Total Clips: 48
Headline Date Outlet Links
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Washington Post - Online Text View Clip
-- True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs a......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 USA Today - Online Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Salt Lake Tribune - Online Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 ABCNews - Online Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Press of Atlantic City Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Charlotte Observer - Online Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Wilmington Star-News Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/19/2009 Seattle Post-Intelligencer Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/19/2009 Sun News, The Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Times Leader Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Tri-City Herald Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Marin Independent Journal Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Some hope for financial aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 CNBC - Online Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Buffalo News - Online Text View Clip
- True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs an......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Daily News-Record Text View Clip
By JUSTIN POPE True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 KAAL-TV - Online Text View Clip
True, its not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, theres more good news out there on college costs and fi......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Advocate, The Text View Clip
A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound: BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Centre Daily Times Text View Clip
Web Search powered by True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out th......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 State - Online, The Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Merced Sun-Star Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Baytown Sun Text View Clip
By JUSTIN POPE True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 San Diego Union-Tribune - Online Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 WINK-TV - Online Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Telegraph - Online, The Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Breitbart.com Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 WHEC-TV - Online Text View Clip
True, its not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, theres more good news out there on college costs and fi......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Columbus Ledger-Enquirer - Online Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy 03/18/2009 Associated Press (AP) Text
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition "deals" some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) A sliver of good news for college-bound students bruised by loan crisis 03/18/2009 Chicago Tribune - Online Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) A sliver of good news for college-found students bruised by loan crisis 03/18/2009 Sun Sentinel - Online Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
(KSU Trumbull) A sliver of good news for college-found students bruised by loan crisis 03/19/2009 WHO-TV - Online Text View Clip
True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and ......
Earmark for Mormon cricket isn't pork to ranchers in Utah (Lorch) 03/18/2009 Seattle Times Text
Big bugs with bulging goggle eyes swarmed the remote Utah ranching outpost of Grouse Creek like a biblical plague. Each of the past four summers, the hungry critters known as Mormon crickets have marched by the tens of thousands over grassy hillsides, past......
KSU offers employee buyouts, raises room and board 03/18/2009 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text
Mar. 18--Kent State University trustees agreed today to offer buyout packages to longtime faculty and staff members in an effort to avoid layoffs and program cuts. The board also approved a 5.87 percent increase in room and board rates for the fall seme......
KSU offers employee buyouts, raises room and board 03/19/2009 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text View Clip
Kent State University trustees agreed today to offer buyout packages to longtime faculty and staff members in an effort to avoid layoffs and program cuts. The board also approved a 5.87 percent increase in room and board rates for the fall semester. ......
KSU offering staff buyouts Trustees also approve 6 percent room, board hike (Lefton, Mullins) 03/19/2009 Record-Courier Text View Clip
By Colin McEwen Record-Courier staff writer Faculty and staff at Kent State University with 15 or more years of service now will have the option to leave the university in a buyout deal approved Wednesday. The University Employee Separation Plan,......
KSU has strategy to trim payroll (Lefton, Fox, Laux) 03/19/2009 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text View Clip
Faculty, administrators, staff offered payments to leave state university Beacon Journal staff writer Kent State announced a plan Wednesday to trim its ranks of some faculty, staff and administrators. Full-time employees with at least 15 years of ......
(KSU Geauga) Associate's degrees may appeal in tough economy (Hoiles) 03/18/2009 News-Herald Text View Clip
With the nation's unemployment rate teetering at the highest it's been in 16 years, job security feels more important than ever. Accreditation can give employees a leg up. And time is of the essence. That's why local two-year colleges, or colleges th......
(KSU-Economy) Kent needs to battle Plusquellic's opposition to fed money for bridge 03/18/2009 Record-Courier Text View Clip
Akron Mayor Don Plusquellic's objection to using federal stimulus money to complete funding for Kent's bridge to span the Cuyahoga River at Fairchild Avenue needs to be taken seriously by those who want the project completed. The mayor has a high profil......
Financial engineering is awarded $66,000 (Holder) 03/18/2009 Record-Courier Text View Clip
Kent State University's Center for Financial Engineering announced recently it received a $66,000 grant from Market Data & Analytics, a division of Deutsche Boerse Group, to research Eurex's Historical Order Book. Eurex, one of the world's leadin......
Struggling KSU students gain reprieve 'Second chance' program aims to curb dismissals for poor 03/19/2009 Record-Courier Text View Clip
Subscription Information: Type: Home Delivery Mail Delivery Web Only Pick one (rates below) Length: 1 Month 3 Months 6 Months 1 Year The longer, the greater the savings Start Date: 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 January February March April M......
(Bahcesehir) Kent State U. backs out of deal with Istanbul university (Lefton, Saunders, Euclide) 03/18/2009 Brown University News Service Text
Kent State U., Kent, OH, Mar 18, 2009 (Daily Kent Stater/UWire via COMTEX News Network) -- When the Office of International Affairs decided it wanted to renovate Van Campen Hall, it didn't anticipate there would be so much uncertainty about the building's ......
(Bahcesehir) Kent State U. backs out of deal with Istanbul university (Lefton, Saunders, Euclide) 03/18/2009 U-WIRE Text
UWIRE-03/18/2009-Kent State U.: Kent State U. backs out of deal with Istanbul university (C) 2008 Daily Kent Stater via UWIRE By Kristine Phillips, Daily Kent Stater (Kent State U.) KENT, Ohio -- When the Office of International Affairs decided i......
(Bahceshehir) Kent State U. backs out of deal with Istanbul university (Lefton, Saunders, Euclide) 03/19/2009 Individual.com Text View Clip
When the Office of International Affairs decided it wanted to renovate Van Campen Hall, it didn't anticipate there would be so much uncertainty about the building's occupancy. President Lester Lefton told Daily Kent Stater editors earlier in the semeste......
(KSU Greeks) The life, times and lessons of a bro 03/18/2009 Brown University News Service Text
Kent State U., Kent, OH, Mar 18, 2009 (Daily Kent Stater/UWire via COMTEX News Network) -- When I reveal one subtle aspect of my life to people who know me but don't know me, the reaction is priceless. Their foreheads crinkle. Their eyeballs expand to p......
(KSU Greeks) The life, times and lessons of a bro 03/18/2009 U-WIRE Text
UWIRE-03/18/2009-Kent State U.: Coumn: The life, times and lessons of a bro (C) 2008 Daily Kent Stater via UWIRE By Darren D'Altorio, Daily Kent Stater (Kent State U.) KENT, Ohio -- When I reveal one subtle aspect of my life to people who know me......
FREE CONCERT FEATURES MIAMI STRING QUARTET (Chan, Yu Jin, Meng Robinson, Robinson) 03/18/2009 PR Newswire Policy & Public Interest Text
KENT, Ohio, March 17 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music is proud to host the internationally recognized Miami String Quartet with special guest, renowned pianistAndre-Miche......
New public health college at Kent State University 03/18/2009 WKSU-FM - Online Text View Clip
A new study shows that, compared to 2004, Ohio now has fewer children without medical insurance. But the number of adults without coverage has risen. The study was released this morning. WKSU's statehouse correspondent Bill Cohen reports: Other optio......
(ETIC) Analysis Iraq's pressing water needs 03/19/2009 Terra Daily Text View Clip
WATER WORLD disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only by John C.K. Daly Istanbul, Turkey (UPI) Mar 18, 2009 Iraq, whose power infrastructure was severely affected by the 2003 opening attacks of Operation Iraqi Freedom and six subsequent ye......


