Santa Clara University

SCU in the News (Oct. 19 - Nov. 1, 2012)

SCU in the News (Oct. 19 - Nov. 1, 2012)

Report Overview:
Total Clips (238)
Alumni (3)
Center for Science, Technology, and Society (1)
College of Arts and Sciences (14)
de Saisset (1)
Environmental Studies Institute (1)
Ignatian Center (1)
Leavey School of Business (14)
Markkula Center for Applied Ethics (24)
School of Engineering (1)
School of Law (141)
Student Life (1)
Students (1)
University (2)
Other (33)


Headline Date Outlet Links

Alumni (3)
Ore. Shakespeare Fest actors at WWU 10/25/2012 Walla Walla Union-Bulletin - Online Text View Clip
MEET THE NEW GUYS: Giovanni Capriglione, Mary E. González, Cecil Bell Jr. 10/22/2012 Texas Tribune Text View Clip
Election 2012: PV school board candidates offer diverse backgrounds: Voters to choose two leaders 10/20/2012 Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online Text View Clip

Center for Science, Technology, and Society (1)
*Kiva Innovations: Accelerator programs for social entrepreneurs 10/30/2012 Kiva,.org Text View Clip

College of Arts and Sciences (14)
*Review: Musical Maverick John Cage at SCU 11/01/2012 Metro Silicon Valley Text View Clip
Raise a glass!Women winemakers winning success 10/30/2012 Port Huron Times Herald - Online Text View Clip
NEW: Prop. 36 takes as swing at three strikes 10/29/2012 CalWatchDog Text View Clip
Hetch Hetchy Redux: An Effort to Turn Back the Environmental Clock 10/28/2012 History News Network Text View Clip
Big Picture Science for 10/29/12 - As You Were 10/28/2012 Cloudymidnights Text View Clip
Big Picture Science for 10/29/12 - As You Were 10/28/2012 ASTRO LINK Text View Clip
*Free Trade Agreement 10/26/2012 Life Week Text View Clip
Psychology of Religion and Spirituality® 10/25/2012 American Psychologist - Online Text View Clip
Part 6: The third presidential debate 10/23/2012 Chico Enterprise Record - Online Text View Clip
*Scouting goes through a rough patch 10/22/2012 CNN.com Text View Clip
Release of abuse files: new challenge for Scouts 10/22/2012 Yahoo! News Text View Clip
Bay Area voters react to final presidential debate 10/22/2012 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Bay Area voters' response 10/22/2012 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Counseling conference planned at Bryan College 10/21/2012 Cleveland Daily Banner - Online Text View Clip

de Saisset (1)
Things To Do: Nov. 1 and beyond 11/01/2012 Palo Alto Daily News - Online Text View Clip

Environmental Studies Institute (1)
El Quito no Garden of Eden for Muradyans 10/23/2012 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip

Ignatian Center (1)
or Jesuit education at Santa Clara University and 10/25/2012 KLIV-AM (Silicon Valley News) Text

Leavey School of Business (14)
Kelly Clarkson and Jerry Rice to help Microsoft open store in Corte Madera [The Marin Independent Journal, Novato, Calif.] 10/31/2012 Bloomberg Businessweek - Online Text View Clip
Author offers tips for native gardeners in how-to book 10/31/2012 Los Altos Town Crier - Online Text View Clip
Study plumbs secrets of social media success 10/30/2012 Regina Leader-Post - Online Text View Clip
Kelly Clarkson and Jerry Rice to help Microsoft open store in Corte Madera 10/30/2012 Marin Independent Journal - Online Text View Clip
The five habits of famed fashion bloggers: study plumbs secret of social media success 10/29/2012 Province - Online, The Text View Clip
The five habits of famed fashion bloggers: study plumbs secret of social media success 10/29/2012 Ottawa Citizen - Online, The Text View Clip
The five habits of famed fashion bloggers: study plumbs secret of social media success 10/29/2012 Regina Leader-Post - Online Text View Clip
The five habits of famed fashion bloggers: study plumbs secret of social media success 10/29/2012 Vancouver Sun - Online, The Text View Clip
Restricted Facebook stock grants vest 10/25/2012 ABC Local - Online Text View Clip
Mastering the art of good leadership 10/23/2012 Times Union Text View Clip
Mackay: Good leaders bring out the best in employees 10/22/2012 Des Moines Register - Online Text View Clip
Leaders different from managers 10/21/2012 Arizona Republic - Online Text View Clip
Food gap still high in county 10/19/2012 San Mateo Daily Journal - Online Text View Clip
Are Post-Grad Certificate Programs Sufficient If All You Want To Do Is Pass the CPA Exam and Move On? 10/19/2012 Going Concern Text View Clip

Markkula Center for Applied Ethics (24)
Santa Clara University Offers a Taste of the Silicon Valley Business World in New Open Online Course 11/01/2012 Benzinga Text View Clip
Filings reveal McKenna's taste for free travel 10/29/2012 Seattle Times - Online Text View Clip
McKenna's free travel studied 10/29/2012 Spokesman-Review - Online, The Text View Clip
McKenna's free trips spotlighted by report 10/29/2012 Olympian - Online, The Text View Clip
But how do you really feel? Someday, the computer might know 10/28/2012 St. Paul Pioneer Press - Online Text View Clip
Filings reveal McKenna's taste for free travel 10/28/2012 Daily Press - Online, The Text View Clip
Filings reveal McKenna's taste for free travel 10/28/2012 Chicago Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Report: McKenna had taste for free travel 10/28/2012 MyNorthwest.com Text View Clip
Report: McKenna had taste for free travel 10/28/2012 Seattle Post-Intelligencer Text View Clip
Report: Washington governor candidate McKenna took many free trips 10/28/2012 Oregonian - Online, The Text View Clip
Report: McKenna had taste for free travel 10/28/2012 Daily Herald - Online, The Text View Clip
McKenna had a taste for free travel 10/28/2012 Tri-City Herald - Online Text View Clip
State law against lying in campaigns? Believe it But offenders face few consequences 10/27/2012 Plain Dealer Text
Report: McKenna had taste for free travel 10/27/2012 Associated Press (AP) Text
Despite laws against lying, tall tales have become the norm on the campaign trail, experts say 10/27/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text View Clip
Gessler alone in using discretionary fund for party events 10/24/2012 Denver Post - Online, The Text View Clip
Where to search for ethics during election season 10/22/2012 Las Vegas Business Press - Online Text View Clip
Review: Gessler lone statewide official to tap fund for partisan use 10/20/2012 Loveland Reporter-Herald - Online Text View Clip
Review: Secretary of State Scott Gessler lone statewide official to tap fund for partisan use 10/20/2012 Canon City Daily Record - Online Text View Clip
Gessler alone in fund use 10/20/2012 Denver Post, The Text
BUT HOW DO YOU REALLY FEEL? SOMEDAY THE COMPUTER MAY KNOW 10/19/2012 Chronicle Herald - Online, The Text View Clip
Review: Gessler lone statewide official to tap fund for partisan use 10/19/2012 Denver Post - Online, The Text View Clip
Death on Demand: the Law in Oregon, on Ballot in Massachusetts, a Hot Radio Show 10/19/2012 Senior Journal Text View Clip
Review: Gessler lone statewide official to tap fund for partisan use 10/19/2012 Loveland Reporter-Herald - Online Text View Clip

School of Engineering (1)
News Update 10/27/2012 China Central TV - New York Bureau Text

School of Law (141)
Is Apple starting to unravel without Jobs? 11/01/2012 MarketWatch Text View Clip
Let's Limit the Effect of Software Patents, Since We Can't Eliminate Them 11/01/2012 Wired - Online Text View Clip
Gay Couples Should File Protective Tax Refund Claims 11/01/2012 Tax Prof Text View Clip
Ruth Silver Taube: We must continue the fight for equal pay 11/01/2012 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
*Gay Couples May Want to File a Protective Tax Refund Claim 10/31/2012 Bucks Text View Clip
Almost Every Website On The Planet Could Be In Legal Jeopardy Now, Thanks To Zappos (AMZN) 10/31/2012 San Francisco Chronicle - Online Text View Clip
Let's Go Back to Patenting the 'Solution,' Not the 'Problem' 10/31/2012 Wired - Online Text View Clip
Federal court rules website terms of service agreement completely invalid.-> 10/31/2012 Slashdot Text View Clip
Website and app owners beware: Your Terms of Service may no longer pass court muster 10/31/2012 Baltimore Sun - Online Text View Clip
Almost Every Website On The Planet Could Be In Legal Jeopardy Now, Thanks To Zappos (AMZN) 10/30/2012 Business Insider Text View Clip
Almost Every Website On The Planet Could Be In Legal Jeopardy Now, Thanks To Zappos 10/30/2012 Yahoo! Finance Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/29/2012 Wisconsin Law Journal Text View Clip
Village Voice Media Sues Yelp 10/29/2012 MediaPost.com Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/28/2012 MSNBC - Online Text View Clip
Online flames lead to court 10/28/2012 Courier-Post - Online Text View Clip
Virtual reviews can carry real-world risks 10/28/2012 First Amendment Center Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks: Doctor's case highlights tension that can develop between consumers and those providing services 10/27/2012 St. Paul Pioneer Press Text
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/26/2012 Sandusky Register - Sandusky Text View Clip
Cybersitter Wins Initial Skirmish In Lawsuit Against Google 10/26/2012 MediaPost.com Text View Clip
Ask the experts: Dealing with patent trolls 10/26/2012 Financial Times Text
Critical Internet reviews land some in court 10/26/2012 Durango Herald - Online, The Text View Clip
Critical online review issue in Minnesota case 10/25/2012 Spokesman-Review - Online, The Text View Clip
Critical online reviews carry risks 10/25/2012 Duluth News Tribune - Online, The Text View Clip
Posting reviews online can carry legal risks 10/25/2012 AZCentral.com Text View Clip
Nation/World briefs 10-25 10/25/2012 Daily Record - Online, The Text View Clip
Online reviews carry legal risks 10/25/2012 Journal Gazette - Online, The Text View Clip
Critical online reviews carry legal risks 10/25/2012 DeKalb County Daily Chronicle - Online Text View Clip
Online reviews can present legal risks 10/25/2012 Worcester Telegram & Gazette - Online Text View Clip
Critical Online Reviews Can Carry Legal Risks 10/25/2012 KSTC-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/25/2012 Detroit News - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/25/2012 Houston Chronicle - Online Text View Clip
Duluth neurologist sues over rate-your-doctor online remarks 10/25/2012 Post-Bulletin - Online Text View Clip
Online Reviews: When Do They Go From Helpful to Defamatory? 10/25/2012 WSJ Blogs Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/25/2012 Marshall Independent - Online, The Text View Clip
*Yoo says Obama -- not Bush -- exceeded constitutional powers 10/25/2012 San Francisco Chronicle Text View Clip
*Opinion: If Obama's appeal to minorities is a gamble so is the GOP's appeal to the "white voter" 10/25/2012 Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Columbus Ledger-Enquirer - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Charlotte Observer - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can escalate into legal battles between doctors, unsatisfied patients 10/24/2012 Republic - Online, The Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 News & Observer - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can escalate into legal battles between doctors, unsatisfied patients 10/24/2012 Daily Journal - Online Text View Clip
FOX 35 News Orlando: Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WOFL-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Washington Examiner - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 San Antonio Express-News - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Tri-City Herald - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Wichita Eagle - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Ashland Times-Gazette - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Bradenton Herald - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Daily Record - Online, The Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Wilmington Star-News - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Tribune - Online, The Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Greenwich Time - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WOOD-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WNYT-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 News Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Lexington Herald-Leader - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Bellingham Herald - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Press Democrat - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 KPTV-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 KVVU-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical Online Reviews Can Carry Legal Risks 10/24/2012 ABC News - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Centre Daily Times - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WFSB-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WNEM-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Belleville News-Democrat - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WLFI-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Daily Herald - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 AZ Family Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 U.S. News & World Report Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 St. Paul Pioneer Press - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WNYW-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WTNH-TV - Online Text View Clip
Fox 2 News Headlines: Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WJBK-TV - Online Text View Clip
Case between Duluth doctor, patient's son moves to Minnesota Supreme Court 10/24/2012 Duluth News Tribune - Online, The Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WSHM-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WTVT-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 KGW-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 KPHO-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Bemidji Pioneer - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Herald-Journal - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WOKV-FM - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can escalate into legal battles between doctors, unsatisfied patients 10/24/2012 Star Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Sarasota Herald-Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WSAV-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WSMV-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WLUK-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 myfoxphilly.com Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WVUE-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WCBD-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WTVG-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Merced Sun-Star - Online Text View Clip
U.S. Disavows Patent at Center of Apple-Samsung Dispute 10/24/2012 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Online Text View Clip
A Coming Storm: FDA Regulation of Mobile Medical Applications 10/24/2012 Healthcare Blog, The Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 One News Now Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Times-News - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 New Canaan News - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Milwaukee Journal Sentinel - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WTHI-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WREG-TV - Online Text View Clip
STEVE KARNOWSKI | Associated Press 10/24/2012 Journal Gazette - Online, The Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WPFO-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 State Journal - Online, The Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WTRF-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 KUSI-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 KOAA-TV - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Salt Lake Tribune - Online, The Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WAFF-TV - Online Text View Clip
online reviews: free speech, costly challenges 10/24/2012 Virginian-Pilot Text
Online reviews carry legal risks Doctor sues over critical remarks, soiled reputation 10/24/2012 Journal Gazette, The Text
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Tuscaloosa News - Online, The Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Bangor Daily News Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 KYPost.com Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Winston-Salem Journal - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 Atlanta Journal-Constitution - Online Text View Clip
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/24/2012 WSLS-TV - Online Text View Clip
Filibustered Federal Appeals Court Nominee Goodwin Liu Proves Himself 'Anything But Extreme' On State Bench 10/23/2012 Think Progress Text View Clip
Grant County prosecutors seek DA's office 10/23/2012 Headlight - Online Text View Clip
REALTOR Leadership Program RLP 10/23/2012 Realtor Magazine - Online Text View Clip
U.S. Disavows Patent at Center of Apple-Samsung Dispute 10/23/2012 New York Times, The Text
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/23/2012 Associated Press (AP) - Online (United States) Text
Critical online reviews can carry legal risks 10/23/2012 Associated Press (AP) Text
AP News in Brief at 5:58 p.m. EDT 10/23/2012 Associated Press (AP) Text
Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney 10/22/2012 Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online Text View Clip
Presidential candidates vary widely on immigration policies 10/22/2012 Vallejo Times-Herald - Online Text View Clip
Dennis W. Chiu is running for the El Camino Hospital District Board on a reform platform Courtesy of Dennis W. Chiu 10/22/2012 Mountain View Patch Text View Clip
Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney 10/22/2012 Oroville Mercury-Register - Online Text View Clip
Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney 10/22/2012 Inland Valley Daily Bulletin - Online Text View Clip
Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney 10/21/2012 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney 10/21/2012 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney 10/21/2012 Marin Independent Journal - Online Text View Clip
Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney 10/21/2012 Chico Enterprise Record - Online Text View Clip
Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney 10/21/2012 San Gabriel Valley Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Activist challenges Facebook's use of personal data 10/20/2012 Rinf.com Text View Clip
LAS VEGAS JUSTICE OF THE PEACE DEPARTMENT 8 10/20/2012 Las Vegas Review-Journal Text
GM, Ford retiree trusts shortfalls expanded in 2011: filings 10/19/2012 US Daily, The Text View Clip
Medical Marijuana: A Surprising Solution to Severe Morning Sickness 10/19/2012 Mothering Text View Clip
Santa Clara County Superior Court hires San Jose's senior deputy city attorney 10/19/2012 Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online Text View Clip
*Second Circuit Finds Defense of Marriage Act Unconstitutional 10/19/2012 Tax Analysts Text View Clip
Facebook privacy targeted by Austrian law student 10/19/2012 Washington Post - Online Text View Clip
If Prop 34 Fails, California Could See a Wave of Executions 10/19/2012 Law.com Text View Clip
*Kanye West Dodges Allegations of Copyright Violation 10/03/2012 Philadelphia Weekly Text View Clip

Student Life (1)
College Fashion: Getting Colder (SLIDESHOW) 10/20/2012 Huffington Post, The Text View Clip

Students (1)
*Preview: Top Shelf Halloween Masquerade 11/02/2012 Metro Silicon Valley Text View Clip

University (2)
Instructure Creates Free 'Canvas Network' for Online Courses 10/31/2012 Campus Technology Text View Clip
Duke, Brown, Rice Weigh in on the College Essay 10/22/2012 Huntington Woods-Berkley Patch Text View Clip

Other (33)
Instructure Launches an Open Online Course Network on Canvas 11/01/2012 KOAM-TV - Online Text View Clip
Instructure Launches an Open Online Course Network on Canvas 11/01/2012 KFMB-AM (760 AM Talk Radio) - Online Text View Clip
A Guide To Mindfulness At Work 11/01/2012 Forbes - Online Text View Clip
AAUW planning its annual holiday boutique at clubhouse in San Jose 10/31/2012 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Vilma Pallette, Volunteer Extraordinaire By Suzy Paluzzi 10/31/2012 Santa Clara Weekly - Online, The Text View Clip
Sesquicentennial Stories 10/31/2012 Albany Patch Text View Clip
CASE promotes welcoming LGBT environment on Catholic campuses 10/30/2012 Greyhound - Online, The Text View Clip
and that the Mission Santa Clara University and I 10/28/2012 KGO-AM (News Talk AM 810) Text
Ryan James Brandau takes over podium of Princeton Pro Musica 10/26/2012 NJ.com Text View Clip
It's a Forum Frenzy! 10/26/2012 Avaya Text View Clip
Part 6: The third presidential debate 10/25/2012 Burlington Record Text View Clip
Heidi Gansert named special assistant to president for external affairs 10/25/2012 Nevada Today Text View Clip
*How to Avoid a Bonfire of the Humanities 10/25/2012 Text View Clip
Assembly District 25's Bob Wieckowski challenged by newcomer ArLyne Diamond 10/25/2012 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
New director takes helm of Princeton Pro Musica with Mozart Requiem 10/25/2012 Times of Trenton, The Text
New Artistic Director and New Season Are In Place for Princeton Pro Musica 10/24/2012 Town Topics - Online Text View Clip
Heidi Gansert named Special Asst. to UNR President 10/24/2012 My News 4 - Online Text View Clip
Do Androids Dream Of Handwriting Recognition? 10/23/2012 Industrial Maintenance & Plant Operation - Online Text View Clip
Silvaco Founder and CEO Dr. Ivan Pesic Succumbs to Cancer 10/23/2012 Virtual Strategy Magazine Text View Clip
Commemorate World AIDS Day at Health Trust's Silicon Valley Hike and Bike Dec. 1| NBC Bay Area 10/23/2012 KNTV-TV - Online Text View Clip
Grant County prosecutors seek DA's office 10/23/2012 Farmington Daily Times - Online Text View Clip
Grant County prosecutors seek DA's office 10/23/2012 Las Cruces Sun-News - Online Text View Clip
LA Galaxy fans arrested for rowdy behavior 10/22/2012 KABC-TV - Online Text View Clip
*Don't Throw the Baby Out With the Bathwater 10/22/2012 Psychology Today Text View Clip
2013 IP Scholars Roundtable at Drake 10/22/2012 madisonian.net Text View Clip
Bay Area voters react to final presidential debate 10/22/2012 Whittier Daily News - Online Text View Clip
Harvey Mackay: Good leadership distinguishes itself 10/21/2012 Tulsa World - Online Text View Clip
Good leadership brings out the best in employees 10/21/2012 Star Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Good leaders bring out the best in employees 10/20/2012 New Mexico Business Weekly - Online Text View Clip
It's JusCollege 10/20/2012 Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal - Online Text View Clip
Good leadership distinguishes itself 10/20/2012 Tulsa World Text
*Can Science Spot a Pedophile? Research Zeroes In On Brain Abnormalities 10/19/2012 Newsweek Text View Clip
California weighs delayed regulation of VoIP 10/19/2012 VoIP News Text View Clip


Ore. Shakespeare Fest actors at WWU | View Clip
10/25/2012
Walla Walla Union-Bulletin - Online

...has a bachelor of fine arts degree from Southern Oregon University, has spent four seasons with the OSF. This is his second year participating in the School Visit Program. In his first year with the program, Sanford received his bachelor's degree from Santa Clara University and his master of fine arts degree from University of Washington. He has won the Charles Lampkin Award for Acting. Founded in 1935, the Tony Award-winning Oregon Shakespeare Festival is one of the oldest professional,...

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MEET THE NEW GUYS: Giovanni Capriglione, Mary E. González, Cecil Bell Jr. | View Clip
10/22/2012
Texas Tribune

...event Giovanni Capriglione is the Republican candidate for House District 98, which includes part of Tarrant County. This seat is currently held by Vicki Truitt. Capriglione received a bachelor's degree in physics and a master's degree in finance from Santa Clara University. Capriglione then went on to work for a Dallas-based venture capital/private equity firm. He is now the owner and president of his own small business, Texas Adventure Capital, LLC., where he provides business services...

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Election 2012: PV school board candidates offer diverse backgrounds: Voters to choose two leaders | View Clip
10/20/2012
Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online

...seat on the board against a challenge by parent and business owner Elsa Nuñez. A second race for a school board seat pits Antonio Rivas, a former city councilman and a school counselor, against Maria Orozco, a former district student who graduated from Santa Clara University in 2010. Retired educator Lupe Rivas, 66, was the only candidate to file for the seat being vacated by Trustee Doug Keegan and will be automatically appointed. Osmundson, 61, is seeking a third four-year term....

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*Kiva Innovations: Accelerator programs for social entrepreneurs | View Clip
10/30/2012
Kiva,.org

Lately, it seems like everyone has caught the startup bug. With constant news of billion dollar companies being founded by college students, the latest iteration of the American Dream has yielded a fresh crop of entrepreneurs.

Scribd, Reddit, Airbnb, Dropbox – what do all of these innovative startups have in common? They all got off the ground with help from programs called "seed accelerators," in this case one in particular: Y Combinator.

Over the past 6 years, accelerator programs have emerged across the country to incubate cutting-edge technologies and fledgling companies. As noted in a recent study by NESTA, Y Combinator launched its first accelerator program in 2005, and now there are dozens of programs like it that support hundreds of startups a year.

Accelerator programs typically run in cycles that begin with an open, competitive application process to admit a "class" or "cohort" of startups. To qualify, these startups must be in the very early stages of inception, with small teams between 2 and 4 people.

If selected, a startup will usually receive pre-seed investment funds from the program (usually in exchange for equity). Accelerators also enroll their cohorts into intensive programs that typically last between 3 and 6 weeks. During this time, the new entrepreneurs hone their business models through workshops, events and near constant mentoring from industry experts.

At the end of a program, participants are typically asked to pitch their ideas to a room full of real investors so they can raise enough funding to take their companies to the next level.

In the end, accelerator programs benefit both entrepreneurs and investors. For the startups, accelerator programs offer funding, time to develop business models, the ability to get feedback from people in the know, and general validation. For investors, these programs provide a filtered pool to concentrate their time and resources. Essentially, they get a front row seat to some of the biggest, best new ideas.

Bringing the accelerator model to social good

Accelerator programs have quickly been adapted for other sectors. For example, the NESTA report cited above gives a shout-out to health care-related technology accelerators RockHealth and Healthbox, and education-related technology accelerators like Imagine K12 and Startl.

At Kiva, we couldn't be more excited about the emergence of accelerators for social entrepreneurs. So far, the ones we've seen have been very successful at pushing early-stage startups to clearly demonstrate their social impact and financial viability, setting them up for success in future funding rounds.

Notable social accelerators include Hub Ventures, the Unreasonable Institute, Global Social Benefit Incubator (GSBI) and GoodCompany. They function similarly to tech accelerator programs, except they require their startups to root their business models in social impact.

