Report Overview:
Total Clips (18)
Headline Date Outlet
(COPH) Kent State University names dean of its College of Public Health 02/26/2010 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

9 00 am, February 26, 2010 Kent State University has named an administrator at Tulane University its first dean of the new College of Public Health. Mark James is currently...

(Geography) This month could end up snowiest ever (Schmidlin) 02/26/2010 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...the Akron-Canton Airport, trumping February 2008, when 25.8 inches fell. Friday morning's snowfall fell short of expectations, said Tom Schmidlin, a Kent State University professor who studies Ohio weather. But he noted more snow is predicted for today and Sunday, "so it could dribble up...

(Geography) This month could end up snowiest ever (Schmidlin) 02/26/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...the Akron-Canton Airport, trumping February 2008, when 25.8 inches fell. Friday morning's snowfall fell short of expectations, said Tom Schmidlin, a Kent State University professor who studies Ohio weather. But he noted more snow is predicted for today and Sunday, ''so it could dribble up...

(COPH) KSU names public health dean (James) 02/26/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

By Matt Fredmonsky Record-Courier staff writer The chance to lead Kent State Universitys new College of Public Health was just too good for Mark James to pass up. James, a professor and vice chair for the...

KSU names public health dean (James, Frank) 02/26/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

By Matt Fredmonsky Record-Courier staff writer The chance to lead Kent State Universitys new College of Public Health was just too good for Mark James to pass up. James, a professor and vice chair for the...

Centennial book details Kent State history 02/27/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...professor pens "A Most Noble Enterprise" William Hildebrand is not a professional historian, so being asked to write A Most Noble Enterprise; The Story of Kent State University, 1910-2010 was a little daunting. He found that telling the universitys history from the point of view of presidents,...

(Nursing) Fulbright Scholar named at Kent State 02/27/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

A professor at Kent State University is headed to Thailand on a Fulbright Scholar grant to teach and conduct research in research methodology. Dr. Ratchneewan...

(Safety) Kent deaths spark fears for safety (Vincent) 02/28/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...November in downtown Kent, city and university officials are working to lessen fears and counter the growing perception of Kent as a violent community. Kent State University graduate student John T. White, 28, of Delaware, died this month following a serious assault near the corner of Main and...

Is plagiarism on the rise? 02/27/2010 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...“serious” offense of plagiarism even if it was unintentional or in oral form. RAMIFICATIONS The consequences of plagiarism can be severe. For example, at Kent State University, the discipline can range from a failing grade to revocation of a degree to suspension or even expulsion, depending on...

BOUQUETS: KSU at Geauga Has Economic Impact 02/27/2010 News-Herald Text Attachment Email

BOUQUETS To Kent State University, for having a $29.2 million economic impact on Geauga County, according to a recent comprehensive study. The report —...

(Geography) This month could end up snowiest ever (Schmidlin) 02/27/2010 Norwalk Reflector Text Attachment Email

...the Akron-Canton Airport, trumping February 2008, when 25.8 inches fell. Friday morning's snowfall fell short of expectations, said Tom Schmidlin, a Kent State University professor who studies Ohio weather. But he noted more snow is predicted for today and Sunday, “so it could dribble up...

(Squirrels) Nature Notes 02/28/2010 Frederick News-Post - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...displayed at the National Zoo and around the National Mall. Today, nearly 25 percent of the squirrels in Washington display black coloration. Members of Kent State University's grounds department and a retired executive from Davey Tree Expert Co. legally imported black squirrels from Ontario,...

(COPH) DR. MARK A. JAMES FIRST DEAN OF NEW COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH (Frank, James) 02/26/2010 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Feb. 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release Dr. Mark A. James, professor and vice chair of the Department of Tropical Medicine...

(Nursing) KENT STATE UNIVERSITY NURSING PROFESSOR RECEIVES FULBRIGHT SCHOLAR GRANT (Ross) 02/26/2010 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Feb. 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release Dr. Ratchneewan Ross, an associate professor in Kent State University's...

(Life Sciences) Data on life sciences published by researchers at Kent State University (Joshi) 02/27/2010 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week Text Email

...digestion by exonuclease and can be detected by measuring the SERS signals before and after the exonuclease digestion," wrote B. Joshi and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded "As a proof of concept, this SERS-based protein-DNA interaction assay is validated...

