Total Clips: 24
Headline Date Outlet Links
(Economic Impact) KSU is a nearly $2 billion economic engine in Northeast Ohio, study says (Lefton) 01/25/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text View Clip
January 25, 2010, 8:00AM Lester LeftonKENT, Ohio -- Kent State University President Lester Lefton says a new study quantifies the university's impact on the region. KSU paid $49,000 to Idaho-based Economic Modeling Specialists Inc., to examine the finan......
(CUDC) Cleveland Design Competition will unleash new ideas (Rugare) 01/24/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text View Clip
January 24, 2010, 12:00AM Mario Caceres and Christian CanonicoA park shaped like the contoured wings of a giant bird stretches over railroad tracks north of the downtown Mall in this proposal by Mario Caceres and Christian Canonico of Paris, France. One......
(Economic Impact) Study shows KSU boosts area economy by $1.9 billion (Lefton) 01/22/2010 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text
Jan. 22--To commemorate its 100th birthday this year, Kent State University commissioned a study to quantify its impact on the region's economy. One figure it revealed at a gathering of 100 alumni and business leaders Thursday: $1.9 billion. That's t......
(Nursing) Couple makes Haiti an avocation (Martsolf) 01/24/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text View Clip
Twenty-nine years ago, Donna Martsolf and her husband took the advice of a colleague and went to Haiti. It was a lark — and a horrible one at that. ''It's the pits of hell,'' said Martsolf, a Kent State nursing professor. ''It's dirty and hot and it ......
(Town-Gown) Agreements near on downtown projects (Lefton) 01/25/2010 Record-Courier Text View Clip
Redevelopment plans for downtown Kent are closer than ever to putting shovels in the ground, as the public and private partners involved are preparing to sign formal commitments to build and fund specific pieces of the project. Officials with the city ......
(Town-Gown) Funding options for ‘Gateway' weighed (Lefton) 01/25/2010 Record-Courier Text View Clip
The jury is still out on a request for $21 million in federal funding to build a multi-modal transit center in downtown Kent. In October, the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority filed for a Transportation Investment Generating Economic Reco......
(Town-Gown, Psychology, Wick, ) ALONG THE WAY (Lefton, Rawson, Hassler) 01/25/2010 Record-Courier Text View Clip
Kent State University President Lester Lefton, whose main mission at a community gathering on campus Thursday was to review the recent study showing the positive economic impact KSU has on Northeastern Ohio, once again reaffirmed his commitment to l......
(KSU Museum) Museum to mark 25th anniversary 01/25/2010 Record-Courier Text View Clip
The Kent State University Museum will celebrate its silver anniversary this year. Opened to the public in October 1985, the Kent State University Museum was founded with an initial gift from New York dress manufacturers Jerry Silverman and Shannon ......
(KSU Museum) 82 plates from Gazette du Bon Ton on display (Druesedow) 01/25/2010 Record-Courier Text View Clip
The Kent State University Museum has on display 82 original plates of illustrations from the Algesa O'Sickey collection of Gazette du Bon Ton from 1920 to 1922 in its Palmer and Mull Galleries. The entire collection will be accessible on the museum's ......
(Read Lecture) Teacher of the year to speak at KSU on Tuesday 01/25/2010 Record-Courier Text View Clip
New York City native, Anthony J. Mullen, who was recognized by President Barack Obama as the 2009 National Teacher of the Year, will present a Gerald H. Read Distinguished lecture at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Kent State University Kiva auditorium. ......
(KSU at Stark) 'Abstractitudes' exhibition opens Tuesday at Kent Stark 01/23/2010 Repository - Online, The Text View Clip
with Totally Local Yellow Pages Four Canton-area painters display their work in a new exhibition at Kent State University Stark Campus. Titled “Abstractitudes,” the show spotlights Aaron Hubbard, Gene Barber, Martin Bertman and Isabel Zaldivar. The show......
(KSU at Stark) Artists overcome challenges to excel in competition 01/23/2010 Repository - Online, The Text View Clip
with Totally Local Yellow Pages Their abilities wildly eclipse their disabilities. A dynamic duo, they are up-and-coming artists. One is a sculptor, the other a photographer. Their work: Competition quality. Rashelle Gold, an 18-year-old Hoover Hi......
(KSU at Ashtabula) Conneaut sixth-graders get hands-on experience at KSUA (Bautista) 01/23/2010 Star-Beacon Text
Jan. 23--ASHTABULA -- Conneaut sixth-grade students got a hands-on lesson on proper hand washing in the nursing department of the new Robert S. Morrison Health and Science Building at Kent State University-Ashtabula on Friday morning. "Who wants to be a......
(Town-Gown) KSU has many projects in works (Lefton) 01/24/2010 Stow Sentry Text View Clip
Record-Courier staff writer Kent State University is poised for a major transition as it marks its Centennial this year with several multi-million dollar construction projects planned both on and off campus. KSU President Lester Lefton gave an update......
(Economic Impact) KSU contributes $1.9 billion to area's economy, president reports (Lefton) 01/24/2010 Hudson Hub-Times Text View Clip
Record-Courier staff writer Alumni, students, faculty and staff of Kent State University pump $1.9 billion annually into Northeast Ohio's economy, KSU President Lester Lefton announced Jan. 21. "That's a lot of money," Lefton told the crowd comprised......
(Geography) Hudson Library - Program looks at top winter storms (Schmidlin) 01/24/2010 Hudson Hub-Times Text View Clip
"The Greatest Winter Storms of Ohio" will be the topic for a program Feb. 8 at 7 p.m. at the Hudson Library and Historical Society. The speaker will be Dr. Tom Schmidlin, a meteorologist and professor of geography at Kent State University. Schmidlin has......
(KSU @ Ashtabula) Conneaut sixth-graders get hands-on experience at KSUA (Bautista) 01/23/2010 Star-Beacon - Online Text View Clip
ASHTABULA — Conneaut sixth-grade students got a hands-on lesson on proper hand washing in the nursing department of the new Robert S. Morrison Health and Science Building at Kent State University-Ashtabula on Friday morning. “Who wants to be a nurse?” a......
Kent State University has many projects in the works (Lefton) 01/24/2010 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text View Clip
Fredmonsky staff writer Kent State University is poised for a major transition as it marks its Centennial this year with several multi-million dollar construction projects planned both on and off campus. KSU President Lester Lefton gave an update ......
(CUDC) Open forum on downtown Cleveland's Public Square redesign draws a big crowd 01/24/2010 Examiner.com Text View Clip
Recently, the Downtown Cleveland Alliance and ParkWorks teamed up to develop new concepts and ideas on what Public Square -- the heart of downtown Cleveland -- should look like. They hired Field Operations, a landscape design firm based in New York City......
(May 4) "Capture the Moment" chronicles indelible images of our times 01/23/2010 Columbus Messenger Newspapers Text View Clip
Images courtesy of the Ohio Historical Society Pulitzer Prize winning photographers have witnessed triumph, as in Joe Rosenthal's image of the raising of the flag on Iwo Jima, and tragedy, when John Paul Filo chronicled the Kent State shootings. "Captur......
(Justice Studies) Enough already — no more whining, no more excuses (Paul Mastriacovo) 01/24/2010 Repository - Online, The Text View Clip
with Totally Local Yellow Pages I am tired of excuses; aren't you? Excuses from athletes and politicians, from philanderers and scofflaws — I am sick of them all. I used to hear an awful lot of excuses when I practiced law full time. I'm sure schoolt......
(KSU at Ashtabula) Conneaut sixth-graders get hands-on experience at KSUA (Bautista) 01/23/2010 Individual.com Text View Clip
Conneaut sixth-grade students got a hands-on lesson on proper hand washing in the nursing department of the new Robert S. Morrison Health and Science Building at Kent State University-Ashtabula on Friday morning. "Who wants to be a nurse?" asked assist......
(Nursing) Couple makes Haiti an avocation (Martsolf) 01/24/2010 Individual.com Text View Clip
Already on mission to help country, KSU professor and spouse arrive Twenty-nine years ago, Donna Martsolf and her husband took the advice of a colleague and went to Haiti. It was a lark -- and a horrible one at that. "It's the pits of hell," sai......
(Psychology) Report summarizes schizophrenia study findings from Kent State University (Seghers) 01/23/2010 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week Text
According to recent research from the United States, "Language symptoms in schizophrenia are exacerbated by arousal of negative affect; the extent of this effect varies widely among patients. The present study assessed predictors of affective speech reacti......


(Economic Impact) KSU is a nearly $2 billion economic engine in Northeast Ohio, study says (Lefton) | View Clip
01/25/2010
Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)

January 25, 2010, 8:00AM Lester LeftonKENT, Ohio -- Kent State University President Lester Lefton says a new study quantifies the university's impact on the region.

KSU paid $49,000 to Idaho-based Economic Modeling Specialists Inc., to examine the financial and intellectual impact of the university on Northeast Ohio. Data from the study, commissioned to celebrate KSU's 100th anniversary, will be used for planning.

"As we look to the next 100 years and as we're forging plans strategically, the board and I are looking at where we've been, where we're going and what we should be doing," Lefton said. "And what we're recognizing is, with a $1.96-billion impact in Northeastern Ohio, we are a huge economic force."

That impact includes $1.6 billion that the study attributed to raising the educational level and productivity of the workforce; $292 million in added income due to KSU's payroll and spending for supplies and services; and $64 million from spending by out-of-area students and visitors drawn by the university.

With 5,000 full-time employees at eight campuses, KSU is the state's 15th-largest employer. It is also Ohio's third-largest university, with more than 38,400 students.

Lefton will speak at Cleveland's Union Club on Thursday to discuss the study and KSU's impact on the Cleveland area, in particular.

