Total Clips: 43
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(Centennial) ITEMS TO BE COLLECTED FOR NEW BOX IN 2010 (Jones) 12/24/2009 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text
Fifty years ago, Kent State officials made plans to bury a time capsule to celebrate the university's semicentennial. Apparently, ''plan'' was all they did. Now that the university is approaching its centennial in 2010, the staff is trying to find th......
(Centennial) Kent State can't find 1960 time capsule (Jones) 12/24/2009 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text
Dec. 24--Fifty years ago, Kent State officials made plans to bury a time capsule to celebrate the university's semicentennial. Apparently, "plan" was all they did. Now that the university is approaching its centennial in 2010, the staff is trying to ......
(Centennial) History mystery Ohio college seeks time capsule 12/24/2009 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text View Clip
Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule. As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to know the fate of the capsule they created in 1960. They......
(Economics) The economic recovery is likely to be fragile (Ellis) 12/27/2009 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text View Clip
''The economic recovery is likely to be fragile, mainly because of the financial position of households. ''The outstanding household debt (mortgages and consumer credit) peaked at 132 percent of after-tax income at the beginning of the recession in 2007......
(Economics) GREATER AKRON ECONOMIC SNAPSHOT (Ellis) 12/27/2009 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text
VIEWS OF THREE LOCAL ECONOMY OBSERVERS _____________________________________ ''The economic recovery is likely to be fragile, mainly because of the financial position of households. ''The outstanding household debt (mortgages and consumer credit) ......
(JMC) At decade's end, revelers wonder what future holds (Batchelor) 12/31/2009 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text View Clip
Out with the old and in with the _ what? With the nation at war on two foreign fronts, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for many, who won......
KSU work may bring $2 million in taxes Kent officials call boost temporary 12/24/2009 Record-Courier Text View Clip
Record-Courier staff writer City officials are expecting a boon to income tax coffers when Kent State University begins work on campus as part of a major capital improvement project approved by university trustees last month. At their November meetin......
Centennial year begins for KSU (Neumann, Finn) 01/02/2010 Record-Courier Text View Clip
By Matt Fredmonsky Record-Courier staff writer Officially, Kent State University has already begun celebrating its centennial celebration with a kick-off event at the 2009 Homecoming in October. Technically, the universitys 100th birthday wont be......
(Town-Gown) KSU key to Kent redevelopment efforts (Clapper) 01/03/2010 Record-Courier Text View Clip
By Matt Fredmonsky Record-Courier staff writer Its no secret Kent State University is slowly expanding its presence off campus and into the neighborhood west of the Kent State University Museum off South Lincoln Street. Since 2007, the university an......
(PMBA) Business program celebrates success 01/04/2010 Record-Courier Text View Clip
The Partnership for the Minority Business Accelerator, a consortium of Akron Urban League, Akron SCORE and Kent State University, has completed its intensive mentoring program for the first group of minority- owned businesses that began the progra......
(JMC) At decade's end, revelers wonder what future holds (Batchelor) 12/31/2009 Record-Courier, The Text View Clip
NEW YORK – Out with the old and in with the — what? With the nation at war on two foreign fronts, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for ma......
(Centennial) History mystery Kent State seeks time capsule (Jones) 12/25/2009 Tribune Chronicle Text View Clip
> News > Ohio News AP KENT, Ohio (AP) — Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule. As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to know the fat......
(KSU Stark) Economy forces many to reinvent, redefine careers (Baxter) 12/31/2009 Repository - Online, The Text View Clip
Purchase this photo Tony Peldunas (left) and Robert Boettler are both laid-off mechanical engineers who took an operational efficiency course at Kent State University Stark Campus. They're helping Goodwill Industries by using their new skills to increas......
(KSU at Trumbull) 3 counties eligible for more funding 01/02/2010 Vindicator - Online Text View Clip
Funding available for 2010 increases to $750,000, up from $500,000 this year. YOUNGSTOWN — Communities in Mahoning, Trumbull and Ashtabula counties could receive state or federal funding to improve infrastructure or create new jobs. Last year marke......
(KSU Museum) Illustrations from fashion magazine on display (Druesedow) 01/03/2010 Stow Sentry Text View Clip
Special Products Editor "If we write here the story of dresses, the dresses will write in due time the story of their times." That was the idea, expressed by Henri Bidou, in the Gazette's first issue after World War I, behind the Gazette du Bon Ton. ......
(KSU Museum) Illustrations from fashion magazine on display (Druesedow) 01/03/2010 Hudson Hub-Times Text View Clip
Special Products Editor "If we write here the story of dresses, the dresses will write in due time the story of their times." That was the idea, expressed by Henri Bidou, in the Gazette's first issue after World War I, behind the Gazette du Bon Ton. ......
(Centennial) History mystery Kent State seeks time capsule (Jones) 12/25/2009 East Liverpool Review Text View Clip
KENT, Ohio (AP) — Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule. As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to know the fate of the capsule for 1960. T......
(Centennial) History mystery Kent State seeks time capsule (Jones) 12/25/2009 Salem News Text View Clip
> News Elsewhere > Ohio News AP KENT, Ohio (AP) — Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule. As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to kn......
(Centennial) History mystery Kent State seeks time capsule (Jones) 12/25/2009 Times Recorder - Online Text View Clip
KENT -- Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule. As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to know the fate of the capsule for 1960. They have f......
In the Region: KSU work may result in $2 million in taxes 12/30/2009 Aurora Advocate Text View Clip
Kent city officials are expecting a boon to income tax coffers when Kent State University begins work on a major capital improvement project approved by university trustees recently. At their November meeting, the KSU board of trustees voted to authoriz......
(KSU at Tusc) Group disburses grants 01/03/2010 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text View Clip
Reeves Foundation distributed more than $700,000 in 2009 The Reeves Foundation The Reeves Foundation of Dover disbursed $739,682 in grants to 36 organizations and public entities during the year 2009. An additional $959,948 in grants has been appr......
(KSU Museum) A tip of the hat to ... hats (Druesedow) 12/24/2009 Bedford Times Register - Online Text View Clip
While hats may not be so much in vogue today, there was a time when the proper chapeau was a regular part -- even a necessity -- of the wardrobe. The many hats of one woman is currently on display at the Kent State University Museum. The museum opened t......
KSU Museum prepares for 25th anniversary 12/24/2009 Bedford Times Register - Online Text View Clip
about 15 hours ago Opened to the public in October 1985, the Kent State University Museum was founded with an initial gift from New York dress manufacturers Jerry Silverman and Shannon Rodgers. Its seven galleries, a total of 10,000 square feet of exhib......
(Centennial) Kent State Has Trouble Tracking Down 50-Year-Old Time Capsule 12/24/2009 WEWS-TV - Online Text View Clip
KENT, Ohio -- Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule. As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to know the fate of the capsule they created in......
(Centennial) History mystery Ohio college seeks time capsule 12/25/2009 WKYC-TV - Online Text View Clip
KENT -- Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule. As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to know the fate of the capsule they created in 1960.......
(Anthropology) Ardi fossil named scientific breakthrough of the year (Lovejoy) 12/30/2009 WKSU-FM - Online Text View Clip
Kent State professor Owen Lovejoy part of the team that discovered oldest human ancestor It beat ... ice on the moon, a new longevity drug, and new pictures from deep space to win Science magazine's breakthrough of the year. In 2009 Ardipithicus, or Ard......
(JMC) At decade's end, revelers wonder what future holds (Batchelor) 12/31/2009 AOL Text View Clip
NEW YORK -Out with the old and in with the — what? With the nation at war on two foreign fronts, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for man......
(JMC) Crowds Gather in Times Square to Mark 2010 (Batchelor) 01/01/2010 New York Times - Online Text View Clip
Filed at 11:37 p.m. ET NEW YORK (AP) -- Hundreds of thousands of revelers gathered in chilly weather Thursday in Times Square to usher in the new decade and say goodbye to 10 years marred by war, recession, terrorism and threats of environmental catastr......
(JMC) Crowds gather in NYC's Times Square to mark 2010 (Batchelor) 01/01/2010 USA Today - Online Text View Clip
A New York City police officer keeps an eye on the crowd as New Year's Eve festivities begin on Times Square on Dec. 31. NEW YORK (AP) — Hundreds of thousands of revelers gathered in chilly weather Thursday in Times Square to usher in the new decade and......
(JMC) At decade's end, revelers wonder what future holds (Batchelor) 12/31/2009 Washington Post - Online Text View Clip
NEW YORK -- Out with the old and in with the - what? With the nation at war on two foreign fronts, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for m......
(JMC) As revelers gather to mark end of decade of uncertainty, what 2010s will hold (Batchelor) 12/31/2009 Los Angeles Times - Online Text View Clip
NEW YORK (AP) — Out with the old and in with the — what? With the nation at war on two foreign fronts, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive f......
(JMC) At decade's end, revelers wonder what future holds (Batchelor) 12/31/2009 Forbes - Online Text View Clip
NEW YORK -- Out with the old and in with the - what? With the nation at war on two foreign fronts, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for m......
(JMC) At decade's end, revelers wonder what future holds (Batchelor) 12/31/2009 San Francisco Chronicle - Online Text View Clip
(12-31) 09:53 PST New York (AP) -- Out with the old and in with the — what? Limbaugh felt pains similar to heart attack 12.31.09 Ex-girlfriend arrested in San Jose dragging death 12.31.09 AT&T is latest to end Tiger Woods sponsorship 12.31.09 ......
(JMC) Americans set to say goodbye to year, decade worth forgetting (Batchelor) 12/31/2009 Tampa Tribune - Online Text View Clip
Hundreds of thousands are in New York's Times Square to bid farewell to the year and the decade. NEW YORK - Hundreds of thousands of revelers gathered in chilly weather Thursday in Times Square to usher in the new decade as organizers prepared to drop 3......
(JMC) New(sU) Takes on E-Learning 12/30/2009 Poynteronline Text View Clip
A week-long seminar at Poynter costs about $1,000. Most participants say you get your money's worth. But some journalists just don't have the money, or the time. On Monday, you can get an hour with one of Poynter's best for just 10 bucks. At 2 p.m. P......
(Anthropology) Evolution's Bad Girl (Lovejoy) 12/31/2009 Science News Text View Clip
Ardi shakes up the fossil record Standing tallIn this artist's illustration, Ardi stands amid Ardipithecus ramidus comrades in once-forested East Africa.Illustration: Jay Matternes © 2009 She's the ultimate evolutionary party crasher. Dubbed Ardi, he......
(Anthropology) 'Ardi' Research Named Science's 'Breakthrough Of Year (Lovejoy) 12/29/2009 mediLexicon Text View Clip
Main Category: Biology / Biochemistry Article Date: 29 Dec 2009 Ardipithecus ramidus, or "Ardi," receives the top honor as the Breakthrough of the Year, named by Science and its publisher, AAAS, the world's largest science society. The Dec. 18 issue ......
(Anthropology) 'Ardi' Research Named Science's 'Breakthrough Of Year (Lovejoy) 12/29/2009 Medical News Today Text View Clip
Ardipithecus ramidus, or "Ardi," receives the top honor as the Breakthrough of the Year, named by Science and its publisher, AAAS, the world's largest science society. The Dec. 18 issue of Science (http://www.sciencemag.org) takes a look back at the big sc......
(Health Sciences) Scientists at Kent State University target nutrition (Ha) 12/24/2009 Women's Health Weekly Text
2009 DEC 24 - () -- According to a study from the United States, "During last few decades, soft drink consumption has steadily increased while milk intake has decreased (see also ). Excess consumption of soft drinks and low milk intake may pose risks of se......
(Health Sciences) Scientists at Kent State University target nutrition (Ha) 12/26/2009 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week Text
According to a study from the United States, "During last few decades, soft drink consumption has steadily increased while milk intake has decreased. Excess consumption of soft drinks and low milk intake may pose risks of several diseases such as dental ca......
(KSU at Ashtabula) MRSA Risk in Children (Rose, Senita) 12/28/2009 Advance for Respiratory Care and Sleep Medicine - Online Text View Clip
"Brian" is an active 8-year-old boy who recently returned from a family vacation in Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Mosquitoes are common on the island, and Brian acquired a number of bites whose erythematous symptoms persisted after the family's return to ......
(KSU at Ashtabula) MRSA Risk in Children (Rose, Senita) 01/03/2010 Advance for Respiratory Care and Sleep Medicine - Online Text View Clip
"Brian" is an active 8-year-old boy who recently returned from a family vacation in Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Mosquitoes are common on the island, and Brian acquired a number of bites whose erythematous symptoms persisted after the family's return to ......
(OEOC) BUSINESS SUCCESSION PLANNING PROGRAM AT KSU OFFERS A SERIES OF WEBINAR (Cooper) 12/28/2009 Federal News Service Text
KENT, Ohio, Dec. 23 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The Ohio Employee Ownership Center's Succession Planning Program at Kent State University has partnered with the Ohio Department of Development (ODOD) to present a series of......


(Centennial) ITEMS TO BE COLLECTED FOR NEW BOX IN 2010 (Jones)
12/24/2009
Akron Beacon Journal, The

Fifty years ago, Kent State officials made plans to bury a time capsule to celebrate the university's semicentennial.

Apparently, ''plan'' was all they did.
Now that the university is approaching its centennial in 2010, the staff is trying to find the time capsule from 1960 ? and can't.
''There was no documentation of a burial,'' said Pamela Jones, an academic program and student development coordinator who is overseeing a similar project for the university's 100-year anniversary.
Jones is taking care to document her committee's work in the university archives, architect's office and student-run media so there is no doubt what they're doing. They have purchased a stainless-steel time capsule for $3,600 from Time Capsules Inc. of Prospect, Pa.
Starting next month, her group will begin soliciting ideas on what to preserve in the cube that measures 36 inches on each side. Possibilities include cell phones, laptops, photos, athletic uniforms, textbooks and collectible items that are special to today's students, she said.
Current plans are to bury the time capsule on Risman Plaza between the student center and the library during homecoming next fall. The capsule will be incorporated into the new design of the plaza, which KSU is renovating next year.
Tom Marak, owner of the company that provided the time capsule, said future generations of KSU students won't have to worry about the box standing the test of time.
He guarantees the KSU box for 500 years against flood damage. He puts a mild organic alkaline substance in a cotton sack in the capsule to neutralize the acidity of paper, preserving books and the like for 500 years as well, he said.
When the time capsule is put in the ground, Marak will vacuum out its atmosphere and insert an inert argon gas. That creates a controlled environment in which mold, fungus and bacteria can't exist, he said.
But as important as making sure the contents survive unharmed is the question of where to put the time capsule and how to alert future generations of its existence.
Jones said the university is toying with the idea of putting a sign or marker where the time capsule is buried.
Because it could be several feet underground, possibly under concrete, and weighs 178 pounds empty, it would be difficult for vandals to steal, she said.
Besides, publicizing the location of time capsules is common today, Marak said. He said his customers almost always ''make sure there's a monument or a cornerstone or that the time capsule's in a vault. These people are serious about them.''
His clients have included such highly visible projects as the Clinton Presidential Library, the Jamestown Settlement in Virginia and the Flight 587 Memorial in New York City.
In the past, church members buried coffee cans filled with mementos in graveyards. But people died, and records were lost or destroyed. Many time capsules have never been recovered, he said.
That could be what happened to the KSU time capsule of 1960.
While Jones found abundant references to a time capsule in minutes of planning meetings for the semicentennial, KSU records, including the yearbook, student-run newspaper and university archives, haven't yielded any clues about whether a time capsule actually was buried.
KSU students tracked down three people who took part in the semicentennial meetings, to no avail. They couldn't remember what happened, either.
''We're thinking that there may have been great intention but we're wondering if a time capsule actually existed,'' Jones said.
She asks anyone with information about the 1960 time capsule to contact her at 330-672-0972 or pjones@kent.edu.

Copyright © 2009 Akron Beacon Journal

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(Centennial) Kent State can't find 1960 time capsule (Jones)
12/24/2009
Akron Beacon Journal, The

Dec. 24--Fifty years ago, Kent State officials made plans to bury a time capsule to celebrate the university's semicentennial.

Apparently, "plan" was all they did.

Now that the university is approaching its centennial in 2010, the staff is trying to find the time capsule from 1960 -- and can't.

"There was no documentation of a burial," said Pamela Jones, an academic program and student development coordinator who is overseeing a similar project for the university's 100-year anniversary.

Jones is taking care to document her committee's work in the university archives, architect's office and student-run media so there is no doubt what they're doing. They have purchased a stainless-steel time capsule for $3,600 from Time Capsules Inc. of Prospect, Pa.

Starting next month, her group will begin soliciting ideas on what to preserve in the cube that measures 36 inches on each side. Possibilities include cell phones, laptops, photos, athletic uniforms, textbooks and collectible items that are special to today's students, she said.

Current plans are to bury the time capsule on Risman Plaza between the student center and the library during homecoming next fall. The capsule will be incorporated into the new design of the plaza, which KSU is renovating next year.

Tom Marak, owner of the company that provided the time capsule, said future generations of KSU students won't have to worry about the box standing the test of time.

He guarantees the KSU box for 500 years against flood damage. He puts a mild organic alkaline substance in a cotton sack in the capsule to neutralize the acidity of paper, preserving books and the like for 500 years as well, he said.

When the time capsule is put in the ground, Marak will vacuum out its atmosphere and insert an inert argon gas. That creates a controlled environment in which mold, fungus and bacteria can't exist, he said.

But as important as making sure the contents survive unharmed is the question of where to put the time capsule and how to alert future generations of its existence.

Jones said the university is toying with the idea of putting a sign or marker where the time capsule is buried.

Because it could be several feet underground, possibly under concrete, and weighs 178 pounds empty, it would be difficult for vandals to steal, she said.

Besides, publicizing the location of time capsules is common today, Marak said. He said his customers almost always "make sure there's a monument or a cornerstone or that the time capsule's in a vault. These people are serious about them."

His clients have included such highly visible projects as the Clinton Presidential Library, the Jamestown Settlement in Virginia and the Flight 587 Memorial in New York City.