Each year, the Unreasonable Institute selects about 25 entrepreneurs from around the world to stay in one house together for 6 weeks and connect with mentors, institutional funders and investors. It also provides access to seed capital, skills training, international exposure and a global support network.

While the organization has gone through its own struggles (which it's refreshingly transparent about), 61 of the 70 ventures that have gone through its rigorous program are now working in 36 countries around the world. Together, these startups have raised over US$23 million and employed over 400 people.

As a more established program, GSBI has mentored over 150 enterprises in the past 10 years. It has an impressive track record – nearly 95% of GSBI alumni are still working at their social ventures, and more than 50% are breaking even and scaling.

Each year, it selects about 20 entrepreneurs to participate in its proven curriculum and individualized mentoring program. This includes a two-week in-residence “boot camp" that ends with formal business plan pitches to Silicon Valley entrepreneurs and venture capitalists.

As noted in a past blog post, given the challenges that social enterprises face in the early stages of financing, Kiva is very interested in working with social impact accelerators to identify potential Field Partners. The way we see it, impact accelerators give a stamp of approval to a selective pool of very early-stage startups that have the potential for strong social impact.

These startups tend to be riskier than our typical partners, which is why we launched our own Experimental Partnership Program. Experimental partners get an initial credit limit of US$20,000 to pilot lending programs with the Kiva model. This trial period helps both Kiva and the partner determine whether it's appropriate to move forward and scale financing.

We're thrilled about this systematic approach to developing financially viable, socially impactful organizations! We'd also love to hear from you if you have ideas or suggestions for how we can better engage with social accelerator programs. Send us your questions and comments at blog@kiva.org.

Rebekah Chang is an intern for Kiva's Strategic Initiatives team, looking for new partners and loan products to extend opportunities and access to more people around the world. Rebekah has an M.A. in Development Economics and Conflict Management from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. Send her your feedback on this blog series at blog@kiva.org.

This is part of a larger series on Kiva's strategic initiatives and innovative loan products, which are designed to expand opportunities for more borrowers across the globe.

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*Review: Musical Maverick John Cage at SCU | View Clip
11/01/2012
Metro Silicon Valley

The Santa Clara University students and guests sitting around me looked confused. There were shuffles and muffled whispers. The newest Justin Bieber song played over and over in my head as I waited for pianist Alex Christie to begin.

For 4 minutes and 33 seconds, the entire audience at Santa Clara University's music hall sat in silence, unsure of why they weren't hearing any noise from the man sitting at the piano.

Last Wednesday, Oct. 24, the SCU Music at Noon series hosted a "Musical Mavericks" concert to celebrate the 100th anniversary of visionary American composer John Cage.

Cage, who died in 1979, was a music theorist, writer, artist and one of the most influential American composers of the 20th century. He is perhaps best known for his 1952 composition, 4'33", which is performed in deliberate silence. The complex preparation for the performance, and the arbitrary-yet-somehow-meaningful length, lie at the heart of the work's artfulness. And while it is often assumed that the content of the composition is the absence of sound, it is actually the presence of sounds—around them and inside their heads—heard by the audience during the performance that creates the "music."

"I actually thought that he had forgotten the notes," one audience member commented, "until I realized that the entire composition was supposed to be silent."

As the Christie stood and took a bow, the entire crowd burst out in applause, as if he had done something revolutionary. It seems that even 60 years after its premiere, 4'33"—and John Cage—still have the power to confuse, and compel, modern audiences.

The Musical Mavericks series continues at SCU in late January with the Santa Clara New Music Festival.

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Raise a glass!Women winemakers winning success | View Clip
10/30/2012
Port Huron Times Herald - Online

...St. Helena, Calif. In 1978, the first vintage Corison worked harvest, she could count on one hand the number of women she knew of doing the same kind of work in the cellars of the Napa Valley. A lot more women work as winemakers today, though research by Santa Clara University professors Lucia Albino Gilbert and John Gilbert found that just under 10 percent of California wineries have women as the main or lead winemaker. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg) / AP In this photo taken Thursday, Aug. 9,...

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NEW: Prop. 36 takes as swing at three strikes | View Clip
10/29/2012
CalWatchDog

...protects our communities and keeps other people from having to suffer that serious or violent felony for the third time in the criminal's history.” The strongest argument in favor of Prop. 36 was made by Elsa Chen, an associate political science professor at Santa Clara University who has been studying the effects of three strikes for 16 years. She argued that public safety would actually be improved by releasing third-strikers. This is because they are older on average than most prisoners and...

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Hetch Hetchy Redux: An Effort to Turn Back the Environmental Clock | View Clip
10/28/2012
History News Network

...indication of the shift in attitudes towards the ongoing conflict between nature preservation and traditional notions of progress. Author:  Nancy C. Unger Bio:  10-29-12 Nancy C. Unger is associate professor of history at Santa Clara University. Her new book is “Beyond Nature's Housekeepers: American Women in Environmental History” (Oxford University Press, 2012). read more

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Big Picture Science for 10/29/12 - As You Were | View Clip
10/28/2012
Cloudymidnights

Big Picture Science - As You Were We all want to turn back time. But until we build a time machine, we'll have to rely on a few creative approaches to capturing things as they were – and preserving them for posterity. One is upping memory storage capacity itself. Discover just how much of the past we can cram into our future archives, and whether going digital has made it all vulnerable to erasure. Plus – scratch it and tear it – then watch this eerily-smart material revert to its undamaged self. And, what was life like pre-digital technology? We can't remember, but one writer knows; he's living life circa 1993 (hint: no cell phone). Also, using stem cells to save the white rhino and other endangered species. And, the arrow of time itself – could it possibly run backwards in another universe? Guests: Michael S. Malone – Professor of professional writing at Santa Clara University and the author of The Guardian of All Things: The Epic Story of Human Memory Oliver Ryder – Director of genetics, San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research Michael E. Smith – Chemist, Arkema, Inc Sean Carroll – Theoretical physicist at the California Institute of Technology, author of The Particle at the End of the Universe: How the Hunt for the Higgs Boson Leads Us to the Edge of a New World Pico Iyer – Writer, author of The Man Within My Head and the New York Times article, “The Joy of Quiet” Permalink: http://radio.seti.org/episodes/As_You_Were You can listen to this and other episodes at http://radio.seti.org/, and be sure to check out Blog Picture Science, the companion blog to the radio show.

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Big Picture Science for 10/29/12 - As You Were | View Clip
10/28/2012
ASTRO LINK

Big Picture Science - As You Were We all want to turn back time. But until we build a time machine, we'll have to rely on a few creative approaches to capturing things as they were – and preserving them for posterity. One is upping memory storage capacity itself. Discover just how much of the past we can cram into our future archives, and whether going digital has made it all vulnerable to erasure. Plus – scratch it and tear it – then watch this eerily-smart material revert to its undamaged self. And, what was life like pre-digital technology? We can't remember, but one writer knows; he's living life circa 1993 (hint: no cell phone). Also, using stem cells to save the white rhino and other endangered species. And, the arrow of time itself – could it possibly run backwards in another universe? Guests: Michael S. Malone – Professor of professional writing at Santa Clara University and the author of The Guardian of All Things: The Epic Story of Human Memory Oliver Ryder – Director of genetics, San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research Michael E. Smith – Chemist, Arkema, Inc Sean Carroll – Theoretical physicist at the California Institute of Technology, author of The Particle at the End of the Universe: How the Hunt for the Higgs Boson Leads Us to the Edge of a New World Pico Iyer – Writer, author of The Man Within My Head and the New York Times article, “The Joy of Quiet” Permalink: http://radio.seti.org/episodes/As_You_Were You can listen to this and other episodes at http://radio.seti.org/, and be sure to check out Blog Picture Science, the companion blog to the radio show.

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*Free Trade Agreement | View Clip
10/26/2012
Life Week

Santa Clara University Professor Greg Corning was quoted in the October 26 issue of Life Week, a weekly news magazine in Beijing. The article discusses plans to negotiate a free trade agreement among China, Japan, and South Korea.

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Psychology of Religion and Spirituality® | View Clip
10/25/2012
American Psychologist - Online

...Piedmont Loyola University Maryland Associate Editors Chris J. Boyatzis Bucknell University Mark M. Leach University of Louisville Lisa Miller Columbia University Crystal L. Park University of Connecticut Thomas G. Plante Santa Clara University Consulting Editors Amy L. Ai University of Pittsburgh Saba R. Ali The University of Iowa Justin L. Barrett University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom Jacob A. Belzen University of Amsterdam,...

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Part 6: The third presidential debate | View Clip
10/23/2012
Chico Enterprise Record - Online

...mercurynews.com Posted: 10/22/2012 08:49:43 PM PDT Allen Ashley, 79, from Castro Valley The Bay Area News Group has been talking to voters at places like World's Fare Donuts in Hayward, The Crucible industrial arts center in Oakland and Santa Clara University's debate class. After Monday night's debate between President Barack Obama and GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney in Florida, we got back to some of those voters to ask them who they thought won the final round....

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*Scouting goes through a rough patch | View Clip
10/22/2012
CNN.com

Disappointment, anger, disgust.

Words like these are echoing throughout social media about a national icon: The Boy Scouts of America.

To put it mildly, Scouting is going through a rough patch.

In July, the BSA national headquarters clarified its ban on gays and lesbians -- leaving it in place and triggering a national movement by hundreds of former Eagle Scouts to renounce their rank and return their treasured medals.
Scouts 'perversion file' to be released
Gay teen stripped of Eagle Scout honors
Advocate to Boy Scouts: Change is coming
Boy Scouts dismiss gay den mother

And then this week, the so-called "perversion files" were publicly released, naming more than 1,000 suspected child sex abusers since the mid-1960s with links to Scouting.

All this has people asking questions: What's going on here? Is Scouting in trouble? Is it even relevant anymore?

Although membership has remained steady at 2.7 million youths, many parents are taking a hard look at the organization -- especially its ban on gays, lesbians, atheists and agnostics, says former Eagle Scout Burke Stansbury, an online activist.

"Some of the aspects of Scouting morality I find is sort of old school -- like they're stuck in the 1950s."

It's become more acceptable, he says, for people to be atheist and agnostic and still be considered moral in our society. Also, "attitudes around homosexuality have changed a lot in the last few decades, and the Boy Scouts' moral code hasn't kept up with those changes."

Here's how mainstream the idea of gay and lesbian Scouts has become: both President Obama and Mitt Romney support it. Obama, in fact, serves as honorary BSA president, a tradition held by every commander in chief since the group was founded.

Eventually, the Boy Scouts will have to change, Stansbury says, or else the organization will become socially irrelevant.

The group is standing at a key moment in its survival, says Stansbury. If it fails to "get with the modern times" within the next decade, "alternative youth organizations will appear that are more inclusive and based on equality."

The majority of Scouts agree with the policy, the BSA said in July. But "no single policy will accommodate the many diverse views among our membership or society."

Scouting offers to teach members skills in "character building" and making good "moral choices," says BSA spokesman Deron Smith. But he also says it's important to separate "the discussion of larger societal issues" from the operation of Scouting. "The state of Scouting is very strong."

'Living your values'

The idea is sometimes referred to as "living your values" -- in other words, interacting only with organizations and businesses that match your morals and ethics.
Zach Plante, 16, opposes the group\'s ban on gays, lesbians and atheists, but he remains loyal to Scouting.
Zach Plante, 16, opposes the group's ban on gays, lesbians and atheists, but he remains loyal to Scouting.

"People with young kids are trying to live their lives more in accordance with their beliefs and their values," says Stansbury. It's hard, he says, to participate in something like the Boy Scouts and everyday question your own integrity.

In protest, Stansbury sent his Eagle medal back to Scout headquarters a few months ago, along with hundreds of other ex-Scouts.

Read a blog written by ex-Scouts who've renounced their Eagle awards

Boy Scout policies and procedures evolve over time, says Smith. For example, the child sex abuse concerns decades ago spurred the BSA to implement strict screening, education and prevention policies that continue today and represent a "gold standard" for protecting kids, Smith says.

Boy Scout Zach Plante of Menlo Park, California, doesn't like the ban on atheists or gays and lesbians. But he loves Scouting.

So the 16-year-old basically looks the other way, he says, along with the rest of Troop 222. "In my troop I don't know of any particular Scouts that are gay or atheist, but I know that our troop wouldn't necessarily kick a Scout out of the troop for being gay or atheist."

Zach's dad, psychology professor Tom Plante, doesn't see any conflict between his support for Scouting and his opposition to the bans. Plante says he does his best to live his values and to make changes where he can. "But at the end of the day we're not going to agree 100% with all the policies and procedures of every organization that we're a part of -- whether it's Scouts or the United States government or churches or companies."

Ryan Andreson's troop wasn't so understanding. When Andreson, who lives in Moraga, California, was denied his Eagle rank because he's gay, he mounted a campaign that gained national attention. Part of that campaign included collecting hundreds of thousands of signatures on a petition for local Scout officials. So far, Andreson is still waiting to get his Eagle.

What if Scouting disappeared? You'd likely see more than $206,000,000 worth of yearly services and charity fundraising provided by Scout groups disappear, according to BSA.

Religious ties

Many critics who accuse the Scouts of failing to change with the times blame BSA's deep connections to organized religion. Approximately 70% of Scout troops are affiliated with some kind of church or religious group, says Smith.

Among the biggest backers are the Catholic Church and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, according to BSA. In 2011, Mormon-backed Cub Scout and Boy Scout units accounted for more than 420,000 of all Scouts nationwide, while more than 200,000 other scouts were members of units affiliated with the Catholic Church.

Links with religious groups are "definitely part of our longstanding tradition," says Smith. "Our policies and procedures and everything that we are is definitely reflected by our membership and our charter organization partners."

Boy Scouts claim kids safer with them than at home

Those affiliations over the years have resulted in a complicated political maze that's difficult to navigate when it comes to change, Stansbury suggests. "Oh yeah -- the Catholic and Mormon churches have a lot of influence on the Boy Scouts, especially the leadership of the Boy Scouts," he says. "I certainly believe that's a big part of why the Boy Scouts have stubbornly held onto this policy.

"It would be a much better organization, not having those people involved. But it's not going to go away immediately."

There's also dissent among leaders inside Scouting -- although many keep a low profile. One Scout leader, who asked to remain anonymous because he fears losing his position, posted comments on a private online message board for Eagle alums.

If the U.S. military can accept openly gay and lesbian troops, he asked, why can't the Boy Scouts of America? "Every day I question my personal integrity for choosing to stay involved with a discriminatory organization."

So -- does America still need the Boy Scouts? Is it still culturally relevant as it enters its second century of service? Will the BSA make it to 200 years?

What do you think? Share your thoughts as well as your stories about Scouting connections and experiences in the comments section below.

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Release of abuse files: new challenge for Scouts | View Clip
10/22/2012
Yahoo! News

...recently reaffirmed policy of excluding gays while seemingly shielding child abusers in their midst. "It's a double whammy for the Boy Scouts right now because they're already under the gun because of the gay issue," said Thomas Plante, a professor at Santa Clara University who researched the Roman Catholic Church's clergy sex abuse scandal. He noted that both the Scouts and Catholic hierarchy had disapproving policies toward homosexuality, yet failed to grapple forthrightly with sex...

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Bay Area voters react to final presidential debate | View Clip
10/22/2012
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...10/22/2012 08:49:43 PM PDT October 23, 2012 3:59 AM GMT Updated: 10/22/2012 08:59:30 PM PDT The Bay Area News Group has been talking to voters at places like World's Fare Donuts in Hayward, The Crucible industrial arts center in Oakland and Santa Clara University's debate class. After Monday night's debate between President Barack Obama and GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney in Florida, we got back to some of those voters to ask them who they thought won the final round....

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Bay Area voters' response | View Clip
10/22/2012
InsideBayArea.com

...10/22/2012 08:49:43 PM PDT October 23, 2012 3:59 AM GMT Updated: 10/22/2012 08:59:30 PM PDT The Bay Area News Group has been talking to voters at places like World's Fare Donuts in Hayward, The Crucible industrial arts center in Oakland and Santa Clara University's debate class. After Monday night's debate between President Barack Obama and GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney in Florida, we got back to some of those voters to ask them who they thought won the final round....

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Counseling conference planned at Bryan College | View Clip
10/21/2012
Cleveland Daily Banner - Online

...George Fox University. Also, Dr. Gary W. Moon, executive director of the Martin Institute for Christianity and Culture and the Dallas Willard Center for Christian Spiritual Formation at Westmont College; Dr. Thomas G. Plante, professor of psychology at Santa Clara University and adjunct clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine; and Dr. Stuart W. Scott, who teaches biblical counseling at The Southern Baptist Seminary. Registration...

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Things To Do: Nov. 1 and beyond | View Clip
11/01/2012
Palo Alto Daily News - Online

...through Feb. 10. The Jameel Prize: Art Inspired by Islamic Tradition, Dec. 12-March 10, 2013. 11 a.m.-5p.m. Wednesdays-Sundays; Thursdays till 8 p.m. Stanford campus, off Palm Drive at Museum Way. 650-723-4177 or museum.stanford.edu de Saisset Museum, Santa Clara University. "Beyond Function: Fiber, Fabric and Finery," work by textile artist Judith Content. Through Dec. 2. de Saisset Museum, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara. www.scu.edu/desaisset...

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El Quito no Garden of Eden for Muradyans | View Clip
10/23/2012
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...floated around is to allow rentals only to Saratoga residents. There are other community gardens in the county. They include the Calabazas Community Garden in San Jose, Edith Morley Community Garden in Campbell, Charles Street Garden in Sunnyvale, Forge Santa Clara University Community Garden and Cupertino Community Garden. The Muradyans shot down the idea when asked if they had thought about relocating to another garden. "That is impossible," Genya Muradyan said on Oct. 17. "We are...

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or Jesuit education at Santa Clara University and
10/25/2012
KLIV-AM (Silicon Valley News)

Hey I have spent many years caring for patients in a wet mother so he urges you the suffering of people I Children's Hospital a high undergraduate degree in nursing a graduate degree in healthcare finance because I want people to yell to get the care they need not to care that can thwart you replay as a daughter Charity it is important that we not only care for the poor but we give voice to the poor I actually assisted in this country layer to our Congress is she to get care and we got ourselves on the back as we opened the clinic for their dignity is so great they need to be able to come with a car just like I do I need to it you it is up to us better to be setting up clinics and outpatient facilities for the work if we really love the people in this country who are rich or and those who may not terrible diseases we make it possible for them to get care and use a dignified way we want to do and yet she do that to my and so I only know I care I understand chair I understand the meeting of the I don't use that voice for the poor shame on you will see you post or send her to lie to any nation Center or Jesuit education at Santa Clara University and the Commonwealth club Silicon Valley again we would like to back sister Carol

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Kelly Clarkson and Jerry Rice to help Microsoft open store in Corte Madera [The Marin Independent Journal, Novato, Calif.] | View Clip
10/31/2012
Bloomberg Businessweek - Online

...similarities with Apple's retail approach. For example, Microsoft stores offer technical help at an "answer desk," an answer to Apple's "genius bar." "Emulation is the greatest form of flattery," said Buford Barr, who teaches marketing and communications at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University. Barr said Microsoft could benefit if curious customers wander in from the nearby Apple store. "Their experience at Apple will get them to come into the Microsoft store," he said of...

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Author offers tips for native gardeners in how-to book | View Clip
10/31/2012
Los Altos Town Crier - Online

...tour and creating a maintenance calendar for native plants. The website has evolved into a valuable resource – the Going Native Garden Tour celebrated its 10th year in April and Popper's book debuted this year. Popper, associate professor of economics at Santa Clara University, said she tackled the project when she realized many experienced native gardeners were getting on in years. While she could still interview some of her mentors, she set aside time to write the book. The result is a beautifully...

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Study plumbs secrets of social media success | View Clip
10/30/2012
Regina Leader-Post - Online

...be famous without that backing - but not just anyone is. So what makes the difference between people who successfully use that megaphone effect and people who end up blogging for their friends and family?" Alongside U of S colleague Jessica Miller and Santa Clara University's Edward McQuarrie, Phillips analyzed the growth of 10 successful fashion blogs (i.e. Fashion Toast, Karla's Closet), following their path from virtual anonymity to industry renown. In doing so, five key traits were...

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Kelly Clarkson and Jerry Rice to help Microsoft open store in Corte Madera | View Clip
10/30/2012
Marin Independent Journal - Online

...similarities with Apple's retail approach. For example, Microsoft stores offer technical help at an "answer desk," an answer to Apple's "genius bar." "Emulation is the greatest form of flattery," said Buford Barr, who teaches marketing and communications at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University. Barr said Microsoft could benefit if curious customers wander in from the nearby Apple store. "Their experience at Apple will get them to come into the Microsoft store," he said of...

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The five habits of famed fashion bloggers: study plumbs secret of social media success | View Clip
10/29/2012
Province - Online, The

...be famous without that backing – but not just anyone is. So what makes the difference between people who successfully use that megaphone effect and people who end up blogging for their friends and family?” Alongside U of S colleague Jessica Miller and Santa Clara University's Edward McQuarrie, Phillips analyzed the growth of 10 successful fashion blogs (ie; Fashion Toast, Karla's Closet), following their path from virtual anonymity to industry renown. In doing so, five key traits were identified...

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The five habits of famed fashion bloggers: study plumbs secret of social media success | View Clip
10/29/2012
Ottawa Citizen - Online, The

...be famous without that backing – but not just anyone is. So what makes the difference between people who successfully use that megaphone effect and people who end up blogging for their friends and family?” Alongside U of S colleague Jessica Miller and Santa Clara University's Edward McQuarrie, Phillips analyzed the growth of 10 successful fashion blogs (ie; Fashion Toast, Karla's Closet), following their path from virtual anonymity to industry renown. In doing so, five key traits were identified...

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The five habits of famed fashion bloggers: study plumbs secret of social media success | View Clip
10/29/2012
Regina Leader-Post - Online

...be famous without that backing – but not just anyone is. So what makes the difference between people who successfully use that megaphone effect and people who end up blogging for their friends and family?” Alongside U of S colleague Jessica Miller and Santa Clara University's Edward McQuarrie, Phillips analyzed the growth of 10 successful fashion blogs (ie; Fashion Toast, Karla's Closet), following their path from virtual anonymity to industry renown. In doing so, five key traits were identified...

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The five habits of famed fashion bloggers: study plumbs secret of social media success | View Clip
10/29/2012
Vancouver Sun - Online, The

...be famous without that backing – but not just anyone is. So what makes the difference between people who successfully use that megaphone effect and people who end up blogging for their friends and family?” Alongside U of S colleague Jessica Miller and Santa Clara University's Edward McQuarrie, Phillips analyzed the growth of 10 successful fashion blogs (ie; Fashion Toast, Karla's Closet), following their path from virtual anonymity to industry renown. In doing so, five key traits were identified...

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Restricted Facebook stock grants vest | View Clip
10/25/2012
ABC Local - Online

...conditions: they had to work at Facebook for four years and they had to wait for six months after the IPO. Those who joined Facebook early on have the greatest reason to beam. "Anyone before 2009 I would say definitely becomes an instant millionaire," Santa Clara University professor Robert Hendershott, Ph. D., said. "People who joined in 2010, I would not assume that they're all instant millionaires." They can start selling their stock on Monday, but that's up to them. "Understand,...

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Mastering the art of good leadership | View Clip
10/23/2012
Times Union

...a leader is to look at the person and see if anybody is following." Leadership is a difficult skill to measure, but it is certainly easy to determine when leadership is not present in an organization. In four years of executive seminars conducted by Santa Clara University and the Tom Peters Group/Learning Systems, more than 5,200 senior managers were asked to describe the characteristics they most admire in a leader. Here are the top 10 characteristics, as reported in Management Review...