For instance, he said, one-third of KSU's students come from Cuyahoga County and a large number of nurses at Cleveland-area hospitals are KSU graduates.

Lefton also cited high-profile programs like the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. KSU has the region's only school of architecture, and faculty and students in the Cleveland office have been active in projects throughout Cleveland.

The urban-design group is the first tenant in downtown Cleveland's new District of Design.

Many small contributions add up, too, according to the study's authors.

For instance, the National Writing Project at KSU has offered in-service training since 2007 to teachers at St. Edward High School in Lakewood. In Elyria, 20 teachers will spend a week this summer in an intensive training program put on by the National Writing Project.

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: jokoben@plaind.com, 216-999-4535

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(CUDC) Cleveland Design Competition will unleash new ideas (Rugare) | View Clip
01/24/2010
Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)

January 24, 2010, 12:00AM Mario Caceres and Christian CanonicoA park shaped like the contoured wings of a giant bird stretches over railroad tracks north of the downtown Mall in this proposal by Mario Caceres and Christian Canonico of Paris, France.

One of the holy grails of city planning in Cleveland is the desire to create a strong connection between the downtown core and the Lake Erie waterfront.

A second is that of building a lakefront train station located more or less where Chicago architect Daniel Burnham proposed building one as part of his 1903 Group Plan for Cleveland.

No one has accomplished either objective in more than a century of planning. But that hasn't stopped a pair of twenty-something architectural designers in Cleveland from trying to jump-start a civic conversation about how best to achieve both goals.

For the third year in a row, Bradley Fink and Michael Christoff, who work at Westlake Reed Leskosky and Forum Architects, respectively, have organized the Cleveland Design Competition.

The idea is simple: using the Internet to invite architects around the world to come up with solutions to design challenges in Cleveland.

The competition this year focused on a hypothetical new lakefront rail station to replace the puny, outdated Amtrak station along the railroad tracks just north of the downtown Mall, which also functions as the roof of the city's convention center.

The topic couldn't be more timely, given the agreement between Cuyahoga County and MMPI Inc. of Chicago to build the nation's first medical mart west of Mall B, the middle section of the three-part public space. MMPI and the county will also rebuild the convention center below malls B and C, which together extend from St. Clair Avenue north to the lakefront overlook north of Lakeside Avenue.

Russell Colin, London, EnglandRussell Colin of London, England, has proposed a sleek series of platforms that would link the Mall to a new lakefront rail station.So far, however, neither the county nor MMPI has reckoned with the need to provide excellent urban design and landscaping for the public spaces on the surface of the Mall when the convention center is rebuilt. Nor has either looked at new linkages to the downtown lakefront.

The design competition, however, could spark conversation about both issues.

Sponsored by the Cleveland Mall Plaza Beautification Fund and the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy in Boston, the competition drew 83 proposals from 25 countries around the world.

Steve Rugare of Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and Greg Peckham of the nonprofit Cleveland Public Art helped organize the competition.

Entries were judged Jan. 14 in Cleveland by an impressive jury that included architects Stanton Eckstut and Vincent Chang, both from New York; architect Mehrdad Yazdani of Los Angeles; Ann Pendleton-Julian, director of the School of Architecture at Ohio State University; and Robert Brown, director of city planning in Cleveland.

The winners will be announced in a free public reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at the Colonial Marketplace, 530 Euclid Avenue. Kathryn Lincoln, chairwoman of the Lincoln Institute's board of trustees, will announce the winners at 7:25 p.m.

A few days ago, Christoff allowed me to take a peek at the entries.

The most flamboyant one, created by Mario Caceres and Christian Canonico of Paris, France, calls for an artificial slope terraced to resemble the curving contour lines on a topographic map. In an aerial view, it looks like the wings of a giant bird.

It's a stunning idea, and would probably be wildly expensive. But remember, this is an idea competition meant to inspire and jolt and spark dialogue.

More practical, and buildable, was a proposal by Russell Collin of London, England, to build a crisp-looking train station north of the Mall, facing Erieside Avenue, with a slender array of terraces cascading from the north end of the Mall to the station.

I should make it clear that these two selections are unrelated to any prize winners chosen by the jury, because that information hasn't been announced.

All entries will be on view at the Colonial Marketplace through Friday, Feb. 19, and will be posted on the Cleveland Design Competition Web site, clevelandcompetition.com.

Whatever the outcome of the competition, it's clear that Christoff and Fink are performing a wonderful service by organizing the competition. Cleveland could use more of the same.

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(Economic Impact) Study shows KSU boosts area economy by $1.9 billion (Lefton)
01/22/2010
Akron Beacon Journal, The

Jan. 22--To commemorate its 100th birthday this year, Kent State University commissioned a study to quantify its impact on the region's economy.

One figure it revealed at a gathering of 100 alumni and business leaders Thursday: $1.9 billion.

That's the average annual added income of Kent State's eight campuses and its alumni -- and is the equivalent of 1.5 percent of the Northeast Ohio economy.

The report, titled "Prosperity By Degrees: The Economic Impact of Kent State University on Northeast Ohio," examines it as an investment and engine of growth and prosperity.

"At a time when companies and organizations are asked to be more accountable and quantify their worth, this report documents the value of a Kent State education for not only our students, but also for our alumni, the communities we serve and our regional economy," KSU President Lester Lefton said.

Key findings from the study include:

--In 2009, the university employed the full-time equivalent of 5,001 faculty and staff, making it the 15th largest employer in Northeast Ohio.

The region receives $292 million in added regional income each year due to the payroll of the university's faculty, staff and spending for supplies and services.

--Every $1 of state and local tax money invested in Kent State today returns $1.80 in added tax revenue and reduced government expenditures. Without KSU's presence, state and local governments would have to raise taxes to account for lower tax revenues, the report said.

--A KSU graduate with a bachelor's degree will average $1.1 million more in earned income over a lifetime than a person with only a high school diploma.

"Kent State takes great pride in our 196,000 alumni," Lefton said. "Our graduates leave the institution and enter the work force armed with employer-valued skills, making immediate contributions and leading successful careers. They also are assets to the region and individually make significant contributions to the quality of life we enjoy in Northeast Ohio."

The report, conducted by Economic Modeling Specialists Inc. (EMSI), also documents Kent's research efforts and role in start-up companies and technology transfer.

KSU is ranked among the nation's top 77 public research universities by the Carnegie Foundation.

"The study renews our pride in this great public research university," Lefton said. "Kent State not only is dear to those of us associated with it, but the institution remains a precious and essential resource for Northeast Ohio as well."

To read the report, visit http://tiny.cc/DvzDJ.

Paula Schleis can be reached at 330-996-3741 or pschleis@thebeaconjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/paulaschleis.

Copyright © 2010 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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(Nursing) Couple makes Haiti an avocation (Martsolf) | View Clip
01/24/2010
Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The

Twenty-nine years ago, Donna Martsolf and her husband took the advice of a colleague and went to Haiti.

It was a lark — and a horrible one at that.

''It's the pits of hell,'' said Martsolf, a Kent State nursing professor. ''It's dirty and hot and it costs money. It's not that it's a nice place. . . . Really, it makes no sense whatsoever.''

Still they have made it their life's avocation to return to Haiti again and again — some 45 times — to deliver health care and to help develop a nursing school.

They had just arrived in the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince when the 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck Jan. 12, the ground rocking and rolling beneath them like an amusement ride.

They spent three days of misery, compounded by a lack of food and water at the end, before being airlifted out with more than 100 other Americans in a

U.S. cargo plane.

''We were extremely grateful to be alive and have the right to come home,'' Donna Martsolf, 59, said.

She said she and her husband, Robert, feel God has called them to their work in Haiti.

Their medical knowledge — he is a family practitioner, she is a psychiatric nurse — and love of camping provided the perfect combination for them to help some of the world's poorest people. Her knowledge of French helped her to learn the dialect of Creole so she could talk to the residents.

''You'd have to be pretty self-centered not to get something out of it,'' Donna Martsolf said.

While they missed some years because the political situation was too dangerous, they have made as many as four trips yearly to the Caribbean country with Grace Mission to Haiti, a nondenominational nonprofit based in Royal Palm Beach, Fla.

They bring medications for intestinal worms, skin conditions like infantigo and malaria, ferrying it up mountains in a four-wheel vehicle or on donkeys. They treat the most basic of human ailments: malnutrition, ear infections, colds and flu, diarrhea, coughs.

That is about the extent of the medical care available for the poorest people in the Americas, who make just $500 a year and live to be just 50.

They have camped in the mountains or stayed in Spartan, church-run compounds, often without electricity, that cater largely to foreigners. Sometimes they brought their two children with them.

Nursing project

In 1991, Donna Martsolf received her doctorate in nursing from the University of Pittsburgh and two years later joined Kent State — a commuting challenge in itself, as she lives 63 miles away in Sharpsville, Pa.

But her new job pointed to yet another unmet need in Haiti.

To obtain tenure — in essence, lifetime employment — at Kent State, she cast around for a way to tie her commitment to Haiti to the public service component that is required for the university ranking.

That led her to win a Fulbright Scholarship to help oversee the start of a nursing school in the coastal city of Leogane, a town of 11,500 about 20 miles west of Port-au-Prince.

Martsolf was ''on the ground,'' as she put it, for the project that was funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development and sponsored by the Presbyterian Church U.S.A., Medical Benevolence Foundation and Episcopal Diocese of Haiti, which is the owner.

She persuaded the Episcopal bishop of Haiti to make the school a four-year baccalaureate program that is part of the Episcopal University of Haiti.

It is the first such program in the country and a dramatic departure from the informal ''schools'' that Haitian nurses set up on their own.

The school project required the couple to spend five months in Haiti. He worked at a hospital and with Grace Mission, while she watched the walls of the school inch up and up, monitoring the placement of equipment and leaning on her KSU colleagues for syllabi that could be adapted for Haiti.