(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Washington Post - Online

-- True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

_____

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year _ above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

____

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

____

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

_____

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program _ direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

____

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder _ particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go tohttp://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
USA Today - Online

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize. BEST VALUE COLLEGES: Top 100 for 2009 COLLEGE BLOG: How to deal with student debt in this economy FULL COVERAGE: Latest college news at highered.usatoday.com

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound: BEST VALUE COLLEGES: Top 100 for 2009 COLLEGE BLOG: How to deal with student debt in this economy FULL COVERAGE: Latest college news at highered.usatoday.com TUITION "Bad: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4% per year above overall inflation. "Good: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5%.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5%. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES "Bad: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support. "Good: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90% of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4%, but aid increases of 9.8%.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5% to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18% more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

GOVERNMENT GRANTS "Bad: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened. "Good: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS "Bad: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out. "Good: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS "Bad: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan. "Good: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Salt Lake Tribune - Online

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

----------

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year -- above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent.

Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional

time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

--------

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

--------

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

----------

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program -- direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

--------

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder -- particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
ABCNews - Online

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound: TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation. FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Press of Atlantic City

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound: BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation. FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000. GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding. FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up. PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Charlotte Observer - Online

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

-----

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent.

Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

----

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

----

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

-----

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

----

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Wilmington Star-News

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

-----

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

----

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

----

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

-----

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

----

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov'>http://www.ed.gov

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/19/2009
Seattle Post-Intelligencer

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound: TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation. FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000. GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding. FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up. PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/19/2009
Sun News, The

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

Tuition

Bad | State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

Good | With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent.

Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

Financial aid from colleges

Bad | The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

Good | The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

Government grants

Bad | State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

Good | The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

Federal student loans

Bad | There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

Good | Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

Private student loans

Bad | When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

Good | The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Times Leader

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

_____

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year _ above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent.

Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

____

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

____

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

_____

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program _ direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

____

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder _ particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Tri-City Herald

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

-----

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent.Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

----

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

----

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

-----

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

----

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Marin Independent Journal

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound: TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per yearabove overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation. FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000. GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding. FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan programdirect lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up. PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harderparticularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Some hope for financial aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
CNBC - Online

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

The bad news about tuition: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year above overall inflation.

The good news about tuition: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent.Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

Financial aid from colleges

Bad: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

Good: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

Government grants

Bad: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

Good: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

Federal student loans

Bad: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program. Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

Good: Considering the upheaval in family loan programs, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Click for related contentSince last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

Private student loans

Bad: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

Good: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.Mor

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Buffalo News - Online

- True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

-----

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent.

Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

----

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

----

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

-----

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

----

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

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(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Daily News-Record

By JUSTIN POPE

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

-----

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

----

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

----

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

-----

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

----

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov .

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
KAAL-TV - Online

True, its not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, theres more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when theyre done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year _ above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a years tuition if you dont have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program _ direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that dont have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder _ particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or cant get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and cant get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. Its even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests theyve now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Advocate, The

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per yearabove overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan programdirect lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harderparticularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Centre Daily Times

Web Search powered by

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

-----

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

----

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

----

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

-----

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

----

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

@Nyx.CommentBody@

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
State - Online, The

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

-----

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent.

Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

----

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

----

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

-----

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

----

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Merced Sun-Star

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

-----

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

----

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

----

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

-----

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

----

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Baytown Sun

By JUSTIN POPE

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

-----

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

----

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

----

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

-----

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

----

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov .

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
San Diego Union-Tribune - Online

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:



TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent.

Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.



FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.



GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.



FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.



PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov .

Notice: This improved Comments system is using new technology, so you'll need to signup for a new Comments account with Disqus. Terms of Use

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
WINK-TV - Online

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

-----

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

----

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

----

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

-----

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

----

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to www.ed.gov. (

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Telegraph - Online, The

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder - particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Breitbart.com

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize. A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

_____

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year-above overall inflation. GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

____

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

____

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

_____

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program-direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

____

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder-particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
WHEC-TV - Online

True, its not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, theres more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

_____

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when theyre done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year _ above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent.

Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a years tuition if you dont have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

____

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

____

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

_____

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program _ direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

____

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that dont have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder _ particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or cant get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and cant get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. Its even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests theyve now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy | View Clip
03/18/2009
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer - Online

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

-----

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year - above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

----

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

----

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

-----

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program - direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) Glimmer of hope for student aid in a bad economy
03/18/2009
Associated Press (AP)

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition "deals" some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

_____

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year _ above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent.

Some are offering "specials." Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

____

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

____

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

_____

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program _ direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

____

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the "supply" of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder _ particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to http://www.ed.gov.

Copyright © 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) A sliver of good news for college-bound students bruised by loan crisis | View Clip
03/18/2009
Chicago Tribune - Online

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

_____

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent. Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

____

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

____

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

_____

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

____

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) A sliver of good news for college-found students bruised by loan crisis | View Clip
03/18/2009
Sun Sentinel - Online

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

_____

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent.

Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

____

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

____

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

_____

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

____

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to www.ed.gov.

Return to Top



(KSU Trumbull) A sliver of good news for college-found students bruised by loan crisis | View Clip
03/19/2009
WHO-TV - Online

True, it's not a great time financially to be going or sending a kid to college. But from the success of a bailout to the federal student loan system, to the tuition 'deals' some colleges are offering, there's more good news out there on college costs and financial aid than some families recognize.

A look at the good and the bad for the college-bound:

_____

TUITION

BAD: State budgets are still in flux, but when they're done, many public universities are likely to impose sharp tuition increases. During the last decade, tuition at public colleges has been rising at a rate of 4 percent per year above overall inflation.

GOOD: With help from federal stimulus money, some public colleges will manage more modest price increases as they drastically cut spending. Maryland will try to freeze in-state tuition for a fourth straight year. Others will keep it closer to their usual increases, like Kentucky, with increases set for between 3 and 5 percent.

Many private colleges have announced their smallest increases in years. Becker and Merrimack colleges in Massachusetts are among those freezing tuition, room and board. William Jessup University in California will cut tuition 2.5 percent.

Some are offering 'specials.' Laid-off employees get one-time tuition and application fee waivers at Kent State-Trumbull in Ohio. Mercer University in Georgia and Manchester College in Indiana promise to cover the costs of additional time if students stay on track but are unable to graduate in four years. Manchester will even refund a year's tuition if you don't have a job or a slot in grad school within six months of graduation.

____

FINANCIAL AID FROM COLLEGES

BAD: The average college endowment is down around one-fourth. Many colleges, particularly regional universities, will be unable to offer as much scholarship support.

GOOD: The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities says more than 90 percent of private colleges will increase aid next year. The group recently surveyed about 200 institutions and found they planned average tuition increases of 4 percent, but aid increases of 9.8 percent.

In recent years, some of the priciest colleges have announced significant increases in aid. Many are determined to keep their promises. Harvard, for example, will increase total fees 3.5 percent to $48,868 next year, but expects to spend 18 percent more on financial aid, which in some cases goes to families earning as much as $200,000.

____

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

BAD: State budget cuts will hit a range of programs that support students at both public and private colleges. Criteria for merit scholarships in some states have already tightened.

GOOD: The federal government is expanding college aid, particularly for low-income students. The stimulus package raises the maximum Pell Grant from $4,731 to $5,350 starting July 1, and $5,550 in 2010-2011. An extra 800,000 students are expected to get Pell funding.

_____

FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS

BAD: There are two major components of the giant federal loan program direct lending by the government and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the latter, lenders including banks and non-profits provide student loans that are guaranteed by the federal government. The program accounts for more than $50 billion in new student loans annually to more than 10 million students, but hundreds of lenders have dropped out.

GOOD: Considering the upheaval in family loan program, the flow of federal loans has held up remarkably well. In fact, if the system that lends money to businesses, homes and automobiles had held up half as well as the one that provides government-backed loans to students, the economy might not be in such a mess.

Since last year, the federal government has bought up nearly $25 billion in student loan securities to provide lenders with capital for new loans. That helped keep the family loan program moving. Even as lenders dropped out of the program, the volume of loans is up this year and some loan providers are returning to the market. The direct lending program has picked up slack with an additional $7 billion in lending so far this academic year as more colleges sign up.

