Santa Clara University

SCU in the News (March 16 - April 3, 2013)

SCU in the News (March 16 - April 3, 2013)

Report Overview:
Total Clips (235)
Alumni (2)
Campus Ministry (2)
Center for Science, Technology, and Society (2)
College of Arts and Sciences (16)
Counseling Psychology (4)
de Saisset (2)
Leavey School of Business (24)
Markkula Center for Applied Ethics (9)
School of Education and Counseling Psychology (2)
School of Engineering; Solar Decathlon (4)
School of Law (140)
Students (3)
University (7)
Other (18)


Headline Date Outlet Links

Alumni (2)
CIVIC LEADER OF THE YEAR 3/29/2013 U-T San Diego Text
A career of giving back 4/1/2013 Chicago Lawyer - Online Text View Clip

Campus Ministry (2)
'Thinking of you' works just fine 3/18/2013 Spokesman-Review, The Text
'Thinking of you' works just fine 3/19/2013 Spokesman-Review - Online, The Text View Clip

Center for Science, Technology, and Society (2)
Rep. Honda to face Ro Khanna challenge 4/2/2013 San Francisco Chronicle - Online Text View Clip
The Future of the Euro: Lessons from History 4/2/2013 Brad DeLong's Semi-Daily Journal Text View Clip

College of Arts and Sciences (16)
*American Women in Environmental History 2/24/2013 C-SPAN3 Text View Clip
Coffee's Economics, Rewritten by Farmers 3/16/2013 New York Times, The Text
Will Jesuit identity help Pope Francis repair 'fractured church'? 3/18/2013 Yahoo! Canada Text View Clip
today we hear from Santa Clara University professor 3/19/2013 KLIV-AM (Silicon Valley News) Text
Will Anything Change With a Latino Pope? 3/19/2013 ABC News - Online Text View Clip
Can the Catholic church attract new adherents with the Internet? 3/19/2013 KPCC-FM - Online Text View Clip
Will Jesuit identity help Pope Francis repair Catholic church? 3/19/2013 Clerical Whispers Text View Clip
most attention but Santa Clara University religious studies 3/20/2013 KLIV-AM (Silicon Valley News) Text
Santa Clara University religious studies professor talks about pope's biggest challenge 3/20/2013 KLIV-AM (Silicon Valley News) Text
Coffee economy rewritten; Costa Rican farmers are reaping the benefits of selling their crop directly to retailers 3/21/2013 Gazette, The Text
Quitting Religion, But Not the Practice of Prayer 3/27/2013 Religion Dispatches Text View Clip
Quitting Religion, But Not the Practice of Prayer 3/27/2013 Democratic Underground Latest … Text View Clip
The numbers men of LA 3/31/2013 The Land Text View Clip
To predict and to serve: the future of law enforcement 3/31/2013 The Land Text View Clip
Michelle Marvier 4/1/2013 Breakthrough Generation Text View Clip
How Not to Raise a Witch 4/1/2013 Huffington Post, The Text View Clip

Counseling Psychology (4)
Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center hosts conference on the substance of mindfulness 3/20/2013 Contra Costa Times Text
Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center hosts conference on the substance of mindfulness 3/22/2013 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Compassion in Action: Opening Minds, Inspiring Hearts 3/22/2013 Los Gatos Patch Text View Clip
Compassion in Action: Opening Minds, Inspiring Hearts conference - March 28 3/24/2013 Saratoga (Calif.) Patch Text View Clip

de Saisset (2)
Before There Was Photoshop: De Saisset Highlights One Photographer's Innovative Style 4/1/2013 Herald - Online, The Text View Clip
The New American Landscape 4/2/2013 Spark - KQED-TV Text

Leavey School of Business (24)
2 professors, portfolio manager share SPIVA grand prize 3/18/2013 Pensions&Investments – Online Text View Clip
Don't jump back into stocks unless you plan to stay 3/21/2013 MarketWatch Text
Don't Jump Back Into Stocks - Unless You Plan To Stay 3/21/2013 Seeking Alpha Text View Clip
Jesuit Justice and the Pope 3/25/2013 Progress Report Text View Clip
US Jobs Coming Home? 3/26/2013 www1.voanews.com Text View Clip
*U.S. Jobs Coming Home? 3/26/2013 Voice of America Text View Clip
Mercury News interview: Meir Statman, Santa Clara University professor of finance 3/31/2013 Contra Costa Times Text
Apple CEO Tim Cook issues rare apology to Chinese consumers 3/31/2013 Contra Costa Times Text
Struggling With Clients 4/1/2013 AdvisorOne Text View Clip
Mercury News interview: Meir Statman, Santa Clara University professor of finance 4/1/2013 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Apple CEO issues rare apology to Chinese consumers 4/1/2013 Sacramento Bee - Online, The Text View Clip
Marketwired: An Evolution From Wire Service to Wired Company 4/1/2013 Marketwire Text
Apple CEO Tim Cook issues rare apology to Chinese consumers [San Jose Mercury News] 4/1/2013 Bloomberg Businessweek - Online Text View Clip
Apple CEO issues rare apology to Chinese consumers 4/1/2013 News & Observer - Online Text View Clip
Apple CEO issues rare apology to Chinese consumers 4/1/2013 Telegraph - Online, The Text View Clip
Mercury News interview: Meir Statman, Santa Clara University professor of finance 4/2/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Apple CEO Tim Cook issues rare apology to Chinese consumers 4/2/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Marketwired: An Evolution From Wire Service to Wired Company 4/2/2013 Marketwire - Online Text View Clip
Apple CEO Tim Cook issues rare apology to Chinese consumers 4/2/2013 El Paso Times - Online Text View Clip
Marketwired: An Evolution From Wire Service to Wired Company 4/2/2013 Yahoo! Finance Text View Clip
Apple CEO Tim Cook issues rare apology to Chinese consumers 4/2/2013 Denver Post - Online, The Text View Clip
Apple CEO Tim Cook issues rare apology to Chinese consumers 4/2/2013 Salt Lake Tribune - Online, The Text View Clip
Apple CEO Tells China He's Sorry 4/2/2013 HispanicBusiness.com Text View Clip
Terri Griffith on Flexible Work 4/3/2013 Huffington Post, The Text View Clip

Markkula Center for Applied Ethics (9)
Lawmaker's involvement questioned in casino grant that would benefit family business 3/16/2013 Journal & Courier - Online, The Text View Clip
Lawmaker's involvement questioned in casino grant that would benefit family business 3/17/2013 Courier-Post - Online Text View Clip
Lawmaker's involvement questioned in casino grant that would benefit family business 3/18/2013 Louisville Courier-Journal - Online Text View Clip
From London to New York to Cyprus, Fraud and Financial "Insanity" 3/24/2013 Rinf.com Text View Clip
Pizarro: Santa Clara University's Markkula Center for Applied Ethics celebrates 25th anniversary 3/27/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Markkula Center for applied ethics at Santa Clara University 3/29/2013 KQED-FM (KQED 88.5) Text
Radio Daily Schedule 3/30/2013 KQED-FM - Online Text View Clip
for applied ethics at Santa Clara University let me 3/31/2013 WESA-FM (Pittsburgh's NPR News Station) Text
Groups led by inside trader, child abuser got Obamacare co-op loans 4/3/2013 Washington Examiner - Online Text View Clip

School of Education and Counseling Psychology (2)
Evidence of Reed Claim About Same-Sex... 3/27/2013 NBC Bay Area - Politics Text View Clip
Evidence of Reed Claim About Same-Sex Parenting Proves Flimsy 3/28/2013 KNTV-TV - Online Text View Clip

School of Engineering; Solar Decathlon (4)
Plaza Vista fifth-graders hang out with solar decathletes 3/20/2013 Orange County Register Text
Fifth-graders hang out with solar decathletes ; Plaza Vista students join online meetings with college scientists. 3/21/2013 Orange County Register Text
Plaza Vista School and Santa Clara University's solar decathlon team hang out on Google 3/22/2013 Orange County Register - Online Text View Clip
Fifth-graders hang out with solar decathletes 3/22/2013 Orange County Register - Online Text View Clip

School of Law (140)
Internal Affairs: State employee panel seems stacked against San Jose pension reformers 3/16/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
THE DATA WAR DISPATCH 3/17/2013 Advertising Age Text
Patent law's 'best mode' requirement a conundrum for attorneys 3/18/2013 Reuters - Online Text View Clip
Join The Conversation On Keeping International Agreements From Restricting Internet Freedom 3/18/2013 Techdirt Text View Clip
Chinese legal dissident Chen Guangcheng calls on Apple and other Silicon Valley companies to advocate for human rights in China 3/18/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Chinese legal dissident Chen Guangcheng calls on Apple and other Silicon Valley companies to advocate for human rights in China 3/18/2013 Press-Telegram - Online Text View Clip
How to choose a tax preparer 3/18/2013 Contra Costa Times Text
Tax preparer fraud creates big refunds, big problems for taxpayers 3/18/2013 Contra Costa Times Text
Chinese legal dissident Chen Guangcheng calls on Apple and other Silicon Valley companies to advocate for human rights in China 3/18/2013 Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online Text View Clip
*U.S. Drone Missiles 3/19/2013 Bloomberg Law Text
Chinese legal dissident Chen Guangcheng calls on Apple and other Silicon Valley companies to advocate for human rights in China 3/19/2013 San Bernardino Sun - Online Text View Clip
*Chen Guangcheng first visit to the Bay Area leading legal Award 3/19/2013 Sing Tao Daily - Milpitas Edition Text View Clip
Tax preparer fraud creates big refunds, big problems for taxpayers 3/19/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
How to choose a tax preparer 3/19/2013 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Tips: How to choose a tax preparer 3/19/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
The Supreme Court's First Sale Ruling Will Spur Price Competition in the Short Run, But Enjoy It While It Lasts 3/20/2013 Forbes - Online Text View Clip
Chinese legal dissident Chen Guangcheng calls on Apple and other Silicon Valley companies to advocate for human rights in China [San Jose Mercury News] 3/20/2013 Bloomberg Businessweek - Online Text View Clip
Deaf, Blind Sue Over Web Shopping 3/20/2013 Wall Street Journal - Online Text View Clip
Bell jury can't change guilty verdicts, judge and experts say 3/21/2013 L.A. Now Text View Clip
Defense attorneys should have polled jury after verdict, experts say 3/21/2013 L.A. Now Text View Clip
Jury in Bell corruption trial can't change guilty verdicts, judge and experts say 3/21/2013 McClatchy Company Washington DC Bureau - Online Text View Clip
*Blind human rights lawyer Chen Guangcheng first visit to San Francisco 3/21/2013 TVB-USA Text View Clip
AP Wins Copyright Lawsuit Against Clipping Service 3/21/2013 MediaPost.com Text View Clip
Juror tells of tense deliberations; Bell trial ends in chaos 3/21/2013 Los Angeles Times - Online Text View Clip
Bell trial ends in chaos 3/21/2013 Los Angeles Times - Online Text View Clip
Bell corruption trial ended with jury intimidation, attorneys say 3/21/2013 L.A. Now Text View Clip
Chinese legal dissident Chen Guangcheng calls on Apple and other Silicon Valley companies to advocate for human rights in China 3/21/2013 Chicago Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Bell trial ends in chaos 3/21/2013 Los Angeles Times Text
Michael Dell may face Mark Hurd as deal deadline looms 3/21/2013 Contra Costa Times Text
Bell trial: After mistrial, next steps for attorneys unclear 3/22/2013 L.A. Now Text View Clip
Radio Ink Magazine 3/22/2013 Radio Ink - Online Text View Clip
Judge Declares Mistrial in Bell Corruption Case | KTLA 5 3/22/2013 KTLA-TV - Online Text View Clip
Blackstone may offer an option to Dell's deal 3/22/2013 Lincoln Journal Star - Online Text View Clip
*Blind human rights lawyer Chen Guangcheng memoirs 3/22/2013 TVB-USA Text View Clip
FCC chair steps down, leaves some thorny tech issues for successor 3/22/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Michael Dell may face Mark Hurd as deal deadline looms 3/22/2013 Willits News - Online Text View Clip
Departing FCC chairman leaves behind mixed record 3/22/2013 CNET.com - New York Bureau Text View Clip
FCC chair leaves some obstacles for successor 3/22/2013 McClatchy Company Washington DC Bureau - Online Text View Clip
Bell trial ends in chaos 3/23/2013 McClatchy Company Washington DC Bureau - Online Text View Clip
Pro-con: Should U.S. boost energy exploration? 3/23/2013 WE Blog Text View Clip
FCC chair leaves obstacles for successor 3/23/2013 Bulletin - Online, The Text View Clip
Dell may face Mark Hurd as deal-deadline ends 3/23/2013 MarketWatch Text View Clip
Tammerlin Drummond: Setting the wrongly convicted free 3/23/2013 InsideBayArea.com Text View Clip
Tammerlin Drummond: Setting the wrongly convicted free 3/23/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Tammerlin Drummond: Setting the wrongly convicted free 3/23/2013 Press-Telegram - Online Text View Clip
Michael Dell may face Mark Hurd as deal deadline looms 3/23/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
The Oakland Tribune Tammerlin Drummond column 3/23/2013 Oakland Tribune Text
China's government-backed media bashes Apple 3/24/2013 Contra Costa Times Text
Dell said to receive two more buyout bids 3/24/2013 MarketWatch Text View Clip
Tax preparer fraud can ruin finances 3/25/2013 Tri-City Herald - Online Text View Clip
Tax preparer fraud can ruin finances 3/25/2013 State - Online, The Text View Clip
Tell-all cars put your driving business out in the open 3/25/2013 Wausau Daily Herald - Online Text View Clip
Tax preparer fraud can ruin finances 3/25/2013 Idaho Statesman - Online Text View Clip
Learn the Art of Negotiating Law School Financial Aid 3/25/2013 U.S. News & World Report Text View Clip
Taxpayer Beware: Big Refunds Can Mean Big Trouble 3/25/2013 HispanicBusiness.com Text View Clip
Tell-all cars put your driving business out in the open 3/25/2013 Herald Times Reporter - Online Text View Clip
Disabled people sue retailers over e-commerce sites 3/25/2013 InsideCounsel - Online Text View Clip
Is your car spying on you? 3/25/2013 Spy vs Spy Text View Clip
that being closely watched Santa Clara University constitutional law 3/25/2013 KLIV-AM (Silicon Valley News) Text
Tell-all cars put your driving business out in the open 3/25/2013 Oshkosh Northwestern - Online Text View Clip
Northern California Innocence Project Successfully Exonerates Innocent Man of Sex Crimes He Did Not Commit 3/25/2013 Life Science Weekly Text
High Court's Decision On Federal Marriage Law Has Tax Implications 3/25/2013 NPR Programs: Morning Edition Text
China's government-backed media bashes Apple 3/25/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Tell-all cars put your driving business out in the open 3/26/2013 Green Bay Press-Gazette - Online Text View Clip
High Court's Decision On Federal Marriage Law Has Tax Implications 3/26/2013 New Hampshire Public Radio - Online Text View Clip
a law professor at Santa Clara University in California 3/26/2013 WBEZ-FM (Chicago Public Radio) Text
China's government-backed media bashes Apple 3/26/2013 Press-Telegram - Online Text View Clip
High Court's Decision On Federal Marriage Law Has Tax Implications 3/26/2013 North Country Public Radio - Online Text View Clip
a law professor at Santa Clara University in California 3/26/2013 WAMU-FM (American University Radio) Text
a law professor at Santa Clara University in California 3/26/2013 WESA-FM (Pittsburgh's NPR News Station) Text
a law professor at Santa Clara University in California 3/26/2013 KQED-FM (KQED 88.5) Text
a law professor at Santa Clara University in California 3/26/2013 WBEZ-FM (Chicago Public Radio) Text
High Court's Decision On Federal Marriage Law Has Tax Implications 3/26/2013 OPBmusic.org Text View Clip
a law professor at Santa Clara University in California 3/26/2013 KOPB-AM Text
*Supreme Court Hears California's Prop. 8 3/26/2013 Bloomberg Law Text
Court's decision on federal marriage law has tax implications 3/26/2013 KPCC-FM - Online Text View Clip
ABC7 News 4:00PM 3/26/2013 ABC 7 News at 4 PM- KGO-TV Text
NBC Bay Area News at 6 3/26/2013 NBC Bay Area News at 6 AM - KNTV-TV Text
ABC7 News 6:00PM 3/26/2013 ABC 7 News at 6 PM- KGO-TV Text
NPR Touts Tax Savings For Same-Sex Couples If DOMA is Struck Down | Media Research Center 3/26/2013 Media Research Center Text View Clip
China, Apple's greatest hope, is also most perplexing challenge 3/26/2013 Contra Costa Times Text
ABC7 News 6:00AM 3/27/2013 ABC 7 Morning News at 6 AM - KGO-TV Text
Potential Broader View of ADA May Impact Online Retailers 3/27/2013 Global Cosmetic Industry (GCI) - Online Text View Clip
Hawaii Intermediate Court of Appeals: Is A Mineral Right An Inherent Servitude, Or Must It Be Reflected In Torrens Title? 3/27/2013 Hawaii Reporter Text View Clip
Apple faces growing obstacles in China 3/27/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Apple faces growing obstacles in China 3/27/2013 Inland Valley Daily Bulletin - Online Text View Clip
The Oakland Tribune Tammerlin Drummond column 3/27/2013 Oakland Tribune Text
Two Bay Area law professors predict Supreme Court will invalidate both Prop 8 And DOMA, but on narrow grounds 3/27/2013 Contra Costa Times Text
China, Apple's greatest hope, is also most perplexing challenge 3/27/2013 Press-Telegram - Online Text View Clip
China, Apple's greatest hope, is also most perplexing challenge 3/27/2013 Willits News - Online Text View Clip
Two Bay Area law professors predict Supreme Court will invalidate both Prop 8 And DOMA, but on narrow grounds 3/27/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Two Bay Area law professors predict Supreme Court will invalidate both Prop 8 And DOMA, but on narrow grounds 3/28/2013 Inland Valley Daily Bulletin - Online Text View Clip
Two Bay Area law professors predict Supreme Court will invalidate both Prop 8 And DOMA, but on narrow grounds 3/28/2013 Press-Telegram - Online Text View Clip
Government scrutiny in China could threaten Apple's global growth 3/28/2013 Red Bluff Daily News - Online Text View Clip
Government scrutiny in China could threaten Apple's global growth 3/28/2013 Lowell Sun - Online Text View Clip
Government scrutiny in China could threaten Apple's global growth 3/28/2013 Farmington Daily Times - Online Text View Clip
Government scrutiny in China could threaten Apple's global growth 3/28/2013 Times-Standard - Online Text View Clip
Tammerlin Drummond: Setting the wrongly convicted free 3/28/2013 Contra Costa Times - Online Text View Clip
Tammerlin Drummond: Setting the wrongly convicted free 3/28/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Government scrutiny in China could threaten Apple's global growth 3/28/2013 Oakland Press - Online, The Text View Clip
Prop 8 / Defense of Marriage Act Updates 3/28/13 #2 3/28/2013 Gayopolis Text View Clip
N.Y. Court Upholds Amazon Tax 3/29/2013 MediaPost.com Text View Clip
Is Your New Car Spying on You? 3/30/2013 Top Tech News Text View Clip
Is Your New Car Spying on You? 3/30/2013 Sci-Tech Today Text View Clip
Is Your New Car Spying on You? 3/30/2013 Mobile Tech Today Text View Clip
Tax-preparer fraud can leave you on hook 3/31/2013 Arizona Daily Star - Online Text View Clip
San Francisco pays top dollar to house County Jail inmates 3/31/2013 San Francisco Examiner - Online Text View Clip
Pressured by China, Apple Apologizes for Warranty Policies 4/1/2013 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Online Text View Clip
Apple Apology To Customers In China Over Repair Policy 4/1/2013 New York Times, The Text
Netflix case leads to SEC ruling that companies may use Twitter or Facebook to share financial information 4/1/2013 Contra Costa Times Text
Apple answers Chinese criticism -- with rare apology 4/1/2013 Seattle Times - Online Text View Clip
Silicon Valley Congressional battle takes shape: Ro Khanna to challenge Mike Honda, using Obama campaign operatives 4/2/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip
Microsoft introduces innovative patent tracker 4/2/2013 Reuters - Online Text View Clip
ABC7 News 4:30AM 4/2/2013 ABC 7 Morning News at 4:30 AM - KGO-TV Text
Let's Judge Patent Rights by Harm to the Public -- Not to Inventors 4/2/2013 Wired - Online Text View Clip
ABC7 News 5:00AM 4/2/2013 ABC 7 Morning News at 5 AM - KGO-TV Text
Finally: This Is How to Fix the 'Patent Fix' We're All In 4/2/2013 Wired - Online Text View Clip
Apple's Tim Cook says sorry to Chinese consumers following criticism from news media | Digital Trends 4/2/2013 Digital Trends Text View Clip
Google Chief Legal Officer to Speak at Santa Clara University School of Law Commencement May 25 4/2/2013 newsblaze.com Text View Clip
*Apple CEO apologizes in letter 4/2/2013 ChinaDaily USA Text View Clip
Google Chief Legal Officer to Speak at Santa Clara University School of Law Commencement May 25 4/2/2013 Pymnts.com Text View Clip
Netflix case leads to SEC ruling that companies may use Twitter or Facebook to share financial information 4/2/2013 Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online Text View Clip
Netflix case leads to SEC ruling that companies may use Twitter or Facebook to share financial information 4/2/2013 Willits News - Online Text View Clip
SEC Approves Using Facebook, Twitter for Company Disclosures 4/2/2013 Financial Planning Text
Tax preparer fraud has victims facing big debts 4/2/2013 Los Angeles Times Text
SEC Approves Using Facebook, Twitter for Company Disclosures 4/2/2013 Bloomberg Businessweek - Online Text View Clip
Ro Khanna Announces Congress Challenge To Rep. Mike Honda 4/2/2013 Huffington Post, The Text View Clip
SEC Approves Using Facebook, Twitter for Company Disclosures 4/3/2013 Bank Investment Consultant - Online Text View Clip
Other brands in the fray 4/3/2013 Orange County Register - Online Text View Clip
SEC Gives Go-Ahead to Disclosures Via Social Media 4/3/2013 Treasury & Risk Text View Clip
Mornings on 2 4/3/2013 Mornings On 2 - KTVU-TV Text
SEC Approves Using Facebook, Twitter for Company Disclosures 4/3/2013 On Wall Street - Online Text View Clip
Coming to your Twitter and Facebook feeds soon: company news 4/3/2013 Financial Post - Online Text View Clip
Young Democrat challenges veteran lawmaker Honda 4/3/2013 KTVU-TV - Online Text View Clip
Netflix Case Leads to SEC Social Media Ruling 4/3/2013 HispanicBusiness.com Text View Clip
Netflix case leads to SEC ruling that companies may use Twitter or Facebook to share financial information [San Jose Mercury News] 4/3/2013 Bloomberg Businessweek - Online Text View Clip
Netflix case leads to SEC ruling that companies may use Twitter or Facebook to share financial information 4/3/2013 Contra Costa Times - Online Text View Clip
The New Way Scammers May Be Targeting You! 4/3/2013 Midlandsbiz.com Text View Clip
SEC: Firms can use Facebook, Twitter for disclosures 4/3/2013 News Journal - Online Text View Clip
*Hints of narrow same-sex marriage ruling Clues indicate inclination to strike DOMA benefits ban, split on Prop. 8 4/9/2013 San Francisco Chronicle Text View Clip

Students (3)
Anxious? Like Wow Man, Not Me. 3/16/2013 Campbell Patch Text View Clip
Cheaper than buying: Online sites offer textbook rentals 4/2/2013 WJAR-TV - Online Text View Clip
Arts groups add extras to build audiences 4/3/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip

University (7)
Can Jesuit, Public School Models Mix? 3/19/2013 San Jose Inside Text View Clip
Multilevel approaches put Jesuits in the thick of immigration issues 3/19/2013 Catholic Sun - Online Text View Clip
Jesuits Stalled in China 3/22/2013 Hoya - Online, The Text View Clip
Visitation Rites - latimes.com 3/29/2013 Los Angeles Times - Online Text View Clip
Oakland's Claremont Middle School celebrates 100th anniversary 3/30/2013 Contra Costa Times Text
'He uses simple words to convey profound content' 4/2/2013 Tidings - Online Text View Clip
A Jesuit's view: Why Pope Francis is different, and why a Jesuit pope is rare 4/3/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text View Clip

Other (18)
*Papež Rambo I. ali Janez Pavel III.? 3/12/2013 Delo Text View Clip
Researcher breaks Pi calculation record with the help of NVIDIA-> 3/16/2013 Slashdot Text View Clip
NBC Bay Area News Special: The Interview 3/16/2013 KNTV-TV Text
Local view: In choosing name, pope stands apart 3/18/2013 Duluth News Tribune, The Text
Majority of congressman educated at Catholic universities are pro-abortion: reform needed 3/19/2013 LifeSiteNews Text View Clip
Chorale Concert Strikes a Patriotic Chord By Diane Andrews 3/20/2013 Santa Clara Weekly - Online, The Text View Clip
North Coast Catholics welcome choice of pope 3/20/2013 Press Democrat - Online Text View Clip
Hemisphere and the first Jesuit Pope marks a significant 3/20/2013 KLIV-AM (Silicon Valley News) Text
Bay Area Catholics hope Pope Francis can change the church 3/20/2013 Baltimore Sun - Online Text View Clip
NBC4 News at 11 pm 3/20/2013 Channel 4 News at 11 PM - KNBC-TV Text
Why are Republicans against health care? (Opinion)... 3/22/2013 AllVoices Text View Clip
NBC Bay Area News at 6 3/26/2013 NBC Bay Area News at 6 AM - KNTV-TV Text
St. Mary's College names Berkeley's Graduate Theological Union head as new president 3/26/2013 Oakland Tribune Text
Passover, Holy Week under way 3/27/2013 Salinas Californian - Online, The Text View Clip
St. Mary's College gets its first lay president 3/27/2013 National Catholic Reporter Online Text View Clip
Governor Brown Announces Appointments 3/29/2013 Imperial Valley News Text View Clip
Herhold: Peter Szego devoted to progressive causes 3/31/2013 San Gabriel Valley Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Colleges With The Most Athletic Guys: College Prowler Ranking 4/1/2013 Huffington Post, The Text View Clip


CIVIC LEADER OF THE YEAR
3/29/2013
U-T San Diego

Olga Diaz

Age: 37

Residence: Escondido

•Diaz, a Democrat, was first elected to the Escondido City Council in 2008. She won re-election last year.

•She was also the first Latina to win election to the council in Escondido.

•As councilwoman, Diaz has focused on issues such as business development, city finances and ethnic relations in light of highly publicized conflicts in Escondido about illegal immigration and the local Latino community. Those tensions have arisen from, among other things, driver's license checkpoints — which critics said is a cover for targeting unauthorized immigrants — and a now-rescinded ordinance in 2006 intended to punish landlords who rent to unauthorized immigrants.

•Diaz is currently spearheading efforts to create a riverside greenbelt through the city.

•Named legislator of the year by the San Diego County Democratic Party; she will be formally honored at a banquet in May.

•Her other job is director of employment services for the nonprofit group Interfaith Community Services.

•Diaz graduated from Santa Clara University with a bachelor's degree in accounting. Now doing graduate studies at the University of San Diego.

•Community affiliations include serving as special-events chair for Escondido's Downtown Business Association.

•She is also chair of the Escondido Creek Watershed Alliance' vice chair of the San Dieguito River Park Joint Powers Authority; a member of the President's Council at California State University San Marcos; and a member of the Escondido Charitable Foundation, Escondido Rotary Club and Escondido Democratic Club.

•She is the former owner of Blue Mug Coffee and Tea in Escondido.

•Diaz and her husband, a lieutenant in the Escondido Police Department, have four children.

Copyright © 2013 U-T San Diego

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A career of giving back | View Clip
4/1/2013
Chicago Lawyer - Online

...countless people around the globe to benefit from a more balanced and complete legal system than they were accustomed to. And that's just fine by him. The planted seeds Loris started down the track his father put him on when he attended the then-named Santa Clara Jesuit University in the 1960s, majoring in history and philosophy with the intention to head to law school upon graduation. For his third year, he was accepted to study abroad in Rome through Loyola University. William Loris...

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'Thinking of you' works just fine
3/18/2013
Spokesman-Review, The

'Thinking of you' works just fineEndNotes

Catherine Johnston and Rebecca Nappi, The Spokesman-Review

Q. I am a lifelong atheist and at the age now when many people in my life are facing illnesses, as well as the deaths of their parents and siblings. Some of these people, not knowing my religious beliefs, ask me to keep them in my prayers. It's always awkward for me, and I usually mumble a half-hearted yes. Instead, should I come clean about my beliefs?

A. It depends on the relationship.

Ray Ideus of the Inland Northwest Freethought Society, a chapter of the Freedom from Religion Foundation, said he's blunt when good friends ask for prayers. He tells them: "I'll do you a favor and not pray for you. A prayer is a way of escaping a responsibility."

He means the responsibility to depend on yourself and other human beings for medical help and healing, rather than ask for help from God or a higher power.

More often, though, Ideus takes a more diplomatic approach, which we recommend.

He says: "I'll be thinking of you."

When people are in crisis, or deep in grief, they can feel isolated. Asking for prayers is one way to connect with others and to God - or a higher power.

More than anything, people in crisis want to be listened to, so a discussion of your humanist beliefs will not be particularly helpful. But when the crisis passes, and the grief diminishes, you might want to talk with a friend about why you couldn't agree to say prayers when asked.

Ideus also believes atheists should not accept prayers on their own behalf.

When he was in the hospital for heart surgery, a chaplain stopped by. He told her: "I'm sorry. I'm an atheist and I don't need you."

She returned the next day and said "My thoughts are with you." He told her: "You chose the right words."

If you keep your focus on the needs of your friends in crisis, rather than on the need to share your beliefs, you too will choose the right words.

Q. My son is a freshman at a college far away from home. One of the students on campus died after drinking too much and falling off the dorm balcony. How can I support my son as he moves through his grief?

A. Your son now belongs to a new community outside of his family and that community will grieve this event together.

Yet you may want to call the college's student life office, campus ministry staff and the counseling center. Ask what they have done to support students after this tragedy. And ask what you can do. You can act as partners in offering support.

"Student life has a protocol for students who may be troubled. They look for changes in behaviors, such as trouble studying, dropping grades, a change in the quality of their interactions or students who suddenly have drug or alcohol violations," Jack Treacy, a Jesuit priest and the director of campus ministry at Santa Clara University, told EndNotes.

"Tell your student 'You will never have another moment in your life when so many people want to support you,'" Treacy said.

Make certain your son knows what resources the school offers, such as drop-in emergency counseling sessions or an evening prayer service where students can openly talk with each other. And tell him you are always available to listen.

While it may be tempting to ask your son to come home after this tragedy, unless he is unable to function, interrupting his education will not be helpful, Treacy said. Allow your son to grieve among his peers.

"Parents can pressure their children, and students are very aware of expectations and they don't want to disappoint," Treacy said.

Catherine Johnston, a health care professional, and Rebecca Nappi, a Spokesman-Review feature writer welcome your questions about what to do in times of illness, dying, death and grief. Contact them through their EndNotes blog at www.spokesman.com/blogs/endnotes.

Copyright © 2013 The Spokesman-Review

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'Thinking of you' works just fine | View Clip
3/19/2013
Spokesman-Review - Online, The

...troubled. They look for changes in behaviors, such as trouble studying, dropping grades, a change in the quality of their interactions or students who suddenly have drug or alcohol violations,” Jack Treacy, a Jesuit priest and the director of campus ministry at Santa Clara University, told EndNotes. “Tell your student ‘You will never have another moment in your life when so many people want to support you,' ” Treacy said. Make certain your son knows what resources the school offers, such as...

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Rep. Honda to face Ro Khanna challenge | View Clip
4/2/2013
San Francisco Chronicle - Online

...Why Manufacturing is Still Key to America's Future," made his announcement in a video released on his campaign website, www.rokhanna.com. The son of immigrants from India, Khanna is a lecturer in economics at Stanford University, an adjunct professor at Santa Clara University Law School and an attorney at the Silicon Valley law firm Wilson Sonsini. He plans to hold his first campaign rally on April 14 at De Anza College in Cupertino, where tech giant Apple is headquartered. Establishment...

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The Future of the Euro: Lessons from History | View Clip
4/2/2013
Brad DeLong's Semi-Daily Journal

...Financial Institutions and Markets and Professor of Economics, Entrepreneurship, and Innovation, New York University Hugh Rockoff, Professor of Economics, Rutgers University Kris James Mitchener, Robert and Susan Finocchio Professor of Economics, Santa Clara University 12:30 p.m. Lunch for Participants and Invited Guests, Faculty Club 1:45 p.m. Fiscal Union Chair: Jan de Vries, Ehrman Professor of History, UC Berkeley John Wallis, Professor of Economics,...

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*American Women in Environmental History | View Clip
2/24/2013
C-SPAN3

Santa Clara University history professor Nancy Unger discusses the role of women in American environmental history from the nineteenth century overland journeys across the prairies to the publication of Rachel Carson's seminal book, “Silent Spring.” Illustrating her talk with many images, Professor Unger argues that women realized the dangers of unregulated exploitation of natural resources and were early advocates for conservation and protection of endangered species. This event was hosted by Town Hall Seattle.
TRT 1:06:55

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Coffee's Economics, Rewritten by Farmers
3/16/2013
New York Times, The

IN 2005, Kenneth Lander, a lawyer in Monroe, Ga., moved with his wife, stepdaughter and the youngest three of his seven children to a coffee farm in San Rafael de Abangares, Costa Rica. He always "had a heart," he said, for Latin America, and after a vacation to the lush cloud forests near Monteverde in 2004, he was determined to return on a more permanent basis.

He was also looking for more balance in his work-driven life. And so, after buying a coffee farm from a farmer he'd met on his earlier trip, he packed up his life and moved.

"It was like Swiss Family Robinson," Mr. Lander jokes. "We just left."

In Costa Rica, Mr. Lander, who is now 46, didn't have to worry about making money. He had received a cash windfall from selling a portion of a residential subdivision he had helped develop in Georgia; the plan was to keep selling more lots and live off the proceeds. So he grew coffee for fun.

Then, in 2008, the financial crisis hit. The value of his subdivision plummeted. Suddenly, he had to support himself as a coffee farmer. Very quickly, he realized how difficult that was going to be. He had just 12 acres that produced 6,000 pounds of specialty-grade coffee beans a year.

He belonged to a "fair trade" co-op, which guarantees farmers a minimum price, but was making only $1.30 a pound on coffee that retailed in the United States for $12 a pound. His net profit was so low that at one point he was down to $120 that had to last two weeks.

"I was at the register debating whether or not to buy shampoo or a bag of rice," Mr. Lander recalls.

Why wasn't he seeing more of that final price?

That question has been asked by farmers throughout history, particularly in developing countries, where growers of commodity crops like coffee and cocoa often live in poverty. Over the last few decades, a worldwide movement under the broad banner of fair trade has tried to rectify that imbalance.

In exchange for receiving "fair" prices for their products, fair trade farmers must adhere to environmental and labor standards set by certification groups, the largest of which is Fairtrade International, a nonprofit organization based in Bonn, Germany. It represents 1.24 million farmers and workers in industries including coffee, bananas and honey.

But Mr. Lander started to think that he might improve on the idea. He began to experiment. Using a roaster he had bought in better times, he started roasting his beans and selling them on Facebook to friends in the United States. He also opened a coffee shop, called the Common Cup, in Monteverde, and sold his coffee to tourists.

When he ran out of beans, he teamed up with two other area coffee farmers, Jorge Fonseca and Alejandro Garcia -- who also had a coffee shop, the Colibri -- and began shipping greater volumes. Suddenly, he was making money.

This D.I.Y. enterprise led to the creation in 2011 of Thrive Farmers Coffee, which Mr. Lander started with Mr. Garcia and Michael Jones, an entrepreneur based in Atlanta. The company is still largely untested, but is built on the idea that farmers can "participate in the added value as coffee moves downstream to the consumer," Mr. Lander said.

TYPICALLY, farmers sell their green, or unroasted, beans. At that stage, the beans generally fetch a price based on the commodity market price, which in February averaged $1.53 a pound for Arabica coffee, according to the International Coffee Organization.

The fair trade concept offers an improvement on that model. It will pay the market price for beans, but, importantly, it guarantees a minimum price -- now $1.40 for Arabica coffee. In addition, the local co-op that collects and processes the beans keeps a premium, now 20 cents, which is used for social services like scholarships and health care for farmers and their families.

Theoretically, a fair trade farmer never loses, because when the commodity market price is higher than the fair trade price, the farmer receives the market price, and the co-op still receives the premium. But fair trade buyers purchase unroasted beans, and the processes that add to the price and value of the coffee come later.

In the system that Thrive is trying to develop, farmers are paid only after their coffee has been exported, packaged and sold -- at a much higher price -- to retailers. If coffee is sold for, say, $7.25 a pound, Thrive splits the proceeds 50-50 with the farmers, who end up, in that example, with about $3.60 a pound.

The farmers working with Thrive must pay the higher costs of processing and exporting, but Mr. Lander says they net about four times as much as they would through fair trade, once production costs and co-op fees are factored in. And Thrive helps farmers by establishing relationships for the farmers with local coffee processing mills and co-ops. Then, once the beans are shipped to the United States, Thrive takes over, handling packaging, roasting and sales. In some cases, Thrive sells green coffee beans to roasters, in which case the farmer receives 75 percent of the proceeds.

"We're teaching a farmer that you don't have to relinquish control of your coffee," Mr. Lander said. "You can see it all the way through the value chain."

Thrive's system is among a growing number of innovative business models in the coffee and cocoa industries that are allowing farmers to increase their ownership and profit margins. Divine Chocolate, based in London, is partly owned by cocoa farmers in Ghana, who get a percentage of company profits. Pachamama Coffee Cooperative, based in Davis, Calif., is owned by farmers in Latin America and Africa. After the coffee is roasted in the United States and sold, all profits go back to the farmers.

All of these initiatives have sprung out of fair trade and aim to send the movement in a more significant for-profit direction.

Fair trade "can be part of a fairer deal for farmers," says Christopher Bacon, an environmental studies professor at Santa Clara University. "Small-scale farmers have historically used fair trade as one of several strategies, including grass-roots organizing, to build stronger cooperatives" that allow farmers "to become active players in the global coffee industry."

But, he added, the fair trade idea "is more about making a living than rocketing coffee farmers out of poverty."

Paul Rice, president and C.E.O. of Fair Trade USA, the nonprofit organization that certifies transactions between United States companies and their suppliers, said that the fair trade price "is a floor, not a cap," and that co-ops with reputations for delivering high-quality coffee have commanded prices of more than $3 a pound. In 2011, a strong year for coffee, the average price for fair trade coffee was $2.84 a pound, according to the organization.

Mr. Rice applauded companies like Thrive, but asked: "Is that model really scalable? Is it going to reach millions of farmers?"

After all, fair trade's partnerships with major coffee companies -- like Starbucks and Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, which together imported 84.6 million pounds of fair trade certified coffee in 2011 -- are central to keeping fair trade farmers in business. And he said those companies were accustomed to the quality and reliability that come with the fair trade label.