(Exercise) New stroke study findings have been reported by researchers at Kent State University 02/27/2010 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week Text Email

...when subjects were pooled together, but each subject retained his individuality (minimal interindividual differences)," wrote M.D. Muller and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded "Results suggest that impedance cardiography may be a reliable technique to use during acute...

(Fashion) Swedish designer makes disposable wearable (Ohrn-McDaniel) 02/28/2010 Swedish Wire Text Attachment Email

...surprise when she turned to the most humble of household castoffs for her newest creation. Öhrn-McDaniel, an assistant professor of fashion design at Kent State University, stitched together used dryer sheets and plastic "sequins" to make a filmy, full-length ballgown with cap sleeves. The...

(Psychology) Researchers' work from Kent State focuses on visual cognition (Merriman) 03/01/2010 Pain & Central Nervous System Week Text Email

...the apparent size of objects in photographs. This understanding was strongly related to verbal reasoning ability," wrote W.E. Merriman and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded "In Study 2, visuospatial reasoning ability was also found to predict who would...


News Headline: (COPH) Kent State University names dean of its College of Public Health | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 9:00 am, February 26, 2010

Kent State University has named an administrator at Tulane University its first dean of the new College of Public Health.

Mark James is currently a professor and vice chairman of the Department of Tropical Medicine at Tulane's School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. He will take his new post at Kent State on July 1. He will replace provost and senior vice president of academic affairs Robert Frank, who has been interim dean of the College of Public Health since last year.

Dr. James has held various leadership positions at Tulane, such as chairman of the Health Sciences Center Biomedical Institutional Review Board and secretary of the general faculty at the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. As an immunoparasitologist, Dr. James' research has focused on the immunology of malaria and Chagas disease.

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News Headline: (Geography) This month could end up snowiest ever (Schmidlin) | Email

News Date: 02/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Feb. 26--You think the snow this month is the worst you've ever seen?
It just might be.
This month's snowfall -- 32.9 inches as of 5 p.m. Friday -- is rivaling that of January 1978, the Akron-Canton area's monthly record holder with 37.5 inches.
Already, this month is the snowiest February on record at the Akron-Canton Airport, trumping February 2008, when 25.8 inches fell.
Friday morning's snowfall fell short of expectations, said Tom Schmidlin, a Kent State University professor who studies Ohio weather. But he noted more snow is predicted for today and Sunday, "so it could dribble up to a record."
Schmidlin, co-author of Thunder in the Heartland A Chronicle of Outstanding Weather Events in Ohio, said while a "monthly record is always surprising, it's kind of been the pattern lately."
He noted that last year saw the second-snowiest January, after January 1978. The second-snowiest March was in 2008.
Schmidlin said this month's heavy snow is attributable to a combination of cold temperatures and lots of low-pressure storms moving east from the Pacific Ocean.
Snow flurries are expected to continue today through Sunday with little or no accumulation predicted.
The Akron-Canton area has had 55.9 inches of snow this winter through 5 p.m. Friday.
That snowfall, since Dec. 1, is 24.7 inches above average.
But the Akron-Canton area is a long way from the snowiest winter on record. No. 1 on that list is the 1977-78 season with 82 inches of snow.
And we might not be done yet. Forecasters are watching another low-pressure system that could bring another round of snow to the area.
Copyright © 2010 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: (Geography) This month could end up snowiest ever (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: You think the snow this month is the worst you've ever seen?

It just might be.

This month's snowfall 32.9 inches as of 5 p.m. Friday is rivaling that of January 1978, the Akron-Canton area's monthly record holder with 37.5 inches.

Already, this month is the snowiest February on record at the Akron-Canton Airport, trumping February 2008, when 25.8 inches fell.

Friday morning's snowfall fell short of expectations, said Tom Schmidlin, a Kent State University professor who studies Ohio weather. But he noted more snow is predicted for today and Sunday, ''so it could dribble up to a record.''

Schmidlin, co-author of Thunder in the Heartland: A Chronicle of Outstanding Weather Events in Ohio, said while a ''monthly record is always surprising, it's kind of been the pattern lately.''

He noted that last year saw the second-snowiest January, after January 1978. The second-snowiest March was in 2008.

Schmidlin said this month's heavy snow is attributable to a combination of cold temperatures and lots of low-pressure storms moving east from the Pacific Ocean.

Snow flurries are expected to continue today through Sunday with little or no accumulation predicted.

