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(COPH) Tulane professor new KSU Public Health dean 02/25/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

A professor at Tulane University has been chosen for the dean of Kent State University's new College of Public Health. The university announced Thursday Mark James will begin his new role in Kent in July....

(COPH) KSU names public health dean (James) 02/26/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

By Matt Fredmonsky Record-Courier staff writer The chance to lead Kent State Universitys new College of Public Health was just too good for Mark James to pass up. James, a professor and vice chair for the...

(May 4) Kent State site is deemed historic 02/25/2010 Toledo Blade - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - The site of the Kent State shootings on May 4, 1970, has been a local landmark for nearly 40 years, attracting scores of visitors annually. Now it is officially...

(JMC) The Future of the Non-Profit Internet (Sledzik) 02/25/2010 Mashable Text Attachment Email

...managers will need to stay on top of the latest Internet slang in order remain effective. “Jargon excludes large chunks of audience,” said blogger and Kent State Professor William Sledzik . “I still have to look up ‘pwn' every time I see it. Most readers won't bother. They'll just move to the...

(COPH) DR. MARK A. JAMES FIRST DEAN OF NEW COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH 02/25/2010 MedCity News - Online Text Attachment Email

News and notes from the day in MedCity, Ohio Kent State University has named Mark A. James, professor and vice chair of the Department of Tropical Medicine at Tulane University School of...

(OEOC) This Import Might Preserve American Jobs (Anderson) 02/25/2010 Miller-McCune - Online Text Attachment Email

...model among several organizations The Cleveland Foundation; the Democracy Collaborative; ShoreBank Enterprise and the Ohio Employee Ownership Center at Kent State University. Many business ideas were floated, among them a laundry that would serve the local health care community, which includes...

(Nursing) KENT STATE UNIVERSITY NURSING PROFESSOR RECEIVES FULBRIGHT SCHOLAR GRANT (Ross) 02/26/2010 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Feb. 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release Dr. Ratchneewan Ross, an associate professor in Kent State University's...

(COPH) DR. MARK A. JAMES FIRST DEAN OF NEW COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH (Frank, James) 02/26/2010 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Feb. 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release Dr. Mark A. James, professor and vice chair of the Department of Tropical Medicine...


News Headline: (COPH) Tulane professor new KSU Public Health dean | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A professor at Tulane University has been chosen for the dean of Kent State University's new College of Public Health.

The university announced Thursday Mark James will begin his new role in Kent in July. James is a professor and vice chair of the Department of Tropical Medicine at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

See Friday's Record-Courier for complete coverage.

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News Headline: (COPH) KSU names public health dean (James) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: By Matt Fredmonsky

Record-Courier staff writer

The chance to lead Kent State Universitys new College of Public Health was just too good for Mark James to pass up.

James, a professor and vice chair for the department of tropical medicine at Tulane University, took the job offer from KSU Thursday morning after a more than four-month interview process. A dean of college of public health is something Ive been working for, interested in, for probably the last five to 10 years, James said via phone from New Orleans Thursday. And so this opportunity is special because its going to be a founding dean of a new college. James, 59, will officially take the position July 1 as dean of Ohios second college of public health, which KSU trustees voted to create in January 2009. Since then, the university has hired 18 faculty members for the new college, and 11 courses will be available in the fall for the first class capable of earning a bachelors degree in public health from KSU.

At Tulane, James has spent the past 21 years in the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, which has a concentration on infectious diseases of the tropics. The Illinois natives expertise is malaria, which kills between 1 million and 3 million people annually.

Tropical medicine differs from traditional public health studies in that it focuses on the social and behavioral aspects of health, James said. Those issues coincide with the study of disease transmission and prevention of chronic and infectious diseases, which James plans to incorporate as founding elements in the KSU health college. Were going to start the college at Kent State with a social behavioral focus, James said. We dont need to think exotic and tropical medicine, the tropics, right away just because my background is in that. There are ways to promote infectious disease of public health at Kent State certainly. James has received an excellence in teaching award five times from Tulane. His career highlights include serving as chair of the Tulane University Health Sciences Center Biomedical Institutional Review Board, secretary of general faculty for the school and as a member of the university senate there.

He visited the Kent campus twice before the university announced his hiring Thursday.