Moreover, exporting creates risks that farmers selling raw beans don't face. "There are aspects around flavor and quality, and the changes in flavor that can happen during export," says Dennis Macray, the former director of ethical sourcing and global responsibility at Starbucks, who is now an independent specialty coffee and cocoa consultant. "Most coffee producers don't have the capacity to manage that risk."

Mr. Lander acknowledges challenges in the Thrive model and says that there have been glitches as he and his partners figured out the business. Two groups of Thrive farmers who did not process their coffee up to standards set by the Specialty Coffee Association of America, for example, had to reprocess the coffee, leading to a delay in sales -- and their payment. "It's the first time that farmers are being asked to think about quality," Mr. Lander said. "Now they're selling to the end user. So that's something we have to teach them."

Carlos Vargas, chief financial officer at CoopeTarrazú R.L., a coffee co-op in Costa Rica, said Thrive's payment model, in which farmers have to wait until their coffee is sold in grocery stores before being paid, could be a hardship for small farmers.

"In the end, the farmer will get a good price, but the problem is there's not the right balance between when the farmer needs the money and when the farmer receives the money," Mr. Vargas said, explaining that farmers depend on money they receive from selling beans during the coffee season to cover their production costs. Waiting for the coffee to be processed and roasted and reach stores can take several months. He said that some farmers he knows, who have been working with Thrive, have had to wait 6 to 12 months to be paid.

"That's a very long time, and they have to invest in the next crop. For a small farmer that's very difficult."

"Farmers do have to wait," said Mr. Lander, who added that 6 to 12 months is a typical time frame for getting paid. For this reason, farmers are asked to put in only a small percentage of their crop the first year and to increase the portion over time.

Still, fair-trade-certified co-ops -- which similarly rely on sales from beans early in the season -- are free to work with Thrive.

According to Mr. Jones, who has invested more than $1 million in Thrive, it is committed to high-quality farming and environmental standards. Eventually, he said, he would "love to have a third-party agency to help us validate things," but "we have to crawl before we walk, and walk before we run."

Mr. Rice of Fair Trade USA agreed that "there are a lot of different doors into this sustainability space that consumers can take." He added that "if a consumer discovers a great product that also makes the world a better place through Thrive, that's great."

IN 2012, Thrive sold 328,000 pounds of coffee over the Internet, to churches and through specialty stores like Golden Harvest Produce Market in Kittery, Me., and Earth Fare, a chain based in Fletcher, N.C. The coffee sells for $9.95 to $12.25 a pound. Mr. Lander said that of Thrive's 625 farmers in Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala, 480 had received their share of coffee sales. The remainder consigned their coffee to Thrive later in the season, so their coffee has not yet hit the market.

As for his own well-being, he said that since Thrive brought on angel investors last fall, he is taking a "conservative salary."

But, he added, "I've never been more happy or more fulfilled." And he has no trouble buying shampoo.

PHOTOS: In Costa Rica, Sergio Cascante sells his coffee harvest via Thrive Farmers Coffee, with its farm-to-table business model. (BU1); "We're teaching a farmer that you don't have to relinquish control of your coffee," says Kenneth Lander, right, on his plantation with Alejandro Garcia. "You can see it all the way through the value chain." They helped to create Thrive Farmers Coffee, which has 625 farmers in Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala.; The Thrive concept is reflected in a coffee shop at Monteverde, Costa Rica, above and top left and right, which sells coffee drinks and homemade treats to tourists lured by the nearby forest. At center right, Michael Jones, a co-founder and chief executive of Thrive, stood among bags of coffee beans in Atlanta; he has invested more than $1 million in the company. Above right, a plant is checked on a Thrive coffee farm -- as a four-legged helper watches. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY KENT GILBERT FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES; CHRISTINE MACRENARIS) (BU3)

Copyright (c) 2013 The New York Times Company

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Will Jesuit identity help Pope Francis repair 'fractured church'? | View Clip
3/18/2013
Yahoo! Canada

...priests, birth control, women's ordination, and gay marriage. “…the Cardinals wanted someone morally beyond reproach, humble, interested in the social justice for the poor and perhaps willing to shake up the Curia,” said Gary Macy, a church historian at the University of Santa Clara, in comments to the Catholic Reporter. “They did not, however, want someone who would stray from the theological path set by the former popes. This election was probably as much of a surprise as the College...

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today we hear from Santa Clara University professor
3/19/2013
KLIV-AM (Silicon Valley News)

16 million in Sunnyvale for you and I will go towards positive territory in the positive direction it down 15 points right now without a ticket about 20 minutes ago if the 14,436 S&P 500 down six at 1546 NASDAQ is down 17 and 3220 but time is 1135 Palo Alto city Council committee is looking at expanding the city's smoking ban quality of services committee will consider a staff report tonight to recommend banning smoking at Lytton and cultural Plaza and E. and Sarah Wallace Park city Council on a So I will see my three hasn't been the house and always entertaining on MSRP is 2900 $1000 owner love you usually use for your we reached kill ideas focusing on local reaction in the South Bay to the selection of Argentinian Cardinal Jorge Bernalillo as blueprints is the first today we hear from Santa Clara University professor about the importance of Francis being a Jesuit Society of Jesus religious order was founded in the 16th century and quickly became one of the Roman Catholic Church 's main weapon to combat the growth of Protestantism during the counterreformation tackler University religious studies professor Sally Backstrom that says and then the influence of the Jesuits with a account with church has continued to grow but there is never been a Jesuit pope until now I will order you will actually tell you that if you don't make any why a lack of powerful people on earth will flagellate for what they are not letting back delete when you get away how you got it I is a Jesuit training plants using an advantage earlier popes did not now what are you for it that you can't wait an entire spiritual life after a link to your virtual life one would think he would do anything if you look at each evening she

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Will Anything Change With a Latino Pope? | View Clip
3/19/2013
ABC News - Online

...for his own hotel bill and asked his countrymen not to spend their money on tickets to attend his inauguration in Rome, but rather to use the funds to help the poor. "I think there will be a change in style," said Paul G. Crowley, a theology professor at Santa Clara University who specializes in the Jesuit Community, in an interview with ABC/Univision. "I think we will see a simpler papacy and more popular gestures of simplicity. There will be a change in that level and that will be significant."...

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Can the Catholic church attract new adherents with the Internet? | View Clip
3/19/2013
KPCC-FM - Online

...as well. The new generation “This new generation won't go pick up the newspaper in the morning and read an article a bishop wrote in it, but they will check their Facebook and notice a post he wrote,” said Paul Soukup, a professor of communication at Santa Clara University with a background in theology. Soukup said cardinals, bishops and priests have been encouraged to blog and to invest funds in better websites. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops went as far as surveying American...

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Will Jesuit identity help Pope Francis repair Catholic church? | View Clip
3/19/2013
Clerical Whispers

...people. He is strong on that.” Mr. Flinn also thinks that Jesuits have, so far, remained fairly clear of the sexual-abuse scandals that rocked the church in the US and Europe. Even Jesuits who do become cardinals "tend not to move in 'cardinal circles,' where they get to know each other. That's not our world," said Gerard Stockhausen, executive secretary of the Jesuit Conference USA, to the Catholic News Service after hearing that the new pope came from his order. The new pope's “Jesuit background will be extremely important in determining what Francis is all about,” offers Walter Modrys, a former pastor at St. Ignatius Loyola Parish in New York, saying that the exercise of spiritual “discernment” and listening to the nature of “God's calling” that is paramount in the “Ignatian spirituality” is key. Since the white puff of smoke indicated his election this week, Francis has been widely depicted as humble, a prelate more interested in pastoral work than theology, a man who combines an interest in social justice and the poor with conservative views on church doctrine. The latter is likely to mean that Francis will not initiate reforms on core Catholic teachings on such issues as celibacy for priests, birth control, women's ordination, and gay marriage. “…the Cardinals wanted someone morally beyond reproach, humble, interested in the social justice for the poor and perhaps willing to shake up the Curia,” said Gary Macy, a church historian at the University of Santa Clara, in comments to the Catholic Reporter.  “They did not, however, want someone who would stray from the theological path set by the former popes. This election was probably as much of a surprise as the College was capable of making.”

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most attention but Santa Clara University religious studies
3/20/2013
KLIV-AM (Silicon Valley News)

The first investor church says the selection of the first pope from the Western Hemisphere and the first Jesuit pope marks a significant turning point for the Catholic Church what I mean I think Around the world of ushering in a new era to St. Francis have a lot of issues to face I pray for healthy change it in the church and we always prayed for the pope for the obvious reason he had all the blessings that that could follow him but he also Will carry the burden of 1 billion Catholics and more that challenges the church faces around the world for the 21st century US the clerk will child molestation scandal is not the most attention but Santa Clara University religious studies professor Sally Van Stram says that is not the new pope's biggest challenge will be in and it will go on a worldwide leadership in the Catholic Church a big challenge for the Catholic Church to figure out how to actually implement the changes that came back a few explains what Vatican II changes she thinks Pope Francis needs to implement a thank you and a universal church afterlife government of the global church needed to become centralized for a couple local churches will greatly empower the local church tomorrow begins a two-part series looking at Houston is doing with its green vision: M. Keith and I were 15 lengthy tale like the time is now 541 will be back with Chuck on traffic and weather in just a moment Wednesday, March 20 of March 2013 that will not happen on March 20 1102 Universal Time which is 6:02 AM Central daylight Time fronts in the central US March equinox signals the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere and autumn in the southern hemisphere equinox represent the plane of Earth's orbit but also an event that happened on the imaginary dome averts Scott it marks a special moment when the sun crosses the celestial equator going from South to North imaginary celestial equator is a great circle dividing the imaginary celestial sphere into its northern and southern hemispheres the celestial equator wrapped the sky directly about Earth's equator and equinox today the sun crosses the celestial equator tend to disguise northern hemisphere all these components are imaginary yet what happened every equinox is very real as real as the suns passage across the sky each day is real is the change of the seasons are distant ancestors didn't understand equinoxes as events that occur in the course of roots yearly orbit around the sun but they were observant issue of the bar today is the midway between some flow staff across the sky in winter and high staff across the sky in some if they thought in terms the four directions name I have also learned a fact of nature that occurs whenever there's an equinox the Sun rises due east and sets due West this guy is clearly assigned him to demonstrate UAV just those doubled the Highway seventeen is we are the next filter is in route as the whiteboard is morning the of vehicles or were on the right-hand shoulder as for the rest of Silicon Valley all clear out there are no stalls were a woman reported Lucille accident nor installed all of the motility with landline phone numbers or goat or await four seven five nine jar through the morning showers in the afternoon high temperature today will be sixty one the reasons for tonight like you to show this evening partly cloudy and cooler overnight global drop-down of forty five . tomorrow the clouds early than only slightly warmer highs Lows in the announcement of the

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Santa Clara University religious studies professor talks about pope's biggest challenge
3/20/2013
KLIV-AM (Silicon Valley News)

this afternoon . he better wrapped up our week long Congresswoman Anna Eshoo of Palo Alto was part of the official congressional delegation attending Pope Francis is investiture she says the selection of the first pope from the Western Hemisphere and the first Jesuit Pope marks a significant turning point for the Catholic Church with enormous meaning I think Catholics around the world are hopeful that this is ushering in a new era she says princes have a lot of issues to face I pray for healthy changes in the church and we always pray for the pope for the obvious reason he has all the blessings that you can follow him but he also now will carry the burden of a billion Catholics and more in the challenges that the church faces around the world the twenty first century in the US the clerical child molestation scandals , most attention that Santa Clara University religious studies professor Sally Vance-Trembath said that he is not the new pope's biggest challenge in handling and if you will know I am worldwide leadership challenge for the Catholic Church . the Catholic Church it could figure out how to actually implement the changes I came back and you , explains what Vatican II changes you think Francis needs to implement you feel where the universal Church and how I got her local church needed to become decentralized relative to the local churches more seriously and power what will you as doing it is all I am decent on art and me a lot you will all you know you will stop in traffic jam in your couple things off my past Goldman saga will want an marketer rolled all those souls about one quarter we will could still use some sort what is the course and so bought a better still suggests a auto . one woman walk or Road this is a six Senate race a bullhorn and some old one back there of what is now clearer to you and your crash all we are handled your boss and call it will map no work on human reason there you think about what you have now been cleared and we are knowing juries will map the last or the Lords work at least a portion the drive when you are wearing out maximum to their and work down to a Wolf world will will will will allow you , would there animal control officials want to suggest for the weather for about four percent translating and you soon tonight or will you mid-forties but it will be just a memory thoughts will also cause you mid-sixties starts tomorrow like the rolls will you use something on Friday mid-sixties amendment temperatures Saturday the sixty's and seventy marks on the dour looking at temperatures under me mid- sixties and is now

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Coffee economy rewritten; Costa Rican farmers are reaping the benefits of selling their crop directly to retailers
3/21/2013
Gazette, The

In 2005, Kenneth Lander, a lawyer in Monroe, Ga., moved with his wife, stepdaughter and the youngest three of his seven children to a coffee farm in San Rafael de Abangares, Costa Rica. He always "had a heart," he said, for Latin America, and after a vacation to the lush cloud forests near Monteverde in 2004, he was determined to return on a more permanent basis.

He was also looking for more balance in his work-driven life. And so, after buying a coffee farm from a farmer he'd met on his earlier trip, he packed up his life and moved.

"It was like Swiss Family Robinson," Lander jokes. "We just left."

In Costa Rica, Lander, who is now 46, didn't have to worry about making money. He had received a windfall from selling part of a residential subdivision he had helped develop in Georgia; the plan was to keep selling lots and live off the proceeds. So he grew coffee for fun.

Then, in 2008, the financial crisis hit. The value of his subdivision plummeted and the development was in debt. Suddenly, he had to support himself as a coffee farmer. Very quickly, he realized how difficult that was going to be. He had just five hectares that produced 6,000 pounds of specialty-grade coffee beans a year.

He belonged to a "fair trade" co-op, which guarantees farmers a minimum price, but was making only $1.30 a pound on coffee that retailed in the United States for $12 a pound. His net profit was so low that, at one point, he was down to $120 that had to last two weeks.

"I was at the register debating whether ... to buy shampoo or a bag of rice," Lander recalls.

Why wasn't he seeing more of that final price?

That question has been asked by farmers throughout history, particularly in developing countries, where growers of commodity crops like coffee and cocoa often live in poverty. Over the past few decades, a worldwide movement under the broad banner of fair trade has tried to rectify that imbalance.

In exchange for receiving "fair" prices for their products, fair trade farmers must adhere to environmental and labour standards set by certification groups, the largest of which is Fairtrade International, a non-profit organization based in Bonn, Germany. It represents 1.24 million farmers and workers in industries including coffee, bananas and honey.

But Lander started to think that he might improve on the idea. He began to experiment. Using a roaster he had bought in better times, he started roasting his beans and selling them on Face-book to friends in the U.S. He also opened a coffee shop, called the Common Cup, in Monteverde, and sold his coffee to tourists.

When he ran out of beans, he teamed up with two other area coffee farmers, Jorge Fonseca and Alejandro Garcia - who also had a coffee shop, the Colibri - and began shipping greater volumes. Suddenly, he was making money.

This DIY enterprise led to the creation in 2011 of Thrive Farmers Coffee, which Lander started with Garcia and Michael Jones, an Atlanta entrepreneur.

The company is still largely untested but is built on the idea that farmers can "participate in the added value as coffee moves downstream to the consumer," Lander said.

Typically, farmers sell their green, or unroasted, beans. At that stage, the beans generally fetch a price based on the commodity market price. In February, that averaged $1.53 a pound for Arabica coffee, according to the International Coffee Organization.

The fair trade concept offers an improvement on that model. It will pay the market price for beans, but, importantly, it guarantees a minimum price - now $1.40 for Arabica coffee. In addition, the local co-op that collects and processes the beans keeps a premium, now 20 cents, which is used for social services like scholarships and health care for farmers and their families.

Theoretically, a fair trade farmer never loses, because when the commodity market price is higher than the fair trade price, the farmer receives the market price and the co-op still receives the premium. But fair trade buyers purchase unroasted beans, and the processes that add to the price and value of the coffee come later.

In the system that Thrive is trying to develop, farmers are paid only after their coffee has been exported, packaged and sold - at a much higher price - to retailers. If coffee is sold for, say, $7.25 a pound, Thrive splits the proceeds 50-50 with the farmers, who end up, in that example, with about $3.60 a pound.

The farmers working with Thrive must pay the higher costs of processing and exporting, but Lander says they net about four times as much as they would through fair trade, once production costs and co-op fees are factored in. And Thrive helps farmers by establishing relationships for the farmers with local coffee processing mills and co-ops. Then, once the beans are shipped to the U.S., Thrive takes over, handling packaging, roasting and sales. In some cases, Thrive sells green coffee beans to roasters, in which case the farmer receives 75 per cent of the proceeds.

"We're teaching a farmer that you don't have to relinquish control of your coffee," Lander said. "You can see it all the way through the value chain."

Thrive's system is among a growing number of innovative business models in the coffee and cocoa industries that are allowing farmers to increase their ownership and profit margins.

Divine Chocolate, based in London, is partly owned by cocoa farmers in Ghana, who receive a percentage of the company's profits.

Pachamama Coffee Cooperative, a business based in Davis, Calif., is owned by farmers in Latin America and Africa. After the coffee is roasted in the U.S. and sold, all profits go back to the farmers.

All of these initiatives have sprung out of fair trade and aim to send the movement in a more significant for-profit direction.

Fair trade "can be part of a fairer deal for farmers," said Christopher Bacon, an environmental studies professor at Santa Clara University.

"Small-scale farmers have historically used fair trade as one of several strategies, including grassroots organizing, to build stronger co-operatives" that allow farmers "to become active players in the global coffee industry."

But, he added, the fair trade idea "is more about making a living than rocketing coffee farmers out of poverty."

Paul Rice, president and CEO of Fair Trade USA, the non-profit group that certifies transactions between U.S. companies and their suppliers, said the fair trade price "is a floor, not a cap," and that co-ops with reputations for delivering high-quality coffee have commanded prices of more than $3 a pound. In 2011, a strong year for coffee, the average price for fair trade coffee was $2.84 a pound, the group said.

Rice applauded companies like Thrive but asked: "Is that model really scalable? Is it going to reach millions of farmers?"

After all, fair trade's partnerships with major coffee companies - like Starbucks and Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, which together imported 84.6 million pounds of fair trade certified coffee in 2011 - are central to keeping fair trade farmers in business. And he said those companies were accustomed to the quality and reliability that come with the fair trade label.

Lander acknowledges challenges in the Thrive model and says there have been glitches as he and his partners figured out the business. Two groups of Thrive farmers who did not process their coffee up to standards set by the Specialty Coffee Association of America, for example, had to reprocess the coffee, leading to a delay in sales - and their payment.

"It's the first time farmers are being asked to think about quality," Lander said. "Now they're selling to the end user. So that's something we have to teach them."

Carlos Vargas, chief financial officer at CoopeTarrazu R.L., a coffee co-op in Costa Rica, said Thrive's payment model, in which farmers have to wait until their coffee is sold in grocery stores before being paid, could be a hardship for small farmers.

Waiting for the coffee to be processed and roasted and reach stores can take several months. Vargas said some farmers he knows, who have been working with Thrive, have had to wait six to 12 months to be paid.

"That's a very long time, and they have to invest in the next crop. For a small farmer, that's very difficult."

KENT GILBERT, THE NEW YORK TIMES / Members of Thrive Farmers Coffee in Costa Rica are roasting and marketing their own beans for greater profit.;

Copyright © 2013 The New York Times

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Quitting Religion, But Not the Practice of Prayer | View Clip
3/27/2013
Religion Dispatches

Elizabeth Drescher is the author, with Keith Anderson, of Click 2 Save: The Digital Ministry Bible (Morehouse, 2012). She teaches religion and pastoral ministries at Santa Clara University. She is currently at work on Choosing Our Religion: The Spiritual Lives of Religious Nones, a project funded in part through a grant from the Social Science Research Council's “New Directions in the Study of Prayer”...

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Quitting Religion, But Not the Practice of Prayer | View Clip
3/27/2013
Democratic Underground Latest …

Wed Mar 27, 2013, 01:51 PM Quitting Religion, But Not the Practice of Prayer http://www.religiondispatches.org/archive/atheologies/6973/quitting_religion__but_not_the_practice_of_prayer The religious past, the spiritual present March 27, 2013 By ELIZABETH DRESCHER Elizabeth Drescher is the author, with Keith Anderson, of Click 2 Save: The Digital Ministry Bible (Morehouse, 2012). She teaches religion and pastoral ministries at Santa Clara University. She is currently at work on Choosing Our Religion: The Spiritual Lives of Religious Nones, a project funded in part through a grant from the Social Science Research Council’s “New Directions in the Study of Prayer” project through the Templeton Foundation. Her website is www.elizabethdrescher.com This Easter, two newly-minted Christian leaders, Pope Francis and Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, will be leading millions in prayers that are traced back to the earliest days of the Church. But what, if anything, do such prayers mean to the growing worldwide and American contingents of the religiously unaffiliated—Nones—whom both Francis and Welby were at pains to acknowledge as they assumed their new ministries? As more and more people pull away from institutional religion, do public expressions of prayer have any real meaning in the wider world? Do they connect in any significant way to private, personal expressions of prayer? Does prayer matter at all? A majority of Americans still answer ‘yes’ to those questions. Close to 90 percent of those affiliated with religions report praying on a regular basis, and 40 percent of Nones in general say they pray with some frequency. Indeed, a plurality (17%) of those identified as “Atheist/Agnostic” by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life report that they pray. Among those who described their religious affiliation as “nothing in particular,” more than half say they pray regularly....

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The numbers men of LA | View Clip
3/31/2013
The Land

...48-year-old cop has a PhD in public policy. Data and statistics don't scare him and he can speak basic academic. The next breakthrough came when Brantingham's collaborator, Dr George Mohler, now an assistant professor of mathematics and computer science at Santa Clara University, discovered that equations used in mapping the aftershocks of earthquakes could be manipulated to map crime. Mohler's discovery had the dramatic effect of allowing the team to quickly apply their theory and create a...

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To predict and to serve: the future of law enforcement | View Clip
3/31/2013
The Land

...48-year-old cop has a PhD in public policy. Data and statistics don't scare him and he can speak basic academic. The next breakthrough came when Brantingham's collaborator, George Mohler, now an assistant professor of mathematics and computer science at Santa Clara University, discovered that equations used in mapping the aftershocks of earthquakes could be manipulated to map crime. Mohler's discovery had the dramatic effect of allowing the team to quickly begin applying their theory and...

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Michelle Marvier | View Clip
4/1/2013
Breakthrough Generation

Michelle Marvier is professor and department chair at the Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences at Santa Clara University and co-author of the pathbreaking textbook Conservation Science: Balancing the Needs of People and Nature. Michelle has published widely in the fields of endangered species management, conservation investment, and environmental...

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How Not to Raise a Witch | View Clip
4/1/2013
Huffington Post, The

...happy story -- in fact, I find it incredibly sad -- but it's kept me thinking about what we know, and don't know, about the potentials of dreaming. Wanda (a pseudonym) was a student in a religious studies course I taught for upper level undergraduates at Santa Clara University. The topic of the class was religious and psychological perspectives on dreaming, and we covered the history of Western dream theories from ancient Greek myths to modern sleep laboratory research. I encouraged the students...

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Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center hosts conference on the substance of mindfulness
3/20/2013
Contra Costa Times

RICHMOND -- An all-day conference on March 8 at the Craneway Pavilion sought to prove the veracity of an improbable claim: Something that looks like nothing is really ... something.

Seeking to deepen human relationships and promote an enriched life, the UC Berkeley-based Greater Good Science Center and a new magazine, Mindful, invited experts and practitioners of mindful research and application to bring an eager audience stories from the field and rock solid science at "Practicing Mindfulness and Compassion" conference.

A sellout crowd of 500 attendees, with a waiting list and 200 people signed up for the live webcast, were a first indication that mindful, compassionate meditations and connections are not only something, they are fast becoming everything.

"The underlying goal of the event is to support a large and growing movement around mindfulness and compassion--a movement we want to fuel with science," is how organizers promoted the conference.

Ann Shulman, the Berkeley center's executive director, said "movement building" was the day's objective and making "amazing science useful" was the responsibility of speakers such as keynote presenter Jon Kabat-Zinn.

Kabat-Zinn, a molecular biologist, author and emeritus professor of medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, is widely known for founding the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction clinic. Like a guru grandfather, his principles and practices are influencing generations of mindfulness practitioners.

San Francisco's Mary Nenning, a 68-year-old retired nurse, signed up for the conference because she admired Kabat-Zinn's ability to "show the science in virtue."

John Berner, a 33-year old clinical psychologist from Arnold, planned to learn more about the meditation techniques he said are "close to miraculous" in treating panic disorder in his patients.

In opening comments, Kabat-Zinn said the world is starving: looking everywhere for interconnectedness. He argued that self-centered thinking and meditating for oneself are misguided forms of violence, not a groundswell of enlightened living.

"Unless we can hold (life) with compassion, no ancient texts will guide us. We're on our own," he warned. "It's time for us to grow up, or grow down into inter-connectedness."

"Growing down" means recognizing our nothingness in a vast universe. Silence and "awareness of the now," Kabat-Zinn suggested, allow the dual waves of mindfulness and compassion to reverberate harmoniously.

"We're losing ourselves," he said. "I joke that I have to call myself and say, 'Jon, are you here? At all?' If we drop in and retune, we can navigate and remember who we are."

Kabat-Zinn's inspirational presentation was followed by scientific and clinical perspectives grounded in real life applications.

UC Berkeley psychology professor Dacher Keltner introduced the day's featured speakers as "individuals taking the wisdom of ancient traditions and pushing them forward."

GGSC science director Emiliana Simon-Thomas laid out the biological brainscape of the day's subjects. Referring to the vagal nerve and the calming function it has when operating efficiently, she mapped the science of breathing.

"There are parasympathetic impulses onto your heart system. It slows down your heart, when you focus on your breath system," she said.

Mapping systems throughout the body's terrain, Simon-Thomas showed images that have become a familiar part of today's lexicon: brilliantly colored brain areas, lit up in response to emotional images or social scenarios.

Shauna Shapiro, associate professor of counseling psychology at Santa Clara University, invited attendees to join her in closing their eyes.

"Attention is present-moment awareness and seeing clearly," she said. "Our monkey mind swings from thought to thought. With practice, we learn to stabilize."

Intention and attitude, two additional components Shapiro said her present research proves can be cultivated through practice, lead to openness, curiosity, patience and kindness. Shapiro is bringing her "slow down, see connectedness" mechanisms into therapies for military personnel suffering post-traumatic stress disorder.

Quoting a poem by Galway Kinnell, she said, "Sometimes it is necessary to reteach a thing its loveliness." She then demonstrated the value of humor in the life of the compassionate mind, finishing with a borrowed joke: "If you can sit quietly after difficult news, have no jealousy, love everyone equally, and find contentment just where you are, you are probably ... a dog."

Kabat-Zinn's opening remarks summarized the day's events best: "While mindfulness looks like much ado about nothing, I like to say it's much ado about almost nothing, which turns out to really be something, to be everything."

Copyright © 2013 Contra Costa Times.

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Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center hosts conference on the substance of mindfulness | View Clip
3/22/2013
InsideBayArea.com

...body's terrain, Simon-Thomas showed images that have become a familiar part of today's lexicon: brilliantly colored brain areas, lit up in response to emotional images or social scenarios. Shauna Shapiro, associate professor of counseling psychology at Santa Clara University, invited attendees to join her in closing their eyes. "Attention is present-moment awareness and seeing clearly," she said. "Our monkey mind swings from thought to thought. With practice, we learn to stabilize." ...

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Compassion in Action: Opening Minds, Inspiring Hearts | View Clip
3/22/2013
Los Gatos Patch

Hospice of the Valley, San Jose and Santa Clara University Department of Counseling Psychology present “Compassion in Action: Opening Minds, Inspiring Hearts” conference – March 28 SAN JOSE, Calif. – March 22, 2013 – Leading national and international experts in the field...

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Compassion in Action: Opening Minds, Inspiring Hearts conference - March 28 | View Clip
3/24/2013
Saratoga (Calif.) Patch

Hospice of the Valley, San Jose and Santa Clara University Department of Counseling Psychology present “Compassion in Action: Opening Minds, Inspiring Hearts” conference – March 28 SAN JOSE, Calif. – March 22, 2013 – Leading national and international experts in the field...

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Before There Was Photoshop: De Saisset Highlights One Photographer's Innovative Style | View Clip
4/1/2013
Herald - Online, The

SANTA CLARA, Calif. — The de Saisset Museum at Santa Clara University explores the work of one of California's most significant 20th- century photographers in Seeking Answers, a new exhibit of images by Wynn Bullock (1902-1975). The show is on view April 12 – June 30, 2013, and features...

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The New American Landscape
4/2/2013
Spark - KQED-TV

darker going on. There are darker narratives. It isn't necessarily a closed narrative. She suggests a narrative and it's really up to the viewer to kind of compose the narrative for him or herself. >> Today tracey is installing a solo show at the de saisset museum at the university of santa clara. The exhibition is called "dark detour." it's a collection of her miniature buildings, sound effects, photographs, and neon signs. >> Tracy Snelling: today I'm installing the tenement sculpture. >> Karen Kienzle: is this something you actually constructed? It looks fabulous. >> Karen kienzle is a curator of tracey's solo show. >> Tracy Snelling: I notice a lot of people are drawn to this little thing, to look in. I think it also gives you a chance to be a voyeur in a way. It's almost like you can go walk around the building and look in every single window, where you know of course in real life you can't really get away with that. In the tenement I have some film clips, there's dogs barking, tv sounds, water running, toilets flushing, music. And they're looped so the reality of life repeating itself over and over and over and how we keep doing the same things every day. >> Capturing the complexity of every day life is at the heart of tracy's work. But she doesn't judge or analyze. >> Tracy Snelling: to me it seems to just encapsulate life, the big scale of life in a small scale with just the various stuff that goes on. [ music ] sometimes I will use put the sculpture and my camera in the car and go drive around. >> Tracey began her career as a photographer before taking up sculpture. Photography is still an important part of her work. She likes to photograph each of her miniatures in real settings. [ music ] this evening she's taking the ice sign to a bait and tackle shop in alameda. >> Tracy Snelling: I like that there's a few old signs. And there's a bar in it. There's an atm sign on the window, there's an old truck out front. In order to get that in focus with the sculpture, I have to stop down on the camera so the exposure is a lot longer than it normally would be. So the challenge here is to beat the cars, to get the time that I need, which right now is about 4 seconds. >> Karen Kienzle: there's something kind of surreal about her images. And it kind of makes me pay more attention to details in the natural world that I would normally overlook. I think that's one of the great things about trace tracey's work. She really gives us a gift of finding beauty in things we wouldn't normally see. >> In her small tributes to the ordinary, tracey doesn't simplify the meaning of these places or the stories they suggest. >> Tracy Snelling: there's sadness, happiness. There is drama going on everyone we look. Yeah, I think for me it's just that life's just complicated, and it's not a black-and-white place. [ wind chimes tinkle ] >> Liz Hickok: hi, I'm liz hickok, I'm an artist. What I'm working on now is basically san francisco in jello. I just like the fact that it's fun and silly, but at the same time, it starts to touch on things that are more serious like the san francisco earthquake. I start out by making a little scale model, for example, the ferry building, and then I make an environment for it. I'm working on a piece that's going to be between people, and -- going to be twin peaks, and so I'm making lots of little molds. Lots of little molds of little houses, and I set it up in my studio first and test it out and make sure it looks great. And then I'll disassemble it and reassemble it in the exploratorium. [ music ]

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2 professors, portfolio manager share SPIVA grand prize | View Clip
3/18/2013
Pensions&Investments – Online

...(BLK); Vijay Singal, the J. Gray Ferguson Chair Professor of Finance, Pamplin College of Business, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Harold Evensky, president of Evensky & Katz; Sanjiv Das, professor of finance, Leavey School of Business, Santa Clara University; and Jeffrey Wurgler, the Nomura Professor of Finance, Stern School of Business, New York University. — Contact Barry B. Burr at bburr@pionline.com | @Burr_PI

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Don't jump back into stocks unless you plan to stay
3/21/2013
MarketWatch

Getty ImagesTraders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

NEW YORK (MarketWatch) — People don't buy umbrellas until it rains. They don't buy overcoats until the thermometer plunges below freezing.

And many don't buy stocks until the market is up. Way up.

We've seen that dramatically this year as retail investors emerged from their bond-market cocoons and jumped back into stocks.

From 2007 through 2012, they pulled $600 billion from U.S. equity mutual funds while putting twice that amount into bond funds, according to the Investment Company Institute.

But in January, investors started pouring money back into U.S. stock funds — some $19 billion, their biggest such contribution in more than six years, according to ICI data. Since then, it's tapered off a bit, though flows into foreign equity mutual funds have remained strong.

Meanwhile, retail brokerage firms like Fidelity, Schwab, and TD Ameritrade reported substantial increases in trading volume over 2012.

Anecdotal evidence of a sentiment shift is also plentiful. This is from :

“Efren Hernandez, 49, a government worker from Los Angeles, got back in the stock market this month after selling most of his stocks in 2007 and 2008….”

“[Joanne] Mechling, 47, a married market researcher with no kids from Portland, Ore., admits that the fear of missing out on gains has given her a new sense of urgency to get invested. With the market near a new high, ‘it's definitely safe to invest now,' she says…”

Investors appear to have gotten back into stocks again for three reasons: equity markets' huge rallies to all-time highs; the decline in volatility, as measured by the VIX VIX , over the past year, and the resolution of that great non-issue, the fiscal cliff, which created a noisy but ultimately meaningless brouhaha in the financial media late in 2012.

As The New York Times , “Jim Cole, a 52-year-old employee at the Bank of the West in San Francisco, had most of the money in his individual retirement account in cash at the end of 2012 as he awaited a bad outcome to the fiscal negotiations in Washington. Since Congress reached its agreement, he has put almost all of that money to work in stocks.”

“'There doesn't seem to be this swirl of impending doom hanging over the U.S. economy or the world economy …,'” Cole told the Times.

I don't want to throw cold water on these good people, who are doing their best for themselves and their families. But really, this is exactly the wrong way to invest.

Investors who dump stocks amid fear and turmoil and then jump back in when their fellow investors are showing signs of complacency — well, what can you say?

This kind of backward market timing has caused mutual fund holders — a good proxy for individual investors — to underperform pitifully.

A study by DALBAR tracking performance of equity mutual fund investors in the 20 years ending December 2011 — a period encompassing bull and bear markets alike — showed their compound returns SPX by more than four percentage points a year, precisely because of dreadful market timing.

Just keeping their money in a no-brainer index fund or ETF and ignoring it would have been much more profitable.

This is where psychology is not investors' best friend. Most of us are buffeted (no pun intended) by conflicting emotions of fear and greed, hubris and regret that prompts us to do exactly the wrong thing at the wrong time.

Researchers in behavioral finance believe that people would much rather avoid a loss than enjoy a gain. Many of us — men in particular — are overconfident in our investing ability. It's the Lake Wobegon syndrome run amok.

Investors kick themselves regularly for errors of omission – not buying Apple Inc. AAPL  when it first came out with the iPhone or not selling Apple when it hit $700, or maybe not being in stocks before the S&P soared 120% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA  hit all-time highs.

“Now what's bothering you is that you're going to be exposed as an idiot,” said Meir Statman, a pioneer in behavioral finance and professor at Santa Clara University.

Regret is linked to what Statman calls “hindsight error.”

“Hindsight error misleads us into thinking that what is clear in hindsight was equally clear in foresight,” he wrote in his book, “What Investors Really Want.”

And Bruno Solnik, who teaches at HKUST Business School in Hong Kong, pointed out that “regret is experienced relative to the best outcome of alternative choices that could have been made” — like, say, investing in stocks in March 2009. Coulda, shoulda, woulda.

That's why after four years of a bull market, I'd be pretty wary of throwing my money at stocks to “make up for lost ground.” And I'm skeptical these people with a newfound affinity for stocks will really stay the course when times get rough again, as they surely will.

That's why Statman suggests easing back in slowly — over a period of months. “Dollar cost averaging is the remedy for regret,” he said.

And I'd recommend if you're going to get in now, don't put more than 25% to 30% of your money in equities, and wait for the next bear market to add more.

But if you're not in it for the long haul, just don't bother. In the stock market, patience is the name of the game.

Howard R. Gold is a columnist at and editor at large for. Follow him on Twitterand catch his coverage of the economy and politics at.

Copyright © 2013 MarketWatch.com

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Don't Jump Back Into Stocks - Unless You Plan To Stay | View Clip
3/21/2013
Seeking Alpha

...or maybe not being in stocks before the S&P soared 120% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average hit all-time highs. "Now what's bothering you is that you're going to be exposed as an idiot," said Meir Statman, a pioneer in behavioral finance and professor at Santa Clara University. Regret is linked to what Statman calls "hindsight error." "Hindsight error misleads us into thinking that what is clear in hindsight was equally clear in foresight," he wrote in his book, What Investors Really Want....

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Jesuit Justice and the Pope | View Clip
3/25/2013
Progress Report

...Jesuit pope, the first from Latin America, and the first to take on the namesake of St. Francis. The Jesuits, a religious order in the Catholic Church founded by St. Ignatius Loyola, are officially named the Society of Jesus. Having taught economics at Santa Clara University, a Jesuit institution, I appreciated its emphasis on ethics and social justice. The missionary zeal of the Jesuits motivated them to establish Catholic schools and universities world-wide, and it is a happy coincidence...

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US Jobs Coming Home? | View Clip
3/26/2013
www1.voanews.com

...six percent, according to Aonl-Hewitt, a global consulting firm. Typically, companies relocating jobs are multi-national firms that are moving “around the margin,” said Andy Tsay, chief of the Operations Management and Information Systems department at Santa Clara University in California. These companies, he said, make their decisions based on a variety of factors, including the cost of labor, fuel, land and equipment, the proximity of customers and suppliers, the complexity of the product,...

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*U.S. Jobs Coming Home? | View Clip
3/26/2013
Voice of America

Something strange is happening to the international labor market. Soaring costs and a changing labor environment in Asia have brought back American jobs that moved overseas in recent years. But experts warn that those returning jobs are small in number, and that American companies are still basing the bulk of their production abroad.

Several leading U.S. companies have announced plans to bring back highly skilled jobs from overseas, expand existing U.S. factories or build new ones. The reasons, they say, are increasing regulations, slower demand, a shortage of skilled labor and significant salary hikes throughout Asia.

Some of the firms bringing back jobs to the US:

Apple: Investing $100 million, bringing back 200 jobs
General Motors: Building a $258 data center in Colorado; plans to hire fewer than 10,000 workers
Oracle: Restoring 130 jobs from Mexico, retaining 300 in Oregon
Chrysler: Investing $374 million in transmission factories, bringing back 1,250 jobs to Indiana
General Electric: Relocating one of its facilities to Georgia, bringing back 400 jobs
Ford: Investing $200 million, adding 450 jobs in Ohio; moving production from a Mexico facility to Michigan, plans to add 12,000 U.S. jobs by 2016
​​​​In China, factory wages jumped 18.9 percent in 2011 and 20 percent last year, according to the National Bureau of Statistics of China. It projects an increase by more than 9 percent this year.