In the past, church members buried coffee cans filled with mementos in graveyards. But people died, and records were lost or destroyed. Many time capsules have never been recovered, he said.

That could be what happened to the KSU time capsule of 1960.

While Jones found abundant references to a time capsule in minutes of planning meetings for the semicentennial, KSU records, including the yearbook, student-run newspaper and university archives, haven't yielded any clues about whether a time capsule actually was buried.

KSU students tracked down three people who took part in the semicentennial meetings, to no avail. They couldn't remember what happened, either.

"We're thinking that there may have been great intention but we're wondering if a time capsule actually existed," Jones said.

She asks anyone with information about the 1960 time capsule to contact her at 330-672-0972 or pjones@kent.edu.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

Copyright © 2009 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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(Centennial) History mystery Ohio college seeks time capsule | View Clip
12/24/2009
Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The

Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule.

As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to know the fate of the capsule they created in 1960.

They have found records of it in university archives, the school newspaper and the yearbook.

But where, or even whether, it was actually buried is another matter. Even tracking down three participants in the 1960 celebration planning hasn't yielded an answer.

This time will be different. The school plans to bury a stainless-steel time capsule on campus next year during homecoming.

It likely will have a marker so a future generation can unearth it to find items that could include cell phones, laptops and uniforms used by current students.

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(Economics) The economic recovery is likely to be fragile (Ellis) | View Clip
12/27/2009
Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The

''The economic recovery is likely to be fragile, mainly because of the financial position of households.

''The outstanding household debt (mortgages and consumer credit) peaked at 132 percent of after-tax income at the beginning of the recession in 2007. Households have reduced spending to repair their finances, and while they have made some progress, lowering their debt to 126 percent of after-tax income, they still have a long way to go to lower it to levels prevailing before the housing bubble developed (in 2002 it was 108 percent).

''Reduced spending has created high unemployment, making it even more difficult for households to generate the income to reduce debt. Monetary and fiscal policies over the last two years have had limited effect on the financial position of households and predictably have been relatively ineffective.

''A stronger recovery will be possible only when households have reduced debt to the level where they are comfortable with their financial position.''

— Michael Ellis,

Department of Economics,

Kent State University

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(Economics) GREATER AKRON ECONOMIC SNAPSHOT (Ellis)
12/27/2009
Akron Beacon Journal, The

VIEWS OF THREE LOCAL ECONOMY OBSERVERS

_____________________________________

''The economic recovery is likely to be fragile, mainly because of the financial position of households.

''The outstanding household debt (mortgages and consumer credit) peaked at 132 percent of after-tax income at the beginning of the recession in 2007. Households have reduced spending to repair their finances, and while they have made some progress, lowering their debt to 126 percent of after-tax income, they still have a long way to go to lower it to levels prevailing before the housing bubble developed (in 2002 it was 108 percent).

''Reduced spending has created high unemployment, making it even more difficult for households to generate the income to reduce debt. Monetary and fiscal policies over the last two years have had limited effect on the financial position of households and predictably have been relatively ineffective.

''A stronger recovery will be possible only when households have reduced debt to the level where they are comfortable with their financial position.''

Michael Ellis, Department of Economics, Kent State University

_______________________________________

''FirstEnergy's economic development team works with local, regional and state organizations and partnerships throughout our Ohio, Pennsylvania and New Jersey service areas to help attract new investment in the communities we serve. . . . In seven out of the last eight years, Site Selection magazine has named FirstEnergy one of the top utilities in the country for promoting economic development and assisting with job growth.

''But 2009 was a very tough year. Our results indicate that while there are still a number of businesses thinking about expanding or relocating to Northeast Ohio, very few projects have actually been announced . . . In addition, we are seeing some previously announced projects having the timelines extended. This isn't ideal, but it's much better than having the project canceled outright.

''There are some real signs that the economy is recovering. Even so, with some uncertainty still out there, from a regional business development standpoint, 2010 might not be much better than what we saw in 2009.''

? Patrick Kelly, director of economic development, FirstEnergy, Akron

__________________________________________

''Fortunately for us,the majority of our customers have seen modest growth over the last year. We see that trend continuing, but we are forecasting commodity prices to turn higher throughout 2010. Our efforts are geared toward trying to hedge our costing so we can keep our sales pricing stable for our customers. There has been a lot of volatility over the last few months, so this will be challenging.

''As we sit today, 2010 looks very promising, but we are not taking this for granted and have to remain cautious in everything we do. These are unprecedented times and there are no blueprints to refer to. We feel we have to remain flexible and nimble so we can react to economic and other forces that we have no control over. We are seeing a lot of opportunities from prospects, but it seems that the sales cycle is taking longer as these prospects are also taking this cautionary approach. ''

? Steven L. Marks Founder, co-chief executive, Main Street Gourmet; founder, Roadrunner Akron Marathon

Copyright © 2009 Akron Beacon Journal

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(JMC) At decade's end, revelers wonder what future holds (Batchelor) | View Clip
12/31/2009
Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The

Out with the old and in with the _ what?

With the nation at war on two foreign fronts, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for many, who wonder what sort of new legacy they can build beginning on Jan. 1, 2010.

"The meaning of the new decade is going to be diminished by the hangover of the last decade," says Bob Batchelor, professor of mass communications at Kent State University and author of "The 2000s," published before the decade was even done. "That makes it tough to be as optimistic as Americans usually are."

In the spirit of fresh beginnings, people around the world planned Thursday to celebrate the transition. In New York's Times Square, new giant digits are in place to mark the new decade, as are 3,000 pounds of confetti.

Sitting with his wife and two daughters in a Manhattan atrium as they discuss plans to celebrate the new year with family, D.J. Alemayehu says he is finding it hard to feel positive about the future after the last decade's jumble of bad news and nagging worries.

"It's very muddled. There's no clear policy. There's no clear direction," says the Englewood, Colo., resident. "We're not in control of much, individually or as a nation."

For this family, it is left to the younger generation to seize hold of optimism. At the end of the only decade she has known, young Escadar sounds a positive note: "I'm just excited because I'm turning 10!"

She will remember the last decade primarily for the election of the nation's first black president, Escadar says. And in 10 years, when she's looking ahead to the '20s _ and her twenties? Life, she believes, will be even better.

Older observers have a hard time seeing such a clear path.

For 45-year-old Manhattanite Susana Buencamino, the last decade was defined by a single act of terrorism and its myriad repercussions.

"Sept. 11, 2001. That changed the whole decade," the systems analyst says near her midtown office. Looking forward to the coming years, one thing seems certain. "The terrorists will still be around."

"All of us, we're going to be worried. Wherever we are," she says.

Such a wary outlook is no surprise after a 10-year stretch that started with fears of Y2K disaster and never quite regained its footing, says Robert Thompson, professor of popular culture at Syracuse University.

"If people were looking for an apocalypse, they kind of got one," he says, listing a string of chaotic milestones, beginning with the contested election of 2000 and the Sept. 11 attacks and ending with the economic crisis and the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"When one looks at the end of this decade, it's good riddance. ... It's a time to wipe the slate clean," he says.

Planned celebrations are taking many forms, with concerts, fireworks, and the timed drop of favorite local symbols.

In the Tennessee cities of Memphis and Nashville, organizers plan to drop a 10-foot, red guitar. In Atlanta, an 800-pound fiberglass peach is to take a 138-foot plunge. In North Carolina, Brasstown, near the Georgia border, will have its annual opossum drop, Mount Olive drops a 3-foot glowing pickle, and the capital city of Raleigh lowers a giant acorn. In Eastport, Maine, an 8-foot wooden sardine is dropped. And in Times Square, an 11,875-pound ball covered with more than 32,000 bulbs is in place to be lowered at midnight.

In Boston, more than 1,000 artists and performers are participating in the "First Night" celebrations. Artists plan to display six ice sculptures, including a recreation of one of the Boston Museum of Fine Art's 4,000 year old Egyptian sculptures.

And in Chicago, the city's Transit Authority is offering rides for a penny to help residents and visitors get in place for fireworks displays planned during the evening and at midnight.

At Times Square, organizers planned to mix about 10,000 handwritten wishes into the thousands of pounds of confetti to be dropped over the crowds. They include appeals for the safe return of the troops, continued employment and a cure for diabetes.

The hundreds of thousands of New York City revelers brought out heightened police security, displayed a day earlier when police evacuated several blocks around Times Square to investigate a parked van without license plates.

Police and other officials planned radiation sweeps for biological contaminants in the area and a command center was to be staffed by FBI, New York and regional police. Thousands of officers were to staff Times Square, where revelers will be banned from carrying backpacks and open bottles.

Among the revelers eager to see the ball drop in Times Square are 23-year-old Leonardo Colombo and 31-year-old Gilberto Oliveira _ both visiting from Sao Paolo, Brazil, where they have seen the last decade transform their nation with the promise of economic power and new wealth.

Their fears are tempered by a sense of possibility.

Oliveira says the decade now in its final hours was defined by "the development of technology and the evolution of communication," changes he believes will soon give us medical advances and new tools to improve our lives.

His friend adds: "The new year is a time for change."

"What defines the new decade? Hope."

Associated Press writers Caryn Rousseau in Chicago, Russell Contreras in Boston and Kate Brumback in Atlanta contributed to this report.

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KSU work may bring $2 million in taxes Kent officials call boost temporary | View Clip
12/24/2009
Record-Courier

Record-Courier staff writer

City officials are expecting a boon to income tax coffers when Kent State University begins work on campus as part of a major capital improvement project approved by university trustees last month.

At their November meeting, the KSU Board of Trustees voted to authorize up to $200 million in bonds to fund construction of new buildings and the renovation of existing facilities on campus. The work is expected to be under way in varying capacities for the next three to five years and could begin in early 2010.

The expected, corresponding income tax increase would come from taxes paid by the construction crews working in the city.

Kent City Manager Dave Ruller wrote in his Dec. 11 communication to Kent City Council members that the rule of thumb for construction work is approximately half of the project costs are in personnel payroll.

Ruller said, based on that logic, he anticipates an injection of as much as $100 million in new payroll, which could amount to a total $2 million in new income taxes during the course of the work.

“If the construction stretches out over the next five years we would likely see a $400,000 to $500,000 bump in our tax base (annually) if plans proceed as forecasted,” Ruller said.

City officials are careful to describe the income tax bump as “temporary” and the figures as a “rough estimate.” Still, the numbers are considered an accurate projection.

Kent Economic Development Director Dan Smith said a boost in income tax is guaranteed if the university follows through with its renovation and construction plans.

“It's somewhat of a one-shot deal that will happen over four or five years,” he said. “But that boost in income tax money will hopefully coincide with some of the work we're planning and will ease our budget challenges over that time frame.”

Kent Finance Director Dave Coffee said the increase to the income tax rolls is conditional and depends on the timeline of the work and the total amount spent by KSU.

“It would probably be more of a bell-shaped curve in terms of income tax receipts, starting off lower, peaking somewhere towards the middle of the total program and trailing off,” Coffee said.

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Centennial year begins for KSU (Neumann, Finn) | View Clip
01/02/2010
Record-Courier

By Matt Fredmonsky

Record-Courier staff writer

Officially, Kent State University has already begun celebrating its centennial celebration with a kick-off event at the 2009 Homecoming in October.

Technically, the universitys 100th birthday wont be marked until May 19, 2010, on the anniversary of the day in 1910 when the Ohio legislature approved State Rep. John Lowrys bill formally establishing funding for two teaching schools in northern Ohio. And Kent wasnt chosen as the location for one of the new schools until after submitting an application in July 1910. The city vied for the new college with seven other communities four of which are now home to KSU regional campuses.

Tom Neumann, chairman of the KSU Centennial Celebration Committee, said officials from both KSU and Bowling Green State University, which was the second school founded by the Lowry Bill, will travel to Columbus in May to mark the bills passage and the founding of the Kent State Normal School. Coincidentally, Bowling Greens current president is Dr. Carol Cartwright, the predecessor of KSU President Lester Lefton.

The trip to Columbus wont be the only event held in 2010 to commemorate the universitys founding on roughly 53 original acres owned primarily and donated by William S. Kent. (The university is named for its benefactor, not the city where it is located.) Along with that, this is the 40th commemoration of May 4, Neumann said. The universitys 100th year will see the start of substantial construction projects at the Kent campus, which was created through the consolidation of property from Kent and several other owners in 1910. Today, the campus totals 866 acres with 119 buildings, a 291-acre airport and a nearby 18-hole golf course.

This fall, the KSU Board of Trustees approved the issuance of up to $250 million in bonds for renovation and new construction, which is expected to begin in 2010 and continue for the next three to five years. And a massive renovation of Risman Plaza will begin in the spring, including removal of the fountain outside the KSU library.

Neumann said the celebration committee has several more events commemorating the centennial in the works for 2010. So, hopefully, well have some other things to add to it as the year goes on, he said. Along with the October start, the university also kicked off its public phase of the Centennial Campaign to raise $250 million for current programs, endowment and capital projects.

Gene Finn, vice president for institutional advancement at KSU, said right now the campaign has raised about $183 million. What were doing now is going around the country with sort of mini campaign launch events with the president, Finn said. Were inviting alumni in various cities to come out, and Lefton talks about priorities and whats new on campus. The fund-raising campaign closes in 2012, Finn said. So we have a little way to go, he said.

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(Town-Gown) KSU key to Kent redevelopment efforts (Clapper) | View Clip
01/03/2010
Record-Courier

By Matt Fredmonsky

Record-Courier staff writer Its no secret Kent State University is slowly expanding its presence off campus and into the neighborhood west of the Kent State University Museum off South Lincoln Street.

Since 2007, the university and the KSU Foundation have purchased eight properties in this area, with a ninth set to close later this month, for a combined price tag of $1,390,500.

For university administrators, the purchases themselves are nothing new, though most of the sales closed in 2009.

Tom Clapper, the universitys director of risk management and real estate, said the city and KSU have conducted extensive planning efforts to create a physical connection between the campus and the downtown as part of Kents overall redevelopment efforts. And these acquisitions are all in support of that initiative, Clapper said. For Councilwoman Heidi Shaffer, whose Ward 5 includes the neighborhood and the western edge of campus, whats new about the plan is how the city and KSU are approaching redevelopment of the neighborhood. Incremental in-fill is the process, but the term Ive been fighting for is neighborhood retention, to retain it as a residential neighborhood, Shaffer said. In 2004, the city adopted its Bicentennial Plan, which identified the neighborhood bordered by Haymaker Parkway, East College Avenue, South Lincoln and East Main streets as a controversial special planning area dubbed the Campus Link neighborhood.

The plan called for several major construction projects in the area, including a hotel and conference center, additional parking and more dense residential. I think most people got this image the neighborhood would be bulldozed, and the university would buy up all the land and move in, Shaffer said. And I think people were reacting to a vision that could be 30 years down the line. Well, thats not going to happen. Its certainly not going to happen all at once. Shaffer said university planners have since adopted a more surgical approach to buying and redeveloping choice properties in the neighborhood as they become available.

Some properties may be taken down over time and replaced with university facilities, such as an alumni center or visitors center. Plans also have changed regarding the proposed location of the hotel and conference center and multi-modal transit facility; the new proposed site is across Haymaker Parkway into the downtown area.

Documents released by the city and university identify one link between the downtown and KSU campus as the tentatively titled Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center.

The hotel has been proposed for the Erie Street property acquired by the university, the former site of the Kent office of the Record-Courier, which closed in late 2007.

As for additional neighborhood redevelopment, Shaffer said planners are relying in large part on current property owners to redevelop their own land. An addendum to the Bicentennial Plan opened up the area to dense, multi-unit residential use, she said. Were looking at this mostly as private development, she said. Whether it stays primarily rental, I see it hopefully developing into a mix. The university already has demolished two houses it bought in the neighborhood.

Properties purchased so far and their sale amounts include: 231 S. Willow St., $125,000; 220 S. Lincoln St., $150,000; 425 E. College Ave., $120,000; 225 S. Willow St., $155,000; 219 S. Willow St., $132,500; 214 and 220 S. Willow St., $267,000; and the former Record-Courier site at 206 E. Erie St., $300,000.

Clapper declined to discuss specific plans about future construction efforts or property purchases, but he did say the university absolutely intends to buy more properties in the neighborhood.

One solid aspect of the universitys plans is extension of The Esplanade the on-campus leg of The Portage Hike and Bike Trail from campus through the neighborhood and into downtown.

A conceptual master plan for the area approved by the KSU Board of Trustees in September showed plans for two new university buildings near the intersection of East Erie Street and Haymaker Parkway. Those plans remain intact, Clapper said. The emphasis is these are always conceptual plans, he said. The acquisitions were making and plan to make will all support this effort.

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(PMBA) Business program celebrates success | View Clip
01/04/2010
Record-Courier

The Partnership for the
Minority Business Accelerator,
a consortium of
Akron Urban League, Akron
SCORE and Kent State University,
has completed its intensive
mentoring program
for the first group of minority-
owned businesses that
began the program in 2008.
In 14 months, these 15
businesses have added 11
new permanent employees,
and 12 new products or services
are offered. They also
have increased revenue by an
estimated $3 million by the
end of 2009.
PMBA continues its support
of minority businesses in
Summit, Medina and Portage
counties and has welcomed a
new group of 20 businesses
that are participating in the
program. This class of business
owners represents the
professional services, retail,
cleaning, catering, transportation,
construction and
printing industries.
PMBA businesses have a
combined total of 103 employees
and their combined
annual revenues are just over
$3,989,000.

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(JMC) At decade's end, revelers wonder what future holds (Batchelor) | View Clip
12/31/2009
Record-Courier, The

NEW YORK – Out with the old and in with the — what?

With the nation at war on two foreign fronts, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for many, who wonder what sort of new legacy they can build beginning on Jan. 1, 2010.

"The meaning of the new decade is going to be diminished by the hangover of the last decade," says Bob Batchelor, professor of mass communications at Kent State University and author of "The 2000s," published before the decade was even done. "That makes it tough to be as optimistic as Americans usually are."