By 2004, the first students were admitted — the 36 who scored the highest on an entrance test. Their education is composed of more than health care.

As students come from such hard-scrabble, subsistence homes, they had to learn the basics that come with a higher standard of living — how to flush a toilet, how to eat three moderate meals a day instead of gorging for fear the food will run out. The first class graduated in 2009.

Obstacles ahead

By the time the Martsolfs returned to Haiti this month, her work had morphed again.

This time her goal was to help hire an administrator for the 200-bed Holy Cross Hospital in Leogane, which was closed last year because of administrative problems, and to meet with nursing school officials on ways to lure faculty to Haiti — a continuing obstacle, as many educated Haitians want to leave the country. Rob Martsolf was to help with a fresh-water project.

It was to be a lightning-quick, two-day trip — albeit perhaps an untypical one, as she brought business suits and high heels and they were to stay in a modest Western-style hotel.

Soon after arriving, though, they began to volunteer at a Doctors Without Borders office. But their own future was uncertain. Fuel was low, food and water were scarce, fellow Americans were at a loss about what to do. How would they get out of the country?

Even though she heads the governing board for the nursing school and is a member of the hospital governing board and he is treasurer of the Grace Mission, staying ''didn't seem like the wisest course of action,'' she said. They didn't have medical supplies and were using resources the native people needed, she said.

As nursing school students put their education to work by setting up 10 first-aid stations around Leogane, the Martsolfs and others from their hotel made their way to the American Embassy to wait for the flight that would take them out. It came about 24 hours later.

But leaving the devastated country was a wrenching decision. Now there's even more to do than there was before.

Donna Martsolf expects they will go back in the next couple of months and take more volunteers with them. They know from experience that interest fades when volunteers learn what their life would be like in Haiti.

Martsolf said she will emphasize what she has told volunteers for decades — to keep their passport on their body, not in the hotel room or on the other side of the clinic.

If they had not had their passport on them, they would not have been allowed to leave the country, she said.

They also must have bottled water on them at all times. The Martsolfs each bought two liters of water at the Miami airport and it turned out to be a lifesaver.

Working in Haiti is not for everybody, she said.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

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(Town-Gown) Agreements near on downtown projects (Lefton) | View Clip
01/25/2010
Record-Courier

Redevelopment plans for downtown Kent are closer than
ever to putting shovels in the ground, as the public and private
partners involved are preparing to sign formal commitments
to build and fund specific pieces of the project.
Officials with the city and Kent State University — two
key players with nearly $6 million invested so far in property
purchases and planning efforts — said this week the
first of several formal development agreements with the
Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority and private
developers the Pizzuti Co. and Fairmount Properties
could be signed within 120 days.
KSU President Lester Lefton said plans to build a transit
center, hotel and conference center, and mixed-use retail,
residential and office space downtown have moved beyond
general discussions to nailing down specifics.
“We're really worrying about the details now,” he said.
“We're deciding whether the door knobs should be brass
or chrome, not if there should be doors.”
Kent City Manager Dave Ruller backed up Lefton's
statement at an economic summit on campus Thursday. He
said current plans call for the hotel, transit, retail and office
spaces to be open and operational by the fall of 2012.
“That's what we're working towards,” he said.
Ruller said he hopes to
draft the development agreements
in two phases:
The first phase spells out
a basic agreement structure
for all parties. The second
phase involves details
— construction timelines,
financing and specific building
locations — and would
be finalized through separate
agreements.
Ruller is hopeful to take
the first phase of the overall
agreement to Kent City
Councilin February for its
consideration.
The Portage County
Board of Commissioners'
plans for a new courthouse
in Kent appear to be moving
too slow for the 2012 deadline,
and current plans do
not show a new courthouse
in the core redevelopment
area. And a request from
PARTA for $21 million in
federal transportation funds
to build the transit center
may not be approved.
Ruller said losing the
courthouse and the grant
would not stop the transit
center plans or the overall
redevelopment effort.
KSU's agreement to become
an equity partner in
the hotel by investing up to
$3 million strengthened financing
for the project. The
city and PARTA have “contingency”
funding plans for
the transit center. Private
contributions from Pizzuti
Co. president and namesake
Ron Pizzuti, a Kent native,
will be measured in “millions”
when the project is
complete, Ruller said.
“The good news is we
have these private partners
who have been able to bring
funding to the table,” Ruller
said. “We've been able to incrementally
narrow the gap
between what we're aspiring
to do and what is doable.
Without this group coming
together, it just would not be
possible.”

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(Town-Gown) Funding options for ‘Gateway' weighed (Lefton) | View Clip
01/25/2010
Record-Courier

The jury is still out on a request for $21 million in
federal funding to build a multi-modal transit center
in downtown Kent.
In October, the Portage Area Regional Transportation
Authority filed for a Transportation Investment
Generating Economic Recovery grant with the U.S.
Department of Transportation. PARTA officials had
expected to hear if they received the grant to build the
Kent Central Gateway transit center as early as Jan. 1,
but a decision has not been announced.
PARTA Planning Director Bryan Smith said the
federal agency has until Feb. 17 to announce the
award recipients based on the wording in the American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which includes
funding for the TIGER grant program.
A total 1,380 applicants submitted proposals for the
grant program. Communities nationwide requested a
total dollar amount of $56.5 billion, according to the
U.S. Department of Transportation.
If PARTA doesn't receive the grant, there are other
funding options to build the Kent Central Gateway.
Kent Economic Development Director Dan Smith
said the city and PARTA are exploring funding
methods through the Akron Metropolitan
Area Transportation
Study and tax-incremental
financing.
The multi-modal transit
center, as currently designed,
would operate as
a bus transfer facility with
10 bus bays, up to 300
parking spaces and 22,000
square feet of commercial
space. Plans call for placing
the facility on Erie
Street where it dead-ends
at Haymaker Parkway.
The “Cadillac” design
plan, as Dan Smith called
it, would be scaled down
to a more cost-effective
total of around $12 million.
Kent City Manager Dave
Ruller said the city would
have to find other methods
of paying for the adjoining
infrastructure improvements.
But the commercial
space would remain so the
building facade fits with
the rest of downtown.
“To the average customer,
it won't look any different,”
he said.
The city and university,
in conjunction with private
developers, are planning
to redevelop the area
around the proposed transit
center into a hotel and
conference center, new retail,
office and residential
space.
Bryan Smith said a
representative from U.S.
Senator Sherrod Brown's
office visited Wednesday
with officials from
PARTA, Kent and KSU to
talk about the transit center
and the other redevelopment
plans.
“They were very supportive
and glad to see
the partnerships,” Bryan
Smith said. “That was one
of the things we stressed.
None of us could do this
alone.”

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(Town-Gown, Psychology, Wick, ) ALONG THE WAY (Lefton, Rawson, Hassler) | View Clip
01/25/2010
Record-Courier

Kent State University President
Lester Lefton, whose main mission
at a community gathering on
campus Thursday was to review
the recent study showing the positive
economic impact KSU has
on Northeastern Ohio, once again
reaffirmed his commitment to link
up the campus with downtown
Kent.
“We're not talking ‘when' or
‘if,'” the president said, referring
to the proposed hotel conference
complex portion of the link.
“We're talking door knobs and fixtures.”
The president, responding to a question by architect
Doug Fuller, said he believes an agreement
between the main parties to proceed with the
downtown renewal project will be in place within
the next 120 days. City Manager Dave Ruller, who
has been deeply involved in putting together the
agreement between the developers, the city and the
university, nodded in agreement when the president
threw the spotlight momentarily his way.
If linkage indeed occurs, it will be an economic
shot in the arm for downtown Kent and give the
city a better than even chance to develop itself into
a first-class college town, something it has always
had the potential to be.

Friday, I had lunch with Robert Wick, a member
of the family that has underwritten Kent State
University's Wick Poetry Center. He lives in Arizona,
where his family's newspaper business is
located, but has memories of attending Kent State
in the 1950s. Noting the geographical separation
between the campus and the city that existed even
in the 1950s, he said he does not recall as an undergraduate
going into downtown Kent very much.
Linking the campus and the downtown with The
Esplanade and the proposed hotel conference center
should make Kent a much more interesting
community, he said.