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Mackay: Good leaders bring out the best in employees | View Clip
10/22/2012
Des Moines Register - Online

...a leader is to look at the person and see if anybody is following.? Leadership is a difficult skill to measure. But it is certainly easy to determine when leadership is not present in an organization. In four years of executive seminars conducted by Santa Clara University and the Tom Peters Group/Learning Systems, more than 5,200 senior managers were asked to describe the characteristics they most admire in a leader. Here are the top 10 adjectives, as reported in Management Review magazine:...

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Leaders different from managers | View Clip
10/21/2012
Arizona Republic - Online

...a leader is to look at the person and see if anybody is following." Leadership is a difficult skill to measure, but it is certainly easy to determine when leadership is not present in an organization. In four years of executive seminars conducted by Santa Clara University and the Tom Peters Group/Learning Systems, more than 5,200 senior managers were asked to describe the characteristics they most admire in a leader. Here are the top 10 characteristics, as reported in Management Review...

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Food gap still high in county | View Clip
10/19/2012
San Mateo Daily Journal - Online

...program is leading an increase in the number of residents receiving some type of food assistance. While the need for food increased by 5 percent between 2010 and 2011, food aid grew by 12 percent, according to the 2011 Hunger Index, a measurement created by Santa Clara University Professor Dr. Drew Starbird. The index, which measures the gap between the need for food and the ability of individuals to receive it, was unveiled yesterday at the Hunger Issues Summit in Redwood Shores. Enrollment...

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Are Post-Grad Certificate Programs Sufficient If All You Want To Do Is Pass the CPA Exam and Move On? | View Clip
10/19/2012
Going Concern

...Unless of course you're talking about throwing their money away at some degree mill but that is a whole other subject. Back when I was still in California and advising would-be CPAs through my work in CPA review, I'd often come across students who came from Santa Clara University's CAAP program, which sounds similar to the program you did. I'd also recommend the program to those in the Bay Area who maybe had a non-accounting degree but had taken a few accounting courses in their undergrad and...

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Santa Clara University Offers a Taste of the Silicon Valley Business World in New Open Online Course | View Clip
11/01/2012
Benzinga

Santa Clara University joins the world of open online education with the premiere of a business ethics course exploring the common and difficult decisions that confront professionals. This course will explore such daily dilemmas as pressure...

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Filings reveal McKenna's taste for free travel | View Clip
10/29/2012
Seattle Times - Online

...Commission (PDC). The free trips and events are allowed under state law as long as they're disclosed to the public, and McKenna said in an interview that his extracurricular activities have helped him develop relationships that benefit Washingtonians. But an ethics expert said the extent of McKenna's free travel and events raises questions about the time he spends away from the office, particularly on trips paid for by political entities, and about the actual benefits the travel and events provide to the...

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McKenna's free travel studied | View Clip
10/29/2012
Spokesman-Review - Online, The

...paid for by others in 2011. The travel included conferences and speaking engagements in-state and out of state, and goodwill and educational trips overseas. Judy Nadler, a senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University, said the extent of McKenna's free travel raises questions about the time he spends away from the office and about the actual benefits the travel provides to the state. As a congressman, Inslee took three privately...

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McKenna's free trips spotlighted by report | View Clip
10/29/2012
Olympian - Online, The

...travel and events provide to the state. “When you take an oath of office, you vow to put the public interest first,” said Judy Nadler, former mayor of Santa Clara, Calif., and a senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University. As a congressman, Inslee took three privately financed trips overseas, and 14 trips to speaking engagements, conferences and fact-finding missions in the United States from June 2001 to June 2011, according to the...

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But how do you really feel? Someday, the computer might know | View Clip
10/28/2012
St. Paul Pioneer Press - Online

...online advertisements knowing how we're feeling today? That's a project the researchers at MIT are considering. How about robots that convince us they really care? "There's something reductionist about" the coming technology, said Irina Raicu, Internet ethics program manager at Santa Clara University in Northern California. "It reduces what may be a complex mix of emotions to maybe one." And affective technology will always be limited by our own ability to interpret emotions, said Arvid...

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Filings reveal McKenna's taste for free travel | View Clip
10/28/2012
Daily Press - Online, The

...travel and events provide to the state. "When you take an oath of office, you vow to put the public interest first," said Judy Nadler, former mayor of Santa Clara, Calif., and a senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University. McKenna, who is running as the Republican candidate for governor, accepted nearly three times as many privately paid trips and event tickets over the past seven years as his predecessor, Gov. Chris Gregoire, did...

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Filings reveal McKenna's taste for free travel | View Clip
10/28/2012
Chicago Tribune - Online

...travel and events provide to the state. "When you take an oath of office, you vow to put the public interest first," said Judy Nadler, former mayor of Santa Clara, Calif., and a senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University. McKenna, who is running as the Republican candidate for governor, accepted nearly three times as many privately paid trips and event tickets over the past seven years as his predecessor, Gov. Chris Gregoire, did...

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Report: McKenna had taste for free travel | View Clip
10/28/2012
MyNorthwest.com

...travel and events provide to the state. "When you take an oath of office, you vow to put the public interest first," said Judy Nadler, former mayor of Santa Clara, Calif., and a senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University. As a congressman, Inslee took three privately financed trips overseas, and 14 trips to speaking engagements, conferences and fact-finding missions in the United States from June 2001 to June 2011, according to the...

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Report: McKenna had taste for free travel | View Clip
10/28/2012
Seattle Post-Intelligencer

...and events provide to the state. "When you take an oath of office, you vow to put the public interest first," said Judy Nadler , former mayor of Santa Clara, Calif., and a senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University . As a congressman, Inslee took three privately financed trips overseas, and 14 trips to speaking engagements, conferences and fact-finding missions in the United States from June 2001 to June 2011, according to the...

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Report: Washington governor candidate McKenna took many free trips | View Clip
10/28/2012
Oregonian - Online, The

...travel and events provide to the state. "When you take an oath of office, you vow to put the public interest first," said Judy Nadler, former mayor of Santa Clara, Calif., and a senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University. As a congressman, Inslee took three privately financed trips overseas, and 14 trips to speaking engagements, conferences and fact-finding missions in the United States from June 2001 to June 2011, according to the...

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Report: McKenna had taste for free travel | View Clip
10/28/2012
Daily Herald - Online, The

...travel and events provide to the state. "When you take an oath of office, you vow to put the public interest first," said Judy Nadler, former mayor of Santa Clara, Calif., and a senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University. As a congressman, Inslee took three privately financed trips overseas, and 14 trips to speaking engagements, conferences and fact-finding missions in the United States from June 2001 to June 2011, according to the...

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McKenna had a taste for free travel | View Clip
10/28/2012
Tri-City Herald - Online

...travel and events provide to the state. “When you take an oath of office, you vow to put the public interest first,” said Judy Nadler, former mayor of Santa Clara, Calif., and a senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University. As a congressman, Inslee took three privately financed trips overseas, and 14 trips to speaking engagements, conferences and fact-finding missions in the United States from June 2001 to June 2011, according to the...

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State law against lying in campaigns? Believe it But offenders face few consequences
10/27/2012
Plain Dealer

Columbus - In Ohio, it's a crime to make false statements about your opponent in an election campaign.

Still, the 2012 political season has been filled with lies, according to fact-checking organizations, including The Plain Dealer's PolitiFact Ohio. But those telling the tall tales probably will face few consequences.

From the race for the White House on down to local legislative races across America, speaking in half-truths and twisting your opponent's record seem to be the norm rather than the exception, government ethics experts agree.

"It happens all the time, but certainly during the campaign season it is much more evident," said Judy Nadler, senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University in California. "The problem is that this leads to an eroding of people's confidence in government. People throw up their hands and say, 'I don't believe any of them,' and it decreases voter registration and turnout."

Said Robert Smith, a political-science professor at Kennesaw State University in Georgia and a leading researcher on ethics laws and commissions: "It has become more prevalent and more characteristic of political campaigns to play footloose and fancy-free with the facts."

Ohio is one of 20 states with laws against making false or misleading statements in political campaigns. A violation is a misdemeanor with a penalty of up to six months in jail and a $5,000 fine.

But a prosecutor can't file charges without a complaint being filed with the Ohio Elections Commission, a five-member bipartisan board that rules on election complaints. And in the last decade, the commission has not referred a single case involving a false statement to a county prosecutor.

Philip Richter, executive director of the commission, could recall only four such referrals dating back to when he joined the commission in the mid-1990s.

"We don't just want to do it willy-nilly," Richter said. "Prosecutors have a very difficult job and should be prosecuting criminals, not chasing after false statements in campaign materials, in our opinion, unless it's particularly egregious."

But why have a law on the books if it's not going to be enforced?

"We are enforcing it; it's just at an administrative level," Richter said. "We are supposed to make that kind of a finding and we do."

While most observers see lying in campaigns on the upswing, Richter said that complaints about alleged campaign falsehoods are actually down this year compared with previous years, with just 38. There were as many as 98 in 2010.

Records supplied by Richter show the commission has heard 176 complaints involving allegations of false and misleading statements in the past three years and found violations in 14 cases - which is 8 percent of the time.

But the punishments barely redden a wrist. In 13 of the 14 cases, the commission just let the violation stand as the only penalty in the matter. The only fine levied in the past three years came in a 2010 case against a township trustee candidate whose complaint the board considered to be "frivolous" and rang up a $5,775 fine.

In all of 2012, the commission has issued only two findings of violations involving false and misleading statements - both involving candidates who implied they already held the office that they were running for this election.

Judicial candidates

Judicial candidates, however, face another layer of scrutiny. Charges can be filed with the Ohio Supreme Court's disciplinary arm, known as the Board of Commissioners on Grievances and Discipline. Penalties can be serious, with the power to impose heavy fines and yank a candidate's law license.

Rick Dove, secretary of the Board of Commissioners on Grievances and Discipline, said he isn't seeing more cases of campaign violations involving false or misleading statements. Still, he's concerned and plans to stress the rules when the board does its next round of mandatory training sessions for judicial candidates.

Records supplied by Dove show that 28 judicial candidates have been disciplined for violating ethical standards related to campaigns dating back to 1995, with six cases coming this year.

Five times, judicial candidates have faced law license suspensions, although four of the suspensions have been lifted on the condition that the violators stay on the straight and narrow.

A Hamilton County judge in 1997 had to pay a $15,000 fine and court costs and attorneys fees for misstating an opponent's record. Records show fines of $1,000 or more in 12 of 28 cases back to 1995.

"We can and do hit people with some pretty serious fines," Dove said.

Smith, the professor who studies ethics laws, said many boards don't have the resources or the ability to seriously punish campaign liars.

"I think many times these entities are toothless tigers," Smith said. "Many times they don't have the resources or the mandate to really do what they are supposed to do. Aside from a symbolic dimension, they may be hard-pressed to do the job that the good people of Ohio want them to do."

Smith said serious punishments including hefty fines or felony charges might deter behavior. "Instead of a $25 fine, maybe it should be a $5,000 fine to a candidate," he said. "That would be a substantial message. Otherwise, it's a slap on the wrist that doesn't really value what these entities are supposed to be doing in the first place."

Are voters also to blame?

Nadler, the government ethics fellow, said the blame for misleading campaigns ultimately can be shouldered by the politicians themselves as well as the voting public.

"It is happening because people have allowed it to happen. Unless or until people no longer allow lying it will happen," she said. "Voters need to send a message that they want the truth, the unvarnished truth, no matter how difficult or painful."

But Nadler, a former longtime mayor of Santa Clara, Calif., said she also finds fault with the political consultants and politicians who want to win more than they want to do the right thing.

"When you have a win-at-any-costs mentality, the cost is far greater than you can imagine," she said. "You can walk away from dirty fights, and talk about the issues. I just think we need a new breed of people running for office who do this."

State Sen. Tom Patton, a Strongsville Republican, said the public's perception is that politicians get away with lies while others can't. He said a car dealer friend recently asked him about the apparent double standard.

"My friend said, 'I can't put out a false or misleading ad. Why am I being held to a different standard?' " Patton said. "Why are these politicians able to get up there and say anything they want?" Patton said he's interested in "improving the dialogue and dialing down the nonsense," but he isn't sure yet that Ohio's laws need an overhaul. He said he plans to talk to Attorney General Mike DeWine and his colleagues to see how others feel about it.

"Maybe if we can tighten the screws up a little bit, we can reduce the amount of over-the-top rhetoric," he said. "I don't think the good Lord made enough soap to wash off all the mud that has been flung this year."

Kate Irby, a fellow in Ohio University's Scripps School of Journalism Statehouse News Bureau, contributed to this story. To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: amarshall@plaind.com, 1-800-228-8272

Copyright © 2012 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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Report: McKenna had taste for free travel
10/27/2012
Associated Press (AP)

SEATTLE_Washington's Republican candidate for governor, Rob McKenna, has spent a lot of time as attorney general traveling on other people's dime, The Seattle Times reported Sunday.

The newspaper said (http://is.gd/ybwy7q) McKenna accepted nearly three times as many privately paid trips and event tickets over the past seven years as his predecessor, Gov. Chris Gregoire, did during her last eight years as attorney general.

Financial reports filed with the Public Disclosure Commission show that McKenna accepted $184,000 worth of free travel and events since taking office in 2005. They include two free trips to Israel, two to Taiwan, and one each to France, the Middle East, Japan, and China and India.

The number of free trips McKenna accepted also is more than four times the number reported over a similar period by his gubernatorial opponent, Democrat Jay Inslee, who recently resigned his seat in Congress.

The free trips are allowed under state law as long as they're disclosed to the public, and McKenna says his extracurricular activities have helped him develop relationships that benefit Washingtonians. He also says he took the trips on his own time.

"All the trips have been at no cost to state taxpayers," McKenna said. "I do get vacation, and I get to use that vacation as I want."

He also said he was invited on many of the trips because he was elected attorney general when he was 42, and the groups considered him a young leader with a promising future.

McKenna's travel began six days after he was first sworn in as Washington's attorney general. His first stop was Washington, D.C., where he attended a conference paid for by the State Government Leadership Foundation, a Republican group that promotes a conservative legislative agenda and bankrolls campaign ads for GOP candidates.

The three-day trip cost $1,108, and was followed by a $17,000 trip to Japan paid for by Japan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, two more conferences hosted by the conservative foundation, and a $2,400 trip to Maui, courtesy of a regional attorneys-general group.

Both trips to Taiwan and one of the Israel trips were connected with delegations sponsored by the National Association of Attorneys General, a professional group. He was elected vice president of the organization in 2009, and its president in 2011. In addition to the foreign travel, he has taken about two trips a year to attend association meetings.

Foreign governments are "looking to build a personal relationship with people who might become leaders of the country," and stateside leaders develop deeper understandings of a range of issues involving trade, extradition and legal systems, said Jim McPherson, the association's executive director.

"There's value in face-to-face meetings with the presidents of Taiwan and Israel and his or her staff," McPherson said

In 2007, a nonpartisan policy group based in Washington, D.C., The Aspen Institute, sent McKenna on an $18,000 trip to China and India in 2007. The next year, it sent him to the Middle East for $13,000.

Also in 2008, the French Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs paid for McKenna's $10,000 trip to France. His wife, Marilyn, accompanied him, but his spokesman said the attorney general paid her way.

McKenna also traveled free to meetings and conferences paid for by the Republican Attorney General's Association, a partisan group affiliated with the conservative foundation that financed earlier trips. The foundation is not required to disclose the donors who fund it.

Records show that McKenna spent 56 days _ eight weeks _ in travel paid for by others in 2011. The travel included conferences and speaking engagements in-state and out of state, and goodwill and educational trips overseas.

Some of the travel, particularly in-state trips, may not have been a full day.

In 2010, he spent 49 days on free travel.

An ethics expert said the extent of McKenna's free travel and events raises questions about the time he spends away from the office, particularly on trips paid for by political entities, and about the actual benefits the travel and events provide to the state.

"When you take an oath of office, you vow to put the public interest first," said Judy Nadler, former mayor of Santa Clara, Calif., and a senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University.

As a congressman, Inslee took three privately financed trips overseas, and 14 trips to speaking engagements, conferences and fact-finding missions in the United States from June 2001 to June 2011, according to the most recent reports available.

Inslee traveled to Germany in 2008 courtesy of the International Management and Development Institute, a nonprofit educational group funded in part by corporations that cannot directly pay for Congress members' travel.

He also traveled to France and Belgium in 2004 on an eight-day trip paid for by the Transatlantic Policy Network, a nonprofit group that seeks to strengthen ties between the U.S. and the European Union, and to Nicaragua in 2005 on a five-day trip sponsored by Global Partnerships, a not-for-profit Seattle-based organization that invests in microfinance groups.

During her tenure as attorney general, Gregoire also accepted free travel, but most of it was directly tied to her role in negotiating a $206 billion settlement between tobacco companies and attorneys general from 46 states.

___

Information from: The Seattle Times, http://www.seattletimes.com

Copyright © 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Despite laws against lying, tall tales have become the norm on the campaign trail, experts say | View Clip
10/27/2012
Plain Dealer - Online

...norm rather than the exception, government ethics experts agree. "It happens all the time, but certainly during the campaign season it is much more evident," said Judy Nadler, senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University in California. "The problem is that this leads to an eroding of people's confidence in government. People throw up their hands and say, 'I don't believe any of them,' and it decreases voter registration and turnout."...

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Gessler alone in using discretionary fund for party events | View Clip
10/24/2012
Denver Post - Online, The

...fund to reimburse expenses without any receipts. The review of current state elected officials who have such accounts also included a review of the discretionary spending of former Secretary of State Bernie Buescher, Gessler's predecessor. Colorado Ethics Watch, a liberal group that has criticized Gessler, on Monday asked District Attorney Mitch Morrissey to look into whether Gessler broke laws against embezzlement of public funds and filing false statements by taking the Florida trip in late August...

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Where to search for ethics during election season | View Clip
10/22/2012
Las Vegas Business Press - Online

...our values and our biases. We agree on some issues, disagree on others and agree to disagree on still others. Behind this, it seems to me, are different ethical viewpoints or approaches. I am indebted to scholars at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University for their description of five such sources of our ethical behavior. I have adapted their findings for the upcoming election. THE UTILITARIAN APPROACH Max Oliva The ethical decision or action is the one that...

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Review: Gessler lone statewide official to tap fund for partisan use | View Clip
10/20/2012
Loveland Reporter-Herald - Online

...fund to reimburse expenses without any receipts. The review of current state elected officials who have such accounts also included a review of the discretionary spending of former Secretary of State Bernie Buescher, Gessler's predecessor. Colorado Ethics Watch, a liberal group that has criticized Gessler, on Monday asked District Attorney Mitch Morrissey to look into whether Gessler broke laws against embezzlement of public funds and filing false statements by taking the Florida trip in late August...

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Review: Secretary of State Scott Gessler lone statewide official to tap fund for partisan use | View Clip
10/20/2012
Canon City Daily Record - Online

...fund to reimburse expenses without any receipts. The review of current state elected officials who have such accounts also included a review of the discretionary spending of former Secretary of State Bernie Buescher, Gessler's predecessor. Colorado Ethics Watch, a liberal group that has criticized Gessler, on Monday asked District Attorney Mitch Morrissey to look into whether Gessler broke laws against embezzlement of public funds and filing false statements by taking the Florida trip in late August...

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Gessler alone in fund use
10/20/2012
Denver Post, The

State law says they can use the funds for official business as they "see fit," and Colorado's five statewide elected officials spend money from their offices' discretionary accounts on meals, office supplies, parking, salaries, employee retirement parties and occasional travel to nonpartisan events -- among other things.

But a review of discretionary-account spending shows that Secretary of State Scott Gessler, a Republican who attended the Republican National Convention and a GOP lawyers meeting on the same Florida trip, is the only current statewide official who has used his office's fund for party-related events. He's also the only public official who has given himself an end-of-year payout from the fund to reimburse expenses without any receipts.

The review of current state elected officials who have such accounts also included a review of the discretionary spending of former Secretary of State Bernie Buescher, Gessler's predecessor.

Colorado Ethics Watch, a liberal group that has criticized Gessler, on Monday asked District Attorney Mitch Morrissey to look into whether Gessler broke laws against embezzlement of public funds and filing false statements by taking the Florida trip in late August using $1,452 from his discretionary fund.

Additionally, Ethics Watch has asked Morrissey to examine a separate $1,400 payout Gessler gave himself from his discretionary fund in July 2011, a sum that depleted what was left in the office account at the end of the 2010-11 fiscal year.

A spokesman for Gessler said the payout was for "day-to-day" expenses incurred by the secretary of state for which he had no receipts, but Ethics Watch questions whether it was a self-awarded bonus. Two Democratic state senators have called for an audit of Gessler's spending.

Ethics Watch also has filed a complaint with the Colorado Independent Ethics Commission, which can fine public officials who run afoul of ethics laws. Morrissey's office and the Ethics Commission are reviewing the complaints.

Gessler has said the Florida trip was justifiable because he attended the Republican National Lawyers Association conference Aug. 24-25 and learned the latest trends affecting election law prior to going to the Republican National Convention. He pointed to continuing-legal-education credit gained at the GOP lawyers conference.

"This is the only way for me to find out what the hot issues are in election law," he said, adding that his discretionary- fund spending shouldn't be singled out.

"You have to look at what people have done historically in this office," Gessler said. "You have to also look at what other state officials are doing."

But it appears no one else is doing what Gessler did.

Records of discretionary-account spending by Gov. John Hickenlooper, a Democrat; Lt. Gov. Joe Garcia, a Democrat; Treasurer Walker Stapleton, a Republican; and Attorney General John Suthers, a Republican, showed no similar spending on political-party-related events -- or for undocumented expenses -- over the past two years, the period in which all but Suthers took office. Rec-ords for Gessler's predecessor in office also do not show spending on party-related events or for personal payouts without documentation.

Under Colorado law, each statewide elected official has a discretionary fund. The governor is appropriated $20,000 per year, while all the other officials have funds of $5,000 per year. The law says the money is to be spent "in pursuance of official business as each elected official sees fit."

Meanwhile, Colorado state rules on budgeting limit the expenditure of public funds to "official state business purposes only." And when Gessler sought reimbursement for his trip, he signed a letter affirming that his supporting documents were for "expenses incurred in pursuance of state business."

"The discretionary fund really is, as its name suggests, at the discretion of the state official," said state Sen. Pat Steadman of Denver, a member of the legislature's Joint Budget Committee and one of the Democrats calling for the audit. "But we expect him to use it only for official state business."

According to the Republican National Lawyers Association's website, the group "builds the Republican Party goals and ideals through a nationwide network of supportive lawyers who understand and directly support Republican policy, agendas and candidates."

One expert on government ethics said there was no way the purpose of Gessler's trip could be called anything but partisan. It's not necessary for the secretary of state to be a lawyer, so the benefit of any continuing- legal-education credit is not to the public, said Judy Nadler, senior fellow in government ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, Calif.

Even if the secretary of state were required to be an attorney, she said, there are nonpartisan groups and events he could have attended for continuing- legal-education credit.

"From the public's perspective, it (the trip) appears to be an opportunity to rub elbows with, strategize with and network with other members of your party," Nadler said. "That comes down to looking very political and not very related to the public good."

It also doesn't help that the documents Gessler submitted for reimbursement from the discretionary fund refer to the "RNLA/RNC" trip, she said.

"The public perception could very easily be that his goal was to go to the RNC," Nadler said

The spending of previous Secretary of State Buescher, a Democrat who lost to Gessler in 2010, ranged from $828 in expenses for himself and six employees to attend a summer conference of Colorado's county clerks in 2009 to $1,052 spent on a county clerks association conference in the winter of 2010 to cover Buescher and four other employees. Some expenses were for printing costs or other items purchased by the office, such as $103 to buy award plaques from the National Association of Secretaries of State.