The Akron-Canton area has had 55.9 inches of snow this winter through 5 p.m. Friday.

That snowfall, since Dec. 1, is 24.7 inches above average.

But the Akron-Canton area is a long way from the snowiest winter on record. No. 1 on that list is the 1977-78 season with 82 inches of snow.

And we might not be done yet. Forecasters are watching another low-pressure system that could bring another round of snow to the area.

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News Headline: (COPH) KSU names public health dean (James) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: By Matt Fredmonsky

Record-Courier staff writer

The chance to lead Kent State Universitys new College of Public Health was just too good for Mark James to pass up.

James, a professor and vice chair for the department of tropical medicine at Tulane University, took the job offer from KSU Thursday morning after a more than four-month interview process. A dean of college of public health is something Ive been working for, interested in, for probably the last five to 10 years, James said via phone from New Orleans Thursday. And so this opportunity is special because its going to be a founding dean of a new college. James, 59, will officially take the position July 1 as dean of Ohios second college of public health, which KSU trustees voted to create in January 2009. Since then, the university has hired 18 faculty members for the new college, and 11 courses will be available in the fall for the first class capable of earning a bachelors degree in public health from KSU.

At Tulane, James has spent the past 21 years in the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, which has a concentration on infectious diseases of the tropics. The Illinois natives expertise is malaria, which kills between 1 million and 3 million people annually.

Tropical medicine differs from traditional public health studies in that it focuses on the social and behavioral aspects of health, James said. Those issues coincide with the study of disease transmission and prevention of chronic and infectious diseases, which James plans to incorporate as founding elements in the KSU health college. Were going to start the college at Kent State with a social behavioral focus, James said. We dont need to think exotic and tropical medicine, the tropics, right away just because my background is in that. There are ways to promote infectious disease of public health at Kent State certainly. James has received an excellence in teaching award five times from Tulane. His career highlights include serving as chair of the Tulane University Health Sciences Center Biomedical Institutional Review Board, secretary of general faculty for the school and as a member of the university senate there.

He visited the Kent campus twice before the university announced his hiring Thursday.

KSU Provost Bob Frank, who has been serving as interim dean of the college, said in a recent interview serving as an inaugural dean is vastly different compared to taking over an established college. A founding dean can shape and direct the colleges development, Frank said.

James said he and KSU President Lester Lefton, who came to KSU from Tulane, only knew each other professionally. He said Lefton did not actively recruit him. I dont think he realized personally or remembered who I was, James said. So it was more of a coincidence than anything else.

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News Headline: KSU names public health dean (James, Frank) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: By Matt Fredmonsky

Record-Courier staff writer

The chance to lead Kent State Universitys new College of Public Health was just too good for Mark James to pass up.

James, a professor and vice chair for the department of tropical medicine at Tulane University, took the job offer from KSU Thursday morning after a more than four-month interview process. A dean of college of public health is something Ive been working for, interested in, for probably the last five to 10 years, James said via phone from New Orleans Thursday. And so this opportunity is special because its going to be a founding dean of a new college. James, 59, will officially take the position July 1 as dean of Ohios second college of public health, which KSU trustees voted to create in January 2009. Since then, the university has hired 18 faculty members for the new college, and 11 courses will be available in the fall for the first class capable of earning a bachelors degree in public health from KSU.

At Tulane, James has spent the past 21 years in the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, which has a concentration on infectious diseases of the tropics. The Illinois natives expertise is malaria, which kills between 1 million and 3 million people annually.

Tropical medicine differs from traditional public health studies in that it focuses on the social and behavioral aspects of health, James said. Those issues coincide with the study of disease transmission and prevention of chronic and infectious diseases, which James plans to incorporate as founding elements in the KSU health college. Were going to start the college at Kent State with a social behavioral focus, James said. We dont need to think exotic and tropical medicine, the tropics, right away just because my background is in that. There are ways to promote infectious disease of public health at Kent State certainly. James has received an excellence in teaching award five times from Tulane. His career highlights include serving as chair of the Tulane University Health Sciences Center Biomedical Institutional Review Board, secretary of general faculty for the school and as a member of the university senate there.

He visited the Kent campus twice before the university announced his hiring Thursday.

KSU Provost Bob Frank, who has been serving as interim dean of the college, said in a recent interview serving as an inaugural dean is vastly different compared to taking over an established college. A founding dean can shape and direct the colleges development, Frank said.