I have to admit I am completely dumbfounded
by Portage County's reluctance to participate in
the downtown renewal with its proposed new Kent
municipal courthouse. That goes against everything
I've ever learned about the importance of vital city
centers and the critical mass they require. The impression
some of us who've followed this have is
that the judges were ready to participate, but the
commissioners have dragged their heels and have
been less than forthright about their intentions for
the municipal courthouse.
I wonder why? It's too bad. When you can get
Kent State University lined up in support of the
city, it means good things can happen. I would
think Portage County would have wanted to have
been a party to something so obviously positive for
the area.
———
At the Thursday session at Kent State, I had
the pleasure of sitting next to Katherine Rawson,
the associate professor of psychology who
was honored Jan. 13 at the White House as
one of 100 beginning researchers to receive the
Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists
and Engineers.
Dr. Rawson was nominated for the award by
the U.S. Department of Education. Her grantfunded
research seeks to identify effective study
strategies and study schedules for students to
learn better in the classroom. She conducts her
research jointly with her colleague, Dr. John
Dunlosky, a psychology professor, who also happens
to be her husband.
The awards were presented in ceremonies
of the East Wing of the White House and those
honored were collectively recognized by the
president.
In addition to her excellence at research, Dr.
Rawson has a very nice personality. I bet she
is popular with her students. She's personable
and down to earth. When she told me she grew
up in southeastern Ohio, I remarked about the
beauty of that region's hills. Dr. Rawson said
she thinks Northeastern Ohio is beautiful, too.
Dr. Rawson has a specialty in text recognition
so we discussed reading. Among her insights,
the one that struck a chord with me, a painfully
slow reader, was that doing lots of reading helps
one become better at it. She said as one develops
reading vocabulary, word recognition and
overall comprehension improves and when that
happens speed picks up.
———
Kent Area Chamber of Commerce Executive
Director Lori Wemhoff, faced with finding a new
location to host monthly chamber lunches when
Twin Lakes Country Club closed, has scheduled
the lunches in three downtown restaurants and
so far the locations are drawing a bigger turnout.
Water Street Tavern/Cajun Dave's brought out 51
on a very cold December day. January's luncheon
upstairs at Ray's Place drew more than 80 to hear
the colorful Kent State University head men's basketball
coach, Geno Ford. The Pufferbelly will host
the occasion every third month, but for breakfast,
which will enable some to attend who can't make
luncheon meetings.
Coach Ford and Wemhoff demonstrated they are
both quick on their feet at the January luncheon
at Ray's Place.. The coach chided Lori for being
a graduate of KSU's arch rival, the University of
Akron. She shot back that Coach Ford was generously
picking up the luncheon tab for the 80 or
so who showed up. Their repartee back and forth
made for a lively luncheon.
The Pufferbelly breakfast in February will feature
a representative of Smithers Oasis, the firm
that produces the floral foam used by florists
around the world.
Mayor Jerry Fiala, who said he can't make all
the chamber meetings, has nevertheless gone out
of his way to attend the first two and he's a most
welcome addition.
———
When David Hassler, director of Kent State
University's Wick Poetry Center, told me his
father, Donald, a professor of English at Kent
State, has a science fiction specialty, I asked for
an opportunity for our son, Chris, to meet him
because Chris enjoys science fiction. At a subsequent
luncheon during Chris' winter college
break, I learned the world “specialty” is an understatement
as Professor Hassler has authored
11 books on the subject. These include books
about the writings of Isaac Asimov, Hal Clement,
and Erasmus Darwin (the grandfather of Charles
Darwin). For 16 years, Professor Hassler also edited
Extrapolation, a journal of science fiction
writing, and he currently serves as treasurer of
the Science Fiction Research Association.
Professor Hassler said his courses in science
fiction writing began after the May 4, 1970
shootings, when Kent State was having trouble
attracting and keeping students. Faculty members
were encouraged to offer courses that
would remedy that. I was told by others that
Professor Hassler's course in science fiction
writing quickly became one of the most popular
courses on campus.
The professor's work has brought him into
contact with major science fiction authors including
Isaac Asimov, who died in 1992, probably
the most published of any science fiction
writer ever.
———
I read Gerry Lewis' Saturday Around Ravenna
column about the gorgeous Christmas season lighting
display at the home of Neil and Barbara Mann
on South Liberty Street in Ravenna and, having
seen it, believe it perhaps the most beautiful of any
in Portage County.
Although Christmas is about the birth of Christ,
its festive aspects have antecedents in pre-Christian
celebrations of the winter solstice, the shortest day
of the year. Early Church leaders wisely permitted
the incorporation of some of those aspects into the
celebration of the birth of Christ.
I know the birth of Christ is sacred. The festive
aura of Christmas helps make winter more bearable.

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(KSU Museum) Museum to mark 25th anniversary | View Clip
01/25/2010
Record-Courier

The Kent State University
Museum will celebrate its silver
anniversary this year.
Opened to the public in October
1985, the Kent State University
Museum was founded
with an initial gift from New
York dress manufacturers Jerry
Silverman and Shannon Rodgers.
Its seven galleries, a total
of 10,000 square feet of exhibit
space, feature changing exhibitions
of work by many of the
world's great designers.
Today, the museum collections
number more than 40,000
objects including high fashion
garments from the 18th to 21st
centuries, regional traditional
costumes, and a decorative arts
collection that includes a 10,000
piece glass collection donated
by Akron collectors Jabe Tarter
and Paul Miller. Considered to
be one of the world's finest collections,
it includes most major
American and European fashion
designers, including Balenciaga,
Chanel, Dior, Halston,
Norell, Oscar de la Renta, Yves
St. Laurent, George Stavropoulos,
and Issey Miyake.
Some of the museum's most
important objects include:
• Katharine Hepburn's personal
collection of her performance
clothes
• Christian Dior's “Vénus,”
a ball gown from 1949 of pink
tulle embroidered with sequins
and crystals that once belonged
to actress Marlene Dietrich
• A 1926 fringed evening
dress by Coco Chanel
• A 1750s blue and silver formal
dress
• A quilt made by Elizabeth
Hobbes Keckley from scraps of
Mary Todd Lincoln's dresses
The museum's 25th anniversary
exhibition schedule is as
follows:
• George Stavropoulos:
through Sept. 5
• Katharine Hepburn: Dressed
for Stage and Screen: Sept. 25-
August 2011
• Gazette du Bon Ton: through
May 29
• Paige Palmer's Collection
of Ohio Art Pottery: begins
June 18
• John Wilkinson Collection
of Decorative Art: begins June
18
• Confessions and the Sense
of Self: through Feb. 14
• Silver Anniversary Exhibition:
opens March 11
• Kokoon Arts Club: Cleveland
Revels: through March 28
• I Never Leave the House
without a Hat: through October
10
• Great American Glass: continuing
The museum is located in
Rockwell Hall, at the corner
of Main and Lincoln streets in
Kent. It is open to the public
and is wheelchair accessible.
Museum hours are 10 a.m. to
4:45 p.m. on Wednesdays, Fridays
and Saturdays; 10 a.m.
to 8:45 p.m. Thursdays; and
noon to 4:45 p.m. Sundays. It is
closed Mondays and Tuesdays.
Admission is $5 for adults, $4
for senior citizens, $3 for ages
7 through 18, and free for children
under 7 and for KSU students,
faculty and staff with a
KSU I.D. Parking is free.
For more information, call
330-672-3450 or visit www.
kent.edu/museum.

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(KSU Museum) 82 plates from Gazette du Bon Ton on display (Druesedow) | View Clip
01/25/2010
Record-Courier

The Kent State University Museum has on
display 82 original plates of illustrations from
the Algesa O'Sickey collection of Gazette du
Bon Ton from 1920 to 1922 in its Palmer and
Mull Galleries. The entire collection will be
accessible on the museum's Web site, www.
kent.edu/museum. The exhibit will be on display
through May 30.
Produced in limited editions on handmade
paper, the series spared no expense and used
the pochoir, or stencil, technique to hand
watercolor what may be the 20th century's
most extraordinary fashion plates, said Jean
Druesedow, museum director. In addition to
the plates, 20 garments from 1912 to 1925
from this period are also on display. The
gowns are from the leading Parisian couture
houses of the teens and 20s, such as those of
Jeanne Paquin, Paul Poiret, Jeanne Lanvin
and the House of Worth. Two of the garments
on display, on loan from the Western Reserve
Historical Society, were the models for two
of the plates, Druesedow added.
The Gazette was published from 1912 to
1925. “If we write here the story of dresses,
the dresses will write in due time the story
of their times,” wrote Henri Bidou in the Gazette's
first issue after World War I, expressing
the idea behind the Gazette du Bon Ton.
The publication was the brain child of Lucien
Vogel, a Frenchman who was fascinated by
19th century hand-colored engravings and
set out to create a luxury modern magazine
that would be the epitome of good taste.
“The Gazette was a combination of Architectural
Digest, Vanity Fair and The New
Yorker,” Druesedow said. “We were given
two or three years' worth of the publication.”
Many plates from the French publication
were translated by Dr. Anne Bissonnette, the
museum's former curator, who put together
the display, Druesedow said.
“These hand-colored illustrations were really
quite beautiful and witty,” Druesedow
said. “There's a lot of whimsy with them.

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(Read Lecture) Teacher of the year to speak at KSU on Tuesday | View Clip
01/25/2010
Record-Courier

New York City native,
Anthony J. Mullen, who
was recognized by President
Barack Obama as the 2009
National Teacher of the Year,
will present a Gerald H.
Read Distinguished lecture
at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday in the
Kent State University Kiva
auditorium.
Mullen served as a New
York City police officer for
20 years before entering the
teaching field.
Mullen teaches ninth
through 12th grades as a special
education teacher at The
ARCH School, an alternative
education branch of Greenwich
High School in Greenwich,
Conn.
This lecture is free. For
more information, call 330-
672-0563.

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(KSU at Stark) 'Abstractitudes' exhibition opens Tuesday at Kent Stark | View Clip
01/23/2010
Repository - Online, The

with Totally Local Yellow Pages

Four Canton-area painters display their work in a new exhibition at Kent State University Stark Campus. Titled “Abstractitudes,” the show spotlights Aaron Hubbard, Gene Barber, Martin Bertman and Isabel Zaldivar. The show opens with a reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the University Center at 6000 Frank Ave. NW in Jackson Township. It will remain on view through May 14.

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(KSU at Stark) Artists overcome challenges to excel in competition | View Clip
01/23/2010
Repository - Online, The

with Totally Local Yellow Pages

Their abilities wildly eclipse their disabilities.

A dynamic duo, they are up-and-coming artists. One is a sculptor, the other a photographer. Their work: Competition quality.

Rashelle Gold, an 18-year-old Hoover High School junior, has been profoundly deaf since birth.

Janaya Smith, 17, a GlenOak High senior who was born in Latvia, suffered the lingering effects of the radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear plant explosion in the Ukraine. She was born with one arm and it is significantly shorter than normal, ending with a partial hand.

Neither allows her handicap to interfere with an affinity for the arts.

Gold, has won a Gold Key award in this year's Northeast Central Ohio scholastic art competition, featuring the entries of middle and high school students from Stark, Summit, Portage, Wayne, Tuscarawas and Medina counties. The event is hosted locally by Kent State University Stark Campus.