Buescher spent $150 on an entrance fee for an annual golf tournament to benefit law-student scholarships at the University of Colorado and the University of Denver.

There were also a variety of expenses for office parties and functions, such as $56.15 on a party for a retiring employee in 2008.

Buescher's expenses also included many meals with staff, lawmakers, lobbyists and attorneys.

Buescher, who now works as a deputy attorney general for Suthers, whose office defends Gessler, has declined to comment on secretary-of-state matters.

Buescher's expenses were similar to those of other current officeholders, who also appear to not have used their discretionary accounts for any party-affiliated functions.

Tim Hoover: 303-954-1626, thoover@denverpost.com or twitter.com/timhoover

Copyright © 2012 The Denver Post

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BUT HOW DO YOU REALLY FEEL? SOMEDAY THE COMPUTER MAY KNOW | View Clip
10/19/2012
Chronicle Herald - Online, The

...online advertisements knowing how we're feeling today? That's a project the researchers at MIT are considering. How about robots that convince us they really care? “There's something reductionist about” the coming technology, said Irina Raicu, Internet ethics program manager at Santa Clara University in Northern California. “It reduces what may be a complex mix of emotions to maybe one.” And affective technology will always be limited by our own ability to interpret emotions, said Arvid...

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Review: Gessler lone statewide official to tap fund for partisan use | View Clip
10/19/2012
Denver Post - Online, The

...the fund to reimburse expenses without any receipts. The review of current state elected officials who have such accounts also included a review of the discretionary spending of former Secretary of State Bernie Buescher, Gessler's predecessor Colorado Ethics Watch, a liberal group that has criticized Gessler repeatedly over elections issues, on Monday asked District Attorney Mitch Morrissey to look into whether Gessler broke laws against embezzlement of public funds and filing false statements by taking...

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Death on Demand: the Law in Oregon, on Ballot in Massachusetts, a Hot Radio Show | View Clip
10/19/2012
Senior Journal

...Rights. The one hour audio show has quickly generated 230 comments on Ashbrook?s website. Most of those who have an interest in this topic are probably senior citizens. Click to the report in The Economist >> Assisted Suicide: Right or Wrong, Santa Clara University >> Assisted Suicide Laws in U.S., Patients Rights Council >> Euthanasia and Physician Assisted Suicide: All sides to the issue, http://www.religioustolerance.org

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Review: Gessler lone statewide official to tap fund for partisan use | View Clip
10/19/2012
Loveland Reporter-Herald - Online

...the fund to reimburse expenses without any receipts. The review of current state elected officials who have such accounts also included a review of the discretionary spending of former Secretary of State Bernie Buescher, Gessler's predecessor Colorado Ethics Watch, a liberal group that has criticized Gessler repeatedly over elections issues, on Monday asked District Attorney Mitch Morrissey to look into whether Gessler broke laws against embezzlement of public funds and filing false statements by taking...

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News Update
10/27/2012
China Central TV - New York Bureau

two thoughts so clearly on display more than what you actually are and that you some personal information such as COM education and on your ethnicity that your huge privacy Santa Clara University computer engineering professor eve of the product recognition technology is very similar to a solar technology pieces product and is at a much earlier stage still uses streaming video sites like YouTube and broken are hungry for such a technology or novel accuracy are you on the payroll stories as major publishers at agencies and mobile operators are currently testing pragmatics product and find out exactly how accurate it is the spice of technology to be incorporated in a number of services within a month's time more new CCTV Mountain View California Asian markets are common place in Malaysia and Thailand Thailand and will naturally contemplate out America's first suburban Chinatown economy he takes us there . just when the sun starts to sound as he is six to stand retail stalls and with the flying fish bowl " and says that even in familiar and some would save over one and two and as long as he is sentencing that inclusion is an is and is not in the far east in Eads located just about my wasted youth in America four yes the world is that it brings so many emotions from Asian and about . and everybody thought highly of you and that is indeed overwhelming attendance for smart spring running over and over twenty seven thousand gas turned away that in this third installment of one hundred thousand visitors in in in in in in in in in is is is is is is is like Ron is uniquely seeing you find in the seventh and featuring films to perform him as an outlet . in that that was and is an equal mix of culture and cuisine is likely to cash from the organizers that he certainly has arrests here in New Jersey and Uganda McGehee CCTV gave thanks for letting CCTV American rain rain and eight Mike Walter incoming ring and the things and is a

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Is Apple starting to unravel without Jobs? | View Clip
11/01/2012
MarketWatch

...jitters about the changes in Cupertino, Calif., in the post-Steve Jobs era. Read: Apple's Forstall leaving in shake-up. “The vacuum left by Steve's death has not been filled, and a fight has broken out,” said Stephen Diamond, associate professor of law at Santa Clara University. “Now the first bodies are being thrown overboard. More will follow because Cook does not have the ability to assert credible leadership in a company that requires, by definition, a creative and dynamic leader.” That...

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Let's Limit the Effect of Software Patents, Since We Can't Eliminate Them | View Clip
11/01/2012
Wired - Online

...perspectives from academia to corporations to other organizations – proposing specific solutions to the patent problem. Some will be presented and debated at the Solutions to the Software Patent Problem conference hosted by the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University on November 16. Help move reform efforts forward by sharing your comments below, since these proposals will help advocates and policy makers decide what to do about software patents.

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Gay Couples Should File Protective Tax Refund Claims | View Clip
11/01/2012
Tax Prof

...were married in California between June 16 and Nov. 4 of 2008, when voters passed Proposition 8, which approved a constitutional amendment restricting marriage to one man and one woman. Those marriages are valid. Patricia Cain, a law professor at Santa Clara University and an authority on legal issues faced by same-sex couples, said others might want to consider filing a protective claim, too. For instance, she noted that an additional nine states, as well as Washington, D.C.,  recognize...

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Ruth Silver Taube: We must continue the fight for equal pay | View Clip
11/01/2012
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...Pay Act's 50th anniversary in 2013, she inspires us to redouble our efforts to eliminate the wage gap in Santa Clara County and the Bay Area. Ruth Silver Taube is special counsel to the Legal Aid Society - Employment Law Center, an Adjunct Professor at Santa Clara University School of Law, and a founding member of the Bay Area Equal Pay Collaborative. She wrote this article for this newspaper.

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*Gay Couples May Want to File a Protective Tax Refund Claim | View Clip
10/31/2012
Bucks

The recent decision by a federal appeals court regarding the Defense of Marriage Act suggests gay couples may want to file something known as a protective refund claim with the Internal Revenue Service in the event the Supreme Court overturns the law, according to accounting experts.

The Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in New York struck down the law's definition of marriage as a union between a man and a woman as unconstitutional. The decision was the second by a federal appeals court striking down DOMA, as the law is known. The law's constitutionality is expected eventually to be considered by the United States Supreme Court.

If the high court invalidates DOMA, legally married same-sex couples will be able to file claims for refunds of federal tax overpayments, said Janis Cowhey McDonagh, a partner at Marcum LLP in New York and a specialist in the firm's national LGBT and non-traditional family practice.

Currently, same-sex marriage is recognized by six states — New York, Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont — and the District of Columbia. In addition, roughly 18,000 same-sex couples were married in California between June 16 and Nov. 4 of 2008, when voters passed Proposition 8, which approved a constitutional amendment restricting marriage to one man and one woman. Those marriages are valid.

Patricia Cain, a law professor at Santa Clara University and an authority on legal issues faced by same-sex couples, said others might want to consider filing a protective claim, too.

For instance, she noted that an additional nine states, as well as Washington, D.C., recognize “marriage equivalent statuses” for same-sex couples, like domestic partnerships or civil unions. While most people presume those relationships aren't marriages, she said in an e-mail, “there's a good argument that absent DOMA such relationships should be treated as marriages for tax purposes.”

In light of such uncertainty, she said, some details may end up being settled by further litigation. “I actually would advise anyone who would benefit from joint filing to file an amended return as a protective claim for refund if they are married (no matter where they live) or in a marriage equivalent status.”

Ms. McDonagh said couples should file a protective refund claim now because there is a three-year statute of limitations on tax refund claims. By filing a claim now, couples will have standing for overpayments dating to 2009, while DOMA wends its way through the court system. The claim applies to income taxes, estate taxes as well as gift taxes, she said.

It's possible, Ms. McDonagh said, that if the Supreme Court voids the law, the I.R.S. could waive the three-year statute of limitations. That would seem the fair thing to do, she said, but there isn't any precedent for the agency doing so. So to be safe, filing a protective claim makes sense.

Couples should consult their accountants for advice about filing a protective claim, which essentially involves filing an amended tax return, she said.

The case decided earlier this month was brought on behalf of Edith Windsor of New York City, who married her longtime partner, Thea Clara Spyer, in 2007 in Canada. When Ms. Spyer died in 2009, Ms. Windsor inherited her property. Because the I.R.S. was not allowed, under the Defense of Marriage Act, to consider her as a surviving spouse, she faced a tax bill of $363,053 that she would not have had to pay if the marriage had been recognized.

Do you intend to file a protective claim?

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Almost Every Website On The Planet Could Be In Legal Jeopardy Now, Thanks To Zappos (AMZN) | View Clip
10/31/2012
San Francisco Chronicle - Online

...The problem: A federal court just ruled that agreement completely invalid. So Zappos will have to go to court—or more likely settle to avoid those legal costs. Here's how Zappos screwed up, according to Eric Goldman, a law professor and director of Santa Clara University's High Tech Law Institute: It put a link to its terms of service on its website, but didn't force customers to click through to it. There's a ton of legal precedents around what constitutes a contract. If you leave...

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Let's Go Back to Patenting the 'Solution,' Not the 'Problem' | View Clip
10/31/2012
Wired - Online

...may be able to solve most of the software patent problem. The experts in this series are presenting, debating, and discussing how to implement their fixes at the Solutions to the Software Patent Problem conference hosted by the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University on November 16. You can help move reform efforts forward by weighing in below: Together with your comments, these proposals will help advocates and policy makers decide what to do about software patents.

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Federal court rules website terms of service agreement completely invalid.-> | View Clip
10/31/2012
Slashdot

...The problem: A federal court just ruled that agreement completely invalid. So Zappos will have to go to court—or more likely settle to avoid those legal costs. Here's how Zappos screwed up, according to Eric Goldman, a law professor and director of Santa Clara University's High Tech Law Institute: It put a link to its terms of service on its website, but didn't force customers to click through to it."

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Website and app owners beware: Your Terms of Service may no longer pass court muster | View Clip
10/31/2012
Baltimore Sun - Online

...Instead, Zappos has followed Internet norm, which is essentially that if user visits a site, than she is unilaterally bound to the TOS that can be found somewhere on the site, whether or not she actually reads them. Eric Goldman, a professor of law at Santa Clara University School of Law, in California, blogged extensivly on this, and his analysis is an eye-opener for anyone who's running a website with a fast-and-loose TOS. The upshot, per Goldman: Judges would rather see websites explicitly...

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Almost Every Website On The Planet Could Be In Legal Jeopardy Now, Thanks To Zappos (AMZN) | View Clip
10/30/2012
Business Insider

...Zappos wants the matter to go into arbitration, citing its terms of service. The problem: A federal court just ruled that agreement completely invalid. Here's how Zappos screwed up, according to Eric Goldman, a law professor and director of Santa Clara University's High Tech Law Institute: It put a link to its terms of service on its website, but didn't force customers to click through to it. There's a ton of legal precedents around what constitutes a contract. If you...

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Almost Every Website On The Planet Could Be In Legal Jeopardy Now, Thanks To Zappos | View Clip
10/30/2012
Yahoo! Finance

...The problem: A federal court just ruled that agreement completely invalid. So Zappos will have to go to court—or more likely settle to avoid those legal costs. Here's how Zappos screwed up, according to Eric Goldman, a law professor and director of Santa Clara University's High Tech Law Institute: It put a link to its terms of service on its website, but didn't force customers to click through to it. There's a ton of legal precedents around what constitutes a contract. If you leave...

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/29/2012
Wisconsin Law Journal

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Village Voice Media Sues Yelp | View Clip
10/29/2012
MediaPost.com

...allegations, but likely will argue that the company's trademark should be invalidated on the ground that a phrase that uses a common adjective like "best of" was never eligible for trademark protection. If so, Yelp has a good chance of prevailing, predicts Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman. "These kinds of laudatory trademarks should not be protectible in trademark law, period," he says. "I can't see how Village Voice has a prayer of winning." Village Voice Media Sues Yelp...

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/28/2012
MSNBC - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Online flames lead to court | View Clip
10/28/2012
Courier-Post - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. “Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had,” said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are “evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they’re still in the process of learning how to do that.” Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Virtual reviews can carry real-world risks | View Clip
10/28/2012
First Amendment Center

...free-speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. “Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had,” said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are “evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that.” Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks: Doctor's case highlights tension that can develop between consumers and those providing services
10/27/2012
St. Paul Pioneer Press

A Minnesota doctor took offense when a patient's son posted critical remarks about him on some rate-your-doctor websites, including a comment by a nurse who purportedly called the physician "a real tool."

So Dr. David McKee had an unusually aggressive response: He sued the son for defamation. The Duluth neurologist's improbable case has advanced all the way to the Minnesota Supreme Court, which is weighing whether the lawsuit should go to trial.

"His reputation is at stake. He does not want to be a target for false and malicious remarks," said his lawyer, Marshall Tanick.

McKee's case highlights the tension that sometimes develops on websites such as Yelp and Angie's List when the free speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names.

"Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that."

Most online reviews never provoke any response. And successful challenges to negative reviews are rare. Americans are legally entitled to express opinions, as long as they don't knowingly make false statements.

But if the two sides contest basic facts, disputes can swiftly escalate.

At issue are six of Dennis Laurion's statements, including the account of the nurse's name calling. McKee and his attorney say the unnamed nurse doesn't exist and that Laurion invented her to hide behind. Laurion maintains she is real, but he can't recall her name.

In arguments before the court in September, Laurion attorney John Kelly said his client's statements were legally protected opinion that conveyed dismay over how McKee treated Laurion's father, who had suffered a stroke. The posts described a single visit that lasted 10 to 15 minutes.

The review said McKee seemed upset that after Laurion's father had been moved from intensive care to a regular hospital room, the doctor "had to spend time finding out if you transferred or died."

Laurion also complained that McKee treated them brusquely and was insensitive to the family's concerns about the patient being seen in public in a gown that gaped open in the back.

In an interview, Kelly said nothing Laurion posted was defamatory -- a false statement that harms a person's reputation.

The court is expected to rule on the case in the next few months.

Lawsuits over professional reviews are uncommon in part because most patients write positive reviews, Goldman said. And many states have passed laws that block the kind of lawsuits that are filed mainly to scare someone into shutting up on matters of public concern.

Known as "strategic lawsuits against public participation," those complaints are often forbidden by broad laws that protect criticism even if it's wrong, Goldman said.

When health care providers do sue, they rarely succeed. Of 28 such lawsuits that Goldman tracked, 16 had been dismissed and six settled. The others were pending.

One notable exception was a Maine case in which a chiropractor sued a former patient for postings on Facebook and websites that accused him of sexually assaulting her. The courts concluded she probably fabricated her story.

In June, a judge ruled that the chiropractor could legally attach $100,000 worth of the patient's property to his claim as security pending further proceedings in the case, which remains open.

Yelp says reviewers are well within their rights to express opinions and relate their experiences.

Spokeswoman Kristen Whisenand says the company discourages professionals from using what she called the "nuclear option" of suing over a negative review. She said they rarely succeed and wind up drawing more attention to the review they dislike.

Angie Hicks, co-founder of Angie's List, said people shouldn't be afraid to post honest opinions about health care or other services.

"Everyone has the right to free speech," Hicks said. "The key here is giving your honest opinion. Honesty is your best defense. Truth is your best defense."

Jeff Hermes, director of the Citizens Media Law Project at Harvard University's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, said people who want to post critical reviews should think about whether they can back up their statements. And they can strengthen their position by stating the facts on which their opinions are based.

Goldman advises reviewers to remember that they are still taking a risk anytime they criticize someone in a public forum.

"The reality is that we bet our house every time that we post content online," Goldman said.

Copyright © 2012 Saint Paul Pioneer Press

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/26/2012
Sandusky Register - Sandusky

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Cybersitter Wins Initial Skirmish In Lawsuit Against Google | View Clip
10/26/2012
MediaPost.com

...responsible if third parties violate state laws. But Lew ruled that more evidence was needed to determine whether Google helped develop the allegedly false ads, in which case the company could lose its immunity. News of the decision was first reported Friday by Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman. He says he expects that Google will eventually prevail, but that the ruling signals that the company "may have an uphill battle with this judge." Cybersitter Wins Initial Skirmish In Lawsuit...

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Ask the experts: Dealing with patent trolls
10/26/2012
Financial Times

...parties with greater access to finance from deliberately escalating costs to force a less well-resourced opponent to accept an unsatisfactory settlement." Alistair Maughan, Morrison & Foerster lawyers "Data was published recently in the US by Colleen Chien of Santa Clara University highlighting the disproportionate effect of trolls on SMEs compared with larger corporations. Companies with revenues of under $10m (£6.2m) represented at least 55 per cent of defendants in patent troll cases (the equivalent...

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Critical Internet reviews land some in court | View Clip
10/26/2012
Durango Herald - Online, The

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health-care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online review issue in Minnesota case | View Clip
10/25/2012
Spokesman-Review - Online, The

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. “Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had,” said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are “evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that.” At issue are six of Dennis Laurion's statements,...

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Critical online reviews carry risks | View Clip
10/25/2012
Duluth News Tribune - Online, The

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. “Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had,” said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are “evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that.” Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Posting reviews online can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/25/2012
AZCentral.com

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. “Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had,” said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law. Health care providers are “evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that.” Most online reviews never provoke any response. And successful challenges...

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Nation/World briefs 10-25 | View Clip
10/25/2012
Daily Record - Online, The

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." What GOP candidates didn't want: a new rape-and-abortion...

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Online reviews carry legal risks | View Clip
10/25/2012
Journal Gazette - Online, The

...free-speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. “Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had,” said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are “evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they’re still in the process of learning how to do that.” Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews carry legal risks | View Clip
10/25/2012
DeKalb County Daily Chronicle - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. “Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had,” said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are “evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that.” Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Online reviews can present legal risks | View Clip
10/25/2012
Worcester Telegram & Gazette - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. “Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had,” said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are “evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they’re still in the process of learning how to do that.” Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical Online Reviews Can Carry Legal Risks | View Clip
10/25/2012
KSTC-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/25/2012
Detroit News - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/25/2012
Houston Chronicle - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Duluth neurologist sues over rate-your-doctor online remarks | View Clip
10/25/2012
Post-Bulletin - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Online Reviews: When Do They Go From Helpful to Defamatory? | View Clip
10/25/2012
WSJ Blogs

...statements were legally protected opinion that conveyed dismay over how McKee treated Laurion's father, who had suffered a stroke. According to the AP, when health care providers do sue, they rarely succeed, according to Eric Goldman, a law professor at Santa Clara University. Of 28 such lawsuits he tracked, 16 had been dismissed and six settled. The others were pending. Nevertheless, Goldman said it's wise to remember that you're still taking a risk anytime you criticize someone in a...

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/25/2012
Marshall Independent - Online, The

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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*Yoo says Obama -- not Bush -- exceeded constitutional powers | View Clip
10/25/2012
San Francisco Chronicle

President Obama “pushed the executive power beyond all constitutional limits” and trampled on congressional authority when he issued an executive order giving some young illegal immigrants a two-year reprieve from deportation, according to a UC Berkeley constitutional law professor.

The prof, who made his case in a Fox News essay Oct. 12, (www.foxnews.com/opinion/2012/10/12/obama-has-pursued-dangerous-change-in-powers-president) is John Yoo. The same John Yoo who, as a Justice Department attorney a decade ago, advised President George W. Bush that as a wartime president he wasn't bound by the usual legal constraints on surveillance and torture.

The difference, Yoo asserted, is a matter of war and peace.

His Justice Department memos recognized “the president's primary duty to protect the national security,” he wrote in his recent column, while Obama's order, unrelated to national security, ”represents a twisting of the Constitution's fabric for partisan ends.”

“I have long been an academic defender of a vigorous presidency,'' Yoo said. “But the president cannot refuse to enforce a law simply because he disagrees with it.''

Some Republican leaders say Yoo's analysis supports their case that Obama is flouting the authority of Congress — which has refused to pass the so-called DREAM Act — and weakening immigration enforcement in a pitch for the Latino vote.

But two immigration law professors said Yoo doesn't seem to understand the laws that govern deportations or the authority Congress has given the president.

Because Congress provides enough funding to remove only a small fraction of the 12 million immigrants who entered illegally, “it's up to the executive to make decisions about who to deport,'' said Pratheepan Gulasekaram of Santa Clara University law school.

“The discretion Obama is exercising here falls in line with the discretion any prosecutor has'' in deciding whom to charge, said Bill Ong Hing, a law professor at the University of San Francisco. He said President George H.W. Bush issued comparable orders barring deportation, or urging exemptions, for Chinese immigrants after the Tiananmen Square protest and the institution of China's one-child policy.

Obama issued an order in June allowing undocumented immigrants aged 30 and younger to get a two-year deferral of deportation, and a work permit, if they had arrived before age 16, attended school or served in the military, had no serious criminal record and posed no security risk. One study found that 1.7 million immigrants would be eligible to apply.

The DREAM Act, blocked by congressional Republicans, would have made those youths eligible for legal residency and eventual citizenship. Obama's order does not legalize their status, a change that would require congressional action.

Yoo, as an attorney in the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, wrote memos in 2001 and 2002 broadly defining presidential authority after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

One memo concluded that the suffocation technique called waterboarding did not amount to torture, but said the president may have the power to order actual torture during a terrorism-related interrogation. Yoo also said the president could order raids on suspected terrorists, or wiretap their phone calls, without the warrants normally required by federal law.

Why do the nation's laws, including the constitutional limits on presidential power, apply to Obama but not to Bush?

“There is a world of difference,” Yoo wrote in his Fox News column, “between putting aside laws that interfere with an executive response to an attack on the country … and ignoring laws to appeal to a constituency vital to re-election.”

Congress, Yoo said, has passed laws defining legal immigration and specifying limited cases for exemptions from deportation, but has never authorized the president to “interrupt the deportation of whole classes of illegal aliens.''

Gulasekaram said Yoo might have a case if Congress had provided enough funding to deport all illegal immigrants and had spelled out criteria for deportation that conflicted with Obama's order. Lawmakers have not taken either step, he said, and have left those decisions to the president.

Noting that deportations under Obama have reached a record level of 400,000 a year, Gulasekaram said, “No president has ever been more faithful to the congressional definition of who should be deported.”

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*Opinion: If Obama's appeal to minorities is a gamble so is the GOP's appeal to the "white voter" | View Clip
10/25/2012

It was clear early on in Mitt Romney's campaign that he had committed himself to the “white vote.” Of course, he had little choice. Almost 90 percent of those who voted in Republican primaries identified as white. The Republican Party has for decades gambled on the surest thing in American politics; the appeal of our country's collective sense of whiteness.

Newsweek and Daily Beast's columnist John Avlon, however, mischaracterizes this phenomenon by claiming that President Obama's appeal to minorities is a gamble, as if the democratic notion of appealing to all people is a foreign concept for democracy. Avlon's benign assumption that the appeal to minorities is an implicit rejection of white people is false. They are not mutually exclusive in form or function. The interests of whites is the same as those of Latinos.