KSU Provost Bob Frank, who has been serving as interim dean of the college, said in a recent interview serving as an inaugural dean is vastly different compared to taking over an established college. A founding dean can shape and direct the colleges development, Frank said.

James said he and KSU President Lester Lefton, who came to KSU from Tulane, only knew each other professionally. He said Lefton did not actively recruit him. I dont think he realized personally or remembered who I was, James said. So it was more of a coincidence than anything else.

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News Headline: (May 4) Kent State site is deemed historic | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2010
Outlet Full Name: Toledo Blade - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - The site of the Kent State shootings on May 4, 1970, has been a local landmark for nearly 40 years, attracting scores of visitors annually.

Now it is officially a national historic site.

The Ohio Historic Preservation Office announced this week the site has been added to the National Register of Historic Places, even though it did not meet the criteria that events being recognized had to have happened at least 50 years ago.

Franco Ruffini, deputy state historic preservation officer, said the site made the National Register because of its "significance to national history."

Four students died and nine were wounded when Ohio National Guardsmen fired into a crowd of people May 4, 1970, during a protest of the U.S. invasion of Cambodia. The historic site includes 17.24 acres of the KSU campus.

Achieving the designation is one of several steps the university is taking in preparation for the 40th anniversary of the shootings.

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News Headline: (JMC) The Future of the Non-Profit Internet (Sledzik) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2010
Outlet Full Name: Mashable
Contact Name: Geoff Livingston
News OCR Text: Geoff Livingston co-founded Zoetica to focus on cause-related work, and released an award-winning book on new media Now is Gone in 2007.

Earlier this month, Pew Internet released its annual Future of the Internet report. The survey of 900 leaders forecasts the future direction of online media. In turn non-profit strategists can glean insights into the future, and how to steer their individual programs.

This year's research report dove into five critical areas. Here's what non-profits need to take away from the Pew report for their efforts:
1. Google Changes the Way We Think
The report goes into great depth about Google — or more specifically, search and the short attention span of the Internet surfer. While most feel that Google does not make us stupid , it does change the way we approach information, changing cognitive processing. End readers will need to have better critical thinking and analytical skills to discern quality information.

With shorter attention spans, non-profits need to become sharper in their initial presentation of information — we now live in a 140 character world. Information must be substantive and factual, as well as inherently searchable on the traditional and social webs so people can find it. Finally, making bookmarks and sharing capabilities part of all content makes sense not only from a social networking standpoint, but so that readers can back track and access information for cognitive purposes.

“The report's findings reflect the notion that the tools are not going to change much in the near future, but organizations need to change in order to use them better,” said author Allison Fine . “Rethinking how they operate, what they are trying to accomplish by connecting with people, is critically important for non-profit organizations to successfully engage through the social web.”
2. The Internet Changes Language




Another critical issue debated by the report is the evolution — or the de-evolution — of the English language due to SMS, Twitter and other short forms of communication. Sixty-five percent of respondents felt the Internet was improving the rendering of knowledge, but that language was evolving.

Non-profits need to remain flexible with the quickly evolving nomenclature of the web. While we may all want to rely on the nuances of great grammar paradigms such as those espoused by the hilarious book Eats, Shoots and Leaves , the new short form that is emerging will only continue to evolve. Community managers will need to stay on top of the latest Internet slang in order remain effective.

“Jargon excludes large chunks of audience,” said blogger and Kent State Professor William Sledzik . “I still have to look up ‘pwn' every time I see it. Most readers won't bother. They'll just move to the next message. And I wonder how many folks outside social media knew the word ‘avatar' before that movie came out.

“But here's the upside,” added Sledzik. “Writing short-form messages for SMS, Twitter and other apps challenges us as writers. Breaking through in two-three seconds isn't easy, and it forces you to know your audience and what motivates them.”
3. The Pundits Don't Know What They're Talking About
Predicting the future of the Internet has become a full time job for many, but 80 percent of Pew survey respondents say the pundits don't really know what's coming next. In fact, most believe that the future killer technologies of 2020 have yet to be revealed.

To stay relevant, non-profit strategists need to stay in touch with their communities and closely watch which technologies and social networks they are adapting. In the end, it's about the non-profit stakeholder and not the tools. At the same time, expect change.