____

PRIVATE STUDENT LOANS

BAD: When students max out on their eligibility for federal loans and still need more money, many turn to private loans that don't have government guarantees and are usually more expensive. This year, there is less money available. Tim Ranzetta from Student Lending Analytics estimates the 'supply' of loan capital from private lenders has declined by around one-third, or between about $6 billion and $7 billion.

Predictably, getting that money is harder particularly if you plan to attend a for-profit college, have bad credit or can't get someone to co-sign a loan.

GOOD: The federal government accounts for five times as much student aid as do private loans. Increased limits for federal programs like Stafford loans have lessened students' need for private ones.

True, if you still need a private loan and can't get one, you may have to choose a cheaper school (or one with a higher graduation rate). But that may not be such a bad thing. Clearly, some students were borrowing too much. It's even becoming clear that some students, seduced by advertising, were taking out private loans before maxing out on federal ones. The current surge in demand for federal loans suggests they've now realized their error.

For more info, contact your college financial aid office, or go to www.ed.gov.

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Earmark for Mormon cricket isn't pork to ranchers in Utah (Lorch)
03/18/2009
Seattle Times

Big bugs with bulging goggle eyes swarmed the remote Utah ranching outpost of Grouse Creek like a biblical plague. Each of the past four summers, the hungry critters known as Mormon crickets have marched by the tens of thousands over grassy hillsides, past juniper trees, across dirt roads and through ranch houses.

The noisy insects have devoured crops, frightened children and threatened families' livelihoods in the tranquil high desert.

"It's almost like an Alfred Hitchcock movie," said Brent Tanner, who helps run a large cattle ranch in Grouse Creek that has been in his family since the 1870s. "You just see swarms of these large crickets that move in and can be devastating to crops, and certainly are very irritating. They'll just crawl right into your house, get up on your walls. It's enough to drive a person totally insane."

And this summer, scientists say, it's a sure bet Mormon crickets will be back.

So to the 80-odd folks who live in Grouse Creek, the $1 million congressional earmark secured by their state's junior senator to kill the insects is hardly wasteful pork, as it has been demonized. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and television comedian Jon Stewart may lampoon it as an egregious example of government spending, but to Grouse Creek, the earmark is salvation.

"Everything that's green is just gone," said Tanner's older brother, Jay, who described what happens after Mormon crickets hatch on federal land, migrate onto his family's Della Ranches and eat up acres of grass, alfalfa and cattle feed. "When the crickets come and devastate the area, then I'm done. There's really nothing I can do. It's just like coming in and stealing money out of my wallet."

The passage of a $410 billion omnibus-spending bill last week rekindled the debate in Washington over lawmakers' long-standing and fiercely guarded practice of appropriating public money for pet projects. The legislation contained more than 8,500 earmarks, which together accounted for roughly 2 percent of the bill's overall spending.

President Obama, even as he imposed new rules aimed at curbing earmarks and making them more transparent, signed the bill and voiced support for lawmakers having a role in the process.

"I recognize that Congress has the power of the purse," Obama said. "As a former senator, I believe that individual members of Congress understand their districts best. And they should have the ability to respond to the needs of their communities. I don't quarrel with that."

But since the bill was introduced last month, McCain, among the most vocal critics of earmarks, has highlighted projects he considers pork-laden. Opining on his Twitter page about the Mormon crickets earmark, he asked, "Is that the species of cricket or a game played by the brits?"

On television, news anchors and late-night hosts were astir over earmarks that sounded silly: the Mormon crickets, of course, but also $1.7 million for a honeybee laboratory in Texas, $238,000 for the Polynesian Voyaging Society in Hawaii and $1.8 million for swine-odor and manure-management research in Iowa.

Earmarks do not mandate additional spending. Rather, they require federal agencies to set aside portions of their budgets for specific projects. Critics say this process has long been ripe for corruption.

McCain recently called the spending provisions a "gateway drug" to possibly illegal forms of influence peddling. "This evil has grown, and it has grown, and it has grown," he said.

But Sen. Daniel K. Inouye, D-Hawaii, chairman of the Appropriations Committee, said, "The trouble is not earmarks, per se. The problem is secrecy, which sometimes can lead to abuses."

When it comes to Mormon crickets, there is no quid pro quo.

"Who gave me the campaign contribution with respect to Mormon crickets?" Sen. Robert Bennett, R-Utah, the earmark's sponsor, said in an interview. "The answer is, obviously, nobody."

Bennett, a top Republican on the Appropriations Committee and a close adviser to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., sponsored 64 earmarks totaling $93.9 million in the latest bill, ranking him 41st among 100 senators, according to the anti-earmarks group Taxpayers for Common Sense.

"I voted for Sen. McCain and I know he's straight down the line on no earmarks, but I would disagree with him," said Brent Rose, 53, who tends to 1,000 cattle on his family's sprawling ranch.

"I would ask, 'Doesn't the government have a responsibility to control the pests that come off of their land?' " Rose said.

This is not the first year Congress has allocated funds in the budget of the Agriculture Department's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to control the insects.

Since 2002, earmarks of $350,000 to $1.1 million have been aimed at cricket control, and local officials say the controls appear to be working. At their recent peak in 2004, Mormon crickets infested about 2.8 million acres, a figure that declined to 37,500 acres in 2008, according to state data.

But officials say the insects are difficult, if not impossible, to kill off. "We don't believe eradication is possible," said Larry Lewis, spokesman for the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food.

State officials kill the insects by laying poisonous bait — rolled oats laced with insecticide — around populated areas and private ranches, Lewis said. The cost is shared equally among the federal government, state government and landowners.

"They have a small effect in killing them off," said Patrick Lorch, a biological scientist at Kent State University who studies Mormon crickets. "Honestly, there are billions of these crickets out there."

In ravaging pastures, Mormon crickets leave cattle without feed, dealing a blow to Utah's agricultural economy, which Bennett valued at $340 million. So spending $1 million on cricket control to protect the area's cattle industry should be an easy choice, Bennett argues.

"Put it in purely economic terms, I believe, a case can be made that the feds make money on this exchange," he said.

Copyright © 2009 Seattle Times Company, All Rights Reserved.

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KSU offers employee buyouts, raises room and board
03/18/2009
Akron Beacon Journal, The

Mar. 18--Kent State University trustees agreed today to offer buyout packages to longtime faculty and staff members in an effort to avoid layoffs and program cuts.

The board also approved a 5.87 percent increase in room and board rates for the fall semester.

Under the buyout plan, employees with at least 15 years of service at the university as of June 30, will receive a payment based on their employment classification and salary if they leave on June 30.

Tenure-track faculty members who participate in the plan will receive 100 percent of their base salary, not to exceed $65,000.

Nontenure-track faculty members will receive 100 percent of their base salary, not to exceed $35,000.

Unclassified employees will receive 100 percent of their base salary not to exceed $55,000.

Classified employees not represented by a bargaining unit will receive 100 percent of their base salary not to exceed $30,000.

Classified employees represented by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees will receive 100 percent of their base salary not to exceed $20,000.

Under the new rates for room and board, a standard double-occupancy room and full meal plan will be $3,970 a semester, an increase of $220 from the current rate of $3,750. A typical double room will increase $135 a semester, from $2,290 to $2,425 and the basic board plan will increase $85 per semester, from $1,460 to $1,545.

Similar increases were instituted for other residential options, which include single and quad rooms and on-campus apartments and four other board plans.

Copyright © 2009 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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KSU offers employee buyouts, raises room and board | View Clip
03/19/2009
Akron Beacon Journal, The

Kent State University trustees agreed today to offer buyout packages to longtime faculty and staff members in an effort to avoid layoffs and program cuts.

The board also approved a 5.87 percent increase in room and board rates for the fall semester.

Under the buyout plan, employees with at least 15 years of service at the university as of June 30, will receive a payment based on their employment classification and salary if they leave on June 30.

Tenure-track faculty members who participate in the plan will receive 100 percent of their base salary, not to exceed $65,000.