And China is not the only nation reporting such increases. India is expected to post wage increases of more than 10 percent this year, the Philippines 7.3 percent and Malaysia six percent, according to Aonl-Hewitt, a global consulting firm.

Typically, companies relocating jobs are multi-national firms that are moving “around the margin,” said Andy Tsay, chief of the Operations Management and Information Systems department at Santa Clara University in California.

These companies, he said, make their decisions based on a variety of factors, including the cost of labor, fuel, land and equipment, the proximity of customers and suppliers, the complexity of the product, and the scarcity of skilled labor.

“If you hold all of them equal and … lower the cost of labor in one place, then yeah, it wouldn't be surprising to see more of the jobs go,” Tsay said.

But Alan Tonelson, a scholar with the Washington-based U.S. Business & Industry Council, said there is another important factor – the “very substantial payments and tax breaks from state and local governments.” This, he said, is enticing many companies to bring jobs back to the United States, set up new factories or expand old ones.

“That certainly sends signals to companies that it's going to be a favorable climate for producing in the United States,” added Scott Paul, president of the Alliance for American Manufacturing.

Even so, the local and state tax breaks haven't resulted in an avalanche of jobs returning to the U.S.

One reason is that many modern products are made up of parts made in a variety of countries.

Employees work at a Foxconn factory in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, Aug. 31, 2012.
​​A case in point is U.S. High tech giant Apple, which plans to invest $100 million to manufacture one of its product lines, the iMac desktop computer, in the United States, thereby creating about 200 jobs. But the company's basic components manufacturer, Foxconn, continues to operate in China with more than a million workers.

To make a tangible contribution, said Santa Clara University's Tsay, the entire overseas component ecosystem would have to move back to the U.S., along with dozens of companies and the educational system needed to provide them with the people with the right skills.

Short of that, the impact of the incoming jobs on employment or economic growth in the U.S. will be negligible, according to both Tsay and Paul.

U.S. manufacturers added 14,000 jobs in February, according to U.S. labor statistics. But experts such as Tonelson noted that the manufacturing sector is still about three percent smaller than it was at the end of 2007.

“It's a little bit too early to say that we are seeing some major trends,” said Tsay.

Moving jobs from one continent to another is an expensive undertaking, Paul added, because it could require establishing factories and investing in equipment.

But he was optimistic that more jobs might come back five years from now due to lower U.S. energy costs, rising wages abroad, shifting currency exchange rates and intellectual property theft challenges in Asia.

“If you look at cost factors over the coming decade,” Paul said, “I think that you see the United States becoming even more cost-competitive.”

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Mercury News interview: Meir Statman, Santa Clara University professor of finance
3/31/2013
Contra Costa Times

Santa Clara University finance professor Meir Statman believes that American employers should be forced to set up retirement plans for their workers for one simple reason: "People are stupid," he said.

Statman, an expert in behavioral finance, includes himself among people who sometimes make stupid financial decisions.

"I know a great deal but I sometimes catch myself saying, 'Whoa, that was stupid, Meir,' " he said.

Statman and his wife, for instance, recently had some windows replaced in one of their bathrooms. Statman paid the bill for the work in full, even though he noticed that some of the caulking wasn't right.

"Then I called to say, 'Can you send somebody to fix it?' " Statman said. "Well, I haven't heard back. Why didn't I just pay them some of the money until it was fixed? There is the matter of social niceties and our aversion to argue. But you can describe that as less than smart."

Statman sat down recently with this newspaper to talk about retirement planning. The interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Q Why should employers be required to set up retirement plans for their employees?

A In 1975 I got a job at City University of New York making $13,500 per year. I was 28 years old. The university had a mandatory savings plan and they put as much as 15 percent on top of my salary into retirement. I had no choice. I couldn't say, "Listen, I could really use that money now for diapers for my daughter." But I had no option. I worked there for two years and contributed a total of $7,000. Thirty-eight years later, when I last looked, that retirement was worth more than $190,000. Even if I had contributed nothing, I would still have a good amount.

Q Even if employers are only required to set up a retirement account for their workers -- and not contribute cash like you received in New York -- what's in it for the employers?

A In Australia, the system has existed for ages now, same thing in Israel. And Britain did the same thing last year. In America, pensions are underfunded. (American) companies today offer 401(k)s and, in some ways, it's complicated for them. It would just make life simple for employers if the government says, "You have to do it. End of story."

Q What's the likelihood that your idea would become reality -- and who would administer such a sweeping change in the United States?

A The idea that it would happen tomorrow in the U.S. is absurd. There's just too much opposition from many quarters. But, in an ideal world, I would have it all handled by a central agency, another government agency, like the Social Security Administration.

Q Is there an overall benefit to the U.S. economy in having more Americans with company-provided retirement plans?

A It's not about helping the economy. It's about helping individual people. When they wake up at age 65, they won't have to rely on soup kitchens and public agencies. This will improve the lives of people. Will it increase the GDP for the U.S. economy? I don't care. If you have a centralized system that keeps expenses low, money that would otherwise go to financial services companies that charge 1 percent or 2 percent won't go to them. That's going to end up in the savings accounts of employees, rather than going to the money managers. And that will help improve people's lives.

Q In your scenario, how much control would employees have over managing their own retirement accounts?

A I don't want to give people too much choice because people are stupid. I would say, abolish all pensions and have everybody in a defined contribution plan. You can still put it all into government bonds, if you want to ensure a conservative income. If it were up to me, I would have retirement plans that put them into index funds only.

Q There are 50-year-old employees with little retirement savings and 30-somethings making $30,000 a year who believe they will never get ahead and will never be able to afford a house, let alone be able to retire comfortably someday. Both groups say there's no point in trying to save for retirement at this point in their lives. What would you say to them?

A They're going to say, "I don't have money to spare for retirement," or, "I need it now and I can't afford to save for later." But you can find ways to cut back, even though I know it's going to be a hardship for many. But even homeless people have cellphones, so start saving now and take advantage of whatever you have. There are IRA accounts they can open even if they don't have an employer that offers it. I would tell the 30-year-old, "Social Security will be there, but it's not going to provide you with a nice standard of living. And you're not a kid anymore. Stop acting like a kid. You have to do your own adult supervision."

Q You're obviously doing well financially, and I would imagine you've done a better job than most at managing your own retirement fund. You're 65 now. When do you plan to retire?

A Never.

Q Then what good has it done you to have had so much money tied up for years in a retirement account that you have no intention of ever tapping into?

A Having a retirement account is useful even if you never plan to retire because I wake up every day knowing that I work because I want to work, not because I have to work. That brings me a kind of inner peace.

Contact Dan Nakaso at 408-271-3648. Follow him at Twitter.com/dannakaso.

Meir Statman

Age: 65

Birthplace: Aalen, Germany.

Company: Santa Clara University

Position: Glenn Klimek professor of finance

Residence: Cupertino

Family: Married; two daughters

Five facts

About Meir Statman

1. Born in 1947 in a German refugee camp to Holocaust survivors and immigrated with them to Israel in 1949. Growing up in Ashkelon, Israel, a short walk from the Mediterranean, he regularly found Roman coins, glass and pottery while walking on the beach.

2. Served a portion of his Israeli military service as a farmer in a kibbutz in the Upper Galilee.

3. Came for a job interview at Santa Clara University in 1979 because the chair of his department at Rutgers University said that an outside offer was necessary for a raise in salary. He got an offer from Santa Clara but never returned to Rutgers.

4. Rolls his eyes when friends claim they can distinguish good wines from mediocre wines, but is confident that he can easily distinguish good olives from mediocre ones.

5. Proud to drive a dented 1994 Toyota Camry wagon with more than 200,000 miles on it.

Copyright © 2013 Contra Costa Times.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook issues rare apology to Chinese consumers
3/31/2013
Contra Costa Times

Facing a barrage of attacks from China's state-controlled media over what appear to be minor complaints about the company's warranty policies, Apple ( AAPL) CEO Tim Cook on Monday issued a rare apology to try to tamp down the controversy.

In a signed note posted on Apple's Chinese website, Cook apologized for the company appearing to be arrogant in a previous response to warranty complaints and detailed a new replacement policy -- one that is now better than what U.S. consumers enjoy.

The unusual move highlights the importance of China to the Cupertino company -- China is now its second-largest market after the United States -- and the intrusive role the Communist government plays in the economy. To succeed in a nation that welcomes foreign investment but is wary of foreign companies dominating local markets, multinationals, even those with the gold-standard reputations, tend to respond quickly to government criticism.

Cook's apology follows a front-page editorial last week in The People's Daily, the mouthpiece for the Communist government, that accused Apple of being "arrogant" for not addressing warranty complaints aired in mid-March on the powerful government-run China Central Television network. Then a Chinese regulator said that it planned to increase its supervision of Apple.

It remains unclear what may underlie the attack on Apple, but Andy Tsay, a professor of operations management at Santa Clara University, said it makes sense for Apple to proceed with caution.

"In a politically charged situation like this, this is something you really have to handle delicately," he said.

Fueling the criticism was the government's insistence that Chinese consumers were not being treated as well as those elsewhere. Whether or not that was true, Apple needed to address the issue, said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China.

It is common in legal disputes between Chinese companies for one to ask for an apology, she said. While Apple's warranty controversy did not involve another company, offering up a public mea culpa resonates with the culture and blunts the government criticisms, Han added.

"They take the wind out of it," she said.

In the letter, Cook said, "We recognize that some people may have viewed our lack of communication as arrogant or as a sign that we didn't care about or value their feedback. We sincerely apologize to our customers for any concern or confusion we may have caused."

The People's Daily and CCTV said Apple did not give consumers new iPhones as replacements for damaged ones as it does in other countries, along with a new one-year warranty.

"The gist of the CCTV report was that everyone else in the world is getting better treatment from Apple by getting replacement phones, so it's discriminatory against the Chinese," Tsay said. "And the Chinese people hate to be made to feel like second-class citizens to anybody."

In fact, the company's U.S. and China warranty policies were virtually the same.

Cook said Apple now in China will replace damaged phones with new devices and give consumers a new one-year warranty. Previously, Apple often would replace damaged parts with new components. In some situations, Apple would replace a damaged phone with a new one but not issue a new one-year warranty.

On its U.S. website, Apple says that under its iPhone one-year warranty, the company will repair defects with new or refurbished parts, give the consumer a new or refurbished phone or offer a refund on the purchase price. Apple does not extend the original one-year warranty but does offer a 90-day warranty on replaced parts of phones.

Apple joins a growing list of foreign brands that have recently experienced negative publicity in China. The contretemps may have unnerved investors. Shares of Apple slipped more than 3 percent Monday to $428.91, causing the company to fall behind Exxon as the most valuable company in the United States based on market valuation.

The criticisms of Apple in China are seen by some as a sign officials are concerned about dominant foreign companies in its mobile industry. Apple is competing against Chinese companies Lenovo, Huawei and ZTE, though South Korea-based Samsung is the smartphone market-share leader in China. Earlier this month, China's Ministry of Industry and Information Technology published a white paper that warned Google ( GOOG) has too much influence in China's smartphone industry through its Android mobile operating system.

Cook's letter does not guarantee future smooth operations for Apple in China, BGC Partners analyst Colin Gillis said.

"Do you think the Chinese government wants Apple to have a dominant position -- or do you think they'd prefer to have one of their own operating systems?" Gillis said.

Contact John Boudreau at 408-278-3496; follow him at Twitter.com/svwriter.

Copyright © 2013 Contra Costa Times.

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Struggling With Clients | View Clip
4/1/2013
AdvisorOne

...that I will not be around in 20 years to enjoy it. Thus I may not only be failing to listen carefully to clients; I may be making too much of the problem too. That possibility was reinforced by Meir Statman, the Glenn Klimek Professor of Finance at the Leavey School of Business, Santa Clara University, who wondered if perhaps the recalcitrant prospects have other resources unknown to the advisor. Even so, while many studies support the idea that advisors often are given less than the full...

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Mercury News interview: Meir Statman, Santa Clara University professor of finance | View Clip
4/1/2013
InsideBayArea.com

Santa Clara University finance professor Meir Statman believes that American employers should be forced to set up retirement plans for their workers for one simple reason: "People are stupid," he said. Statman, an expert in behavioral finance,...

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Apple CEO issues rare apology to Chinese consumers | View Clip
4/1/2013
Sacramento Bee - Online, The

...powerful government-run China Central Television network. Then a Chinese regulator said that it planned to increase its supervision of Apple. It remains unclear what underlies the attack on Apple, but Andy Tsay, a professor of operations management at Santa Clara University, said it makes sense for Apple to proceed with caution. "In a politically charged situation like this, this is something you really have to handle delicately," he said. Fueling the criticism was the government's...

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Marketwired: An Evolution From Wire Service to Wired Company
4/1/2013
Marketwire

TORONTO--(Marketwired - April 02, 2013) - Today, Marketwire takes the next step in its evolution from a wire service to a wired company. Outwardly, this includes debuting a new name -- Marketwired -- and logo, as well as naming former Yahoo! vice president of business intelligence, Stu Ogawa, as the company's new Global EVP, Product and Technology.

Internally, the company has embraced "open business" by improving its people, products and processes to become an innovative social communications company offering best-in-class news distribution and reporting, and state-of-the-art social media monitoring and analytics. Powered by Sysomos, Marketwired's product suite provides decision makers with real-time data, actionable insights and the confidence to make informed decisions.

"Working with Marketwired enables clients to discover opportunities that will drive future success," explained Marketwired CEO, Michael Nowlan. "By embracing technology, we continue to transform how we work, how our clients reach their customers and how we help them do it."

Marketwired has implemented a number of significant changes over the past few years, including the acquisition of Sysomos, the most comprehensive social media monitoring and analytics platform. The Sysomos engine now powers Marketwired products, including MAP and Heartbeat. Recently, Marketwired became part of the Twitter Certified Partner Program and unveiled a new feature allowing clients to search influencers' Twitter bios. Additionally, Marketwired has focused on attracting top talent, including Ogawa, from major industry players.

As Marketwired's new Global EVP, Product and Technology, Ogawa will oversee technology and product roadmaps for the company going forward. A 25-year technology and software veteran, Ogawa will draw on his diverse experience leading large development, product and engineering teams at start-ups and multi-billion dollar enterprises. Prior to joining Marketwired, Ogawa led Yahoo!'s sales tools and analytics organization, as well as a team operating big data analytics responsible for processing 1.5 billion transactions per day. Before that, Ogawa was General Manager, Vice President, Applications at Teradata Corporation, and Chief Technology Officer of AngelPoints Inc. He earned his MBA from the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University, and completed the Advanced Leadership Program at Stanford Graduate School of Business.

"At Marketwired, our goal is keeping clients ahead of the curve. As the thousands of people, events and opinions influence clients' target markets, we can help turn that influence into opportunity," explained COO Jim Delaney. "That's what we call the power of influence."

The transformed brand will enhance Marketwired's news release distribution, social media monitoring tools and other services. Now, it will be even easier for Marketwired clients to create opportunity through easier access to all of the Marketwired services. Additionally, in the coming months, Marketwired will continue to steadily expand its offerings and expertise to help clients discover new opportunities that will drive future success.

Partnering with companies of all sizes -- from start-ups to Fortune 500 enterprises -- Marketwired is an innovative, social communications company offering best-in-class global news distribution and reporting. Powered by Sysomos, Marketwired's products also provide state-of-the-art social media monitoring and analytics. This critical business intelligence provides instant and unlimited access to all social media conversations, allowing brands to see what's happening, why it's happening, and who's driving the conversations.

Marketwired is majority-owned by OMERS Private Equity (www.omerspe.com), which manages the private equity activities of OMERS Administration Corporation and today has $6.4 billion of investments under management. OMERS Private Equity is headquartered in Toronto, Canada, with offices in New York and London.

Contact: Media Contact: Heather Whaling heather@GebenCommunication.com 614-364-2888

Contact:

Copyright © 2013 Marketwire L.P. All rights reserved.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook issues rare apology to Chinese consumers [San Jose Mercury News] | View Clip
4/1/2013
Bloomberg Businessweek - Online

...powerful government-run China Central Television network. Then a Chinese regulator said that it planned to increase its supervision of Apple. It remains unclear what may underlie the attack on Apple, but Andy Tsay, a professor of operations management at Santa Clara University, said it makes sense for Apple to proceed with caution. "In a politically charged situation like this, this is something you really have to handle delicately," he said. Fueling the criticism was the government's...

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Apple CEO issues rare apology to Chinese consumers | View Clip
4/1/2013
News & Observer - Online

...powerful government-run China Central Television network. Then a Chinese regulator said that it planned to increase its supervision of Apple. It remains unclear what underlies the attack on Apple, but Andy Tsay, a professor of operations management at Santa Clara University, said it makes sense for Apple to proceed with caution. "In a politically charged situation like this, this is something you really have to handle delicately," he said. Fueling the criticism was the government's...

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Apple CEO issues rare apology to Chinese consumers | View Clip
4/1/2013
Telegraph - Online, The

...powerful government-run China Central Television network. Then a Chinese regulator said that it planned to increase its supervision of Apple. It remains unclear what underlies the attack on Apple, but Andy Tsay, a professor of operations management at Santa Clara University, said it makes sense for Apple to proceed with caution. "In a politically charged situation like this, this is something you really have to handle delicately," he said. Fueling the criticism was the government's...

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Mercury News interview: Meir Statman, Santa Clara University professor of finance | View Clip
4/2/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

Santa Clara University finance professor Meir Statman believes that American employers should be forced to set up retirement plans for their workers for one simple reason: "People are stupid," he said. Statman, an expert in behavioral finance,...

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Apple CEO Tim Cook issues rare apology to Chinese consumers | View Clip
4/2/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...powerful government-run China Central Television network. Then a Chinese regulator said that it planned to increase its supervision of Apple. It remains unclear what may underlie the attack on Apple, but Andy Tsay, a professor of operations management at Santa Clara University, said it makes sense for Apple to proceed with caution. "In a politically charged situation like this, this is something you really have to handle delicately," he said. Fueling the criticism was the government's...

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Marketwired: An Evolution From Wire Service to Wired Company | View Clip
4/2/2013
Marketwire - Online

...operating big data analytics responsible for processing 1.5 billion transactions per day. Before that, Ogawa was General Manager, Vice President, Applications at Teradata Corporation, and Chief Technology Officer of AngelPoints Inc. He earned his MBA from the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University, and completed the Advanced Leadership Program at Stanford Graduate School of Business. "At Marketwired, our goal is keeping clients ahead of the curve. As the thousands of people, events...

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Apple CEO Tim Cook issues rare apology to Chinese consumers | View Clip
4/2/2013
El Paso Times - Online

...powerful government-run China Central Television network. Then a Chinese regulator said that it planned to increase its supervision of Apple. It remains unclear what may underlie the attack on Apple, but Andy Tsay, a professor of operations management at Santa Clara University, said "In a politically charged situation like this, this is something you really have to handle delicately," he said. Fueling the criticism was the government's insistence that Chinese consumers were not being...

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Marketwired: An Evolution From Wire Service to Wired Company | View Clip
4/2/2013
Yahoo! Finance

...operating big data analytics responsible for processing 1.5 billion transactions per day. Before that, Ogawa was General Manager, Vice President, Applications at Teradata Corporation, and Chief Technology Officer of AngelPoints Inc. He earned his MBA from the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University, and completed the Advanced Leadership Program at Stanford Graduate School of Business. "At Marketwired, our goal is keeping clients ahead of the curve. As the thousands of people, events...

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Apple CEO Tim Cook issues rare apology to Chinese consumers | View Clip
4/2/2013
Denver Post - Online, The

...powerful government-run China Central Television network. Then a Chinese regulator said that it planned to increase its supervision of Apple. It remains unclear what may underlie the attack on Apple, but Andy Tsay, a professor of operations management at Santa Clara University, said it makes sense for Apple to proceed with caution. "In a politically charged situation like this, this is something you really have to handle delicately," he said. Fueling the criticism was the government's...

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Apple CEO Tim Cook issues rare apology to Chinese consumers | View Clip
4/2/2013
Salt Lake Tribune - Online, The

...powerful government-run China Central Television network. Then a Chinese regulator said that it planned to increase its supervision of Apple. It remains unclear what may underlie the attack on Apple, but Andy Tsay, a professor of operations management at Santa Clara University, said it makes sense for Apple to proceed with caution. "In a politically charged situation like this, this is something you really have to handle delicately," he said. Fueling the criticism was the government's...

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Apple CEO Tells China He's Sorry | View Clip
4/2/2013
HispanicBusiness.com

...powerful government-run China Central Television network. Then a Chinese regulator said that it planned to increase its supervision of Apple. It remains unclear what may underlie the attack on Apple, but Andy Tsay, a professor of operations management at Santa Clara University, said it makes sense for Apple to proceed with caution. "In a politically charged situation like this, this is something you really have to handle delicately," he said. Fueling the criticism was the government's...

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Terri Griffith on Flexible Work | View Clip
4/3/2013
Huffington Post, The

Yahoo!'s recent announcement to end telecommuting has caused quite the stir. It's hard to be neutral on the topic. (Put me in the 'bad idea' camp.) I recently spoke about this with Terri Griffith, Professor at Santa Clara University and the author of the award-winning book, The Plugged-In Manager: Get in Tune with Your People, Technology, and Organization to Thrive. She is an expert on how you make combined technology and organization decisions...

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Lawmaker's involvement questioned in casino grant that would benefit family business | View Clip
3/16/2013
Journal & Courier - Online, The

...Casino, the grant for Destination Brookville has generated local controversy because of McMillin. Ethics questioned Judy Nadler, a former Santa Clara, Calif., mayor who now directs government ethics programs at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University, said McMillin’s involvement was a huge conflict of interest. That, she said, would still be true even if he had made sure the public knew at each step in this process of his family’s involvement. “Transparency...

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Lawmaker's involvement questioned in casino grant that would benefit family business | View Clip
3/17/2013
Courier-Post - Online

...Casino, the grant for Destination Brookville has generated local controversy because of McMillin. Ethics questioned Judy Nadler, a former Santa Clara, Calif., mayor who now directs government ethics programs at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University, said McMillin’s involvement was a huge conflict of interest. That, she said, would still be true even if he had made sure the public knew at each step in this process of his family’s involvement. “Transparency...

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Lawmaker's involvement questioned in casino grant that would benefit family business | View Clip
3/18/2013
Louisville Courier-Journal - Online

...Casino, the grant for Destination Brookville has generated local controversy because of McMillin. Ethics questioned Judy Nadler, a former Santa Clara, Calif., mayor who now directs government ethics programs at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University, said McMillin’s involvement was a huge conflict of interest. That, she said, would still be true even if he had made sure the public knew at each step in this process of his family’s involvement. “Transparency...

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From London to New York to Cyprus, Fraud and Financial "Insanity" | View Clip
3/24/2013
Rinf.com

...economics and law at the University of Missouri Kansas City (UMKC). He was the Executive Director of the Institute for Fraud Prevention from 2005-2007. He has taught previously at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin and at Santa Clara University, where he was also the distinguished scholar in residence for insurance law and a visiting scholar at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics. Black was litigation director of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, deputy...

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Pizarro: Santa Clara University's Markkula Center for Applied Ethics celebrates 25th anniversary | View Clip
3/27/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University marked its 25th anniversary with a special dinner on campus, where it honored four couples and an individual who have had a significant impact on the center. The first Moral Compass Awards were presented...

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Markkula Center for applied ethics at Santa Clara University
3/29/2013
KQED-FM (KQED 88.5)

cloudy skies saving some fog after midnight then mostly cloudy most of the weekend tonight slows in the fifties ice tomorrow in the sixties I'm Dave Freeman good evening you're listening to KQED FM San Francisco and take you we are North Highland Sacramento eight p.m. welcome to the weekly broadcast at the Commonwealth club of California I'm Gloria Duffy President and CEO the : the Commonwealth club is a nonpartisan public forum dedicated to airing diverse views on important topics of national interest domains program is underwritten in part by Bernard Gaucher foundation and the members of the Commonwealth club . and welcome to tonight's meeting of the Commonwealth club of California is a place where you're in the know my name is Joe Epstein on a past chair , world " of Governors and I'll be your chair for tonight's program you can find the Commonwealth club on the Internet at Commonwealth club . court this program is part of the club 's good list series underwritten by the Bernardo Gaucher foundation in today's program will feature a conversation about America's educational system with Michelle Rhee founder and CEO of students first and former Chancellor of the District of Columbia system and author of the new book radical fighting to put students first is we will be in conversation with Professor Kurt Hansen Executive Director of the Markkula Center for applied ethics at Santa Clara University love you now tell you a little bit more about Ms. Ray during her controversial tenure as Chancellor of the DC school system Michelle reclosed underperformance twenty three's

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Radio Daily Schedule | View Clip
3/30/2013
KQED-FM - Online

...inner-city Baltimore; her turbulent tenure as chancellor of the Washington, D.C. public school system; and her current role as CEO of the nonprofit StudentsFirst. She appeared in conversation with Kirk Hanson, executive director of the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University. Inside Europe Funding Europe A political economist joins the program to shed light on the financial machinations of the Eurozone, and help explain the terms of the Euro bailout. The program also looks at...

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for applied ethics at Santa Clara University let me
3/31/2013
WESA-FM (Pittsburgh's NPR News Station)

the Commonwealth club is a nonpartisan public forum dedicated to airing diverse views on important topics of national interest today's program is underwritten in part by the Bernardo Gaucher foundation and the members of the Commonwealth club . and welcome to tonight's meeting of the Commonwealth club of California the place where you're in the know my name is Joe of Seattle -- Sheriff , will close board of governors of Yorkshire or tonight's program you can find the Commonwealth club on the Internet at Commonwealth club .org this program is part of the club's good live series underwritten by the Bernard Gaucher foundation entities program will feature a conversation about America's educational system with Michelle Rhee's founder and CEO of students first and former Chancellor of the District of Columbia system and author of the new book radical fighting to put students first is removing conversation with Professor Kurt Hansen Executive Director of the Markkula Center for applied ethics at Santa Clara University let me now tell you a little bit more about his rate during a controversial tenure as Chancellor of the DC school system Michelle reclosed underperformance twenty three schools alone as a matter of fact two thousand and eight she turns waste from the central bureaucracy and fire large numbers of ineffective teachers based in part on controversial standardized tests many of us have followed Michelle 's highly visible career particularly since the movie waiting for Superman let me just tell you a little bit about early years shall joint the Baltimore public schools for three years and in nineteen ninety seven she founded and served as CEO of the new teacher Project which trained and supplied urban school districts twenty three thousand midcareer classroom teachers and two thousand and ten she started a grassroots organization called students first former New York City Chancellor Joel Klein said this of Michelle which he did in Washington DC was a game changing which is precisely the kind of bold leadership this country needs please welcome Michelle Ray a professor Kirk has him him Michelin delighted to be in polarization with you the Washington Post pulled your new book radical e-mail more / manifesto I'd like to focus first on the manifesto part in your diagnosis of the the the problems of American education system and look at some of the more principally sure I have some questions but were going to be getting questions from the audience for discussion as well and I will and those to the ones that I have dreaded ask as many as we can you obviously have tremendous experience in different aspects of American education can you give us your basic diagnosis of what leads to low performance of American schools today in Africa . and the reason why I am a little progrowth answer is because people are always looking for both simplistic at you from him and simplistic answers and the bottom and now I can't play the number of calls I get from donors in only one famous idea I and their hope is that by doing one thing and it seems that the system the school system and their status is not possible to deal similarly little hesitant but I will say this given my experiences I had to boil things down to one issue it would be that complete and utter lack of accountability that exist in public schools today on I went to DC originally I see you was was unlikely I was a thirty seven -year-old Korean girl from Toledo Ohio who had never run a school much like a school district cell landmine by Adrian Nancy announced that has to be the city's first schools Chancellor that system was pre- message coming entire city unit was thinking what on God's green earth when Adrian thinking and Remus was going through my head while sitting in an office on the first day and try to know what you start when the system is broken evidence and on I started looking through the what was going on and what the problems were was interesting because on my system and my assistance on at an experience where he was trying find out you know what were we spending money on in my and it turned out that on a tremendous amount of money was being spent on

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Groups led by inside trader, child abuser got Obamacare co-op loans | View Clip
4/3/2013
Washington Examiner - Online

...Healthsource prior to the merger, according to a CIGNA spokesman. Even so, Schilling's group received a $65 million loan. Neither Schilling nor CCIIO responded to a reporter's multiple telephone calls and emails seeking comment. Judy Nadler, a government ethics expert and former mayor of Santa Clara, California, said the Obamacare co-op loan program needs much more transparency. "How can individuals who have some negative experiences and scrapes with the law, how is it they could come to...

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Evidence of Reed Claim About Same-Sex... | View Clip
3/27/2013
NBC Bay Area - Politics

...Reed says there is clear proof that heterosexual parenting provides the best outcome for children. In this Reality Check report, Sam Brock takes a look at this bold statement. Evidence of Reed claim about... Link Embed Email Copy Link to this video Copy Embed this video Replay More videos (3 of 9) « » The debate over marriage equality currently being staged before the U.S. Supreme Court may ultimately hinge on questions of legal standing, constitutional interpretation or even states' rights. But according to Ralph Reed, conservative activist and founder of the Faith & Freedom Coalition, the issue before the country is whether there's a "compelling interest" in strengthening and supporting the union between man and woman. In a round table discussion on NBC's Meet the Press, Reed followed his family preservation analysis with a bold claim. Reed told host David Gregory that two biological parents are empirically better for raising a child than any other arrangement, and science supports his contention. "The verdict of social science is overwhelming and irrefutable," said Reed, "that the enduring, loving, in-tact, biological mother and father is best for children, and it's not even a close call." Many social scientists who have conducted research on the subject or reviewed its vast literature, however, take issue with the claim. "The overwhelming evidence seems to indicate the exact opposite," said Dr. Nick Ladany, Dean of Santa Clara University's School of Education and Counseling Psychology, "which is to say, there's no difference between same-sex parents or opposite-sex parents [in child outcome]." Last week, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the foremost group of pediatricians in the country, came out supporting marriage equality on the basis it would be beneficial to children, after reviewing decades of research and at least 55 studies. One of the report's authors, Dr. Benjamin Siegel, told NBC Bay Area that when it comes to child outcomes, the sexual orientation of the parents is irrelevant. "With regard to children and their development it's more important that they have people who love them, and it's better to have two people or a large village, than it is a single person," Siegel said. To take that a step further, Siegel continued, "children need to be nurtured by people who are relatively stable socially, emotionally and economically." During the discussion on Meet the Press, Gregory pointed out the American Academy of Pediatrics disagrees with Reed's stance, to which Reed responded, "and the American College of Pediatricians came out the other way." So why is there a discrepancy amongst pediatricians? "The American College of Pediatricians looks like a professional organization," Ladany said, "and to be fair, they are a professional organization of a subgroup of pediatricians who have certain statements or have certain positions that they are grounded...

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Evidence of Reed Claim About Same-Sex Parenting Proves Flimsy | View Clip
3/28/2013
KNTV-TV - Online

...even a close call.” Many social scientists who have conducted research on the subject or reviewed its vast literature, however, take issue with the claim. “The overwhelming evidence seems to indicate the exact opposite,” said Dr. Nick Ladany, Dean of Santa Clara University's School of Education and Counseling Psychology, “which is to say, there's no difference between same-sex parents or opposite-sex parents [in child outcome].” Last week, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the foremost...

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Plaza Vista fifth-graders hang out with solar decathletes
3/20/2013
Orange County Register

It's not always easy coaxing fifth-graders to get up in front of 300 people, but Scott Bedley's students were running to the front of his classroom for a chance to speak.

Then again, it's not every day that the Plaza Vista School students get to chat with innovative college scientists on Google+ Hangout - with 12 other classrooms watching online.

Once a month, Bedley's class will check in with Santa Clara University's team for the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon coming Oct. 3-13 to the Orange County Great Park. Hundreds of college students design and build solar-powered homes for the annual event, usually held on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Santa Clara's contingent has been working for two years on this year's design and is teaching Bedley's students what it takes to build a home from the ground up. Meanwhile, the fifth-graders serve as reporters, furiously scribbling notes for reports that will be featured in the Voices page of the Irvine World News.

During their first meeting on March 7, team representatives Beth Avon, Brian Grau, Nicole Pal and Brittnie Swartchick introduced the competition and took the Plaza Vista students on a virtual tour of Santa Clara's 2009 house, which took first place in the architecture category. Coos of "awesome" and "whoa" followed the team as they showed off the house's features, including cabinets that slide out of walls to save space, windows operated by a central control panel and a bathroom that begins to heat water as soon as you step in the door.

At the first quiz question, Miki Bethke's hand shot up. At a nod from Bedley, she bolted up to stand in front of the camera.

"My favorite part was when we answered the questions because we can really talk with them, and then we wouldn't just have to sit in the background not participating," Miki, 10, said after the hangout.

During the question-and-answer portions, eager hands flew into the air as the fifth-graders asked how each of the solar decathletes got involved in the project, what inspires their designs, how they're paying for the project and whether they've cooked any food in the 2009 house. (The answer is yes, a full Thanksgiving meal was made there.)

After flipping through renderings and plans for the 2013 house, the decathletes gave the students a chance to weigh in on the color of the bathroom tiles - an overwhelming majority chose green.

Copyright © 2013 ProQuest Information and Learning Company; All Rights Reserved.

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Fifth-graders hang out with solar decathletes ; Plaza Vista students join online meetings with college scientists.
3/21/2013
Orange County Register

IRVINE It's not always easy coaxing fifth-graders to get up in front of 300 people, but Scott Bedley's students were running to the front of his classroom for a chance to speak.

Then again, it's not every day that the Plaza Vista School students get to chat with innovative college scientists on Google+ Hangout - with 12 other classrooms watching online.

Once a month, Bedley's class will check in with Santa Clara University's team for the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon coming to the Orange County Great Park on Oct. 3-13. Hundreds of college students design and build solar-powered homes for the annual event, typically held at the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Santa Clara's contingent has been working for two years on this year's design and is teaching Bedley's students what it takes to build a home from the ground up. Meanwhile, the fifth-graders serve as reporters, furiously scribbling notes for reports that will be featured in the Voices page of the Irvine World News.

During their first meeting on March 7, team representatives Beth Avon, Brian Grau, Nicole Pal and Brittnie Swartchick introduced the competition and took the students on a virtual tour of Santa Clara's 2009 house, which took first place in the architecture category. Coos of "awesome" and "whoa" followed the team a they showed off the house's features, including cabinets that slide out of walls to save space, windows operated by a central control panel and an entirely waterproof bathroom that begins to heat up water as soon as you step in the door.

At the first quiz question, Miki Bethke's hand shot up - along with several others. At a nod from Bedley, she bolted out of her chair to stand in front of the camera.

"My favorite part was when we answered the questions because we can really talk with them, and then we wouldn't just have to sit in the background not participating," Bethke, 10, said after the hangout.

During the question-and-answer portions, eager hands flew into the air as the fifth-graders asked how each of the solar decathletes got involved in the project, what inspires their designs, how they're paying for the project and whether they've cooked any food in the 2009 house.

After flipping through renderings and plans for their 2013 house, the decathletes gave the students a chance to weigh in on the color of the bathroom tiles - an overwhelming majority chose green.

From here, Bedley's fifth-graders will do more research for their newspaper articles, while Plaza Vista's fourth-graders will watch along so they're up to speed next year when the competition kicks off in Irvine. The hangouts are one of the many teaching innovations that earned Bedley this year's Elementary School Teacher of the Year award from the Irvine Unified School District.

"Just the look on the faces on the kids and how focused they were on it all tells everything to me," Bedley said.

714-796-7944 or ljow@ocregister.com

Copyright © 2013 ProQuest Information and Learning Company; All Rights Reserved.

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Plaza Vista School and Santa Clara University's solar decathlon team hang out on Google | View Clip
3/22/2013
Orange County Register - Online

Follow the hangouts The first hangout is available for viewing on YouTube on the pvfifthgrade channel. For more information on the hangouts, contact teacher Scott Bedley at scottbedley@iusd.org. To learn more about Santa Clara University's project, email scusolar13 @gmail.com or visit sd13.scu.edu. Keep an eye on the Voices page in the Irvine World News for reports from the students.

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Fifth-graders hang out with solar decathletes | View Clip
3/22/2013
Orange County Register - Online

...for a chance to speak. Then again, it's not every day that the Plaza Vista School students get to chat with innovative college scientists on Google+ Hangout – with 12 other classrooms watching online. Once a month, Bedley's class will check in with Santa Clara University's team for the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon coming to the Orange County Great Park on Oct. 3-13. Hundreds of college students design and build solar-powered homes for the annual event, typically held at...

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Internal Affairs: State employee panel seems stacked against San Jose pension reformers | View Clip
3/16/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...Board of Supervisors has selected as its new county counsel. It won't be Lori Pegg, however, because the acting county counsel has told the board that she'd like to keep her options open for a Superior Court judgeship appointment. The board chose the Santa Clara University Law School graduate, who has spent the last 12 years working for the county counsel office, to serve as acting county counsel last June after Gov. Jerry Brown promoted her boss, Miguel Marquez, to the San Jose-based...

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THE DATA WAR DISPATCH
3/17/2013
Advertising Age

Brad Rencher believes that one day data will be listed as an asset on the corporate balance sheet. The senior VP-general manager of digital marketing at Adobe may be dreaming, but his prognostication is inspired by a very real premise: The value of data is on the rise. And, like any other raw material, its value is directly correlated with the desire for protection and control of that materialsetting up an epic tussle over ownership and monetization.

Boundaries are being drawn in the data-control war. Brands and website publishers are taking steps to maximize the worth of the information they glean about their customers and site visitors. Social-media platforms are reining in access to their data. And consumers are being given more options to restrict access to their data as tensions escalate between privacy advocates and the ad industry.

Twitter and Facebook have gone to court to seize access to their precious data, shutting off access to some third-party partners. Googles been forced by the Federal Trade Commission to cede data control to less formidable foes. And the biggest digital-ad trade group called a recent move by Firefox maker Mozilla, blocking access to online consumer data, akin to atomic warfareor, specifically a nuclear first strike against [the] ad industry, per a tweet from Mike Zaneis, senior VP-general counsel of the Interactive Advertising Bureau

And its only the first of many battles in the continuing war over who owns the data.

DRILL, BABY, DRILL

Sitting at the intersection of brands looking to acquire data and the firms that want to get paid to divulge data is Venture Development Center. The company evaluates whether there is a market for the data sets its clients are considering unloading. There are more and more companies out there looking to monetize data assets that they have, said Matt Staudt, president and chief operating officer. The data they have is a derivative of their core business.

Forbes is one of countless publishers that has taken its data to the digital-ad market. The companys data is branded with the Forbes name in BlueKais data exchange, and categorized into audience segments like business investors and entrepreneurs. However, at this stage, Forbes isnt exactly swimming in data cash; its a blip on the screen within the firms digital revenue, said Mark Howard, senior VP-digital advertising strategy at Forbes Media.