HAND SKILLS

Gold's category was sculpture, and whimsy was her muse.

Her entry was a size 8, Mary Jane-style canvas shoe she transformed with clay into an unexpectedly realistic, striped three-dimensional white tiger complete with hairy ears, beady eyes and fine-wire whiskers.

“I was shocked when I found her digging the glass eyes out of an old stuffed animal,” her mother, Lisa Gold, said. “I said, ‘What are you doing?' ”

“I just imagined what kind of eyes the tiger should have,” her daughter explained.

The petite sculptor with silky brown hair and a perpetual smile answered questions about her work using sign language translated by her interpreter, Danielle Judy, who has worked with her since she was a kindergartner.

Though Gold has undergone a cochlear implant in one ear and wears a hearing aid in the other, she feels most articulate communicating with her hands.

She described painstakingly applying bits of real fur plucked from an old coat, making the inside of the tiger's ears mimic nature.

Marylin Hlass, a teacher of the deaf, has worked with her since she began preschool at age 3. She describes Gold as caring and fun-loving.

Her Hoover High School art teacher, mentor and fan Janet Baransaid said “I know that she struggles with writing because of her handicap so art has been a good outlet for her. Rashelle's a real fighter and a great kid.

“I had her in my art classes in ninth and 10th grades. She was inspired to create her sculpture by the shoe itself. She thought it would be fun to do something that was black and white and she found the white tiger.”

Gold, who enjoys texting her friends and visits to Starbucks, also works part time at the Washington Square Wendy's restaurant.

The daughter of Lisa and Chris Gold will have her entry shipped to New York City for a national awards judging process.

A student art exhibit of Gold Key winners, approximately 300 works, will be there in June. Select works will appear in the national catalog and some issues of scholastic magazines and other publications.

Though high school graduation is a year away, Gold has tentative plans for college. She is enrolled in Hoover's culinary arts program.

CHALLENGES MET, OVERCOME

Smith was adopted as a 1-year-old by William and Mary Smith of Plain Township. She is the second youngest of their 10 biological and adopted children.

Her GlenOak High School photography teacher, Jeannene Mathis-Bertosa, lauds her work, an admirable grade-point average and can-do determination.

“I am always amazed that before I can figure out how to adapt equipment for her, she is already halfway through the assignment,” Mathis-Bertosa said.

Smith's portfolio showcases her darkroom expertise in a series of purposely grainy black-and-white photographs of people at a downtown Canton SARTA bus stop.

“I really like to shoot nature,” Smith said. “And I like to do still life in the studio. We're so lucky at GlenOak to have all the photo experiences available to us.”

There is little Smith, who has become adept at compensating for her missing limbs, can't do. She has been a cast member in a Canton Players Guild production, enjoys horseback riding and has not ruled out a future broadcasting career.

In August, she will begin studies at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh, planning to attend year-round, earning a bachelor's degree in three years.

TAKE AN ART STROLL FREE

All the scholastic art competition entries will be on display in the Kent Stark Campus Center and the Fine Arts Building through Feb. 4. Hours are 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday.

The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards are the largest, longest-running and most prestigious recognition programs for middle and high school art and photography students in the United States. Kent State Stark is one of 90 regional partners that sponsor the local award program.

During the 2010 program year, more than 30,000 students will be recognized in their local communities, while 1,000 students will receive national awards. Students and teachers are honored at regional ceremonies, public events and the national ceremony at Carnegie Hall.

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(KSU at Ashtabula) Conneaut sixth-graders get hands-on experience at KSUA (Bautista)
01/23/2010
Star-Beacon

Jan. 23--ASHTABULA -- Conneaut sixth-grade students got a hands-on lesson on proper hand washing in the nursing department of the new Robert S. Morrison Health and Science Building at Kent State University-Ashtabula on Friday morning.

"Who wants to be a nurse?" asked assistant nursing professor Rowena Bautista of the sixth-grade students who sat expectantly inside the new nursing department. "It is a passion of a nurse to teach the proper way to wash your hands to prevent the spread of disease and infection."

Students were surprised as Bautista exposed the germs on their hands, by shining a black light over them. The students then were given an opportunity to practice good hand-washing techniques and then see the results.

The nursing department workshop was just one of several breakout sessions the middle school students experienced at the college through the College by Six Program, made possible through a Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR-UP) grant awarded to Conneaut Middle School through the Ashtabula County Continued Education Support Services (ACCESS) office.

"I feel this is important for the students to see they can truly grow up to become whatever they want, through a wonderful college close by," said Sara Gleason, GEAR-UP adviser at Conneaut Middle School. "The grant had to be designated to one school, and after doing research, we chose Conneaut." "Conneaut School District has a high graduation rate, but less than half go on to post secondary education. We are hoping by exposing children to college at a young age, we can turn that around," Gleason said.

The purpose of the program, which is in its fourth year, is to get the children exposed to higher education early, said John Roskovics, assistant principal of Conneaut Middle School.

"We consider ourselves very fortunate to have a chance to do this, I believe there are only seven GEAR-UP districts in Ohio. Our students receive a T-shirt, tour different classrooms and have a provided lunch," Roskovics said. "All of the professors who participate in the program volunteer their time to do this for our students."

The academic areas the students were exposed to included math, science, nursing, business, theater arts, library science, biology, English and physical therapy.

"I talk about college all the time to my students, but here they get to experience it, and many of them have never seen Kent-Ashtabula," said J.C. Lenk, Conneaut Middle School teacher.

Kayla Masirovits has dreams of becoming a doctor or occupational therapist someday, and the sixth-grader was impressed with her visit to KSUA.

"In the biology class, we got to see the DNA of a strawberry. That was fun and different," she said.

Student Aaron Ledlow was thrilled with what he had experienced throughout the morning, especially in biology.

"I got to touch a human brain and see some cells under a microscope," he said. "I want to go to college. I want to be a carpenter and a cartoonist."

Copyright © 2010 Star Beacon, Ashtabula, Ohio

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(Town-Gown) KSU has many projects in works (Lefton) | View Clip
01/24/2010
Stow Sentry

Record-Courier staff writer

Kent State University is poised for a major transition as it marks its Centennial this year with several multi-million dollar construction projects planned both on and off campus.

KSU President Lester Lefton gave an update on the university's plans for a downtown hotel and conference center and the estimated $250 million capital improvement plan for the Kent campus during a recent meeting with members of the Stow Sentry and Record-Courier editorial staff.

Lefton said the university, city, Portage County and two private developers -- Columbus-based hotel developer Pizzuti Companies and Cleveland-based retail developer Fairmount Properties -- continue to meet weekly on redevelopment plans for the downtown area.

He estimates all five parties could sign a development agreement within four months. "It's not moving as quickly as I would like, but every week we make progress," he said.

Plans to build the hotel and conference center along with new, mixed use retail and residential space are part of an effort to create a physical link between the campus and downtown.

The goal, Lefton said, is to build a college town atmosphere to rival university communities such as Boston, Ann Arbor, Mich., and Ithaca, N.Y. "It's been missing for 100 years," Lefton said.

The project, when done, will be "10 times bigger" than the recently completed Phoenix Project in downtown Kent, he said.

Lefton said the university has offered to become an equity partner in the hotel project, tentatively named the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center. The option is the developers' choice, but the KSU Board of Trustees has authorized the university to spend up to $3 million on the project, he said.

The campus renovation plan, announced in November, involves the university spending as much as $250 million to build new facilities and renovate existing buildings on the Kent campus. KSU will issue bonds to pay for the updates and could begin construction within the next four months. The work, expected to span the next five to six years, will push administrators to the outskirts of campus, bring student space closer to the core and include a major reconstruction of Risman Plaza at the Kent Student Center. Detailed construction plans have not been finalized, Lefton said.

"Right now, we are deep in detailed project discussions," he said. "We need facilities that match the aspirations of our students and faculty."

There will not be a new facility for the recently created College of Public Health, Lefton said. Instead, existing space will be renovated for the college.

The campus facelift will include demolition of some structures and creation of a new, 24-hour student study space. In addition, the Art Building and Van Deusen Hall will likely be reduced to structural steel and completely rebuilt, he said.

Lefton said he anticipates the hotel and campus renovations alone will create an "economic boon" to the area, adding, "It will bring a lot of money and a lot of jobs to the county nd] the city."

Lefton also said that KSU "has no immediate -- or even not immediate -- plans to pull out" of the Kent State Airport, which the university owns on Route 59 in Stow. The subject "comes up every year," he said, but no changes for the airport are planned.

KSU pumps $1.9 billion

into area's economy, Lefton reports

Lefton announced this past Thursday the results of an economic impact study of KSU and its eight campuses on Northeastern Ohio. Alumni, students, faculty and staff of Kent State University pump $1.9 billion annually into Northeast Ohio's economy, he told area politicians, business owners and community members at a Jan. 21 summit.

The $1.9 billion figure represents the impact of KSU's eight campuses in 12 counties, approximately 5,000 employees, nearly 40,000 total enrolled students and 196,000 alumni. KSU is Northeast Ohio's 15th largest employer as the state's third-largest public university, according to the study.

The study showed the region receives roughly $292 million in added income annually due to the payroll of KSU faculty and staff and other university spending. Lefton said Northeast Ohio can continue to count on KSU as a steady employer.

"We are a leading business enterprise in Northeast Ohio," he said. "We are not just a major player, we are the leading research institute in Northeast Ohio." Of the $1.9 billion, the study attributes $64 million to area visitors attracted by KSU who may visit a local restaurant or venues such as the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The study also quantified the value of a KSU degree and attributed $1.6 billion to "raising the educational attainment and productivity of the workforce."