“I am often asked if Twitter is going to be around in 10 years, or if non-profits will have some other ‘next big thing' to worry about,” said Holly Ross, executive director of the Nonprofit Technology Network . “The reality is that no one knows what tools will capture our collective imaginations next month, let alone in the next decade. What we can guarantee is the the tools will reflect the trends and norms of our society, which increasingly values openness and transparency.”
4. The Internet Will Remain End-to-End — Sort Of
One of the ongoing issues of today's Internet has been net neutrality as well as the rise of clearinghouses for information , from blog content networks to social networks. More than 60 percent of Pew respondents said they felt the Internet would always be an open end-to-end network.

From an architecture standpoint, the respondents are right. The financial benefits for the economy are obvious. Yet the rise of the influential middle party — the clearinghouse — cannot be denied.

Many Internet users rely on voices they trust to filter that information — from top-ranked bloggers to community content streams on social networks. Non-profits will need to maintain strong relationships with powerful community influencers.

“Clearinghouses for information have been in the forms of our friends and neighbors for decades,” said Amber Naslund, director of community, Radian6 and blogger at Altitude Branding . “With the ubiquity of information across the social web, we'll always look to voices that we trust to help us separate the wheat from the chaff. Influence isn't always about who has the loudest voice or the most attention. Influence can be related to people who are passionate about your mission and spread the word voraciously, not just through a massive network.”
5. Anonymity and Privacy Will Continue to Be Big Issues
Anonymity and privacy will continue to be big issues. Respondents had no clear direction on how authenticity pressures would impact anonymity and privacy . 41% see stronger measures in place by 2020, and 55% say the Internet will remain as is.

This is a particular thorny topic for non-profits, especially those dealing with children, medical records, financial information, or traditionally inflammatory subjects. While privacy remains important, so does maintaining enough openness to keep a community committed. Non-profits will have to weigh this issue on a case-by-case basis.

“Charitable organizations must take precautions to ensure that their constituents, including staff and volunteers are protected,” said Jocelyn Harmon, director, Non-Profit Services at Care2 and author of the Nonprofit Marketing Blog . “That said, being transparent, for example, the finances and operations of your organization is also a core value that non-profits must embrace. It's a tough tightrope to walk but charitable organizations must attempt to strike a balance between these competing priorities.”
More social good resources from Mashable:
- 5 Real Challenges For Non-Profit Texting Campaigns
- Why We're In the Age of the Citizen Philanthropist
- How Social Media Creates Offline Social Good
- How Non-Profits and Activists Can Leverage Location Based Services
- 5 Essential Tips for Promoting Your Charity Using Social Media

[img credits: David Reece , ydhsu ]

Image courtesy of iStockphoto , alexsl

Tags: analysis , List , Lists , non-profit , Pew , social good , social media , study

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News Headline: (COPH) DR. MARK A. JAMES FIRST DEAN OF NEW COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2010
Outlet Full Name: MedCity News - Online
Contact Name: Mary Vanac
News OCR Text: News and notes from the day in MedCity, Ohio:

Kent State University has named Mark A. James, professor and vice chair of the Department of Tropical Medicine at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, as the founding dean of KSU's College of Public Health, effective July 1, according to a university release.


http://www.med.wright.edu/

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News Headline: (OEOC) This Import Might Preserve American Jobs (Anderson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2010
Outlet Full Name: Miller-McCune - Online
Contact Name: Judith D. Schwartz
News OCR Text: Might a cooperative model that arose from ashes of a civil war serve the Rust Belt economies of America's Midwest?

The Mondragón Corporation, a cooperative that arose from ashes of a civil war, may be a model that could serve the Rust Belt economies of America's Midwest. (Konstantinos Kokkinis)

As the U.S. unemployment breaches the 10 percent mark — with manufacturing sector rates even higher — policymakers and industry representatives in the Midwest are seeking strategies to keep the Rust Belt from getting even rustier. In this war for economic survival, groups in cities like Cleveland, Detroit and Chicago, as well as the million-plus-members-strong United Steelworkers Union, have turned to a model borne of another war-torn region: the Mondragón Corporation in the Basque area of Spain.

The Mondragón Corporation (MCC) is a multilayered organization with worker-owned cooperatives and participatory governance at its core. The corporation is a group of cooperatives and cooperative members, a seat of governance as well as planning, researching and generating funding for new businesses — a kind of meta-cooperative.