In the spirit of fresh beginnings, people around the world planned Thursday to celebrate the transition. In New York's Times Square, new giant digits are in place to mark the new decade, as are 3,000 pounds of confetti.

Sitting with his wife and two daughters in a Manhattan atrium as they discuss plans to celebrate the new year with family, D.J. Alemayehu says he is finding it hard to feel positive about the future after the last decade's jumble of bad news and nagging worries.

"It's very muddled. There's no clear policy. There's no clear direction," says the Englewood, Colo., resident. "We're not in control of much, individually or as a nation."

For this family, it is left to the younger generation to seize hold of optimism. At the end of the only decade she has known, young Escadar sounds a positive note: "I'm just excited because I'm turning 10!"

She will remember the last decade primarily for the election of the nation's first black president, Escadar says. And in 10 years, when she's looking ahead to the '20s — and her twenties? Life, she believes, will be even better.

Older observers have a hard time seeing such a clear path.

For 45-year-old Manhattanite Susana Buencamino, the last decade was defined by a single act of terrorism and its myriad repercussions.

"Sept. 11, 2001. That changed the whole decade," the systems analyst says near her midtown office. Looking forward to the coming years, one thing seems certain. "The terrorists will still be around."

"All of us, we're going to be worried. Wherever we are," she says.

Such a wary outlook is no surprise after a 10-year stretch that started with fears of Y2K disaster and never quite regained its footing, says Robert Thompson, professor of popular culture at Syracuse University.

"If people were looking for an apocalypse, they kind of got one," he says, listing a string of chaotic milestones, beginning with the contested election of 2000 and the Sept. 11 attacks and ending with the economic crisis and the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"When one looks at the end of this decade, it's good riddance. ... It's a time to wipe the slate clean," he says.

Planned celebrations are taking many forms, with concerts, fireworks, and the timed drop of favorite local symbols.

In the Tennessee cities of Memphis and Nashville, organizers plan to drop a 10-foot, red guitar. In Atlanta, an 800-pound fiberglass peach is to take a 138-foot plunge. In North Carolina, Brasstown, near the Georgia border, will have its annual opossum drop, Mount Olive drops a 3-foot glowing pickle, and the capital city of Raleigh lowers a giant acorn. In Eastport, Maine, an 8-foot wooden sardine is dropped. And in Times Square, an 11,875-pound ball covered with more than 32,000 bulbs is in place to be lowered at midnight.

In Boston, more than 1,000 artists and performers are participating in the "First Night" celebrations. Artists plan to display six ice sculptures, including a recreation of one of the Boston Museum of Fine Art's 4,000 year old Egyptian sculptures.

And in Chicago, the city's Transit Authority is offering rides for a penny to help residents and visitors get in place for fireworks displays planned during the evening and at midnight.

At Times Square, organizers planned to mix about 10,000 handwritten wishes into the thousands of pounds of confetti to be dropped over the crowds. They include appeals for the safe return of the troops, continued employment and a cure for diabetes.

The hundreds of thousands of New York City revelers brought out heightened police security, displayed a day earlier when police evacuated several blocks around Times Square to investigate a parked van without license plates.

Police and other officials planned radiation sweeps for biological contaminants in the area and a command center was to be staffed by FBI, New York and regional police. Thousands of officers were to staff Times Square, where revelers will be banned from carrying backpacks and open bottles.

Among the revelers eager to see the ball drop in Times Square are 23-year-old Leonardo Colombo and 31-year-old Gilberto Oliveira — both visiting from Sao Paolo, Brazil, where they have seen the last decade transform their nation with the promise of economic power and new wealth.

Their fears are tempered by a sense of possibility.

Oliveira says the decade now in its final hours was defined by "the development of technology and the evolution of communication," changes he believes will soon give us medical advances and new tools to improve our lives.

His friend adds: "The new year is a time for change."

"What defines the new decade? Hope."

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(Centennial) History mystery Kent State seeks time capsule (Jones) | View Clip
12/25/2009
Tribune Chronicle

> News > Ohio News

AP

KENT, Ohio (AP) — Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule.

As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to know the fate of the capsule for 1960. They have found records of it in university archives, the school newspaper and the yearbook.

But where, or even whether, it was actually buried is another matter. Even tracking down three participants in the 1960 celebration planning hasn't yielded an answer. They weren't sure what became of it.

‘‘There was no documentation of a burial,'' said Pamela Jones, an academic program and student development coordinator leading a similar project for the university's 100-year anniversary.

This time will be different. The school plans to bury a stainless-steel time capsule on campus next year during homecoming, and Jones is taking care to document her committee's work in the university archives, the architect's office and student-run media. The school bought the 2010 capsule for $3,600 from Time Capsules Inc. of Prospect, Pa.

Tom Marak, owner of the company, said publicizing the location of time capsules has become a common practice. His customers usually ‘‘make sure there's a monument or a cornerstone or that the time capsule's in a vault.''

But that wasn't always the case in the past, and he said many time capsules have been lost to the ages.

The new Kent capsule likely will have a marker so a future generation can unearth it to find items that could include cell phones, laptops, textbooks and athletic uniforms used by current students.

Jones said it's unlikely vandals would take it because the capsule will be several feet underground, possibly under concrete, and it weighs 178 pounds.

Meanwhile, the university is still asking for any information that could lead to the whereabouts of the 1960 capsule, if it exists.

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(KSU Stark) Economy forces many to reinvent, redefine careers (Baxter) | View Clip
12/31/2009
Repository - Online, The

Purchase this photo

Tony Peldunas (left) and Robert Boettler are both laid-off mechanical engineers who took an operational efficiency course at Kent State University Stark Campus. They're helping Goodwill Industries by using their new skills to increase efficiency in the textile baler operation behind them.

Carol Biggums may be the face — the changing face — of employment in Stark County.

In 1999, she was one of about 53,500 people who had a “goods producing” job in Stark and Carroll counties.

Now the area has only 34,000 such jobs, and Biggums is unemployed. Her job is gone, along with more than 19,000 others, according to the latest Ohio labor force figures. One-third of those 19,000 have disappeared in the last year.

The loss of jobs has forced people, including Biggums, to “reinvent” themselves. People who had jobs in one sector of the economy are looking for new skills, or honing skills they already had, to make themselves more marketable.

Biggums, 50, started work at the Hoover Co. in 1994 and eventually became a production line operator. She said she always believed that Hoover wouldn't be her last job.

“You can handle working in a factory when you're younger,” she said, “but I knew at that time I did not want to grow old in a factory.”

When she was told the factory would close, she knew she'd be headed back to school. She lost her job in 2007.

Biggums was offered an office job before she went to school, but she knew she didn't have the skills. “I didn't feel comfortable,” she said.

So she took refresher courses at Timken High School, which she credited with helping prepare her for later study in business administration at Stark State College through The Employment Source.

Biggums said her courses have included “a lot of computer classes” along with English and math. She started school with federal help because her job was eliminated when the work was moved overseas.

That took care of finishing a one-year program, but a counselor advised her to go on to earn an associate's degree, so she plans to find a way to finish.

“I'm going to have a job when I'm done,” she said. “I have that much confidence in me.”

WHITE-COLLAR CHANGE

Not all the people reinventing themselves are blue-collar workers. White-collar workers — especially those connected with manufacturing — have changed careers. Shaye Hicks has done it twice.

After getting an associate's degree from Hocking College, a technical school in Nelsonville, in 1992, he was a corrections officer for seven years. He then jumped into another field — as a benefits coordinator at Timken Co.

He knew he needed a four-year degree to be promoted at Timken, and the company paid for him to go through the Malone University Management Program.

But by the time he finished the program, Timken was cutting all salaried employee pension plans and was reducing staff.

“My future at the Timken Co. was beginning to look grim,” he said.

Hicks decided to change his life again. He quit the Timken Co. and went back to Malone full-time to pursue a teaching degree. Costs for the second degree were half-price because he already had a Malone degree.

Today, Hicks is an intervention specialist in Perry Local Schools, teaching sixth- and seventh-grade classes.

DEVELOPING NEW SKILLS

Still others are looking to develop new skills to make themselves more marketable. That's why Robert Boettler and Tony Peldunas went through Lean Six Sigma Black Belt training at the Corporate University at Kent State University Stark Campus.

Corporate University Director Kelli Baxter described Lean Six Sigma as “a new way to think about what you do in your work.”

The program's goal is to teach people how to examine workplace processes to eliminate waste and reduce variation. Students learn statistical tools to apply in seeking ways to increase efficiency.

The Employment Source helps dislocated workers such as Boettler and Peldunas pay for the Lean Six Sigma Black Belt training and certification program at Kent Stark.

Boettler was laid off from Timken after 21 years, where he was a senior production technician. He had started in the steel mill and used the company's reimbursement program to get first an associate's degree, then a bachelor's degree.

Peldunas was in manufacturing for 30 years and then for two nonprofit agencies, but was laid off in June. A mechanical engineer, he has both bachelor's and master's degrees in business administration.

“But they don't do you much good,” he said.

Boettler heard about and saw the use of Lean Six Sigma at Timken, where other people had gone through the program.

“I thought it would be something good to have for switching to another career,” he said.

Since going through the program, the two have partnered on a project for Goodwill Industries.

They're working to apply what they learned to improve the non-profit's baling operation in Canton, which takes in clothing that won't sell from all the Goodwill stores in the area and bales it up for sale overseas, Boettler said.

The operation makes about 10 1,200-pound bales each day, he said. It runs six days a week and sometimes seven.

They want to make the operation more efficient. If they succeed, Goodwill may be able to expand its baling operation to other materials.

“They (Goodwill) would like to get into other types of recycling — maybe paper or light metals,” Boettler said.

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(KSU at Trumbull) 3 counties eligible for more funding | View Clip
01/02/2010
Vindicator - Online

Funding available for 2010 increases to $750,000, up from $500,000 this year.

YOUNGSTOWN — Communities in Mahoning, Trumbull and Ashtabula counties could receive state or federal funding to improve infrastructure or create new jobs.

Last year marked the first the three counties were considered part of Appalachia, making them eligible for additional federal funding through the Appalachian Regional Commission.

Funding for 2009 totaled $500,000, and was used to help fund projects at a pretreatment wastewater facility in West Farmington, improvements at the Mahoning Valley Sanitary District and an electronic medical-records program at the Ashtabula County Medical Center, said Kathy Zook of Eastgate Regional Council of Governments, the local development district for ARC.

“For fiscal year 2010, we'll be getting $750,000,” she said.

That includes $500,000 in federal dollars and $250,000 from the state through the Governor's Office of Appalachia.

Applications for that funding were due earlier this month, and Zook expects entities to learn in about three months if their applications were successful. The information must be submitted to both the federal ARC and the governor's office.

“There are four major goals in ARC, and the projects have to meet at least one of them” to receive funding, Zook said.

The goals are job creation or retention, increased capacity to compete on a global economy, improvement and development of infrastructure and development of the Appalachian highway system.

“I think our projects meet at least one if not more of the four goals,” Zook said.

Projects submitted for 2010 funding came from the Mahoning County Sanitary Engineer, Trumbull and Ashtabula county commissioners, Lordstown, Kent State University Trumbull Campus, MVSD and the Ashtabula County Medical Center.

The amount requested totals $739,750 which would help fund more than $2.9 million in projects.

The Mahoning County sanitary engineer's office is asking for $83,625 as part of a $167,250 project to install 1,000 feet of sanitary sewer in Austintown.

The work is to improve infrastructure and prevent closure of the state Route 46 fire station because of Ohio Environmental Protection Agency requirements.

Andy Frost III, that township's assistant fire chief, said runoff from the station's bays has been flowing into the septic system that serves the station. OEPA doesn't allow that, and the agency has been working with the township to correct the problem, he said.

Trumbull commissioners have requested $250,000 as part of a $1.9 million project to install sanitary-sewer lines for 37 homes and 17 businesses in Vienna Township.

KSU wants $205,616 toward its $411,232 project to expand the industrial-maintenance training program at the Trumbull campus and to increase the number of dislocated workers who get job-skill training.

Ashtabula commissioners have requested $98,000 for a $196,000 plan to build an access road including waterline and sanitary-sewer connection and sidewalk in Austinburg to help five new businesses and create about 40 new jobs.

MVSD's request is for $75,000 of a $150,000 project to replace its 1930s lime chemical-feed system. Lime is used to remove the hardness or particles from water to make it safe to drink.

Ashtabula County Medical Center wants $59,659 toward a $152,237 effort to hire a full-time diabetes educator, to buy office equipment and to offset the membership dues for 100 patients.

Lordstown's $65,850 request would go toward a $131,700 project to build a wind turbine at the village administration building.

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(KSU Museum) Illustrations from fashion magazine on display (Druesedow) | View Clip
01/03/2010
Stow Sentry

Special Products Editor

"If we write here the story of dresses, the dresses will write in due time the story of their times."

That was the idea, expressed by Henri Bidou, in the Gazette's first issue after World War I, behind the Gazette du Bon Ton. The Gazette was a publication which ran between 1912 and 1925.

The Kent State University Museum has on display 82 original plates from the Algesa O'Sickey collection of Gazette du Bon Ton from 1920 to 1922 in its Palmer and Mull Galleries. The entire collection will be accessible on the museum's Web site. The exhibit will be on display through May 30.

Produced in limited editions on handmade paper, the series spared no expense and used the pochoir, or stencil, technique to hand watercolor what may be the 20th century's most extraordinary fashion plates, said Jean Druesedow, museum director. In addition to the plates, 20 garments from 1912 to 1925 from this period are also on display. The gowns are from the leading Parisian couture houses of the teens and 20s, such as those of Jeanne Paquin, Paul Poiret, Jeanne Lanvin and the House of Worth. Two of the garments on display, on loan from the Western Reserve Historical Society, were the models for two of the plates, Druesedow added.

"The Gazette was a combination of Architectural Digest, Vanity Fair and The New Yorker," Druesedow said. "We were given two or three years worth of the publication."

The Gazette du Bon Ton was the brain child of Lucien Vogel, a Frenchman who was fascinated by 19th century hand-colored engravings and set out to create a luxury modern magazine that would be the epitome of good taste.

"These hand-colored illustrations were really quite beautiful and witty," Druesedow said. "There's a lot of whimsy with them.

Many plates from the French publication were translated by Dr. Anne Bissonnette, the museum's former curator who put together the display, Druesedow said.

Hours and admission information

The museum is open Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 8:45 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 4:45 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, and $3 for students 7 through 18. It is on the Kent State University campus, on the corner of Main Street and S. Lincoln. Parking is free.

For additional information about the Kent State University Museum, go to http://www.kent.edu/musem, or call 330-672-3450.

E-mail: ahelms@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

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(KSU Museum) Illustrations from fashion magazine on display (Druesedow) | View Clip
01/03/2010
Hudson Hub-Times

Special Products Editor

"If we write here the story of dresses, the dresses will write in due time the story of their times."

That was the idea, expressed by Henri Bidou, in the Gazette's first issue after World War I, behind the Gazette du Bon Ton. The Gazette was a publication which ran between 1912 and 1925.

The Kent State University Museum has on display 82 original plates from the Algesa O'Sickey collection of Gazette du Bon Ton from 1920 to 1922 in its Palmer and Mull Galleries. The entire collection will be accessible on the museum's Web site. The exhibit will be on display through May 30.

Produced in limited editions on handmade paper, the series spared no expense and used the pochoir, or stencil, technique to hand watercolor what may be the 20th century's most extraordinary fashion plates, said Jean Druesedow, museum director. In addition to the plates, 20 garments from 1912 to 1925 from this period are also on display. The gowns are from the leading Parisian couture houses of the teens and 20s, such as those of Jeanne Paquin, Paul Poiret, Jeanne Lanvin and the House of Worth. Two of the garments on display, on loan from the Western Reserve Historical Society, were the models for two of the plates, Druesedow added.

"The Gazette was a combination of Architectural Digest, Vanity Fair and The New Yorker," Druesedow said. "We were given two or three years worth of the publication."

The Gazette du Bon Ton was the brain child of Lucien Vogel, a Frenchman who was fascinated by 19th century hand-colored engravings and set out to create a luxury modern magazine that would be the epitome of good taste.

"These hand-colored illustrations were really quite beautiful and witty," Druesedow said. "There's a lot of whimsy with them.

Many plates from the French publication were translated by Dr. Anne Bissonnette, the museum's former curator who put together the display, Druesedow said.

Hours and admission information

The museum is open Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 8:45 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 4:45 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, and $3 for students 7 through 18. It is on the Kent State University campus, on the corner of Main Street and S. Lincoln. Parking is free.

For additional information about the Kent State University Museum, go to http://www.kent.edu/musem, or call 330-672-3450.

E-mail: ahelms@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

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(Centennial) History mystery Kent State seeks time capsule (Jones) | View Clip
12/25/2009
East Liverpool Review

KENT, Ohio (AP) — Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule.

As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to know the fate of the capsule for 1960. They have found records of it in university archives, the school newspaper and the yearbook.

But where, or even whether, it was actually buried is another matter. Even tracking down three participants in the 1960 celebration planning hasn't yielded an answer. They weren't sure what became of it.

‘‘There was no documentation of a burial,'' said Pamela Jones, an academic program and student development coordinator leading a similar project for the university's 100-year anniversary.

This time will be different. The school plans to bury a stainless-steel time capsule on campus next year during homecoming, and Jones is taking care to document her committee's work in the university archives, the architect's office and student-run media. The school bought the 2010 capsule for $3,600 from Time Capsules Inc. of Prospect, Pa.

Tom Marak, owner of the company, said publicizing the location of time capsules has become a common practice. His customers usually ‘‘make sure there's a monument or a cornerstone or that the time capsule's in a vault.''

But that wasn't always the case in the past, and he said many time capsules have been lost to the ages.

The new Kent capsule likely will have a marker so a future generation can unearth it to find items that could include cell phones, laptops, textbooks and athletic uniforms used by current students.

Jones said it's unlikely vandals would take it because the capsule will be several feet underground, possibly under concrete, and it weighs 178 pounds.

Meanwhile, the university is still asking for any information that could lead to the whereabouts of the 1960 capsule, if it exists.