Nontenure-track faculty members will receive 100 percent of their base salary, not to exceed $35,000.

Unclassified employees will receive 100 percent of their base salary not to exceed $55,000.

Classified employees not represented by a bargaining unit will receive 100 percent of their base salary not to exceed $30,000.

Classified employees represented by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees will receive 100 percent of their base salary not to exceed $20,000.

Under the new rates for room and board, a standard double-occupancy room and full meal plan will be $3,970 a semester, an increase of $220 from the current rate of $3,750. A typical double room will increase $135 a semester, from $2,290 to $2,425 and the basic board plan will increase $85 per semester, from $1,460 to $1,545.

Similar increases were instituted for other residential options, which include single and quad rooms and on-campus apartments and four other board plans.

Kent State University trustees agreed today to offer buyout packages to longtime faculty and staff members in an effort to avoid layoffs and program cuts.

The board also approved a 5.87 percent increase in room and board rates for the fall semester.

Under the buyout plan, employees with at least 15 years of service at the university as of June 30, will receive a payment based on their employment classification and salary if they leave on June 30.

Tenure-track faculty members who participate in the plan will receive 100 percent of their base salary, not to exceed $65,000.

Nontenure-track faculty members will receive 100 percent of their base salary, not to exceed $35,000.

Unclassified employees will receive 100 percent of their base salary not to exceed $55,000.

Classified employees not represented by a bargaining unit will receive 100 percent of their base salary not to exceed $30,000.

Classified employees represented by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees will receive 100 percent of their base salary not to exceed $20,000.

Under the new rates for room and board, a standard double-occupancy room and full meal plan will be $3,970 a semester, an increase of $220 from the current rate of $3,750. A typical double room will increase $135 a semester, from $2,290 to $2,425 and the basic board plan will increase $85 per semester, from $1,460 to $1,545.

Similar increases were instituted for other residential options, which include single and quad rooms and on-campus apartments and four other board plans.

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KSU offering staff buyouts Trustees also approve 6 percent room, board hike (Lefton, Mullins) | View Clip
03/19/2009
Record-Courier

By Colin McEwen

Record-Courier staff writer

Faculty and staff at Kent State University with 15 or more years of service now will have the option to leave the university in a buyout deal approved Wednesday.

The University Employee Separation Plan, approved by the KSU Board of Trustees, is an attempt by the university to tighten its belt without making dramatic layoffs.

The board also agreed to increase room and board rates by 6 percent to offset rising costs of food and utilities. The rate increase is expected to take effect this fall.

The employee buyouts will begin much sooner than that. Letters are expected to be mailed today to all eligible employees, with the election period from April 6 through May 22.

According to a university e-mail to staff and faculty, eligible employees who choose the buyout will leave the university on June 30, with a separation package that includes a base amount plus an amount equivalent to a portion of the employees accrued sick leave pay. The base dollar amounts are as follows: Tenure-track faculty: 100 percent of base salary not to exceed $65,000 Non-tenure track faculty: 100 percent of base salary not to exceed $35,000 Unclassified: 100 percent of base salary not to exceed $55,000 Unrepresented Classified: 100 percent of base salary not to exceed $30,000 Represented Classified: 100 percent of base salary not to exceed $20,000

KSU President Lester Lefton said the one-time arrangement would constitute a total separation from the university, with payments to be made over a five- to eight-year period. This is a way to trim our budget, said Lefton, adding that he expects savings to be $3 for every $1. Those eligible including union and non-union employees with 15 or more years of consecutive service will leave the university June 30 with a separation package that includes a base amount plus a figure equivalent to a portion of the employees accrued sick leave pay.

Although not concrete in numbers, administration officials believe as many as 100 staff and another 90 faculty could take the voluntary buyout. Im not sure how many people will take it because its completely voluntary, said Lefton. Many will see this as a great opportunity. He said that if only a few take the option, the university would not likely make any cuts to the staff. And conversely, if many more than expected take the buy-out, the university would reserve its option to delay the employees leaving for one year.

The buyout would not include health care for eligible employees.

Part-time employees and employees who have retired and were subsequently rehired by the university are not eligible to participate in the plan.

Students returning to classes next fall will see the costs for room and board raised.

Under the new rates, a standard double-occupancy room and a full meal plan would cost $3,970 per semester an increase of $220.

In addition to keeping pace with rising costs, the increase will also help repay debt incurred from construction and renovation projects to the universitys residence and dining hall facilities. Its cheaper (for students) to live and eat on campus than for them to live off campus, said Lefton, adding that he believes the cost for rent will increase more than the rate for on-campus students.

Board chairman Patrick Mullins agreed. Its something weve just got to do, he said. The cost at Kent State University will continue to be among the lowest in the state.

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KSU has strategy to trim payroll (Lefton, Fox, Laux) | View Clip
03/19/2009
Akron Beacon Journal, The

Faculty, administrators, staff offered payments to leave state university

Beacon Journal staff writer

Kent State announced a plan Wednesday to trim its ranks of some faculty, staff and administrators.

Full-time employees with at least 15 years of service would receive one year of base salary, up to a limit, that would be paid over eight years if they are retiring or five years if they are not. Health care is not included.

President Lester Lefton said this was one of a ''variety of different measures'' KSU is taking to trim its budget in light of what probably will be limited financial support from the state of Ohio in the coming year.

About 70 percent of the university's operating budget is devoted to labor. Last year, the university sustained the first operating loss in its history at $2.2 million and is on track to lose perhaps $3.2 million this year, Lefton said.

Lee Fox, president of the

tenure-track unit of the American Association of University Employees, said she did not know how appealing the plan would be to her colleagues, whose payment would be capped at $65,000, regardless of how much they make.

The average annual salary for Kent State faculty ranges from $99,200 for professors to $46,800 for assistant professors, according to the the industry newspaper the Chronicle of Higher Education.

''This could be attractive for a fairly limited number of people those very near retirement or who are sitting on the fence, who were waiting for a little bit of an incentive,'' said Fox, an associate professor of psychology at KSU's Stark campus. ''But it's always a little bit of crapshoot, especially in this economy.''

Tracy Laux, president of the Kent State AAUP nontenure-track unit and a math lecturer on the Kent campus, said he did not expect ''great numbers'' of employees to volunteer.

Unlike tenure-track faculty, nontenured teaching employees receive yearly contracts and are not guaranteed what is virtually lifetime employment.

Nontenure-track faculty would be paid up to $35,000; unclassified employees, which would include administrators, up to $55,000; classified employees not represented by a bargaining unit, up to $30,000; and classified employees represented by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, up to $20,000.

A consultant told the university that it could expect to save $3 over five years for every $1 it pays in severance, Lefton said.

The university will achieve the savings by hiring replacement employees at lower salaries, redeploying some employees and not filling some positions, he said.

''This is an opportunity to reassess our student needs,'' he said. ''This is a way to create an opportunity to trim.''

He said the consultant, the Educators Preferred Corp. of Southfield, Mich., indicated that the university could expect 90 faculty and 100 staff and administrators to take advantage of the voluntary plan.

KSU has about 850 tenure-track faculty, 350 nontenure-track faculty and about 2,200 staff and administrators.

Employees who are deemed critical to the university's mission might be required to wait a year before taking advantage of the offer that would be effective for others on July 1.

Educators Preferred will receive $220 for each participating employee per year for each of the first three years.

When asked if the university would resort to forced layoffs if it doesn't get the response it hopes for, Lefton said, ''We're nowhere near that kind of planning.''

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

Kent State announced a plan Wednesday to trim its ranks of some faculty, staff and administrators.

Full-time employees with at least 15 years of service would receive one year of base salary, up to a limit, that would be paid over eight years if they are retiring or five years if they are not. Health care is not included.

President Lester Lefton said this was one of a ''variety of different measures'' KSU is taking to trim its budget in light of what probably will be limited financial support from the state of Ohio in the coming year.