James said he and KSU President Lester Lefton, who came to KSU from Tulane, only knew each other professionally. He said Lefton did not actively recruit him. I dont think he realized personally or remembered who I was, James said. So it was more of a coincidence than anything else.

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News Headline: Centennial book details Kent State history | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Emeritus English professor pens "A Most Noble Enterprise"

William Hildebrand is not a professional historian, so being asked to write A Most Noble Enterprise; The Story of Kent State University, 1910-2010 was a little daunting.

He found that telling the universitys history from the point of view of presidents, faculty, students and community members made the task easier. I like narrative histories, Hildebrand said. Of course, theyre always very driven by people. That lent itself very well to the material I had to work with from the past 50 years. An emeritus English professor, Hildebrand was a professor at KSU from 1958 until his retirement in 1996. I was looking for something to do, said Hildebrand, a Munroe Falls resident. And when I was invited to do this book, I was excited. Little did I know all the work that would be involved. Hildebrand labored for three and a half years researching and writing the book.

Fortunately, he could rely on Phillip Shrivers Years of Youth, a record of the universitys first 50 years which was published in 1960. Still, he spent long days scouring the archives at the KSU library.

After researching, he would return to his Munroe Falls home and a small, book-lined study on the second-floor to relive the universitys trials and tribulations. It was very taxing, and I didnt realize the pressure I was putting myself under, Hildebrand said. But it wasnt all hard work. It was fun, too. Countless hours researching and more than two dozen interviews, some conducted in his home, helped frame the story in a more personal perspective.

One personal exchange in the book takes place in 1982 between former KSU President Michael Schwartz and then Black United Students president Kirk Braithwaite, who stormed into Schwartzs office upset over an exchange between a black student and a resident hall guard. The guard reportedly sparked a scuffle between the two by uttering a racial slur.

Hildebrand cites The Daily Kent Stater, which reported Schwartz cordially disarmed Braithwaite by assuring him of the actions the presidents office had already taken on the matter. Braithwaite told the Stater he gave Schwartz a plus for this go-round. Will Underwood, director of the University Press, which published 4,000 copies of the book, said it was agreed Hildebrands account should be a narrative rather than an institutional history. Thats why its the story of Kent State, Underwood said. One of the things we discussed was that he would have a free editorial hand. Nobody signed off on the manuscript up the food chain. Jerry Lewis, a 40-year sociology professor at KSU, is a noted historian of the May 4, 1970 events. Lewis described what hes read so far as terrific. I learned a lot, Lewis said. Particularly in terms of the early controversies and on the decision on how they chose Kent. Bills book is ... so well written and interesting. Hildebrand said he tried to avoid a historians tone in writing the book. As a professor, he lived through many of the events he detailed, including the May 4, 1970, shootings. Re-telling, and reliving, those events proved especially painful for a faculty member who had encouraged peaceful protest. I tried to be fair, but I couldnt achieve the newspaper ideal of objectivity, as if everything is seen through the eyes of God, he said. I couldnt do that. I wanted it to have some of my own voice ... I thought it would make a better story.

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News Headline: (Nursing) Fulbright Scholar named at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A professor at Kent State University is headed to Thailand on a Fulbright Scholar grant to teach and conduct research in research methodology.

Dr. Ratchneewan Ross, an associate professor in the KSU College of Nursing, will teach research methodology to graduate students and doctoral candidates at five universities in Thailand from June to October 2010. While in Thailand, she also will conduct seminars for nursing faculty and conduct her own research project.

The Fulbright grant will cover travel expenses and the costs of living abroad, and it also will provide a stipend. In addition, Ross will receive financial support for her research project, "Intimate Partner Violence, Social Support and Health Outcomes Among Thai OB/GYN Patients."

The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. Each year, the Fulbright Scholar Program sends approximately 800 U.S. faculty and professionals to 140 countries.

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News Headline: (Safety) Kent deaths spark fears for safety (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: By Matt Fredmonsky

Record-Courier staff writer

Following two assault-related deaths since November in downtown Kent, city and university officials are working to lessen fears and counter the growing perception of Kent as a violent community.

Kent State University graduate student John T. White, 28, of Delaware, died this month following a serious assault near the corner of Main and Water streets last month. And 23-year-old KSU student Christopher Kernich died in November less than a week after being severely beaten near the intersection of East Main and DePeyster streets.