A premium digital publisher selling directly could tack on targeted-audience data to boost its CPM rate from $20 to $25 or $30, said Doug Pollack, director of client strategy and business development at data-management platform and data seller Lotame. If a firm like Lotame were to sell publisher audience data at a $1 a CPMan entirely separate revenue stream for a publisher than direct media salesthe publisher would earn around 50, he added.

I do know there is a business thats going to emerge out of this for us. It will be a core driver of our business, said Mr. Howard.

That belief drove Forbess decision to work with Krux, which provides a tag-management system that essentially secures data collected on the Forbes site from being distributed to parties the publisher would rather not have it. The ability to ward off data leakage is the big reason we were comfortable getting into the data business, said Mr. Howard.

Another premium publisher recently approached Forbes, telling Mr. Howard it had been purchasing Forbes-branded data through BlueKai and was interested in partnering to co-create audience segments. Without the tag-management system in place, suggested Mr. Howard, Forbes data could have become overly commoditized by spilling into exchanges without the companys approval.

DONT COMMODITIZE ME

Its really hard to say, Is a publisher getting paid for the value theyre creating? said Adobes Mr. Rencher. Adobes Omniture analytics tracking tags are ubiquitous online.

Sometimes unbeknownst to website publishers and even some of their partners, data are transferred or leaked from one company to another. In 2012 just 45% of the tracking tags disseminating data were added to publisher sites directly. The rest were spawned by their partners and their partners partners and so on, according to Evidon, another firm with a tag-management product.

Data leakage is less of a problem than some believe, argued Ramsey McGrory, president-CEO of social-sharing platform AddThis. Its not someone yelling Fire! in a crowded theater. Its a guy standing outside the theater and blowing smoke into the theater.

Publishers and other data dealers dont always know whether cookie-spawning leads to the sowing of actual consumer data or is merely part of the cookie-syncing process performed to match a cookie ID in one system to an ID in another for ad targeting. But many publishers are not willing to take the risk because they dont want their audiences bought elsewhere, said Mr. Pollack.

Data commoditization is a concern for the new crop of information merchants. For years, online-review platform Bazaarvoice has been collecting data on consumers who visit product pages and evaluate goods. Now it is building a division pumping out that detailed consumer-profile data. But dont expect Bazaarvoice data to hit the ad exchanges anytime soon.

If we put it into the exchanges, we give up control of it, said Donnovan Andrews, VP-Bazaarvoice Media Labs. Another drawback of an exchange would be the potential for advertisers to use Bazaarvoice data to conquest their rivals by targeting ads on pages featuring a competitor brands products.

Brands are especially averse to the risk of competitors accessing their information. Its no wonder large retailers and product brands keep the bulk of their customer data locked in secure servers housed in the Fort Knox-esque facilities of data firms such as Acxiom, like so much gold bullion. (See our Consumer-Data Industry graphic, P. 22).

TIGHTENING THE DATA SPIGOT

VDCs Mr. Staudt said hes been approached by would-be data providers that have harvested their information legitimately via APIs (application-programming interfaces), but whose rights to sell it are questionable.

Just about every brand, from Sears to ESPN, offers APIs for developers to build online and mobile tools based on their data. The department-store giant, for instance, hopes that by exposing its data for use in apps, it can capture shoppers seeking local deals or information about certain products.

However, as APIs proliferate, some popular data providers are restricting access to them in order to better control who can use their data and how. Theres dynamism around terms of service around the API, said Erick Huddleston, exec VP-product and chief technology officer of social-media marketing firm Dachis Group.

Facebook, which offers several APIs for various purposes, won a case against Power Ventures, which operated a platform that showed Facebook user-profile data it scraped to give its own users access to their Facebook friend information on Power.com, arguably grabbing users away from the Facebook platform itself.

Twitter has had less luck in its battle against PeopleBrowsr, a Twitter-analytics firm that relies on and pays for the full Twitter firehose of tweet data. Twitter attempted to sever ties with the firm, hoping to push PeopleBrowsr toward one of its data resellersintermediary firms that offer a more limited set of Twitter data. These authorized resellers, DataSift, Gnip and Topsy, help companies like Twitter better manage and control how much information other companies can pull from them, and how often. A ruling earlier this month lets PeopleBrowsr maintain its full firehose access. (See story, P. 18.)

Twitter snatched its tweet-data feed from Googles Realtime search in 2011. Twitters efforts to better monetize its so-called data firehose is why Twitter and Google broke up, said Eric Goldman, an internet and advertising law professor at Santa Clara University School of Law.

FIGHTING IN THE DATA WAR ROOM

One of the worlds largest data collectors, Google itself has attempted to hold on to as much of its data as possible, but hasnt always been successful. It is now required under a Federal Trade Commission settlement to allow competing ad platforms to access data from its ad campaigns for optimization and measurement. We are seeing consistently antitrust-style challenges against the keepers of good data, said Mr. Goldman.

Media buyer VivaKi and WPP-owned Group M are both knee-deep in constructing technology infrastructure to manage and parse data for cross-platform ad targeting. Its super-critical for us that we get access to data ... that differentiates us, said Pradeep Ananthapadmanabhan, chief technology officer of ViviaKi, a Publicis-owned digital division. As client brands themselves recognize the value of their own customer data, their agencies are building facilities to refine their client-data crude, raising questions as to who owns the refined data. Its another battleground we can expect these data armies to occupy.

Meanwhile, the consumersthe laborers in this data-production scenariotoil with little incentive besides the promise of more relevant advertising and offers. A handful of services has sprouted in the mission to compensate consumers for their data with money or free stuff. Still, its no wonder a privacy cold war has been waged in recent years between the data-hungry ad industry and consumer advocates hoping to guard personal data privacy and security.

Now it looks like the chilly diplomacy could turn radioactive. The Interactive Advertising Bureau earlier this month sent a letter to its members opposing the recent decision by Firefox browser maker Mozilla to block third-party cookies by default, arguing that the move would harm the ad-supported internet, which is reliant on third-party cookies for consumer-behavioral-data collection, ad targeting and site and advertising measurement and analytics.

Copyright © 2013 Crain Communications Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Patent law's 'best mode' requirement a conundrum for attorneys | View Clip
3/18/2013
Reuters - Online

...infringement. Under the new act, which went into effect in September 2011, an inventor is still required to disclose the best mode, but that disclosure can no longer be used as a defense to patent infringement. Brian Love, an assistant professor at Santa Clara Law School, and Christopher Seaman, an assistant professor at Washington & Lee University School of Law, argued in a recent article that the change could lead to patent applicants gaming the system by withholding the best mode...

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Join The Conversation On Keeping International Agreements From Restricting Internet Freedom | View Clip
3/18/2013
Techdirt

...entertainment industry has often driven international agreements, and then used those international agreements -- which they had a hand in writing -- to then demand changes to various laws to "meet our international obligations." Just law week, I saw Bruce Lehman (at Santa Clara University's DMCA summit), the architect of the DMCA, flat out admit that he intentionally went to WIPO to get the 1996 WIPO Copyright Treaty passed as an "end run around Congress," since Congress wasn't interested in passing the...

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Chinese legal dissident Chen Guangcheng calls on Apple and other Silicon Valley companies to advocate for human rights in China | View Clip
3/18/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...rights," Chen said Monday in an interview with this newspaper. "Since individuals can do this kind of thing, big companies should be able to do it as well." Chen was in Silicon Valley to receive the Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize Monday night from Santa Clara University School of Law for his protests of China's forced birth-control policy, which led to his arrest and imprisonment in his homeland. The a 41-year-old self-taught lawyer received a fellowship to study at New York University...

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Chinese legal dissident Chen Guangcheng calls on Apple and other Silicon Valley companies to advocate for human rights in China | View Clip
3/18/2013
Press-Telegram - Online

...is a blind Chinese civil rights activist attorney who protested alleged forced abortions in his homeland and gained international attention by fleeing his house arrest. He will be the recipient of this year's Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize from Santa Clara University School of Law. (Dan Honda/Staff) SAN JOSE -- Chen Guangcheng suffered for years at the hands of the Chinese government before his dramatic departure to the United States last year that riveted attention around the...

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How to choose a tax preparer
3/18/2013
Contra Costa Times

Before you hire a tax preparer, do your homework.

* First, check to see that the preparer has the Tax Identification Number required by the IRS. Check the preparer's history with the Better Business Bureau, and call the IRS, state board of accountancy or state bar to see if the preparer is properly licensed.

* Once you choose a preparer, still be cautious:

* Check your tax return thoroughly to make sure it is accurate.

* Sign your tax return, and make sure your preparer signs it and includes the identification number. Never sign a blank or incomplete form.

* Keep a copy of your tax return.

* Don't use preparers who charge a percentage of your refund.

* Stay away from preparers who advertise that they can get you bigger refunds than their competitors.

* Make sure your bank account number -- not the preparer's -- is on the return to receive the entire refund.

* Ask for an e-file.

* Report fraudulent tax preparers at www.irs.gov or call 800-829-3676

Here are resources for finding a licensed and registered tax return preparer.

California Board of Accountancy: dca.ca.gov/cba

California Society of Certified Public Accountants: calcpa.org

State Bar of California: calbar.ca.gov

California Society of Enrolled Agents: csea.org

California Tax Education Council: ctec.org

IRS: irs.gov

Plenty of free tax return assistance is available, including at the Santa Clara University Low-Income Tax Clinic, which is open Wednesday evenings at the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center, at 1030 The Alameda, San Jose. Call 408-288-7030.

The IRS-funded Volunteer Income Tax Assistance clinics offer free tax preparation across the Bay Area. Find a site at irs.treasury.gov/freetaxprep/

Sources: National Taxpayer Advocate Service, IRS, California Franchise Tax Board, California Tax Education Council and the SCU Low-Income Tax Clinic

Contact Heather Somerville at 925-977-8418. Follow her at Twitter.com/heathersomervil.

Copyright © 2013 Contra Costa Times.

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Tax preparer fraud creates big refunds, big problems for taxpayers
3/18/2013
Contra Costa Times

For Oscar Sotelo, tax season was a gold mine for two years running. He found a man who prepared taxes in the Central Valley, promised big refunds -- and delivered.

Then the IRS letters started coming. Sotelo was never supposed to get that money; now, the IRS wanted it back.

The IRS says Sotelo was the victim in 2009 and 2010 of tax preparer fraud, a widespread scam that can leave innocent taxpayers with a mountain of debt and put them in the crosshairs of the IRS. In this type of fraud, a tax preparer creates big refunds by lying on the tax return, giving both the preparer and taxpayer a nice payday. But when the IRS comes knocking, it's the taxpayer who's on the hook.

"There's this huge refund that goes out the door that the taxpayer is clearly not entitled to, but they don't know that," said Caroline Chen, assistant clinical professor of law and director of the Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic at Santa Clara University. "They find out later, after the money, of course, is spent."

The cumbersome tax code, insufficient regulations and under-resourced enforcement agencies have helped create a breeding ground for tax preparer fraud, experts said. Even in California, a state with some of the toughest oversight, there are up to 5,000 tax preparers practicing illegally, possibly hundreds in the Bay Area alone, according to estimates from the California Tax Education Council. Each year, they strike, leaving their frequent victims, low-income and immigrant taxpayers, in financial ruin.

"There's a lot of people who prepare tax returns who are not qualified," said Special Agent Arlette Lee of the IRS Criminal Investigations for Northern California. "Tax return preparers may be doing this, and the taxpayer has no idea."

The fraud happens in a few different ways. In some cases, the preparer lies on the tax return, fabricating deductions such as charitable contributions, property taxes and business expenses. The taxpayer often doesn't know the preparer is lying on the return or is tricked. The fictitious deductions inflate the amount of the refund, and the preparer demands a generous percentage -- a billing system the IRS says is illegal.

"These preparers get paid and then they disappear," said David Freeman, a third-year law student at Santa Clara University who helps at the tax clinic. "And then the clients show up a couple years later to us."

Tax refunds are paid automatically and immediately, and the IRS has up to three years after the refund to audit, Chen said.

Sotelo, a truck driver and father of four from Livingston, in Merced County, already had several notices from the IRS by the time he went to the SCU tax clinic last year. His preparer, Sarad Chand, who operated S. Chand Tax & Accounting Service in Ripon, had told him to ignore the letters, Sotelo said.

"I felt bad in the beginning. I had to pay so much money," Sotelo said in Spanish. "I didn't understand why."

Chand was charged in December with 10 counts of falsifying tax returns as part of a multimillion-dollar fraud scheme. He pleaded not guilty and was released on a $100,000 bond. His clients have to pay thousands of dollars back to the IRS.

"They are ultimately responsible for the information listed on the tax return -- no matter if it is right, wrong or even fraudulent," said Gigi Campo, spokeswoman for the California Tax Education Council, a nonprofit created by the state legislature to oversee tax preparer education and compliance. "The damage those tax preparers committed on the tax return is still the consumer's problem to deal with."

That damage can be devastating, because scheming preparers target the most vulnerable -- poor and non-English speaking communities.

"They are attractive to people who don't like bureaucracy," Freeman said. "To them, H&R Block probably looks like a DMV."

But the taxpayer has to take some responsibility, said Randy Warshawsky, an IRS enrolled tax agent at The Tax Man in San Jose. They need do their homework to find a reputable preparer. With at least 41,000 certified tax preparers in the state, there are options.

"It's your responsibility to sign the tax return and to make sure what's being reported is correct," he said.

Campo said the number of illegal preparers -- those working outside state laws -- has dropped by half since 2005, when the Franchise Tax Board began enforcing tax preparer requirements. California has some of the toughest regulations in the country, and requires that tax preparers who charge a fee must be either an attorney, a CPA, an IRS enrolled agent or a registered tax preparer with the Tax Education Council.

Still, Campo said, illegal preparers are always going to be a problem. Just last year, the Franchise Tax Board fined 122 tax preparers for practicing without the proper licenses.

"You'll always have those questionable people out there," she said.

Contact Heather Somerville at 925-977-8418. Follow her at Twitter.com/heathersomervil.

choosing a tax preparer

Do your homework. Make sure they have the Preparer Tax Identification Number required by the IRS, check their history with the Better Business Bureau and ask about any disciplinary actions.

Check your preparer's work to make sure it is accurate.

Sign your tax return, and make sure your preparer signs it and includes the identification number. Never sign a blank or incomplete form.

Keep a copy of your tax return.

Don't use preparers who charge a percentage of your refund.

Stay away from preparers who advertise that they can get you bigger refunds than their competitors.

Make sure your bank account number -- not the preparer's -- is on the return to receive the entire refund.

Ask for an e-file.

Report fraudulent tax preparers at www.irs.gov or call 800-829-3676.

Sources: National Taxpayer Advocate Service, IRS, California Franchise Tax Board

finding tax return preparers

Find licensed and registered tax return preparers in California at:

California Board of Accountancy: dca.ca.gov/cba

California Society of Certified Public Accountants: calcpa.org

State Bar of California: calbar.ca.gov

California Society of Enrolled Agents: csea.org

California Tax Education Council: ctec.org

IRS: irs.gov

Sources: California Franchise Tax Board, California Tax Education Council

free tax help

Free tax return assistance is available to some taxpayers:

Santa Clara University Low-Income Tax Clinic, open Wednesday evenings at the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center, at 1030 The Alameda, San Jose. Call 408-288-7030.

Volunteer Income Tax Assistance clinics offer free tax preparation across the Bay Area. Find a site at irs.treasury.gov/freetaxprep/

Source: SCU Low-Income Tax Clinic

Copyright © 2013 Contra Costa Times.

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Chinese legal dissident Chen Guangcheng calls on Apple and other Silicon Valley companies to advocate for human rights in China | View Clip
3/18/2013
Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online

...is a blind Chinese civil rights activist attorney who protested alleged forced abortions in his homeland and gained international attention by fleeing his house arrest. He will be the recipient of this year's Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize from Santa Clara University School of Law. (Dan Honda/Staff) SAN JOSE -- Chen Guangcheng suffered for years at the hands of the Chinese government before his dramatic departure to the United States last year that riveted attention around the...

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*U.S. Drone Missiles
3/19/2013
Bloomberg Law

Santa Clara University School of Law Professor David Sloss spoke to Bloomberg Law Radio about the United States' drone missile program and the controversy over disclosures about the program.

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Chinese legal dissident Chen Guangcheng calls on Apple and other Silicon Valley companies to advocate for human rights in China | View Clip
3/19/2013
San Bernardino Sun - Online

...is a blind Chinese civil rights activist attorney who protested alleged forced abortions in his homeland and gained international attention by fleeing his house arrest. He will be the recipient of this year's Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize from Santa Clara University School of Law. (Dan Honda/Staff) SAN JOSE -- Chen Guangcheng suffered for years at the hands of the Chinese government before his dramatic departure to the United States last year that riveted attention around the...

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*Chen Guangcheng first visit to the Bay Area leading legal Award | View Clip
3/19/2013
Sing Tao Daily - Milpitas Edition

(Translated from Chinese via Google Translate)
(Ren Weiwei Santa Clara, this reporter reported)

Chinese blind human rights activist Chen Guangcheng (Chen Guangcheng) yesterday was issued by the University of Santa Clara Legal Award. He said that the award is issued to the pursuit of equality, justice.

Chen Guangcheng and his wife Yuan Weijing this was St. Clara University was invited to the Bay Area to receive the annual legal Award of the Yale Law School. Viewing rights phenomenon in China against the implementation of policies in the years of hard work, and the awards usually granted top lawyer committed to changing the social inequalities and injustices. This is Chen Guangcheng the United States after more than nine months, for the first time to California.

To the pursuit of equality and justice

Director Donald Polden, Santa Clara University School of Law in last night's awards ceremony, a certificate issued to Chen Guangcheng. Chen Guangcheng, said he was honored to receive recognition, said the awards issued to him, is distributed to all the pursuit of equality, justice.

In a press conference held before the award, Chen Guangcheng said rights is a natural reaction for him: "Some people take a stick and hit you naturally want to hide what. Help the weak defenders with a "must do" mentality: "Once I know but do not do it, I could not sleep".

Chen Guangcheng was born in 1971 in Shandong Linyi early age blind, he relies on self-knowledge of the law, to help many of the villagers to protect their interests, women, people with disabilities, to be known as the "barefoot lawyer". In 2005 he began to investigate, organize collective action and outward media violence, family planning events disclosed in Linyi, Shandong, was arrested and sentenced to four years' imprisonment. In April 2012, he get rid of the closely monitored in Shandong home straight on the capital, to enter the U.S. Embassy to stay on the 6th U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's visit to China in May, has drawn international attention, and eventually the United States in the multi-party negotiations.

"China's revolution has begun"

Chen Guangcheng said, although he was blind, but through smart phones, computers to easily communicate with the outside world, learning English and Braille. Most linked to heart nephew Chen Kegui Circumstances under various threats in the detention center.

He is currently studying at New York University., Learning a different understanding of China and the United States legal contrast to both the human rights situation in the next two years will focus on writing his memoirs. He said: "Memoirs of the people can understand the human rights violations in China so far how bad can also understand the matter between some large countries.

Although no recent home plan but the Chen Guangcheng believe that he was definitely able to return to China. "China's transformation has already begun, as when completed, depends on us effort."

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Tax preparer fraud creates big refunds, big problems for taxpayers | View Clip
3/19/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...taxpayer who's on the hook. "There's this huge refund that goes out the door that the taxpayer is clearly not entitled to, but they don't know that," said Caroline Chen, assistant clinical professor of law and director of the Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic at Santa Clara University. "They find out later, after the money, of course, is spent." The cumbersome tax code, insufficient regulations and under-resourced enforcement agencies have helped create a breeding ground for tax preparer fraud,...

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How to choose a tax preparer | View Clip
3/19/2013
InsideBayArea.com

...href='http://calcpa.org'>calcpa.org State Bar of California: calbar.ca.gov California Society of Enrolled Agents: csea.org California Tax Education Council: ctec.org IRS: irs.gov Plenty of free tax return assistance is available, including at the Santa Clara University Low-Income Tax Clinic, which is open Wednesday evenings at the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center, at 1030 The Alameda, San Jose. Call 408-288-7030. The IRS-funded Volunteer Income Tax Assistance clinics...

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Tips: How to choose a tax preparer | View Clip
3/19/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...Public Accountants: calcpa.org State Bar of California: calbar.ca.gov California Society of Enrolled Agents: csea.org California Tax Education Council: ctec.org IRS: irs.gov Plenty of free tax return assistance is available, including at the Santa Clara University Low-Income Tax Clinic, which is open Wednesday evenings at the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center, at 1030 The Alameda, San Jose. Call 408-288-7030. The IRS-funded Volunteer Income Tax Assistance clinics...

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The Supreme Court's First Sale Ruling Will Spur Price Competition in the Short Run, But Enjoy It While It Lasts | View Clip
3/20/2013
Forbes - Online

...directly. So, as a content consumer, enjoy the upcoming price competition while it lasts. The First Sale doctrine is dying rapidly, and we as consumers are becoming poorer as that happens. Some Related Materials * In 2010, the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University School of Law held an all-day academic conference on the First Sale doctrine. See the associated symposium issue in the Santa Clara Law Review. * In 2010-11, the Ninth Circuit issued a troika of...

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Chinese legal dissident Chen Guangcheng calls on Apple and other Silicon Valley companies to advocate for human rights in China [San Jose Mercury News] | View Clip
3/20/2013
Bloomberg Businessweek - Online

...rights," Chen said Monday in an interview with this newspaper. "Since individuals can do this kind of thing, big companies should be able to do it as well." Chen was in Silicon Valley to receive the Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize Monday night from Santa Clara University School of Law for his protests of China's forced birth-control policy, which led to his arrest and imprisonment in his homeland. The 41-year-old self-taught lawyer received a fellowship to study at New York University...

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Deaf, Blind Sue Over Web Shopping | View Clip
3/20/2013
Wall Street Journal - Online

...costs of making your site accessible." Several other companies have worked with the NFB to make their websites more accessible to people with disabilities, including eBay Inc., Monster.com, Travelocity and Ticketmaster. Eric Goldman, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law, said most courts have ruled that online spaces aren't covered by the ADA. "Congress never contemplated the Internet at the time, and if they had, they would have included it," he said. But that could...

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Bell jury can't change guilty verdicts, judge and experts say | View Clip
3/21/2013
L.A. Now

...and ask to reexamine verdicts doesn't happen." However, as puzzling as the behavior might be, experts said it was extremely unlikely the jury would be allowed to go back on their decision. FULL COVERAGE: Bell corruption trial Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University School of Law criminal law professor who was part of the O.J. Simpson defense "dream team," said the "verdict is final once returned and rendered." "One juror changing their mind afterward doesn't make any difference...

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Defense attorneys should have polled jury after verdict, experts say | View Clip
3/21/2013
L.A. Now

...is nothing short of bizarre. To go back and ask to reexamine verdicts doesn't happen." However, as puzzling as the behavior might be, experts said it was extremely unlikely the jury would be allowed to go back on their decision. Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University School of Law criminal law professor who was part of the O.J. Simpson defense "dream team," said the "verdict is final once returned and rendered." "One juror changing their mind afterward doesn't make any difference...

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Jury in Bell corruption trial can't change guilty verdicts, judge and experts say | View Clip
3/21/2013
McClatchy Company Washington DC Bureau - Online

...is nothing short of bizarre. To go back and ask to re-examine verdicts doesn't happen." However, as puzzling as the behavior might be, experts said it was extremely unlikely the jury would be allowed to go back on their decision. Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University School of Law criminal law professor who was part of the O.J. Simpson defense "dream team," said the "verdict is final once returned and rendered." "One juror changing their mind afterward doesn't make any difference...

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*Blind human rights lawyer Chen Guangcheng first visit to San Francisco | View Clip
3/21/2013
TVB-USA

(Translated from Chinese via Google Translate)

Exiled to the United States China's blind activist lawyer Chen Guangcheng last year, recently came to the San Francisco Bay Area for the first time, accepted the awards to a local University College of Law and the legal profession and civil rights scholars share rights experience

Blind human rights lawyer Chen Guangcheng came to the United States nearly a year, recently visited the San Francisco Bay Area for the first time, to accept legal awards issued by the University of Santa Clara

This award is named Alexander Law Prize every year, do not ask the nationality awards to a solicitor, in recognition of their legal knowledge and the ability to change the social inequities, and hopes to raise the public image of lawyers and motivate the legal profession with industry , Chen Guangcheng, the early years in China's self-knowledge of the law, participated in a number of rights case, after more because of the one-child policy lawsuit imprisonment, thereby gaining praise able to receive this award, visit the San Francisco Bay Area to accept the award, accompanied by his wife, Yuan Weijing Chen Guangcheng

Chen Guangcheng: this award in my opinion, the award like this, it is a value of signs of human equality and justice, community similar to the more so the prize, whether this social justice whether an equal measure will be more of a point scale

Share his awards speech rights experience, with particular emphasis on the responsibility that everyone should do.

Chen Guangcheng: I think everyone on this society for the better, can not shirk its responsibility

While living in the United States, his Chinese politics also very concerned about the Chinese communist government after the change of the political situation, he had this view

Chen Guangcheng: China's future does not depend on the change which government only the powers of the people's consciousness, civic awareness, legal awareness, reach a certain level, both the ruling, he can not be avoided in the end the people's demand, he have to follow the historical trend

He also believed that, with the rapid development of network, people can get more audible opportunity to help promote human rights work,

Chen Guangcheng: network generation, generation of blog, Twitter generation, so that the end of the Chinese People's People's mouthpiece, the only party mouthpiece history, that the people with the mouthpiece, he has had to speak, and now is a period

Chen Guangcheng visit to the Bay Area, in addition to the award, also met and local civil rights, and later returned to New York, to focus on writing in his memoirs

The TVB reporter Lei Yu Qi reported in San Francisco

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AP Wins Copyright Lawsuit Against Clipping Service | View Clip
3/21/2013
MediaPost.com

...half the length of Meltwater's excerpts.” But her decision still raises the possibility that a company like Google could be liable for its alerts, which send people emails with headlines and snippets of stories about particular companies, according to Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman. He adds that the ruling is a “mixed bag” for Google News Alerts. On one hand, like Meltwater, Google News automatically scrapes material from news organizations. But unlike Meltwater,...

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Juror tells of tense deliberations; Bell trial ends in chaos | View Clip
3/21/2013
Los Angeles Times - Online

...jury's behavior was extremely unusual. "I have never heard of anything like this in my 40 years of law," said Robert Sheahen, a veteran Los Angeles criminal defense attorney. "To go back and ask to reexamine verdicts doesn't happen." Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University School of Law criminal law professor, said that the jury problems could help the defense in a challenge but that Kennedy was correct in refusing to set aside the Wednesday verdicts. "They will be looking to see if...

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Bell trial ends in chaos | View Clip
3/21/2013
Los Angeles Times - Online

...jury's behavior was extremely unusual. "I have never heard of anything like this in my 40 years of law," said Robert Sheahen, a veteran Los Angeles criminal defense attorney. "To go back and ask to reexamine verdicts doesn't happen." Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University School of Law criminal law professor, said that the jury problems could help the defense in a challenge but that Kennedy was correct in refusing to set aside the Wednesday verdicts. "They will be looking to see if...

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Bell corruption trial ended with jury intimidation, attorneys say | View Clip
3/21/2013
L.A. Now

...was extremely unusual. “I have never heard of anything like this in my 40 years of law,” said Robert Sheahen, a veteran Los Angeles criminal defense attorney. “To go back and ask to reexamine verdicts doesn't happen.” Gerald F. Uelmen, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law, said the jury problems could help the defense in an appeal but said Kennedy was correct in refusing to set aside the Wednesday verdicts. “They will be looking to see if there was any coercion and will...

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Chinese legal dissident Chen Guangcheng calls on Apple and other Silicon Valley companies to advocate for human rights in China | View Clip
3/21/2013
Chicago Tribune - Online

...rights," Chen said Monday in an interview with this newspaper. "Since individuals can do this kind of thing, big companies should be able to do it as well." Chen was in Silicon Valley to receive the Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize Monday night from Santa Clara University School of Law for his protests of China's forced birth-control policy, which led to his arrest and imprisonment in his homeland. The 41-year-old self-taught lawyer received a fellowship to study at New York University...

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Bell trial ends in chaos
3/21/2013
Los Angeles Times

Lead story

The Bell corruption trial came to a chaotic end Thursday as the judge declared a mistrial on the outstanding counts, saying "all hell has broken loose" with the deeply divided jury.

An exasperated Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kennedy drew the case to a close after a bizarre day in which one juror asked to reconsider the guilty verdicts reached Wednesday. Then, an anonymous juror passed a note to Kennedy urging her to "remind the jury to remain respectful and not to make false accusations and insults to one another." Kennedy refused to set aside the guilty verdicts.

The jurors asked to be escorted out of the courthouse by sheriff's deputies without speaking to reporters.

But in an interview later with The Times, one juror said dissension on the jury worsened considerably in the last week.

"We had some jurors who just kind of didn't care what the instructions were and what the judge said and that was just that," said the woman, who asked to remain anonymous and said she was in favor of guilt.

The woman said it was time to end deliberations.

"It was very, very tense, and I believe that if we hadn't ended when we did it probably could have been a lot worse," she said. "I believe that [the defendants] were good people but that wasn't what we were there to decide, I was doing my best to base everything on the evidence and the facts of the case."

Even defense attorneys were stunned by the turn of events in the downtown Los Angeles courtroom.

"The verdicts came out and then it got weird," said Stanley L. Friedman, who represents one of the accused former city leaders.

At one point, a juror inquired about Bell's former city attorney, Edward Lee, who was not charged in the sweeping corruption probe and didn't testify during the trial. The juror wrote to Kennedy that knowing more about Lee would help the panel in deliberations and be "certain beyond a reasonable doubt."

Jurors spent 17 days behind closed doors before convicting Victor Bello, George Cole, Oscar Hernandez, Teresa Jacobo and George Mirabal of driving up their salaries by serving on government boards that prosecutors said rarely met and, in one case, may have been invented as a device to push their paychecks even higher.

The panel of seven women and five men acquitted the defendants on some charges and were unable to reach a verdict on the remaining charges. Luis Artiga, a pastor, was exonerated on all counts.

There were indications early on that the jury was fractured. A few days into deliberations, one juror was removed for alleged misconduct. In the end, deliberations took nearly as long as the trial itself.

Legal experts say the jury's behavior was extremely unusual.

"I have never heard of anything like this in my 40 years of law," said Robert Sheahen, a veteran Los Angeles criminal defense attorney. "To go back and ask to reexamine verdicts doesn't happen."

Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University School of Law criminal law professor, said that the jury problems could help the defense in a challenge but that Kennedy was correct in refusing to set aside the Wednesday verdicts.

"They will be looking to see if there was any coercion and will probably file motions for a new trial," he said. "But the bottom line is the jury reached its decision."

Prosecutors declined to comment because of the upcoming trial of Robert Rizzo, the former city administrator alleged to be the mastermind of the corruption. But an official said no decision has been made about retrying the defendants on the remaining charges.

Cole's attorney, Ronald Kaye, said the jury's behavior suggested "coercion and intimidation" that throws the guilty verdicts into question.

Attorney Shepard Kopp, who represented Jacobo, said the jury's conduct is "tremendous legal grounds for motion for a new trial."

Prosecutors charged the officials with misappropriating public funds by exceeding pay limits established in state law and the city's own charter. The prosecution had argued that the six defendants overpaid themselves by sitting on city boards and authorities that did little work and that council members in a city the size of Bell can only legally earn an annual salary of $8,076.

The defendants drew pay for serving on four boards, boosting their salaries to up to $100,000 a year, among the highest in the state for part-time council members. Defense attorneys maintained that their clients labored tirelessly for the community on nights and weekends and could receive additional compensation for work outside meetings. They also placed the blame for the scandal on Lee and on Rizzo, saying the city administrator manipulated the unsuspecting council members. Rizzo, who earned nearly $800,000 a year, and his deputy Angela Spaccia go on trial later this year.

After reaching verdicts on some counts Wednesday, the jury began deliberations on the remaining charges Thursday.

Four jurors had indicated that they believed the remaining counts could be decided with more direction from the court.

An anonymous juror sent a note to Kennedy saying: "I have been debating in my own mind that due to the pressure and stress of the deliberation process the jury may have given an improper verdict of guilty."

Kennedy received a similar note from a juror Wednesday, though it was unclear whether that came from the same juror.

Defense attorneys asked to find out who wrote the most recent note and demanded further inquiry. Kennedy denied the attorneys' request.

There were indications early on of heated jury deliberations.

The panel got the case Feb. 22. A few days later, one juror tearfully complained that the others were picking on her. She later told Kennedy she had gone online "looking to see at what point can I get the harassment to stop. ... How long do I have to stay in there and deliberate with them when I have made my decision."

Kennedy dismissed her for misconduct.

The judge replaced her with an alternate juror and told the panel to begin deliberations from scratch. The jury later had multiple questions about the law and made requests for read-back of testimony. It appeared they were grappling with the task of determining whether the salaries, while excessive, were legal. They also had questions about jury instructions.

Last week, the jury requested a read-back of testimony regarding one defendant's pay as well as the city clerk's testimony about slipping doctored contracts into a stack of papers to be signed by the mayor.

The end came Thursday afternoon after Kennedy received more juror notes.

"It seems to me all hell has broken loose," she said. "I'm going to bring them out now."

Once the jurors returned to the courtroom, she said: "I'm getting the sense that the lines of communication have broken down between each and every one of you. You've got to decide whether continuing to deliberate makes sense in terms of how you are functioning as a jury."

After less than half an hour of additional deliberations, the jury informed Kennedy they were hopelessly deadlocked. The jury foreman said the panel was divided 9 to 3 for guilty on the remaining charges.

--

corina.knoll@latimes.com

richard.winton@latimes.com

ruben.vives@latimes.com

Times staff writers Jeff Gottlieb, Kate Mather and Samantha Schaefer contributed to this report.

PHOTO: DEFENSE ATTORNEYS and their clients speak at a news conference. From left: attorney Ronald Kaye, defendant Victor Bello, attorney Leo Moriarty, defendant George Mirabal and attorney Alex Kessell.

PHOTOGRAPHER:Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times

PHOTO: MAX HUNTSMAN, rear, and Jennifer Benz Snyder, prosecutors in the Bell trial, leave courthouse.

PHOTOGRAPHER:Gary Friedman Los Angeles Times

Copyright (c) 2013 Los Angeles Times

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Michael Dell may face Mark Hurd as deal deadline looms
3/21/2013
Contra Costa Times

SAN FRANCISCO -- They faced off as chief executives of the two main competitors in the personal computer market.

Now, Michael Dell and Mark Hurd could end up in another showdown: this time, over who should lead Dell.

In an odd twist to Dell's bid to go private, Michael Dell and Silver Lake Partners' plan is facing a possible challenge from Blackstone, another private equity firm that, according to media reports, is considering placing a higher bid. Based on a deadline set by the Dell board for a "go-shop period," Blackstone has until a minute past midnight on Saturday to make its pitch.

And that bid supposedly would include a key enticement: Hurd, the former CEO of Hewlett-Packard ( HPQ), Dell's chief nemesis during the heyday of the PC wars and now co-president at Oracle ( ORCL).

Dell Inc. and Blackstone declined to comment on the reports.

"The use of dueling CEOs like this is a little unusual, and I think that does make it a slightly different case," Santa Clara University law professor Stephen Diamond told MarketWatch.

Having another private equity firm put up a rival bid isn't unusual, said Stanford University law professor Michael Klausner. "What's unusual is the celebrity aspect," he told MarketWatch, referring to high-profile reputations of both Dell and Hurd.

But then again, he added, given Michael Dell's prominent role both in terms of his personal investment and his role as a company founder and CEO, a rival bid simply had to come up with a counterproposal that would try to match that prominence.

"The first deal is so linked to Michael Dell that an alternative deal almost has to be linked to somebody else," Klausner said. "Michael Dell is such an important part of the initial buyout offer that a competitive bidder would need to offer an assurance that's going to be able to run the company without Michael Dell."

Michael Dell has a huge stake in the company that is helping to finance the $24.4 billion buyout deal, in which shareholders will get $13.65 a share.

Mizuho Securities analyst Abhey Lamba wasn't too impressed with the Blackstone scenario featuring Hurd.

"It is a bit of a unique situation, as Michael Dell is still involved with the company and he is also a very large shareholder," he told MarketWatch. "So bringing in a new CEO to replace Michael in a buyout scenario might be a tough proposition."

But IDC's Crawford Del Prete speculated on a different scenario in case there is a bidding war, one in which Michael Dell and Hurd end up working together -- if the two bidding parties were able to reach some sort of compromise.

"I think the reason Mark Hurd's name is being thrown out here is he is a very rare guy," Del Prete told MarketWatch. "He is a guy who understands the very business Dell is in."

And he sees Hurd playing a role another former Dell CEO, Kevin Rollins, took on, in partnership with Michael Dell.

"This is no uncharted territory for a guy like Michael Dell," he said. "If you go back to the days of Kevin Rollins, he was pretty much the operations lead, while Michael spent more time on different areas."

Copyright © 2013 Contra Costa Times.

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Bell trial: After mistrial, next steps for attorneys unclear | View Clip
3/22/2013
L.A. Now

...behavior suggested "coercion and intimidation" that throws the guilty verdicts into question. Attorney Shepard Kopp, who represented Teresa Jacobo, said the jury's conduct is "tremendous legal grounds for motion for a new trial." Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University School of Law criminal law professor, said the jury problems could help the defense in a challenge but that Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kennedy was correct in refusing to set aside Wednesday's verdicts....

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Radio Ink Magazine | View Clip
3/22/2013
Radio Ink - Online

...earlier in his career. Other names being thrown around include, Karen Kornbluh, a former FCC official who is currently President Obama’s Ambassador to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. Cathy Sandoval, a lawyer and professor at Santa Clara University School of Law and Susan Crawford, a professor at Cardozo School of Law. Crawford, the author of Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry and Monopoly in the New Guilded Age. Advertisements

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Judge Declares Mistrial in Bell Corruption Case | KTLA 5 | View Clip
3/22/2013
KTLA-TV - Online

...jury's behavior was extremely unusual. "I have never heard of anything like this in my 40 years of law," said Robert Sheahen, a veteran Los Angeles criminal defense attorney. "To go back and ask to reexamine verdicts doesn't happen." Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University School of Law criminal law professor, said that the jury problems could help the defense in a challenge but that Kennedy was correct in refusing to set aside the Wednesday verdicts. "They will be looking to see if...

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Blackstone may offer an option to Dell's deal | View Clip
3/22/2013
Lincoln Journal Star - Online

...nemesis during the heyday of the PC wars and now co-president at Oracle Corp. Dell Inc. and Blackstone declined to comment on the reports. “The use of dueling CEOs like this is a little unusual, and I think that does make it a slightly different case,” Santa Clara University law professor Stephen Diamond told MarketWatch. Having another private equity firm put up a rival bid isn't unusual, said Stanford University law professor Michael Klausner. “What's unusual is the celebrity aspect,”...