About 70 percent of the university's operating budget is devoted to labor. Last year, the university sustained the first operating loss in its history at $2.2 million and is on track to lose perhaps $3.2 million this year, Lefton said.

Lee Fox, president of the

tenure-track unit of the American Association of University Employees, said she did not know how appealing the plan would be to her colleagues, whose payment would be capped at $65,000, regardless of how much they make.

The average annual salary for Kent State faculty ranges from $99,200 for professors to $46,800 for assistant professors, according to the the industry newspaper the Chronicle of Higher Education.

''This could be attractive for a fairly limited number of people those very near retirement or who are sitting on the fence, who were waiting for a little bit of an incentive,'' said Fox, an associate professor of psychology at KSU's Stark campus. ''But it's always a little bit of crapshoot, especially in this economy.''

Tracy Laux, president of the Kent State AAUP nontenure-track unit and a math lecturer on the Kent campus, said he did not expect ''great numbers'' of employees to volunteer.

Unlike tenure-track faculty, nontenured teaching employees receive yearly contracts and are not guaranteed what is virtually lifetime employment.

Nontenure-track faculty would be paid up to $35,000; unclassified employees, which would include administrators, up to $55,000; classified employees not represented by a bargaining unit, up to $30,000; and classified employees represented by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, up to $20,000.

A consultant told the university that it could expect to save $3 over five years for every $1 it pays in severance, Lefton said.

The university will achieve the savings by hiring replacement employees at lower salaries, redeploying some employees and not filling some positions, he said.

''This is an opportunity to reassess our student needs,'' he said. ''This is a way to create an opportunity to trim.''

He said the consultant, the Educators Preferred Corp. of Southfield, Mich., indicated that the university could expect 90 faculty and 100 staff and administrators to take advantage of the voluntary plan.

KSU has about 850 tenure-track faculty, 350 nontenure-track faculty and about 2,200 staff and administrators.

Employees who are deemed critical to the university's mission might be required to wait a year before taking advantage of the offer that would be effective for others on July 1.

Educators Preferred will receive $220 for each participating employee per year for each of the first three years.

When asked if the university would resort to forced layoffs if it doesn't get the response it hopes for, Lefton said, ''We're nowhere near that kind of planning.''

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

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(KSU Geauga) Associate's degrees may appeal in tough economy (Hoiles) | View Clip
03/18/2009
News-Herald

With the nation's unemployment rate teetering at the highest it's been in 16 years, job security feels more important than ever. Accreditation can give employees a leg up.

And time is of the essence.

That's why local two-year colleges, or colleges that offer two-year degrees, may seem more appealing lately, said Marilyn Jones, vice president for learning support and vice provost at Lakeland Community College in Kirtland.

And that's in addition to wanting to update your skills or test the collegiate waters.

'Coming in for the two-year degree is not as huge a commitment in terms of time, money and disruption to your life,' she said. 'The fact that we are local and most of our students come from a four-county area, more than half are part-time, working, with families. But they're able to get the degree on a part-time basis, continue their current jobs and then move up to a better job once they have a degree.'

Lakeland, whose average student is 27 years old, graduates its single largest groups each year with associate's degrees in arts, allied health areas of applied science and applied business, she said. Specialties include emergency management, criminal justice, engineering technology, fire science and human resources management.

'The two-year degree does get you an excellent job,' she said. 'Dozens of programs in allied health in the two-year degree turn you into a registered nurse, technician, a medical assistant.' she continued. 'In the business area students get jobs immediately.'

In fact, associate's degrees can be so helpful that Kent State University's Geauga campus pushes students to collect those diplomas midway through earning their bachelor's degrees for safekeeping. Tom Hoiles, director of enrollment management and student services, said his previous employer had even put together one-year degrees.

This especially benefits returning students trying to repackage themselves for a job.

'It's a credentialing thing,' he said. 'It gives a student the opportunity to take a credential into the workplace. With the number of people who are competing for jobs right now, any advantage is good. Even here I have students who are pursuing a bachelor's degree, and once they've met the criteria for meeting an associate's degree, we encourage them to apply for it. Otherwise in case something happens they don't have anything to show for their work just a collection of credits.'

KSU Geauga offers associate's of arts degrees and associate's of science degrees that are transferable to future degrees.

'As you move through the pathway of your bachelor's, you'll be able to clip off the associate's along the way,' Hoiles said. 'It's an insurance policy; no one can take your degree away from you.'

Ted Hansen, campus director at Bryant & Stratton College in Eastlake, which primarily offers associate's degrees, said his school has a 90 percent job placement rate after graduation.

'It allows a student to get in and get out, if you will,' he said. 'Two-year colleges generally don't have a lot of the electives that you have to do; it's pretty career-specific. They come in and they're focused on the career.'

Financial comparisons also reveal a 'tremendous cost differential,' Jones said, for students who earn an associate's degree at Lakeland and then pursue a bachelor's elsewhere. Those can be found at lakelandcc.edu/2plus2calculator, which pits the cost of the 2+2 formula against spending all four years elsewhere.

To guarantee its credits transfer, Lakeland has transfer assurance guides for all public institutions in Ohio and most private ones, as well as articulation agreements with more than 50 colleges and universities across the country, Jones said. 'The whole point of the transfer assurance guides and articulation agreements is to save students time, money and effort, that nobody wants them to have to double back and redo things.'

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(KSU-Economy) Kent needs to battle Plusquellic's opposition to fed money for bridge | View Clip
03/18/2009
Record-Courier

Akron Mayor Don Plusquellic's objection to using federal stimulus money to complete funding for Kent's bridge to span the Cuyahoga River at Fairchild Avenue needs to be taken seriously by those who want the project completed.

The mayor has a high profile nationally and his clout could be instrumental in denying Kent the $3 million it is seeking for the project whose costs, engineers believe, have risen by that amount.

If the shoe were on the other foot, if for instance the project at issue consisted of improvements to the Y bridge in Akron, which some have proposed as a suitable recipient of federal stimulus dollars, we have no doubt that Plusquellic, a fierce champion of Akron, would be fighting for his hometown just as he did a few years ago when Akron's extensive rights to the Cuyahoga River waters as they flow through Portage County were at issue.

The mayor objects because he says the intent of the stimulus bill was to create new jobs and implement new projects. We would argue the Kent bridge accomplishes both those goals. It is shovel-ready, which is what the supporters of the federal stimulus package want. It will employ construction workers who might otherwise not have jobs. It is certainly a new project, in the sense that work on the bridge has not even begun and, without federal stimulus funds, Kent and Portage County, both hard pressed in these dire economic times, will have to scramble to find an extra $3 million needed to get the job done.

When Akron got state economic development dollars a year and a half ago to help it create a suitable site for Goodyear's new world headquarters, it probably denied Kent any chance of winning dollars for an industrial park projected along Mogadore Road. We did not object nor did anyone from Kent object because the Goodyear project seemed by miles more important if choices had to be made. In fact, most in Portage County rejoiced at the news that Goodyear would remain in Akron because we knew that secures Akron's future as an important corporate headquarters and that will benefit everyone in Northeastern Ohio.

For sure, the Kent bridge project is no Goodyear, but it is important to Kent's economic development and why Plusquellic cannot perceive that as benefiting the area is a mystery to us. Like most of the Great Lakes region, Northeastern Ohio is in decline economically. Its future, most believe, depends on creating new kinds of jobs, spin-offs from research from our universities such as Kent State University and the University of Akron.

Kent, a college town doing well, will work to the benefit of Kent State University and a healthy Kent State is good for Northeastern Ohio. A river town such as Kent needs good bridges across the Cuyahoga to facilitate transportation. The bridge at Fairchild also will lead to improvements along the city's riverfront, which will help the community prosper.

As a champion for his hometown, Plusquellic has no equal in Northeastern Ohio. We admire him for that, but it is hard not to conclude that his myopia in Akron's favor involves a double standard when it comes to tallying up the interests of the whole of Northeastern Ohio. It would be nice, occasionally, if he could look beyond Akron at the interests of other communities and see that if they do well, it might help Akron, too.