Citing the study, Lefton said a KSU graduate is likely to make $1.1 million more in their lifetime compared to a non-KSU graduate. The multiplier effect, he said, occurs when those graduates buy a car, remodel their home or make other purchases that generate revenue for businesses and local governments.

"Because of your educational attainment ... You're doing stuff that is spending money in Northeast Ohio," he said.

Rebecca Zurava, a Silver Lake resident who received a master's degree from KSU, said she was happy to hear how much growth the university initiates, particularly near its regional campuses.

"I thought the results were astounding," she said.

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(Economic Impact) KSU contributes $1.9 billion to area's economy, president reports (Lefton) | View Clip
01/24/2010
Hudson Hub-Times

Record-Courier staff writer

Alumni, students, faculty and staff of Kent State University pump $1.9 billion annually into Northeast Ohio's economy, KSU President Lester Lefton announced Jan. 21.

"That's a lot of money," Lefton told the crowd comprised mostly of alumni. They gathered for the invitation-only "Summit to Engage Regional Leaders" on campus. KSU invited area politicians, business owners and community members to the summit, where Lefton unveiled the results of an economic impact study commissioned in 2009 titled "Prosperity by Degrees: The Economic Impact of Kent State University on Northeast Ohio."

The $1.9 billion figure represents the impact of KSU's eight campuses in 12 counties, approximately 5,000 employees, nearly 40,000 total enrolled students

and 196,000 alumni.

KSU is Northeast Ohio's 15th largest em-ployer as the state's third-largest public university, according to the study.

The study showed the region receives roughly $292 million in added income annually due to the payroll of KSU faculty and staff and other university spending. Lefton said Northeast Ohio can continue to count on KSU as a steady employer.

"We are a leading business enterprise in Northeast Ohio," he said. "The data shows we are not just a major player, we are the leading research institute in Northeast Ohio." Of the $1.9 billion, the study attributes $64 million to area visitors attracted by KSU who may visit a local restaurant or venues such as the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The study also quantified the value of a KSU degree and attributed $1.6 billion to "raising the educational attainment and productivity of the workforce."

Citing the study, Lefton said a KSU graduate is likely to make $1.1 million more in their lifetime compared to a non-KSU graduate.

The multiplier effect, he said, occurs when those graduates buy a car, remodel their home or make other purchases that generate revenue for businesses and local governments.

"Because of your educational attainment ... You're doing stuff that is spending money in Northeast Ohio," he said.

Separate reports from the Milken Institute, a California-based economic think tank, ranked KSU fifth in the U.S. and Canada for the number of start-up companies formed and patents issued per $1 million in research expenditures.

KSU set a record in 2009 by obtaining $46.1 million in external research funding.

The university has helped produce 16 start-up companies, including Alpha Micron, which recently expanded into the 41,000 square foot KSU Centennial Research Park facility.

It's not just visitors, alumni, students and KSU employees helping to drive the regional economy. The university itself spent $38 million on construction projects in 2008 that generated or retained 380 jobs, according to the study.

And this year, the university is planning to begin a renovation of the Kent campus with an estimated cost of $200 million, which local officials anticipate will generate $2 million in city income tax revenue during construction.

Rebecca Zurava, a Silver Lake resident who received a master's degree from KSU, said she was happy to hear how much growth the university initiates, particularly near its regional campuses.

"I thought the results were astounding," she said.

Newly appointed Ravenna Mayor Joe Bica, who attended the summit Jan. 21, said he is hopeful to see more cooperation between KSU and Ravenna during his tenure.

"Kent State is the (third) largest university in Ohio," he said. "How could they not have a huge economic impact? I don't think people realize how big they are."

The economic impact study was compiled by Idaho-based Economic Modeling Specialists, Inc. Lefton said the university commissioned the study to commemorate KSU's 2010 Centennial.

"This is just the first 100 years," he said. "Our best days are still ahead of us."

E-mail: mfredmonsky@recordpub.com

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(Geography) Hudson Library - Program looks at top winter storms (Schmidlin) | View Clip
01/24/2010
Hudson Hub-Times

"The Greatest Winter Storms of Ohio" will be the topic for a program Feb. 8 at 7 p.m. at the Hudson Library and Historical Society. The speaker will be Dr. Tom Schmidlin, a meteorologist and professor of geography at Kent State University.

Schmidlin has a bachelor's degree in meteorology from Iowa State, an master's degree in bioclimatology from the University of Nevada-Reno, and Ph.D. in meteorology from Cornell University. He has conducted field work and other research on severe weather and the risk of death in tornadoes and hurricanes, and is co-author, along with his wife, Jeanne, of "Thunder in the Heartland: A Chronicle of Outstanding Weather Events in Ohio."

This program is free and open to the public. There is no registration required. For more information, call the reference desk at 330-653-6658 ext. 1010, e-mail askus@hudson.lib.oh.us, or visit hudsonlibrary.org.

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(KSU @ Ashtabula) Conneaut sixth-graders get hands-on experience at KSUA (Bautista) | View Clip
01/23/2010
Star-Beacon - Online

ASHTABULA — Conneaut sixth-grade students got a hands-on lesson on proper hand washing in the nursing department of the new Robert S. Morrison Health and Science Building at Kent State University-Ashtabula on Friday morning.

“Who wants to be a nurse?” asked assistant nursing professor Rowena Bautista of the sixth-grade students who sat expectantly inside the new nursing department. “It is a passion of a nurse to teach the proper way to wash your hands to prevent the spread of disease and infection.”

Students were surprised as Bautista exposed the germs on their hands, by shining a black light over them. The students then were given an opportunity to practice good hand-washing techniques and then see the results.

The nursing department workshop was just one of several breakout sessions the middle school students experienced at the college through the College by Six Program, made possible through a Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR-UP) grant awarded to Conneaut Middle School through the Ashtabula County Continued Education Support Services (ACCESS) office.

“I feel this is important for the students to see they can truly grow up to become whatever they want, through a wonderful college close by,” said Sara Gleason, GEAR-UP adviser at Conneaut Middle School. “The grant had to be designated to one school, and after doing research, we chose Conneaut.” “Conneaut School District has a high graduation rate, but less than half go on to post secondary education. We are hoping by exposing children to college at a young age, we can turn that around,” Gleason said.

The purpose of the program, which is in its fourth year, is to get the children exposed to higher education early, said John Roskovics, assistant principal of Conneaut Middle School.

“We consider ourselves very fortunate to have a chance to do this, I believe there are only seven GEAR-UP districts in Ohio. Our students receive a T-shirt, tour different classrooms and have a provided lunch,” Roskovics said. “All of the professors who participate in the program volunteer their time to do this for our students.”

The academic areas the students were exposed to included math, science, nursing, business, theater arts, library science, biology, English and physical therapy.

“I talk about college all the time to my students, but here they get to experience it, and many of them have never seen Kent-Ashtabula,” said J.C. Lenk, Conneaut Middle School teacher.

Kayla Masirovits has dreams of becoming a doctor or occupational therapist someday, and the sixth-grader was impressed with her visit to KSUA.

“In the biology class, we got to see the DNA of a strawberry. That was fun and different,” she said.

Student Aaron Ledlow was thrilled with what he had experienced throughout the morning, especially in biology.

“I got to touch a human brain and see some cells under a microscope,” he said. “I want to go to college. I want to be a carpenter and a cartoonist.”

Return to Top



Kent State University has many projects in the works (Lefton) | View Clip
01/24/2010
Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online

Fredmonsky

staff writer

Kent State University is poised for a major transition as it marks its Centennial this year with several multi-million dollar construction projects planned both on and off campus.

KSU President Lester Lefton gave an update on the university's plans for a downtown hotel and conference center and the estimated $250 million capital improvement plan for the Kent campus during a recent meeting with members of the Cuyahoga Falls News-Press and Record-Courier editorial staff.

Lefton said the university, city, Portage County and two private developers -- Columbus-based hotel developer Pizzuti Companies and Cleveland-based retail developer Fairmount Properties -- continue to meet weekly on redevelopment plans for the downtown area.

He estimates all five parties could sign a development agreement within four months.

"It's not moving as quickly as I would like, but every week we make progress," he said.

Plans to build the hotel and conference center along with new, mixed use retail and residential space are part of an effort to create a physical link between the campus and downtown.

The goal, Lefton said, is to build a college town atmosphere to rival university communities such as Boston, Ann Arbor, Mich., and Ithaca, N.Y. "It's been missing for 100 years," Lefton said.

The project, when done, will be "10 times bigger" than the recently completed Phoenix Project in downtown Kent, he said.

Lefton said the university has offered to become an equity partner in the hotel project, tentatively named the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center.

The option is the developers' choice, but the KSU Board of Trustees has authorized the university to spend up to $3 million on the project, he said.

The campus renovation plan, announced in November, involves the university spending as much as $250 million to build new facilities and renovate existing buildings on the Kent campus. KSU will issue bonds to pay for the updates and could begin construction within the next four months.

The work, expected to span the next five to six years, will push administrators to the outskirts of campus, bring student space closer to the core and include a major reconstruction of Risman Plaza at the Kent Student Center. Detailed construction plans have not been finalized, Lefton said.

"Right now, we are deep in detailed project discussions," he said. "We need facilities that match the aspirations of our students and faculty."

There will not be a new facility for the recently created College of Public Health, Lefton said. Instead, existing space will be renovated for the college.

The campus facelift will include demolition of some structures and creation of a new, 24-hour student study space.

In addition, the Art Building and Van Deusen Hall will likely be reduced to structural steel and completely rebuilt, he said.

Lefton said he anticipates the hotel and campus renovations alone will create an "economic boon" to the area.

"It will bring a lot of money and a lot of jobs to the county nd] the city," he said.