The network is comprised of more than 250 distinct, independently run businesses across several industries; more than 100 are worker-owned cooperatives. Some 90,000 people work under the Mondragón umbrella. Taken together, MCC's companies are the seventh largest corporation in Spain and rank among Europe's leading providers of appliances and industrial equipment.

Mondragón has long been a mecca for Americans interested in worker cooperatives. This is in part for the democratic values — shared financial stake in business' success without the threat of outside ownership; one-worker, one-vote governance; and an ethos that values people over profit — but also because of its success. Last year, while Spain's economy languished, Mondragon Corp.'s income rose 6 percent, to 16.8 billion euros. During the 1980s, when Spain's unemployment hit 27 percent, Mondragón's hovered below 1 percent.

Brownfield Development

In 1941, Catholic priest Jose Maria Arizmendiarrieta found a Basque community — Arrasate, as Mondragón is known in Basque — where the striking mountain vistas and picturesque medieval architecture couldn't hide the ravages of the recently concluded Spanish Civil War, rampant unemployment and a once-thriving manufacturing infrastructure in disrepair. Two years later he opened a polytechnic school. And in 1956, the first cooperative, a stove factory, was launched. A bank and credit union soon followed and new cooperatives sprung up in electronics, tools, bicycles and so on.

At MCC, the resources of all the cooperatives are pooled in the corporation, which gives small and upstart companies financial ballast and economies of scale. A portion of each worker's earnings is retained as “the patronage dividend,” which gathers interest; another portion goes to a collective account of the cooperative, as an investment in the business' future. Workers pay membership fees but receive a percentage of revenues, plus higher interest on their accounts when businesses show a profit. Worker-owners are guaranteed employment; should one enterprise fail — and the failure rate is extremely low — jobs will be found in another cooperative.

The bulk of profit is reinvested into the cooperative network: to an education fund, to research and development, to cover potential losses, etc.; a percentage is directed to regional cultural institutions, maintaining vibrant community life. In order to promote economic equality, there are only five pay scales; in a given firm, the highest-paid employee earns no more than eight times the salary of a beginning worker. (The average Fortune 500 CEO's compensation is more than 400 times what his employees make.)

While the very word Mondragón has evoked an “if only” longing for many co-op watchers, the model hasn't taken root in the United States, even if the broader idea of the cooperative has. Michael Peck, the North American delegate for the Mondragón Corp., noted, “There are over 29,000 cooperatives in the U.S., and 80 to 100 million Americans belong to them.” These range from small food purchasing co-ops to large credit unions, and account for $3 billion a year in assets.

But new developments in the industrial Midwest may broaden this. In inner-city Cleveland, the Evergreen Cooperative Laundry opened late last month, the first in a projected consortium of three cooperatives run according to the Mondragón template. On Oct. 27, the United Steelworkers and MCC announced an agreement to team up in forming Mondragón-style manufacturing cooperatives in the U.S. and Canada. Civic leaders in Detroit have consulted with Mondragón representatives and in southwest Wisconsin, plans are underway for the Mondragón-inspired Driftless Foods Co-op, beginning with an agricultural processing plant.

Meanwhile, on Chicago's West Side, Austin Polytechnic Academy is into its third year of offering high school students a combined college-prep and technical training curriculum. In September, a group of Austin Polytech students traveled to Spain and spent four days in Mondragón.

“The school is training the next generation of manufacturing leaders,” explained Dan Swinney, executive director of the Center for Labor and Community Research, which helped develop the school. He said that the polytech, part of an effort to revive manufacturing in the now downtrodden Austin neighborhood, is “modeled in part on the Mondragón Polytechnic.”

While Mondragón has a business presence in the U.S. — upwards of $200 million a year in mostly industrial products — the Steelworkers agreement marks the first time the Spanish cooperative has joined forces with a North American group.

“The general idea is that, in light of today's economic problems, there's much interest in trying to figure out a way to create jobs that are sustainable and accountable to the workers,” said Rob Witherell of the Steelworkers. “This is certainly a step in the right direction.” He did not specify a timeline.

Mondragón's Peck said that the disconnect between Wall Street profits and Main Street layoffs has created a hunger for new business structures. “People are beginning to understand that workplace ownership is just as valuable as home ownership,” he said.

The newly-opened Evergreen Cooperative Laundry, a state-of-the-art commercial laundry designed for LEED Silver certification, is the culmination of extensive preparation and research on the Mondragón model among several organizations: The Cleveland Foundation; the Democracy Collaborative; ShoreBank Enterprise and the Ohio Employee Ownership Center at Kent State University. Many business ideas were floated, among them a laundry that would serve the local health care community, which includes the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals, and the Veterans Administration Medical Center.