If he did, we might even think of him as a good neighbor.

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Financial engineering is awarded $66,000 (Holder) | View Clip
03/18/2009
Record-Courier

Kent State University's
Center for Financial Engineering
announced recently
it received a $66,000
grant from Market Data
& Analytics, a division of
Deutsche Boerse Group, to
research Eurex's Historical
Order Book.
Eurex, one of the world's
leading derivatives exchanges,
operates the most
liquid-fixed income markets
in the world.
Eurex's Historical Order
Book provides in-depth
historical intraday market
data that is time stamped
with an accuracy of ten
milliseconds.
Through the Market Data
& Analytics research grant,
KSU's Center for Financial
Engineering has the unique
opportunity to study this
data for the purpose of furthering
the fields of finance
and derivatives trading.
“This is an invaluable
opportunity for Kent State,”
said KSU Provost Robert
Frank. “The research
supported by this grant
will build on Kent State's
Center for Financial Engineering's
reputation as an
internationally recognized
center dedicated to the progressing
knowledge of derivatives
and the expansion
of financial engineering research

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Struggling KSU students gain reprieve 'Second chance' program aims to curb dismissals for poor | View Clip
03/19/2009
Record-Courier

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(Bahcesehir) Kent State U. backs out of deal with Istanbul university (Lefton, Saunders, Euclide)
03/18/2009
Brown University News Service

Kent State U., Kent, OH, Mar 18, 2009 (Daily Kent Stater/UWire via COMTEX News Network) -- When the Office of International Affairs decided it wanted to renovate Van Campen Hall, it didn't anticipate there would be so much uncertainty about the building's occupancy.

President Lester Lefton told Daily Kent Stater editors earlier in the semester that Kent State was in talks with Bahcesehir University in Istanbul to convert the building into a Turkish student center for their exchange program, but the two universities "were having communication problems" over plans for renovating.

After almost a year of negotiations that began with Steve Michael, vice provost for diversity, the university backed out of the agreement in February.

Among the things Lefton said the universities disagreed on were the need for wheelchair access to the buildings and family-style bathrooms.

"There was no understanding that we had to go by Ohio law," said Mary Ann Saunders, executive director of international affairs.

Saunders said Kent State tried negotiating with representatives from the Turkish university. First, Bahcesehir University said it would pay the costs of renovation for the building. When officials from the universities couldn't reach an agreement on the plans for the building, Kent State agreed to absorb the costs, while giving Bahcesehir University the first right of refusal to use the space.

Saunders said Kent State is now in talks with a number of other international universities to use the space as a student center. The dormitories may also be used as housing for Kent State students.

Despite the uncertainty as to who will occupy the building, building renovations began in mid-January with demolitions.

Currently, there are three parts to the building, two of which will undergo renovations, said Tom Euclide, executive director of facilities planning and operations.

The office portion of the building, which contains the Office of International Affairs, will not be renovated. However, the dormitory portion and the lobby area will be renovated. Demolitions of buildings have been mostly completed.

Euclide said the dormitories will be fitted with air conditioning units. Also, the entire plumbing, lighting and electrical systems will be replaced from the system that was installed in the 1960s, when the building first opened. The dorms have been vacant for about three years.

In the lobby portion of the building, Euclide said several classrooms will be updated with newer systems and brought up to code. A wheelchair lift from the lobby area to the ground floor of the dormitory for handicapped students will also be included.

As renovations progress on Van Campen, the university is still trying to find an occupant for the building. Euclide said the renovations will be complete by mid-summer and will be ready to house students in the fall.

"I would love to see that dorm as a mixture of domestic students with an interest in international affairs and international students," Saunders said. "This would make the area part of an international courtyard."

http://www.kentnewsnet.com

Copyright © 2009 Daily Kent Stater via UWire

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(Bahcesehir) Kent State U. backs out of deal with Istanbul university (Lefton, Saunders, Euclide)
03/18/2009
U-WIRE

UWIRE-03/18/2009-Kent State U.: Kent State U. backs out of deal with Istanbul university (C) 2008 Daily Kent Stater via UWIRE

By Kristine Phillips, Daily Kent Stater (Kent State U.)

KENT, Ohio -- When the Office of International Affairs decided it wanted to renovate Van Campen Hall, it didn't anticipate there would be so much uncertainty about the building's occupancy.

President Lester Lefton told Daily Kent Stater editors earlier in the semester that Kent State was in talks with Bahcesehir University in Istanbul to convert the building into a Turkish student center for their exchange program, but the two universities "were having communication problems" over plans for renovating.

After almost a year of negotiations that began with Steve Michael, vice provost for diversity, the university backed out of the agreement in February.

Among the things Lefton said the universities disagreed on were the need for wheelchair access to the buildings and family-style bathrooms.

"There was no understanding that we had to go by Ohio law," said Mary Ann Saunders, executive director of international affairs.

Saunders said Kent State tried negotiating with representatives from the Turkish university. First, Bahcesehir University said it would pay the costs of renovation for the building. When officials from the universities couldn't reach an agreement on the plans for the building, Kent State agreed to absorb the costs, while giving Bahcesehir University the first right of refusal to use the space.

Saunders said Kent State is now in talks with a number of other international universities to use the space as a student center. The dormitories may also be used as housing for Kent State students.

Despite the uncertainty as to who will occupy the building, building renovations began in mid-January with demolitions.

Currently, there are three parts to the building, two of which will undergo renovations, said Tom Euclide, executive director of facilities planning and operations.

The office portion of the building, which contains the Office of International Affairs, will not be renovated. However, the dormitory portion and the lobby area will be renovated. Demolitions of buildings have been mostly completed.

Euclide said the dormitories will be fitted with air conditioning units. Also, the entire plumbing, lighting and electrical systems will be replaced from the system that was installed in the 1960s, when the building first opened. The dorms have been vacant for about three years.

In the lobby portion of the building, Euclide said several classrooms will be updated with newer systems and brought up to code. A wheelchair lift from the lobby area to the ground floor of the dormitory for handicapped students will also be included.

As renovations progress on Van Campen, the university is still trying to find an occupant for the building. Euclide said the renovations will be complete by mid-summer and will be ready to house students in the fall.

"I would love to see that dorm as a mixture of domestic students with an interest in international affairs and international students," Saunders said. "This would make the area part of an international courtyard."

##30##

((Distributed on bahalf of U-Wire via M2 Communications Ltd - http://www.m2.com)) ((U-Wire - http://www.uwire.com))

Copyright © 2009 U-Wire

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(Bahceshehir) Kent State U. backs out of deal with Istanbul university (Lefton, Saunders, Euclide) | View Clip
03/19/2009
Individual.com

When the Office of International Affairs decided it wanted to renovate Van Campen Hall, it didn't anticipate there would be so much uncertainty about the building's occupancy.

President Lester Lefton told Daily Kent Stater editors earlier in the semester that Kent State was in talks with Bahcesehir University in Istanbul to convert the building into a Turkish student center for their exchange program, but the two universities 'were having communication problems' over plans for renovating.

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(KSU Greeks) The life, times and lessons of a bro
03/18/2009
Brown University News Service

Kent State U., Kent, OH, Mar 18, 2009 (Daily Kent Stater/UWire via COMTEX News Network) -- When I reveal one subtle aspect of my life to people who know me but don't know me, the reaction is priceless.

Their foreheads crinkle. Their eyeballs expand to perfect circles. Their lips separate, forming the classic "O" face. It's an awkward look of, "I can't believe you just admitted that."

I'm in a fraternity.

Yep, I'm a bro. Since the first semester of my freshman year I have been part of the ever-so-small, yet largely criticized, Greek community at Kent State.