The two incidents, which occurred less than two blocks apart, both took place shortly after 2 a.m. on weekends following evenings the victims spent downtown.

Kent Safety Director William Lillich said the deaths have been discussed to some degree in the police and city administrative ranks. Everybody here is very sensitive to it, although we have the same problem in other areas, he said. Our people are hard pressed to be on every street corner. The city recently received grant funding to increase neighborhood policing efforts, which include putting more officers on foot and bike patrols in neighborhoods. Its going to give us the ability to put extra people out at critical times of the day and week, he said. Is that going to stop all of this? No, because people dont generally stop if theyve had a few drinks and contemplate if the police are around if they feel inclined to assault somebody. The two deadly assaults occurred off campus, but on campus, KSU experienced a string of robberies during the fall semester.

In response, KSU published FBI crime statistics in February showing fewer crimes were committed on campus in 2009 than in the previous three years, including fewer serious crimes such as sex offenses, assaults and burglaries.

KSU also pointed to a listing published by the Web site StateUniversity.com, which ranked KSU as the safest Ohio campus among state schools behind only Lakeland Community College and Cuyahoga Community College. The ranking, based on crime reports submitted by the schools for 2008, gave KSU a 92.5 safety rating out of 100. Unfortunately, there were some very high-profile incidents, KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent said. But if you look at the crime statistics, those are very false views of the university. Its a concern, and we want to address it and set the facts straight. The KSU police department hired six new officers in recent months to bring the departments personnel total to 32. Starting in March, the citys police department will host monthly meetings to encourage the formation of neighborhood watch groups and other crime prevention activities. There is a lot of sensitivity to the concerns that are being reported right now, Lillich said. There always has been. Our people continue to work hard to try and keep the community safe, and we hope people in the community would be a little more patient and a little less inclined to resort to violence.

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News Headline: Is plagiarism on the rise? | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Robert Wang
News OCR Text: with Totally Local Yellow Pages

When plagiarism occurs on a college campus, it's usually an instructor making that charge against a student.

But in a case at Malone University in Canton, it was the students who made that accusation — against the president of their university, Gary Streit.

Earlier this month, students through the Student Senate sent a petition to the school's board of trustees demanding an investigation. Malone's student newspaper, The Aviso, said 607 undergraduates signed the petition after a student saw similarities between a speech given by Streit on Jan. 13 and an Associated Press story printed by The Repository.

On Monday, Streit announced his retirement.

So how prevalent is this kind of case in the academic world? And how much plagiarism occurs on college campuses?

Professors who have dealt with plagiarism issues at Ohio State University and Ohio University said they could not recall a case when a university administrator used unattributed material in a speech.

“I think there's a difference between a college freshman and a university president,” said Scott Titsworth, a communication professor at Ohio University who teaches public speaking. “That person should know better.”

“It was sloppy and pretty amateurish,” said Don Hubin, a professor of philosophy and ethics at Ohio State, who speculated that Streit may have felt pressed for time. “I think he embarrassed himself and he embarrassed the college.”

SPEECHES QUESTIONED

A review of Streit's speech to students in January shows that major portions matched almost word for word two Associated Press articles, an entry from the online encyclopedia Wikipedia, and a paragraph that matches the wording in several Web sites about the Roman god Janus.

Questions also have been raised about some of Streit's other speeches.

One was a May 2007 commencement address by Streit, then provost at Olivet Nazarene University in Illinois. An audio of the speech posted on that school's Web site shows that Streit, without attributing sources, presented words matching nearly verbatim the text from “What Exactly IS a Provost” on the University of Iowa Web site.

The Aviso reported that the Malone Student Senate had discovered that what appeared to be a personal anecdote by Streit in a September 2008 speech actually was part of an article in the Journal of Education.

Streit could not be reached for comment through his listed home phone number or the university.

Did Streit commit plagiarism?

“It's a borderline case. I don't think it's clear one way or another,” said Hubin, who noted that Streit's speech was not an academic product.

“What counts as a misrepresentation depends a whole lot on what people's reasonable expectations are,” he said.

For example, it's common practice for ministers to use other pastors' outlines of sermons, Hubin said.

Politicians often use speech writers. Their audiences understand that someone else may have composed their speeches.