Return to Top



(Centennial) History mystery Kent State seeks time capsule (Jones) | View Clip
12/25/2009
Salem News

> News Elsewhere > Ohio News

AP

KENT, Ohio (AP) — Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule.

As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to know the fate of the capsule for 1960. They have found records of it in university archives, the school newspaper and the yearbook.

But where, or even whether, it was actually buried is another matter. Even tracking down three participants in the 1960 celebration planning hasn't yielded an answer. They weren't sure what became of it.

‘‘There was no documentation of a burial,'' said Pamela Jones, an academic program and student development coordinator leading a similar project for the university's 100-year anniversary.

This time will be different. The school plans to bury a stainless-steel time capsule on campus next year during homecoming, and Jones is taking care to document her committee's work in the university archives, the architect's office and student-run media. The school bought the 2010 capsule for $3,600 from Time Capsules Inc. of Prospect, Pa.

Tom Marak, owner of the company, said publicizing the location of time capsules has become a common practice. His customers usually ‘‘make sure there's a monument or a cornerstone or that the time capsule's in a vault.''

But that wasn't always the case in the past, and he said many time capsules have been lost to the ages.

The new Kent capsule likely will have a marker so a future generation can unearth it to find items that could include cell phones, laptops, textbooks and athletic uniforms used by current students.

Jones said it's unlikely vandals would take it because the capsule will be several feet underground, possibly under concrete, and it weighs 178 pounds.

Meanwhile, the university is still asking for any information that could lead to the whereabouts of the 1960 capsule, if it exists.

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(Centennial) History mystery Kent State seeks time capsule (Jones) | View Clip
12/25/2009
Times Recorder - Online

KENT -- Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule.

As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to know the fate of the capsule for 1960. They have found records of it in university archives, the school newspaper and the yearbook.

But where, or even whether, it was actually buried is another matter. Even tracking down three participants in the 1960 celebration planning hasn't yielded an answer. They weren't sure what became of it.

"There was no documentation of a burial," said Pamela Jones, an academic program and student development coordinator leading a similar project for the university's 100-year anniversary.

This time will be different. The school plans to bury a stainless-steel time capsule on campus next year during homecoming, and Jones is taking care to document her committee's work in the university archives, the architect's office and student-run media. The school bought the 2010 capsule for $3,600 from Time Capsules Inc. of Prospect, Pa.

Tom Marak, owner of the company, said publicizing the location of time capsules has become a common practice. His customers usually "make sure there's a monument or a cornerstone or that the time capsule's in a vault."

But that wasn't always the case in the past, and he said many time capsules have been lost to the ages.

The new Kent capsule likely will have a marker so a future generation can unearth it to find items that could include cell phones, laptops, textbooks and athletic uniforms used by current students.

Jones said it's unlikely vandals would take it because the capsule will be several feet underground, possibly under concrete, and it weighs 178 pounds.

Meanwhile, the university is still asking for information that could lead to the whereabouts of the 1960 capsule, if it exists.

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In the Region: KSU work may result in $2 million in taxes | View Clip
12/30/2009
Aurora Advocate

Kent city officials are expecting a boon to income tax coffers when Kent State University begins work on a major capital improvement project approved by university trustees recently.

At their November meeting, the KSU board of trustees voted to authorize up to $200 million in bonds to fund construction of new buildings and the renovation of existing facilities.

The work is expected to be under way in varying capacities for the next three to five years and could begin in early 2010.

The expected, corresponding income tax increase would come from taxes paid by the construction crews working in the city.

Kent City Manager Dave Ruller said he anticipates an injection of as much as $100 million in new payroll, which could amount to a total $2 million in new income taxes during the course of the work.

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(KSU at Tusc) Group disburses grants | View Clip
01/03/2010
Times-Reporter - Online, The

Reeves Foundation distributed more than $700,000 in 2009

The Reeves Foundation

The Reeves Foundation of Dover disbursed $739,682 in grants to 36 organizations and public entities during the year 2009.

An additional $959,948 in grants has been approved by the foundation's trustees and will be disbursed later.

The grants awarded last year were the following:

Tuscarawas County University Foundation, $133,300 for the new Performing Arts Center at Tuscarawas Campus of Kent State University at New Philadelphia;

Muskingum Lakes Chapter of the American Red Cross at New Philadelphia, $30,000, automated external defibrillators;

Tuscarawas County Public Library at New Philadelphia, $45,000, elevator modernization project;

HELPS Foundation at New Philadelphia, $1,198, office equipment;

Friends of the Homeless of Tuscarawas County, $14,500, new roof;

Zoar Community Assn., $2,104, outdoor lighting;

Horizons Inc. at Dover, $8,750, commercial shredder;

Mobile Meals at Dover, $5,700, food containers, and $750, tuition expense;

Tuscarawas County Senior Center at Dover, $6,454, vehicle;

Greater Dover-New Philadelphia Food Pantry, $15,720, refrigerators and freezers;

Dover Historical Society, $58,750, general fund and supplements;

Gnadenhutten Historical Society, $17,750, structure maintenance;

Dennison Railroad Depot Museum, $18,393, museum maintenance;

Ohio Foundation of Independent Colleges at Columbus, $16,000, 2009-2010 annual campaign to assist students with tuition costs;

Tuscarawas County Senior Center, $8,000, Horizons Inc. at Dover, $4,107, and Society for Equal Access at New Philadelphia, $9,600, each for a radio system for their transportation drivers and to link them all;

Tuscarawas County Council for Church and Community, $55,000, general fund and emergency assistance fund;

COMMUNITIES

Dennison, $8,500, thermal imaging camera;

Newcomerstown, $15,440, vehicle equipment;

Bolivar, $8,710, vehicle;

Strasburg, $20,000, ball fields;

Midvale, $3,391, playground equipment;

Mineral City, $13,295, fire department equipment;

Strasburg, $5,130, police video equipment and $5,320, library carpet;

Roswell, $14,916, playground equipment;

Warren Township, $3,418, community center table and chairs at New Cumberland;

Gnadenhutten-Clay Township Union Cemetery, $3,479, tractor;

Stone Creek Volunteer Fire Department, $18,700, new roof;

SCHOOLS

Newcomerstown, $57,975, auditorium seats;

Dover, $23,970, resurfacing Crater Stadium track; and $24,300, wheelchair platform and ramp at Crater Stadium;

Claymont at Uhrichsville, Dover, Indian Valley at Gnadenhutten, New Philadelphia, Strasburg and Tuscarawas Valley at Zoarville, each $5,000 to buy computer equipment for Project Lead the Way.

Sandy Valley at Magnolia, $3,000, library books;

Garaway at Sugarcreek, $15,000, playground equipment;

Indian Valley, $2,377, band raincoats;

Strasburg, $3,485, point of sale system for cafeteria items;

Tuscarawas Valley, $7,500, point of sale system for cafeteria items.

The Reeves Foundation was incorporated in 1966 and has been providing grants to organizations and public entities since then. During 2009, the Reeves Foundation observed 43 years of continuous community service with a total of $26,628,002 in 972 grants. Major recipients include Union Hospital, Tuscarawas County YMCA, Tuscarawas Campus of Kent State University, Dover City Schools, Twin City Hospital and the Tuscarawas County Council for Church and Community.

The foundation's first trustees were Samuel Reeves, Helen Reeves and Thomas Scheffer. Samuel Reeves served as president from 1966 until his death in 1977.

Grant request information is available by calling the Reeves Foundation business office at (330) 364-4660, or by mail to Don Patterson, executive director, Box 441, Dover, 44622.

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(KSU Museum) A tip of the hat to ... hats (Druesedow) | View Clip
12/24/2009
Bedford Times Register - Online

While hats may not be so much in vogue today, there was a time when the proper chapeau was a regular part -- even a necessity -- of the wardrobe.

The many hats of one woman is currently on display at the Kent State University Museum. The museum opened this latest exhibit in November, 'I Never Leave the House Without a HAT, The Savanna Vaughn Clark Collection.' The display will be on exhibit through Oct. 10, 2010 in the Alumni Gallery.

Clark gave more than 100 hats to the Kent State University Museum, said Jean Druesedow, museum director. More than 50 of those hats are included in the current exhibit. Milliners represented include Philip Treacy, Patricia Underwood, Frank Olive, Jack McConnell, Yves Saint Laurent among others.

'I've wanted to do this exhibit for some time,' Druesedow said.

Druesedow said that Elizabeth Morgan, a graduate student at Wright Stte University looked up the information on the hats and milleners, and guest curated the display.

'We tried to get an overview of the kinds of hats she had,' Duesedow said. 'Some of them are very sculptural in the way they are put together.'

Clark has been an active contributor to a number of organizations, founding the Washington, D. C. Capital City chapter of The Links, Inc., an organization of black women dedicated to each other and to civic work. She was a founding member of the Women's Committee of the National Museum of Women in the Arts, a founding member for the Kennedy Center Friends and Volunteers, Golden Circle and Honors Committees; Vice President of the Women's Committee of the Washington Ballet, and Chairperson for the Howard University School of Communications Scholarships. She served on the Executive Committee for YMCA Worldwide Refugee Relief. Her awards and citations include the Lou Rawls Trophy for her work raising funds for the National Negro College Fund, and three listings in Who's Who -- in Washington, Among Black Americans, and in American Education. She has garnered five National Best Dressed Women Awards.

The museum is open Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., Thursdays from10 a.m. to 8:45 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 4:45 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, and $3 for students 7 through 18. It is on the Kent State University campus, on the corner of Main Street and S. Lincoln. Parking is free.

For additional information about the Kent State University Museum, go to http://www.kent.edu/muusem, or call 330-672-3450.

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KSU Museum prepares for 25th anniversary | View Clip
12/24/2009
Bedford Times Register - Online

about 15 hours ago

Opened to the public in October 1985, the Kent State University Museum was founded with an initial gift from New York dress manufacturers Jerry Silverman and Shannon Rodgers. Its seven galleries, a total of 10,000 square feet of exhibit space, feature changing exhibitions of work by many of the world's great designers.

Today, the museum collections number more than 40,000 objects including high fashion garments from the 18th to 21st centuries, regional traditional costumes, and a decorative arts collection which includes a 10,000 piece glass collection donated by Akron collectors Jabe Tarter and Paul Miller. Most major American and European fashion designers are represented, including Balenciaga, Chanel, Dior, Halston, Norell, Oscar de la Renta, Yves St. Laurent, George Stavropoulos, and Issey Miyake to name a few.

Some of the museum's most important objects include:

* A quilt made by Elizabeth Hobbes Keckley from scraps of Mary Todd Lincoln's dresses.

* Katharine Hepburn's personal collection of her performance clothes.

* Christian Dior's 'Vénus,' a splendid ball gown from 1949 of pink tulle embroidered with sequins and crystals that once belonged to actress Marlene Dietrich.

* A 1926 fringed evening dress by Coco Chanel

* A 1750s blue and silver formal dress

For details about the Kent State University Museum, go to www.kent.edu/muusem, or call 330-672-3450.

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(Centennial) Kent State Has Trouble Tracking Down 50-Year-Old Time Capsule | View Clip
12/24/2009
WEWS-TV - Online

KENT, Ohio -- Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule.

As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to know the fate of the capsule they created in 1960.

They have found records of it in university archives, the school newspaper and the yearbook.

But where, or even whether, it was actually buried is another matter. Even tracking down three participants in the 1960 celebration planning hasn't yielded an answer.

This time will be different. The school plans to bury a stainless-steel time capsule on campus next year during homecoming.

It likely will have a marker so a future generation can unearth it to find items that could include cell phones, laptops and uniforms used by current students.

Return to Top



(Centennial) History mystery Ohio college seeks time capsule | View Clip
12/25/2009
WKYC-TV - Online

KENT -- Kent State University officials might need a time machine to find out what happened to the school's 50-year anniversary time capsule.

As they prepare for their centennial in 2010, they'd like to know the fate of the capsule they created in 1960.

They have found records of it in university archives, the school newspaper and the yearbook.

But where, or even whether, it was actually buried is another matter. Even tracking down three participants in the 1960 celebration planning hasn't yielded an answer.

This time will be different.

The school plans to bury a stainless-steel time capsule on campus next year during homecoming.

It likely will have a marker so a future generation can unearth it to find items that could include cell phones, laptops and uniforms used by current students.

Return to Top



(Anthropology) Ardi fossil named scientific breakthrough of the year (Lovejoy) | View Clip
12/30/2009
WKSU-FM - Online

Kent State professor Owen Lovejoy part of the team that discovered oldest human ancestor

It beat ... ice on the moon, a new longevity drug, and new pictures from deep space to win Science magazine's breakthrough of the year. In 2009 Ardipithicus, or Ardi was introduced as the newest, and oldest member of the human family tree. Kent State professor of anthropology Owen Lovejoy was part of the international team of scientists who discovered the 4.4 million year old fossil.

Jeff St.Clair talks with Dr. Owen Lovejoy

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(JMC) At decade's end, revelers wonder what future holds (Batchelor) | View Clip
12/31/2009
AOL

NEW YORK -Out with the old and in with the — what?

With the nation at war on two foreign fronts, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for many, who wonder what sort of new legacy they can build beginning on Jan. 1, 2010.

"The meaning of the new decade is going to be diminished by the hangover of the last decade," says Bob Batchelor, professor of mass communications at Kent State University and author of "The 2000s," published before the decade was even done. "That makes it tough to be as optimistic as Americans usually are."

In the spirit of fresh beginnings, people around the world planned Thursday to celebrate the transition. In New York's Times Square, new giant digits are in place to mark the new decade, as are 3,000 pounds of confetti.

Sitting with his wife and two daughters in a Manhattan atrium as they discuss plans to celebrate the new year with family, D.J. Alemayehu says he is finding it hard to feel positive about the future after the last decade's jumble of bad news and nagging worries.

"It's very muddled. There's no clear policy. There's no clear direction," says the Englewood, Colo., resident. "We're not in control of much, individually or as a nation."

For this family, it is left to the younger generation to seize hold of optimism. At the end of the only decade she has known, young Escadar sounds a positive note: "I'm just excited because I'm turning 10!"

She will remember the last decade primarily for the election of the nation's first black president, Escadar says. And in 10 years, when she's looking ahead to the '20s — and her twenties? Life, she believes, will be even better.

Older observers have a hard time seeing such a clear path.

For 45-year-old Manhattanite Susana Buencamino, the last decade was defined by a single act of terrorism and its myriad repercussions.

"Sept. 11, 2001. That changed the whole decade," the systems analyst says near her midtown office. Looking forward to the coming years, one thing seems certain. "The terrorists will still be around."

"All of us, we're going to be worried. Wherever we are," she says.

Such a wary outlook is no surprise after a 10-year stretch that started with fears of Y2K disaster and never quite regained its footing, says Robert Thompson, professor of popular culture at Syracuse University.

"If people were looking for an apocalypse, they kind of got one," he says, listing a string of chaotic milestones, beginning with the contested election of 2000 and the Sept. 11 attacks and ending with the economic crisis and the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"When one looks at the end of this decade, it's good riddance. ... It's a time to wipe the slate clean," he says.

Planned celebrations are taking many forms, with concerts, fireworks, and the timed drop of favorite local symbols.

In the Tennessee cities of Memphis and Nashville, organizers plan to drop a 10-foot, red guitar. In Atlanta, an 800-pound fiberglass peach is to take a 138-foot plunge. In North Carolina, Brasstown, near the Georgia border, will have its annual opossum drop, Mount Olive drops a 3-foot glowing pickle, and the capital city of Raleigh lowers a giant acorn. In Eastport, Maine, an 8-foot wooden sardine is dropped. And in Times Square, an 11,875-pound ball covered with more than 32,000 bulbs is in place to be lowered at midnight.

In Boston, more than 1,000 artists and performers are participating in the "First Night" celebrations. Artists plan to display six ice sculptures, including a recreation of one of the Boston Museum of Fine Art's 4,000 year old Egyptian sculptures.

And in Chicago, the city's Transit Authority is offering rides for a penny to help residents and visitors get in place for fireworks displays planned during the evening and at midnight.

At Times Square, organizers planned to mix about 10,000 handwritten wishes into the thousands of pounds of confetti to be dropped over the crowds. They include appeals for the safe return of the troops, continued employment and a cure for diabetes.

The hundreds of thousands of New York City revelers brought out heightened police security, displayed a day earlier when police evacuated several blocks around Times Square to investigate a parked van without license plates.

Police and other officials planned radiation sweeps for biological contaminants in the area and a command center was to be staffed by FBI, New York and regional police. Thousands of officers were to staff Times Square, where revelers will be banned from carrying backpacks and open bottles.

Among the revelers eager to see the ball drop in Times Square are 23-year-old Leonardo Colombo and 31-year-old Gilberto Oliveira — both visiting from Sao Paolo, Brazil, where they have seen the last decade transform their nation with the promise of economic power and new wealth.

Their fears are tempered by a sense of possibility.

Oliveira says the decade now in its final hours was defined by "the development of technology and the evolution of communication," changes he believes will soon give us medical advances and new tools to improve our lives.

His friend adds: "The new year is a time for change."

"What defines the new decade? Hope."

Associated Press writers Caryn Rousseau in Chicago, Russell Contreras in Boston and Kate Brumback in Atlanta contributed to this report.

Copyright 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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(JMC) Crowds Gather in Times Square to Mark 2010 (Batchelor) | View Clip
01/01/2010
New York Times - Online

Filed at 11:37 p.m. ET

NEW YORK (AP) -- Hundreds of thousands of revelers gathered in chilly weather Thursday in Times Square to usher in the new decade and say goodbye to 10 years marred by war, recession, terrorism and threats of environmental catastrophe.

Fireworks were set off at about 6 p.m. and the gigantic ball was set into place in preparation for midnight. Many people wore conical party hats and 2010 glasses that blinked colorfully, and some were jumping up and down to keep warm -- the National Weather Service said the temperature will be in the low 30s and forecast snow for around midnight.

Cell phones were brought out to document the last few hours of a decade many wanted to leave behind.