Everyone knows the classic profile of a frat boy or sorority girl. Throughout past semesters, this forum page has hosted articles like "The Evolution of a Greek: a Darwinian perspective" by Allison Brager and "Taking responsibility for your actions" by Beth Rankin, which attempted to define, describe and pinpoint the role of Greeks at Kent State.

As you can imagine, they were narrow-minded and stereotypical, blaming fraternity brothers for all the crime and craziness in Kent and claiming sorority sisters excel at dressing like Jersey Shore whores and worshipping "Laguna Beach."

These are just a couple of the portraits painted about Greek life. Not to mention the multitude of criticisms witnessed by me and other members of the Greek community every day: You pay for your friends. You're a tool/douchebag/whore/alcoholic/asshole.

For a community that represents only 4 percent of the Kent State population, these negative opinions are a lot of wasted thought. Rarely does positive light shine on the Greeks of Kent State, but here is some perspective from my experience as a brother.

Greek chapters work to promote ideals, both personal and communal. Community service, charitable contribution, academic excellence and friendship are all focal points for my chapter.

In the past, these agendas have been mucked up by idiotic behavior on behalf of some Greek members, casting a grim shadow over the entire community.

To be fair, my fraternity is not innocent. Our house has seen fights. Some of our brothers have failed out of school. Drug and alcohol abuse has been a problem for some. A few semesters ago we were put on social probation by campus because a certain percentage of our members didn't attend a mandatory meeting. In these ways we have failed at living up to our ideals. We've failed the campus, the Greek community and ourselves.

In the wake, I have realized the power of fraternity more than ever this semester. It all hit me last weekend when I was locked in the parlor room of my fraternity house from 10 p.m. Friday until 5 a.m. Saturday.

This sequestration was necessary. A brother confessed to being addicted to cocaine.

A lock-in like this is not something normal. In the past eight semesters, only two have been called. It's a time to make every member of our chapter, both young and old, more aware of what we stand for so we can better serve campus and ourselves. It is a time to share personal stories.

Cigarette smoke hung in the air that night, along with the spectrum of emotions created by each individual's story.

I learned that as a child, one of my brothers watched his father die on the floor of his home and watched his mother almost do the same as she abused pills in the aftermath.

I learned that many of my brothers suffered from addiction to drugs at some point in their lives.

I learned that one of my brothers fights personal, narrow-minded attitudes of racism instilled in him from his small-town upbringing, where the Ku Klux Klan is alive and well.

I learned that one of my brothers, who was adopted from Korea, loves America with all his soul.

I learned that half of my brothers, myself included, come from a broken home.

I learned that my fraternity has become the center of these guys' lives. It is a foundation, a home base, an organization that strives to make individuals become better people.

We entered college as strangers. We saw something positive about the fraternity that drew us into the mystery. Then we all invested time, energy and money to be a part of the organization, uniting individual men under a title, three letters that represent a mission.

We realized our downfalls and shortcomings, then we rallied around our ideals and pledged to change our lives and our chapter for the better.

I hope each member of the Greek community understands the power of the organization to which he or she belongs.

And to the haters, who will always be haters: Keep hating, because you make us better, and for that we thank you.

http://www.kentnewsnet.com

Copyright © 2009 Daily Kent Stater via UWire

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(KSU Greeks) The life, times and lessons of a bro
03/18/2009
U-WIRE

UWIRE-03/18/2009-Kent State U.: Coumn: The life, times and lessons of a bro (C) 2008 Daily Kent Stater via UWIRE

By Darren D'Altorio, Daily Kent Stater (Kent State U.)

KENT, Ohio -- When I reveal one subtle aspect of my life to people who know me but don't know me, the reaction is priceless.

Their foreheads crinkle. Their eyeballs expand to perfect circles. Their lips separate, forming the classic "O" face. It's an awkward look of, "I can't believe you just admitted that."

I'm in a fraternity.

Yep, I'm a bro. Since the first semester of my freshman year I have been part of the ever-so-small, yet largely criticized, Greek community at Kent State.

Everyone knows the classic profile of a frat boy or sorority girl. Throughout past semesters, this forum page has hosted articles like "The Evolution of a Greek: a Darwinian perspective" by Allison Brager and "Taking responsibility for your actions" by Beth Rankin, which attempted to define, describe and pinpoint the role of Greeks at Kent State.

As you can imagine, they were narrow-minded and stereotypical, blaming fraternity brothers for all the crime and craziness in Kent and claiming sorority sisters excel at dressing like Jersey Shore whores and worshipping "Laguna Beach."

These are just a couple of the portraits painted about Greek life. Not to mention the multitude of criticisms witnessed by me and other members of the Greek community every day: You pay for your friends. You're a tool/douchebag/whore/alcoholic/asshole.

For a community that represents only 4 percent of the Kent State population, these negative opinions are a lot of wasted thought. Rarely does positive light shine on the Greeks of Kent State, but here is some perspective from my experience as a brother.

Greek chapters work to promote ideals, both personal and communal. Community service, charitable contribution, academic excellence and friendship are all focal points for my chapter.

In the past, these agendas have been mucked up by idiotic behavior on behalf of some Greek members, casting a grim shadow over the entire community.

To be fair, my fraternity is not innocent. Our house has seen fights. Some of our brothers have failed out of school. Drug and alcohol abuse has been a problem for some. A few semesters ago we were put on social probation by campus because a certain percentage of our members didn't attend a mandatory meeting. In these ways we have failed at living up to our ideals. We've failed the campus, the Greek community and ourselves.

In the wake, I have realized the power of fraternity more than ever this semester. It all hit me last weekend when I was locked in the parlor room of my fraternity house from 10 p.m. Friday until 5 a.m. Saturday.

This sequestration was necessary. A brother confessed to being addicted to cocaine.

A lock-in like this is not something normal. In the past eight semesters, only two have been called. It's a time to make every member of our chapter, both young and old, more aware of what we stand for so we can better serve campus and ourselves. It is a time to share personal stories.

Cigarette smoke hung in the air that night, along with the spectrum of emotions created by each individual's story.

I learned that as a child, one of my brothers watched his father die on the floor of his home and watched his mother almost do the same as she abused pills in the aftermath.

I learned that many of my brothers suffered from addiction to drugs at some point in their lives.

I learned that one of my brothers fights personal, narrow-minded attitudes of racism instilled in him from his small-town upbringing, where the Ku Klux Klan is alive and well.

I learned that one of my brothers, who was adopted from Korea, loves America with all his soul.

I learned that half of my brothers, myself included, come from a broken home.

I learned that my fraternity has become the center of these guys' lives. It is a foundation, a home base, an organization that strives to make individuals become better people.

We entered college as strangers. We saw something positive about the fraternity that drew us into the mystery. Then we all invested time, energy and money to be a part of the organization, uniting individual men under a title, three letters that represent a mission.

We realized our downfalls and shortcomings, then we rallied around our ideals and pledged to change our lives and our chapter for the better.

I hope each member of the Greek community understands the power of the organization to which he or she belongs.

And to the haters, who will always be haters: Keep hating, because you make us better, and for that we thank you.

##30##

((Distributed on bahalf of U-Wire via M2 Communications Ltd - http://www.m2.com)) ((U-Wire - http://www.uwire.com))

Copyright © 2009 U-Wire

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FREE CONCERT FEATURES MIAMI STRING QUARTET (Chan, Yu Jin, Meng Robinson, Robinson)
03/18/2009
PR Newswire Policy & Public Interest

KENT, Ohio, March 17 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music is proud to host the internationally recognized Miami String Quartet with special guest, renowned pianistAndre-Michel Schub,as they perform on Saturday, April 4 at 7:30 p.m.in Ludwig Recital Hall in the Music and Speech Center, 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent, Ohio.

The impressive Miami String Quartet has been Kent State's Quartet in Residence since 2004 and the members serve as full-time faculty in the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music. The Quartet's members are Ivan Chan, violin; Yu Jin, viola; Cathy Meng Robinson, violin; and Keith Robinson, cello.