But while mutual exclusivity on the basis of race and ethnicity is false, it is precisely the narrative the Romney campaign has appealed to throughout the year, and Avlon is reinforcing this narrative, even if unintentionally. This is the nature of systemic racism. You breathe it.

The former chairman of the Republican National Committee admitted as much. In 2005, Ken Mehlman said, “Some Republicans gave up on winning the African American vote, looking the other way or trying to benefit politically from racial polarization. I am here today as the Republican chairman to tell you we were wrong.”

Yet this history of racial division against African-Americans hasn't changed the tactics of the GOP's approach towards Latino voters. When Pete Wilson's seat as governor of California was threatened, he bet on whiteness. He blamed California's ailing economy on undocumented immigrants, which turned into an assault on Latino identity. Of course, he won.

Jan Brewer, the governor of Arizona, found herself in a similar position in 2010. With Arizona's economy reeling from the collapse of the housing market, Brewer faced a 50 percent unfavorability rating in the polls by February of 2010. Brewer responded by appealing to her ace in the hole; she bet on whiteness. The month after the anti-immigrant bill, SB1070, was signed, Brewer's favorability reached its highest in her career and skyrocketed her back into office later that year.

Yet these laws can't be explained by economics. These laws have had devastating economic results on states that embrace these laws, yet they continue to gain momentum across the country. Two researchers, Karthick Ramakrishnan and Pratheepan Gulasekaram, looked at 25,000 municipalities and all fifty states to see if anti-immigration laws could be explained simply by economics. They found that the most accurate explanation for these laws was partisan identity. In other words, the more Republican a district or state was, the more likely we are to see these laws emerge.

The GOP, however, wants us to believe that these laws have nothing to do with race. They are simply rational reactions to circumstance. They are pushbacks against the Federal government's refusal to enforce our immigration laws.

In a highly-publicized event, Donald Trump offered the President five million dollars in exchange for the release of his college transcripts. Nobody expected the President to take him up on the offer, but that wasn't the point. The point was to continue the assault on President Obama's legitimacy as a rightful member of society. From the obsession with his birth certificate, his middle name or his father's nationality, the whole purpose is to appeal to the country's sense of whiteness.

There is a serious gamble going on, but the gamble is not on minorities or by Barack Obama; the gamble is being taken by the others.

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Charlotte Observer - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can escalate into legal battles between doctors, unsatisfied patients | View Clip
10/24/2012
Republic - Online, The

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
News & Observer - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can escalate into legal battles between doctors, unsatisfied patients | View Clip
10/24/2012
Daily Journal - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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FOX 35 News Orlando: Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WOFL-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Washington Examiner - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
San Antonio Express-News - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Tri-City Herald - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Wichita Eagle - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Ashland Times-Gazette - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Bradenton Herald - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Daily Record - Online, The

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Wilmington Star-News - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Tribune - Online, The

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Greenwich Time - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WOOD-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WNYT-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
News Tribune - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Lexington Herald-Leader - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Bellingham Herald - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Press Democrat - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
KPTV-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
KVVU-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical Online Reviews Can Carry Legal Risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
ABC News - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Centre Daily Times - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WFSB-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WNEM-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Belleville News-Democrat - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WLFI-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Daily Herald - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. “Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had,” said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are “evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they’re still in the process of learning how to do that.” Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
AZ Family

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
U.S. News & World Report

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
St. Paul Pioneer Press - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WNYW-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WTNH-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Fox 2 News Headlines: Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WJBK-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Case between Duluth doctor, patient's son moves to Minnesota Supreme Court | View Clip
10/24/2012
Duluth News Tribune - Online, The

...free speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their names. “Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had,” said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are “evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that.” Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WSHM-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WTVT-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
KGW-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
KPHO-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Bemidji Pioneer - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Herald-Journal - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WOKV-FM - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can escalate into legal battles between doctors, unsatisfied patients | View Clip
10/24/2012
Star Tribune - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Sarasota Herald-Tribune - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WSAV-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WSMV-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WLUK-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
myfoxphilly.com

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WVUE-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WCBD-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WTVG-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Merced Sun-Star - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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U.S. Disavows Patent at Center of Apple-Samsung Dispute | View Clip
10/24/2012
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Online

...be outmatched by wealthy companies when patents are filed. But post-grant review affords another, more painstaking look. "It gives the patent office the ability to focus on the patents that really matter," said Colleen Chien, an assistant professor at the Santa Clara University Law School. The patent office's re-examination team issued its invalidation decision on patent 7,469,381. It was one of the six patents that formed the basis of the jury verdict against Samsung in a federal court...

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A Coming Storm: FDA Regulation of Mobile Medical Applications | View Clip
10/24/2012
Healthcare Blog, The

...Group, LLC, a regulatory coaching firm providing FDA and legislative guidance to mobile medical application start-ups and developers. He is a member of the AHLA, HIMSS, and serves on the HIMSS Legal Task Force. He is also in his last year of law school at Santa Clara University School of Law where he focuses on agency regulation, EHR legal policy, and NwHIN architecures. You can contact him at ryan.minarovich@tenzinggroup.com or 858.449.9106.

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
One News Now

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Times-News - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
New Canaan News - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WTHI-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WREG-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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STEVE KARNOWSKI | Associated Press | View Clip
10/24/2012
Journal Gazette - Online, The

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WPFO-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
State Journal - Online, The

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WTRF-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
KUSI-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
KOAA-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Salt Lake Tribune - Online, The

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Most online reviews never provoke any response. And successful challenges to negative reviews are rare. Americans are legally entitled to express opinions, as long as they don't...

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WAFF-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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online reviews: free speech, costly challenges
10/24/2012
Virginian-Pilot

By Steve Karnowski | The Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS

A Minnesota doctor took offense when a patient's son posted critical remarks about him on some rate-your-doctor websites, including a comment by a nurse who purportedly called the physician "a real tool." So Dr. David McKee sued the son for defamation. The Duluth neurologist's improbable case has advanced all the way to the Minnesota Supreme Court, which is weighing whether the lawsuit should go to trial.

"His reputation is at stake. He does not want to be a target for false and malicious remarks," said his lawyer, Marshall Tanick.

McKee's case highlights the tension that sometimes develops on websites such as Yelp and Angie's List when the free speech rights of patients and their families clash with the desire of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their reputations.

"Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that."

Most online reviews never provoke any response, and successful challenges to negative reviews are rare. Americans are legally entitled to express opinions, as long as they don't knowingly make false statements.

At issue are six of Dennis Laurion's statements, including the account of the nurse's name-calling. McKee and his attorney say the unnamed nurse doesn't exist and that Laurion invented her to hide behind. Laurion maintains she is real, but he can't recall her name.

In arguments before the court in September, Laurion attorney John Kelly said his client's statements were legally protected opinion that conveyed dismay over how McKee treated Laurion's father, who had suffered a stroke. The posts described a single visit that lasted 10 to 15 minutes.

The review said McKee seemed upset that after Laurion's father had been moved from intensive care to a regular hospital room, the doctor "had to spend time finding out if you transferred or died."

Laurion also complained that McKee treated them brusquely and was insensitive to the family's concerns about the patient being seen in public in a gown that gaped open in the back.

In an interview, Kelly said nothing Laurion posted was defamatory - a false statement that harms a person's reputation.

The court is expected to rule on the case sometime in the next few months.

Lawsuits over professional reviews are uncommon in part because most patients write positive reviews, Goldman said. And many states have passed laws that block the kind of lawsuits that are filed mainly to scare someone into shutting up on matters of public concern.

Known as "strategic lawsuits against public participation," those complaints are often forbidden by broad laws that protect criticism even if it's wrong, Goldman said.

When health care providers do sue, they rarely succeed. Of 28 such lawsuits that Goldman tracked, 16 had been dismissed and six settled. The others were pending.

One notable exception was a Maine case in which a chiropractor sued a former patient for postings on Facebook and websites that accused him of sexually assaulting her. The courts concluded she probably fabricated her story.

In June, a judge ruled that the chiropractor could legally attach $100,000 worth of the patient's property to his claim as security pending further proceedings in the case.

Yelp says reviewers are well within their rights to express opinions and relate their experiences.

Spokeswoman Kristen Whisenand says the company discourages professionals from using what she called the "nuclear option" of suing over a negative review. She said they rarely succeed and wind up drawing more attention to the review they dislike.

Angie Hicks, co-founder of Angie's List, said people shouldn't be afraid to post honest opinions about health care or other services.

"Everyone has the right to free speech," Hicks said. "The key here is giving your honest opinion. Honesty is your best defense. Truth is your best defense."

Jeff Hermes, director of the Citizens Media Law Project at Harvard University's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, said people who want to post critical reviews should think about whether they can back up their statements.

Goldman advises reviewers to remember that they are still taking a risk anytime they criticize someone in a public forum.

"The reality is that we bet our house every time that we post content online," he said.

lawsuits

Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law, said lawsuits over professional reviews are uncommon in part because most patients write positive reviews. Many states have passed laws that block the kind of lawsuits that are filed mainly to scare someone into shutting up on matters of public concern.

success

When health care providers do sue, they rarely succeed. Of 28 such lawsuits that Goldman tracked, 16 had been dismissed and six settled. The others were pending.

Copyright © 2012 The Virginian-Pilot, Inc.

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Online reviews carry legal risks Doctor sues over critical remarks, soiled reputation
10/24/2012
Journal Gazette, The

A Minnesota doctor took offense when a patient's son posted critical remarks about him on some rate-your-doctor websites, including a comment by a nurse who purportedly called the physician "a real tool."

So Dr. David McKee had an unusually aggressive response: He sued the son for alleged defamation. The Duluth neurologist's improbable case has advanced all the way to the Minnesota Supreme Court, which is weighing whether the lawsuit should go to trial.

"His reputation is at stake. He does not want to be a target for false and malicious remarks," said his lawyer, Marshall Tanick.

McKee's case highlights the tension that sometimes develops on websites such as Yelp and Angie's List when the free-speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names.

"Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that."

Most online reviews never provoke any response. And successful challenges to negative reviews are rare. Americans are legally entitled to express opinions, as long as they don't knowingly make false statements.

But if the two sides contest basic facts, disputes can swiftly escalate.

At issue are six of Dennis Laurion's statements, including the account of the nurse's name-calling. McKee and his attorney say the unnamed nurse doesn't exist and that Laurion invented her to hide behind. Laurion maintains she is real but that he can't recall her name.

In arguments before the court in September, Laurion attorney John Kelly said his client's statements were legally protected opinion that conveyed dismay over how McKee treated Laurion's father, who had suffered a stroke. The posts described a single visit that lasted 10 to 15 minutes.

The review said McKee seemed upset that after Laurion's father had been moved from intensive care to a regular hospital room, the doctor "had to spend time finding out if you transferred or died."

Laurion also complained that McKee treated them brusquely and was insensitive to the family's concerns about the patient being seen in public in a gown that gaped open in the back.

Kelly said that nothing Laurion posted was defamatory, or falsely harmful to a person's reputation.

The court is expected to rule on the case in the next few months.

Lawsuits over professional reviews are uncommon in part because most patients write positive reviews, Goldman said.

And many states have passed laws that block the kind of lawsuits that are filed mainly to scare someone into shutting up on matters of public concern.

Known as "strategic lawsuits against public participation," those complaints are often forbidden by broad laws that protect criticism even if it's wrong, Goldman said.

When health care providers do sue, they rarely succeed. Of 28 such lawsuits that Goldman tracked, 16 had been dismissed and six settled. The others were pending.

Yelp says reviewers are well within their rights to express opinions and relate their experiences.

Spokeswoman Kristen Whisenand says the company discourages professionals from using what she called the "nuclear option" of suing over a negative review. She said they rarely succeed and wind up drawing more attention to the review they dislike.

Angie Hicks, co-founder of Angie's List, said people shouldn't be afraid to post honest opinions about health care or other services.

"Everyone has the right to free speech. The key here is giving your honest opinion. Honesty is your best defense. Truth is your best defense."

Copyright © 2012 ProQuest Information and Learning Company; All Rights Reserved.

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Tuscaloosa News - Online, The

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Bangor Daily News

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. “Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had,” said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are “evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that.” Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
KYPost.com

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Winston-Salem Journal - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. “Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had,” said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are “evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that.” Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
Atlanta Journal-Constitution - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks | View Clip
10/24/2012
WSLS-TV - Online

...speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names. "Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that." Most online reviews never provoke any response....

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Filibustered Federal Appeals Court Nominee Goodwin Liu Proves Himself 'Anything But Extreme' On State Bench | View Clip
10/23/2012
Think Progress

...over a wage law. Although it's still too early to assess the kind of judge Liu will become, the former board member of an ACLU chapter has blended easily with the six other judges, all Republican appointees. “A paragon of judicial restraint,” opined Santa Clara University law professor Gerald Uelmen in describing Liu's early record. […] If you asked the prominent legal figures from across the ideological spectrum who backed Liu's nomination from the start, they never doubted that Liu would...

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Grant County prosecutors seek DA's office | View Clip
10/23/2012
Headlight - Online

...them to join the "Z" party." Christine Steele can be reached at (575) 538-5893 ext. 5802. CANDIDATE PROFILES District Attorney of the Sixth Judicial District George Zsoka Political party: Republican Age: 49 Education: BA in history from Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, Calif. (1984). JD from Santa Clara University, (1987) Immediate family: Wife Lynn, lived in Silver City since 1997. Past political or public service positions: No previous political...

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REALTOR Leadership Program RLP | View Clip
10/23/2012
Realtor Magazine - Online

Suzanne Yost has been a REALTOR® for 31 years, currently with Alain Pinel REALTORS® in Los Gatos, CA. She is a graduate of Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and Santa Clara University School of Law and is licensed to practice law in California. In addition to real estate, Suzanne teaches contract and risk management courses for local associations and Graduate Realtor Institute as master faculty. She...

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U.S. Disavows Patent at Center of Apple-Samsung Dispute
10/23/2012
New York Times, The

The United States Patent and Trademark Office has decided that one of the smartphone patents at the center of the legal dispute between Apple and Samsung Electronics -- which resulted in a jury award to Apple of $1.05 billion -- should never have been granted.

The patent office decision is an initial ruling, in a document dated Oct. 15, and filed electronically on Monday, and probably will be challenged by Apple. It affects the patent for Apple's "rubber-banding" or "bounce" feature, which makes the digital page bounce when a user pulls a finger from the top of the touch screen to the bottom.

If the patent office ruling withstands challenges by Apple, it could be used to roll back the $1.05 billion in damages in the California case and strengthen Samsung's hand in settlement talks with Apple, said James E. Bessen, a lecturer at the Boston University School of Law. The patent office's action, patent specialists say, shows that the office, and not only courts around the world, will be an important front in the smartphone patent wars. These legal clashes mainly pit Apple against companies that use Google's Android software for smartphones, including Samsung, HTC and Motorola Mobility, which Google acquired last year.

The patent office ruling was first reported Tuesday by Florian Müeller, a patent analyst and blogger based in Germany.

The decision to invalidate the Apple patent was made under longstanding procedures for re-examining previously granted patents.

Under the America Invents Act, which was passed last year, the post-grant review process is being strengthened and applies to patent re-examination requests filed after Sept. 16.

Patent specialists say the new rules will make it more likely that courts will wait until the patent office has finished studying whether a patent should be invalidated. And the new law gives the director of the patent office the power to order that a patent be re-examined.

"The patent office now has the opportunity to actually take the lead rather than following the courts," said Arti K. Rai, a professor at Duke University School of Law and a former external affairs administrator at the patent office. "This has the potential to be a really important way to try to curb the problems with existing patents."

A major problem, according to patent specialists, is that the patent office grants patents too easily in the first place. That is particularly the case, they say, with certain kinds of patents, including those on software. Unlike pharmaceuticals, where a single clearly defined molecule can be the patented invention, software patents often describe digital concepts carried out in code. In software, the boundaries are less clear, and innovation tends to be step-by-step, building on years, sometimes decades of work.

Big technology companies, patent specialists say, have exploited the complexity and uncertainty of software to amass large portfolios of patents.

Frontline patent examiners, working under tight time pressure, they say, tend to be outmatched by wealthy companies when patents are filed. But post-grant review affords another, more painstaking look. "It gives the patent office the ability to focus on the patents that really matter," said Colleen Chien, an assistant professor at the Santa Clara University Law School.

The patent office's re-examination team issued its invalidation decision on patent 7,469,381. It was one of the six patents that formed the basis of the jury verdict against Samsung in a federal court in San Jose, Calif.

The patent is at the center of Apple's intellectual property strategy in smartphones and tablets of patenting user-experience software. Upon review, the patent office determined that the idea and the bounce feature had been invented earlier, even if the pointing device was not a finger on a touch screen.

Before the California trial, Samsung had made a change to sidestep the Apple patent on its newest smartphones. The same finger stroke brings a blue glow at the bottom of the screen, not a bounce.

This week, Samsung filed a copy of the patent office's initial invalidation ruling on the Apple patent with the judge in the California case, Judge Lucy Koh. Samsung has asked that Judge Koh overrule the jury. And the company is appealing the entire verdict.

The Android camp has filed other requests to re-examine Apple smartphone patents with the patent office.

In a statement, Allen Lo, Google's deputy general counsel, said: "The patent office plays a critical role in ensuring that overly broad patents cannot be used to limit consumer choice. We appreciate the care the patent office has taken in re-examining dubious software claims."

Apple did not respond to an e-mail request for comment.

Copyright © 2012 The New York Times Company

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks
10/23/2012
Associated Press (AP) - Online (United States)

MINNEAPOLIS_A Minnesota doctor took offense when a patient's son posted critical remarks about him on some rate-your-doctor websites, including a comment by a nurse who purportedly called the physician "a real tool."

So Dr. David McKee had an unusually aggressive response: He sued the son for defamation. The Duluth neurologist's improbable case has advanced all the way to the Minnesota Supreme Court, which is weighing whether the lawsuit should go to trial.

"His reputation is at stake. He does not want to be a target for false and malicious remarks," said his lawyer, Marshall Tanick.

McKee's case highlights the tension that sometimes develops on websites such as Yelp and Angie's List when the free speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names.

"Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that."

Most online reviews never provoke any response. And successful challenges to negative reviews are rare. Americans are legally entitled to express opinions, as long as they don't knowingly make false statements.

But if the two sides contest basic facts, disputes can swiftly escalate.

At issue are six of Dennis Laurion's statements, including the account of the nurse's name calling. McKee and his attorney say the unnamed nurse doesn't exist and that Laurion invented her to hide behind. Laurion maintains she is real, but he can't recall her name.

In arguments before the court in September, Laurion attorney John Kelly said his client's statements were legally protected opinion that conveyed dismay over how McKee treated Laurion's father, who had suffered a stroke. The posts described a single visit that lasted 10 to 15 minutes.

The review said McKee seemed upset that after Laurion's father had been moved from intensive care to a regular hospital room, the doctor "had to spend time finding out if you transferred or died."

Laurion also complained that McKee treated them brusquely and was insensitive to the family's concerns about the patient being seen in public in a gown that gaped open in the back.

In an interview, Kelly said nothing Laurion posted was defamatory _ a false statement that harms a person's reputation.

The court is expected to rule on the case sometime in the next few months.

Lawsuits over professional reviews are uncommon in part because most patients write positive reviews, Goldman said. And many states have passed laws that block the kind of lawsuits that are filed mainly to scare someone into shutting up on matters of public concern.

Known as "strategic lawsuits against public participation," those complaints are often forbidden by broad laws that protect criticism even if it's wrong, Goldman said.

When health care providers do sue, they rarely succeed. Of 28 such lawsuits that Goldman tracked, 16 had been dismissed and six settled. The others were pending.

One notable exception was a Maine case in which a chiropractor sued a former patient for postings on Facebook and websites that accused him of sexually assaulting her. The courts concluded she probably fabricated her story.

In June, a judge ruled that the chiropractor could legally attach $100,000 worth of the patient's property to his claim as security pending further proceedings in the case, which remains open.

Yelp says reviewers are well within their rights to express opinions and relate their experiences.

Spokeswoman Kristen Whisenand says the company discourages professionals from using what she called the "nuclear option" of suing over a negative review. She said they rarely succeed and wind up drawing more attention to the review they dislike.

Angie Hicks, co-founder of Angie's List, said people shouldn't be afraid to post honest opinions about health care or other services.

"Everyone has the right to free speech," Hicks said. "The key here is giving your honest opinion. Honesty is your best defense. Truth is your best defense."

Jeff Hermes, director of the Citizens Media Law Project at Harvard University's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, said people who want to post critical reviews should think about whether they can back up their statements. And they can strengthen their position by stating the facts on which their opinions are based.

Goldman advises reviewers to remember that they are still taking a risk anytime they criticize someone in a public forum.

"The reality is that we bet our house every time that we post content online," Goldman said. "It's a lousy answer from a societal standpoint because we need people to share their experiences so vendors will be punished or rewarded as appropriate."

Copyright © 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Critical online reviews can carry legal risks
10/23/2012
Associated Press (AP)

MINNEAPOLIS_A Minnesota doctor took offense when a patient's son posted critical remarks about him on some rate-your-doctor websites, including a comment by a nurse who purportedly called the physician "a real tool."

So Dr. David McKee had an unusually aggressive response: He sued the son for defamation. The Duluth neurologist's improbable case has advanced all the way to the Minnesota Supreme Court, which is weighing whether the lawsuit should go to trial.

"His reputation is at stake. He does not want to be a target for false and malicious remarks," said his lawyer, Marshall Tanick.

McKee's case highlights the tension that sometimes develops on websites such as Yelp and Angie's List when the free speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names.

"Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that."

Most online reviews never provoke any response. And successful challenges to negative reviews are rare. Americans are legally entitled to express opinions, as long as they don't knowingly make false statements.

But if the two sides contest basic facts, disputes can swiftly escalate.

At issue are six of Dennis Laurion's statements, including the account of the nurse's name calling. McKee and his attorney say the unnamed nurse doesn't exist and that Laurion invented her to hide behind. Laurion maintains she is real, but he can't recall her name.

In arguments before the court in September, Laurion attorney John Kelly said his client's statements were legally protected opinion that conveyed dismay over how McKee treated Laurion's father, who had suffered a stroke. The posts described a single visit that lasted 10 to 15 minutes.

The review said McKee seemed upset that after Laurion's father had been moved from intensive care to a regular hospital room, the doctor "had to spend time finding out if you transferred or died."

Laurion also complained that McKee treated them brusquely and was insensitive to the family's concerns about the patient being seen in public in a gown that gaped open in the back.

In an interview, Kelly said nothing Laurion posted was defamatory _ a false statement that harms a person's reputation.

The court is expected to rule on the case sometime in the next few months.

Lawsuits over professional reviews are uncommon in part because most patients write positive reviews, Goldman said. And many states have passed laws that block the kind of lawsuits that are filed mainly to scare someone into shutting up on matters of public concern.

Known as "strategic lawsuits against public participation," those complaints are often forbidden by broad laws that protect criticism even if it's wrong, Goldman said.

When health care providers do sue, they rarely succeed. Of 28 such lawsuits that Goldman tracked, 16 had been dismissed and six settled. The others were pending.

One notable exception was a Maine case in which a chiropractor sued a former patient for postings on Facebook and websites that accused him of sexually assaulting her. The courts concluded she probably fabricated her story.

In June, a judge ruled that the chiropractor could legally attach $100,000 worth of the patient's property to his claim as security pending further proceedings in the case, which remains open.

Yelp says reviewers are well within their rights to express opinions and relate their experiences.

Spokeswoman Kristen Whisenand says the company discourages professionals from using what she called the "nuclear option" of suing over a negative review. She said they rarely succeed and wind up drawing more attention to the review they dislike.

Angie Hicks, co-founder of Angie's List, said people shouldn't be afraid to post honest opinions about health care or other services.