Gail Guay of Raymond, N.H., came to New York City with two friends to celebrate her 50th birthday. The trio carried a huge white hotel towel with ''Happy New Year New Hampshire 2010'' printed on it.

Reflecting on the past decade when she had buried her mother, Guay had this advice: ''Don't look back.''

Her friend Doreen O'Brien, 48, of Nashua, N.H., said that the crowd in Times Square seemed to be feeling positive on the cusp of a new decade. ''People are in a great mood; it's very friendly. It's like New York has slowed down.''

But a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for many, who wonder what sort of legacy will begin on Jan. 1, 2010.

''Nothing seems to be going well,'' said John O'Donnell of Hazleton, Pa. ''People are losing their lives overseas, people are unemployed. It doesn't seem like it's about to end soon.''

David Fraley, 56, of Las Vegas, attended a party in Sin City's downtown where 35,000 were expected.

''This decade's over. Let's get a better one going,'' said Fraley, who said he lost his job as a supermarket liquor clerk in March.

''The meaning of the new decade is going to be diminished by the hangover of the last decade,'' says Bob Batchelor, professor of mass communications at Kent State University and author of ''The 2000s,'' published before the decade was even done. ''That makes it tough to be as optimistic as Americans usually are.''

But New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg was more tempered in his assessment.

''If you put it in the context of what people are suffering around the world, we're in very good shape,'' he said from Times Square.

Celebrations are taking many forms, with concerts, fireworks, and the timed drop of favorite local symbols.

In the Tennessee cities of Memphis and Nashville, organizers plan to drop a 10-foot red guitar. In Atlanta, an 800-pound fiberglass peach is to take a 138-foot plunge. In North Carolina, Brasstown, near the Georgia border, will have its annual opossum drop, Mount Olive will drop a 3-foot glowing pickle, and the capital city of Raleigh will lower a giant acorn. In Eastport, Maine, an 8-foot wooden sardine is dropped. And in Times Square, an 11,875-pound ball covered with more than 32,000 bulbs is in place to be lowered at midnight.

In Boston, more than 1,000 artists and performers are participating in the ''First Night'' celebrations. Artists plan to display six ice sculptures, including a replica of one of the Boston Museum of Fine Art's 4,000-year-old Egyptian sculptures.

And in Chicago, the city's Transit Authority is offering rides for a penny to help residents and visitors get in place for fireworks displays planned during the evening and at midnight.

Las Vegas prepared to welcome some 315,000 people with fireworks from casino rooftops, a traffic-free Las Vegas Strip and toasts at nightclubs from celebrities including actress Eva Longoria and rapper 50 Cent.

And around the world, from fireworks in Sydney to balloons sent aloft in Tokyo, revelers at least temporarily shelved worries about the future to bid farewell to the first decade of the 21st century.

In Times Square, organizers planned to mix about 10,000 handwritten wishes into the confetti to be dropped over the crowds. They include appeals for the safe return of troops fighting overseas, continued employment and a cure for diabetes.

The hundreds of thousands of revelers in New York City brought out heightened police security, displayed a day earlier when police evacuated several blocks around Times Square to investigate a parked van without license plates. Only clothing and clothes racks were found inside.

New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, speaking from Times Square on a Webcast, said the department had ''many, many'' police officers in the crowd, both uniformed and plainclothes.

He said officers were using bomb-sniffing dogs and technology to detect biological and chemical agents. Counter-sniper teams were set up as well.

''This is something we do every year,'' he said. ''We change it somewhat so it's not that predictable.''

Associated Press writer Oskar Garcia in Las Vegas contributed to this report.

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(JMC) Crowds gather in NYC's Times Square to mark 2010 (Batchelor) | View Clip
01/01/2010
USA Today - Online

A New York City police officer keeps an eye on the crowd as New Year's Eve festivities begin on Times Square on Dec. 31.

NEW YORK (AP) — Hundreds of thousands of revelers gathered in chilly weather Thursday in Times Square to usher in the new decade and say goodbye to 10 years marred by war, recession, terrorism and threats of environmental catastrophe.

Fireworks were set off at about 6 p.m. and the gigantic ball was set into place in preparation for midnight. Many people wore conical party hats and 2010 glasses that blinked colorfully, and some were jumping up and down to keep warm — the National Weather Service said the temperature will be in the low 30s and forecast snow for around midnight.

Cellphones were brought out to document the last few hours of a decade many wanted to leave behind.

Gail Guay of Raymond, N.H., came to New York City with two friends to celebrate her 50th birthday. The trio carried a huge white hotel towel with "Happy New Year New Hampshire 2010" printed on it.

MORE CELEBRATIONS: World kicks off New Year's parties

PHOTO GALLERY: Worldwide festivities welcome 2010

Reflecting on the past decade when she had buried her mother, Guay had this advice: "Don't look back."

Her friend Doreen O'Brien, 48, of Nashua, N.H., said that the crowd in Times Square seemed to be feeling positive on the cusp of a new decade. "People are in a great mood; it's very friendly. It's like New York has slowed down."

But a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for many, who wonder what sort of legacy will begin on Jan. 1, 2010.

"Nothing seems to be going well," said John O'Donnell of Hazleton, Pa. "People are losing their lives overseas, people are unemployed. It doesn't seem like it's about to end soon."

David Fraley, 56, of Las Vegas, attended a party in Sin City's downtown where 35,000 were expected.

"This decade's over. Let's get a better one going," said Fraley, who said he lost his job as a supermarket liquor clerk in March.

"The meaning of the new decade is going to be diminished by the hangover of the last decade," says Bob Batchelor, professor of mass communications at Kent State University and author of "The 2000s," published before the decade was even done. "That makes it tough to be as optimistic as Americans usually are."

But New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg was more tempered in his assessment.

"If you put it in the context of what people are suffering around the world, we're in very good shape," he said from Times Square.

Celebrations are taking many forms, with concerts, fireworks, and the timed drop of favorite local symbols.

In the Tennessee cities of Memphis and Nashville, organizers plan to drop a 10-foot red guitar. In Atlanta, an 800-pound fiberglass peach is to take a 138-foot plunge. In North Carolina, Brasstown, near the Georgia border, will have its annual opossum drop, Mount Olive will drop a 3-foot glowing pickle, and the capital city of Raleigh will lower a giant acorn. In Eastport, Maine, an 8-foot wooden sardine is dropped. And in Times Square, an 11,875-pound ball covered with more than 32,000 bulbs is in place to be lowered at midnight.

In Boston, more than 1,000 artists and performers are participating in the "First Night" celebrations. Artists plan to display six ice sculptures, including a replica of one of the Boston Museum of Fine Art's 4,000-year-old Egyptian sculptures.

And in Chicago, the city's Transit Authority is offering rides for a penny to help residents and visitors get in place for fireworks displays planned during the evening and at midnight.

Las Vegas prepared to welcome some 315,000 people with fireworks from casino rooftops, a traffic-free Las Vegas Strip and toasts at nightclubs from celebrities including actress Eva Longoria and rapper 50 Cent.

And around the world, from fireworks in Sydney to balloons sent aloft in Tokyo, revelers at least temporarily shelved worries about the future to bid farewell to the first decade of the 21st century.

In Times Square, organizers planned to mix about 10,000 handwritten wishes into the confetti to be dropped over the crowds. They include appeals for the safe return of troops fighting overseas, continued employment and a cure for diabetes.

The hundreds of thousands of revelers in New York City brought out heightened police security, displayed a day earlier when police evacuated several blocks around Times Square to investigate a parked van without license plates. Only clothing and clothes racks were found inside.

New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, speaking from Times Square on a webcast, said the department had "many, many" police officers in the crowd, both uniformed and plainclothes.

He said officers were using bomb-sniffing dogs and technology to detect biological and chemical agents. Counter-sniper teams were set up as well.

"This is something we do every year," he said. "We change it somewhat so it's not that predictable."

Copyright 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Return to Top



(JMC) At decade's end, revelers wonder what future holds (Batchelor) | View Clip
12/31/2009
Washington Post - Online

NEW YORK -- Out with the old and in with the - what?

With the nation at war on two foreign fronts, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for many, who wonder what sort of new legacy they can build beginning on Jan. 1, 2010.

"The meaning of the new decade is going to be diminished by the hangover of the last decade," says Bob Batchelor, professor of mass communications at Kent State University and author of "The 2000s," published before the decade was even done. "That makes it tough to be as optimistic as Americans usually are."

In the spirit of fresh beginnings, people around the world planned Thursday to celebrate the transition. In New York's Times Square, new giant digits are in place to mark the new decade, as are 3,000 pounds of confetti.

Sitting with his wife and two daughters in a Manhattan atrium as they discuss plans to celebrate the new year with family, D.J. Alemayehu says he is finding it hard to feel positive about the future after the last decade's jumble of bad news and nagging worries.

"It's very muddled. There's no clear policy. There's no clear direction," says the Englewood, Colo., resident. "We're not in control of much, individually or as a nation."

For this family, it is left to the younger generation to seize hold of optimism. At the end of the only decade she has known, young Escadar sounds a positive note: "I'm just excited because I'm turning 10!"

She will remember the last decade primarily for the election of the nation's first black president, Escadar says. And in 10 years, when she's looking ahead to the '20s - and her twenties? Life, she believes, will be even better.

Older observers have a hard time seeing such a clear path.

For 45-year-old Manhattanite Susana Buencamino, the last decade was defined by a single act of terrorism and its myriad repercussions.

"Sept. 11, 2001. That changed the whole decade," the systems analyst says near her midtown office. Looking forward to the coming years, one thing seems certain. "The terrorists will still be around."

"All of us, we're going to be worried. Wherever we are," she says.

Return to Top



(JMC) As revelers gather to mark end of decade of uncertainty, what 2010s will hold (Batchelor) | View Clip
12/31/2009
Los Angeles Times - Online

NEW YORK (AP) — Out with the old and in with the — what?

With the nation at war on two foreign fronts, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for many, who wonder what sort of new legacy they can build beginning on Jan. 1, 2010.

"The meaning of the new decade is going to be diminished by the hangover of the last decade," says Bob Batchelor, professor of mass communications at Kent State University and author of "The 2000s," published before the decade was even done. "That makes it tough to be as optimistic as Americans usually are."

In the spirit of fresh beginnings, people around the world planned Thursday to celebrate the transition. In New York's Times Square, new giant digits are in place to mark the new decade, as are 3,000 pounds of confetti.

Sitting with his wife and two daughters in a Manhattan atrium as they discuss plans to celebrate the new year with family, D.J. Alemayehu says he is finding it hard to feel positive about the future after the last decade's jumble of bad news and nagging worries.

"It's very muddled. There's no clear policy. There's no clear direction," says the Englewood, Colo., resident. "We're not in control of much, individually or as a nation."

For this family, it is left to the younger generation to seize hold of optimism. At the end of the only decade she has known, young Escadar sounds a positive note: "I'm just excited because I'm turning 10!"

She will remember the last decade primarily for the election of the nation's first black president, Escadar says. And in 10 years, when she's looking ahead to the '20s — and her twenties? Life, she believes, will be even better.

Older observers have a hard time seeing such a clear path.

For 45-year-old Manhattanite Susana Buencamino, the last decade was defined by a single act of terrorism and its myriad repercussions.

"Sept. 11, 2001. That changed the whole decade," the systems analyst says near her midtown office. Looking forward to the coming years, one thing seems certain. "The terrorists will still be around."

"All of us, we're going to be worried. Wherever we are," she says.

Such a wary outlook is no surprise after a 10-year stretch that started with fears of Y2K disaster and never quite regained its footing, says Robert Thompson, professor of popular culture at Syracuse University.

"If people were looking for an apocalypse, they kind of got one," he says, listing a string of chaotic milestones, beginning with the contested election of 2000 and the Sept. 11 attacks and ending with the economic crisis and the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"When one looks at the end of this decade, it's good riddance. ... It's a time to wipe the slate clean," he says.

Planned celebrations are taking many forms, with concerts, fireworks, and the timed drop of favorite local symbols.

In the Tennessee cities of Memphis and Nashville, organizers plan to drop a 10-foot, red guitar. In Atlanta, an 800-pound fiberglass peach is to take a 138-foot plunge. In North Carolina, Brasstown, near the Georgia border, will have its annual opossum drop, Mount Olive drops a 3-foot glowing pickle, and the capital city of Raleigh lowers a giant acorn. In Eastport, Maine, an 8-foot wooden sardine is dropped. And in Times Square, an 11,875-pound ball covered with more than 32,000 bulbs is in place to be lowered at midnight.

In Boston, more than 1,000 artists and performers are participating in the "First Night" celebrations. Artists plan to display six ice sculptures, including a recreation of one of the Boston Museum of Fine Art's 4,000 year old Egyptian sculptures.

And in Chicago, the city's Transit Authority is offering rides for a penny to help residents and visitors get in place for fireworks displays planned during the evening and at midnight.

At Times Square, organizers planned to mix about 10,000 handwritten wishes into the thousands of pounds of confetti to be dropped over the crowds. They include appeals for the safe return of the troops, continued employment and a cure for diabetes.

The hundreds of thousands of New York City revelers brought out heightened police security, displayed a day earlier when police evacuated several blocks around Times Square to investigate a parked van without license plates.

Police and other officials planned radiation sweeps for biological contaminants in the area and a command center was to be staffed by FBI, New York and regional police. Thousands of officers were to staff Times Square, where revelers will be banned from carrying backpacks and open bottles.

Among the revelers eager to see the ball drop in Times Square are 23-year-old Leonardo Colombo and 31-year-old Gilberto Oliveira — both visiting from Sao Paolo, Brazil, where they have seen the last decade transform their nation with the promise of economic power and new wealth.

Their fears are tempered by a sense of possibility.

Oliveira says the decade now in its final hours was defined by "the development of technology and the evolution of communication," changes he believes will soon give us medical advances and new tools to improve our lives.

His friend adds: "The new year is a time for change."

"What defines the new decade? Hope."

Associated Press writers Caryn Rousseau in Chicago, Russell Contreras in Boston and Kate Brumback in Atlanta contributed to this report.

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(JMC) At decade's end, revelers wonder what future holds (Batchelor) | View Clip
12/31/2009
Forbes - Online

NEW YORK -- Out with the old and in with the - what?

With the nation at war on two foreign fronts, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for many, who wonder what sort of new legacy they can build beginning on Jan. 1, 2010.

"The meaning of the new decade is going to be diminished by the hangover of the last decade," says Bob Batchelor, professor of mass communications at Kent State University and author of "The 2000s," published before the decade was even done. "That makes it tough to be as optimistic as Americans usually are."

In the spirit of fresh beginnings, people around the world planned Thursday to celebrate the transition. In New York's Times Square, new giant digits are in place to mark the new decade, as are 3,000 pounds of confetti.

Sitting with his wife and two daughters in a Manhattan atrium as they discuss plans to celebrate the new year with family, D.J. Alemayehu says he is finding it hard to feel positive about the future after the last decade's jumble of bad news and nagging worries.

"It's very muddled. There's no clear policy. There's no clear direction," says the Englewood, Colo., resident. "We're not in control of much, individually or as a nation."

For this family, it is left to the younger generation to seize hold of optimism. At the end of the only decade she has known, young Escadar sounds a positive note: "I'm just excited because I'm turning 10!"

She will remember the last decade primarily for the election of the nation's first black president, Escadar says. And in 10 years, when she's looking ahead to the '20s - and her twenties? Life, she believes, will be even better.

Older observers have a hard time seeing such a clear path.

For 45-year-old Manhattanite Susana Buencamino, the last decade was defined by a single act of terrorism and its myriad repercussions.

"Sept. 11, 2001. That changed the whole decade," the systems analyst says near her midtown office. Looking forward to the coming years, one thing seems certain. "The terrorists will still be around."

"All of us, we're going to be worried. Wherever we are," she says.

Such a wary outlook is no surprise after a 10-year stretch that started with fears of Y2K disaster and never quite regained its footing, says Robert Thompson, professor of popular culture at Syracuse University.

"If people were looking for an apocalypse, they kind of got one," he says, listing a string of chaotic milestones, beginning with the contested election of 2000 and the Sept. 11 attacks and ending with the economic crisis and the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"When one looks at the end of this decade, it's good riddance. ... It's a time to wipe the slate clean," he says.

Planned celebrations are taking many forms, with concerts, fireworks, and the timed drop of favorite local symbols.

In the Tennessee cities of Memphis and Nashville, organizers plan to drop a 10-foot, red guitar. In Atlanta, an 800-pound fiberglass peach is to take a 138-foot plunge. In North Carolina, Brasstown, near the Georgia border, will have its annual opossum drop, Mount Olive drops a 3-foot glowing pickle, and the capital city of Raleigh lowers a giant acorn. In Eastport, Maine, an 8-foot wooden sardine is dropped. And in Times Square, an 11,875-pound ball covered with more than 32,000 bulbs is in place to be lowered at midnight.

In Boston, more than 1,000 artists and performers are participating in the "First Night" celebrations. Artists plan to display six ice sculptures, including a recreation of one of the Boston Museum of Fine Art's 4,000 year old Egyptian sculptures.

And in Chicago, the city's Transit Authority is offering rides for a penny to help residents and visitors get in place for fireworks displays planned during the evening and at midnight.

At Times Square, organizers planned to mix about 10,000 handwritten wishes into the thousands of pounds of confetti to be dropped over the crowds. They include appeals for the safe return of the troops, continued employment and a cure for diabetes.

The hundreds of thousands of New York City revelers brought out heightened police security, displayed a day earlier when police evacuated several blocks around Times Square to investigate a parked van without license plates.

Police and other officials planned radiation sweeps for biological contaminants in the area and a command center was to be staffed by FBI, New York and regional police. Thousands of officers were to staff Times Square, where revelers will be banned from carrying backpacks and open bottles.

Among the revelers eager to see the ball drop in Times Square are 23-year-old Leonardo Colombo and 31-year-old Gilberto Oliveira - both visiting from Sao Paolo, Brazil, where they have seen the last decade transform their nation with the promise of economic power and new wealth.

Their fears are tempered by a sense of possibility.