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*Blind human rights lawyer Chen Guangcheng memoirs | View Clip
3/22/2013
TVB-USA

Translated via Google Translate

(3-22-13)
Chinese blind activist lawyer Chen Guangcheng's first visit to the San Francisco Bay Area, an exclusive interview with the reporter of this station, talking about over the last six months of daily life in the United States, as well as plans for the future

Gave rise to the US-China diplomatic tussle by Blind human rights lawyer Chen Guangcheng caught the attention of the international community to come to the United States from China living the ten few months, from the beginning a dramatic exodus action, later becoming a part of New York University to study life, spiritual path curious, he recently came to San Francisco to attend the activities of an exclusive interview with this reporter's talking about the living conditions in the United States

Chen Guangcheng: Generally speaking, in side the one hand, to learn, on the one hand, to understand the laws of the United States and the different legal, do a comparison of China's deteriorating human rights situation in a series of cases, there is continuing concern

That there is no worry about the family's life in China, he said, and part of his family to stay in touch, in particular, concerned about the nephew Chen Kegui cases last year because of injury people sentenced to prison, he criticized the Chinese authorities for various torture and intimidation of Chen Kegui that he can not appeal, he is currently in New York University, in addition to the study of the laws of the United States and the similarities and differences, also is writing an autobiography, is expected to be completed in October this year

Chen Guangcheng: Because this tell you what happens through these things, we can learn how bad the situation of human rights violations in China, and can also understand something in between the major powers

Comes to expectations for returning, he admitted that depends on the change in China, and are confident that one day can go back

Chen Guangcheng: I believe that I will certainly be back in China, and I believe China is absolutely impossible to go on like this forever, change is inevitable, in fact, this transformation has already begun, but when completed, depending on the effort with

The TVB reporter Lei Yu Qi reported in San Francisco

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FCC chair steps down, leaves some thorny tech issues for successor | View Clip
3/22/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...confront. Genachowski's resignation opens the door for President Obama to nominate a new FCC chairperson from a list of potential candidates that reportedly includes Washington-based tech investor Tom Wheeler, several current administration officials and Santa Clara University law professor Catherine Sandoval, who's on the California Public Utilities Commission. As the Obama administration's top WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 22: U.S. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski...

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Michael Dell may face Mark Hurd as deal deadline looms | View Clip
3/22/2013
Willits News - Online

...nemesis during the heyday of the PC wars and now co-president at Oracle (ORCL). Dell Inc. and Blackstone declined to comment on the reports. "The use of dueling CEOs like this is a little unusual, and I think that does make it a slightly different case," Santa Clara University law professor Stephen Diamond told MarketWatch. Having another private equity firm put up a rival bid isn't unusual, said Stanford University law professor Michael Klausner. "What's unusual is the celebrity aspect,"...

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Departing FCC chairman leaves behind mixed record | View Clip
3/22/2013
CNET.com - New York Bureau

...current administrator of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), is another name that has been discussed as a possibility. NTIA is an agency that advises the president on telecom policy. Cathy Sandoval, a law professor at Santa Clara University School of Law, also has been named as a potential candidate. Susan Crawford, a law professor at Cardozo School of Law, has been mentioned as well. Some women's groups have called on the president to nominate a woman...

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FCC chair leaves some obstacles for successor | View Clip
3/22/2013
McClatchy Company Washington DC Bureau - Online

...confront. Genachowski's resignation opens the door for President Barack Obama to nominate a new FCC leader from a list of potential candidates that reportedly includes Washington-based tech investor Tom Wheeler, several current administration officials and Santa Clara University law professor Catherine Sandoval, who's on the California Public Utilities Commission. As the Obama administration's top communications regulator, Genachowski launched new programs that extended broadband service...

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Bell trial ends in chaos | View Clip
3/23/2013
McClatchy Company Washington DC Bureau - Online

...jury's behavior was extremely unusual. "I have never heard of anything like this in my 40 years of law," said Robert Sheahen, a veteran Los Angeles criminal defense attorney. "To go back and ask to re-examine verdicts doesn't happen." Gerald F. Uelmen, a Santa Clara University School of Law criminal law professor, said that the jury problems could help the defense in a challenge but that Kennedy was correct in refusing to set aside the Wednesday verdicts. "They will be looking to see if...

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Pro-con: Should U.S. boost energy exploration? | View Clip
3/23/2013
WE Blog

...even greater domestic supplies in the future. Energy presents the biggest opportunity to build a stronger foundation and a brighter future for our country. The 21st century has brought America an era of energy abundance. Let's make the most of it for the sake of our economy, competitiveness and national security. – Karen A. Harbert, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Abandoning fossil-fuel exploration altogether is not feasible for America. But significant further government support of oil and gas drilling in places like the Alaskan wilderness or the American heartland in the name of economic growth would be a huge mistake. Instead, for our national security, economic growth and a sound energy policy, what we need is to shift to promoting industries and technologies that focus on clean, renewable and alternative sources of energy. Clean-tech is a fast-growing global industry that holds the potential to fix our current climate and other environmental challenges and build the jobs of tomorrow. The 2010 BP oil catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico, the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill and the serious concerns raised about hydraulic fracturing have not merely been the results of chance. Nor are the extreme storms, droughts and heat waves, which are expected to rise in frequency and severity with fossil fuel use-linked climate change. The U.S. cannot afford to invest and lock itself into many more decades of reliance on the dirty and unsustainable sources of energy of the past. – Tseming Yang, Santa Clara University

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FCC chair leaves obstacles for successor | View Clip
3/23/2013
Bulletin - Online, The

...confront. Genachowski's resignation opens the door for President Barack Obama to nominate a new FCC leader from a list of potential candidates that reportedly includes Washington-based tech investor Tom Wheeler, several current administration officials and Santa Clara University law professor Catherine Sandoval, who's on the California Public Utilities Commission. As the Obama administration's top communications regulator, Genachowski launched new programs that extended broadband service...

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Dell may face Mark Hurd as deal-deadline ends | View Clip
3/23/2013
MarketWatch

...co-president at Oracle Corp. /quotes/zigman/76584/quotes/nls/orcl ORCL -0.99% Dell Inc. and Blackstone declined to comment on the reports. “The use of dueling CEOs like this is a little unusual, and I think that does make it a slightly different case,” Santa Clara University law professor Stephen Diamond told MarketWatch. Having another private-equity firm put up a rival bid isn't unusual, said Stanford Law Professor Michael Klausner. “What's unusual is the celebrity aspect,” he told...

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Tammerlin Drummond: Setting the wrongly convicted free | View Clip
3/23/2013
InsideBayArea.com

...attempted murder and sentenced to 25 years to life. For six years, he languished in a cell at California State Prison, Solano for a crime he didn't commit. Who knows how long he would have remained there had the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law not thrown him a lifeline? The law school students and project attorneys teamed up with the San Francisco law firm Keker & Van Nest -- which worked pro bono -- to reinvestigate Ross' case. They found...

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Tammerlin Drummond: Setting the wrongly convicted free | View Clip
3/23/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...attempted murder and sentenced to 25 years to life. For six years, he languished in a cell at California State Prison, Solano for a crime he didn't commit. Who knows how long he would have remained there had the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law not thrown him a lifeline? The law school students and project attorneys teamed up with the San Francisco law firm Keker & Van Nest -- which worked pro bono -- to reinvestigate Ross' case. They found...

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Tammerlin Drummond: Setting the wrongly convicted free | View Clip
3/23/2013
Press-Telegram - Online

...attempted murder and sentenced to 25 years to life. For six years, he languished in a cell at California State Prison, Solano for a crime he didn't commit. Who knows how long he would have remained there had the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law not thrown him a lifeline? The law school students and project attorneys teamed up with the San Francisco law firm Keker & Van Nest -- which worked pro bono -- to reinvestigate Ross' case. They found...

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Michael Dell may face Mark Hurd as deal deadline looms | View Clip
3/23/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...nemesis during the heyday of the PC wars and now co-president at Oracle (ORCL). Dell Inc. and Blackstone declined to comment on the reports. "The use of dueling CEOs like this is a little unusual, and I think that does make it a slightly different case," Santa Clara University law professor Stephen Diamond told MarketWatch. Having another private equity firm put up a rival bid isn't unusual, said Stanford University law professor Michael Klausner. "What's unusual is the celebrity aspect,"...

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The Oakland Tribune Tammerlin Drummond column
3/23/2013
Oakland Tribune

March 24--All the evidence points quite strikingly to the conclusion that there's almost nothing more convincing than a live human being who takes the stand, points a finger at the defendant and says, "That's the one!"

-- Former U.S. Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan Jr., 1981

Eyewitness testimony is one of the most compelling pieces of evidence in criminal court proceedings. Every year, 75,000 people in this country are convicted based upon someone's claim that they saw them commit a crime.

But what happens when eyewitnesses are mistaken, influenced by police and others or flat out lie? Innocent people end up going to prison, robbed of precious years. Time that they can never get back.

People

like Ronald Ross.

Ross wasn't anyone's choir boy. He had a drug record. But he swore he didn't knock on Renardo Williams' door in June 2007 and shoot him.

It didn't matter.

Williams identified Ross from an Oakland police photo lineup as his attacker. The victim was in his hospital bed on a morphine drip when Detective Steve Lovell showed him the photos of suspects -- hardly the ideal situation to yield a reliable identification. Williams chose another man at first. But when the detective told him to look again, he fingered Ross. The only "evidence" connecting Ross to the shooting was the fact that his mother had lived near Williams 10 years earlier.

Ross was convicted of attempted murder and sentenced to 25 years to

life.

For six years, he languished in a cell at California State Prison, Solano for a crime he didn't commit.

Who knows how long he would have remained there had the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law not thrown him a lifeline? The law school students and project attorneys teamed up with the San Francisco law firm Keker & Van Nest -- which worked pro bono -- to reinvestigate Ross' case.

They found evidence that OPD's investigation was so sloppy it bordered on criminal negligence. They took their findings to the Alameda County district attorney which agreed to drop the charges. In February, an Alameda County Superior Court judge overturned Ross' conviction and set the 51-year-old man free.

"The entire criminal justice system -- including myself on behalf of our police department -- owes an apology to Mr. Ronald Ross," Chief Howard Jordan said in a letter to the community earlier this month after Ross' release.

I should say so.

Two weeks later, an Alameda County judge overturned the conviction of Johnny Williams which had also been based in large part on a misidentification by an eyewitness.

But not before Williams had served 14 years in prison -- falsely accused of sexually assaulting a 9-year-old girl in Oakland in 1998. The victim identified Williams as her attacker after her mother suggested that it might have been him because his name is Johnny -- the same name as the man who the girl said had assaulted her. The California DNA Project -- the Innocence Project's sister organization -- sent a sample of the girl's T-shirt -- provided by the Alameda County district attorney -- for DNA testing. It did not match Williams' DNA profile. The testing would not have been possible without a federal grant that will run out in September.

California DNA Project lawyers and Oakland police say "nobody did anything wrong" in the criminal prosecution that led to Williams' conviction.

Small consolation for a man who has had to live with the stigma of being branded a child rapist all these years.

According to Linda Starr, legal director of the Innocence Project, of the 303 people nationwide who have been exonerated through DNA testing, 75 percent of the convictions were based on witness misidentification. Which is why, Starr says, more law enforcement agencies should follow lineup best practices, making sure that those administering the lineups do not know the identity of the suspects reduces the likelihood of witness coaching -- one major cause of wrong suspect identifications.

On Thursday, the Innocence Project held a fundraiser in Redwood City. Ross and Williams were among the exonerated who attended. Francisco "Franky" Carrillo Jr., an Innocence Project client who spent 20 years in prison for a murder that he did not commit -- also based on a mistaken witness identification -- accepted the Freedom Award on behalf of all of whom were exonerated.

Since 2001, the Northern California Innocence Project has gotten 16 convictions overturned.

Yet the nonprofit can only investigate a fraction of the convictions that merit review.

What happens to innocent people in prison who don't have anyone to fight for justice for them?

Tammerlin Drummond is a columnist for the Bay Area News Group. Her column runs Tuesday and Sunday. Contact her at tdrummond@bayareanewsgroup.com or follow her at Twitter.com/Tammerlin.

___

(c)2013 The Oakland Tribune (Oakland, Calif.)

Visit The Oakland Tribune (Oakland, Calif.) at www.insidebayarea.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright © 2013 The Oakland Tribune

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China's government-backed media bashes Apple
3/24/2013
Contra Costa Times

Apple ( AAPL), whose products are eagerly embraced by China's growing middle class, found itself in the cross hairs of the Chinese government Monday when its official newspaper attacked the company for its "empty and self-praising" response to an earlier report by China's national television broadcaster about alleged poor consumer services.

Monday's page-one article in the People's Daily took a swipe at Apple for its reaction to a CCTV report that alleged Apple treats Chinese consumers differently than it does customers in other countries and for poor warranty policies. The editorial also criticized Apple for not agreeing to interview requests from local reporters. In a separate article, the newspaper accused Apple of being "arrogant" and published a cartoon mocking the company's "empty" response to complaints.

During the weekend, Apple posted a message on its Chinese website that said it provides a 90-day warranty on repairs -- just like in the United States -- longer than the 30 days mandated by law in China.

While the complaints against Apple seem relatively minor, getting called out by the traditional mouthpiece of the Communist government should concern Apple, said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China.

"You need to take these comments seriously," she said. "To me, it clearly is a target against Apple."

The criticism is a possible sign officials are concerned about dominant foreign companies in its mobile industry. Apple is competing against Chinese companies Lenovo, Huawei and ZTE, though South Korea-based Samsung is the smartphone market-share leader in China. Earlier this month, China's Ministry of Industry and Information Technology published a white paper that warned Google ( GOOG) has too much influence in China's smartphone industry through its Android mobile operating system.

Apple is not the first foreign company to be singled about by China's official media. Volkswagen and McDonald's have also come under recent criticism from CCTV.

In 2009, CCTV accused Google of being a porn search engine, though the report was discredited by Chinese bloggers who accused the TV station of manipulating searches and interviewing a student who turned out to be an intern at the news organization. It occurred at a time the government was mandating the installation of filtering software, Green Dam-Youth Escort, on new computers. After an industry uproar, the requirement was rescinded.

In Apple's case, it's hard to say what message the government is sending the Cupertino company, Han said.

"You need to read it as significant for something that is happening, but what is happening is hard to understand," she said. "They may have decided Apple is getting too big. They could be promoting their own companies. But if they want to promote their own companies, they should tout the better products, if they have them."

Greater China, which includes mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, is Apple's second-largest market behind the United States. During the company's first quarter, revenues for the region jumped 67 percent from the year-ago period to $6.83 billion, Apple reported in January.

"I am very happy with how things are going," company CEO Tim Cook told analysts during a conference call in January.

Apple's popularity extends from secretaries to high-ranking government officials, and is so feverish among some customers that fights have broken out at Apple's flagship Beijing store during iPhone launches.

Bill Bishop, a Beijing-based independent analyst who publishes the daily Sinocism China Newsletter, wrote Monday: "If there is a bright side today for Apple, at least there is no word yet that as part of the frugality and anti-corruption campaigns Chinese officials will no longer be allowed to use Apple products."

Contact John Boudreau at 408-278-3496; follow him at Twitter.com/svwriter.

Copyright © 2013 Contra Costa Times.

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Dell said to receive two more buyout bids | View Clip
3/24/2013
MarketWatch

...firm's offer was accepted, but there's no indication that Hurd would agree. Dell Inc. and Blackstone declined to comment on the reports. “The use of dueling CEOs like this is a little unusual, and I think that does make it a slightly different case,” Santa Clara University law professor Stephen Diamond told MarketWatch. Having another private-equity firm put up a rival bid isn't unusual, said Stanford Law Professor Michael Klausner. “What's unusual is the celebrity aspect,” he said,...

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Tax preparer fraud can ruin finances | View Clip
3/25/2013
Tri-City Herald - Online

...taxpayer who's on the hook. "There's this huge refund that goes out the door that the taxpayer is clearly not entitled to, but they don't know that," said Caroline Chen, assistant clinical professor of law and director of the Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic at Santa Clara University. "They find out later, after the money, of course, is spent." The cumbersome tax code, insufficient regulations and under-resourced enforcement agencies have helped create a breeding ground for tax preparer fraud,...

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Tax preparer fraud can ruin finances | View Clip
3/25/2013
State - Online, The

...taxpayer who's on the hook. "There's this huge refund that goes out the door that the taxpayer is clearly not entitled to, but they don't know that," said Caroline Chen, assistant clinical professor of law and director of the Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic at Santa Clara University. "They find out later, after the money, of course, is spent." The cumbersome tax code, insufficient regulations and under-resourced enforcement agencies have helped create a breeding ground for tax preparer fraud,...

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Tell-all cars put your driving business out in the open | View Clip
3/25/2013
Wausau Daily Herald - Online

...it comes to banking transactions, medical records, phone and Internet use. But data generated by cars, which these days are basically rolling computers, are not. All too often,”people don’t know it’s happening,” says Dorothy Glancy, a law professor at Santa Clara University in California who specializes in transportation and privacy. “People should be able to decide whether they want it collected or not.” Try as you may to protect your privacy while driving, it’s only going to get harder....

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Tax preparer fraud can ruin finances | View Clip
3/25/2013
Idaho Statesman - Online

...taxpayer who's on the hook. "There's this huge refund that goes out the door that the taxpayer is clearly not entitled to, but they don't know that," said Caroline Chen, assistant clinical professor of law and director of the Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic at Santa Clara University. "They find out later, after the money, of course, is spent." The cumbersome tax code, insufficient regulations and under-resourced enforcement agencies have helped create a breeding ground for tax preparer fraud,...

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Learn the Art of Negotiating Law School Financial Aid | View Clip
3/25/2013
U.S. News & World Report

...advice for parents of law school candidates, and I have a question regarding my daughter potentially transferring after the first year of law school. My daughter plans to start law school in fall 2013. So far, she has been admitted to the law schools at Santa Clara University and University of Southern California; however, her dream school is Stanford, and she has not received that decision yet. If she is not accepted at Stanford but does well in her first year at Santa Clara, what are...

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Taxpayer Beware: Big Refunds Can Mean Big Trouble | View Clip
3/25/2013
HispanicBusiness.com

...on the hook. "There's this huge refund that goes out the door that the taxpayer is clearly not entitled to, but they don't know that," said Caroline Chen, assistant clinical professor of law and director of the Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic at Santa Clara University. "They find out later, after the money, of course, is spent." The cumbersome tax code, insufficient regulations and under-resourced enforcement agencies have helped create a breeding ground for tax preparer...

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Tell-all cars put your driving business out in the open | View Clip
3/25/2013
Herald Times Reporter - Online

...it comes to banking transactions, medical records, phone and Internet use. But data generated by cars, which these days are basically rolling computers, are not. All too often,”people don’t know it’s happening,” says Dorothy Glancy, a law professor at Santa Clara University in California who specializes in transportation and privacy. “People should be able to decide whether they want it collected or not.” Try as you may to protect your privacy while driving, it’s only going to get harder....

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Disabled people sue retailers over e-commerce sites | View Clip
3/25/2013
InsideCounsel - Online

...with their brick-and-mortar stores. Most courts have dismissed cases in which advocates argue that the ADA applies to the Internet. “Congress never contemplated the Internet at the time [it enacted the ADA], and if they had, they would have included it,” Santa Clara University School of Law Professor Eric Goldman told the Wall Street Journal. Nonetheless, the national Federal of the Blind and the National Association of the Deaf have won cases against companies including Netflix Inc. and...

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Is your car spying on you? | View Clip
3/25/2013
Spy vs Spy

Is your car spying on you? If it's a recent model, has a fancy infotainment system or is equipped with toll-booth transponders or other units you brought into the car that can monitor your driving, your driving habits or destination could be open to the scrutiny of others. If your car is electric, it's almost surely capable of ratting you out. You may have given your permission, or you may be the last to know. At present, consumers' privacy is regulated when it comes to banking transactions, medical records, phone and Internet use. But data generated by cars, which these days are basically rolling computers, are not. All too often,"people don't know it's happening," says Dorothy Glancy, a law professor at Santa Clara University in California who specializes in transportation and privacy. "People should be able to decide whether they want it collected or not." Try as you may to protect your privacy while driving, it's only going to get harder. The government is about to mandate installation of black-box accident recorders, a dumbed-down version of those found on airliners - that remember all the critical details leading up to a crash, from your car's speed to whether you were wearing a seat belt. The devices are already built into 96% of new cars. More here: http://www.ksdk.com/news/article/371305/28/Is-your-car-spying-on-you

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that being closely watched Santa Clara University constitutional law
3/25/2013
KLIV-AM (Silicon Valley News)

this your and has netted more than seventeen hundred firearms fifteen ninety taillight News-Times five ten a man wanted for the murder of the San Jose plumber in Santa Cruz last month is arrested on unrelated charges several people witnessed the fatal shooting of thirty two -year-old Polly Silva outside of the downtown born February ninth Santa Cruz police CVS tool putting together the case say they have forensic evidence to connect the him him suspect to murder fifteen ninety daylighting time is five ten and timing free during the Montgomery management , the newly northern California of Fremont and L I Siano ran aware of the seller hundred and twenty five brand-new twenty thirteen monitoring Ms. Martens and out the is three thousand dollars on MSRP nonbranded twenty thirteen Monzon three thousand three thousand dollars mandating on MSRP : two thousand dollars and him and thousand dollar love . a him and him and we're happy and the contest driving during my freeman is not the top two money-losing northing California a three-month on the screen Boulevard and Thomas on the family-friendly in San Jose online AVG thinking on the proud members of the you were in your group also was and him and him and him and him and him and him and his five eleven US Supreme Court will begin to days of oral arguments in a pair of critical gay marriage cases tomorrow local law professor explains why that being closely watched Santa Clara University constitutional law professor David Cole the sacred fill schedule IV national decision won't come until should you for always giving oral argument sycophant for first that you really get at hearing which we justices might go what they're interested in what questions are asked of you have been submitted before . you have been kicked around in lower courts for quite some time that this is really the first time we an indication of where the Supreme Court might go a single sequences legal observers will be particularly interested to see if the justices explore the issue standing whether or not Supreme Court has the ability to decide the case Passover begins at sundown tonight the holiday is a celebration of Jews being freed from slavery in Egypt associate Rabbi Joshua Bell at congregation Monsieur had -- Los Gatos tills cannulae the quality is not just celebrated by James are you will and will and will you and your version your determination and him and Joe the and in this way story of Passover NBC and Universal we invite people of all religions enjoyed of the Passover Seder table the Passover dinner or Cedar is anchored by drinking wine while eating matzoh bitter herbs another symbolics including vegetables dipped in salt water and hard-boiled eggs Passover holiday last fourteen days in the United States fifteen ninety flightiness times five thirteen centiseconds supports the sharks would betray sending long-time defenseman Douglas Murray to the Penguins executive vice president and general manager Doug Wilson now saturated the sharks acquired two second round picks for the was worried that so taken of this year's draft and in next years draft in the second round Kevin Kruse covers shores for CSN Bay Area .com until stimuli the things to trade is good for both teams are in the people . all le Carr�

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Tell-all cars put your driving business out in the open | View Clip
3/25/2013
Oshkosh Northwestern - Online

...it comes to banking transactions, medical records, phone and Internet use. But data generated by cars, which these days are basically rolling computers, are not. All too often,”people don’t know it’s happening,” says Dorothy Glancy, a law professor at Santa Clara University in California who specializes in transportation and privacy. “People should be able to decide whether they want it collected or not.” Try as you may to protect your privacy while driving, it’s only going to get harder....

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Northern California Innocence Project Successfully Exonerates Innocent Man of Sex Crimes He Did Not Commit
3/25/2013
Life Science Weekly

2013 MAR 26 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- The Northern California Innocence Project (NCIP) and the California DNA Project (CDP) at Santa Clara University School of Law announced that on March 8, the Alameda County Superior Court overturned the wrongful conviction of Johnny Williams for sex crimes after new DNA evidence proved his innocence. Mr. Williams served 14 years in prison.

"We are thrilled the state has recognized Johnny's innocence and cleared his name," said Linda Starr, NCIP's legal director. "Additionally, we are grateful to the Alameda County District Attorney's Office for their cooperation. Of the 303 innocent people exonerated by post-conviction DNA testing, nearly 75 percent involved eyewitness misidentification. Thus, in cases relying almost exclusively on eyewitnesses, we've learned that DNA evidence is the only way to conclusively prove innocence." Background On September 28, 1998, a man who called himself "Johnny" sexually accosted a nine-year-old girl as she walked home from school. The next day, while walking in the same area, the same man attempted to rape her. Mr. Williams was a former neighbor of the victim and familiar with her family. When the victim first reported the assault she did not say she knew the attacker, thus suggesting a stranger. However, individuals close to the victim suggested to police that "Johnny" may be Mr. Williams. One week after the attack the Oakland Police Department collected the clothes the victim was wearing during the assault. Forensic tests at the time of trial were unable to confirm biological evidence and no DNA testing was performed. On June 8, 2000, Mr. Williams was convicted of two counts of forcible lewd conduct against a child and one count of attempted rape.

In 2012, NCIP, with the assistance of CDP, re-tested the victim's t-shirt and found enough biological material to yield a complete male DNA profile that conclusively excluded Mr. Williams as the perpetrator.

"To be convicted of such a terrible crime and spend 14 years in prison, labeled a sex offender, is a nightmare most people could never imagine," said Melissa Dague O'Connell, Mr. Williams' lead attorney with CDP. "Without DNA evidence, we would not have been able to prove his innocence."

Mr. Williams' exoneration was made possible by a grant which created CDP and paid for the costs of retesting. However, that funding will expire in September.

"Something terrible happened to that little girl and I hope they find the person who did it. I am thankful people finally know the truth about me so that I can rebuild my life," Mr. Williams said after the ruling.

This is the second innocent person NCIP has exonerated in 2013, and its 16th victory since its creation in 2001. About the Northern California Innocence Project The Northern California Innocence Project (NCIP) at Santa Clara University School of Law is a pro bono legal clinical program where law students, attorneys, pro bono counsel, and volunteers work to free wrongfully convicted prisoners. NCIP promotes substantive legislative and policy reform through data-driven research and policy recommendations aimed at ensuring the integrity of our justice system. For more information, please visit http://law.scu.edu/ncip/. About Santa Clara University School of Law Santa Clara University School of Law, one of the nation's most diverse law schools, is dedicated to educating lawyers who lead with a commitment to excellence, ethics, and social justice. For more information, see law.scu.edu.

Keywords for this news article include: DNA Research, Santa Clara University.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2013, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2013 Life Science Weekly via NewsRx.com

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High Court's Decision On Federal Marriage Law Has Tax Implications
3/25/2013
NPR Programs: Morning Edition

Morning Edition

11:00-12:00 PM

RENEE MONTAGNE: How much money the government takes in could be influenced by how the Supreme Court rules on the Defense of Marriage Act. That's one of the two gay marriage cases being heard this week.NPR's Carrie Johnson reports the decision on that federal law could have big implications for how much some same-sex couples owe the IRS.

CARRIE JOHNSON: The case that could throw out a law that defines marriage as between a man and woman started with a tax bill.

EDIE WINDSOR: I'm Edie Windsor and I brought my case against the government because I couldn't believe that our government would charge me $350,000 because I was married to a woman and not to a man.

CARRIE JOHNSON: Edie Windsor married her partner of more than 40 years in Canada back in 2007. Their relationship was recognized by the state of New York, where they lived together. But when her spouse died two years later, Edie inherited a huge estate tax bill - a bill she would have avoided if her marriage had been recognized under federal law.Nanette Lee Miller is an accountant who works with gay and lesbian clients.

NANETTE LEE MILLER: I mean, the big thing that people need to be aware of is that you have to actively plan if you're LGBT in your estate or individual taxes, 'cause the law is not set up to protect you.

CARRIE JOHNSON: Miller says many of those couples are watching the Supreme Court this week for clues about what's in store for their own finances.They don't get a marital deduction for estate tax purposes, so they usually need access to cash or life insurance to be able to inherit their partner's share of a home or other assets.That could change, if the high court rules for Edie Windsor and declares the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act - or DOMA - unconstitutional. In that case, same-sex couples would get the same estate tax benefits.Roberton Williams of the Urban Institute in Washington says those savings would help just a tiny fraction of people.

ROBERTON WILLIAMS: Very, very few people pay estate taxes. We estimate that with today's exemption level of $5 million, less than two-tenths of 1 percent of deaths result in a taxable estate.

CARRIE JOHNSON: A ruling that the entire DOMA law is unconstitutional would have a much BIGGER impact on individual tax returns; the ones filed by same-sex married couples or registered domestic partners every year.Patricia Cain is a law professor at Santa Clara University in California.

PATRICIA CAIN: I think if failure to recognize same-sex couples for tax purposes is unconstitutional, then it would be unconstitutional also to insist that it be a man and a woman, husband and wife, who file a joint return.

CARRIE JOHNSON: Cain says the ability for same-sex couples to file taxes jointly will be a mixed bag.

PATRICIA CAIN: And that's good for some people and bad for others. In other words, you know, we have a marriage bonus when you have a couple with one high earner and one stay-at-home partner or low income partner. And those people usually experience a tax bonus when they file jointly.

CARRIE JOHNSON: So, generally, good news for couples whose incomes are wide apart. But bad for some other same-sex couples with roughly similar incomes. The numbers are complicated; so many couples are asking accountants like Nanette Lee Miller for advice. Miller says people who may get some tax benefits if DOMA is overturned are thinking about amending their tax returns for the past three years to try to collect some extra money.

NANETTE LEE MILLER: For individuals, you can go back to 2009, 2010, 2011 and you can also file an amended return or there's a form to fill out and take advantage of married filing jointly.

CARRIE JOHNSON: But Miller says some clients have been surprised to find out they could pay the dreaded marriage penalty.

NANETTE LEE MILLER: Of course, they're not happy. They go what, there's a penalty?

EDIE WINDSOR: She tells them that's just a price of equality.

NANETTE LEE MILLER: So to me it's about everybody having the same amount of pain in taxes.

CARRIE JOHNSON: Carrie Johnson, NPR News, Washington.

RENEE MONTAGNE: You're listening to MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

Copyright © 2013 NPR

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China's government-backed media bashes Apple | View Clip
3/25/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...like in the United States -- longer than the 30 days mandated by law in China. While the complaints against Apple seem relatively minor, getting called out by the traditional mouthpiece of the Communist government should concern Apple, said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China. "You need to take these comments seriously," she said. "To me, it clearly is a target against Apple." The criticism is a possible sign officials...

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Tell-all cars put your driving business out in the open | View Clip
3/26/2013
Green Bay Press-Gazette - Online

...it comes to banking transactions, medical records, phone and Internet use. But data generated by cars, which these days are basically rolling computers, are not. All too often,”people don’t know it’s happening,” says Dorothy Glancy, a law professor at Santa Clara University in California who specializes in transportation and privacy. “People should be able to decide whether they want it collected or not.” Try as you may to protect your privacy while driving, it’s only going to get harder....

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High Court's Decision On Federal Marriage Law Has Tax Implications | View Clip
3/26/2013
New Hampshire Public Radio - Online

...every year. "If failure to recognize same-sex couples for tax purposes is unconstitutional, then it would be unconstitutional also to insist that it be a man and a woman — husband and wife — who file a joint return," says Patricia Cain, a law professor at Santa Clara University in California. Cain says the ability for same-sex couples to file taxes jointly will be a mixed bag. "That's good for some people and bad for others," Cain says. "In other words, you know we have a marriage bonus...

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a law professor at Santa Clara University in California
3/26/2013
WBEZ-FM (Chicago Public Radio)

soon Julie Rosner and PR news Washington money the government and he could be influenced by the Supreme Court rules on the Defense of marriage act that's one that you marriage cases be heard this week you read what is on that federal law good at the implications for how much some same sex couples of the IRS mechanics that could throw out a lot that defines marriage as between a man and woman starting when to ask now is Sarah and I like he's against the government because I couldn't believe that our government when charge me three hundred and twenty thousand dollars because I was married to a woman natural in eating and married her partner more than forty years in Canada back in two thousand Saturn Shinji was racking the state of work where they live together but when her sparrows dying two years later he inherited a huge estate tax bill until she would've avoided if her marriage had been recognized under federal law Nanette Lee Miller is an accountant who works with gay and lesbian clients and the big thing that people need to be aware of is that you have to actively plan your LGB team your state or individual taxes as the law is not set up to protect you dealer says many of those couples are watching the Supreme Court this week for clues about what's in store for their own finances they don't get a marital deduction for estate tax purposes so they usually need access to cash or life insurance to be able to parent their partner's share of the home or other assets that could change if the high court rules for eating Windsor in the clearest nineteen ninety six Defense of marriage act , unconstitutional in that case same-sex couples would get the same estate tax benefits Robert to millions of the urban Institute in Washington says the savings would help Justin Frank Chin people very very few people that is we estimate that with today's exemption level five million dollars less than two tenths of one percent of deaths resulted in taxable state of ruling the entire dome lies unconstitutional we have a much bigger impact on individual tax returns the ones filed by same-sex married couples were registered domestic partners every year Patricia Kane is a law professor at Santa Clara University in California and other failure to recognize same-sex couples or purposes of the alternate would be unconstitutional also to insist that it be a man and a woman husband and wife who file a joint return seen since the police same-sex couples to file taxes jointly will be a mixed bag and that good people and bad brother and other work you would have them a marriage bonus when you have a couple with one high earner in one

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China's government-backed media bashes Apple | View Clip
3/26/2013
Press-Telegram - Online

...like in the United States -- longer than the 30 days mandated by law in China. While the complaints against Apple seem relatively minor, getting called out by the traditional mouthpiece of the Communist government should concern Apple, said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China. "You need to take these comments seriously," she said. "To me, it clearly is a target against Apple." The criticism is a possible sign officials...

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High Court's Decision On Federal Marriage Law Has Tax Implications | View Clip
3/26/2013
North Country Public Radio - Online

...every year. "If failure to recognize same-sex couples for tax purposes is unconstitutional, then it would be unconstitutional also to insist that it be a man and a woman — husband and wife — who file a joint return," says Patricia Cain, a law professor at Santa Clara University in California. Cain says the ability for same-sex couples to file taxes jointly will be a mixed bag. "That's good for some people and bad for others," Cain says. "In other words, you know we have a marriage bonus...

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a law professor at Santa Clara University in California
3/26/2013
WAMU-FM (American University Radio)

Are you still wanted a fundamental appeal to putting the making and releasing private plants remain a political fit while he ran to the national Academy for State health policy I think in states where the resistance expansion was based primarily on this is a big government program that we can't make any bigger or finding a way to duty expansion through private coverage will hope a door to a conversation or otherwise was not take place a key issue for many states that the federal government hasn't said exactly how much they can spend on private land Sec. Sibelius says officials will spell out more details on that soon Julie Rossner NPR news Washington money to governments who could be influenced by how the Supreme Court rules on the Defense of marriage at 22 marriage to be heard this week you report it to you on that federal law that the implications or how much some same-sex couples are higher a case that could throw out a lot if I hear you between a man who one who started with attacks to how we think there were like against the government because I couldn't believe that our government would try journey to a $50,000 because I was married to one or one E. Windsor married her partner of more than 40 years in Canada in 2000 Saturday should you recognize the state of New York where they live together the first time to hear his later inherited at you just taxed now ago she would've avoided it for Mary Chapin recognized under federal law e-mailer is an accountant who works with any lasting client to delete to be aware of is that you have to actively plan if your LDP team your state or individual tax the law is not set up to protect you Ehlers has many couples are watching the Supreme Court this week for clues about what's in store for their own finances they don't get a marital deduction for estate tax purposes so they usually need access to cash or life insurance to be able to carry their partner's share of a home or other assets that could change if the high court rules for E Windsor declares the nineteen ninety six Defense of marriage act or , unconstitutional in a same-sex couples would get the same estate tax that affects Robert Williams at the urban Institute in Washington says the savings would help just a fraction of people very very few people as a we estimate that with the use of will five million dollars less than two tenths of one percent of deaths resulting attacks will stick the entire dome allies unconstitutional would have a much bigger impact on individual tax returns once filed by same-sex married couples were registered domestic partners every year Patricia Kane is a law professor at Santa Clara University in California . failure to write you own or are you a note under would be under also to be a man or the woman what pilot your return seen since the police same-sex couples to file taxes jointly will be a mixed bag and that some people and better other of the work you have a marriage over when you couple with one high earner once a hold partner or low-income partner . the people usually . I asked older when they filed jointly so you only use your couples scenes are wide apart the cash for some other same-sex couples with roughly similar encompass the numbers are complicated so many couples are asking accounts like Lee Miller for advice Miller says people who make it

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a law professor at Santa Clara University in California
3/26/2013
WESA-FM (Pittsburgh's NPR News Station)

sat there should ship was recognized by the state of New York where they lived together when Hearst died two years later he carried a huge estate still feel she would've avoided if her marriage had been recognized under federal law e-mailer is an accountant who works with gain lasting Klein's and lead should be aware of is that you have to delete plan your LG senior state or individual taxes the law is not set up to protect you diverse as many as couples are watching the Supreme Court this week for clues about what's in store for their own finances and don't get marital deduction for state acts purposes so they usually need access to capture life insurance to be able to parent their partner's share of a home or other assets that could change if the high court rules for EE Windsor chanticleers nineteen ninety six Defense of marriage act , unconstitutional in a same-sex couples would get the same estate tax affects Robert to millions of the urban Institute in Washington says the savings would help just structure people are you as we are in the news will follow dollars less than two tenths of one percent of deaths result in actual states the entire , are constitutional we have a much bigger impact on individual tax returns once filed by same-sex married couples are registered domestic partners every year Patricia Kane is a law professor at Santa Clara University in California and are in the couple or the opener would be unconstitutional out to be a man and a woman in the white file a joint return teams as easily same-sex couples to file taxes jointly will be a mixed

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a law professor at Santa Clara University in California
3/26/2013
KQED-FM (KQED 88.5)

High Court rules free Windsor and clears the nineteen ninety six Defense of marriage act or dome unconstitutional in a same-sex couples would get the same estate tax benefits Robert Williams at the urban Institute in Washington says the savings would help just a fraction of people very very few people but isn't we estimate that with today's exemption level five million dollars less than two tenths of one percent of deaths resulting factual studies improving the entire dome lines unconstitutional would have a much bigger impact on individual tax returns once filed by same-sex married couples were registered domestic partners every year Patricia Kane is a law professor at Santa Clara University in California . learn failure to recognize same-sex couples work product purposes is unconstitutional but it would be unconstitutional also to insist that it be a man and a woman husband and wife who file a joint return teens has the ability for same-sex couples to file taxes jointly will be a mixed bag and that good people and bad brother in other words you would have them a marriage bonus when you have a couple with one high earner in one state home partner or lower-income partner and those people usually experience a act bonus when they filed jointly sell and delete news for couples seems blighted parts but for some other same-sex couples with roughly similar incomes and numbers are complicated so many couples are asking accounts like Lee Miller for advice Miller says people who may get some tax benefits if Gomez overturned are thinking about naming their tax returns for that has to be years to try to collect some extra money for individuals you can go back to two thousand nine two thousand ten two thousand elevenths he could also file an amended return it is a form to fill out and take advantage of married filing jointly by Naylor says some priced at eight eight eight eight eight one and titled the decals than just price of the quality is about everybody having same amount is six letter to Johnson and Karen Hughes watched him him him him him him him eleven will you soldier ... Richard Berkeley because of an accident Wednesday at Gilman is on the shoulder but the shoulders of her narrow their back to the least all be deducted Richmond just a minor accident that resulted eighty West on its executor field another crushing the shoulder jam there yet big point eastbound for Bighorn's report of an accident on the shoulder that Executive Director must there is developing thereto and San Jose two problems : consonant tables to reconnect the power pole down moderate high with Kurt or fatal accident investigations upon such the block trouble , particularly to you and tell you my story you will will will will will will will start as you want or what you thought just you and him to you by yourself and four seven good morning and the California report any pals in raids on my route and forty years after California voters passed proposition eight defining marriage as being only between a man and a woman is finally landed before the US Supreme Court the California report Scott Schenker is there is I get just thirty minutes to

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a law professor at Santa Clara University in California
3/26/2013
WBEZ-FM (Chicago Public Radio)

same-sex couples would get the same estate tax benefits Robert to millions of the urban Institute in Washington says the savings would help just a fraction of people very very few people visit us we estimate that with today's exemption level five million dollars less than two tenths of one percent of deaths resulted in taxable state of ruling the entire dome lies unconstitutional we have a much bigger impact on individual tax returns once filed by same-sex married couples were registered domestic partners every year Patricia Kane is a law professor at Santa Clara University in California and were failure to recognize same sex couple for our purposes is unconstitutional under would be unconstitutional also to it that it be a man and a woman husband-and-wife file a joint return seen since the ability for same-sex couples to file taxes jointly will be a mixed bag and that good people and bad brother of the work you would have them a marriage bonus when you have a couple with one high earner and when they hold partner or lower-income partner and those people usually experience a tax bonus when they filed jointly some really good news for couples seems some wide apart the cash for some other same-sex couples with roughly similar incomes and numbers are complicated so many couples are asking accountants like Lee Miller for advice Miller says people who make it syntax benefits it still has overturned our thinking about amending their tax returns for the past three years to try to collect some extra money for individuals you can go back to two thousand nine two thousand ten two thousand eleven he could also file an amended return or there's a form to fill out and take advantage of married filing jointly but Miller said some clients have been surprised to find out they could pay in to Rite Aid marriage penalty of course are not happy what there's a penalty kick house when just price of the quality and about everybody same amount of pain in Texas in Johnson PR news Washington baby forty nine good morning your listening GWB easy states even for the morning shift in just a couple minutes here on W easy but first let's look at traffic years and a decent shower this morning and travel times look great even nineteen at least between Michael and the county to county out . thirty one twenty three from Montrose Drobny expressed in the Johnson link and twenty two to get mohair I thirty four from Darnell . the one coming in from Waltham living well is something completely delayed freedom and the TypePad approaching the circle ninety ... any enough delays on the work of descent and Lakeshore Drive in Skyway when he backups you like traffic on its Reiki is writing at three fifty five support provided by care smoke alarms I'm politicking the traffic on WB easy thanks things on WBZ is supported by members like you remember stations and we are now learning centers providing innovative programs for reading comprehension and math at eight hundred three hundred eighteen eighteen and CFP certified financial planner professionals and rents retirement taxes helping bring clients finances together online make plan .org support also comes from each trance and Allstate company offering coverage counselor in online jeweler provides car insurance options based on user's needs at insurance .com and WBZ is supported by the house dedicated to helping physicians manage industry change the focus on patient care more about me see HR and practice management services is the house .com WBZ is also supported by Carthage College six-year participant in NASA's system engineering educational discovery program more information is available at card

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High Court's Decision On Federal Marriage Law Has Tax Implications | View Clip
3/26/2013
OPBmusic.org

...every year. "If failure to recognize same-sex couples for tax purposes is unconstitutional, then it would be unconstitutional also to insist that it be a man and a woman — husband and wife — who file a joint return," says Patricia Cain, a law professor at Santa Clara University in California. Cain says the ability for same-sex couples to file taxes jointly will be a mixed bag. "That's good for some people and bad for others," Cain says. "In other words, you know we have a marriage bonus...