Lefton also mentioned that KSU "has no immediate -- or even not immediate -- plans to pull out" of the Kent State Airport, which the university owns on Route 59 in Stow.

The subject "comes up every year," he said, but no changes for the airport are planned.

University pumps

$1.9 billion

into area's economy,

Lefton reports

Lefton announced this past Thursday the results of an economic impact study of KSU and its eight campuses on Northeastern Ohio. Alumni, students, faculty and staff of Kent State University pump $1.9 billion annually into Northeast Ohio's economy, he told area politicians, business owners and community members at a Jan. 21 summit.

The $1.9 billion figure represents the impact of KSU's eight campuses in 12 counties, approximately 5,000 employees, nearly 40,000 total enrolled students and 196,000 alumni. KSU is Northeast Ohio's 15th largest employer as the state's third-largest public university, according to the study.

The study showed the region receives roughly $292 million in added income annually due to the payroll of KSU faculty and staff and other university spending.

Lefton said Northeast Ohio can continue to count on Kent State as a steady employer.

"We are a leading business enterprise in Northeast Ohio," he said. "We are not just a major player, we are the leading research institute in Northeast Ohio."

Of the $1.9 billion, the study attributes $64 million to area visitors attracted by KSU who may visit a local restaurant or venues such as the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The study also quantified the value of a KSU degree and attributed $1.6 billion to "raising the educational attainment and productivity of the workforce."

Citing the study, Lefton said a KSU graduate is likely to make $1.1 million more in their lifetime compared to a non-KSU graduate. The multiplier effect, he said, occurs when those graduates buy a car, remodel their home or make other purchases that generate revenue for businesses and local governments.

"Because of your educational attainment ... You're doing stuff that is spending money in Northeast Ohio," he said.

Rebecca Zurava, a Silver Lake resident who received a master's degree from KSU, said she was happy to hear how much growth the university initiates, particularly near its regional campuses.

"I thought the results were astounding," she said.

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(CUDC) Open forum on downtown Cleveland's Public Square redesign draws a big crowd | View Clip
01/24/2010
Examiner.com

Recently, the Downtown Cleveland Alliance and ParkWorks teamed up to develop new concepts and ideas on what Public Square -- the heart of downtown Cleveland -- should look like.

They hired Field Operations, a landscape design firm based in New York City, to come up with the plans. Field Operations, along with The Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative of Kent State, came up with three ways to unite the four quadrants: Frame It, Forest It, and Thread It. On Thursday, the first open forum was held at CSU's Levin College of Urban Affairs. It was fairly well attended with over 100 people showing up.

The first concept, Frame It, would involve building a large, 55-foot tall metal trellis-like structure around the perimeter which you could put hanging gardens on. This plan didn't make much sense to me. You're just putting more "stuff" onto the Square, taking away sitelines, not adding anything very engaging and just adding more things for the city to maintain. This design was also the least favorite of the crowd at the forum.

The part that I did like about the Frame It plan was redesigning Ontario by getting rid of curbs and other barriers and making the road more "temporary" so it could easily be closed for events. Without people having to worry about falling off a curb as they walked, closing Ontario would make it feel like two sections instead of four. It would make it easier to temporarily recapture some of the Square taken over by roads. Public Square actually covers 10 acres, but the four quadrants themselves actually only occupy a total of four acres. The rest of the land is taken up by streets (4 acres) and sidewalks (2 acres).

Being held captive by vehicular traffic is one of the problems with Public Square. It's littered with bus stops and two major roadways, Ontario and Prospect, which cause the Square to be cut up into four different quadrants. Field Operations says (and I agree) that, "In order to truly transform Public Square, the pedestrian must have priority use of the space."

That's why my favorite design going into the forum was the second one, Forest It. This would involve shutting Ontario permanently, creating two separate rectangles. The rectangle closest to Tower City would include the Soliders and Sailors monument and be heavily forested, with benches and seating areas underneath the trees. The north rectangle would be bordered by trees but would primarily be a large lawn where concerts, farmers markets and other events could take place.

Right now, there's nothing happening in Public Square to draw people to it. During events like Winterfest and Fourth of July celebrations, Public Square is packed with thousands of people. Why? First, there's an event occurring and second, they close off the Square to vehicular traffic. As Field Operations says, right now, "Waiting is the primary everyday activity in Public Square."

Getting the city to shut down Ontario and Superior only happens about twice a year for two major events. But if the Square was always united, smaller groups would be able to put on more events year round -- art shows, festivals, music performances, farmers markets, etc.

But I fear that closing Superior and Ontario altogether is never going to happen. At the forum, Joe Marinucci, president of the Downtown Cleveland Alliance, said that we need to be aware of certain investments, like the new Euclid HealthLine, that would prevent the closing of Ontario and Superior. But the HealthLine goes around Public Square, not through it. It wouldn't be affected by street closings. Joe Calabrese, General Manager of the Greater Cleveland RTA, is part of the Public Square task force, so don't expect him to go along with rerouting bus lines around Public Square, either.

But others at the forum brought up the issue of closing down Superior and Ontario as well in order to create a truly unified space. There may be some traffic issues, but isn't the payoff worth it? People have gotten used to driving around Central Park in New York City -- a place with much more traffic than Cleveland. They could adapt here as well.

The third design, Thread It, was by far the crowd favorite with the vast majority of people at the forum saying that's what they wanted. This would involve creating a large mound structure that would peak at the center of Public Square. This would allow Superior and Ontario to stay open, with traffic going underneath the mound while pedestrians crossing the Square would go over it. It does leave the possibility for closing Ontario down altogether.

This design would allow pedestrian traffic going from Tower City to cross over Public Square to Key Tower and The Mall without ever being stopped by traffic. James Corner, head of Field Operations, also mentioned that retail establishments, such as small coffee shops, could be built into the mound, creating destination and gathering areas and also allowing some tax revenue to pay for upkeep of the Square, which could be high.

Corner said that the Thread It design was his favorite because people will be drawn to it and it connects the diagonal movement where most pedestrians go. He also liked the revenue generating potential of retail integrated into the hill. It's something iconic and different that people will talk about.

My biggest concern with the Thread It design is that it would pretty much eliminate Public Square as a location for outdoor concerts, such as the one held annually by The Cleveland Orchestra for the Fourth of July. However, it was brought up that the nearby Mall, which will have to be redesigned for the new convention center, could be a more ideal place to hold concerts like that anyway.

Others who spoke up at the forum were concerned about segregating crowds -- how do you draw people below the mound as well as above it? The people below the mound will probably just be waiting for buses while the people on the mound will be strolling across it or just people watching. Would there be some sort of class division between people underground and people above? And is the only reason to go under the mound to catch a bus?

The design also looks to be the most costly and have the most engineering problems and red tape to deal with.

Another interesting comment by someone at the forum was connecting the underground portion of the Thread It design, where people are waiting for buses, to Tower City. You could have a tunnel where someone could get off the rapid at Tower City, walk underground to Public Square to get on a bus and then go almost anywhere in the city without having to walk through the snow or rain. An interesting idea that certainly has potential.

While the Forest It design was my favorite going into the forum, there were some strong points given to the Thread It design. I might be in favor of that design if a couple of things happen:

Corner says projects like this need strong civic leaders to get things done. Projects that fail do so because of buracracy. He likes what he's seen so far from the Downtown Cleveland Alliance and ParkWorks.

Marinucci said that the next step is selecting one of the three designs and getting a better idea on how much this would cost. That should be complete sometime in March. Then, it's a matter of getting the public and other parties behind it and figuring out how we're going to pay for this redesign that will probably last for the next 100 years.

For more information:

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(May 4) "Capture the Moment" chronicles indelible images of our times | View Clip
01/23/2010
Columbus Messenger Newspapers

Images courtesy of the Ohio Historical Society

Pulitzer Prize winning photographers have witnessed triumph, as in Joe Rosenthal's image of the raising of the flag on Iwo Jima, and tragedy, when John Paul Filo chronicled the Kent State shootings. "Capture the Moment" at the Ohio Historical Center displays all of the 150 prize winners and tells the stories behind the efforts to preserve the key moments of our history.

News photographers step into the line of fire, risk death and disease and emotional trauma to emerge with the images that define our lives.

"They're there because we want to be there," explained Cyma Rubin, curator of "Capture the Moment: The Pulitzer Prize Photographs," on display at the Ohio Historical Center through July 25. "They're our eyes."

Through a lens, those eyes have seen and preserved for posterity the raising of the American flag on Iwo Jima, the shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald, the massacre of students at Kent State, and the terror of the attacks on the World Trade Center towers.

They have also glimpsed the quieter moments that illustrate our humanity.

"There is a lot of warmth and humility here," Rubin said.

With its 150 images dating from 1942, when the prize was first awarded for photography, "Capture the Moment" is the largest collection of Pulitzer Prize winning photos ever assembled, and is making its only Ohio stop at the historical center.

The exhibit was developed by the Newseum, with Business of Entertainment and Rubin, a Tony and Emmy winning producer, director and writer.

Each frame tells a story, but Rubin also tells the story behind the story in the text that accompanies the enlarged images, and in her Emmy Award-winning documentary, "Moment of Impact," examining the background and aftermath of four of the iconic photographs. The documentary plays continuously at the center.

Freeze frame

Each photograph is "a split-second study" that became "a marriage of artist and subject," Rubin observed.

Some of the photographers dismiss their accomplishments as just being "in the right place at the right time."

Rubin disagrees. "They're artists," she insisted. "They were compelled to take a picture that was important to them."

That compulsion, and the adrenaline rush of action, drives the photographer into situations most of us would run from.

Combat photographers face many of the same dangers as soldiers. Daily newspaper photographers listen to police scanners, waiting for the crackle that will announce a fire or a crime scene.