Oliveira says the decade now in its final hours was defined by "the development of technology and the evolution of communication," changes he believes will soon give us medical advances and new tools to improve our lives.

His friend adds: "The new year is a time for change."

"What defines the new decade? Hope."

Associated Press writers Caryn Rousseau in Chicago, Russell Contreras in Boston and Kate Brumback in Atlanta contributed to this report.

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed

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(JMC) At decade's end, revelers wonder what future holds (Batchelor) | View Clip
12/31/2009
San Francisco Chronicle - Online

(12-31) 09:53 PST New York (AP) --

Out with the old and in with the — what?

Limbaugh felt pains similar to heart attack 12.31.09

Ex-girlfriend arrested in San Jose dragging death 12.31.09

AT&T is latest to end Tiger Woods sponsorship 12.31.09

Court freed Somali suspect with chemicals, syringe 12.31.09

With the nation at war on two foreign fronts, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for many, who wonder what sort of new legacy they can build beginning on Jan. 1, 2010.

"The meaning of the new decade is going to be diminished by the hangover of the last decade," says Bob Batchelor, professor of mass communications at Kent State University and author of "The 2000s," published before the decade was even done. "That makes it tough to be as optimistic as Americans usually are."

In the spirit of fresh beginnings, people around the world planned Thursday to celebrate the transition. In New York's Times Square, new giant digits are in place to mark the new decade, as are 3,000 pounds of confetti.

Sitting with his wife and two daughters in a Manhattan atrium as they discuss plans to celebrate the new year with family, D.J. Alemayehu says he is finding it hard to feel positive about the future after the last decade's jumble of bad news and nagging worries.

"It's very muddled. There's no clear policy. There's no clear direction," says the Englewood, Colo., resident. "We're not in control of much, individually or as a nation."

For this family, it is left to the younger generation to seize hold of optimism. At the end of the only decade she has known, young Escadar sounds a positive note: "I'm just excited because I'm turning 10!"

She will remember the last decade primarily for the election of the nation's first black president, Escadar says. And in 10 years, when she's looking ahead to the '20s — and her twenties? Life, she believes, will be even better.

Older observers have a hard time seeing such a clear path.

For 45-year-old Manhattanite Susana Buencamino, the last decade was defined by a single act of terrorism and its myriad repercussions.

"Sept. 11, 2001. That changed the whole decade," the systems analyst says near her midtown office. Looking forward to the coming years, one thing seems certain. "The terrorists will still be around."

"All of us, we're going to be worried. Wherever we are," she says.

Such a wary outlook is no surprise after a 10-year stretch that started with fears of Y2K disaster and never quite regained its footing, says Robert Thompson, professor of popular culture at Syracuse University.

"If people were looking for an apocalypse, they kind of got one," he says, listing a string of chaotic milestones, beginning with the contested election of 2000 and the Sept. 11 attacks and ending with the economic crisis and the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"When one looks at the end of this decade, it's good riddance. ... It's a time to wipe the slate clean," he says.

Planned celebrations are taking many forms, with concerts, fireworks, and the timed drop of favorite local symbols.

In the Tennessee cities of Memphis and Nashville, organizers plan to drop a 10-foot, red guitar. In Atlanta, an 800-pound fiberglass peach is to take a 138-foot plunge. In North Carolina, Brasstown, near the Georgia border, will have its annual opossum drop, Mount Olive drops a 3-foot glowing pickle, and the capital city of Raleigh lowers a giant acorn. In Eastport, Maine, an 8-foot wooden sardine is dropped. And in Times Square, an 11,875-pound ball covered with more than 32,000 bulbs is in place to be lowered at midnight.

In Boston, more than 1,000 artists and performers are participating in the "First Night" celebrations. Artists plan to display six ice sculptures, including a recreation of one of the Boston Museum of Fine Art's 4,000 year old Egyptian sculptures.

And in Chicago, the city's Transit Authority is offering rides for a penny to help residents and visitors get in place for fireworks displays planned during the evening and at midnight.

At Times Square, organizers planned to mix about 10,000 handwritten wishes into the thousands of pounds of confetti to be dropped over the crowds. They include appeals for the safe return of the troops, continued employment and a cure for diabetes.

The hundreds of thousands of New York City revelers brought out heightened police security, displayed a day earlier when police evacuated several blocks around Times Square to investigate a parked van without license plates.

Police and other officials planned radiation sweeps for biological contaminants in the area and a command center was to be staffed by FBI, New York and regional police. Thousands of officers were to staff Times Square, where revelers will be banned from carrying backpacks and open bottles.

Among the revelers eager to see the ball drop in Times Square are 23-year-old Leonardo Colombo and 31-year-old Gilberto Oliveira — both visiting from Sao Paolo, Brazil, where they have seen the last decade transform their nation with the promise of economic power and new wealth.

Their fears are tempered by a sense of possibility.

Oliveira says the decade now in its final hours was defined by "the development of technology and the evolution of communication," changes he believes will soon give us medical advances and new tools to improve our lives.

His friend adds: "The new year is a time for change."

"What defines the new decade? Hope."

Associated Press writers Caryn Rousseau in Chicago, Russell Contreras in Boston and Kate Brumback in Atlanta contributed to this report.

Return to Top



(JMC) Americans set to say goodbye to year, decade worth forgetting (Batchelor) | View Clip
12/31/2009
Tampa Tribune - Online

Hundreds of thousands are in New York's Times Square to bid farewell to the year and the decade.

NEW YORK - Hundreds of thousands of revelers gathered in chilly weather Thursday in Times Square to usher in the new decade as organizers prepared to drop 3,000 pounds of confetti at midnight along with the New Year's Eve crystal ball.

Fireworks were set off at about 6 p.m. and the gigantic ball was lowered into place in preparation for midnight. Many people wore conical party hats and 2010 glasses that blinked colorfully, and some were jumping up and down to keep warm — the National Weather Service said the temperature will be in the low 30s and forecast snow for around midnight.

Cell phones were brought out to document the last few hours of a decade many wanted to leave behind.

Gail Guay of Raymond, N.H., came to New York City with two friends to celebrate her 50th birthday. The trio carried a huge white hotel towel with "Happy New Year New Hampshire 2010" printed on it.

Reflecting on the past decade when she had buried her mother, Guay had this advice: "Don't look back."

Her friend Doreen O'Brien, 48, of Nashua, N.H., said that the crowd in Times Square seemed to be feeling positive on the cusp of a new decade. "People are in a great mood; it's very friendly. It's like New York has slowed down."

But with the nation at war, the economy uncertain, terrorism a threat and environmental catastrophe on the list of possible destinies, a sense of starting fresh remains elusive for many, who wonder what sort of legacy will begin on Jan. 1, 2010.

"The meaning of the new decade is going to be diminished by the hangover of the last decade," says Bob Batchelor, professor of mass communications at Kent State University and author of "The 2000s," published before the decade was even done. "That makes it tough to be as optimistic as Americans usually are."

Celebrations are taking many forms, with concerts, fireworks, and the timed drop of favorite local symbols.

In the Tennessee cities of Memphis and Nashville, organizers plan to drop a 10-foot red guitar. In Atlanta, an 800-pound fiberglass peach is to take a 138-foot plunge. In North Carolina, Brasstown, near the Georgia border, will have its annual opossum drop, Mount Olive will drop a 3-foot glowing pickle, and the capital city of Raleigh will lower a giant acorn. In Eastport, Maine, an 8-foot wooden sardine is dropped. And in Times Square, an 11,875-pound ball covered with more than 32,000 bulbs is in place to be lowered at midnight.

In Boston, more than 1,000 artists and performers are participating in the "First Night" celebrations. Artists plan to display six ice sculptures, including a replica of one of the Boston Museum of Fine Art's 4,000-year-old Egyptian sculptures.

And in Chicago, the city's Transit Authority is offering rides for a penny to help residents and visitors get in place for fireworks displays planned during the evening and at midnight.

Las Vegas prepared to welcome some 315,000 revelers with fireworks from casino rooftops, a traffic-free Las Vegas Strip and toasts at nightclubs from celebrities including actress Eva Longoria and rapper 50 Cent.

And around the world, from fireworks in Sydney to balloons sent aloft in Tokyo, revelers at least temporarily shelved worries about the future to bid farewell to the first decade of the 21st century.

In Times Square, organizers planned to mix about 10,000 handwritten wishes into the confetti to be dropped over the crowds. They include appeals for the safe return of troops fighting overseas, continued employment and a cure for diabetes.

The hundreds of thousands of revelers in New York City brought out heightened police security, displayed a day earlier when police evacuated several blocks around Times Square to investigate a parked van without license plates. Only clothing and clothes racks were found inside.

Police and other officials planned sweeps to detect traces of radiation or biological agents in the area, while a command center was to be staffed by FBI, New York and regional police.

Thousands of officers were scattered around Times Square, some heavily armed, and revelers were banned from carrying backpacks and open bottles.

Return to Top



(JMC) New(sU) Takes on E-Learning | View Clip
12/30/2009
Poynteronline

A week-long seminar at Poynter costs about $1,000. Most participants say you get your money's worth. But some journalists just don't have the money, or the time.

On Monday, you can get an hour with one of Poynter's best for just 10 bucks.

At 2 p.m. Poynter broadcast group leader Al Tompkins will present "Get Online and Find News Fast," an hour-long, live webinar. To join in, you'll need a high-speed Internet connection and a telephone. Click here to register.

The session is a variation on a class Tompkins has taught in person at Poynter (and elsewhere) more than 100 times. But online, it's available to almost anyone. And at $10, he said, it's affordable.

"There's no excuse for not getting training," he said. "None."

The session is one of the newest offerings from News University, a Poynter e-learning project co-sponsored by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

NewsU, which turned two years old last month, currently offers 40 courses to more than 40,000 registered users; and it's growing every week. Users enroll in e-learning courses ranging from "The Interview", which puts the user in a virtual exchange with a friendly "but not entirely forthcoming" source, to "Language of the Image", which teaches the user about "quality of light, juxtaposition, point of entry, mood, emotion and a sense of place." The courses, which are produced by NewsU's eight-person staff and a number of contributing instructors, are interactive, and most are free.

The Tompkins webinar isn't free, but interactive learning director Howard Finberg said that isn't an indication that tuition will soon apply to all NewsU courses.

"We're not going to flip a switch and all of a sudden start charging for things," he said.

In fact, the Knight grant that helped establish the program specified free, online journalism training. That grant ends in July 2008. Finberg is optimistic that the NewsU crew will find funding for the future.

"NewsU isn't going anywhere," he said.

Financial support isn't the only challenge the program is facing. Despite a large and growing international audience -- in 197 countries -- NewsU courses are offered only in English so far, and often fail to address all the needs of foreign journalists. The domestic audience is growing, too.

Even though NewsU was created in 2005 to train professional journalists, it has caught on with students and teachers at the high school and college levels as a source of high-quality, low-cost journalism education. Sixteen percent of NewsU users who report their job titles say they're students. That's the second-biggest category of users, behind reporters/writers.

NewsU also hopes to serve the public -- non-journalists -- readers, listeners and viewers.

Of the 100 or so people signed up for the Tompkins webinar, all but a few are professional journalists.

Tompkins will introduce them to a slew of online resources, including Web sites like Guidestar, Farm Subsidy Database and Argali. That last one is an online phonebook, in the same way Switchboard.com and WhitePages.com are. But with the click of button, Argali provides the phone numbers of a person's neighbors, too.

That's information anyone can use, whether you're a professional journalist, a college student or a plumber.

The webinar launches Monday. But there's lots more coming from NewsU, too. Here are a few upcoming projects.

High School Journalism Adviser Boot Camp

The folks entrusted with educating the youngest journalists often have the least training. NewsU's "virtual boot camp," created in partnership with ASNE and Kent State University, will give high school journalism advisers a chance to educate themselves July 9-27. The online course will teach student media law and ethics, management of student publications and reporting/design skills. The course will cost around $100. The application deadline is June 11.

Frontline Editors Assessment Tool

Want to be a fronline editor? If you do, a more important question should follow. How well suited are you to the job?

Before NewsU could help you answer that question, it had to figure out the characteristics that make for a good frontline editor. For that, it enlisted the help of Assessment Technology Group. The industrial/organizational psychologists at ATG gathered a bunch of frontline editors from various newspapers and asked them to classify the traits they felt were essential to their job.

The NewsU assessment, which should launch this summer, will appear in two parts. The first will present a user with an on-the-job situation, require her to select a response to that situation and then, based on that response, tell her which traits she needs to work on acquiring. The second will take an in-depth analysis of a user's existing traits -- similar to those examined by the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator -- and compare those with the ideal for frontline editors.

"The point," said NewsU interactive learning producer Vanessa Goodrum, "is to look at what your strengths are, look at what your weaknesses are, and go in prepared to deal with them."

Telling Stories With Sound

Among buzzwords in journalism today, "multimedia" is one of the hottest. All over the place, journalists are experimenting with new techniques and equipment, whether or not they have any idea what they're doing. This course will teach you how to tell stories with sound.

The course covers reporting, editing and finding audio stories. It will teach you how to research a location and pack your gear, select and place mics, mix audio in the studio and do everything in between. The course, which is free, is taught by New York Times multimedia editor Andrew DeVigal, and should launch in June.

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(Anthropology) Evolution's Bad Girl (Lovejoy) | View Clip
12/31/2009
Science News

Ardi shakes up the fossil record

Standing tallIn this artist's illustration, Ardi stands amid Ardipithecus ramidus comrades in once-forested East Africa.Illustration: Jay Matternes © 2009

She's the ultimate evolutionary party crasher. Dubbed Ardi, her partial skeleton was unearthed in Ethiopia near the scattered remains of at least 36 of her comrades. Physical anthropologists had known about the discovery of this long-gone gal for around 15 years, but few expected to see the 4.4-million-year-old hell-raiser that was unveiled in 11 scientific papers in October.

Like a biker chick strutting into a debutante ball, Ardi brazenly flaunts her nonconformity among more-demure members of the human evolutionary family, known as hominids. She boasts a weird pastiche of anatomical adornments, even without tattoos or nose studs. In her prime, she moved slowly, a cool customer whether upright or on all fours. Today, she's the standard bearer for her ancient species, Ardipithecus ramidus.

And in true biker-chick fashion, Ardi chews up and spits out conventional thinking about hominid origins, according to a team — led by anthropologist Tim White of the University of California, Berkeley — that unearthed and analyzed her fragile bones (SN: 10/24/09, p. 9). First, White and his colleagues assert, Ardi's unusual mix of apelike and monkeylike traits demolishes the long-standing assumption that today's chimpanzees provide a reasonable model of either early hominids or the last common ancestor of people and chimps — an ancestor which some scientists suspect could even have been Ardi, if genetics-based estimates of when the split occurred are borne out.

Second, the team concludes, Ardi trashes the idea that knuckle-walking or tree-hanging human ancestors evolved an upright gait to help them motor across wide ancient savannas. Her kind lived in wooded areas and split time between lumbering around on two legs hominid-style and cruising carefully along tree branches on grasping feet and the palms of the hands.

One member of White's team argues for a controversial possibility: that two-legged walking evolved because Ardipithecus males had small canine teeth. Many living and fossil male apes fight for mates by wielding formidable canines, but Ardi's male counterparts had to band together and forage over long distances to obtain mates, his thinking goes.

In a third slap at scientific convention, Ardi fits a scenario in which a few closely related hominid lineages preceded the larger-brained Homo genus that emerged around 2.4 million years ago, White says. In contrast, many anthropologists think of hominid evolution as a bush composed of numerous lineages that, for the most part, died out.

Each of Ardi's challenges draws plenty of fire. While lauding the new finds and the painstaking reconstruction of Ardi's bony frame, some critics dismiss White and company's reading of the fossils as incomplete and speculative.

Presentations at the Royal Society of London in October by several members of the Ardi excavation team produced “much sparring,” says anthropologist William McGrew of the University of Cambridge in England.

“There's legitimate disagreement,” White says. “But Ardi provides a perspective on early hominid evolution that was previously missing. This is a really bizarre primate.”

Chimp change

Ardi sports a peculiar skeletal medley that pushes chimps and gorillas out of the evolutionary spotlight, says anthropologist Owen Lovejoy, a member of White's team. Ardi's ancient remains indicate that the last common ancestor of humans and chimps must not have looked much like living chimps, as many researchers have assumed, asserts Lovejoy, of Kent State University in Ohio.

Since a split 8 million years ago or so, chimps and gorillas have evolved along evolutionary paths that eventually produced specialized traits such as knuckle-walking, he says.

In his opinion, Ardi indicates that a human-chimp ancestor had monkeylike limb proportions and feet, a flexible and unchimplike lower back, and an ability to move along tree branches on all fours, rather than swinging chimp-style from branch to branch and hanging by outstretched arms.

“Ardipithecus, not living chimps, offers a remarkably good perspective on the last common ancestor,” he says. “We can't modify the truth to make chimps more important.”

That conclusion leaves some scientists unimpressed. “It's way too early to claim that we know what the last common ancestor looked like without actually finding its fossils,” remarks anthropologist Brian Richmond of George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

Richmond holds that Ardi lived several million years after the last common ancestor, plenty of time for her kind to have evolved substantial skeletal changes.

And those changes may not have been as substantial as White's team claims, adds Richmond. Ardi's curved toes, wide big toe and large body correspond pretty well to chimps, in his opinion.

Other fossil evidence suggests that hominids came from a climbing and knuckle-walking ape ancestor that was unlike Ardi, Richmond argues.

Ardi, deconstructedView larger version | A top-to-bottom look at the skeletal and physical structure of Ardipithecus Ramidus.Illustrations: Jay Matternes © 2009

Chimps and other living apes can provide testable ideas about issues such as tool use among early hominids and even the last common ancestor (SN: 11/21/09, p. 24), McGrew says. “Ardi is an intermediate hominid form, as is Lucy. So what?” he asks.