"Everyone has the right to free speech," Hicks said. "The key here is giving your honest opinion. Honesty is your best defense. Truth is your best defense."

Jeff Hermes, director of the Citizens Media Law Project at Harvard University's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, said people who want to post critical reviews should think about whether they can back up their statements. And they can strengthen their position by stating the facts on which their opinions are based.

Goldman advises reviewers to remember that they are still taking a risk anytime they criticize someone in a public forum.

"The reality is that we bet our house every time that we post content online," Goldman said. "It's a lousy answer from a societal standpoint because we need people to share their experiences so vendors will be punished or rewarded as appropriate."

Copyright © 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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AP News in Brief at 5:58 p.m. EDT
10/23/2012
Associated Press (AP)

What GOP candidates didn't want: a new rape-and-abortion controversy just before Election Day

WASHINGTON (AP) _ Just as Mitt Romney and other Republicans had cut into the Democrats' advantage with female voters, a tea party-backed Senate candidate's awkward remark _ that if rape leads to pregnancy it's "something God intended" _ has propelled the emotional issue of abortion back to the political forefront. It's put GOP candidates in tight races, from the presidential candidate on down, on the defensive.

Divisive social issues are hardly what most GOP candidates want to be discussing in the few days remaining until elections largely hinging on jobs and the economy. Almost immediately after Richard Mourdock's comment, Republican candidates distanced themselves from the Indiana state treasurer _ though by varying degrees.

The Romney campaign said Wednesday that the presidential nominee disagreed with Mourdock but stood by his endorsement of the Senate candidate. There were no plans to drop a Romney testimonial ad for Mourdock that began airing in Indiana on Monday.

Mourdock's comment in a Tuesday night debate came in answer to a question on when abortion should or should not be allowed. Said Romney spokeswoman Andrea Saul: "We disagree on the policy regarding exceptions for rape and incest but still support him."

Reaction was quick from Republican senators and candidates rejecting Mourdock's statement.

___

Obama predicts deal on deficits and immigration in 2nd term; Romney makes election personal

DAVENPORT, Iowa (AP) _ President Barack Obama is confidently predicting speedy second-term agreement with Republicans to reduce federal deficits and overhaul immigration laws, commenting before setting out Wednesday on a 40-hour campaign marathon through battleground states that could decide whether he'll get the chance. Republican Mitt Romney looked to the Midwest for a breakthrough in a close race shadowed by a weak economy.

Romney declared, "We're going to get this economy cooking again," addressing a boisterous crowd in Reno, Nev., before flying back eastward to tend to his prospects in Ohio and Iowa. Romney urged audience members to consider their personal circumstances, and he said the outcome of the Nov. 6 election "will make a difference for the nation, will make a difference for the families of the nation and will make a difference for your family, individually and specifically."

With 13 days until Election Day, opinion polls depicted a close race nationally. Romney's campaign claims momentum as well as the lead in Florida and North Carolina, two battleground states with a combined 44 of the 270 electoral votes needed to win. Obama's aides insist the president is ahead or tied with his rival in both of those states and in the other seven decisive battlegrounds.

Not even Obama, in an interview with radio host Tom Joyner, predicted that fellow Democrats would win control of the House from Republicans, who are looking to renew a majority they won two years ago in a landslide triggered by the tea party.

The Democrats and Republicans are struggling uncertainly for control of the Senate. And for the second time, a hard-fought Senate campaign was jolted by a dispute over abortion, in this case a statement by Republican Richard Mourdock of Indiana that when a woman becomes pregnant by rape, "that's something God intended" and there should be no abortion allowed.

___

Study: Aspirin may treat certain types of colon cancer; a gene-targeted drug for just pennies?

NEW YORK (AP) _ Aspirin, one of the world's oldest and cheapest drugs, has shown remarkable promise in treating colon cancer in people with mutations in a gene that's thought to play a role in the disease.

Among patients with the mutations, those who regularly took aspirin lived longer than those who didn't, a major study found. Five years after their cancers were diagnosed, 97 percent of the aspirin users were still alive versus 74 percent of those not taking the drug.

Aspirin seemed to make no difference in patients who did not have the mutations.

This sort of study can't prove that aspirin caused the better survival, and doctors say more research must confirm the findings before aspirin can be recommended more widely. The study wasn't designed to test aspirin; people were taking it on their own for various reasons.

Still, the results suggest that this simple medicine might be the cheapest gene-targeting therapy ever found for cancer. About one-sixth of all colon cancer patients have the mutated gene and might be helped by aspirin. And aspirin costs just pennies a day.

___

Ind. GOP Senate candidate Mourdock stands by rape, abortion comment; says others twisted words

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) _ Indiana Republican Senate candidate Richard Mourdock said Wednesday that he is standing by his statement that when a woman becomes pregnant during a rape "that's something God intended." He says some people have twisted the meaning of his comment.

Mourdock said in a news conference that he abhors any sexual violence and regrets it if his comment during a debate Tuesday night left another impression. He said he firmly believes all life is precious and that he abhors violence of any kind.

"I spoke from my heart. And speaking from my heart, speaking from the deepest level of my faith, I would not apologize. I would be less than faithful if I said anything other than life is precious, I believe it's a gift from god," Mourdock said

Presidential candidate Mitt Romney and other Republicans have distanced themselves from Mourdock's stance.

Mourdock, who has been locked in one of the country's most expensive and closely watched Senate races, was asked during the final minutes of a debate Tuesday night whether abortion should be allowed in cases of rape or incest.

___

US suit cites 'brazen' mortgage fraud at Countrywide, even after Bank of America purchase

NEW YORK (AP) _ The latest federal lawsuit over alleged mortgage fraud paints an unflattering picture of a doomed lender: Executives at Countrywide Financial urged workers to churn out loans, accepted fudged applications and tried to hide ballooning defaults.

The suit, filed Wednesday by the top federal prosecutor in Manhattan, also underscored how Bank of America's purchase of Countrywide in July 2008, just before the financial crisis, backfired severely.

The prosecutor, Preet Bharara, said he was seeking more than $1 billion, but the suit could ultimately recover much more in damages.

"This lawsuit should send another clear message that reckless lending practices will not be tolerated," Bharara said in a statement. He described Countrywide's practices as "spectacularly brazen in scope."

He also charged that Bank of America has resisted buying back soured mortgages from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which bought loans from Countrywide.

___

UN Security Council backs plan for Syria truce over holiday weekend, but skepticism prevails

BEIRUT (AP) _ The U.N. Security Council gave unanimous backing Wednesday to a four-day truce proposed by the international mediator for Syria to mark a major Muslim holiday after he warned that the failure of yet another cease-fire plan would only worsen the fighting.

Yet even this modest effort _ the international community's only plan for scaling back the violence _ appears doomed.

Previous cease-fire missions have failed, in part because neither Syrian President Bashar Assad nor rebels trying to topple him had an incentive to end their bloody war of attrition. Both sides believe they can still make gains on the battlefield even as they are locked in a stalemate, and neither has faith in negotiations on a political transition.

Lakhdar Brahimi, the U.N.-Arab League envoy to Syria, has proposed that both sides lay down their arms during the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, which begins Friday.

The Security Council is normally divided on Syria, but Assad allies Russia and China joined other council members in endorsing the idea of a temporary truce that is meant to pave the way for talks on ending Syria's 19-month-old conflict.

___

Gaza militants blast southern Israel with rockets, drawing airstrikes, threats of retaliation

JERUSALEM (AP) _ Hamas militants in the Gaza Strip fired dozens of rockets and mortar shells into southern Israel on Wednesday in the heaviest bombardment on the area in months, drawing ominous Israeli threats of retaliation and dangers of escalation.

The violence came a day after a landmark visit to Gaza by the emir of Qatar. Israeli officials suggested the visit, the first by a head of state to the Hamas-ruled territory, emboldened the militant group.

The rocket fire began shortly after the emir left Gaza late Tuesday and continued through the night. Israeli officials said more than 80 projectiles were fired, and Hamas claimed responsibility for many of the attacks.

Israel responded with a series of airstrikes on rocket launchers, killing two Palestinian militants, according to Gaza medical officials. Two other Palestinians were killed Tuesday.

Three Thai laborers working on an Israeli farm were wounded, two seriously, when a rocket hit a chicken coop. Other rockets badly damaged five houses and broke car windows. Schools in the area were closed.

___

Provocative research could lead to babies with DNA from 3 people, avoiding rare disease risk

NEW YORK (AP) _ Scientists in Oregon have created embryos with genes from one man and two women, using a provocative technique that could someday be used to prevent babies from inheriting certain rare incurable diseases.

The researchers at Oregon Health & Sciences University said they are not using the embryos to produce children, and it is not clear when or even if this technique will be put to use. But it has already stirred a debate over its risks and ethics in Britain, where scientists did similar work a few years ago.

The British experiments, reported in 2008, led to headlines about the possibility someday of babies with three parents. But that's an overstatement. The DNA from the second woman amounts to less than 1 percent of the embryo's genes, and it isn't the sort that makes a child look like Mom or Dad. The procedure is simply a way of replacing some defective genes that sabotage the normal workings of cells.

The British government is asking for public comment on the technology before it decides whether to allow its use in the future. One concern it cites is whether such DNA alteration could be an early step down a slippery slope toward "designer babies" _ ordering up, say, a petite, blue-eyed girl or tall, dark-haired boy.

Questions have also arisen about the safety of the technique, not only for the baby who results from the egg, but also for the child's descendants.

___

Libyan pro-government militiamen occupy center of former Gadhafi stronghold

BANI WALID, Libya (AP) _ Libya's government declared Wednesday that it had taken control of one of the last strongholds of deposed dictator Moammar Gadhafi's loyalists, as its fighters in the heart of the city fired their guns into the air to celebrate victory after fierce battles that left dozens dead and thousands displaced.

The capture of Bani Walid, some 140 kilometers (90 miles) southeast of Tripoli, was a triumph for the government that replaced Gadhafi's regime. But the length of time it took the government to secure the town _ a full year _ underlined the difficulties faced by the new regime in imposing its authority over squabbling tribes and heavily armed militias.

The victory could even spark new violence. The government-backed militia that led the charge came from the city of Misrata, a longtime rival of Bani Walid, and reprisals could result.

The New York based Human Rights Watch group was critical of the attack and urged the government to protect residents from revenge attacks.

The Libyan military's Chief of Staff Youssef al-Mankoush said military operations in the city were terminated but that some forces were still chasing a few pockets of Gadhafi loyalists. He was speaking in Tripoli.

___

Critical online reviews can escalate into legal battles between doctors, unsatisfied patients

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) _ A Minnesota doctor took offense when a patient's son posted critical remarks about him on some rate-your-doctor websites, including a comment by a nurse who purportedly called the physician "a real tool."

So Dr. David McKee had an unusually aggressive response: He sued the son for defamation. The Duluth neurologist's improbable case has advanced all the way to the Minnesota Supreme Court, which is weighing whether the lawsuit should go to trial.

"His reputation is at stake. He does not want to be a target for false and malicious remarks," said his lawyer, Marshall Tanick.

McKee's case highlights the tension that sometimes develops on websites such as Yelp and Angie's List when the free speech rights of patients and their families clash with the rights of doctors, lawyers and other professionals to protect their good names.

"Patients now have power to affect their businesses in ways they never had," said Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law who studies the issue. Health care providers are "evolving how to deal with patient feedback, but they're still in the process of learning how to do that."

Copyright © 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney | View Clip
10/22/2012
Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online

...in creating immigration policy is emerging as the most salient issue to many immigrants. Presidents can do a lot on the immigration front even if Congress refuses to take up the issue of comprehensive reform, said Pratheepan Gulasekaram, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. The Obama administration, for instance, has "far outstripped its predecessors in terms of year-on-year deportations," Gulasekaram said. It has also, however, used its executive discretion to do something...

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Presidential candidates vary widely on immigration policies | View Clip
10/22/2012
Vallejo Times-Herald - Online

...in creating immigration policy is emerging as the most salient issue to many immigrants. Presidents can do a lot on the immigration front even if Congress refuses to take up the issue of comprehensive reform, said Pratheepan Gulasekaram, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. The Obama administration, for instance, has "far outstripped its predecessors in terms of year-on-year deportations," Gulasekaram said. It has also, however, used its executive discretion to do something...

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Dennis W. Chiu is running for the El Camino Hospital District Board on a reform platform Courtesy of Dennis W. Chiu | View Clip
10/22/2012
Mountain View Patch

...General Information Name : Mr. Dennis W. Chiu Age : 41 Place of residence : Sunnyvale Education College Attended college : Yes College : UCLA Degree : Bachelor of Arts Year of graduation : 1993 Grad school Ph D. University : Santa Clara University School of Law Area of research : Law (Juris Doctor) Year of graduation : 1996 Employment Information Job titles held : Vice President & General Counsel, Chief Operating Officer & General Counsel, Owner, Attorney...

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Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney | View Clip
10/22/2012
Oroville Mercury-Register - Online

...in creating immigration policy is emerging as the most salient issue to many immigrants. Presidents can do a lot on the immigration front even if Congress refuses to take up the issue of comprehensive reform, said Pratheepan Gulasekaram, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. The Obama administration, for instance, has "far outstripped its predecessors in terms of year-on-year deportations," Gulasekaram said. It has also, however, used its executive discretion to do something...

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Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney | View Clip
10/22/2012
Inland Valley Daily Bulletin - Online

...in creating immigration policy is emerging as the most salient issue to many immigrants. Presidents can do a lot on the immigration front even if Congress refuses to take up the issue of comprehensive reform, said Pratheepan Gulasekaram, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. The Obama administration, for instance, has "far outstripped its predecessors in terms of year-on-year deportations," Gulasekaram said. It has also, however, used its executive discretion to do something...

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Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney | View Clip
10/21/2012
InsideBayArea.com

...in creating immigration policy is emerging as the most salient issue to many immigrants. Presidents can do a lot on the immigration front even if Congress refuses to take up the issue of comprehensive reform, said Pratheepan Gulasekaram, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. The Obama administration, for instance, has "far outstripped its predecessors in terms of year-on-year deportations," Gulasekaram said. It has also, however, used its executive discretion to do something...

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Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney | View Clip
10/21/2012
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...in creating immigration policy is emerging as the most salient issue to many immigrants. Presidents can do a lot on the immigration front even if Congress refuses to take up the issue of comprehensive reform, said Pratheepan Gulasekaram, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. The Obama administration, for instance, has "far outstripped its predecessors in terms of year-on-year deportations," Gulasekaram said. It has also, however, used its executive discretion to do something...

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Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney | View Clip
10/21/2012
Marin Independent Journal - Online

...in creating immigration policy is emerging as the most salient issue to many immigrants. Presidents can do a lot on the immigration front even if Congress refuses to take up the issue of comprehensive reform, said Pratheepan Gulasekaram, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. The Obama administration, for instance, has "far outstripped its predecessors in terms of year-on-year deportations," Gulasekaram said. It has also, however, used its executive discretion to do something...

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Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney | View Clip
10/21/2012
Chico Enterprise Record - Online

...in creating immigration policy is emerging as the most salient issue to many immigrants. Presidents can do a lot on the immigration front even if Congress refuses to take up the issue of comprehensive reform, said Pratheepan Gulasekaram, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. The Obama administration, for instance, has "far outstripped its predecessors in terms of year-on-year deportations," Gulasekaram said. It has also, however, used its executive discretion to do something...

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Immigration a wedge between Obama, Romney | View Clip
10/21/2012
San Gabriel Valley Tribune - Online

...in creating immigration policy is emerging as the most salient issue to many immigrants. Presidents can do a lot on the immigration front even if Congress refuses to take up the issue of comprehensive reform, said Pratheepan Gulasekaram, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. The Obama administration, for instance, has "far outstripped its predecessors in terms of year-on-year deportations," Gulasekaram said. It has also, however, used its executive discretion to do something...

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Activist challenges Facebook's use of personal data | View Clip
10/20/2012
Rinf.com

...a high school exchange student in Florida, where he was amazed to see that most Americans don't have the thick hedges favored by Austrians to limit views into their homes. But it was his second stint in the United States, as an exchange student at Santa Clara University School of Law in Silicon Valley, that focused him on technology issues. When a Facebook official made a guest appearance at a class, he botched a description of European privacy law, Schrems said. That emboldened him...

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LAS VEGAS JUSTICE OF THE PEACE DEPARTMENT 8
10/20/2012
Las Vegas Review-Journal

By JOE HAWK

LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL

They may be fighting for the same spot on the judicial bench, but incumbent Ann E. Zimmerman and challenger Amy Chelini share one goal for Las Vegas Justice Court Department 8: ensuring fairness to all parties who step into the courtroom.

Justice of the Peace Zimmerman is seeking her third six-year term, while Chelini, a local defense attorney who once worked as a prosecutor in the Clark County district attorney's office, is going for her first judicial post.

Both stress the cornerstone of interpreting law — a balanced judicial scale — in their campaign for the job.

“To be a good judge you have to be fair to both sides. You have to be willing to listen,” said Zimmerman, who earned her law degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City in 1989. “I know when I'm campaigning, there are people who want you to say you will do this or do that or be something you aren't. But my purpose is to be fair. You can't compromise your position in any way as a judge.”

Zimmerman received a 68 percent retention rating in the Las Vegas Review-Journal's 2011 Judicial Performance Evaluation.

Chelini also cited “fairness and integrity” as being something she would bring to the bench, if elected. She said that although she comes from a family filled with strong law enforcement ties — a father, two brothers and two nephews — she would not have a pro-police bent.

“That wouldn't be a concern of mine. Remember, I'm a defense attorney right now,” said Chelini, who graduated in 1999 from Santa Clara University Law School in California . “I think everybody who walks into a courtroom wants a judge up there who will be fair and treat people with integrity. They want to know they will receive a fair shake.”

Chelini said a judgeship is something she has always aspired to, and she is receiving “a tremendous amount of support from seniors, police and unions” while out on the campaign trail.

“It's encouraging and something I'm tremendously proud of,” she said of the backing.

Zimmerman, meanwhile, said she has learned a lot from her 12 years as justice of the peace, and her proudest accomplishment has been her volunteer work with a drug court program that serves to rehabilitate, rather than incarcerate, many first-time offenders.

The program requires the offender to pay $400 toward treatment, with the rest subsidized by a grant. Keeping someone in the Clark County Detention Center, on the other hand, costs $150 per day, Zimmerman explained.

“Drug addiction is such a big problem in our community,” she said. “We all have had a friend or a family member or a co-worker who has been touched by the drug issue. The thing is we can't keep arresting these people, putting them in jail and then releasing them, where many of them go back out and get involved with drugs again.

“This treatment program is proving to be successful.”

Whoever is elected this term will handle civil cases for the first year.

Contact reporter Joe Hawk at jhawk@reviewjournal.com or 702-387-2912.

Name: Ann E. Zimmerman *

Party: Nonpartisan

Age: 48

Occupation: Justice of the peace

Name: Amy Chelini

Party: Nonpartisan

Age: 40

Occupation: Attorney

Copyright © 2012 Las Vegas R-J. All rights reserved.

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GM, Ford retiree trusts shortfalls expanded in 2011: filings | View Clip
10/19/2012
US Daily, The

...shares and common stock, fell by more than one-fifth, or about $3 billion, while the broader S&P 500 index was flat. "There are some risks you cannot escape when you have assets that are north of a billion dollars," said Steve Diamond, a law professor at Santa Clara University School of Law who specializes in corporate finance and securities law. "But you're not allowed to turn yourself into a hedge fund." The VEBA fared worse than the automaker's pension plan, which was 13 percent underfunded...

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Medical Marijuana: A Surprising Solution to Severe Morning Sickness | View Clip
10/19/2012
Mothering

...the lock, so I add an extra measure of safety by educating them about the honest dangers of using medicines that are not needed. In addition, by sharing my views about the politics behind the issues, I am teaching them another, equally important lesson. As Santa Clara University School of Law Professor Gerald Uelmen stated last year at the medical marijuana giveaway at the City Hall in Santa Cruz, California, “We are teaching our children compassion for the sick and dying; only a twisted and...

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Santa Clara County Superior Court hires San Jose's senior deputy city attorney | View Clip
10/19/2012
Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online

...the Political Reform Act, Ralph M. Brown Act, California Public Records Act and Elections Code. Herrick has also worked on litigation involving the city's ethics ordinances. Herrick has a bachelor of arts degree from the UC San Diego and a J.D. from Santa Clara University. She has been involved in the Santa Clara County Bar Association, where she served as president as well as on its board of trustees. At the Superior Court, Herrick will oversee a wide range of legal services and...

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*Second Circuit Finds Defense of Marriage Act Unconstitutional | View Clip
10/19/2012
Tax Analysts

In affirming a refund of estate tax paid by the surviving spouse of a same-sex marriage, the Second Circuit on October 18 held that the federal definition of marriage in the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional.

Edith Windsor sued for a refund of tax paid on the estate of her spouse, arguing that she would have received a marital deduction under section 2056 for property passing to her but for section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) (1 U.S.C. 7), which limits the definition of marriage under federal law to heterosexual couples.

Windsor argued that DOMA violates equal protection under the Fifth Amendment. In June the district court held that DOMA was unconstitutional and granted Windsor a refund. Windsor filed for expedited appeal in the Second Circuit, as well as for Supreme Court review of the district court decision. (For Windsor v. United States, Nos. 12-2335, 12-2435 (2nd Cir. 2012), see Doc 2012-21564 2012 TNT 203-14: Court Opinions . For the district court opinion, No. 1:10-cv-08435 (S.D. N.Y. 2012), see Doc 2012-12315 or 2012 TNT 111-17 2012 TNT 111-17: Court Opinions. For the certiorari petition, see Doc 2012-19622 or 2012 TNT 185-24 2012 TNT 185-24: Court Petitions and Complaints.)

The three-judge panel from the Second Circuit, with one dissenter, held that gays are a quasi-suspect class and that DOMA is subject to intermediate scrutiny. While the district court had applied rational basis review, the circuit court found that gays as a group qualified under the factors used by the Supreme Court to define quasi-suspect classes. The Second Circuit is the first circuit court to apply heightened scrutiny to discrimination against sexual orientation.

Under intermediate scrutiny, a classification must be substantially related to an important government interest. The court held that the various arguments offered in defense of DOMA, including establishing a uniform definition of marriage and conserving federal resources, failed to meet that test. The defense of DOMA fell to counsel hired by the Bipartisan Legal Advisory Group of the House of Representatives, after the Department of Justice ceased defending the law in 2011.

The First Circuit held earlier this year in Massachusetts v. Health and Human Services that the definition of marriage in DOMA is invalid. In that case, the plaintiffs challenged restrictions on federal benefits resulting from DOMA, including the inability to file joint tax returns. (For Massachusetts v. Health and Human Services, Nos. 10-2204, 10-2207, 10-221 (1st Cir. 2012), see Doc 2012-11729 or 2012 TNT 106-15 2012 TNT 106-15: Court Opinions.)

The Supreme Court is expected to accept a case this term to decide whether the federal definition of marriage is constitutional.

"We appear to be at or close to the brink of achieving formal equality for married same-sex couples under the federal tax laws, which is long overdue," said professor Anthony C. Infanti of the University of Pittsburgh School of Law.

Professor Patricia Cain of Santa Clara University said married same-sex couples have been encouraged to amend prior returns to claim married status before the statute of limitations expires, on the belief that the Supreme Court will find DOMA unconstitutional. "Although the current challenges are as applied, it seems unlikely the Court will make a decision that does not resolve the question more broadly," she said.