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a law professor at Santa Clara University in California
3/26/2013
KOPB-AM

week -- Kerry Johnson reports the decision on that federal law could have big implications for how much some same sex couples owed the IRS the case that could throw out a lot that defines marriage as between a man and woman started with a tax bill enabling Sarah and I for one case against the government because I couldn't believe that our government would charge me three hundred and fifty thousand dollars because I was married to a woman natural man eating Windsor married her partner of more than forty years in Canada back in two thousand seven should you recognize the state of New York where they lived together when Hearst died two years later he inherited a huge estate tax down until she would've avoided if our marriage had been recognized under federal law e-mailer is an accountant who works with gay and lesbian clients and people need to be aware you have to delete plan your LGB senior skater individual tax law is not set up a Jew mailer says many things couples are watching the Supreme Court this week for clues about what's in store for their own finances and don't get marital deduction for estate tax purposes so they usually need access to Asher life insurance to be able to parent their partner's share of the home or other assets that could change if the high court rules for eating Windsor declares nineteen ninety six Defense of marriage act , unconstitutional and same-sex couples would get the same estate tax affects Robert to millions of the urban Institute in Washington says the savings would help just a fraction of people buried in you and that is exempt will find dollars less than two tenths of one percent of deaths result in taxable state of the entire Delmar constitutional would have a much bigger impact on individual tax returns once filed by same-sex married couples are registered domestic partners every year Patricia Kane is a law professor at Santa Clara University in California and are you coupled with her in it and open it would be unconstitutional also to repeat a man and woman husband want to file joint return team's sex couples to file taxes jointly will be a mixed bag and that good people and bad rather than what you would have them a marriage owner of with one or one and only partner or low-income partner . people usually . a bonus when they filed jointly so we used a couple you are why are the first same-sex couples with roughly similar incomes and numbers are complicated so many couples are asking towns like Lee Miller for advice Miller said people who may get some tax benefit the dome is overturned are thinking about you and her tax returns for three years to try to collect some extra money for individuals you can go back to two thousand nine two thousand and two thousand eleven he could also file an amended return or there's a form to fill out and take advantage of married filing jointly but Miller's has some client surprised that they could pay you to write a marriage penalty courts are not happy what there's a penalty she tells them that just price of the quality such me about everybody having the same amount it paid six . Johnson NPR news Washington , before US Supreme Court has wrapped up arguments this morning over the constitutionality of proposition eight California's voter approved ban on gay marriage and we belonged senior editor at Slate .com is been following the argument the morning into a big force in just about fifteen minutes here on stations OPB exceed forty nine wanting from Jeff Ross thanks for checking in with these morning edition support for OPB listeners that commodity was growing up Sonoma County proudly part of the organ lifestyle and culture were supportive community groups like OPB music auditing this grueling cutting and from Oregon executive MBA University working program at Portland evening open house April eleven OEM BA . you working . you regional coverage of EMR perfects Northwest public media partnership is made possible by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting Earth things is sponsored locally by numerous on either wing LLP safety is to this is a BB's morning edition on Jeff Norcross there are several hundred derelict and abandoned vessels dotting the waterways Washington organ they can block navigation and pollute the environment and can also be very

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*Supreme Court Hears California's Prop. 8
3/26/2013
Bloomberg Law

Santa Clara University School of Law Professor Margaret Russell spoke to Bloomberg Law Radio about the Supreme Court's hearing on California's anti-gay-marriage law Prop. 8.

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Court's decision on federal marriage law has tax implications | View Clip
3/26/2013
KPCC-FM - Online

...every year. "If failure to recognize same-sex couples for tax purposes is unconstitutional, then it would be unconstitutional also to insist that it be a man and a woman - husband and wife - who file a joint return," says Patricia Cain, a law professor at Santa Clara University in California. Cain says the ability for same-sex couples to file taxes jointly will be a mixed bag. "That's good for some people and bad for others," Cain says. "In other words, you know we have a marriage bonus...

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ABC7 News 4:00PM
3/26/2013
ABC 7 News at 4 PM- KGO-TV

sharing this same picture. The red equality sign saying you know, equality for all. >> The arguments were and they say they're interested in the final outcome of the watt voter approved ban on same-sex marriage. >> I thought arguments had merit. I do believe it's it's the right to have equal rights for all. >> Both sides won't predict how the high court will vote. But chris stow likes when justice kennedy introduced the issue of same-sex marriages and how they are affected. >> Sympathy are not in the direction of holding prop 8 but he also expressed some skepticism about whether now is the right time for the supreme court to address this. >> Bill may is with catholics for the common good, pleased by what he heard. >> They felt for the first time that, they got a fair hearing before a fair panel of judges. A lot of people here in the castro tonight. We'll bring you that live tonight. Live in the castro, abc 7 news. >> Thank you. >> This is a fascinating most in history. >> We're joined now but a law professor at santa clara university. Thanks for joining us today. >> Thank you for having me. >> What did you find most interesting about arguments today? >> This is interesting is that several justices indicate that had perhaps the court should not have taken this case in the first place. >> How so? What gave you that sense? >> A few times justice kenneed yedy asked the question perhaps we shouldn't have taken. Several other justices including roberts and ginzberg grilled both attorneys as to whether parties presenting arguments in favor of proposition 8 should have legal standings, eligibility to be in court. >> Is there predicted value? Any questions heard today? >> It's always difficult to try to read tea leaves with the court. One thing that appears certain is that it's going to be hard for there to be five votes for any position seemed like all positions were highly contested. If there is one position that started to have perhaps four or five justices it's likely the position courts should not be hearing this case. >> People don't have the legal stand something. >> Right. >> What about doma? >> So it presents common, but different questions about federal law. How marriage is defined for federal benefits. Also has a standing question in it so I think we're going hear about that. It's hard to sell tel how tomorrow's is going to go. It's conceiveable that it's more likely that it will reach it in that case. >> What do you tell your law students to watch? What do they learn? What can all of us learn? >> This is a historic moment. One of the things we try to focus on is the process of adjudication. Questions of standing which most people don't think about. Can up end up having deep affects on the substance of peoples' rights. It's a historic moment for california. >> Thank you very much. >> Thank you. >> Rainbow flags flying over city hall in a number of bay area cities today this, is video of a flag going up this morning in berkeley. Many cities have raised their pride flags. City leaders wanted to show support during the hearing autos maybe you've seen this today a lot of people are changing their facebook pictures. The lgbt rights organization is encouraging people to use this to show support as the court hearing begins. The usual logo is a yellow equal sign over a blue background as you can see. Carolyn tileler was inskpid going to join us for abc 7 news at 5:00 with some key players from the bay area in, washington today for this hearing including lieutenant governor newsom who started this when he was mayor and aloud same-sex marriage in city hall.

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NBC Bay Area News at 6
3/26/2013
NBC Bay Area News at 6 AM - KNTV-TV

technological era. >>> Good tuesday evening, I'm janelle wang. >> And I'm jessica aguirre. We begin with history in the making. Several cities across the bay area raised rainbow flags as the supreme court for the first time ever heard arguments in the same-sex marriage debate. >> Outside the nation's highest court in washington, d.c., thousands of supporters and opponents of same-sex marriage clashed in dueling demonstrations. Inside the justices heard just over an hour of arguments for and against california's voter-approved prop 8 which bans same-sex marriage. Whatever their decision, which is expected this june, it will be a landmark ruling. We have live team coverage tonight. Cheryl hurd spoke with gavin newsom and is live at a pro gay marriage vigil. >> But we begin with marianne favro who's here with a closer look at what was said and what hints the justices may have given the crowd. >> Reporter: the U.S. supreme court justices spent quite a bit of time today questioning whether this is a case they should even be hearing, and legal experts say there are early indications they might want americans to decide on same-sex marriage instead of the court doing it. For 80 minutes, justices listened to oral arguments. Some legal experts say it appears some had concerns about the possibility of a sweeping decision affecting 50 states. Chief justice john roberts. >> You don't have to include everybody just because some other aspects of it can be applied to them. >> Justice anthony kennedy questioned whether anyone would be harmed by allowing same-sex couples to marry. >> Are you conceding the point that there is no harm on denigration to traditional opposite-sex marriage couples? >> Reporter: supporters of the ban argue that it protects the traditional marriage and its intent of having kids. >> And it will refocus, refocus the purpose of marriage and the definition of marriage away from the raising of children. >> Reporter: justice alana kagan pointed out california doesn't ban older people getting married. >> If both the woman and the man are over the age of 55, there are not a lot of women coming out of that marriage. >> Reporter: justice scalia had questions about the children of gay couples. >> Whether that is harmful to the child or not. >> The couple brought the case after the argument their son talked about his two moms. >> We love them, we love our family and we look forward to the day when we will be treated equally, just like our neighbor's families. >> Marriage is a civil right. >> Reporter: despite the emotional pleas outside the court, the justices are tasked with deciding the merit of the case before them. Santa clara university law professor margaret russell predicts a majority of the justices will rule the case does not have the standing to be heard before the high court. >> If the supreme court sends it back down and says that they do not -- they are not going to consider the appeal, then it would go to the district court for an order to issue, to lift proposition 8 and allow marriages to occur. >> Reporter: the supreme court is expected to issue its ruling in june. Professor russell says while some gay marriage supporters might see sending the case back to the lower court where prop 8 was ruled unconstitutional, others might consider it a setback because that would mean the high court didn't make a decision affecting the entire nation. Tomorrow justices will hear arguments about the defense of marriage act that bars several benefits for same-sex couples married in states that do allow gay marriage. Marianne favro, nbc bay area news. >> Now, you may have noticed a growing number of red profile pictures. It's the human rights campaign logo. The hrc asked people to change their profile for support of same-sex marriage. The court's ruling on california's same-sex marriage ban is expected in june. Now, back here in the bay area, groups in several cities found their open way to mark today's historic hearing. Many say they can hardly wait for the decision. Cheryl hurd continues our coverage where same-sex marriage supporters have gathered for a vigil. >> Reporter: that's right. About three dozen people are holding a vigil outside the state building today because there have been a lot of arguments inside this building for and against the issue. Meanwhile today we've talked to a lot of people who are paying close attention to the supreme court. >> A localized -- >> Reporter: california lieutenant governor gavin newsom was mayor of san francisco when he opened the flood gates in the same-sex marriage debate when he first allowed same-sex couples to marry in san francisco nine years ago. Today he is in washington, d.c., watching over the supreme court proceedings that could set a national precedent on the topic. >> I can imagine a day not too far in the distant future as

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ABC7 News 6:00PM
3/26/2013
ABC 7 News at 6 PM- KGO-TV

institution that unites kids with moms and dad autos two justices said that is not an issue in this case. Jean tate agreed. >> There is a lot of bad s and so if that is a right to get marry that had should be held for the same for all. >> In city hall, marriage licenses were given out only to heterosexual COUPLES.ok something that may change depending on how justices rule. June seems far away. In case you missed it, the court will ISSUEu >> Thank you very much. Attorney general harris today predicted the high court would have to strike down proposition 8 and set a new Qu. For the zV country NhT a interw from the w%zV abc 7 NEWSwU >> With us now is a professor of law at santa clara university and an expert on constitutional law. They could decide just to make a decision that affects california and proposition 8 and that justices could decide a broader decision what. Are issues zitding that? >> There is a range of possibilities here for outcome. Dismissing the case as you said, possibly making a ruling only for californians striking that proposition 8 or suggesting that marriage, same-sex marriage has to be constitutional everywhere in the united states. I think that the issue is really about how broad the justices want to make their ruling based on questioning and answering today, it's -- it's suggesting that only two or three justices seem ready and most seem reluctant. >> It did seem several were questioning whether the court should be taking this case. Based n comments you heard you get a sense it's just a handful of them, perhaps just four wanted to take this on. >> It's thoord tell only four justices are needed to grant a hearing. Certainly the questioning suggests several were reluctant to be hearing this case z question had whether this is an appropriate time to be hearing the case. >> To put this into case the importance of the event in the life of the country sfr sn. >> It's a significant ruling and a ruling on par, I think will be on par of several major rulings. And loving versus virginia so I think a ruling on that part if the court needs a constitutional ruling. >> Thank you for your time and for joining us z on our web site a link to audio recordings from the hearing go to abc 7 news.com and look under see it on tvzabc 7 news reporter carolyn tyler, she mentioned will be back in court tomorrow. When justices will hear arguments here. >> Let's move on to other news. A standoff between police and S.W.A.T. teams in a motel room ended after more than five hours when a man in trouble with the law gave himself up. Police say the 29-year-old man is wanted on a parole violation after serving time on a weapons charge. The woman, police say is his girlfriend was taken into custody. There, you can see them leading him away. It started about sock this morning. >> Oakland police on the lookout for a man suspected of trying to kidnap and sexual assault a 9-year-old girl.

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NPR Touts Tax Savings For Same-Sex Couples If DOMA is Struck Down | Media Research Center | View Clip
3/26/2013
Media Research Center

...change, if the high court rules for Edie Windsor." Later in the segment, Johnson played soundbites from the Tax Policy Center's Roberton Williams, who spotlighted "DOMA's tax hassles for same-sex couples" in a Wednesday article ; and Santa Clara University law professor Patricia Cain, who is a former board member for the homosexual activist group Lambda Legal. Near the end of her report, the NPR correspondent hyped that some of Miller's customers...

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China, Apple's greatest hope, is also most perplexing challenge
3/26/2013
Contra Costa Times

Even as Apple ( AAPL) enjoys breakneck growth in China, recent tongue-lashings from government-controlled media show the company faces perils in the country crucial to spur its global sales.

The media criticism, a new lawsuit by a Chinese company asserting Apple copied its software to develop the iPhone's and iPad's "Siri" personal assistant, and growing pressure from Samsung as the purveyor of tech cool in the world's second-largest economy underscore the Cupertino company's challenges.

"China has never been easy," said independent wireless analyst Chetan Sharma.

The new media scrutiny and more assertive legal challenges from Chinese companies reflect the broader pursuit of the "Chinese Dream," as advocated by newly installed President Xi Jinping, that emphasizes local innovation and brands.

"There seems to be this targeting of Apple," said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China. "But this is going to happen to all U.S. companies in China."

Apple has come under government scrutiny in China at a time when it is encountering stiff competition from Samsung, now the smartphone leader in that country, for the hearts and wallets of wealthy Chinese anxious to buy the latest status-symbol product. CEO Tim Cook must craft a careful strategy for China, where hundreds of millions of potential consumers with modest incomes would eagerly buy cheaper versions of the iPhone, a move that would boost market share but threaten Apple's premium brand.

Cook also is involved in tough negotiations with China Mobile, which has some 700 million subscribers and is aggressively promoting Samsung devices, to carry the iPhone, a process that has stretched on for years.

The stakes are huge for Apple, which has boasted explosive growth in China. During the company's first quarter, revenues for Greater China, which includes mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, jumped 67 percent from the year-ago period to $6.83 billion, Apple reported in January.

But its success is placing the company in the cross hairs of officials seeking to dim its reputation and of local companies eager to protect their patents or cash in through lawsuits, Han said, in a judicial system where they enjoy "home court advantage."

On Wednesday, Apple's lawyers appeared in a Shanghai court, where a Chinese company accused it of copying its software for the "Siri" personal assistant. Last year, Apple paid $60 million to Chinese computer maker Shenzhen Proview Technology to settle a legal dispute over the "iPad" trademark.

The latest court hearing came on the heels of Monday's criticism of Apple by the People's Daily, the Communist Party's flagship newspaper, which lambasted the company for not adequately responding to warranty complaints raised by an earlier broadcast on CCTV, the government-run television network. The news report suggested the Cupertino company treats consumers in China differently than it does customers in other countries. It was also critical of Apple's warranty policies.

During the weekend, Apple posted a message on its Chinese website saying it provides a 90-day warranty on repairs -- just like in the United States -- longer than the 30 days mandated by law in China.

The media attacks on a foreign company help deflect criticism of some Chinese companies after scandals such as the sale of tainted milk or the recent dumping of 16,000 dead pigs in a river that supplies drinking water to Shanghai, said Shanghai-based Shaun Rein, founder of China Market Research Group.

"They are trying to chip away at foreign companies and their reputations to say it's not just Chinese brands that have problems," said Rein, author of, "The End of Cheap China: Economic and Cultural Trends That Will Disrupt the World." "They are going after the best-of-breed foreign brands."

But Stanford University professor Hau Lee, a guru of supply-chain management, said the growing criticism of foreign brands may be part of a new government effort to protect consumers and give them more confidence to buy products.

"They are actually giving more rights to the consumers, and the Chinese government has encouraged more transparencies in the supply chain," Lee, who is traveling in China, said in an email.

The recent criticism of Apple, though, was viewed as ham-handed by many Chinese, who went online to mock the media reports.

"No one takes seriously the news from CCTV, at least no professionals," said Linda Jiang, vice president of business development of Umeng Analytics Platform, a Beijing-based mobile app and analytics service.

Apple's biggest problem in China is fine-tuning its strategy for a market that is very different from the West, said Duncan Clark, chairman of BDA China, a Beijing-based investment and strategy consultancy. Apple needs more models of differing sizes, such as Samsung offers, he said.

Clark pointed to Samsung's Galaxy Note line, devices with five-inch screens that act both as tablets and phones, and have been nicknamed "No Face" in China because they hide the user's face. They are now popular among trendy young women, he said.

While Apple remains a coveted brand in China, it is increasingly sharing the spotlight with Samsung, whose phones are popular among professionals, Rein said. Apple needs to expand its retail presence -- there are now eight stores in China, far short of the 25 it had planned to have open in the country by the end of 2011 -- and "launch new and better products," he said.

A deal with China Mobile would help Apple blunt Samsung's advances, Rein added. He believes Apple and China Mobile need a partnership more than ever. China Mobile is being challenged by the new free mobile phone text and voice messaging service WeChat developed by Tencent. Adding the iPhone to its network would juice revenues, he said.

"They both are facing massive challenges," Rein said of Apple and China Mobile. "So they need to cooperate."

Contact John Boudreau at 408-278-3496; follow him at Twitter.com/svwriter.

Copyright © 2013 Contra Costa Times.

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ABC7 News 6:00AM
3/27/2013
ABC 7 Morning News at 6 AM - KGO-TV

>>> Also new this moorng contra costa county sheriff's deputy is recovering after his patrol car crashed while responding to a call. Look at this. Ended up on its side. The crash happened just before midnight on richmond parkway in unincorporated san pablo. Officials say the deputy hit the center divide other than san pablo avenue after passing another vehicle. They say he suffered minor injuries but is expected to be fine. >>> Happening now day two in the historic battle for gay rights before the nation's highest court. This is a live look from outside the supreme court. The justices will take up the federal defense of marriage act also known as doma which defines marriage as between a man and a woman. The 1996 law prevents same sex couples even though legally married in states that allow it from collecting federal benefits. Today's case involves an 83-year-old woman from new york who was denied the benefits of marriage following a 42-year partnership. Now today's landmark marriage case comes one day after the justices considered a california case on whether gays and lesbians have a fundamental right to marry. A huge crowd rallied outside the high court yesterday while inside the justices had hard-hitting questions for critics and supporters of prop 8, california's same sex marriage ban. In addition to the merits of the case the justices must decide if prop 8 backers have the right to be in court since the state is not defending the voter-approved ban. The supreme court is expected to issue a ruling in both cases by june. >>> Here in the bay area many same sex couples are feeling cautiously optimistic about the supreme court taking on the same sex marriage. This couple is getting ready to adopt their first child despite the fact that they can't legally marry in california right now. >> The ceremony that I want is probably not going to happen any time soon necessarily. But I do want it. Just like anyone else. >> It's important for a child to be able to say that my parents are married and that the state recognizes their marriage. >> Questions from several justices yesterday focused on the children of same sex couples. According to a santa clara university constitutional law professor, this may be why californians no longer support prop 8. The professor said marriage is not simply about procreating anymore. Abc 7 news reporter carolyn tyler is in washington, D.C. covering the supreme court and is just about to go in to watch today's doma hearing. We'll have live reports this afternoon starting at 4:00. Carolyn is also tweeting updates from her twitter account at c tyler abc 7.

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Potential Broader View of ADA May Impact Online Retailers | View Clip
3/27/2013
Global Cosmetic Industry (GCI) - Online

...access to "public accommodations," which include retail stores. It makes no mention of websites as a public accommodation. "Congress never contemplated the Internet at the time, and if they had, they would have included it," Eric Goldman, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law,tells WSJ. But that could change with the U.S. Department of Justice expected to issue new regulations on website accessibility later in 2013 that could take a broad view of the ADA's jurisdiction over...

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Hawaii Intermediate Court of Appeals: Is A Mineral Right An Inherent Servitude, Or Must It Be Reflected In Torrens Title? | View Clip
3/27/2013
Hawaii Reporter

...and the federal courts. Robert received his LLM, with honors, from Columbia Law School where he was a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar, and his JD from the University of Hawaii School of Law where he served as editor of the Law Review. Robert taught law at the University of Santa Clara School of Law, and was an exam grader and screener for the California Committee of Bar Examiners. He currently serves as the Chair of the Condemnation Law Committee of the American Bar Association's Section...

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Apple faces growing obstacles in China | View Clip
3/27/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...more assertive legal challenges from Chinese companies reflect the broader pursuit of the "Chinese Dream," as advocated by President Xi Jinping, that emphasizes local innovation and brands. "There seems to be this targeting of Apple," said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China. "But this is going to happen to all U.S. companies in China." Apple has come under government scrutiny in China at a time when it is encountering...

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Apple faces growing obstacles in China | View Clip
3/27/2013
Inland Valley Daily Bulletin - Online

...legal challenges from Chinese companies reflect the broader pursuit of the "Chinese Dream," as advocated by newly installed President Xi Jinping, that emphasizes local innovation and brands. "There seems to be this targeting of Apple," said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China. "But this is going to happen to all U.S. companies in China." Apple has come under government scrutiny in China at a time when it is encountering...

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The Oakland Tribune Tammerlin Drummond column
3/27/2013
Oakland Tribune

March 28--Eyewitness testimony is one of the most compelling kinds of evidence in criminal court proceedings. Every year, 75,000 people in this country are convicted based upon someone's claim that they saw them commit a crime.

But what happens when eyewitnesses are mistaken, influenced by police and others or flat-out lie? Innocent people end up going to prison, robbed of precious years. Time that they can never get back.

People like Ronald Ross.

Ross wasn't anyone's choir boy. He had a drug record. But he swore he didn't knock on Renardo Williams' door in June 2007 and shoot him.

It didn't matter.

Williams identified Ross from an Oakland police photo lineup as his attacker. The victim was in

his hospital bed on a morphine drip when Detective Steve Lovell showed him the photos of suspects -- hardly the ideal situation to yield a reliable identification. Williams chose another man at first. But when the detective told him to look again, he fingered Ross. The only "evidence" connecting Ross to the shooting was the fact that his mother had lived near Williams 10 years earlier.

Ross was convicted of attempted murder and sentenced to 25 years to life.

For six years, he languished in a cell at California State Prison, Solano for a crime he didn't commit.

Who knows how long he would have remained there had the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law not thrown him a lifeline? The

law school students and project attorneys teamed up with the San Francisco law firm Keker & Van Nest -- which worked pro bono -- to reinvestigate Ross' case.

They found evidence that OPD's investigation was so sloppy it bordered on criminal negligence. They took their findings to the Alameda County District Attorney's Office, which agreed to drop the charges. In February, an Alameda County Superior Court judge overturned Ross' conviction and set the 51-year-old man free.

"The entire criminal justice system -- including myself on behalf of our Police Department -- owes an apology to Mr. Ronald Ross," Chief Howard Jordan said in a letter to the community earlier this month after Ross' release.

I should say so.

Two weeks later, an Alameda County judge overturned the conviction of Johnny Williams, which had also been based in large part on a misidentification by an eyewitness.

But not before Williams had served 14 years in prison -- falsely accused of sexually assaulting a 9-year-old girl in Oakland in 1998. The victim identified Williams as her attacker after her mother suggested that it might have been him because his name is Johnny -- the same name as the man who the girl said had assaulted her. The California DNA Project -- the Innocence Project's sister organization -- sent a sample of the girl's T-shirt -- provided by the Alameda County district attorney -- for DNA testing. It did not match Williams' DNA profile. The testing would not have been possible without a federal grant that will run out in September.

California DNA Project lawyers and Oakland police say "nobody did anything wrong" in the criminal prosecution that led to Williams' conviction.

Small consolation for a man who has had to live with the stigma of being branded a child rapist all these years.

According to Linda Starr, legal director of the Innocence Project, of the 303 people nationwide who have been exonerated through DNA testing, 75 percent of the convictions were based on witness misidentification. Which is why, Starr says, more law enforcement agencies should follow lineup best practices. Making sure that those administering the lineups do not know the identity of the suspects reduces the likelihood of witness coaching -- one major cause of wrong suspect identifications.

On Thursday, the Innocence Project held a fundraiser in Redwood City. Ross and Williams were among the exonerated who attended. Francisco "Franky" Carrillo Jr., an Innocence Project client who spent 20 years in prison for a murder he did not commit -- also based on a mistaken witness identification -- accepted the Freedom Award on behalf of all those who were exonerated.

Since 2001, the Northern California Innocence Project has gotten 16 convictions overturned.

Yet the nonprofit can only investigate a fraction of the convictions that merit review.

What happens to innocent people in prison who don't have anyone to fight for justice for them?

Tammerlin Drummond is a columnist for the Bay Area News Group. Her column runs Tuesday and Sunday. Contact her at tdrummond@bayareanewsgroup.com, or follow her at Twitter.com/Tammerlin.

___

(c)2013 The Oakland Tribune (Oakland, Calif.)

Visit The Oakland Tribune (Oakland, Calif.) at www.insidebayarea.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright © 2013 The Oakland Tribune

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Two Bay Area law professors predict Supreme Court will invalidate both Prop 8 And DOMA, but on narrow grounds
3/27/2013
Contra Costa Times

Two Bay Area constitutional law professors predicted today the U.S. Supreme Court, after two days of hearings on same-sex marriage, will end up invalidating both California's Proposition 8 and a key section of the federal Defense of Marriage Act.

But Santa Clara University professor Margaret Russell and University of San Francisco professor Julie Nice said they expect the rulings to be narrow, limited or splintered.

The decisions are due by the close of the court's current term at the end of June.

"We are not likely to get a direct ruling on the merits," Russell said of today's hearing on the 1996 federal law, known as DOMA.

The nine justices heard arguments today on an 83-year-old New York widow's challenge to a DOMA provision that bars the U.S. government from recognizing legal same-sex marriages.

The provision denies gay and lesbian couples who were legally married in their state more than 1,000 federal benefits and programs, ranging from Social Security survivors' payments to tax advantages.

Widow Edith Windsor is challenging a $363,000 federal estate tax she had to pay after the 2009 death of her wife, Thea Spyer. She claims the law violates her constitutional right to equal treatment.

A decision overturning the measure would affect couples in the nine states that currently allow same-sex marriage.

Russell and Nice said they expect the court to strike down that section of DOMA, but in a splintered decision without a majority on the reasoning.

"We're not going to have that ringing majority ruling that gets to the crux of this case, which is discrimination based on sexual orientation," Nice said.

The two professors predicted the court's four liberal justices will cite a constitutional right to equal protection while Justice Anthony Kennedy, a swing vote, may favor a more limited federalism argument of respecting individual states' definition of marriage.

"The question is whether or not the federal government under a federalism system has the authority to regulate marriage," Kennedy commented during the two-hour hearing.

Russell said she thinks Chief Justice John Roberts may join Kennedy in the federalism argument.

The predicted 5-4 or 6-3 ruling would be a "majority result without a majority rationale" on issues of alleged discrimination against gays and lesbians, Nice noted.

Still, "as long as five justices agree for whatever reason on the result, it's very meaningful in itself that DOMA will be struck down," Russell said.

The two professors said there may be an even less definitive ruling on Proposition 8, the same-sex marriage ban enacted by California voters in 2008.

The court heard arguments Tuesday on the initiative sponsors' appeal of a decision by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco last year striking down the measure.

The case began with a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco in 2009 by a lesbian couple from Berkeley and a gay couple from Burbank, who claim the initiative violates the Constitution's guarantees of equal treatment and due process.

Russell and Nice said the justices' comments Tuesday suggest that they will either overturn Proposition 8 with a narrow ruling that would apply only to California, or dismiss the appeal on the ground that the sponsors lacked the legal authority to appeal after California officials declined to defend the measure.

Either way, the professors said, they expect the crucial fifth vote to be provided by Kennedy, who commented Tuesday that the voice of 40,000 California children who want their gay and lesbian parents to be married "is important in this case."

"It's very likely that one way or another, Proposition 8 is gone," Russell said.

Nice said, "I think there is not likely to be a sweeping victory for either side, but it seems very likely that Proposition 8 is not likely to be upheld and that it will no longer be in effect in California at the end of this process."

If the Supreme Court dismisses the Proposition 8 appeal, that action would reinstate a broad ruling in which U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker said in 2010 that the U.S. Constitution provides a right to same-sex marriage, and ordered state officials to allow the unions.

Proposition 8 supporters and opponents disagree on whether Walker's order would then apply only to the two couples who sued, Kristin Perry and Sandra Stier of Berkeley and Paul Katami and Jeffrey Zarrillo of Burbank, or whether it would apply statewide.

More lawsuits or court proceedings might result to determine the answer to that question, but many analysts, including Nice and Russell, believe that same-sex marriages would eventually resume in California.

In the meantime, the lower court rulings overturning Proposition 8 have been put on hold and the ban has remained in effect during the appeal to the Supreme Court.

Even though the panel's expected decisions in the two cases may be limited, Russell said, "I think it's been a remarkable two days in terms of the tone of the Supreme Court, the questions and the arguments."

Russell said that even the justices who might be expected to vote against recognition of same-sex marriage adopted a more respectful and less harsh tone during the two hearings than was heard in some justices' comments on gay rights cases in the 1980s and 1990s.

"Language is a key indicator of respect," she said. "It's as though it's finally sunk in that you have to think of these people as human beings."

JuliaCheever1017p03/27/13

CONTACT: Santa Clara University spokeswoman Deborah Lohse (408) 554-5121

University of San Francisco spokeswoman Anne-Marie Devine (415) 422-2697

Copyright © 2013 by Bay City News, Inc. Republication, re-transmission or reuse without the express written consent of Bay City News, Inc. is prohibited.

Copyright © 2013 Contra Costa Times.

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China, Apple's greatest hope, is also most perplexing challenge | View Clip
3/27/2013
Press-Telegram - Online

...legal challenges from Chinese companies reflect the broader pursuit of the "Chinese Dream," as advocated by newly installed President Xi Jinping, that emphasizes local innovation and brands. "There seems to be this targeting of Apple," said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China. "But this is going to happen to all U.S. companies in China." Apple has come under government scrutiny in China at a time when it is encountering...

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China, Apple's greatest hope, is also most perplexing challenge | View Clip
3/27/2013
Willits News - Online

...legal challenges from Chinese companies reflect the broader pursuit of the "Chinese Dream," as advocated by newly installed President Xi Jinping, that emphasizes local innovation and brands. "There seems to be this targeting of Apple," said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China. "But this is going to happen to all U.S. companies in China." Apple has come under government scrutiny in China at a time when it is encountering...

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Two Bay Area law professors predict Supreme Court will invalidate both Prop 8 And DOMA, but on narrow grounds | View Clip
3/27/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

... Two Bay Area constitutional law professors predicted today the U.S. Supreme Court, after two days of hearings on same-sex marriage, will end up invalidating both California's Proposition 8 and a key section of the federal Defense of Marriage Act. But Santa Clara University professor Margaret Russell and University of San Francisco professor Julie Nice said they expect the rulings to be narrow, limited or splintered. The decisions are due by the close of the court's current term at the...

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Two Bay Area law professors predict Supreme Court will invalidate both Prop 8 And DOMA, but on narrow grounds | View Clip
3/28/2013
Inland Valley Daily Bulletin - Online

... Two Bay Area constitutional law professors predicted today the U.S. Supreme Court, after two days of hearings on same-sex marriage, will end up invalidating both California's Proposition 8 and a key section of the federal Defense of Marriage Act. But Santa Clara University professor Margaret Russell and University of San Francisco professor Julie Nice said they expect the rulings to be narrow, limited or splintered. The decisions are due by the close of the court's current term at the...

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Two Bay Area law professors predict Supreme Court will invalidate both Prop 8 And DOMA, but on narrow grounds | View Clip
3/28/2013
Press-Telegram - Online

... Two Bay Area constitutional law professors predicted today the U.S. Supreme Court, after two days of hearings on same-sex marriage, will end up invalidating both California's Proposition 8 and a key section of the federal Defense of Marriage Act. But Santa Clara University professor Margaret Russell and University of San Francisco professor Julie Nice said they expect the rulings to be narrow, limited or splintered. The decisions are due by the close of the court's current term at the...

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Government scrutiny in China could threaten Apple's global growth | View Clip
3/28/2013
Red Bluff Daily News - Online

...legal challenges from Chinese companies reflect the broader pursuit of the "Chinese Dream," as advocated by newly installed President Xi Jinping, that emphasizes local innovation and brands. "There seems to be this targeting of Apple," said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China. "But this is going to happen to all U.S. companies in China." Apple has come under government scrutiny in China at a time when it is encountering...

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Government scrutiny in China could threaten Apple's global growth | View Clip
3/28/2013
Lowell Sun - Online

...legal challenges from Chinese companies reflect the broader pursuit of the "Chinese Dream," as advocated by newly installed President Xi Jinping, that emphasizes local innovation and brands. "There seems to be this targeting of Apple," said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China. "But this is going to happen to all U.S. companies in China." Apple has come under government scrutiny in China at a time when it is encountering...

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Government scrutiny in China could threaten Apple's global growth | View Clip
3/28/2013
Farmington Daily Times - Online

...legal challenges from Chinese companies reflect the broader pursuit of the "Chinese Dream," as advocated by newly installed President Xi Jinping, that emphasizes local innovation and brands. "There seems to be this targeting of Apple," said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China. "But this is going to happen to all U.S. companies in China." Apple has come under government scrutiny in China at a time when it is encountering...

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Government scrutiny in China could threaten Apple's global growth | View Clip
3/28/2013
Times-Standard - Online

...legal challenges from Chinese companies reflect the broader pursuit of the "Chinese Dream," as advocated by newly installed President Xi Jinping, that emphasizes local innovation and brands. "There seems to be this targeting of Apple," said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China. "But this is going to happen to all U.S. companies in China." Apple has come under government scrutiny in China at a time when it is encountering...

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Tammerlin Drummond: Setting the wrongly convicted free | View Clip
3/28/2013
Contra Costa Times - Online

...attempted murder and sentenced to 25 years to life. For six years, he languished in a cell at California State Prison, Solano for a crime he didn't commit. Who knows how long he would have remained there had the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law not thrown him a lifeline? The law school students and project attorneys teamed up with the San Francisco law firm Keker & Van Nest -- which worked pro bono -- to reinvestigate Ross' case. They found...