Questions remain about whether Ardi had the build for regular upright walking — a clear marker of hominid status — or for primarily moving through trees, with occasional two-legged jaunts on the ground, adds anthropologist John Hawks of the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Consider Oreopithecus, an ape that lived on an island near Italy between 9 million and 7 million years ago. This creature possessed a pelvis, legs and feet that supported tree climbing as well as slow and somewhat stilted walking.

“Oreopithecus shows that there are alternate pathways to evolving a ground-based skeleton from the ape body plan,” Hawks says.

But Oreopithecus differed from Ardi in critical ways, Lovejoy responds, such as having extremely long arms. “Locomotion differed vastly between Oreopithecus and Ardi,” he says.

If Ardipithecus adopted upright walking in a big way and was a precursor of the human lineage, Hawks posits, “it could be the first hominid or perhaps even the common ancestor of humans and chimps — if we take genetic studies seriously.” DNA analyses suggest that people and chimps split from a common ancestor between 5 million and 4.5 million years ago, around Ardi's time.

Lovejoy regards those genetic estimates as unreliable. DNA studies rest on doubtful assumptions, he says, such as constant rates of genetic mutation in the human and chimp lineages.Fossil evidence places the human-chimp split at more like 8 million to 10 million years ago, in his view.

Hominid family values

Disputes over Ardi's evolutionary relationships to living and extinct apes seem cordial compared with debate over her sexual relationships and their implications for ancient hominid social life.

This fracas goes back to 1981, when Lovejoy published a paper in Science about the sex life of what was, at that time, the earliest known hominid species,

Australopithecus afarensis. The most famous member of that species is Lucy, a 3.2-million-year-old partial female skeleton found at another Ethiopian site in 1974. Lovejoy proposed that Lucy's kind possessed traits consistent with what amounted to a sexual revolution in the ape world (SN: 6/11/05, p. 379).

In most ape species, males are much larger than females and fight viciously to mate with fertile females, who advertise their availability with swollen red tissue. Females raise offspring on their own.

Lucy's kind upended that arrangement, Lovejoy argued. Males grew only slightly larger than females and had small canines. Adults of both sexes favored long-term relationships as a matter of survival, he theorized. Males supplied food to regular partners with whom they had children, allowing females to spend more time raising their own children.

Monogamy worked, in Lovejoy's view, because female anatomy evolved to mask obvious signs of ovulation that signal sexual readiness to males, instead developing features such as permanently enlarged breasts. Hit-and-run unions stood a good chance of yielding no offspring and thus became unappealing to both sexes.

Lovejoy's evidence for minimal size differences between A. afarensis sexes has been sharply criticized. Critics charge that he's underestimated the size disparities.

Detractors add that upright males with diminutive canines could have found plenty of ways to pummel one another in mating battles, even if they had to resort to fisticuffs.

With Ardi in tow, Lovejoy has now elaborated on his argument. A transition to monogamous relationships, expanded child care by mothers and hidden female ovulation first occurred before Lucy, in Ardipithecus, he proposes. Ardi's kind displays even smaller sex differences in canine size than Lucy's species. “Australopithecus represents a more intense version of what was already evolving in Ardipithecus,” Lovejoy says.

Cooperation among males later expanded in A. afarensis, he posits. Male bands scoured forests and savannas for food and worked together to avoid and defend against predators.

A social puzzle

Ardipithecus canines excavated by White's team validate Lovejoy's scenario, remarks anthropologist Robert Tague of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. Male canines are slightly larger than those of females, but all the canines are about the size of female chimps' canines, he says.

“Although Lovejoy's theory is widely cited and presented in almost all biological anthropology textbooks, it is also widely rejected,” Tague acknowledges.

And for good reason, argues J. Michael Plavcan of the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. Using a different statistical approach, he estimates that Lucy was actually considerably smaller than her male cohorts.

To portray early hominids as a peaceful, monogamous crowd “is phenomenally speculative,” Plavcan says. Although large-bodied primate males with fanglike canines usually fight over mates, minimal sex differences can result in any of a variety of mating arrangements, he contends.

What's more, Ardipithecus ramidus fossils do display size differences between the sexes sufficient to assume that males mated with several females, as in many other primates with size disparities, McGrew remarks.

“Lovejoy's social hypothesis is an interesting just-so story,” Richmond asserts. “He's winning the competition for the title of the Rudyard Kipling of paleoanthropology.”

Primatologist Frans de Waal of Emory University in Atlanta doesn't dismiss Lovejoy's social hypothesis but faults him for comparing Ardi's kind with common chimps while ignoring pygmy chimps, or bonobos. Bonobos have small canines relative to common chimps, a largely peaceful social life and a fondness for sexual activity.

“It's high time for a new look at the bonobo,” de Waal wrote in a published commentary shortly after the Ardi papers appeared in Science. “What if we descend not from a blustering chimplike ancestor but from a gentle, empathic, bonobo-like ape?”

That's doubtful, since bonobos differ in some critical ways from Ardi's kind, Lovejoy responds. In particular, he says, bonobo males display moderately larger canines and body sizes than females.

“Ardipithecus ramidus preserves some of the ancestral characteristics of the last common ancestor [of humans and chimps] with much greater fidelity than does any living African ape,” Lovejoy says.

Not-so-bushy evolution

If Ardi cuts a singular figure that sets her apart from living apes, she also bolsters an argument for cutting back the expanding number of proposed early hominid lineages, White says. Since 1994, fossil discoveries have led to reports of four new genera from eastern Africa and Chad: 7-million to 6-million-year-old Sahelanthropus (SN: 7/13/02, p. 19), 6-million-year-old Orrorin (SN: 7/14/01, p. 20), 3.5-million-year-old Kenyanthropus (SN: 3/24/01, p. 180) and Ardipithecus, including fragmentary remains of 5.8-million to 5.2-million-year-old Ardipithecus kadabba.

White's team folds Sahelanthropus, known only from skull remains, and Orrorin, known from fossil teeth and leg-bone pieces, into the better-described Ardipithecus genus.

“Ardipithecus may represent a long period of stasis in hominid evolution,” Lovejoy says.

From about 6 million to 4.2 million years ago, he proposes, Ardipithecus evolved as a set of separate hominid groups in East Africa that interbred enough to maintain biological unity.

After that, Ardi's kind possibly evolved into the first Australopithecus species. Or, one Ardipithecus group may have settled in an isolated area where it alone evolved into Australopithecus. It's also possible that Australopithecus derived from a hominid lineage that researchers haven't found, relegating Ardipithecus to an evolutionary side branch.

Anthropologists, in particular those who have excavated and named other early hominid genera, have not jumped on the Ardipithecus bandwagon. Proponents of bushy hominid evolution, such as Richmond, rely on computerized models that divvy up species by distinguishing between shared and distinctive skeletal traits across fossil sets, an approach that White and Lovejoy have criticized (SN: 11/25/00, p. 346).

“More time is needed to study Ardi and compare her to living primates,” Hawks says. “White's team had 15 years to study this skeleton that the rest of us saw for the first time in October.”

Complaints have circulated in anthropological circles over the past decade that White has inappropriately kept outside investigators from studying Ardi's remains. White vehemently denies those charges, saying that he has abided by Ethiopian law by publishing an initial description of the finds before making them available for others to study.

Researchers can now examine casts of the Ardipithecus fossils or, in certain cases, the fragile bones themselves, White says.

“These finds are phenomenally important and will keep many of us busy for years to come,” says anthropologist Carol Ward of the University of Missouri in Columbia.

In other words, the evolutionary shindig that Ardi crashed has just started. The night is young. Party hearty, Ardi.

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(Anthropology) 'Ardi' Research Named Science's 'Breakthrough Of Year (Lovejoy) | View Clip
12/29/2009
mediLexicon

Main Category: Biology / Biochemistry

Article Date: 29 Dec 2009

Ardipithecus ramidus, or "Ardi," receives the top honor as the Breakthrough of the Year, named by Science and its publisher, AAAS, the world's largest science society. The Dec. 18 issue of Science (http://www.sciencemag.org) takes a look back at the big science stories over the past 12 months and presents its selections for the 10 major scientific breakthroughs of 2009. "Ardi," a hominid species that lived 4.4 million years ago, was unveiled on Oct. 1 by Kent State University Professor of Anthropology Dr. C. Owen Lovejoy and his colleagues. Their research findings on "Ardi" change the way we think of human evolution.

An internationally recognized biological anthropologist who specializes in the study of human origins, Lovejoy was a part of an international research team that has spent that last several years studying "Ardi." Primarily, Lovejoy served as post-cranial anatomist and behavioral theorist. Research findings on "Ardi" were presented in 11 papers that appeared in the Oct. 2 issue of Science. Lovejoy was first author on five papers and contributed to an additional three.

"I, of course, think it's a great honor and entirely typical of all aspects of work going on at Kent State, especially in our growing number of flagship departments and schools," Lovejoy said regarding being a part of Science's 2009 Breakthrough of the Year.

Source: Emily Vincent

Kent State University

Original article posted on Medical News Today.

Articles not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

Medical News Today publishes the latest health news and health videos for consumers and health professionals. It has a searchable archive of over 100,000 health news articles.

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

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(Anthropology) 'Ardi' Research Named Science's 'Breakthrough Of Year (Lovejoy) | View Clip
12/29/2009
Medical News Today

Ardipithecus ramidus, or "Ardi," receives the top honor as the Breakthrough of the Year, named by Science and its publisher, AAAS, the world's largest science society. The Dec. 18 issue of Science (http://www.sciencemag.org) takes a look back at the big science stories over the past 12 months and presents its selections for the 10 major scientific breakthroughs of 2009. "Ardi," a hominid species that lived 4.4 million years ago, was unveiled on Oct. 1 by Kent State University Professor of Anthropology Dr. C. Owen Lovejoy and his colleagues. Their research findings on "Ardi" change the way we think of human evolution.

An internationally recognized biological anthropologist who specializes in the study of human origins, Lovejoy was a part of an international research team that has spent that last several years studying "Ardi." Primarily, Lovejoy served as post-cranial anatomist and behavioral theorist. Research findings on "Ardi" were presented in 11 papers that appeared in the Oct. 2 issue of Science. Lovejoy was first author on five papers and contributed to an additional three.

"I, of course, think it's a great honor and entirely typical of all aspects of work going on at Kent State, especially in our growing number of flagship departments and schools," Lovejoy said regarding being a part of Science's 2009 Breakthrough of the Year.

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(Health Sciences) Scientists at Kent State University target nutrition (Ha)
12/24/2009
Women's Health Weekly

2009 DEC 24 - () -- According to a study from the United States, "During last few decades, soft drink consumption has steadily increased while milk intake has decreased (see also ). Excess consumption of soft drinks and low milk intake may pose risks of several diseases such as dental caries, obesity, and osteoporosis."

"Although beverage consumption habits form during young adulthood, which has a strong impact on beverage choices in later life, nutrition education programs on beverages are scarce in this population. The purpose of this investigation was 1) to assess soft drink and milk consumption and 2) to evaluate the effectiveness of 15-week class-based nutrition intervention in changing beverage choices among college students. A total of 80 college students aged 18 to 24 years who were enrolled in basic nutrition class participated in the study. Three-day dietary records were collected, verified, and analyzed before and after the intervention. Class lectures focused on healthful dietary choices related to prevention of chronic diseases and were combined with interactive hands on activities and dietary feedback. Class-based nutrition intervention combining traditional lecture and interactive activities was successful in decreasing soft drink consumption. Total milk consumption, specifically fat free milk, increased in females and male students changed milk choice favoring skim milk over low fat milk. (1% and 2%). Class-based nutrition education focusing on prevention of chronic diseases can be an effective strategy in improving both male and female college students' beverage choices," wrote E.J. Ha and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "Using this type of intervention in a general nutrition course may be an effective approach to motivate changes in eating behaviors in a college setting."

Ha and colleagues published the results of their research in Nutrition Journal (Evaluation of effectiveness of class-based nutrition intervention on changes in soft drink and milk consumption among young adults. Nutrition Journal, 2009;8():50).

For additional information, contact E.J. Ha, Kent State University, 100 Nixson Hall, Kent, OH 44242, USA.

The publisher of the Nutrition Journal can be contacted at: Biomedical Central Ltd., 236 Grays Inn Rd., Floor 6, London WC1X 8HL, England.

Copyright © 2009 Women's Health Weekly via NewsRx.com

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(Health Sciences) Scientists at Kent State University target nutrition (Ha)
12/26/2009
Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week

According to a study from the United States, "During last few decades, soft drink consumption has steadily increased while milk intake has decreased. Excess consumption of soft drinks and low milk intake may pose risks of several diseases such as dental caries, obesity, and osteoporosis."

"Although beverage consumption habits form during young adulthood, which has a strong impact on beverage choices in later life, nutrition education programs on beverages are scarce in this population. The purpose of this investigation was 1) to assess soft drink and milk consumption and 2) to evaluate the effectiveness of 15-week class-based nutrition intervention in changing beverage choices among college students. A total of 80 college students aged 18 to 24 years who were enrolled in basic nutrition class participated in the study. Three-day dietary records were collected, verified, and analyzed before and after the intervention. Class lectures focused on healthful dietary choices related to prevention of chronic diseases and were combined with interactive hands on activities and dietary feedback. Class-based nutrition intervention combining traditional lecture and interactive activities was successful in decreasing soft drink consumption. Total milk consumption, specifically fat free milk, increased in females and male students changed milk choice favoring skim milk over low fat milk. (1% and 2%). Class-based nutrition education focusing on prevention of chronic diseases can be an effective strategy in improving both male and female college students' beverage choices," wrote E.J. Ha and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "Using this type of intervention in a general nutrition course may be an effective approach to motivate changes in eating behaviors in a college setting."

Ha and colleagues published the results of their research in Nutrition Journal (Evaluation of effectiveness of class-based nutrition intervention on changes in soft drink and milk consumption among young adults. Nutrition Journal, 2009;8():50).

For additional information, contact E.J. Ha, Kent State University, 100 Nixson Hall, Kent, OH 44242, USA.

The publisher of the Nutrition Journal can be contacted at: Biomedical Central Ltd., 236 Grays Inn Rd., Floor 6, London WC1X 8HL, England.

Copyright © 2009 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week via NewsRx.com

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(KSU at Ashtabula) MRSA Risk in Children (Rose, Senita) | View Clip
12/28/2009
Advance for Respiratory Care and Sleep Medicine - Online

"Brian" is an active 8-year-old boy who recently returned from a family vacation in Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Mosquitoes are common on the island, and Brian acquired a number of bites whose erythematous symptoms persisted after the family's return to the United States.

On a Sunday about eleven days after Brian's family got home, the bug bites became inflamed and reddened, with pinpoint white pustules. Brian also developed a low-grade fever. Brian, who participates in sports including swimming and soccer, had taken one swimming lesson and played a game of indoor soccer since returning from vacation.

The next morning, the bites appeared more reddened and somewhat larger. Brian's mother scheduled an appointment with their pediatric provider for that afternoon. Between the time she called to schedule the appointment and when she and Brian arrived at the office, the bites had worsened significantly. The provider prescribed oral cephalexin. Tuesday, the fever was gone. But the bites were larger and more inflamed.

Tuesday afternoon, Brian and his mother consulted with a specialist, who suspected methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). By that time, a low-grade fever had resurfaced in Brian. The specialist immediately admitted Brian to the hospital, where the staff obtained wound cultures and started intravenous fluids and clindamycin therapy. The specialist explained that surgery might be needed to debride necrotic tissue from the wound sites.

Wednesday morning, wound cultures confirmed that MRSA was the problem microorganism. The pustules had improved, but the specialist decided to surgically excise and debride four areas: two on the back, one on the waist and one on the arm. After 3 days in the hospital, Brian was discharged. Oral clindamycin therapy, antiseptic body washes, and wound care were continued at home until healing occurred weeks later.

So what was the suspected source of MRSA in this case? It was not Brian's faraway vacation spot; it was the local pool or the artificial turf at the indoor soccer field.

Background

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) logged 94,000 invasive MRSA infections in the United States in 2005, and 19,000 deaths occurred as a result. A more recent, more comprehensive study concluded that the overall MRSA prevalence rate is 46.3 per 1,000 patients - eight to 11 times higher than previous estimates.1 In terms of children, a study published early this year noted a significant increase in pediatric infections caused by MRSA.2

Clinicians need to take a proactive approach to enhancing awareness of the virulence of MRSA and to provide education to patients, parents, children and all community members who work with children. Education should focus on prevention, early identification, methods of transmission and treatment.

What Is MRSA?

MRSA was first identified in the 1960s, shortly after the introduction of methicillin. Experts believe it developed due to overuse and improper use of antibiotics including methicillin. The first large outbreak in the United States was documented in 1968.3In addition to methicillin, MRSA is resistant to oxicillin, penicillin, amoxicillin and other antibiotics.

Table 1 outlines established risk factors for MRSA.4 In the 1990s, MRSA was identified in seemingly healthy patients without risk factors, including school-age children.5MRSA activity continues to change, and outbreaks are now more common in populations previously considered uncommon, such as athletes and children attending child care centers.6

RSA is classified as hospital acquired (HA-MRSA) or community acquired (CA-MRSA). CA-MRSA primarily surfaces as skin and soft tissue infections. The consequences of such infections include abscesses, cellulitis, folliculitis, and impetigo.6At least one study has identified skin and soft tissue as the most frequent sites of CA-MRSA (Table 2).7Emergency department statistics support this finding.8

MRSA Prevention

MRSA occurs and lives in a variety of environments, so one of the first steps in prevention is increasing awareness of locations where MRSA may be more prevalent. About 25 percent to 30 percent of the U.S. population is colonized by MRSA, meaning that the bacteria is present but not causing active infection.9

MRSA colonization occurs primarily in the nares or nose.10Transmission occurs more readily in settings such as schools, dormitories, military barracks, households, correctional facilities, and daycare centers. All of these settings have the potential for crowding and frequent skin-to-skin contact, which increases the risk for MRSA transmission.

School-age children face increased MRSA risk when using locker rooms and sharing sports or physical education equipment (balls, gloves, mats, etc.). Football and wrestling can present particular risks because of the close contact inherent in these sports. MRSA is primarily transmitted via skin-to-skin contact through a break in the skin barrier.