Wendy S. Goffe of Stoel Rives LLP said she has been building flexibility into estate plans for same-sex couples, in some cases providing different estate structures depending on whether the marital deduction is available. For example, a plan may call for a charitable remainder trust instead of a qualified terminable interest property trust if the marital deduction is not available. "As the exemption has gone up, fewer people have been affected, but if the exemption goes down it will be more important," she said. Unless the law is changed, the individual estate tax exclusion will decrease from $5.12 million to $1 million at the end of the year.

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Facebook privacy targeted by Austrian law student | View Clip
10/19/2012
Washington Post - Online

...year as a high school exchange student in Florida, where he was amazed to see that most Americans don't have the thick hedges favored by Austrians to limit views into their homes. But it was his second stint in the United States, as an exchange student at Santa Clara University School of Law in Silicon Valley, that focused him on technology issues. When a Facebook official made a guest appearance at a class, he botched a description of European privacy law, Schrems said. That emboldened him...

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If Prop 34 Fails, California Could See a Wave of Executions | View Clip
10/19/2012
Law.com

...Laurence says isn't meaningful. And some 330 inmates still haven't been appointed habeas counsel, he adds, meaning decades of litigation likely remain ahead for them. The vast majority of these people are going to die in prison of old age, he says. Santa Clara University law professor Gerald Uelmen, who was executive director of the Fair Administration of Justice commission, said even if Prop 34 fails, a relatively close vote might discourage the Legislature from paying out the extra...

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*Kanye West Dodges Allegations of Copyright Violation | View Clip
10/03/2012
Philadelphia Weekly

Kanye West: A-list hip-hop star, among the top-selling artists of the 21st century and most awarded singers of all time…and song thief?

Not so, according to a decision by the federal 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago.

West was facing a lawsuit for copyright violation filed by one Vincent Peters, also known as Vince P, alleging that the rap superstar had stolen the idea for his 2007 hit “Stronger” from another song by the same name written by Peters.

Along with the title of the song, Peters' complaint mentions that West uses a similar version of the Friedrich Nietzsche quotation, “What does not kill me makes me stronger” in his lyrics, rhymes “stronger” with “wronger” and “longer,” and includes a reference to the model Kate Moss.

However, a federal judge tossed the lawsuit last year for not meeting the standards of a copyright violation, and the appeals court recently upheld the dismissal.

“In the end we see only two songs that rhyme similar words, draw from a commonplace maxim, and analogize feminine beauty to a specific successful model,” the court's opinion reads. “These songs are separated by much more than ‘small cosmetic differences;' rather, they share only small cosmetic similarities. This means that Vince P's claim for copyright infringement fails as a matter of law.”

You Didn't Make That Up

Tyler T. Ochoa

Despite the apparent similarities in the two songs, Peters never had much of a leg to stand on when it comes to copyright infringement.

“People will look at this and say, famous singer, big corporation, they ripped off the little guy,” says Tyler T. Ochoa, an expert in copyright law and professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law. “But the fact is, he borrowed a famous quote from the public domain. The fact that more than one singer has been inspired by the quote shouldn't lead to liability.”

Point by point, the court decision took apart Peters' claim:

The use of the Nietzsche quotation clearly falls within the public domain. “You didn't make that up,” Ochoa explains. “You can only claim copyright in what is original to you.”
Rhyming “stronger” with “wronger” and “longer” isn't protected either, especially since the other words in the lyrics are different. “You're allowed to use rhyming words,” says the attorney. “Copyright does not protect the method of expression, it protects the expression that you use.”
Finally, referencing Kate Moss is also not a violation. Peters' line reads, “Trying to get a model chick like Kate Moss,” while West sings, “You could be my black Kate Moss tonight.” Not even close to a copyright problem. “Analogies of models as shorthand for beauty is common in our society,” says Ochoa. “Using Kate Moss, who is famous in her own right, doesn't make this a creative choice.”

Inspiration Irrelevant

Where Peters may have appeared to have a case against West was in his assertion that he had played his version of the song in 2006 for producer John Monopoly, who has worked with West. It seems reasonable that West could have heard Peters' version and subsequently decided to write his own song based on the same quote.

However, whether Kanye was inspired by Peters' song is irrelevant when it comes to the law. According to a 1991 Supreme Court decision, facts, ideas and things in the public domain cannot be copyrighted. “Not all copying is copyright infringement,” the law professor says.

Regardless of where West got the idea for “Stronger,” the song is original enough to beat any copyright allegations. “None of the lyrics in the verses are the same,” says Ochoa. “None of the music is alleged to be the same. So the court says, it's not the same song. It wasn't a copy of your song, it wasn't a derivative work based on your song.”

Tough luck for Peters. His track was never released, while Kanye's version of “Stronger” won a Grammy for best solo rap performance and has sold more than 4.4 million copies.

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College Fashion: Getting Colder (SLIDESHOW) | View Clip
10/20/2012
Huffington Post, The

...if you make the cut. VCU Saddle Shoes University of Alberta - photo by Skye Oleson-Cormack Sheepskin Angela, Harvard University. Photo by Emily Xie at BooksandLiquor.com Black on Black Amber at Santa Clara University. Photo by Samir Khanna Red Kiltie Anthony Miller, faculty at SCAD. Photo by Mangue Banzima. Post-Labor Day Whites Jen at Princeton University. Photo by Charmaine Lee Floral Print Harvard - Photo by...

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*Preview: Top Shelf Halloween Masquerade | View Clip
11/02/2012
Metro Silicon Valley

Lately, Santa Clara University has become a launching pad for DJs and music producers. With bars like the Hut and Da Silva's Broncos right next to campus, student music DJs have found a prime area to forge the soundtrack for some wild nights.

In particular, two students, David Belogolovsky and Raymond Jacob, have risen to dominate the SCU music scene. If you had told David Belogolovsky three years ago that he would be part of a successful lighting and event services company by his senior year, he would have been surprised. When he started out at SCU studying marketing and graphic design, Belogolovsky saw DJing as just a hobby.

Belogolovsky, who spins under the name DJ3W, got started playing at local house parties. “From there, I got my first show opening for Minnesota, Babylon System and Helicopter Showdown, which are three really big artists,” says Belogolovsky of his first big break.

What's really put Belogolovsky's name out there is his connection to Top Shelf Lighting and DJ Services. Belogolovsky heard of the small business through a friend and became one of its partners. Since then, the company has grown in size and demand. “We do weddings, concerts; we've actually done lighting for Foster the People and Dylan Francis, and at Snowglobe up in Tahoe,” Belogolovsky says.

The company also brings on other DJs to spin at shows that they mount. Raymond Jacob, who produces music under the name Atlas, is one of these DJs. Originally from Texas, Jacob now studies marketing and music at SCU and spends the rest of his time creating original, fist-pumping tracks.

“When I was a freshman I started getting really serious [about music production],” Jacob says. “When I make music, it's the purest expression of me. It's like a road map into my soul. I decided on the name Atlas because what better way than a map into Raymond Jacob as a person?”

Jacob will often drop in at the Hut on Tuesdays to spin alongside his friends at Top Shelf, and he also maintains a gig at Da Silva's Broncos, where he strives to create funky mixes that combine the current hits with his own original Atlas sound.

“I try to mix in the newest, freshest stuff that people haven't heard before and mix it with my music,” Jacob explains. However, despite his popularity as a DJ, Jacob notes, “I am a music producer first and foremost. People call me a DJ, but I've never actually spun a turntable in my life. I do it in a completely different way, with my knowledge from Santa Clara and all of these new programs I use. So it's funky, it's fresh and it's new. I hope people enjoy the sound.”

Both DJ3W and Atlas can be heard at the Top Shelf Halloween Masquerade at Neto's Market & Grill this Wednesday.—

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Instructure Creates Free 'Canvas Network' for Online Courses | View Clip
10/31/2012
Campus Technology

...of students." Some of the highlights of the system include: As part of the launch, 11 institutions have created courses on the network. These include Ball State University, Brown University, Colorado State University-Global Campus, Peninsula College, Santa Clara University, Scottsdale Community College, SeattleCentral Community College, University of Central Florida, University of Utah, University of Washington, Utah State University, and WestEd. The courses that will be offered range...

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Duke, Brown, Rice Weigh in on the College Essay | View Clip
10/22/2012
Huntington Woods-Berkley Patch

...of your dreams a movie trailer, not an entire script, so admissions staff  can know who you are. Write it yourself! “Students do not need to compile an entire season into an essay,” said Lorenzo Gamboa, associate director of undergraduate admission for Santa Clara University. “Just give us one place, one time, one moment, and that will do it for you. “The key is to show genuine passion, commitment and that they have what it takes to survive at the school.” Gamboa says the best essays...

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Instructure Launches an Open Online Course Network on Canvas | View Clip
11/01/2012
KOAM-TV - Online

...topics such as economics, math, engineering, dance, music, art, literature, business and science. A few of the institutions participating include: Brown University Ball State University Colorado State University-Global Campus Peninsula College, Santa Clara University Scottsdale Community College Seattle Central Community College Santa Clara University University of Central Florida University of Utah WestEd Lumen Learning Flat World Knowledge...

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Instructure Launches an Open Online Course Network on Canvas | View Clip
11/01/2012
KFMB-AM (760 AM Talk Radio) - Online

...topics such as economics, math, engineering, dance, music, art, literature, business and science. A few of the institutions participating include: Brown University Ball State University Colorado State University-Global Campus Peninsula College, Santa Clara University Scottsdale Community College Seattle Central Community College Santa Clara University University of Central Florida University of Utah WestEd Lumen Learning Flat World Knowledge...

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A Guide To Mindfulness At Work | View Clip
11/01/2012
Forbes - Online

...culture. The Mind Business Mindfulness In Silicon Valley One chapter in Contemplative Practices in Action is devoted to the impact of meditation in the lives of Silicon Valley leaders. In a seminar called Spirituality for Organizational Leadership at Santa Clara University, participants discuss how meditation practices can assist them in leading their organization. Those who complete the seminar tend to integrate what they learned into their busy lives in the following way: Mindfulness...

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AAUW planning its annual holiday boutique at clubhouse in San Jose | View Clip
10/31/2012
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...selection of desserts may be enjoyed at the event. Proceeds from this annual event go toward scholarships for women seeking four-year college degrees. In the past 32 years, AAUW San Jose has awarded $96,500 in scholarships to 93 women. Many have gone on to Santa Clara University, San Jose State University, Stanford University and UC-Berkeley, earning degrees in business, international studies and science. AAUW San Jose has 325 members and works toward the common goal to "advance equity for...

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Vilma Pallette, Volunteer Extraordinaire By Suzy Paluzzi | View Clip
10/31/2012
Santa Clara Weekly - Online, The

...also worked on the Santa Clara County Juvenile Justice Commission and chaired the San Jose/California Sesquicentennial Celebration. She, as a retiree, just completed the task of volunteer coordinator of Zero1 in fall, 2012. Locally, Pallette began the Santa Clara University Osher Life Long Learning Institute Volunteers and Events programs. The volunteers not only assist the professors and students, but also fundraise and help develop policies and curriculum. In 2011, Santa Clara Councilmember...

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Sesquicentennial Stories | View Clip
10/31/2012
Albany Patch

...Saint Mary's enjoyed great success. The enrollment of about thirty students in August 1868 grew to 240 by 1875. At one point, Saint Mary's was the largest institution of higher learning in the state, larger than U.C. Berkeley (1868), and the Jesuit Fathers' Santa Clara University (1851).

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CASE promotes welcoming LGBT environment on Catholic campuses | View Clip
10/30/2012
Greyhound - Online, The

...introduced only a month ago, CASE has gotten media coverage from the Human Rights Campaign and The Washington Post. Campus involvement has grown from just Georgetown and Loyola and extended to Boston College, Fordham University, College of the Holy Cross, Santa Clara University, University of San Francisco, Loyola University Chicago and Loyola University New Orleans. As for how CASE and, on Loyola's campus specifically, Spectrum will help LGBT awareness, Oropesa said, “Personally, I believe...

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and that the Mission Santa Clara University and I
10/28/2012
KGO-AM (News Talk AM 810)

however it was not until the apologist that became defined in the apologists is that age in which you begin to find ways of mentioning God in very specific terminology employing the philosophical jargon of the day and trying to not just greater theology but trying to prove that and demonstrated that with the role of the apologist ate away only ten is our number if you want to continue this conversation by all means give me call us talk to him and Campbell hi and welcome back and I wanted to clarify in a statement and I think I hear you saying is that in Europe and not a governing anger on it and went in the nineteen Creed but that what problem you think is that the church required people to believe that without opportunity did that happen around question for challenging this seems to me than single disc people aren't able to ask questions and answer them yet and held in common that I have Mennonite and that the Mission Santa Clara University and I also heard the late work with different pre- very old one and one of them I think was : eighty cool on school openly encourage quiet . and all I wanted that praying is out on ABE then that the body of pre- ejaculate I find very open-minded and uncle . upon their warm Richard or with a friend in him and him and God is teaching a lot of them sound like a guilty food turned out he had been very intelligently done a lot of investigation and note the language obtained Al and I get rated sell refreshing cell and management think I'm not because there aren't many things in the Catholic faith that I struggle with perfectly and I know a lot of women do and I don't think I need to go into that but this process is just so ... my sinks and institutions is going to is going to keep it's one you have a lot of medieval filing Catholicism have a lot of almost medieval thought and process and that doesn't change quickly and tried it out and realizing them hope and change it overnight hope this actually write and eight Bob Harris : now I heard a part that there I can't even name on that team . Marybeth Hock at Santa Clara University free to the public there is a very late very intelligent and knowledgeable professor and I around spirituality and politics spirituality and homosexuality I mean . it's an ongoing one hour lecture that happening right now in the professor who reiterated every in and told that you've learned about homosexuality and the Bible and let an eye-opener for me in actuality there ( literally called a sexual pervert family called them at basically that they had an actual preference and how were they sexual orientation this was even before it was pervert the considered mentally ill at right now in progress is it happening like you give me how this will is is is interesting thing to me is we're willing to take on issues like this in homosexuality or even abortion and discuss them debate them yelling eternal rest but when it comes to dogma and don't dare I know that there is blood on all relate to reality written by a non- cruel and probably not any give it to her quote exactly that she is something that she went that we would need asking on Intel pre- getting rained on winning being ordained and putting on the answer on abortion , sexuality and less wise counsel because because of this resolve those two conflicts on those two lifestyles of those two choices whenever you resolve those anywhere where's could change thousands and thousands of lives as well as update the image of intrusion if

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Ryan James Brandau takes over podium of Princeton Pro Musica | View Clip
10/26/2012
NJ.com

...following an intensive year-long search for a successor. He was selected from a pool of more than 50 candidates. He comes to Princeton fresh off the artistic directorship of the Santa Clara Chorale in California. He has been director of choral activities at Santa Clara University and interim artistic director of the San Francisco-based women's vocal ensemble Musae. Of Princeton Pro Musica, he says, “This is a group that I had known about years ago when I was an undergrad at Princeton. I just...

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It's a Forum Frenzy! | View Clip
10/26/2012
Avaya

...sales enablement and engagement for next generation innovations and contact center capabilities. She has over 15 years experience in strategy, sales and marketing, a BA in International Business from the University of California at Davis, and an MBA from Santa Clara University. ****************************************************************************************** The communications frenzy is afoot! Before the days of the modern Internet, companies lived or died by the service...

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Part 6: The third presidential debate | View Clip
10/25/2012
Burlington Record

...final presidential debate Staff report mercurynews.com Posted: 10/22/2012 09:49:43 PM MDT The Bay Area News Group has been talking to voters at places like World's Fare Donuts in Hayward, The Crucible industrial arts center in Oakland and Santa Clara University's debate class. After Monday night's debate between President Barack Obama and GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney in Florida, we got back to some of those voters to ask them who they thought won the final round....

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Heidi Gansert named special assistant to president for external affairs | View Clip
10/25/2012
Nevada Today

...Development and Business Relations Task Force, which includes several deans and administrators with outreach responsibilities. Gansert received a master's of business of administration from the University of Nevada, Reno and bachelor's degree in engineering from Santa Clara University. She is a member of the University of Nevada, Reno's College of Engineering Advisory Board. Her husband, Guy, is an alumnus of the University of Nevada, Reno and the University of Nevada School of Medicine. They have...

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*How to Avoid a Bonfire of the Humanities | View Clip
10/25/2012

A half-century ago in his famous "Two Cultures" speech, C.P. Snow defined the growing rift between the world of scientists (including, increasingly, the commercial world) and that of literary intellectuals (including, increasingly, the humanities). It's hard to imagine the sciences and the humanities ever having been united in common cause. But that day may come again soon.

Today, the "two cultures" not only rarely speak to one another, but also increasingly, as their languages and world views diverge, are unable to do so. They seem to interact only when science churns up in its wake some new technological phenomenon—personal computing, the Internet, bioengineering—that revolutionizes society and human interaction and forces the humanities to respond with a whole new set of theories and explanations.

Not surprisingly, as science has grown to dominate modern society, the humanities have withered into increasing irrelevancy. For them to imagine that they have anything approaching the significance or influence of the sciences smacks of a kind of sad, last-ditch desperation. Science merely nods and says, "I see your Jane Austen monographs and deconstructions of 'The Tempest' and raise you stem-cell research and the iPhone"—and then pockets all of the chips on the table.

All of this may seem like a sideshow—in our digital age the humanities will limp along as science consolidates its triumph. There is, after all, a distinct trajectory to industries and disciplines that are about to be annihilated by technology. Typically, those insular worlds operate along with misplaced confidence. They expect an industry evolution; they fail to recognize that they are facing a revolution—and if they don't utterly transform themselves, right now, it will destroy them. But of course, they never do.

I watched this happen in almost every tech industry, and now it is spreading to almost every other industry and profession. Medicine, education, governance, the military and my own profession of journalism. And so I found myself earlier this year talking with the head of the English department where I teach. The department's tenured faculty had been reduced to just a handful of professors, many nearing retirement; the rest of the staff was mostly part-time adjunct lecturers. And the students? Little more than half the number of majors of just a decade earlier. I had seen this before.

I asked him: How bad is it? "It's pretty bad," he said. "And this economy is only making it worse. There are parents now who tell their kids they will only pay tuition for a business, engineering or science degree."

Aversion to risk, lack of research money, dwindling market share, a declining talent pool. That is how mature industries die; perhaps it is the same story with aging fields of thought. But hope for the humanities may be on the horizon, coming from an unlikely source: Silicon Valley.

A few months back I invited a friend to speak in front of my professional writing class. Santosh Jayaram is the quintessential Silicon Valley high-tech entrepreneur: tech-savvy, empirical, ferociously competitive, and a veteran of Google, Twitter and a new start-up, Dabble. Afraid that he would simply run over my writing students, telling them to switch majors before it was too late, I asked him not to crush the kids' hopes any more than they already were.

Santosh said, "Are you kidding? English majors are exactly the people I'm looking for." He explained: Twenty years ago, if you wanted to start a company, you spent a month or so figuring out the product you wanted to build, then devoted the next 10 or 12 months to developing the prototype, tooling up and getting into full production.

These days, he said, everything has been turned upside down. Most products now are virtual, such as iPhone apps. You don't build them so much as construct them from chunks of existing software code—and that work can be contracted out to hungry teams of programmers anywhere in the world, who can do it in a couple of weeks.
But to get to that point, he said, you must spend a year searching for that one undeveloped niche that you can capture. And you must also use that time to find angel or venture investment, establish strategic partners, convince talented people to take the risk and join your firm, explain your product to code writers and designers, and most of all, begin to market to prospective major customers. And you have to do all of that without an actual product.

"And how do you do that?" Santosh said. "You tell stories." Stories, he said, about your product and how it will be used that are so vivid that your potential stakeholders imagine it already exists and is already part of their daily lives. Almost anything you can imagine you can now build, said Santosh, so the battleground in business has shifted from engineering, which everybody can do, to storytelling, for which many fewer people have real talent. "That's why I want to meet your English majors," he said.

Asked once what made his company special, Steve Jobs replied: "It's in Apple's DNA that technology alone is not enough—it's technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the result that makes our heart sing."

Could the humanities rebuild the shattered bridge between C.P. Snow's "two cultures" and find a place at the heart of the modern world's virtual institutions? We assume that this will be a century of technology. But if the competition in tech moves to this new battlefield, the edge will go to those institutions that can effectively employ imagination, metaphor, and most of all, storytelling. And not just creative writing, but every discipline in the humanities, from the classics to rhetoric to philosophy. Twenty-first-century storytelling: multimedia, mass customizable, portable and scalable, drawing upon the myths and archetypes of the ancient world, on ethics, and upon a deep understanding of human nature and even religious faith.

The demand is there, but the question is whether the traditional humanities can furnish the supply. If they can't or won't, they will continue to wither away. But surely there are risk-takers out there in those English and classics departments, ready to leap on this opportunity. They'd better hurry, because the other culture won't wait.

Mr. Malone is the author of the recently published "The Guardian of All Things: The Epic Story of Human Memory" (St. Martin's Press). This op-ed is based on his speech at the Rothermere American Institute at Oxford University on Oct. 18

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Assembly District 25's Bob Wieckowski challenged by newcomer ArLyne Diamond | View Clip
10/25/2012
InsideBayArea.com

...Served on city of Fremont Recreation Commission and Fremont Planning Commission. City Council 2004-2010. Elected to Assembly District 20 2010, which became District 25 after redistricting. Personal: Domestic partner Education: B.A. UC Berkeley; J.D. Santa Clara University Website: www.bobwieckowski.com

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New director takes helm of Princeton Pro Musica with Mozart Requiem
10/25/2012
Times of Trenton, The

Princeton Pro Musica

Mozart Requiem; music of Bach

When: 3 p.m. Sunday

Where: Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall, Princeton University

Admission: $25-$55; princeton.edu/utickets or at the auditorium box office after 1 p.m. today

&byline;By Ross Amico

&source;for the times

For the 33 years of its existence, Princeton Pro Musica has had a single artistic director, its founder, Frances Fowler Slade.

She conducted her last Pro Musica concert in May, when she led the choir in Bach's Mass in B minor. Now the baton passes, quite literally, to her successor, Ryan James Brandau.

Brandau takes over following an intensive year-long search for a successor. He was selected from a pool of more than 50 candidates.

He comes to Princeton fresh off the artistic directorship of the Santa Clara Chorale in California. He has been director of choral activities at Santa Clara University and interim artistic director of the San Francisco-based women's vocal ensemble Musae.

Of Princeton Pro Musica, he says, "This is a group that I had known about years ago when I was an undergrad at Princeton. I just knew that there was a very fine community ensemble in town that did a lot of major works."

Brandau received his B.A. in music, magna cum laude, from Princeton. He has been involved, in one way or another, with community choirs since his time at Yale School of Music, where he earned master of musical arts and doctor of musical arts degrees. In between, he attended Cambridge University in England as a Gates Scholar, earning an MPhil in historical musicology.

"Working with groups like this has really been a highlight for me thus far in my career," Brandau says. "It's just something about that particular energy, when you have a lot of talented singers who are not necessarily professionals, who aren't doing this for a paycheck or aren't doing it for university credit. They are doing it just because they love it, they can't live without it. It's a wonderful working environment. So when this job posting turned up, I thought that is a choir I would love to work with and love to build a career around."

Brandau's four-concert season begins Sunday with Mozart's Requiem and Bach's Cantata 118, "O Jesu Christi, meins Lebens licht."

"I thought [the Requiem] would be a great place to start," he says, "because it allows us to walk on familiar ground, but do so in a new way. Rather than try to teach the group a brand new piece, a brand new set of notes and perhaps even a brand new musical style, we're starting with a piece that is sort of deeply ingrained in everyone's hearts and ears, and it has allowed me to work on the group's sound, to bring sort of my own interpretation to the group, my own sense of style. It's just obviously a wonderful piece, and I've been wanting to do it for a couple of years."