“The University Circle area has wealthy anchor institutions that are part of the history of the city's industrial past,” said Jim Anderson, who will function as Evergreen Laundry's CEO and is program coordinator at the Ohio Employee Ownership Center. “The neighborhood that surrounds The Circle is poor and underserved, with an average household income of $18,500. We asked: Is there a way to enhance community wealth by employing folks from the neighborhood in worker cooperatives and, at the same time, for them to provide a service to these institutions? Of the nearly $3 billion spent on services and procurements, only about 10 to 15 percent is spent right here in northeast Ohio. We saw in this the opportunity for a for-profit enterprise. The anchor institutions are going to stay here, so why don't' we get jobs that are anchored with them?”

Rather than thriving despite their surroundings, business leaders have an investment in helping the surrounding neighborhood thrive. “We needed to create businesses that would sustain themselves,” says Anderson. “These had to be real jobs that would keep people working for the long term.”

In fall 2008, a group of a dozen community leaders, professionals and leaders from several universities traveled to Mondragón, which generated yet more enthusiasm about the project, Anderson noted. Alas, this was when the financial system began to unravel. “When we got off the plane, we learned that the bank we were dealing with was sold to a bank in another state,” he recalls. “But, still, we got up and kept this process moving – and got here. It's a model we're convinced is replicable, city to city.”

Oliver Henkel, chief external affairs officer at the Cleveland Clinic, just returned from a follow-up trip to Mondragón. “These neighborhoods are a base of employment for us, and we prefer to draw on services close by for environmental as well as economic reasons,” he says. “While here in Cleveland we can't replicate this model down to the last detail, elements are particularly attractive. In Mondragón, I saw a workforce secure in their jobs working as teams with extraordinary results, plus the security that enhanced wealth creates.”

Mondragón is not without its critics. The corporation has subsidiaries in more than 20 countries and so far, these do not have the same cooperative framework. Their retail company, Eroski, has grown rapidly — it operates the largest Spanish-owned food chain — and has more employees than worker-owners. But the company is planning to offer membership to the 40,000 people who work for it.

And no business model can insulate workers from a global economic slide. But worker-members can choose how to confront it and, as has happened, vote to take a temporary pay cut of, say, 8 to 10 percent, to ride out a downturn rather than trim any staff. And, boosters say, the results speak for themselves.

Like many from the U.S. who travel to Mondragón, Susan Witt, executive director of the E.F. Schumacher Society, was struck by the lack of economic disparity when she visited in 2007. “You could tell that no one was wealthy — but everyone was well off,” said Witt. Beyond the sense of worker equity she observed, what makes her hopeful about bringing the Mondragón model stateside is the chance to build a resilient production sector. “A huge concern of mine is the loss of production in this country,” she said. “The outsourcing of production skills makes us so vulnerable; the memory of production is disappearing. Mondragón shows that there's a dignity and potential in production. That's the lesson to bring here.”

The Evergreen Cooperative Laundry is now humming, processing 1,000 to 2,000 pounds of laundry a day from three health care customers. Edward Cole is one of the six workers who run the machines. Cole, 59, learned of Evergreen while living and working at a homeless shelter and was assisted in the application process through Cleveland's Towards Employment program. “It's really great here. It's a good team,” said Cole, a Vietnam combat vet who spent 10 years in prison for a crime he says he did not commit. He likes that he has been trained in the use, mechanics and maintenance of every machine.

“If I'm going to become an owner, I want to know what I'm owning.” For Cole, the worker-owner model sends a powerful message that he is valued, plus that he can build personal wealth.

Said Evergreen CEO Anderson, “If we're right – and we've been conservative because we've felt obligated not to let this fail – the worker-owners will have in their patronage account $60,000 in eight or nine years. That can help someone buy a home, send a child to college.”

“My dream is to own part of this company,” said Cole. “Now I have the dreams but don't have the nightmares,” he says, referring to longstanding problems with PTSD. “This place is putting that dream in me. I can walk down the street and say, ‘That's my company.'”