Table 3 outlines CDC recommendations for preventing MRSA transmission.9Education has typically been focused toward professionals in the healthcare environment, but educating communities, students, schools, health clubs and recreational facilities is just as important. Be vigilant in providing appropriate assessment, early identification and treatment of MRSA infections. Be equally vigilant in efforts to increase awareness of this infection with education. The CDC has devoted a section of its website to CA-MRSA.9

Identification of Infection

As stated, skin and soft tissue infections are the most common presentations of CA-MRSA.11With early identification, proper antibiotic therapy can prevent extreme cases of this infection. Many CA-MRSA infections begin with a "spider bite" appearance.9 These lesions are typically red, edematous and warm to touch, with a pustule containing pus or purulent drainage. In the school-age child, the school nurse or health assistant is often the first to suspect MRSA.12

Early recognition of CA-MRSA soft tissue infections will result in prompt initiation of appropriate treatment.13Signs and symptoms that require quick evaluation for possible MRSA include cellulitis that is swollen, reddened, hot, and tender; fluctuance (pus causes a soft, boggy feeling on palpation), and crepitus (gas-forming infection causes a crackling or grating feeling on palpation).

Patient and community education about the identification of MRSA infection may lead to earlier medical attention for soft tissue infections. This education should be directed at athletic coaches, parents, school staff members, and children themselves. Recent literature in the sports world has focused on the need for surveillance in athletic settings.14,15

Management

CDC guidelines for the clinical management of MRSA identify two steps as deserving of priority: identification of MRSA strain and early intervention.16Obtain wound cultures before initiating antimicrobial therapy.

Depending on the patient's clinical symptoms, empiric therapy may be warranted for skin and soft tissue infections that are suspicious for MRSA. When empiric antimicrobial therapy is provided for treatment of skin and soft tissue infections compatible with S aureus infection, local susceptibility data should be used to guide treatment.9Obtain further information at www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/pdf/ar/CAMRSA_ExpMtgStrategies.pdfs.

Treatment varies according to the severity of the infection as well as other considerations. Treatments used for outpatient cases of MRSA include clindamycin, rifampin, rimethoprim sulfamethoxazole,and tetracycline. One study found that in as much as 57 percent of cases, proper antibiotic therapy was not prescribed.8To avoid this, follow updated guidelines for antimicrobial therapy, adjust therapy according to culture and sensitivity results, and educate patients about proper use of the medication.

The persistence or worsening of symptoms within 48 hours of treatment initiation requires follow-up. The infection may be resistant or changing; intravenous antibiotics, surgical intervention or a consult with an infectious disease specialist may be necessary.9sup>

anagement of MRSA should also include education about the transmission of the infection and how to prevent spread to other people. Emphasize hand washing and standard infection control precautions.

Putting It Into Practice

School-age children are at particular risk for MRSA and should be considered a target population for prevention, early identification and education. More widespread education and management are essential to preventing and treating this increasingly virulent infection.

Stacy Rose is a women's health nurse practitioner who is an assistant professor of nursing at Kent State University's Ashtabula, Ohio, campus. Julie Senita is an RN with a master's degree in nursing. She is an assistant professor of nursing at Kent State Ashtabula and is a certified diabetes educator and certified nurse educator.

References

1. Jarvis WR, et al. National prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in inpatients at US healthcare facilities, 2006. Am J Infect Control. 2007;35(10):631-700.

2. Naseri I, et al. Nationwide trends in pediatric Staphylococcus aureus head and neck infections. Arch Otolaryngol. 2009;135(1):14-16.

3. Barrett FF, et al. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus at Boston City Hospital. N Engl J Med.1968;279(9):441-448.

4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Four pediatric deaths from community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Minnesota and North Dakota, 1997-1999. JAMA. 1999;282(12):1123-1125.

5. Klevens RM, et al. Invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in the United States. JAMA. 2007;298(15):1763-1771.

6. Kluytmans-Vandenbergh MF, Kluytmans JA. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: current perspectives. Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2006;12(Suppl 1):9-15.

7. Fridkin SK, et al. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus disease in three communities. N Engl J Med. 2005;352(14):1436-1444.

8. Moran GJ, et al. Methicillin-resistant S aureus infections among patients in the emergency department. N Engl J Med. 2006;355(7):666-674.

9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Overview of community-associated MRSA. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/ar_mrsa_ca.html. Accessed April 13, 2009.

10. Creech CB, et al. Increasing rates of nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in healthy children. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005;24(7):617-621.

11. Cunha BA. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: clinical manifestations and antimicrobial therapy. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2005;11(Suppl 4):33-42.

12. Alex A, Letizia M. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: considerations for school nurses. J Sch Nurs. 2007;23(4):210-213.

13. Zetola N, et al. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an emerging threat. Lancet Infect Dis. 2005;5(5):275-286.

14. Beam JW, Buckley B. Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus. J Athl Train. 2006;41(3):337-340.

15. Newell K. The invisible enemy. Coach Athletic Dir. 2006;76(4):62-77.

16. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Strategies for clinical management of MRSA in the community. Available at: www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/pdf/ar/CAMRSA_ExpMtgStrategies.pdf. Accessed April 13, 2009.

Return to Top



(KSU at Ashtabula) MRSA Risk in Children (Rose, Senita) | View Clip
01/03/2010
Advance for Respiratory Care and Sleep Medicine - Online

"Brian" is an active 8-year-old boy who recently returned from a family vacation in Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Mosquitoes are common on the island, and Brian acquired a number of bites whose erythematous symptoms persisted after the family's return to the United States.

On a Sunday about eleven days after Brian's family got home, the bug bites became inflamed and reddened, with pinpoint white pustules. Brian also developed a low-grade fever. Brian, who participates in sports including swimming and soccer, had taken one swimming lesson and played a game of indoor soccer since returning from vacation.

The next morning, the bites appeared more reddened and somewhat larger. Brian's mother scheduled an appointment with their pediatric provider for that afternoon. Between the time she called to schedule the appointment and when she and Brian arrived at the office, the bites had worsened significantly. The provider prescribed oral cephalexin. Tuesday, the fever was gone. But the bites were larger and more inflamed.

Tuesday afternoon, Brian and his mother consulted with a specialist, who suspected methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). By that time, a low-grade fever had resurfaced in Brian. The specialist immediately admitted Brian to the hospital, where the staff obtained wound cultures and started intravenous fluids and clindamycin therapy. The specialist explained that surgery might be needed to debride necrotic tissue from the wound sites.

Wednesday morning, wound cultures confirmed that MRSA was the problem microorganism. The pustules had improved, but the specialist decided to surgically excise and debride four areas: two on the back, one on the waist and one on the arm. After 3 days in the hospital, Brian was discharged. Oral clindamycin therapy, antiseptic body washes, and wound care were continued at home until healing occurred weeks later.

So what was the suspected source of MRSA in this case? It was not Brian's faraway vacation spot; it was the local pool or the artificial turf at the indoor soccer field.

Background

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) logged 94,000 invasive MRSA infections in the United States in 2005, and 19,000 deaths occurred as a result. A more recent, more comprehensive study concluded that the overall MRSA prevalence rate is 46.3 per 1,000 patients - eight to 11 times higher than previous estimates.1 In terms of children, a study published early this year noted a significant increase in pediatric infections caused by MRSA.2

Clinicians need to take a proactive approach to enhancing awareness of the virulence of MRSA and to provide education to patients, parents, children and all community members who work with children. Education should focus on prevention, early identification, methods of transmission and treatment.

What Is MRSA?

MRSA was first identified in the 1960s, shortly after the introduction of methicillin. Experts believe it developed due to overuse and improper use of antibiotics including methicillin. The first large outbreak in the United States was documented in 1968.3In addition to methicillin, MRSA is resistant to oxicillin, penicillin, amoxicillin and other antibiotics.

Table 1 outlines established risk factors for MRSA.4 In the 1990s, MRSA was identified in seemingly healthy patients without risk factors, including school-age children.5MRSA activity continues to change, and outbreaks are now more common in populations previously considered uncommon, such as athletes and children attending child care centers.6

RSA is classified as hospital acquired (HA-MRSA) or community acquired (CA-MRSA). CA-MRSA primarily surfaces as skin and soft tissue infections. The consequences of such infections include abscesses, cellulitis, folliculitis, and impetigo.6At least one study has identified skin and soft tissue as the most frequent sites of CA-MRSA (Table 2).7Emergency department statistics support this finding.8

MRSA Prevention

MRSA occurs and lives in a variety of environments, so one of the first steps in prevention is increasing awareness of locations where MRSA may be more prevalent. About 25 percent to 30 percent of the U.S. population is colonized by MRSA, meaning that the bacteria is present but not causing active infection.9

MRSA colonization occurs primarily in the nares or nose.10Transmission occurs more readily in settings such as schools, dormitories, military barracks, households, correctional facilities, and daycare centers. All of these settings have the potential for crowding and frequent skin-to-skin contact, which increases the risk for MRSA transmission.

School-age children face increased MRSA risk when using locker rooms and sharing sports or physical education equipment (balls, gloves, mats, etc.). Football and wrestling can present particular risks because of the close contact inherent in these sports. MRSA is primarily transmitted via skin-to-skin contact through a break in the skin barrier.

Table 3 outlines CDC recommendations for preventing MRSA transmission.9Education has typically been focused toward professionals in the healthcare environment, but educating communities, students, schools, health clubs and recreational facilities is just as important. Be vigilant in providing appropriate assessment, early identification and treatment of MRSA infections. Be equally vigilant in efforts to increase awareness of this infection with education. The CDC has devoted a section of its website to CA-MRSA.9

Identification of Infection

As stated, skin and soft tissue infections are the most common presentations of CA-MRSA.11With early identification, proper antibiotic therapy can prevent extreme cases of this infection. Many CA-MRSA infections begin with a "spider bite" appearance.9 These lesions are typically red, edematous and warm to touch, with a pustule containing pus or purulent drainage. In the school-age child, the school nurse or health assistant is often the first to suspect MRSA.12

Early recognition of CA-MRSA soft tissue infections will result in prompt initiation of appropriate treatment.13Signs and symptoms that require quick evaluation for possible MRSA include cellulitis that is swollen, reddened, hot, and tender; fluctuance (pus causes a soft, boggy feeling on palpation), and crepitus (gas-forming infection causes a crackling or grating feeling on palpation).

Patient and community education about the identification of MRSA infection may lead to earlier medical attention for soft tissue infections. This education should be directed at athletic coaches, parents, school staff members, and children themselves. Recent literature in the sports world has focused on the need for surveillance in athletic settings.14,15

Management

CDC guidelines for the clinical management of MRSA identify two steps as deserving of priority: identification of MRSA strain and early intervention.16Obtain wound cultures before initiating antimicrobial therapy.

Depending on the patient's clinical symptoms, empiric therapy may be warranted for skin and soft tissue infections that are suspicious for MRSA. When empiric antimicrobial therapy is provided for treatment of skin and soft tissue infections compatible with S aureus infection, local susceptibility data should be used to guide treatment.9Obtain further information at www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/pdf/ar/CAMRSA_ExpMtgStrategies.pdfs.

Treatment varies according to the severity of the infection as well as other considerations. Treatments used for outpatient cases of MRSA include clindamycin, rifampin, rimethoprim sulfamethoxazole,and tetracycline. One study found that in as much as 57 percent of cases, proper antibiotic therapy was not prescribed.8To avoid this, follow updated guidelines for antimicrobial therapy, adjust therapy according to culture and sensitivity results, and educate patients about proper use of the medication.

The persistence or worsening of symptoms within 48 hours of treatment initiation requires follow-up. The infection may be resistant or changing; intravenous antibiotics, surgical intervention or a consult with an infectious disease specialist may be necessary.9sup>

anagement of MRSA should also include education about the transmission of the infection and how to prevent spread to other people. Emphasize hand washing and standard infection control precautions.

Putting It Into Practice

School-age children are at particular risk for MRSA and should be considered a target population for prevention, early identification and education. More widespread education and management are essential to preventing and treating this increasingly virulent infection.

Stacy Rose is a women's health nurse practitioner who is an assistant professor of nursing at Kent State University's Ashtabula, Ohio, campus. Julie Senita is an RN with a master's degree in nursing. She is an assistant professor of nursing at Kent State Ashtabula and is a certified diabetes educator and certified nurse educator.

References

1. Jarvis WR, et al. National prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in inpatients at US healthcare facilities, 2006. Am J Infect Control. 2007;35(10):631-700.

2. Naseri I, et al. Nationwide trends in pediatric Staphylococcus aureus head and neck infections. Arch Otolaryngol. 2009;135(1):14-16.

3. Barrett FF, et al. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus at Boston City Hospital. N Engl J Med.1968;279(9):441-448.

4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Four pediatric deaths from community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Minnesota and North Dakota, 1997-1999. JAMA. 1999;282(12):1123-1125.

5. Klevens RM, et al. Invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in the United States. JAMA. 2007;298(15):1763-1771.

6. Kluytmans-Vandenbergh MF, Kluytmans JA. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: current perspectives. Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2006;12(Suppl 1):9-15.

7. Fridkin SK, et al. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus disease in three communities. N Engl J Med. 2005;352(14):1436-1444.

8. Moran GJ, et al. Methicillin-resistant S aureus infections among patients in the emergency department. N Engl J Med. 2006;355(7):666-674.

9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Overview of community-associated MRSA. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/ar_mrsa_ca.html. Accessed April 13, 2009.

10. Creech CB, et al. Increasing rates of nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in healthy children. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005;24(7):617-621.

11. Cunha BA. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: clinical manifestations and antimicrobial therapy. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2005;11(Suppl 4):33-42.

12. Alex A, Letizia M. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: considerations for school nurses. J Sch Nurs. 2007;23(4):210-213.

13. Zetola N, et al. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an emerging threat. Lancet Infect Dis. 2005;5(5):275-286.

14. Beam JW, Buckley B. Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus. J Athl Train. 2006;41(3):337-340.

15. Newell K. The invisible enemy. Coach Athletic Dir. 2006;76(4):62-77.

16. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Strategies for clinical management of MRSA in the community. Available at: www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/pdf/ar/CAMRSA_ExpMtgStrategies.pdf. Accessed April 13, 2009.

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(OEOC) BUSINESS SUCCESSION PLANNING PROGRAM AT KSU OFFERS A SERIES OF WEBINAR (Cooper)
12/28/2009
Federal News Service

KENT, Ohio, Dec. 23 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The Ohio Employee Ownership Center's Succession Planning Program at Kent State University has partnered with the Ohio Department of Development (ODOD) to present a series of free webinars for small business owners on exit planning. The program is designed to provide business owners with the information they need to get started with their business transition. The webinars start Jan. 5 and run through Feb. 25.

Given the turbulent economy, many business owners feel that they cannot afford to take the time and spend the money to plan for exiting their business. Often they will say "Retire? I am trying to make it past this week. I'll worry about that later! Besides, my business is worth less than it was six months ago." Unfortunately, this is almost always the wrong approach. Many business owners think that the time to start planning to exit their business is when times are good. The irony is, done in this fashion, by the time the owner has completed the planning process and is ready to pull the trigger (a process that can take 10 months or 10 years), the economy may have turned down again. This may make the transaction less desirable from the owner's point of view. A more recommended approach might be to plan when times are good or bad, and pull the trigger when times are good.

Studies show that those owners who complete timely succession planning achieve a higher number of their objectives. "The consequence of the absence of succession planning is that frequently businesses are sold to competitors, often at bargain basement prices, who may consolidate operations, or the business may need to be liquidated to pay estate taxes, or in a worst case scenario, medical bills," said Chris Cooper of the Business Succession Planning Program at Kent State. "This can lead to business and job loss. We believe that the failure to plan for business succession in small and middle-sized closely held businesses is the leading preventable cause of job loss in the United States."

Exiting Your Business: Winter 2010 Small Business Succession Planning Webinars All sessions are at 10 a.m. and last approximately 45 minutes. There is no charge to attend. Participants will need a computer, internet connection and a phone to participate in the webinars. No software download or configuration is required. For those who are unable to attend a webinar live, each one will be recorded and archived on the Ohio Employee Ownership Center's Web site.

The Winter 2010 webinar schedule is:

1. Jan. 5 - Selling to an Outside Buyer: Managing the Process - Kipp Krukowski, Confidential Business Sale, Inc.

2. Jan. 7 - Where the Business Plan, Strategic Plan and Succession Plan Meet - Jim Aussem - Cavitch Familo & Durkin

3. Jan. 19 - Employee Ownership Sustainability: Will Your ESOP Last Forever? - Jim Steiker, SES Advisors, Inc. and Steiker, Fischer, Edwards & Greenapple

4. Jan. 21 - Selling to Managers/Key Person(s) - Dave Gustafson, Apple Growth Partners

5. Feb. 9 - Small Business Planning for Multiple Shareholders - Tom Gilbride, Gilbride & Company

6. Feb. 11 - Maximizing the ESOP Benefit: Employee Ownership Culture - Jay Simecek, Ohio Employee Ownership Center

7. Feb. 23 - Issues as an Employee-Owned Co-operative Matures - Leslie Schaller, ACEnet

8. Feb. 25 - Selling Your Business to an Employee-Owned Co-operative: Doing the Deal - Mark Stewart, Shumaker Loop & Kendrick

The Succession Planning Program's Web site has many additional resources for business owners exploring exiting their business, including: * Additional recorded webinars archived from previous series

* Full downloadable text and video clips from the book/DVD combo: "An Owners Guide to Business Succession Planning"

* Articles related to succession/exit planning issues

* A directory of professionals (lawyers, accountants, financial planners, etc.) who can help business owners design and implement their plans

To register or for more information about the webinar series, visit www.oeockent.org/index.php/successionplanning/resources/webinars.

For more information on the Ohio Employee Ownership Center, visit www.oeockent.org, call 330-672-3028 or e-mail oeoc@kent.edu.For more information please contact: Sarabjit Jagirdar, Email:- htsyndication@hindustantimes.com.

Copyright © 2009 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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