Brandau will be employing the Robert Levin edition of the Requiem for this performance.

In a well-known piece of classical music lore (thanks especially to a fictional spin in "Amadeus"), Mozart received a commission from a mysterious stranger to compose the work. At the time of his death, only the first third or so of the piece was complete, with some indications of instrumental, choral and solo parts for the middle section.

The last third, or so it is thought, was never composed by Mozart at all. Desperate for the money, the composer's widow, Constanze, employed his student and sometimes assistant, Franz Xaver Sussmayr, to complete the piece.

Although it secured Sussmayr's posthumous fame as a musical footnote, many have long been dissatisfied with the results. Scholars and musicologists have striven for improvements over the years, but few so boldly or as convincingly as Levin, who is a noted fortepianist and Mozart scholar.

"Many members of the chorus are very fond of (the Levin), those who have sung different editions," Brandau says. "I have never conducted it before, and am very taken by it. When I spent some time with it, I thought, let's give it a whirl.

"From a practical perpective, it's different in that Levin has created a fugue to follow on the Lacrimosa movement, an "amen' fugue, that brings us kind of a different balance to the sequence that begins with "Dies Irae.' It brings a nice sort of closure to the sequence. And then there are some differences in some of the choral parts in some of the other movements.

"For me, from a conducting standpoint, the biggest difference has to do with the orchestration, that the orchestration, to my ear, allows the choir to speak clearly, and very much allows the solo quartet to speak more clearly. In general, the orchestration is more transparent. Also, in Levin's estimation, and I agree with him, it's more "Mozartian,' [in terms] of elegance."

The vocal soloists for Sunday's performance will be soprano Justine Aronson, alto Amanda Quist, tenor Christopher Hodson and bass Dashon Burton.

Of the Bach, Brandau says, "It was labeled a cantata in the 19th century, but it really isn't a cantata. Some people call it a motet, although it's not really like Bach's other motets. It's just a sort of free-standing piece of music that was written in the 1730s for a state funeral.

"Part of Bach's duties, in addition to providing music for church services all the time, was to provide music for certain civic functions. So this is actually a sort of funeral motet that was used for an outdoor ceremony.

"The original version was for brass instruments and choirs, and Bach made a second version for strings and continuo and two trumpets, and that's the version that we're going to do.

"It's one of these wonderful Lutheran texts that just sort of anticipate the end of life as a moment of bliss or of reunification. It's a very positive outlook on that moment, and as such, I thought it would make a nice pair with the Mozart."

Brandau also plans to introduce relevant orchestral works into the Princeton Pro Musica programs. Sunday's concert will include Bach's Violin Concerto in E Major, with Elizabeth Field as soloist.

"She's a wonderful violinist who plays both modern violin and baroque violin, and so brings a great sense of style to what she's doing. I'm really looking forward to working with her."

Field will also act as concertmaster for the concert.

"I thought it would be a wonderful complement to the solemnity of the Requiem, which is this sort of fabulous, sort of austere D minor, to do this incredibly dancing, effervescent piece of instrumental music by Bach that's in E major. It's really sort of a rollicking concerto, and I thought the orchestra would have a lot of fun doing it."

Pro Musica's March concert will also mix choral and orchestral works. The choir will perform the Fauré Requiem and Francis Poulenc's "Four Motets for a Time of Penitence," while Princeton University organist Eric Plutz will solo in Poulenc's Concerto for Organ, Timpani and Strings. Also on the program will be Arvo Pärt's haunting "Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten," for string orchestra and bell. That concert will take place at Princeton University Chapel.

In December, Brandau will continue the tradition of the choir's annual "Messiah." George Frideric Handel's popular favorite will be performed at the Trenton War Memorial.

The season will conclude in May with an all-American program featuring a capella works and works with piano accompaniment by Copland, Barber, Morten Lauridsen and Eric Whitacre, with arrangements by Alice Parker, Moses Hogan and others. The concert, which will include early American music and music from the African-American spiritual tradition, will take place at Prince-ton Presbyterian Church in West Windsor.

"I wanted to, with my first season with the group, sort of spend some time with different kinds of music," Brandau says. "By the end of the season, I will have had the opportunity to work on a bunch of different kinds of sounds and styles with the group and build our working relationship through the music."

He acknowledges that kind of relationship is only possible because of the firm foundation laid down by his predecessor.

"A lot of community choirs will have two concerts a year, or three, and maybe once a year they'll perform with orchestra, that kind of thing. But with Pro Musica, they have had the benefit for many years of a strong organization. Frances really got things rolling on the right foot. We have a wonderfully active board, a working board, very hands-on in terms of operations of the group, and that allows us to have this wonderfully full season."

Slade founded the nonprofit community chorus in 1979. She stepped down at the end of last season, cloaked in the honorary title of artistic director emeritus. Looking forward to some time off after three decades, she has no immediate plans to return.

"The Pro Musica and I certainly are so happy with the legacy that Frances built," Brandau says. "She absolutely is handing over the baton when the organization and the choir is at its peak. I think that says a lot about her love for the group."

Copyright © 2012 The Times, Trenton N.J. All Rights Reserved.

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New Artistic Director and New Season Are In Place for Princeton Pro Musica | View Clip
10/24/2012
Town Topics - Online

...had a national search for director, and considered  53 candidates,” says Ms. Trigg. “Ryan was an outstanding choice.” Superior Musicianship Previously the artistic director of the Santa Clara Chorale in California and director of choral activities at Santa Clara University, Brandau has also worked with choirs at colleges and churches in Massachusetts and Connecticut. A Princeton University graduate, he has received graduate degrees from the University of Cambridge and the Yale School of...

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Heidi Gansert named Special Asst. to UNR President | View Clip
10/24/2012
My News 4 - Online

...Development and Business Relations Task Force, which includes several deans and administrators with outreach responsibilities. Gansert received a master's of business of administration from the University of Nevada, Reno and bachelor's degree in engineering from Santa Clara University. She is a member of the University of Nevada, Reno's College of Engineering Advisory Board.

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Do Androids Dream Of Handwriting Recognition? | View Clip
10/23/2012
Industrial Maintenance & Plant Operation - Online

...Paragon Software Group where she handles editorial exposure for the company's mobility and disk utilities divisions. Ms. Shabanova studied linguistics at Moscow State Linguistic University and University of Texas at Austin; English and German philology at Santa Clara University, California; and earned Master of Arts degrees in English and German Philology at Georg-August University of Göttingen, Germany. You may contact her at kshabanova@paragon-software.com or connect with her on LinkedIn...

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Silvaco Founder and CEO Dr. Ivan Pesic Succumbs to Cancer | View Clip
10/23/2012
Virtual Strategy Magazine

...Iliya who now assumes the role of Chairman of the Board of Silvaco. Dr. Pesic's longtime associate and Chief Operating Officer, David Halliday, has been appointed CEO. Mr. Iliya Pesic obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Santa Clara University, and continued his education at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan where he obtained a Master of Science degree in Electronic Engineering under the guidance of Professor Fujio Masuoka, the inventor of Flash memory. Prior...

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Commemorate World AIDS Day at Health Trust's Silicon Valley Hike and Bike Dec. 1| NBC Bay Area | View Clip
10/23/2012
KNTV-TV - Online

...commemorative Hike & Bike T-shirt and various incentives for different fundraising levels. When: Saturday, December 1, 2012, 32-mile Bike Ride starts at 9:00AM and 11-mile bike ride and 2- mile walk begin at 10:00AM Where: Locatelli Student Activity Center Santa Clara University Campus (and surrounding areas) Who: Hundreds of walkers, bikers, students, dedicated volunteers and community members. Sponsored by: The Health Trust and hosted by Santa Clara University's Public...

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Grant County prosecutors seek DA's office | View Clip
10/23/2012
Farmington Daily Times - Online

...them to join the "Z" party." Christine Steele can be reached at (575) 538-5893 ext. 5802. CANDIDATE PROFILES District Attorney of the Sixth Judicial District George Zsoka Political party: Republican Age: 49 Education: BA in history from Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, Calif. (1984). JD from Santa Clara University, (1987) Immediate family: Wife Lynn, lived in Silver City since 1997. Past political or public service positions: No previous political...

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Grant County prosecutors seek DA's office | View Clip
10/23/2012
Las Cruces Sun-News - Online

...them to join the "Z" party." Christine Steele can be reached at (575) 538-5893 ext. 5802. CANDIDATE PROFILES District Attorney of the Sixth Judicial District George Zsoka Political party: Republican Age: 49 Education: BA in history from Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, Calif. (1984). JD from Santa Clara University, (1987) Immediate family: Wife Lynn, lived in Silver City since 1997. Past political or public service positions: No previous political...

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LA Galaxy fans arrested for rowdy behavior | View Clip
10/22/2012
KABC-TV - Online

...(KABC) -- Several Los Angeles Galaxy soccer fans were arrested Sunday for alleged rowdy behavior during the team's match with the San Jose Earthquakes. Fans watching the game on TV were not aware of what was going on in the stands of Buck Shaw Stadium at Santa Clara University. At least 20 Santa Clara police units were called to the stadium, and seven fans were arrested. Authorities said five are being charged with resisting arrest. "I heard yelling and screaming, so I looked back and...

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*Don't Throw the Baby Out With the Bathwater | View Clip
10/22/2012
Psychology Today

Like the Catholic Church, Penn State, and other organizations that engage youth, the Boy Scouts have had a great deal of terrible press in the past few days and weeks. For example, this week over 1,000 files of scout leaders accused of sexual violations with boy scouts were released. The parallels between the boy scouts and with the Catholic Church are striking. Leaders found to have had inappropriate sexual contact with boys, “perversion files” were kept, police and child protection resources were generally not informed, and these leaders either continued in scouting elsewhere or disappeared to perhaps abuse more boys. Names were finally made public, lawsuits filed, and you know the rest of the story.

For those of us who work in this area none of these shocking news reports are new or surprising. My view with the media on this typically is “what took you so long to finally pay attention?” We know that child sexual and physical abuse is tragically common and appears to have been especially frequent in the 1960-1980s. All organizations that serve youth (e.g., churches, schools, youth sports, scouts) where men have access to and power over young people with minimal supervision have many cases of sexual abuse that has or has not yet been discovered or made public. Research tells us that just about 4% of priests in the Catholic Church sexually violated a minor between about 1950 and 2006. A report conducted for the US Department of Education and published in 2005 found higher figures of child sexual abuse by school personnel during a similar time frame. While we don't know for sure how many men have sexually violated a child in the general population we know that the numbers must be high since about 25% of adult woman and about 15% of adult men say that they were sexually violated as a child by an adult when they were young. So, if you think that sexual abuse doesn't occur in all large organizations with ready access to children you are deceiving yourself. Fortunately, with much better awareness, policies and procedures among organizations that serve youth, mandatory child abuse reporting laws, and better education these numbers have been decreasing since the 1980s.

So, like the Catholic Church, youth sports, and now scouts we must be careful not to throw the baby out with the bathwater. Policies and procedures are now in place to maximize the odds that children are now safe in scouts among other organizations like the Catholic Church. These organizations certainly have been and continue to be hammered in the press from events that happened long ago but today much has been done to keep kids safe in these
organizations. Of course, all the best policies and procedures in the world for screening, training, reporting, and keeping children safe from harm are only as good as their implementation. That's the rub. Churches, scouting, education, and youth sports all offer so much to the positive and formative development of children but all those involved with these organization must follow their own policies and procedures to make it all works and keep kids safe.

So what do you think?

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2013 IP Scholars Roundtable at Drake | View Clip
10/22/2012
madisonian.net

2013 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SCHOLARS ROUNDTABLE Intellectual Property Law Center Drake University Law School Friday-Saturday, April 12-13, 2013 DESCRIPTION: The Drake Intellectual Property Law Center is proud to present the 2013 Intellectual Property Scholars Roundtable. This annual interdisciplinary event brings together intellectual property and technology law scholars from around the world to present their works-in-progress. It provides academics with a forum for sharing their latest research and an opportunity for peer networking. For participation in this invitation-only event, contact Prof. Peter Yu at peter.yu@drake.edu. ROUNDTABLE ORGANIZER: • Prof. Peter K. Yu, Kern Family Chair in Intellectual Property Law & Director, Intellectual Property Law Center, Drake University Law School CONFIRMED PARTICIPANTS: • Prof. Howard B. Abrams, University of Detroit Mercy College of Law • Prof. Derek Bambauer, James E. Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona • Prof. M. Scott Boone, John Marshall Law School, Atlanta • Prof. Annemarie Bridy, University of Idaho College of Law • Prof. Sarah Burstein, University of Oklahoma College of Law • Prof. Leah Chan Grinvald, Saint Louis University School of Law • Prof. Colleen V. Chien, Santa Clara University Law School • Prof. John T. Cross, University of Louisville School of Law • Prof. Tonya M. Evans, Widener University School of Law–Harrisburg • Prof. Thomas C. Folsom, Regent University School of Law • Prof. William Gallagher, Golden Gate University School of Law • Prof. Kristelia A. Garcia, George Washington University School of Law • Prof. Jon M. Garon, Chase College of Law, Northern Kentucky University • Prof. Llewellyn Joseph Gibbons, University of Toledo College of Law • Prof. Paul J. Heald, University of Illinois College of Law • Prof. William Hubbard, University of Baltimore School of Law • Prof. Shontavia Johnson, Drake University Law School • Prof. Deidré A. Keller, Claude W. Pettit College of Law, Ohio Northern University • Prof. Sapna Kumar, University of Houston Law Center • Prof. David S. Levine, Elon University School of Law • Raizel Liebler, John Marshall Law School, Chicago • Prof. Yvette Joy Liebesman, Saint Louis University School of Law • Prof. Benjamin Liu, John Marshall Law School, Chicago • Prof. Doris E. Long, John Marshall Law School, Chicago • Prof. Emily Michiko Morris, Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Indiana University • Prof. Liam O'Melinn, Claude W. Pettit College of Law, Ohio Northern University • Prof. Chidi Oguamanam, Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa (Canada) • Dr. Nahoko Ono, Visiting Scholar, Columbia University School of Law (Japan) • Prof. Lucas Osborn,...

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Bay Area voters react to final presidential debate | View Clip
10/22/2012
Whittier Daily News - Online

...10/22/2012 10:22:39 PM PDT October 23, 2012 5:22 AM GMT Updated: 10/22/2012 10:22:42 PM PDT The Bay Area News Group has been talking to voters at places like World's Fare Donuts in Hayward, The Crucible industrial arts center in Oakland and Santa Clara University's debate class. After Monday night's debate between President Barack Obama and GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney in Florida, we got back to some of those voters to ask them who they thought won the final round....

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Harvey Mackay: Good leadership distinguishes itself | View Clip
10/21/2012
Tulsa World - Online

...a leader is to look at the person and see if anybody is following." Leadership is a difficult skill to measure, but it is certainly easy to determine when leadership is not present in an organization. In four years of executive seminars conducted by Santa Clara University and the Tom Peters Group/Learning Systems, more than 5,200 senior managers were asked to describe the characteristics they most admire in a leader. Here are the top 10 characteristics, as reported in Management Review...

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Good leadership brings out the best in employees | View Clip
10/21/2012
Star Tribune - Online

...a leader is to look at the person and see if anybody is following." Leadership is a difficult skill to measure, but it is certainly easy to determine when leadership is not present in an organization. In four years of executive seminars conducted by Santa Clara University and the Tom Peters Group/Learning Systems, more than 5,200 senior managers were asked to describe the characteristics they most admire in a leader. Here are the top 10 characteristics, as reported in Management Review...

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Good leaders bring out the best in employees | View Clip
10/20/2012
New Mexico Business Weekly - Online

...“I have come to the conclusion that the only way one can determine a leader is to look at the person and see if anybody is following.” Leadership is a difficult skill to ... Companies Mentioned BusinessWeek University of Southern California Santa Clara University Relevant Industries Human Resources

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It's JusCollege | View Clip
10/20/2012
Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal - Online

...to students. We give businesses an opportunity to ... Diana Samuels covers technology, cleantech, biotech and venture capital. Her phone number is 408.299.1835. Menlo Park Companies Mentioned Stanford University San Jose State University Santa Clara University Relevant Industries Technology

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Good leadership distinguishes itself
10/20/2012
Tulsa World

It's election season, and one of the greatest privileges we have in America is selecting our own leaders. While we might have widely varied opinions of who should win, the fundamental characteristics of good leadership remain constant.

A sociology professor from one of the country's major universities spent his life studying leadership by tracing the careers of 5,000 former students. When he was asked how you spot a leader he said, "I have come to the conclusion that the only way one can determine a leader is to look at the person and see if anybody is following."

Leadership is a difficult skill to measure, but it is certainly easy to determine when leadership is not present in an organization.

In four years of executive seminars conducted by Santa Clara University and the Tom Peters Group/Learning Systems, more than 5,200 senior managers were asked to describe the characteristics they most admire in a leader. Here are the top 10 characteristics, as reported in Management Review magazine: honest, competent, forward-looking, inspiring, intelligent, fair-minded, broad-minded, courageous, straightforward and imaginative.

Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu said, "Fail to honor people, they fail to honor you. But of a good leader, who talks little, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will all say, 'We did this ourselves.'" He made that observation more than 2,000 years ago. Some things never change.

Good leaders really listen to the people who work for them. They pay attention to what people are telling them and take it very seriously.

Good leaders use their power to implement ideas that workers bring forth; they are quick to give credit to the person who had the idea. Then comes the action that really sets good leaders apart: They are willing to accept the blame and criticism when mistakes are made. They don't abandon their employees.

Warren Bennis spent much of his life researching leadership and has written several books on the subject of what makes leaders. He is a distinguished professor of business administration and the founding chairman of The Leadership Institute at the University of Southern California, which I had the honor of serving on the board. In 2007, Businessweek called him one of the 10 business school professors who have had the greatest influence on business thinking.

Bennis traveled around the country spending time with 90 of the most effective and successful leaders in the nation - 60 from corporations and 30 from the public sector. His goal was to find these leaders' common traits. At first, he had trouble pinpointing any common traits, as the leaders were more diverse than he had expected. But he later wrote: "I was finally able to come to conclusions, of which perhaps the most important is the distinction between leaders and managers. Leaders are people who do the right thing; managers are people who do things right. ...Both roles are crucial, but they differ profoundly. I often observe people in top positions doing the wrong thing well," he wrote in his book "Why Leaders Can't Lead."

I tend to think of the differences between leaders and managers as the difference between those who master the context within which they operate and those who surrender to it. There are other differences that are enormous and crucial. Bennis details them in his book, "On Becoming A Leader," and they include:

The manager administers; the leader innovates.

The manager is a copy; the leader is an original.

The manager maintains; the leader develops.

The manager focuses on systems and structure; the leader focuses on people.

The manager relies on control; the leader inspires trust.

The manager has a short-range view; the leader has a long-range perspective.

The manager asks "how" and "when"; the leader asks "what" and "why."

The manager always has his eye on the bottom line; the leader has his eye on the horizon.

The manager imitates; the leader originates.

The manager accepts the status quo; the leader challenges it.

The manager is the classic good soldier; the leader is his own person.

Mackay's Moral:Good leaders develop more than good employees. They develop more good leaders.

Harvey Mackay is the author of the New York Times best-seller "Swim With the Sharks Without Being Eaten Alive." To send him a question or comment, go totulsaworld.com/mackayfeedback.

Copyright © 2012 World Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

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*Can Science Spot a Pedophile? Research Zeroes In On Brain Abnormalities | View Clip
10/19/2012
Newsweek

As the Catholic Church, college football, and now the Boy Scouts reel from sex-abuse scandals, new studies suggest the urge to prey on children may come from how a brain is wired.

New research suggests that pedophiles can be identified before the mental illness turns into a crime, potentially keeping many children out of harm's way. The analysis comes at a crucial moment, amid a wave of pedophilia cases dominating headlines, from Jerry Sandusky's sentencing to allegations of sexual abuse within the Boy Scouts and the British Broadcasting Corporation.

Identifying pedophilia through MRIs and IQ studies may seem like quack science, but many experts say it is a mental illness and, just like clinical depression or bipolar disorder, can be treated—and maybe one day cured.

At least five studies conducted in the past two years have dealt with various abnormalities detected in pedophiles' brains. Research has varied, from discerning irregularities in the frontal lobe to observing brain activity as pedophiles viewed images of naked children.

Pedophiles appear to have significantly less white matter—a substance that connects different parts of the brain—than nonpedophiles, according to research conducted by James Cantor, an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto. Cantor is working with new types of MRI scans known as diffusion tensor imaging to get a better sense of what he calls “the literal crosswiring of the brain” commonly found in pedophiles.

Cantor has said that a lack of connection between separate parts of the brain could mean that pedophiles have serious trouble differentiating between sexual objects. His research has also found that pedophiles generally have lower IQs than people with sexual interest in adults, and that pedophiles are also disproportionately left-handed compared to the overall population.

One cause of pedophilia may be a biological problem that some are simply born with, Cantor says. “Whatever chain of events leads to pedophilia, the first link in that chain seems to be before birth,” he told The Daily Beast.

“We don't have a smoking gun” to say definitively how pedophilia develops, Cantor says, but it could form from “maternal stress while the mother is still pregnant, or a combination of maternal stress or poor nutrition, or household stress during childhood. If we take out one of those ingredients, we may break the chain and understand the whole system that ends in pedophilia.”

The search for a cause has intensified in recent years, as much of the most recent research has focused on medical treatments for pedophilic urges.

Medications such as Depo-Provera—which is commonly prescribed for prostate cancer—lower testosterone and libido levels and are being tested as effective “chemical-castration” treatments, and some say cures, to pedophilia. Those who seek help are also often treated with talk therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy in addition to the medicinal route.

But not everyone is convinced that stopping pedophilia is as simple as taking a pill or reading an MRI.

“Whatever chain of events leads to pedophilia, the first link in that chain seems to be before birth,” Cantor told The Daily Beast.

“We're looking for a machine that goes ‘bing,'” says Thomas Plante, a psychology professor at California's Santa Clara University who has done extensive research on child abuse within the Catholic Church. Instead of finding a “magic pharmaceutical that will make a certain part of the brain not light up,” Plante says, “we need a more integrated perspective if we want to keep kids safe.”

Treating pedophilia is particularly difficult, he argues, because many of the sex offenders that authorities consider pedophiles are “not pedophiles at all.” Instead of targeting children specifically, offenders will “target teenagers or they are situational generalists who target anyone they can get,” Plante says. He adds that many pedophiles and sex offenders “have more than one diagnosis. They may have substance-abuse disorders, impulse-control disorders, or personality disorders.” Finding a solution to that potentially combustible combination of diseases “is more complicated than it appears,” Plante says.

Plante says the new policies and procedures in place at institutions that have been nearly destroyed by sexual deviance—the Catholic Church and even the Boy Scouts—should serve as a model for child-focused organizations trying to prevent sexual abuse. He says pedophilia can be considered a public-health issue that requires a hybrid of biological, psychological, and social treatments rather than a criminal predilection or a disease easily treated with a pill.

He says the next step in preventing pedophilia will be to focus on kids in youth sports, public schools, and organizations where children are left unsupervised. Plante says, “kids in the Boy Scouts, Catholic Church, and in college football will be the safest kids on the planet”—but it's children everywhere else that remain at risk.

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California weighs delayed regulation of VoIP | View Clip
10/19/2012
VoIP News

...is that it fails to provide consumers with the necessary protection against unfair business practices and that Californians won't have any recourse if they wish to lodge companies about their VoIP service. AARP, Greenlining Institute, Consumers Union, Santa Clara University of Law, The Utility Reform Network, the Center for Accessible Technology – they are only a handful of SS 1161 opponents. Without regulation under the PUC, these powerful factions argue that the pricing, service quality,...

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