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Tammerlin Drummond: Setting the wrongly convicted free | View Clip
3/28/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...attempted murder and sentenced to 25 years to life. For six years, he languished in a cell at California State Prison, Solano for a crime he didn't commit. Who knows how long he would have remained there had the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law not thrown him a lifeline? The law school students and project attorneys teamed up with the San Francisco law firm Keker & Van Nest -- which worked pro bono -- to reinvestigate Ross' case. They found...

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Government scrutiny in China could threaten Apple's global growth | View Clip
3/28/2013
Oakland Press - Online, The

...legal challenges from Chinese companies reflect the broader pursuit of the "Chinese Dream," as advocated by newly installed President Xi Jinping, that emphasizes local innovation and brands. "There seems to be this targeting of Apple," said Anna Han, a Santa Clara University business law professor who advises U.S. companies operating in China. "But this is going to happen to all U.S. companies in China." Apple has come under government scrutiny in China at a time when it is encountering...

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Prop 8 / Defense of Marriage Act Updates 3/28/13 #2 | View Clip
3/28/2013
Gayopolis

...the more absurd moments outside of the two hearings: The last 72 hours, or so, have been a roller coaster of emotions and media madness. Here are a few of the more amusing images. Pink News reports that two SF law professors think DOMA is toast: Santa Clara University professor Margaret Russell and University of San Francisco professor Julie Nice both said they expected the rulings to be narrow, limited or splintered, but that they expected both Prop 8 and a key section of DOMA would...

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N.Y. Court Upholds Amazon Tax | View Clip
3/29/2013
MediaPost.com

...but many observers think that people under-report their online ecommerce activity. The ruling upholding New York's law could encourage other states to pass similar laws, which potentially would lead other retailers to stop using affiliates, says Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman. "This opinion greenlights states to treat affiliates as traveling salespeople," he says. "This case is almost certainly the end of the line for the 2000-2010 decade concept of affiliate...

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Is Your New Car Spying on You? | View Clip
3/30/2013
Top Tech News

...comes to banking transactions, medical records, phone and Internet use. But data generated by cars, which these days are basically rolling computers, are not. All too often, "people don't know it's happening," says Dorothy Glancy, a law professor at Santa Clara University in California who specializes in transportation and privacy. "People should be able to decide whether they want it collected or not." Try as you may to protect your privacy while driving, it's only going to get...

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Is Your New Car Spying on You? | View Clip
3/30/2013
Sci-Tech Today

...comes to banking transactions, medical records, phone and Internet use. But data generated by cars, which these days are basically rolling computers, are not. All too often, "people don't know it's happening," says Dorothy Glancy, a law professor at Santa Clara University in California who specializes in transportation and privacy. "People should be able to decide whether they want it collected or not." Try as you may to protect your privacy while driving, it's only going to get...

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Is Your New Car Spying on You? | View Clip
3/30/2013
Mobile Tech Today

...comes to banking transactions, medical records, phone and Internet use. But data generated by cars, which these days are basically rolling computers, are not. All too often, "people don't know it's happening," says Dorothy Glancy, a law professor at Santa Clara University in California who specializes in transportation and privacy. "People should be able to decide whether they want it collected or not." Try as you may to protect your privacy while driving, it's only going to get...

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Tax-preparer fraud can leave you on hook | View Clip
3/31/2013
Arizona Daily Star - Online

...taxpayer who's on the hook. "There's this huge refund that goes out the door that the taxpayer is clearly not entitled to, but they don't know that," said Caroline Chen, assistant clinical professor of law and director of the Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic at Santa Clara University. "They find out later, after the money, of course, is spent." The cumbersome tax code, insufficient regulations and under-resourced enforcement agencies have helped create a breeding ground for tax preparer fraud,...

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San Francisco pays top dollar to house County Jail inmates | View Clip
3/31/2013
San Francisco Examiner - Online

...felonies. When they are finally sentenced, many are credited with time served, according to a recent City Controller's Office report. “S.F. unquestionably has more ‘serious' offenders in its jails than other counties,” said W. David Ball, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law and co-chairman of the American Bar Association's Corrections Committee. More serious crimes, such as violent felonies, have higher bail amounts set by judges or inmates may be held without bail. Other...

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Pressured by China, Apple Apologizes for Warranty Policies | View Clip
4/1/2013
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Online

...force and management team to deal with the challenges of the China market. "Whatever the merits of the case, Apple's not going to win here," Mr. Bishop said in an interview Monday. "Apple can't fight this." Anna Han, an associate professor of law at Santa Clara University, said Mr. Cook's letter of apology was a smart tactic and a "very Chinese thing to do." She compared it to public apologies that plaintiffs will sometimes ask for from defendants in Chinese courts. That action, combined...

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Apple Apology To Customers In China Over Repair Policy
4/1/2013
New York Times, The

SHANGHAI -- Apple's chief executive, Tim Cook, took the unusual step Monday of apologizing to Chinese customers over the company's warranty policy and said he would improve customer service in the country.

Apple's apology Monday was the latest twist in a strange spectacle that has unfolded in recent weeks in China over Apple's warranty policies and underscored the challenges the company is facing as the country becomes an important market for its products.

Apple's problem began on International Consumers' Day, when China's biggest state-run television network, as is its tradition, broadcast an investigative report on how companies operating in China cheat or mistreat consumers. This year, on March 15, one of the targets was Apple.

China Central Television criticized the American company's after-sales iPhone customer service in China because it gave only a one-year warranty, while in China the law is two years. It also said that phone owners had to pay about $90 to replace a faulty back cover.

Apple did not immediately respond to some of the accusations, but other state media outlets stepped up their criticism over the next two weeks, raising the stakes for Apple in China, which is now the company's second-biggest market after the United States. Soon after the segment was broadcast, several Chinese celebrities piled on, posting harsh comments on Weibo, China's Twitter-like service.

Then People's Daily, the official mouthpiece of the Communist Party, published a series of editorials and articles, including one paper titled "Defeat Apple's Incomparable Arrogance."

Other state organs also joined the fray. China's State Administration of Industry and Commerce, which has oversight of business practices in China, called for "strengthened supervision" of Apple.

And in recent days, television news broadcasts have included images of Chinese journalists being turned away from Apple's offices in China.

Apple, based in Cupertino, Calif., issued a statement in Chinese Monday. "We realize that a lack of communication in this process has led the outside to believe that Apple is arrogant and doesn't care or value consumers' feedback," Mr. Cook wrote in the open letter. "We sincerely apologize for any concern or misunderstanding this has brought to the customers."

Some media analysts and bloggers have called the media frenzy over Apple's warranty policies bizarre because of the ferocity of it.

Several online bloggers, for instance, noted that Chinese celebrities who posted online shortly after the television broadcast on March 15 seemed not to be doing so spontaneously, but at the urging of the state broadcaster. The suspicions arose after one celebrity's post ended with the line: "to publish around 8:20 p.m."

Other analysts speculate that the continuing media blitz against Apple is aimed at showing what the government can do to American technology giants, even those as successful as Apple.

The criticism of Apple coincides with the Obama administration's pressure on Beijing on cybersecurity issues. A growing number of American companies have complained about computer hacking attacks that seemed to be originating in China.

And earlier this year, several members of Congress moved to restrict two of China's biggest telecommunications equipment makers, Huawei and ZTE, from doing business in the United States because of concerns that they could engage in espionage.

Sprint Nextel and SoftBank, its Japanese suitor, are expected to enter an agreement with American law enforcement officials to allay such national security concerns. It will restrict the combined company's ability to pick suppliers for its telecom equipment and systems, like Huawei and ZTE.

Bill Bishop, a Beijing technology analyst and publisher of the online newsletter Sinocism China, said it was difficult to know what prompted the investigation by the state media, but he noted that Apple's explosive growth in China might have outpaced the company's ability to fully train and prepare its work force and management team to deal with the challenges of the Chinese market.

"Whatever the merits of the case, Apple's not going to win here," Mr. Bishop said in an interview Monday. "Apple can't fight this."

Anna Han, an associate professor of law at Santa Clara University, said Mr. Cook's letter of apology was a smart tactic and a "very Chinese thing to do." She compared it with public apologies that plaintiffs will sometimes ask for from defendants in Chinese courts. That action, combined with the change in its warranty policy, "sort of takes the wind out of the government's sails," said Ms. Han, who advises American companies doing business in China.

"It says, 'We're accused of something and we're doing something about it.' "

Ms. Han said it was possible that the Chinese state media were taking an aggressive approach toward Apple in part to help Chinese companies that could compete more closely with Apple over time, like ZTE. While past attacks on Western companies have been related to food and drug safety issues, she said the Apple warranty issues were relatively minor, suggesting they were motivated by a form of protectionism.

Apple has been riding a wave of popularity in China with revenue reaching $20 billion during the last year. In its most recently reported quarter, sales in China were about 13 percent of the company's total sales, up from 9 percent a year earlier.

Apple has occasionally apologized or made policy changes when controversies in the United States over its products have erupted, even in cases where the company felt the issues were blown out of proportion.

In 2010, Apple agreed to give iPhone customers a free bumper for their devices after some found that holding their iPhones directly weakened its wireless signal. Last year, Mr. Cook published a letter of apology to Apple customers after the company released an online maps service that contained incorrect addresses, distorted aerial imagery and other problems.

PHOTO: An Apple store in Beijing. Apple is facing challenges as China becomes an important market for its products. (PHOTOGRAPH BY MARK RALSTON/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE -- GETTY IMAGES) (B2)

Copyright (c) 2013 The New York Times Company

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Netflix case leads to SEC ruling that companies may use Twitter or Facebook to share financial information
4/1/2013
Contra Costa Times

In an era when people share all kinds of news on social media -- from their dating status to what they had for breakfast -- it's perfectly fine for publicly traded companies to disclose significant financial information on Twitter or Facebook, the Securities and Exchange Commission said Tuesday.

But after examining Netflix ( NFLX) CEO Reed Hasting's decision to announce a corporate milestone on his personal Facebook page last year, the SEC warned that it's only fair to share important information through such channels if a company has told investors where to look for it.

Netflix hadn't done that, the commission said, but officials added that they won't penalize the company or its CEO because there has been uncertainty about the rules.

The SEC had already ruled in 2008 that companies could share information on their corporate websites or official blogs. The agency on Tuesday characterized the Netflix decision as an extension of its earlier ruling. But Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the new finding recognizes social media as an important source of information, especially for small investors who may not be able to attend financial "road show" meetings or conference calls that are generally open to institutional analysts, major investors and sometimes the press.

"Social media has leveled the playing field," said Eric Goldman, director of the university's High Tech Law Institute.

Hastings drew the SEC's attention when he posted on his personal Facebook page that Netflix had streamed more than 1 billion hours of Internet video last June. The company had previously cited streaming volume as an indicator of its business strength, the SEC said. But Netflix, based in Los Gatos, did not share that particular milestone in a news release or on other public channels, such as the company's website or its official Facebook page.

That wasn't fair to investors who might not have known to watch Hastings' personal Facebook account for relevant information, the SEC said. The agency said companies should provide "appropriate notice to investors of the specific channels" the company plans to use for sharing news.

While the agency didn't go into details, Goldman said the ruling suggests a company can share information on a public account, but it wouldn't do for a CEO to use Facebook's privacy settings to share significant information only with "friends."

"Most social media are perfectly suitable methods for communicating with investors, but not if the access is restricted or if investors don't know that's where they need to turn to get the latest news." said George Canellos, acting director of the SEC's Division of Enforcement.

In a statement, a Netflix spokesman said, "We appreciate the SEC's careful consideration and resolution of this matter."

Contact Brandon Bailey at 408-920-5022; follow him at Twitter.com/BrandonBailey

Copyright © 2013 Contra Costa Times.

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Apple answers Chinese criticism -- with rare apology | View Clip
4/1/2013
Seattle Times - Online

...and prepare its workforce and management team to deal with the challenges of the China market. “Whatever the merits of the case, Apple's not going to win here,” Bishop said in an interview Monday. “Apple can't fight this.” Anna Han, a law professor at Santa Clara University, said Cook's apology letter was a smart tactic and a “very Chinese thing to do.” She compared it to public apologies plaintiffs sometimes ask for from defendants in Chinese courts. That action, combined with the change...

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Silicon Valley Congressional battle takes shape: Ro Khanna to challenge Mike Honda, using Obama campaign operatives | View Clip
4/2/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...world." Khanna casts himself as not only for Silicon Valley but of Silicon Valley. Working as a deputy assistant secretary of commerce from 2009 to 2011 and since then at the valley's biggest law firm, while also teaching economics at Stanford and law at Santa Clara University, gives him an edge in knowing how to nurture the high-tech sector, he said. Don't expect Khanna and Honda to differ much on social issues like abortion rights or same-sex marriage. The race instead might hinge on...

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Microsoft introduces innovative patent tracker | View Clip
4/2/2013
Reuters - Online

...no sure way of knowing who owns which patents, or which patents even exist, she said. With an industrywide patent-tracking system, patent developers also could focus on innovation rather than litigation, Colleen Chien, an assistant professor of law at Santa Clara University, wrote in a letter in January to the U.S. Patent and Trade Office. A copy of the letter was provided to Reuters by the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Chien did not return a request for comment. The volume of patent...

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ABC7 News 4:30AM
4/2/2013
ABC 7 Morning News at 4:30 AM - KGO-TV

put together the strongest and most comprehensive bill in the united states. >> Both sides expect to approve the pack an -- the package toll. >> The national rifle association will have recommendations for preventing gun violence anowing the national school shield program in december in response to the shooting, with training for remain ad guards and legislative proposals for congress. >> A former contra costa narcotics officer will be sentenced on drug charges today. In december, he pleaded guilty to five felony counts admitting to stealing drugs from an evidence locker and re-selling them on the street. He took cash and cell phones from prostitutes. He faces a possible ten year prison sentence under a deal with the prosecution. >> The san francisco entertainment commission meets to consider ways to cut down on noise from the concerts associated with the america's cup racing contest. Big name acts like sting and train have been backed but people in telegraph hill are concerned they will be loud and disruptive. In response, the number of america's cup concerts planned for the waterfront are scaled back ahead of the hearing. There will be 30 concerts now rather than the 40 that were originally planned. They will be held between may 31 and october 15 and will end at 10:30 on weeknights and 11:00 on weekends. Speakers face the water and audio curtains are used to dampen the sound. >> Silicon valley congressional battle is shaping up, a former member of the obama administration says he will challenge representative for his 17th district seat next year. Well, I guess we are having audio problems. But he is making the pitch on YouTube. He served as assistant secretary of commerce for two years, from 2009 and is a santa clara university law professor. The "san jose mercury news" reports that the 36-year-old will use many of president obama's 2012 campaign operatives in his congressional run but the president has endorsed the 71 -year-old honda. >> There is approval of an application for a flood warning system along a creek that frequently spills the banks sending water into palo alto and menlo park and calls for installing rainfall gages along the creek. Now they use a patchwork of gauges to predict flooding. Only one measures rainfall. The grant will buy three more rain gauges as funded by proposition 84. >> We have seen some rain recently. >> And fog. >> Yes. >> What will we see today? >> What is next? >> Great question. >> We will check with mike. I am here to answer it. From the east bay hills looking back toward the west, you can see some of the fog that is developing along the east bay shoreline and, also, into the north bay. Novato is reporting .16 mile visibility and half mile in santa rosa. Right now the thickest fog is along the east bay shore is not hitting the reporting stations with those along the bay shore but it will filter down to those areas. Watch out for fog through 7:00. Temperatures in the mid-40's to around 50. We will see increasing sunshine by noon. We will have high clouds and sunshine this afternoon. We will be brighter and remain warmer than yesterday with mid-50's at the coast and mid-to-upper 60's for the rest and a quiet evening with high clouds and sunshine again and 50 for the cool spot and upper 50's to low 60's for bay and inland neighborhood. Tomorrow is the warm of the day, increasing clouds ahead of our wet system for thursday morning. It will be a quick hit because by friday it is gone with increasing sunshine once again. Time for a check of the commute. Leyla gulen? >> The drive along 101 through san rafael into central san rafael we have clear conditions and closer to 580 and sir francis drake we have construction out this blocking a couple of lanes southbound 101 to the waldo tunnel so watch out and we have more construction to get to along 101, 380, and the westbound 380 to southbound 101 will be closed until 6:00 A.M. due to road work and as we look at fremont, northbound 680 between mission boulevard south to mission boulevard north the drive as you come up, that is looking at three lanes blocked until 6:00 A.M. >> Thank you, it is 4:39. >> The bay area city plan to keep some people out of certain neighborhoods. >> A real life version of the movie "footloose" and why these protesters are using fancy footwork to force changes in the law. But first the tech bytes this morning. >> In today's tech byte apple issues an apology to the customers in china, the C.E.O.

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Let's Judge Patent Rights by Harm to the Public -- Not to Inventors | View Clip
4/2/2013
Wired - Online

...involved — Wired has been running a special series of expert opinions on “the patent fix“. To help move reform efforts forward, some of these proposals also advocate specific Solutions to the Software Patent Problem (as part of a conference hosted by the Santa Clara University High Tech Law Institute).

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ABC7 News 5:00AM
4/2/2013
ABC 7 Morning News at 5 AM - KGO-TV

week end. >> Silicon valley congressional battle is taking shape with a former member of the administration abouncing his bid to make a challenge for the 17th district seat next year. >> I am running for congress because I believe silicon valley's innovation and energy can cut through old-style washington, dc, politics. >> He is already making a pitch on YouTube and served as assistant secretary of commerce for two years from 2009 and is a santa clara university law professor and will use many of president obama's 2012 campaign operative but honda has received the president's endorsement. >> Palo alto city council has approved an application seeking state funding for a flood warning system along a creek that frequently spills sending water into palo alto and east palo alto and menlo park. They will install rainfall gauges. Authorities use a patchwork of creek gages to try and predict flood. Only one measures rainfall. The grant to buy three more rain gauges is funded by proposition 84. >> You say the name that creek so ease-- easily. >> Can you say it, mike? >> I need to practice. >> "the arsonist had oddly shaped feet." >> Never heard that one before. Review your movies. >> A lot of quotes from the movies. But we need to keep it clean this morning. Here is a look, everyone, from the tower and you can see how quiet it is in san francisco. Just about 30 minutes ago we could barely see because of the fog. It is moving and it does have flow to it so watch out. It could be clear in your neighborhood but fog could move in rather quickly. Right now the bulk is in the north bay, petaluma is at 48, we are radio in richmond and san leandro and union city and financial district is at 51, and 48 in belmont, and 47 in walnut creek and pittsburg is 52 and pleasanton is 45. Today we stay in the 40's with patchy fog through the morning commute. It will be dry at lunch and notice the temperatures in the coast stay in the 60's, and this afternoon, we will be brighter and warmer than yesterday. Tomorrow is the warm of the day in the forecast with increasing clouds in the afternoon ahead of a wet system especially for thursday morning, and friday we are dry, sunny, and even warmer, so watch out on thursday morning. This morning, everything is good. We will find out about the commute. >> "how now brown cow." that was in the movie, I think? Wasn't it? Our favorite. Good morning, everyone, we have a brand new stall at MacARTHUR maze driving from berkeley along westbound 80 at 580 and it looks like it is east roadways but it is if a bad spot for C.H.P. so watch out for that, and the rest of the drive is looking clear as you make it toward the bay bridge. Taking you to san rafael where we have clear conditions, and southbound along 101 into central san rafael and the drive is thicker tail lights pushing to 580 but we have construction approaching sir francis drake to the tunnel. >> Knights of columbus, imagine being told you have to stay out of certain neighborhoods in your city? The bay area city where that now is happening and who is targeted. >> The real life version of "footloose," protesters are using fancy footwork to force

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Finally: This Is How to Fix the 'Patent Fix' We're All In | View Clip
4/2/2013
Wired - Online

...up on Wired's entire patent opinion series here. To help move reform efforts forward, many of these pieces proposed specific Solutions to the Software Patent Problem, thanks to a conference of the same name hosted by Colleen Chien and Eric Goldman at the Santa Clara University High Tech Law Institute.

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Apple's Tim Cook says sorry to Chinese consumers following criticism from news media | Digital Trends | View Clip
4/2/2013
Digital Trends

...suggested that some of the celebrities who posted negative comments about the situation might not have done so spontaneously – one celebrity post, for example, ended with the words, “to publish around 8.20pm”. Anna Han, an associate professor of law at Santa Clara University, told the NY Times the government may have used the media to attack Apple in an effort to support local companies operating in the same line of business. She added that from a cultural point of view, Apple had been wise...

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Google Chief Legal Officer to Speak at Santa Clara University School of Law Commencement May 25 | View Clip
4/2/2013
newsblaze.com

Breaking News: A Way to Force Sane Gun Laws: Boycott Starbucks Published: April 02, 2013 Press Release Google Chief Legal Officer to Speak at Santa Clara University School of Law Commencement May 25 SANTA CLARA, Calif. - (BUSINESS WIRE) - The attorney responsible for helping global search-engine company Google navigate some of the world's most cutting-edge legal issues...

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*Apple CEO apologizes in letter | View Clip
4/2/2013
ChinaDaily USA

Apple Inc has issued a letter signed by CEO Tim Cook apologizing to Chinese consumers and announcing changes to several product-warranty terms in the wake of criticism from Chinese authorities, media and the public in recent weeks.
In the letter, posted to Apple's Chinese-language website on Monday, Cook said he wanted to express "sincere apologies" for any misunderstandings caused by poor communication from the Cupertino, California, electronics company to customers in its second-biggest market.
"We are aware that because of a lack of communication, some parties have seen Apple as arrogant or inattentive, or that it doesn't care or attach enough importance to consumer feedback," he wrote in the letter. "We express our sincere apologies for any concerns or misunderstandings this gave consumers."
The company's public-relations problem hit its peak on March 15, which is World Right Day, when China Central Television reported that some of Apple's consumer policies discriminated against customers in China.
CCTV interviewed several people who complained that while Apple would replace a damaged iPhone for a qualified consumer in the United States or another country, Chinese customers had to use the back cover from their old iPhone or buy a new cover. Other people said Apple offered only one-year warranties on the mainboard of its MacBook Air notebooks, even though Chinese consumer laws require computer makers to provide two-year protection for such components.
A day after the program aired, Apple issued a statement saying it was committed to providing world-class products and services without directly addressing the Chinese accusations.
The following week, on March 23, the company put out a second statement. It said there was no major difference between Apple's policies in China and other parts of the world and that Chinese consumers enjoy the highest standard of service, like Apple customers everywhere.
Critics, however, found the second statement self-serving.
The People's Daily, the largest daily newspaper in China, published editorials and reports for several days afterward that, among other things, accused Apple of being "arrogant" in failing to respond to Chinese consumers. Xinhua News Agency carried similarly critical stories and commentary.
Last week, two Chinese government agencies tasked with protecting consumers' rights and industrial standards urged the US tech giant to revise its warranty policies to conform to Chinese law. The agencies also told local subordinate bodies nationwide to increase scrutiny of Apple products and consumer practices.
According to the company's latest statement, Apple then reviewed feedback regarding its service and warranty policies, consulted relevant government agencies about laws and rules, reviewed its communication procedures and worked to "streamline" customer-feedback processes with its authorized service providers in China. Cook also said the company would further train its authorized resellers on Apple's warranty policies and clearly post these online.
Anna Han, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law in California, said many multinationals that enter China don't succeed because they try to copy practices from their home market, which can leave them in breach of domestic laws.
"However, in the case of Apple, there seems to have been more of a public-relations issue, where the warranties were slightly different in China from its US warranties," she said.
Although Apple has the vast majority of its products made in China, it's likely that growth in that market has outpaced the company's ability "to put in place the necessary customer-service infrastructure", said Jason Dedrick, who teaches in Syracuse University's School of Information Studies.
In the US, Apple operates a nationwide network of retail stores to provide service to customer concerns. But China has only a few Apple stores, and third-party vendors render most customer service.
Multinational companies, Dedrick said, often face difficulties in adjusting to, and complying with, local regulations and customs. In a market as huge as Apple's is in China, the risk from compliance lapses can be significant.
"One lesson is that it often is better to go slower and build the necessary relationships, infrastructure and understanding of a new market before going all-out to build market share," he said.
China is Apple's second-biggest market, after the US. The company's Chinese sales last year totaled $23.8 billion, which was 15 percent of total worldwide revenue.
Citigroup Inc analyst Glen Yeung said that if the negative publicity led to a reduction of half of Apple's market share in China, as happened to US-based Hewlett-Packard Co after a recall of notebook computers in 2010, the cost to Apple could be as high as $13.1 billion.
Apple's stocks closed on Monday at $428.91, down 3 percent.
Most analysts expect any damage Apple suffers in China will be minor.
Van Baker, research vice-president of mobility with US technology consulting firm Gartner Inc, said that if Apple "adequately" addresses consumer complaints in China, the impact should be minimal, given CEO Cook's letter of apology and promises of revised practices.
Contact the writers at yuwei12@chinadailyusa.com and liubaijia@chinadailyusa.com

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Google Chief Legal Officer to Speak at Santa Clara University School of Law Commencement May 25 | View Clip
4/2/2013
Pymnts.com

The attorney responsible for helping global search-engine company Google navigate some of the world's most cutting-edge legal issues will be the commencement speaker for Santa Clara University School of Law May 25. David Drummond, a 1985 undergraduate alumnus of Santa Clara University, will be the honored speaker at SCU Law's commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 25 at 9:30 a.m. in the Mission Gardens....

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Netflix case leads to SEC ruling that companies may use Twitter or Facebook to share financial information | View Clip
4/2/2013
Santa Cruz Sentinel - Online

...been uncertainty about the rules. The SEC had already ruled in 2008 that companies could share information on their corporate websites or official blogs. The agency on Tuesday characterized the Netflix decision as an extension of its earlier ruling. But Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the new finding recognizes social media as an important source of information, especially for small investors who may not be able to attend financial "road show" meetings or conference...

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Netflix case leads to SEC ruling that companies may use Twitter or Facebook to share financial information | View Clip
4/2/2013
Willits News - Online

...been uncertainty about the rules. The SEC had already ruled in 2008 that companies could share information on their corporate websites or official blogs. The agency on Tuesday characterized the Netflix decision as an extension of its earlier ruling. But Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the new finding recognizes social media as an important source of information, especially for small investors who may not be able to attend financial "road show" meetings or conference...

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SEC Approves Using Facebook, Twitter for Company Disclosures
4/2/2013
Financial Planning

U.S. companies will now be able to post their earnings on Twitter or update their status on Facebook as long as investors have been told in advance where to look.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission issued guidance yesterday permitting companies to use social media sites including Facebook Inc. and Twitter Inc. to communicate company announcements. The guidance came as part of a report detailing its investigation into Netflix Inc. Chief Executive Officer Reed Hastings, who in July posted monthly viewership results on his Facebook page rather than in an SEC filing or news release.

The SEC refrained from bringing an enforcement action against Hastings or Netflix, which runs a subscription service for watching television programs and movies, because rules around using social media for company disclosures had been unclear, the agency said.

"Most social media are perfectly suitable methods for communicating with investors, but not if the access is restricted or if investors don't know that's where they need to turn to get the latest news," George Canellos, acting director of the SEC's enforcement division, said in a statement.

The SEC confirmed that a regulation prohibiting companies from disclosing material information to select investors applies to social media and other emerging means of communication the same way it applies to company websites. Company communications made through social media channels could constitute a violation of the fair disclosure rule known as Regulation FD if investors had not been told in advance where the information would be posted, the SEC said.

'A Good Thing'

Social media "has tremendous potential to level the playing field for participants in the markets," said Stephen Diamond, a securities law professor at Santa Clara University's School of Law. The report "shows a commission that's being flexible and responsive, and it shows a government agency that actually thinks innovation is a good thing."

Jim Prosser, a spokesman for San Francisco-based Twitter, declined to comment.

"We welcome, and certainly agree with, the SEC's finding that Facebook is an established means for companies and individuals to share and disseminate information broadly," Menlo Park, California-based Facebook said in a statement.

While the agency didn't explain exactly how a company should inform investors about social media use, the new guidance will give companies greater comfort in communicating with investors via Facebook and Twitter, said David Katz, a partner at law firm Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz.

"Do I see it as a sea change? No," Katz said in a telephone interview. "But investor relations has moved into the 21st century and the SEC has caught up."

Facebook Post

Hastings stirred controversy over SEC disclosure guidelines when he wrote in a July 3 post on Facebook's website that viewing on Netflix's video-streaming service had "exceeded 1 billion hours for the first time" in June. The incident led to calls for the SEC to broaden its rules to allow social media to be used to communicate to investors.

In December, Hastings and Netflix each received a Wells Notice, indicating SEC staff intended to pursue enforcement action in the matter. That same month, Hastings said that posting to his Facebook contingent of 200,000 followers "is very public."

Netflix said it welcomed the SEC's guidance. "We appreciate the SEC's careful consideration and resolution of this matter," spokesman Joris Evers said in a statement.

Gene Goldman, a partner at law firm McDermott Will & Emery LLP, said the report provides companies a road map for staying out of trouble.

"But the next time material information is disclosed on an executive's Facebook page without the company alerting all shareholders to look there for information, the matter will likely be met with an SEC lawsuit instead of a report," Goldman said.

Copyright © 2013 Financial Planning. All rights Reserved.

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Tax preparer fraud has victims facing big debts
4/2/2013
Los Angeles Times

Wire

For Oscar Sotelo, tax season was a gold mine for two years running. He found a man who prepared taxes in California's Central Valley, promised big refunds -- and delivered.

Then the Internal Revenue Service letters started coming. Sotelo was never supposed to get that money; now, the IRS wanted it back.

The agency says Sotelo was the victim in 2009 and 2010 of tax preparer fraud, a widespread scam that can leave innocent taxpayers with a mountain of debt and put them in the cross hairs of the IRS. In this type of fraud, a tax preparer creates big refunds by lying on the tax return, giving both the preparer and taxpayer a nice payday.

But when the IRS comes knocking, it's the taxpayer who's on the hook.

"There's this huge refund that goes out the door that the taxpayer is clearly not entitled to, but they don't know that," said Caroline Chen, assistant clinical professor of law and director of the Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic at Santa Clara University. "They find out later, after the money, of course, is spent."

The cumbersome tax code, insufficient regulations and understaffed enforcement agencies have helped create a breeding ground for tax preparer fraud, experts said. Each year, illegally practicing tax preparers strike, leaving their victims, frequently low-income and immigrant taxpayers, in financial ruin.

"There's a lot of people who prepare tax returns who are not qualified," said Special Agent Arlette Lee of IRS Criminal Investigations for Northern California. "Tax return preparers may be doing this, and the taxpayer has no idea."

The fraud happens in a few different ways. In some cases, the preparer lies on the tax return, fabricating deductions such as charitable contributions, property taxes and business expenses. The taxpayer often doesn't know the preparer is lying on the return or is tricked. The fictitious deductions inflate the amount of the refund, and the preparer demands a generous percentage -- a billing system the IRS says is illegal.

"These preparers get paid and then they disappear," said David Freeman, a third-year law student at Santa Clara University who helps at the tax clinic. "And then the clients show up a couple years later to us."

Tax refunds are paid automatically and immediately, and the IRS has up to three years after the refund to audit, Chen said.

Sotelo, a truck driver and father of four from Livingston, Calif., already had several notices from the IRS by the time he went to the university's tax clinic last year. His preparer, Sarad Chand, who operated S. Chand Tax & Accounting Service in Ripon, Calif., had told him to ignore the letters, Sotelo said.

"I felt bad in the beginning. I had to pay so much money," Sotelo said in Spanish. "I didn't understand why."

Chand was charged in December with 10 counts of falsifying tax returns as part of a multimillion-dollar fraud scheme. He pleaded not guilty and was released on a $100,000 bond. His clients have to pay thousands of dollars back to the IRS.

"They are ultimately responsible for the information listed on the tax return -- no matter if it is right, wrong or even fraudulent," said Gigi Campo, spokeswoman for the California Tax Education Council, a nonprofit created by the state Legislature to oversee tax preparer education and compliance. "The damage those tax preparers committed on the tax return is still the consumer's problem to deal with."

Randy Warshawsky, an IRS-enrolled tax agent at the Tax Man in San Jose, said taxpayers need do their homework to find a reputable preparer.

"It's your responsibility to sign the tax return and to make sure what's being reported is correct," he said.

--

Somerville writes for the San Jose Mercury News/ McClatchy.

Copyright (c) 2013 Los Angeles Times

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SEC Approves Using Facebook, Twitter for Company Disclosures | View Clip
4/2/2013
Bloomberg Businessweek - Online

...had not been told in advance where the information would be posted, the SEC said. ‘A Good Thing' Social media “has tremendous potential to level the playing field for participants in the markets,” said Stephen Diamond, a securities law professor at Santa Clara University's School of Law. The report “shows a commission that's being flexible and responsive, and it shows a government agency that actually thinks innovation is a good thing.” Jim Prosser, a spokesman for San Francisco-based...

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Ro Khanna Announces Congress Challenge To Rep. Mike Honda | View Clip
4/2/2013
Huffington Post, The

...Obama administration himself as deputy assistant secretary of commerce from 2009 to 2011 and as an appointee to the White House Business Council, has roots in the tech industry that dominates Silicon Valley. A professor of economics at Stanford and law at Santa Clara University, Khanna said his time with the tech industry helps him know what will help the area to grow. In addition to his own experience and the connections of some of his campaign staffers, Khanna released a book in July 2012...

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SEC Approves Using Facebook, Twitter for Company Disclosures | View Clip
4/3/2013
Bank Investment Consultant - Online

...Good Thing? Schapiro Joins Consulting Firm Social Media, Risk Weigh Heavily on ICBA Conference Social media ?has tremendous potential to level the playing field for participants in the markets,? said Stephen Diamond, a securities law professor at Santa Clara University?s School of Law. The report ?shows a commission that?s being flexible and responsive, and it shows a government agency that actually thinks innovation is a good thing.? Jim Prosser, a spokesman for San Francisco-based...

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Other brands in the fray | View Clip
4/3/2013
Orange County Register - Online

...approach to Apple, perhaps in part to help Chinese companies that could compete more closely with Apple over time, like ZTE. While past attacks on Western companies have been related to food and drug safety issues, Anna Han, an associate professor of law at Santa Clara University, said the Apple warranty issues were relatively minor.

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SEC Gives Go-Ahead to Disclosures Via Social Media | View Clip
4/3/2013
Treasury & Risk

...Regulation FD if investors had not been told in advance where the information would be posted, the SEC said. Social media “has tremendous potential to level the playing field for participants in the markets,” said Stephen Diamond, a securities law professor at Santa Clara University's School of Law. The report “shows a commission that's being flexible and responsive, and it shows a government agency that actually thinks innovation is a good thing.” Jim Prosser, a spokesman for San Francisco-based...

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Mornings on 2
4/3/2013
Mornings On 2 - KTVU-TV

>>> Lodge-time south bay congressman mike hon ta is getting competition. R o khanna announced he plans to challenge hon ta for the seat in 2014. The district includes parts of from mann -- fremont, san jose, sunnyvale and cupertino. >> But I bring a different perspective on issues of silicon valley and the economy. I have different ideas how we will attract small/medium-sized businesses. >> Khanna teaches at the santa clara university of law and also at stanford. On monday, honda posted a website saying he's looking forward to the strongest campaign yet in 2014. >>> We're getting some local reaction to the nra's proposal that would arm at least one adult in every school. Former police officer troy coleman runs a security emergency response training center in san jose. He says teachers should be armed and he's prepared to train them in the proper ways to own and handle a gun. School administrators disagree and say the teacher's first priority is to remain locked down with students. >>> Dozens of educators in georgia who have been indicted in a cheating scandal turned themselves in. This is video of the principals, teachers and testing coordinators making their way to a jail in atlanta to face charges. A state investigation was launched after an unexplained surge in test scores in some atlanta schools. According to investigators, the teacher held answer-changing parties where they erased wrong answers on students' tests and put in the right answers. >>> Police say 19-year-old jacob valaviazo was shot on 24th and bryant after mistaken for a gang member. He was home on spring break visiting his parents. He was visiting lewis and clark college in portland.

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SEC Approves Using Facebook, Twitter for Company Disclosures | View Clip
4/3/2013
On Wall Street - Online

...?A Good Thing? Schapiro Joins Consulting Firm SEC Zeros In on Potential Conflicts of Interest Social media ?has tremendous potential to level the playing field for participants in the markets,? said Stephen Diamond, a securities law professor at Santa Clara University?s School of Law. The report ?shows a commission that?s being flexible and responsive, and it shows a government agency that actually thinks innovation is a good thing.? Jim Prosser, a spokesman for San Francisco-based...

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Coming to your Twitter and Facebook feeds soon: company news | View Clip
4/3/2013
Financial Post - Online

...had not been told in advance where the information would be posted, the SEC said. ‘A Good Thing' Social media “has tremendous potential to level the playing field for participants in the markets,” said Stephen Diamond, a securities law professor at Santa Clara University's School of Law. The report “shows a commission that's being flexible and responsive, and it shows a government agency that actually thinks innovation is a good thing.” Jim Prosser, a spokesman for San Francisco-based...

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Young Democrat challenges veteran lawmaker Honda | View Clip
4/3/2013
KTVU-TV - Online

...edge of the Bay and includes parts of Fremont, San Jose, Sunnyvale and Cupertino. 26-years-old Ro Khanna is a former lawyer in the Commerce Department who recently announced his plan to run for Honda's seat with an online message. Khanna teaches at the Santa Clara University School of law and at Stanford. "I understand the skill set required for young people to be competitive in the 21st century, whether that's vocational education, robotics, tech skills," said Khanna. Even with about...

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Netflix Case Leads to SEC Social Media Ruling | View Clip
4/3/2013
HispanicBusiness.com

...been uncertainty about the rules. The SEC had already ruled in 2008 that companies could share information on their corporate websites or official blogs. The agency on Tuesday characterized the Netflix decision as an extension of its earlier ruling. But Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the new finding recognizes social media as an important source of information, especially for small investors who may not be able to attend financial "road show" meetings or conference...

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Netflix case leads to SEC ruling that companies may use Twitter or Facebook to share financial information [San Jose Mercury News] | View Clip
4/3/2013
Bloomberg Businessweek - Online

...been uncertainty about the rules. The SEC had already ruled in 2008 that companies could share information on their corporate websites or official blogs. The agency on Tuesday characterized the Netflix decision as an extension of its earlier ruling. But Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the new finding recognizes social media as an important source of information, especially for small investors who may not be able to attend financial "road show" meetings or conference...

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Netflix case leads to SEC ruling that companies may use Twitter or Facebook to share financial information | View Clip
4/3/2013
Contra Costa Times - Online

...been uncertainty about the rules. The SEC had already ruled in 2008 that companies could share information on their corporate websites or official blogs. The agency on Tuesday characterized the Netflix decision as an extension of its earlier ruling. But Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman said the new finding recognizes social media as an important source of information, especially for small investors who may not be able to attend financial "road show" meetings or conference...

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The New Way Scammers May Be Targeting You! | View Clip
4/3/2013
Midlandsbiz.com

...that several legal blogs (including that of the South Carolina Bar Association) have warned about these types of scams. Patent trolls sometimes follow through with lawsuits, although they often just want to scare businesses into settling outside of court. Santa Clara University School of Law professor Colleen Chien surveyed 79 startups who received patent demand letters: 18% settled, 22% did nothing, and 35% fought the allegations inside or outside of court. Those who settled paid an average...