The Miami String Quartet has appeared extensively throughout the United States and Europe. Highlights of recent seasons include performances in New York at Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall, Boston, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, New Orleans, San Francisco, Seattle, St. Paul and its own concert series in Palm Beach, Florida. International highlights include appearances in Bern, Cologne, Istanbul, Lausanne, Montreal, Rio de Janeiro, Hong Kong, Taipei and Paris. The Quartet has toured with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and they appear annually with the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society. In 2002 the Miami String Quartet made its debut at the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam as well as at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.

The concert will feature guest pianist Andre-Michel Schub, winner of the 1974 Naumburg International Piano Competition, recipient of the 1977 Avery Fisher Career Grant and grand prize winner of the 1981 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. Schub has been the artistic director of the Virginia Arts Festival Chamber Music Series since 1997.

He appears as a guest artist with Mostly Mozart, Tanglewood, Ravinia, the Blossom Festival, Wolf Trap and the Casals Festival in Puerto Rico. He has repeatedly performed with the world's most prestigious orchestras, among them the Boston Symphony, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Cleveland Orchestra, the Los Angeles and the New York Philharmonics, the Detroit Symphony, the Royal Concertgebouw and the Bournemouth Symphony. The New York Times said this about Schub, "Mr. Schub has an impeccable technique, combining unfailing digital accuracy with seamlessly even scales and a bejeweled tone. He is a straightforward pianist, with an even temperament and few mannerisms."

The concert is free and open to the public.

For more information call The Hugh A. Glauser School of Music Concert Line at 330-672-3609.For more information please contact: Sarabjit Jagirdar, Email:- htsyndication@hindustantimes.com.

Copyright © 2009 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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New public health college at Kent State University | View Clip
03/18/2009
WKSU-FM - Online

A new study shows that, compared to 2004, Ohio now has fewer children without medical insurance. But the number of adults without coverage has risen. The study was released this morning.

WKSU's statehouse correspondent Bill Cohen reports:

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(ETIC) Analysis Iraq's pressing water needs | View Clip
03/19/2009
Terra Daily

WATER WORLD disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only by John C.K. Daly

Istanbul, Turkey (UPI) Mar 18, 2009

Iraq, whose power infrastructure was severely affected by the 2003 opening attacks of Operation Iraqi Freedom and six subsequent years of coalition military operations, is slowly and painfully reviving. While the world's attention remains largely focused on the country's oil industry and reserves, water remains even more important to Iraq's population and has been since the world's first known Neolithic agrarian societies developed in the great Mesopotamian 'Fertile Crescent' alluvial plain between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers around 9,000 B.C.

Even then, the region suffered from violence related to water resources, as when two Sumerian city-states, Lagash and Umma, clashed over the draining of a freshwater canal in the southern portion of today's Iraq 4,500 years ago. Some issues never change.

Quite aside from Baghdad trying to negotiate increased water flow of the Euphrates and Tigris rivers from its upstream neighbors Syria and Turkey and maintaining good relations with Iran -- which is the source of several Tigris tributaries -- wars, sanctions, lack of maintenance and underinvestment in Iraq's energy-grid structures over several decades has severely affected the country's entire power-generation system. Iraq's hydropower infrastructure consists of eight major facilities -- the Aski Mosul, Dokan, Darbandikhan, Hemreen, Haditha, Hindiya, Kufa and Samarra dams and their attendant hydroelectric facilities.

Coalition forces destroyed Iraq's water treatment plants during the 1991 Operation Desert Storm, affecting the water quality of the Tigris. Since then, the U.S. Agency for International Development has assisted in repairing and upgrading water and sewage treatment plants.

Since 2003 Iraq has been repairing and upgrading its hydroelectric facilities while simultaneously attempting to safeguard them against insurgent attacks. Given the unsettled nature of the country's political life, its hydroelectric infrastructure suffers from both domestic and international pressures that seem unlikely to be resolved anytime soon.

The mothers of all water resources in Iraq are the Euphrates and Tigris rivers, as important now as they were in antiquity. Within present-day Iraq, the Euphrates flows for about 620 miles and the Tigris for about 800 miles before combining their downstream flows into the Shatt Al-Arab basin, which meanders for another 120 miles before debouching into the northern Persian Gulf.

The average annual flow of the Euphrates as it enters Iraq is estimated at 30 cubic kilometers, but it suffers from a fluctuating annual value from 10 to 40 cubic kilometers and receives no tributaries during its passage in Iraq.

The estimated average annual runoff of the Tigris as it enters Iraq is 21.2 cubic kilometers. Unlike the Euphrates, the Tigris during its passage through Iraq is fed by a number of tributaries, including the Greater Zab, Lesser Zab, Al-Adhaim, Diyala, Nahr at Tib, Dewarege, Shehabi, and Al-Karkha rivers.

Of these tributaries, the Greater Zab, rising in Turkey, is partly regulated by the still unfinished 1,500-megawatt Bakhma dam, the construction of which was interrupted by the 1991 Gulf War and subsequent sanctions.

The Lesser Zab, which originates in Iran, is equipped with the Dokan dam, located 185 miles north of Baghdad. The Diyala, which also has its origin in Iran, contains the Darbandikhan dam, 260 miles northeast of Baghdad.

After the overthrow of Saddam Hussein, many of the country's hydroelectric facilities have become potential hostages to interethnic conflict. The Dokan and Darbandikhan hydroelectric plants are the two largest power plants in Iraq's three-province Kurdistan Regional Government, while the 320-megawatt Mosul Dam, a hydroelectric facility formerly known as the Great Qadisia Saddam Dam that is the country's largest and the Middle East's fourth-largest dam, is 35 miles northwest of the contested Ninawa provincial capital Mosul and outside the KRG. Peshmerga forces under the joint control of the Kurdistan Democratic Party and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan currently control the facility, which contains 12 billion cubic meters of water and provides electricity to Mosul's 1.7 million residents. It represents a valuable prize in the Kurds' ongoing struggle with Baghdad for increased autonomy.

Baghdad is having some modest successes in reviving its dilapidated hydroelectric infrastructure, having in 2007 acquired a three-year, $40 million Dokan and Darbandikhan Emergency Hydropower Project loan from the World Bank.

On the issue of trans-boundary river flows through neighboring Turkey, Syria and Iran, Iraq's Ministry of Water Resources continues to place its hopes in negotiations that began in the 1960s. In 1980 a joint Iraqi-Syrian-Turkish technical committee was established to reach a just division of the two rivers' water. The committee held 16 meetings, along with further meetings in 1992 in the aftermath of the Gulf War and subsequent international sanctions.

Besides regional agreements, Iraq has also placed its faith in international treaties covering water disputes, particularly the Convention on the Law of the Non-Navigational Uses of International Watercourses, adopted by the U.N. General Assembly in 1997 following 27 years of negotiation. The convention may prove only partially useful to Iraq, however, because Turkey was one of the three countries that voted against it. All is not necessarily lost, though, as Iraq has something valuable to barter with -- oil. Last June Turkey's Turkiye Petrolleri Anonim Ortakligi state oil concern was included among six state-owned companies granted the right to extract oil in Iraq, Oil Ministry official Asim Jihad said. As Turkey currently imports 90 percent of its energy needs, Baghdad is now without leverage.

Non-governmental organizations also have a potential role to play. The Euphrates-Tigris Initiative for Cooperation includes Turkey, Syria, Iraq and Iran. ETIC was founded at Kent State University in Ohio in May 2005 by Olcay Unver, former head of the Southeastern Anatolia Project, also known as GAP, and academics from Iraq, Syria, Turkey and the United States.

But for the present, Iraq's water needs are still closed on the Euphrates-Tigris basins. Jean-Marc Faures, senior water-resources management officer at the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, underlined this reality when he said, 'Iraqi water resources are based mainly on two rivers originating outside the country. In view of the scarcity of water in Iraq and growing demand for food and energy, there is a pressing need for improved management of water, in particular in irrigated agriculture.'

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