Robert Capa, who landed on D-Day in World War II, believed "if the picture isn't good, you aren't close enough," Rubin shared.

That philosophy cost him his life when he stepped on a mine in Vietnam, she added.

Throughout the conflict in Vietnam, 135 photographers were killed.

In Afghanistan and Iraq, seven photographers and 37 video camera operators have died, along with 132 journalists, according to Rubin.

She has known photographers who committed suicide over scenes of famine and war that continued to haunt them.

But they keep working, despite the danger. "They're not afraid. They can't be afraid. One photographer told me 'It's like having a mistress you can't give up,'" Rubin said.

That liaison has yielded many indelible images, and societal changes, as well.

Stanley Forman's 1975 image of a mother and child falling from a burning building struck some as sensationalism, but it led to improved fire codes in Boston and across the country.

Robert Jackson took this shot at the same moment that Jack Ruby shot and killed Lee Harvey Oswald, accused of assassinating President Kennedy in 1963. The New York Times photography staff collectively earned a Pulitzer Prize for their coverage of the attacks on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001.

Robert Jackson was in the motorcade accompanying John F. Kennedy in Dallas in 1963, and was changing film when the shots rang out that killed the president.

The photographer was disappointed that he had missed such an opportunity, but he camped out at the jail where Lee Harvey Oswald was being held with the hope of getting another chance when the accused was transferred.

This doggedness allowed Jackson to capture the scene of Jack Ruby shooting and killing Oswald as he was brought out of the jail.

Jackson was so close to the action that he testified to the Warren Commission that investigated the assassination.

Photographers find more reflective, and even humorous, moments, as well.

William Gallagher showed the weariness of the campaign trail by getting a shot of the hole in presidential candidate Adlai Stevenson's shoe in "Adlai Bares His Sole."

Not to be outdone, the witty Stevenson sent a note when the photographer was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, congratulating him for winning with "a hole in one."

Kent State

The compelling images come from all over the world, or in our own backyards, as proven by photojournalism student John Paul Filo's "Kent State Massacre," with its horrified young woman kneeling over the body of a student shot by the National Guard during an anti-war protest.

The historical center is taking advantage of the display of the photograph, and its own access to official records, to tell the entire story of the events around May 4, 1970, according to Lisa Wood, curator of audio-visual collections.

"It Happened in Ohio: The Kent State Shootings" provides a timeline of the actions that led to the deaths of four students and the wounding of nine others on the campus, and the aftermath.

Letters and documents from the Highway Patrol and the Adjutant General's office accompany the display of photos and personal items.

"We have a unique opportunity to tell a balanced story," from the point of view of the students and the National Guardsmen, Wood said.

As part of its new Community Conversations series, the center will present "Reflections on Kent State," May 15, bringing together Ohioans who experienced this time of turmoil, including Alan Canfora, wounded at Kent and now the director of the Kent May 4 Center; Charles Fassinger, the senior uniformed officer on campus on that date; Glenn Harper, a private in the National Guard; and KSU journalism major Scott Mueller, who assisted James Michener with his book "Kent State: What Happened and Why."

Self-guided tours of the exhibits are from 6-7 p.m. and Community Conversations are from 7-9 p.m. in the Arthur C. Johnson Auditorium at the Ohio Historical Center.

The curators expect that many of the photographs will evoke strong emotional responses - as they were intended to do.

"They're in your face," Rubin said. "They should be."

The Ohio Historical Center is located at 1-71 and 17th Avenue in Columbus. Admission is $8 for adults, $7 for senior and $4 for children ages 6 to 12. Parking is $4. Ohio Historical Society members receive free admission and parking.

For information about programs and events, call 295-2300 or 800-686-6124 or go online at www.ohiohistory.org.

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(Justice Studies) Enough already — no more whining, no more excuses (Paul Mastriacovo) | View Clip
01/24/2010
Repository - Online, The

with Totally Local Yellow Pages

I am tired of excuses; aren't you? Excuses from athletes and politicians, from philanderers and scofflaws — I am sick of them all.

I used to hear an awful lot of excuses when I practiced law full time. I'm sure schoolteachers hear even more excuses than I do as a professor, and I hear my share. When people find out my wife and I run and work out, they are quick to explain why they can't, even though they know they should. As if my wife and I don't have to make sacrifices to do what we do. So many excuses, so little time.

When my Kent State students give me a litany of reasons why they can't be in class, do an assignment or take a test, I tell them I hear their reasons but every student in my class has a story. Every student has problems and issues. Some are pregnant. Some have a disability. Some just broke up with a significant other. Some have to work. Some went to war. The list goes on.

MINOR ISSUES, MAJOR WHINING

The sad thing is, those with the biggest issues usually don't complain. It is the people with the more minor or typical problems who are the biggest whiners. But in my class, those reasons do not excuse any individual from fulfilling the requirements. We are a no-excuse zone.

Why do so many people find reasons not to do something instead of using their energy to do something? I bet you know someone who spends more time and energy figuring out how not to work than it would take to actually work and make a living.

In a management course I took when I was chief counsel at the Stark County prosecutor's office, I learned that people will accomplish more if they are expected to accomplish more. I saw this in practice. One of our employees in the prosecutor's office was a nice person, but she took a lot of time off, sloughed off work and made half-hearted attempts to finish what she started.

Prior to taking the management course, I would have been inclined to fire her. Instead, I decided to learn more from her supervisors and co-workers about why she wasn't doing well.

I found that she was being assigned menial, routine tasks, and I concluded that she wasn't incompetent, she was bored and insecure. She was not expected to accomplish very much, and she managed somehow to accomplish even less.

NEW APPROACH WORKED

So I gave her more work and more responsibility. I assigned her complicated tasks for which she was accountable in clear and obvious ways. And she thrived. She not only surprised her colleagues, she even surprised herself. And I am pretty sure she is the rule and not the exception.

Each of us wants to be respected and to have the autonomy to make decisions. Studies show that employees want their work to be valued by their employers even more than they want their salaries to be increased.

I have been reading about experimental no-excuse high schools in Harlem, Los Angeles and Boston. Teachers and students are held accountable if students don't do well. Students go to class six long days a week with no study halls. They are given homework and are expected to complete it for every class, every day. The tests are exacting and hard. Summer vacation is only a few weeks, not a few months. In one Boston inner-city school, students must pass two advanced-placement classes and one university class to receive a diploma.

AFTER AWHILE, THEY GET IT

At first, students don't like it. But after a few weeks, they learn to appreciate it. They have a sense of satisfaction and a sense of accomplishment.

They enjoy the idea that they are doing something others aren't. They feel as if, after they've graduated, they will have a leg up in competing with students from more lackadaisical programs. And the results bear this out. In the MATCH charter public school, 99 percent of graduates go to college.

I know it is a cliché, but “make an effort, not an excuse” should be taught to every child. And to every adult.

Paul A. Mastriacovo of Plain Township is a faculty member in the Department of Justice Studies at the main campus of Kent State University.

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(KSU at Ashtabula) Conneaut sixth-graders get hands-on experience at KSUA (Bautista) | View Clip
01/23/2010
Individual.com

Conneaut sixth-grade students got a hands-on lesson on proper hand washing in the nursing department of the new Robert S. Morrison Health and Science Building at Kent State University-Ashtabula on Friday morning.

"Who wants to be a nurse?" asked assistant nursing professor Rowena Bautista of the sixth-grade students who sat expectantly inside the new nursing department. "It is a passion of a nurse to teach the proper way to wash your hands to prevent the spread of disease and infection."

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(Nursing) Couple makes Haiti an avocation (Martsolf) | View Clip
01/24/2010
Individual.com

Already on mission to help country, KSU professor and spouse arrive

Twenty-nine years ago, Donna Martsolf and her husband took the advice of a colleague and went to Haiti.

It was a lark -- and a horrible one at that.

"It's the pits of hell," said Martsolf, a Kent State nursing professor. "It's dirty and hot and it costs money. It's not that it's a nice place. . . . Really, it makes no sense whatsoever."

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(Psychology) Report summarizes schizophrenia study findings from Kent State University (Seghers)
01/23/2010
Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week

According to recent research from the United States, "Language symptoms in schizophrenia are exacerbated by arousal of negative affect; the extent of this effect varies widely among patients. The present study assessed predictors of affective speech reactivity."

"Based on earlier research, it was expected that speech reactivity would be predicted by a combination of neurocognitive and emotional variables. We assessed patients (n = 50) for baseline depression; neurocognitive functioning in the domains of sustained attention. immediate auditory memory, organizational sequencing. and conceptual sequencing ability; and clarity of speech communication in both stress and non-stress conditions. Twenty-three subject-nominated ''significant others'' (SOs) also participated in the study, and were assessed for levels of expressed emotion (EE) as an index of relationship stressors. in turn, rated the subjective stressfulness of being in the presence of their SOs, from which the propensity to perceive interpersonal experiences as stressful was calculated by regressing out EE ratings. As predicted, baseline depression and sensitivity to interpersonal stressors were related to affective reactivity of speech, with stress sensitivity mediating the relationship between depression and speech reactivity. Contrary to expectations, baseline neurocognitive functioning was not related to speech reactivity," wrote J.P. Seghers and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for understanding both schizophrenic language disturbance and stress vulnerability."

Seghers and colleagues published their study in Psychiatry Research (Cognitive impairments, emotion, stress, and language in schizophrenia. Psychiatry Research, 2009;170(2-3):97-102).

For additional information, contact J.P. Seghers, Kent State University, Dept. of Psychology, POB 5190, Kent, OH 44242, USA.

Publisher contact information for the journal Psychiatry Research is: Elsevier Ireland Ltd., Elsevier House, Brookvale Plaza, East Park Shannon, Co. Clare, Ireland.

Copyright © 2010 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week via NewsRx.com

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