone backwards in a lot of ways," Chang said by telephone, pointing to one of his themes, the resegregation of public schools.

Among the workshops, one stands out for a unique and provocative approach to a touchy subject: white privilege and racism.

Nancy Arvold, a San Mateo County social worker with a doctorate in white studies, will describe how even liberal whites fail to recognize the privileges they have enjoyed without knowing it, or subtle racial prejudices and stereotypes they may harbor.

"We white people need to do some deep work," Arvold said.

Contact Joe Rodriguez at 408-920-5767.

DIVERSITY CONFERENCE

Tickets for the Diversity Leadership Conference at Santa Clara University on Saturday have sold out. For the list of workshops and information about future events, go to www.scu.edu/oml/dlc.

Copyright © 2011 Contra Costa Times.

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*NOT SO DIVERSE AFTER ALL? EVENT TO EXPLORE REALITY
04/28/2011
San Jose Mercury News

A few years ago, Laurie Jones Neighbors wanted to know whether the Bay Area's rich cultural diversity was reflected on local boards and commissions, the sort that deal with apartment rents, public buses, air pollution and other realities of everyday urban life.

"There was very little representation of people of color and low-income people," she said after canvassing dozens of agencies. "We're not going to arrive at a just society that way."

The nonprofit organization she works for, Urban Habitat, won a grant to recruit and train low-income minorities and get them appointed. Two years later, the Oakland-based group has placed all of its first class of 26 on local boards and has another group in the pipeline.

Jones Neighbors will tell this story at the sold-out Diversity Leadership Conference on Saturday at Santa Clara University. More than 300 scholars, students and community activists will explore the region's cultural diversity, especially how it plays out in local government, education, race relations and the cultural politics of race and immigration.

"People think the Bay Area doesn't have a lot of work to do because it's so diverse, but the contrary is true," said Lester Deanes, assistant dean for student life at Santa Clara University and a co-organizer of the conference.

Speakers from at least 15 campuses, including San Jose State, Stanford University, UC Berkeley and De Anza College, will lead discussions at 40 workshops. A panel by Google, the conference's main sponsor, will explore the "opportunities and challenges of diversity" in the technology industry.

Ten years after Asians, Latinos and other minorities became the majority in much of Silicon Valley, scholars and other observers say these groups still lack political power, which can't be explained by the natural lag time associated with first-generation immigrants. For example, a recent report by this newspaper based on 2010 U.S. census results revealed that minorities now outnumber whites almost 2-to-1 in Santa Clara County, but whites still hold three-quarters of the seats on town and city councils. The city of Santa Clara, home to Santa Clara University and the conference, has one of the county's four all-white councils.

In a reflection of the topic's heat, the conference sold out weeks in advance.

Jeff Chang, the keynote speaker, said he will touch on the vexing inequality in a relatively rich, economically healthy region. A journalist and music critic on hip-hop and American culture, his "Can't Stop, Won't Stop," won an American Book Award in 2005.

"We've gone backwards in a lot of ways," Chang said by telephone, pointing to one of his themes, the resegregation of public schools.

Among the workshops, one stands out for a unique and provocative approach to a touchy subject: white privilege and racism.

Nancy Arvold, a San Mateo County social worker with a doctorate in white studies, will describe how even liberal whites fail to recognize the privileges they have