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SEC: Firms can use Facebook, Twitter for disclosures | View Clip
4/3/2013
News Journal - Online

...Regulation FD if investors had not been told in advance where the information would be posted, the SEC said. Social media “has tremendous potential to level the playing field for participants in the markets,” said Stephen Diamond, a securities law professor at Santa Clara University’s School of Law. The report “shows a commission that’s being flexible and responsive, and it shows a government agency that actually thinks innovation is a good thing.” Some investor advocates are less sanguine about...

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*Hints of narrow same-sex marriage ruling Clues indicate inclination to strike DOMA benefits ban, split on Prop. 8 | View Clip
4/9/2013
San Francisco Chronicle

The U.S. Supreme Court seems prepared to order the federal government to end its denial of benefits to legally married same-sex couples, including 18,000 in California. There were also hints last week of a narrow ruling that could lead to the resumption of same-sex marriages in California for the first time since voters passed Proposition 8 in 2008.

But gay-rights advocates, buoyed by a surge in public and political support, have been hoping for more: a judicial condemnation of state-sanctioned discrimination against gays and lesbians, which could be used to challenge marriage exclusions and numerous other laws.

Advocates want the Supreme Court to follow the lead of a conservative federal appeals court judge in New York, Dennis Jacobs, whose October ruling in one of the marriage cases said any denial of equal treatment based on sexual orientation should be constitutionally suspect. That is also the position the Obama administration argued to the high court.

Yet the strongest message that seemed to emerge from the court's first-ever hearings on same-sex marriage was a determination to decide as little as possible.

As usual, the central figure was Justice Anthony Kennedy, the former Sacramento attorney who generally stands at the center of a divided court.

Kennedy was the author of the court's first ruling favoring gays and lesbians, a 1996 decision overturning Colorado's voter-approved ban on ordinances that protected them from discrimination. He said any law rooted in hatred or prejudice against such a group is unconstitutional.

Seven years later, when the court struck down state criminal laws against gay sexual conduct, Kennedy opened his majority opinion by declaring that "liberty presumes an autonomy of self that includes freedom of thought, belief, expression, and certain intimate conduct."

He made few such sweeping statements in last week's hearings.

Prop. 8 arguments

The closest he came was in Tuesday's hearing on Prop. 8, which banned same-sex marriages in California. The measure, Kennedy said, may cause harm to 40,000 children of gay and lesbian couples in the state, who want their parents to have "full recognition and full status."

But Kennedy later seemed to draw back, telling Theodore Olson, a lawyer for gay and lesbian couples, that he was asking the court "to go into uncharted waters" by advocating their right to marry. Conservative Justice Samuel Alito sounded the same theme, observing that same-sex marriage was newer than cell phones or the Internet.

Kennedy also rejected Olson's comparison of Prop. 8 with the bans on interracial marriage that the court had overturned in 1967, said a federal appeals court had used an "odd rationale" to find the California initiative unconstitutional, and questioned why the case was even before the court.

Liberal Justice Sonia Sotomayor also appeared to suggest the court had acted prematurely in taking the case, an apparent indication that she hasn't found a five-member majority to overturn Prop. 8 and would prefer to sidestep the issue.

DOMA debate clearer

It was a different story Wednesday, when five justices seemed inclined to strike down the ban on federal benefits to same-sex spouses in the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act. But Kennedy, the likely fifth vote, did not criticize DOMA as discriminatory and said only that it appeared to intrude on states' historic authority to define and regulate marriage.

When the Obama administration's lawyer, Donald Verrilli, argued that gays and lesbians should receive constitutional protection from exclusionary laws because of their "history of terrible discrimination," not one liberal justice spoke up in his support.

The only response came from Chief Justice John Roberts, who invoked the power of the gay-rights lobby and said "political figures are falling all over themselves" to support the cause - evidence that no special judicial protection is needed.

"It takes a certain amount of bravery to see (marriage) as an equality issue," said Margaret Russell, a constitutional law professor at Santa Clara University and a gay-rights supporter. "My sense is that marriage is different in the minds of a lot of the justices, especially Justice Kennedy."

Kennedy's position got a different take from Douglas Kmiec, a constitutional law professor at Pepperdine University and a Republican who once supported Prop. 8 but now favors marriage rights for gays and lesbians.

Kmiec said Kennedy never got a clear answer when he pressed a lawyer defending DOMA to justify the federal government's unprecedented refusal to grant benefits to couples who are regarded as legally married by their states. That will inevitably lead the justice to conclude that the law is based on discrimination, Kmiec said, and he will return to the principles he proclaimed in his earlier gay-rights decisions.

"He can't just disavow those," Kmiec said. "It's not in his personality."

2 cases, 2 decisions

In the Prop. 8 case, by contrast, there was little evidence of a majority either to uphold the same-sex marriage ban or to strike it down.

The third option, which drew signs of support from Roberts and several liberal justices, would be to dismiss the appeal by Prop. 8's sponsors. That would be based on a conclusion that the sponsors, who stepped in when state officials declined to defend Prop. 8, lacked legal standing to appeal because their rights would not be affected if same-sex marriages resumed.

Such a ruling would reinstate the August 2010 decision by then-Chief U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker that gays and lesbians have a constitutional right to marry. It could lead to further litigation by the elected clerk of Imperial County, who opposes issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples and might have standing to appeal an adverse decision.

Question of standing

It would also raise the question of whether state officials who opposed an initiative could effectively veto it by refusing to defend it in federal court. That was the concern expressed by the California Supreme Court in a unanimous November 2011 decision that said Prop. 8's sponsors should be allowed to represent the state and its voters in court.

Some legal commentators said such fears shouldn't be overstated.

"State officials are part of the political process" and face repercussions for refusing to defend voter-approved laws, said Joan Hollinger, a law lecturer at the University of San Francisco who has closely tracked the Prop. 8 case.

Rory Little, a law professor at UC Hastings in San Francisco and a former Supreme Court clerk, noted that sponsors of ballot measures have the right to defend them in state courts, where most legal challenges arise. He said the more serious consequence of such a ruling by the nation's high court would be the further erosion of private citizens' right of access to the federal courts.

"The liberals are shooting themselves in the foot" if they vote to dismiss the Prop. 8 case for lack of standing, Little said. That doctrine, he said, "is most often used by conservatives to keep people out of court."

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Anxious? Like Wow Man, Not Me. | View Clip
3/16/2013
Campbell Patch

...development of new treatments. As a country we should ask ourselves if fear or acceptance is the way to advancement. The answer should be clear, as should our course of action. Legalize, regulate, tax, and let science flourish! Ellen Wilfley is a senior at Santa Clara University studying biochemistry. SCU sophomore Sarah Ebbott contributed editing to this story.

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Cheaper than buying: Online sites offer textbook rentals | View Clip
4/2/2013
WJAR-TV - Online

...your rental. The company does ask that you not to write in the rental, and limit your highlighting. Chegg offers standard shipping for $3.99 and free return shipping. Also check out Chegg's handy iPhone app. BookRenter was founded by Colin Barceloux, a Santa Clara University student who was fed up with paying for textbooks and started collecting discarded books and selling them online. He eventually realized that the process of buying, using, and selling a book was essentially renting it....

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Arts groups add extras to build audiences | View Clip
4/3/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...snuggled in bed," she notes. "I also am very happy that no matter where you live, as long as you have an Internet connection, you now have access to the arts." Indeed, if cost and location are no issue, a whole new generation of arts lovers may be born. Santa Clara University student Darren Keith Velasco says apps will get young people in the door. "It can introduce folks who are just curious and could possibly convert them," says Velasco, a theater fan. "I really love the idea, especially...

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Can Jesuit, Public School Models Mix? | View Clip
3/19/2013
San Jose Inside

Santa Clara University's educational mission centers around Jesuit principles. (Photo by Dvortygirl, via Wikimedia Commons) Everything since last Tuesday's election of Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio as Pope Francis has reignited my Jesuit instincts....

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Multilevel approaches put Jesuits in the thick of immigration issues | View Clip
3/19/2013
Catholic Sun - Online

...follow up with investigations and prosecution when crimes occur. The Immigrant Students National Position Paper, released in January, was co-written by legal and social research teams from Fairfield University in Connecticut, Loyola University Chicago and Santa Clara University in California. The three institutions used a Ford Foundation grant to survey administrators and students at six schools in depth and conduct a smaller online survey at all 28 U.S. Jesuit colleges and universities...

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Jesuits Stalled in China | View Clip
3/22/2013
Hoya - Online, The

...also a senior coordinator of Jesuit university networking at Georgetown and served as the interim secretary of higher education for the Jesuits. The proposal has four founding partners — Georgetown, Fordham University, the College of the Holy Cross and Santa Clara University — as well as 23 other partner colleges in countries on six continents. Former President of Holy Cross Fr. Michael McFarland, S.J., would serve as interim president of the liberal arts college during its first year. ...

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Visitation Rites - latimes.com | View Clip
3/29/2013
Los Angeles Times - Online

...director of Undergraduate Admission and Relations with Schools at UCLA . "Most colleges and university admission offices assign an admission counselor to work with students from specific high schools." Mike Sexton, vice president for enrollment management at Santa Clara University likes to stress the importance of the college road trip by quoting from a sign he once saw in a high school counseling office: "Choosing a college without visiting the campus is like marrying a blind date before you...

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Oakland's Claremont Middle School celebrates 100th anniversary
3/30/2013
Contra Costa Times

An elegant cast-iron gate -- a gracious relic from the past -- stands at the corner of Birch Court and College Avenue, across from the Trader Joe's in Rockridge -- one of the remaining original elements of the Claremont Middle School building from 1913.

Later this year, Claremont Middle School and its friends, supporters and alumni are celebrating the school's centennial. Reinstalling the iron gate, which now stands in front of a newly completed garden area, is one of their projects.

I recently spoke with two people who have played a role in reinstalling the historic gate. Annette Floystrop, a longtime Rockridge resident who lives on nearby Birch Court, is a Claremont alumna. Kris Brekke is a parent and member of the Dad's Club at Claremont. I was interested to find out how the gate was saved and how it came to be a visible symbol of the school.

A modern school was erected in the 1970s (after it was determined that it would be too expensive to bring the old school up to modern seismic standards), and Floystrop and I met for coffee across the street from the new school. Floystrop recalled how the old school building had an entry where the gate originally stood and classrooms with "windows that opened" faced the street. "We students could look out on the busy thoroughfare; we could smell the freshly mowed grass from the front strip of lawn on the breezes that came through the open windows," she said.

"I remember my English teacher, Mr. Dash, giving us a creative writing assignment -- to describe that fresh-cut grass scent," Floystrop said.

She also remembers an assembly in the old auditorium when the students got word that President John F. Kennedy had been assassinated.

Floystrop and her parents were recently arrived immigrants from Denmark in the 1950s. "I was 5 when we came. I started to learn English from my kindergarten teacher (at Peralta Elementary)." She later graduated from Oakland Tech.

I met Kris Brekke at the Main Library's History Room, where he was checking history files about Claremont. The architect was John J. Donovan (1877-1949), a nationally known expert on building schools in the 1910s and 1920s. In addition to several Oakland schools, including Oakland Tech, a city landmark, Donovan designed the campuses of Saint Mary's College and Santa Clara University.

Brekke told me that in 2009 the school received mitigation funds from the Caldecott Tunnel Fourth Bore Project, "which enabled us to bring the gate out of storage and use it as a feature in our new community garden."

More funds are needed to tackle some needed repairs to protect and weatherize the gate, he said.

The centennial celebration is scheduled for June, he said, and the parent group is hoping that people share stories and help with fundraising (donations are tax deductible).

For more on the June 1 celebration, contact Amy Vaughan, Claremont PTA president, at avaughan@stmaryscenter.org. On April 6, the Claremont Dad's Club is hosting a pancake breakfast. Go to www.claremontms.org for details.

To learn more about the Caldecott Tunnel fourth bore mitigations, go to www.rockridge.org/news/public-review-tunnel-mitigations.

Contact Annalee Allen at ldmksldy@aol.com.

Copyright © 2013 Contra Costa Times.

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'He uses simple words to convey profound content' | View Clip
4/2/2013
Tidings - Online

Written by Doris Benavides Friday, 05 April 2013 00:00 A very articulate and eloquent pastor … “a good communicator.” The description of Pope Francis is from Jesuit Father Alfonso José Gomez who, like the pope, is a former provincial of the Society of Jesus in Argentina-Uruguay. He entered the province of Argentina when then-Father (later Cardinal-Archbishop) Jorge Mario Bergoglio was the provincial (1973-79)....

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A Jesuit's view: Why Pope Francis is different, and why a Jesuit pope is rare | View Clip
4/3/2013
San Jose Mercury News - Online

...stripping down the layers of Renaissance garb that often engulfed his predecessors. He is a simple man with simple tastes. His simplicity and humility are classic attributes to which all members of his religious order, the Jesuits, aspire, but it is not a Jesuit attribute to rise in the ranks of Catholicism to bishop or cardinal - much less pope. However, there is a wisdom to the choice that is rooted in the Jesuit tradition. When Pope Francis entered the Jesuit Order, he chose a lifestyle,...

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*Papež Rambo I. ali Janez Pavel III.? | View Clip
3/12/2013
Delo

Fr. Peter Rozic, a Jesuit Post-Doctoral Fellow in Political Science published an op ed piece about the election of a new pope in the main Slovenian daily newspaper "Delo."

Naloga novega papeža je, da odpre vrata. To pomeni vstop v novo resničnost in odpiranje v nov prostor.

Danes se kardinali s ključem (»cum clave«) zapirajo v Sikstinsko kapelo. Tesno zapiranje vrat spominja na apostole, to je na najožje Jezusove sodelavce, ki se po smrti Učitelja iz strahu zaklenejo pred svetom in zunanjim vplivom. Morda so tudi kardinali preplašeni in razočarani. Pred očmi jim malodane umira Kristusovo telo – Cerkev. Najbrž jih je presenetil papežev odstop. Slišali so za vatikansko pranje denarja in prikrivanja grozljivih zločinov nad otroki. Najbrž se spominjajo afere Vatileaks. Mori jih finančni zlom škofij od Los Angelesa do Maribora. Še teološko mišičasti Benedikt XVI. ni zdržal do konca in je ponižno odstopil. Od zunaj pritiski in preganjanja po medijih, sodiščih. Od znotraj upad vere, vernikov in verodostojnosti. Cerkev umira, vstajenja pa od nikoder. Ni čudno, da se zaklepajo. Toda, bo tudi tokrat pri zaklenjenih vratih vstopil Rešenik? Le komu bo poveril nebeškega kraljestva ključ? In izvoljenec, bo odklenil vrata svetu – cum clave?

Pričakovanja javnosti

Konklave je v medijih prebudil zelo veliko zanimanje. V primerjavi z drugimi volitvami po svetu so te ene najbolj medijsko spremljanih. Od odstopa Benedikta XVI. svoj pogled vsak dan podaja ameriški The New York Times, italijanska La Repubblica in tudi slovenski časopisi. Na takšno zanimanje širše javnosti so se kardinali različno odzvali. Nekatere so novice in govorice iz italijanskih medijev globoko pretresle. Ameriški kardinali so v Vatikan pripeljali kar svoje novinarje in pripravljali tiskovne konference. Pred tednom dni je Vatikan kardinalom iz Amerike sicer zabičal medijski molk. Niso pa molčali italijanski kardinali. Kljub zaprisegi k tajnosti so nadaljevali posredovanje sočnih govoric in poročil po osebnih poznanstev z novinarji. Poznavalci trdijo, da je prav takšen način poročanja botroval škandalu Vatileaks. Kmalu po škandalu se je Benedikt XVI. odločil za odstop in službo namenil človeku boljšega zdravja, torej mlajšemu in močnejšemu.

Pričakovanja katoličanov

Odstop Benedikta XVI. ni prebudil zanimanja samo pri širši javnosti, ampak tudi pri katoličanih. Pred tednom dni so rezultati široko zasnovane raziskave med ameriškimi katoličani predstavili za kardinale kar presenetljivo sliko. Medtem ko svojim škofom skoraj ne zaupajo, svojim župnikom in redovnicam izražajo veliko podporo. Nadalje, le 19 odstotkov vprašanih katoličanov iz Amerike hoče, da bi naslednji papež nadaljeval delo Benedikta XVI. Kar 66 odstotkov bi raje izbralo mlajšega papeža. Isti odstotek bi papežu svetoval, naj duhovnikom dovoli poroko. Tri četrtine vprašanih meni, da papežev odstop pomeni nekaj dobrega. Vendar njegov korak prinaša določene posledice, ki presegajo težko pričakovano izvolitev papeža ali mnenja Američanov. Novi papež se bo kaj kmalu znašel pod pritiskom in pričakovanji različnih skupin. Gotovo bo pozvan k odstopu, če dela ne bo opravljal tako, kot bi si vplivne skupine ali posamezniki želeli.

Cerkev na razpotju

Poleg pritiskov in pričakovanj bo novega papeža kmalu pričakala številčno oslabljena Cerkev. V svetovnem merilu se, na primer, mladi Cerkvi pridružujejo redkeje kot v preteklosti. Mnogi Cerkev zapustijo. Še bolj kot mladi pa Cerkev zapuščajo ženske. Zadnji podatki o tem vsesvetovnem eksodusu postavljajo zelo pomembno vprašanje kontinuitete. Kako naj se vera prenaša na mlajše rodove brez žensk, če so do zdaj za to v glavnem skrbele žene, matere in babice? Ob takšnih trendih bo Cerkev v nekaj desetletjih implodirala. Ali pa se ji bo zgodila nova reformacija. Naj torej novi papež zajezi izstope z odloki, kakršna sta žensko duhovništvo in škofovstvo? Konservativna struja bi takoj skočila pokonci in zahtevala papežev odstop. Naj se torej Cerkev obda z nepremagljivim obzidjem? V takšno trdnjavo bo vstopov malo, izstopov pa zaradi izolacije še več. Storiti nič na ladji, ki jo viharji napolnjujejo z vodo, bi krizo poglobilo. Nadalje se je ob škandalih ustvarila zahteva o papežu, ki naj bo neomadeževan in brez napak. Toda če je nedolžnost edino merilo za kakovost, potem se kaj lahko zgodi, da bo krmilo Cerkve prevzel človek s pomanjkljivimi izkušnjami. Le kako bo neizkušen skrbel za edinost tako raznovrstne skupnosti? Spet nekateri želijo, naj bo novi papež uspešen direktor največjega svetovnega podjetja. Toda za druge bistvo petrinske službe ni v vladanju in menedžmentu, ampak v služenju. Poleg tega bi novi papež moral tekoče govoriti italijansko in biti dobro podkovan v teologiji. Naj bi bil mož molitve in telesno čil. Seveda ne premlad in ne prestar.

Novi stari Pastir?

Vsaka skupnost se distancira od tega, o čemer meni, da ji škodi. Vendar če je Cerkev v svojem bistvu znamenje upanja, potem odpira vrata vsem. Njen ustanovitelj »ni prišel klicat pravičnih, ampak grešne«. Ključno vprašanje je: Bo novi vrhovni pastir Cerkve vključujoč ali izključujoč? Za odgovor poglejmo k primerom zadnjih papežev. Morda bo novi papež kot Janez Pavel II. Ta je bil karizmatični papež, ki je želel nadaljevati delo svojih predhodnikov Janeza XXIII. in Pavla VI. ter vero ponesti na vse konce sveta. Ali pa bo novi papež podoben Janezu XXIII., ki je s klicem po prenovi pripomogel k »podanašnjenju« Cerkve. Ali pa bo raje poudarjal brezčasno lepoto in pravila krščanskega verovanja in delovanja – kot Benedikt XVI. Ta je tudi spet uvedel določene ceremonialne okraske (npr. rdeči čevlji), ki jih od časa papeža Pavla VI. – še enega prenovitelja – skoraj nismo več opazili. Poziv Janeza XXIII. in Pavla VI. k prenovi je bil poln upanja – in ne togega strahu. Prevevala ju je želja, naj Cerkev odpre okna in se nadiha svežega zraka. Tudi današnja Cerkev potrebuje osvobajanje. Toda naloga novega papeža je zdaj morda ta, da odpre tudi vrata. Odpiranje vrat pomeni vstop v novo resničnost in odpiranje v nov prostor. Ključe za osvoboditev bo novi papež imel. Toda ali bo imel voljo in moč odpreti?

Zdaj nam bo najbrž ostalo še neznano, kdo bo novi papež. Zakrožila so sicer nekatera imena, a stara modrost pravi, da je o imenih bolje ne govoriti. So pa kardinali volivci že namignili, da hočejo človeka, ki je sposoben dobro komunicirati in odločno voditi. Poudarjanje teh lastnosti pomeni nekakšno priznanje pomanjkljivosti Benedikta XVI. Za časa njegovega vodstva je Cerkev še naprej izgubljala vpliv v Evropi, ZDA in Latinski Ameriki. Rimska kurija je postala bolj neučinkovita in škandalozna. Zato je kardinal Egan, ki tokrat ne voli, a je glasoval na prejšnjem konklavu, omenil, da bo prva naloga novega papeža »narediti velik red v centralni administraciji kurije [in] da mora [to] biti človek, ki vero razume ter jo zanimivo in preprosto posreduje«. Kardinal Wuerl je k temu pripomnil, naj bo papež človek pastoralne izkušnje vodenja škofije, ne le dela v kuriji.« Drugi kardinali so dodali sposobnost, da se papež z neredom v Vatikanu lahko spopade kot neustrašen šerif. Kardinali torej hočejo nekoga, ki bo imel karizmo in žar Janeza Pavla II. Nekoga, ki bo pritegnil. Hočejo pa tudi nekoga, ki bo kot udaren prenovitelj vztrajen. Bo novi papež Janez Pavel III.? Ali pa po govoricah iz Vatikana raje kar Rambo I.?

Bog ve. Danes bodo o tem za zaklenjenimi vrati Sikstinske kapele začeli odločati princi Cerkve. Toda na vratih konklava že stoji nekdo in trka. Rešenik? Otrok? Ženska? Morda bodo princi prisluhnili. In ko se bo pokadil beli dim, bo mogoče novoizvoljeni na stežaj odprl vrata in stopil med ljudi? Bog ve.

––––––

Prispevek je mnenje avtorja in ne izraža uradnega stališča Rimskokatoliške cerkve ali stališča uredništva.

p. Peter Rožič je jezuit, politolog na Univerzi Santa Clara v Kaliforniji.

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Researcher breaks Pi calculation record with the help of NVIDIA-> | View Clip
3/16/2013
Slashdot

narcoleptic5052 writes "Yesterday's self-congratulatory pat on the back to anyone reciting Pi to ten digits might feel a bit inadequate compared to Santa Clara University's Ed Karrels. The researcher has broken the record for calculating Darren Aronofsky's favorite number, taking the ratio to eight quadrillion places right of the decimal."

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NBC Bay Area News Special: The Interview
3/16/2013
KNTV-TV

threats to our forces, threats to our embassies, threats to our locations. All the things that terrorists in our nation's enemies are up to. When you get through with one of those sessions, I have to tell you, you really take a deep gulp and ask yourself which one of these many, many threats is going to turn out to be real? >> With that said, was it that much more difficult, what happened in benghazi and the criticism you received in. >> In the big picture, I can't tell you how many threats we dealt with that we effectively dealt with that don't make news. Yet, you know, the fact is, we are responsible for making sure that everything works and that particularly our U.S. citizens and our american ambassadors are protected. And when that happened, there's no question that we had to learn some important lessons in order to make sure it never happens again. >> As he unpacks a lifetime of memories, he has no desire to fix washington, he wants to replace it. Inside his unassuming panetta institute. >> I can't think of a moment in history where it's more important to inspire people to get involved in public life. We need to have new blood that is dedicated to governing this country. >> It was a fascinating interview. He added, don't be surprise if you see him at santa clara university teaching. He made a bet over a $10,000 bottle of wine over bin laden. We'll have that later in the show. From panetta to powell. Colin powell works on sand hill road at the venture capital firm. His old life keeps him in the headlines, even if it's controversial. The former secretary of state spoke us to candidly about a checkered past in american history. As he walked through the news room, you wouldn't know it, but old wounds, especially for a military man die hard. >> Saddam hussein and his regime are concealing effortings to produce more weapons of mass production. >> His now infamous speech to the united nations which he outlined the united states plan to attack iraq, an outline based on false information. Now, through speeches and a new book, powell is rewriting a controversial chapter in history. >> It was one of my most moe men tus failures. >> How are you misled? >> I don't like the word misled. We don't think we were misled. We had bad information. We had wrong analysis. It isn't as if I was misled by people who, you know, thought they were miss leading me. Some people should have known some of the information was bad and didn't pull on our chains and say wait a minute, stop. Some of those folks wrote books saying we do. Maybe you do but you didn't tell me or the president or general frank or the joint chiefs of staff. We all went into this conflict with the belief. We didn't have hard evidence, it was a case there was weapons of mass destruction on the ground in iraq. >> Built an empire based on food. Celebrity chef tyler -- when you describe yourself, are you a tv guide, a chef, which one?

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Local view: In choosing name, pope stands apart
3/18/2013
Duluth News Tribune, The

Wow! As a former Jesuit seminarian (1979-1987), I was stunned to learn the cardinal-electors in the Roman Catholic Church elected a Jesuit from Argentina to be the new pope.

Wow! As a former Jesuit seminarian (1979-1987), I was stunned to learn the cardinal-electors in the Roman Catholic Church elected a Jesuit from Argentina to be the new pope.

He's the first pope from Latin America, where Jesuit missionaries ran famous missions, commemorated in the 1986 movie, “The Mission.”

He's the first Jesuit to be elected pope. The early Jesuits included certain larger-than-life missionaries who were sent to faraway places such as China (Matteo Ricci), India (Francis Xavier), North America (the North American martyrs), and Latin America.

And he's the first pope to take the name Francis, in honor of Italy's most widely known saint, Francis of Assisi.

Yes, San Francisco is named after Francis of Assisi, and the nearby Santa Clara University, the Jesuit university in Santa Clara Valley (also known as Silicon Valley), is named after Clare of Assisi. Franciscan missionaries were at one time quite active in California.

Francis of Assisi also is commemorated in garden statues that are sold in stores in Duluth that have no obvious connection with the Catholic Church. As the story goes, Francis did at times talk with birds and animals. The 1995 Walt Disney movie “Pocahontas” is filled with spirited songs about nature mysticism. Even though the movie is a highly stylized rendition of American Indian spirituality, serious scholars who have studied American Indian spirituality have characterized it as being infused with the sense of the interconnection of cosmology and community.

Francis of Assisi expressed this kind of spirit in the lovely song he composed, the “Canticle of Brother Sun.” As the title suggests, Francis felt he had a relationship to brother sun, a sense of the inter-being of cosmology and community. Because he expanded this theme to other natural objects, the canticle can be described as a song about nature mysticism.

But it is not entirely clear just how well Pope Francis understands this aspect of his namesake's life and thought. Nevertheless, we might hope the pope's name helps make Francis' canticle more widely known because it surely deserves to be more widely known. It's a gem.

Francis of Assisi is probably most widely known for embracing poverty, which is probably why Pope Francis chose to honor him by taking his name. The fact the new pope is the first pope to take the name Francis shows poverty has not been exactly a popular theme with previous popes. But it also has not been exactly popular with Jesuits, either, who are known more for their vow of obedience than their vow of poverty.

Thanks to all those garden statues of Francis of Assisi, he is probably more familiar to most Americans — Catholic and non-Catholic alike — than are the Jesuits. But Jesuits who have professed their final vows in the Jesuit order take a special fourth vow that's in addition to the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. The special fourth vow is a vow to go wherever the pope may send them. This vow is largely symbolic, because the pope usually does not get involved in sending Jesuits anywhere. In the routine business of the Jesuit order, Jesuits are sent on new assignments by their religious superiors in the order, not by the pope. Nevertheless, the symbolism of the fourth vow stands. Symbolically, Pope Francis, like every other pope before him, is the ultimate boss of every professed Jesuit around the world today.

Of course, in the normal course of the business of running the Roman Catholic Church, every Catholic bishop around the world reports periodically to the pope in a personal visit to the Vatican.

Your guess is as good as mine as to how Pope Francis will set the tone and exercise his influence. By all accounts, he is as doctrinally conservative as all other Catholic cardinals and bishops. But his tone and style of leadership could be important. Even though he is of Italian descent, I still find it hopeful that he has honored Francis of Assisi by taking the name Pope Francis.

Thomas J. Farrell is professor emeritus in writing studies at the University of Minnesota Duluth.

Copyright © 2013 Duluth News Tribune

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Majority of congressman educated at Catholic universities are pro-abortion: reform needed | View Clip
3/19/2013
LifeSiteNews

...crime to harm a fetus during another crime. Nancy Pelosi (CA-12) graduated from Trinity College in Washington, D.C., in 1962. The president of NARAL referred to Pelosi as a “pro-choice champion.” Zoe Lofgren (CA-19) graduated from the University of Santa Clara School of Law in 1975. Ranked 100 percent by NARAL, Rep. Lofgren reportedly voted against the ban on partial-birth abortion. Sam Farr (CA-20) graduated from Willamette University in Salem, Oregon, and attended the Monterey Institute...

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Chorale Concert Strikes a Patriotic Chord By Diane Andrews | View Clip
3/20/2013
Santa Clara Weekly - Online, The

...performances offered a choice of times and venues to the more than 450 attendees. The March 10 afternoon concert took place at the First Baptist Church of Palo Alto. The March 15 evening concert was presented at historic Mission Santa Clara on the campus of Santa Clara University (SCU). The non-profit Santa Clara Chorale, comprised of about 70 voices, will close its formal season with one performance only of Handel's "Messiah," May 4, 8 p.m., at Mission Santa Clara. The finale, accompanied...

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North Coast Catholics welcome choice of pope | View Clip
3/20/2013
Press Democrat - Online

...finest saints you could role model after." Pope Francis' status as a Jesuit priest resonated with a large number of Catholics. "The Jesuits have a history of speaking honestly about what needs to be done," said Rutherford, who attended the Jesuit-led Santa Clara University. "They're deeply involved in education and missions." Newman senior Matt Phelps agreed. "I'm a big fan of the Jesuits," said Phelps, 17. "The Jesuits have a lot of new ideas and I think (they) can really involve younger...

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Hemisphere and the first Jesuit Pope marks a significant
3/20/2013
KLIV-AM (Silicon Valley News)

involved in four presidential and three gubernatorial campaigns near his take on the current state of California politics Wednesday night at 7 yard field IV if you missed it you can download the podcast agility.com deal of the time used now 12 or more power to take a look at all but more local news for you and the war of trouble for a museum or something quilts and textiles museum may be fine and corporate respirators e-mail message to supporters warning of the downtown gallery cooked clothes would raise $80,000 by the end of the month museums doesn't already taken steps to stitch its finances together including cuts in staff and exhibit hours and 20% reduction in the souring of its executive director HP Pavilion Ian sample sales for NCAA men's college basketball tournament for the second time in forty two unlikely ten Bay Area fans will get a chance . around to see a local team with the calderas that wanting tomorrow's schedule in June . go told anyone the ability in treatment . with the Golden bear him out of an Orthodox and well in life . is it which is a traditional powerhouse at the traditionally strong fall conference is always late for further a field so throwing UNLV and throw in the Ophelia . you give makes her very strong field know the school you stand amid what tools would William sessions tomorrow with women's plane home � the world looking at this week the local Catholic reaction to the election of a new Pope Cardinal boarded them of your portrait taken at the Francis this afternoon Jason Benner concludes our series Congresswoman Anna Eshoo of Palo Alto was part of the official congressional delegation attending Pope Francis is investiture she says the selection of the first pope in the Western Hemisphere and the first Jesuit Pope marks a significant turning point for the Catholic Church with enormous meaning I think around the world are hopeful that this is ushering in a new era she says Francis has a lot of issues to face I pray for healthy changes in the church and we always pray for the pope for the obvious reason he has all the blessings that second follow him but he also now will carry the burdens of a billion Catholics and more the challenges that the church faces around the world the twenty first century in the US the clerical child molestation scandal is gone most attention that Santa Clara University religious studies professor Sally Van Stram

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Bay Area Catholics hope Pope Francis can change the church | View Clip
3/20/2013
Baltimore Sun - Online

...American Catholics supported Benedict's conservative views, many in the Bay Area are hoping the new pope will bring an open mind to social issues such as the role of women and contraception. But Thomas Cattoi, a professor of Christology and Cultures at Santa Clara University, notes that Bergoglio adamantly has opposed same-sex marriage and likely will not be the agent of sweeping doctrine change. "People are going to be very disappointed if they are expecting him to turn the church around...

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NBC4 News at 11 pm
3/20/2013
Channel 4 News at 11 PM - KNBC-TV

that one house out of my mind. Yeah, but what about the modern one? The my new home app from chase keeps your entire home buying experience at your finger tips. We did both like the colonial. Carry and compare pictures of your favorite houses, calculate monthly payments with a competitive rate, and contact your chase mortgage banker at any time for help along the way. Get the my new home app today, and get moving with chase. >> I'm out with fritz and fred and chuck. It's not every day that you see a person with brains and beauty. That's what I see out there. >> The college rank the nation hottest. There's hottest and smartest. You put them together and here's what you get. Eight california sdools landed in the top 25. Cal poly, san luis obispo was number 25. Uc santa barbara, number 24. And look at this, sc beats ucla, at least in this category. 19th and 14th respectively. >> Yeah. Viola university number 1. Santa clara university number nine. Stanford, number eight. Pacific union college came in second, and the number one hottest and smartest school in the country? Byu. Brigham young university in utah. >> That's where our bos went to school. >> Somebody I know did a little time there as well. >> All right. >> Time, huh? >> Something happened in anaheim.

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Why are Republicans against health care? (Opinion)... | View Clip
3/22/2013
AllVoices

...corporations currently controlling the system. "In Alameda County, a private hospital turned away a woman in labor because the hospital's computer showed that she didn't have insurance. Hours later, her baby was born dead in a county hospital," according to a Santa Clara University report . There were other horror stories of death from health care rationing noted in the report, each detailing an equally barbaric picture. Other counties with far better overall health and life expectancy rates...

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NBC Bay Area News at 6
3/26/2013
NBC Bay Area News at 6 AM - KNTV-TV

>>> Breaking with 150 years of tradition, st. Mary's college will not be led by a priest. St. Mary's reached out to the graduate theological union, a group of schools in beckerly, and hired its president to be the 29th president of st. Mary's. He is the first lay leader of the catholic college replacing brother ronald gallagher. He is married with two adult children and also taught for a while at santa clara university. >>> Let's send things over to meteorologist jeff ranieri. >> A little bit of cloud cover coming our way, ladies, and also the chance of increasing showers up in the north bay. We had some of our coolest weather today. Santa rosa at 65, also san francisco at 61 and the warmest down here in the south bay was awesome. We had a decent amount of sunshine by the midday and afternoon hours. 73 in santa teresa and also 74 in gilroy. Current temperatures are beginning to cool off. Most notably at the coastline. Gradually it's filtering down into the silicon valley and cooling us off. Right now 63 in cupertino, 63 in san jose and 65 in santa teresa. Let's get you live outside of this live hd camera network, not only are you enjoying it but the cows out here in the hills enjoying it. Clear skies throughout much of the east bay tonight. Let's also bring you off here to san jose as the sun sets. An awesome view. A little bit of cloud cover we're dealing with but a lot of blue sky at the moment with another system sitting offshore. As we take you off to the north you can see in san bruno we don't have any heavy fog but we'll start to see low clouds roll back in for tonight. Another system is hitting offshore. It's pretty weak at this point. It's going to be slow moving but eventually give us another shot of some showers in the forecast. We also have a storm system for this weekend to bring us back in rainfall. As we head throughout wednesday and thursday, we're only expecting trace amounts to maybe a tenth of an inch as the system breaks apart at the coastline. As we head throughout this weekend, it's going to be a huge area of upper low pressure and a chance for scattered showers friday through sunday. Really for saturday and sunday that's the best shot of getting any rainfall with a tenth to a half inch expected there. As we head throughout wednesday's forecast, we'll have some filtered sunshine in here by the afternoon for the bay and interior valleys, mid to upper 60s and partly cloudy skies. Again, best chance of showers starting to return as we head throughout thursday's forecast at this point and any kind of showers will help the allergy forecast, which is in the moderate range at this point. You can get more on your forecast at nbcbayarea.com. I'm back with the full seven-day forecast a little later on in the show. >> Thanks, jeff.

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St. Mary's College names Berkeley's Graduate Theological Union head as new president
3/26/2013
Oakland Tribune

March 27--MORAGA -- Saint Mary's College looked around the world for the 29th president in its 150-year history and found one a few miles away -- James Donahue, the president of the Graduate Theological Union, a consortium of schools based in Berkeley.

Donahue, a theologian, will be the school's first lay leader. He was introduced to the campus at an outdoor gathering Tuesday in front of the chapel.

"I promise that I will dedicate myself with all that I have to make Saint Mary's College the finest academic institution it can possibly be," he said.

On July 1, Donahue will replace Brother Ronald Gallagher, known as Brother Ron, an Irish literature professor who has led the college since 2005.

"He seems like

a really cool guy," said Kayla Riley, a sophomore, who said the whole selection process had been "top secret," with rumors swirling about who the new leader would be. The appointment was announced during spring break, so few students heard the news in person.

The Catholic liberal arts college in Moraga is one of the oldest in California. It has 2,800 undergraduate and nearly 1,300 graduate students, and is affiliated with the De La Salle Christian Brothers, an order dedicated to teaching.

While the lay appointment is historic for the college, Catholic institutions have long been making such shifts in response to the waning number of people entering religious life. The western United States has just 85 Christian Brothers; their

average age is 68, Gallagher said.

"We kind of expected this," said Annalee Lamoreaux, a faculty member. "With (Donahue's) background, he certainly will understand the Catholic traditions of the college that are an important part of who we are. We're embracing the transition."

Donahue, who is married and has two grown children, said he would work closely with the more than 20 brothers at Saint Mary's to keep Lasallian and Catholic values at the center of his decisions.

Donahue taught theology and ethics at Georgetown and later became vice president for student affairs. He has also been on the faculty at Santa Clara University, according to Saint Mary's. He lives in El Cerrito with his wife, Jane Purinton, and has led the Graduate Theological Union since 2000.

A statement posted on the consortium's website by GTU board Chairman Harold T. Leach Jr. described the news as "bittersweet," thanked Donahue for his leadership and friendship, and said the school is developing a transition plan.

Apart from issues of faith and tradition, Donahue said it's important to make sure Saint Mary's attracts strong students and makes college affordable. He also expects to explore such questions as the role of technology and online courses at the liberal arts institution.

"Any school has to think about: How are we going to engage the future?" he said.

Follow Katy Murphy at Twitter.com/katymurphy.

___

(c)2013 The Oakland Tribune (Oakland, Calif.)

Visit The Oakland Tribune (Oakland, Calif.) at www.insidebayarea.com

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Copyright © 2013 The Oakland Tribune

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