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News Headline: (Nursing) KENT STATE UNIVERSITY NURSING PROFESSOR RECEIVES FULBRIGHT SCHOLAR GRANT (Ross) | Email

News Date: 02/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb. 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release
Dr. Ratchneewan Ross, an associate professor in Kent State University's College of Nursing, has received a Fulbright Scholar grant to teach and conduct research in Thailand. Ross will teach research methodology to graduate students and doctoral candidates at five universities in Thailand from June to October 2010. While in Thailand, she also will conduct seminars for nursing faculty and conduct her own research project.
"I'm quite honored to receive this prestigious grant," said Ross, who is in her eighth year at Kent State. "I will be very busy - teaching in four different regions of the country - but I am really looking forward to this opportunity."
The Fulbright grant will cover travel expenses and the costs of living abroad, and it also will provide a stipend. In addition, Ross will receive financial support for her research project, "Intimate Partner Violence, Social Support and Health Outcomes Among Thai OB/GYN Patients."
"Developing international understanding requires a commitment on the part of Fulbright grantees to establish open communication and long-term cooperative relationships," said Shirley Green, chair of the Fulbright Scholarship Board. "In this way, Fulbrighters enrich the educational, political, economic, social and cultural lives of countries around the world."
The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. Established in 1946, the Fulbright Program provides participants - chosen for their academic merit and leadership potential - with the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.
Each year, the Fulbright Scholar Program sends approximately 800 U.S. faculty and professionals to 140 countries to lecture, research or participate in seminars. More information is available at www.fulbright.state.gov.For more information please contact Sarabjit Jagirdar, Email - htsyndication@hindustantimes.com.
Copyright © 2010 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: (COPH) DR. MARK A. JAMES FIRST DEAN OF NEW COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH (Frank, James) | Email

News Date: 02/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb. 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release
Dr. Mark A. James, professor and vice chair of the Department of Tropical Medicine at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, will become founding dean of Kent State University's College of Public Health on July 1, 2010, announced Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Robert G. Frank. Frank has served as interim dean of the college since its inception in 2009.
"The opportunity at Kent State University is ideal in that it allows one to build the college in the vision of a founding dean, together with a committed administration, faculty, staff and students," James said.
In addition to his extensive teaching experience, James' distinguished career in public health includes leadership positions as chair of the Tulane University Health Sciences Center Biomedical Institutional Review Board, secretary of General Faculty for the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, and member of the University Senate at Tulane University. Trained as an immunoparasitologist, James' research interests include the immunology of malaria and Chagas' disease in Latin America.
"Kent State University's College of Public Health is poised to prepare students to meet the region's and nation's need for trained public health professionals," Frank said. "Dr. James' knowledge of what it takes to build an accredited program of public health will guide the college to meet those needs and leverage the educational and research strengths of its faculty."
James has been recognized by Tulane University on five separate occasions with the annual Excellence in Teaching Award. He also has received the Teaching Scholar Award in the School of Public Health in Tropical Medicine in 1999 and was recognized with the Chancellor's Teaching Scholar Award at the Tulane University Medical Center. He is an inaugural member of the ASPH/Pfizer Public Health Academy of Distinguished Teachers.
James holds a bachelor of science degree in zoology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a master's degree in zoology and a doctor of philosophy in tropical medicine from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Kent State's College of Public Health is Ohio's second college of public health. It was established to help meet the demonstrated state and national need for public health professionals. In Ohio alone, the projected shortage of educated and trained public health professionals is estimated to be in excess of 10,000 workers by 2020.
Last Friday, Gov. Ted Strickland and Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Eric D. Fingerhut announced Kent State as a Center of Excellence in Biomedicine and Health Care for Ohio. Kent State's Center of Excellence focuses on the health of individuals and communities. The university was awarded this distinction due to its College of Public Health and its College of Nursing.
In October 2009, Kent State received approval by the Ohio Board of Regents to offer a bachelor of science (B.S.P.H.) degree in public health. Currently, 146 students are taking four courses this spring through its Experimental Programs (EXPR) Division, and the university is accepting applications for the B.S.P.H. program for fall 2010. The College of Public Health is also planning an undergraduate certificate in public health. The college has 18 full-time tenure track faculty members with the goal of 25 by 2012.
For more information on Kent State's College of Public Health, visit www.kent.edu/academics/publichealth.For more information please contact Sarabjit Jagirdar, Email - htsyndication@hindustantimes.com.
Copyright © 2010 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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