Titsworth says he teaches students to cite their sources, even in speeches. He said that if Streit used language that was not his own without attribution, he committed a “serious” offense of plagiarism even if it was unintentional or in oral form.

RAMIFICATIONS

The consequences of plagiarism can be severe. For example, at Kent State University, the discipline can range from a failing grade to revocation of a degree to suspension or even expulsion, depending on the circumstances.

Rob Coleman, a chemistry professor at Ohio State and  chairman of the school's Committee on Academic Misconduct, said professors caught plagiarizing extensively in a book could see their academic careers ended.

It's not clear whether there is more or less plagiarism today.

Hubin said he has reported about one or two of his students for plagiarism every two years. Titsworth said that during his dozen years in teaching, he has encountered three or four such cases involving undergraduates.

Yet evidence from Ohio State suggests there has been an increase, although the reasons aren't clear. During the 2000-01 academic year, the Ohio State academic misconduct committee said it determined that plagiarism had occurred at the school in 60 cases. That figure more than tripled to 221 findings of plagiarism in 2005-06. It fell to 169 plagiarism cases in 2008-09.

It is not known how much the increase was due to the Internet making it easier for students to commit plagiarism or the Internet making it easier to catch them.

Ryan Fletcher, a freshman English composition instructor at the University of Akron, said he's caught only a couple of students plagiarizing during the last four semesters through Internet searches.

But Fletcher said he often comes across passages in student papers that don't sound like the students' own words, but the language also doesn't match anything on the Internet.

And finding no match on Google doesn't eliminate the possibility someone wrote part of the paper for the student.

“There's plenty of times I've suspected somebody of plagiarizing but haven't been able to prove it,” Fletcher said.

COLLEGE PLAGIARISM POLICIES

Malone University

“A. Plagiarism ... 1. submitting as one's own work, part or all of an oral or written assignment which is copied, paraphrased, or purchased from another source, including world wide web and other online sources, without proper acknowledgment of that source. In written assignments, using three or more words in succession from a source without quotation marks and proper acknowledgment can be considered plagiarism. ... 2. submitting as one's own, course work which has been prepared or extensively revised by someone else.”

Kent State University

“'Plagiarize' means to take and present as one's own a material portion of the ideas or words of another or to present as one's own an idea or work derived from an existing source without full and proper credit to the source of the ideas, words, or works.”

Ohio State University

“Examples of academic misconduct include, but are not limited to: ... submitting plagiarized word for an academic requirement. Plagiarism is the representation of another's work or ideas as one's own; it includes the unacknowledged word-for-word use and/or paraphrasing of another person's work, and/or the inappropriate unacknowledged use of another person's ideas.”

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News Headline: BOUQUETS: KSU at Geauga Has Economic Impact | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BOUQUETS: To Kent State University, for having a $29.2 million economic impact on Geauga County, according to a recent comprehensive study.

The report — titled "Prosperity By Degrees: The Economic Impact of Kent State University on Northeast Ohio" — was done by Economic Modeling Specialists Inc. and indicated the eight-campus system generates $1.96 billion in added income to the Northeast Ohio economy.

The Geauga campus in particular has a total economic impact of $29.2 million that stems from the productivity effects of alumni who live and work in Geauga County.

"I think (the Geauga Campus) is a very positive thing," said Geauga County Commissioner Bill Young. "I think they've continued to grow from there and have been able to provide education to help strengthen young adults to go forward and perhaps locate job in this area.

"(Otherwise) many students would leave Geauga County to go to college and then take a job from another state," he added.

Clearly, Kent State-Geauga has played a key role in bolstering its namesake county's strong economic foundation.

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News Headline: (Geography) This month could end up snowiest ever (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: Norwalk Reflector
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: You think the snow this month is the worst you've ever seen?

LOU REDA/REFLECTOR Norwalk street department worker Jim Horner operates a front-end loader and refills his truck with salt Friday afternoon as city crews work to clear streets to keep pace with the latest snow storm hitting the Firelands.

It just might be.

This month's snowfall — 32.9 inches as of 5 p.m. Friday — is rivaling that of January 1978, the Akron-Canton area's monthly record holder with 37.5 inches.

Already, this month is the snowiest February on record at the Akron-Canton Airport, trumping February 2008, when 25.8 inches fell.

Friday morning's snowfall fell short of expectations, said Tom Schmidlin, a Kent State University professor who studies Ohio weather. But he noted more snow is predicted for today and Sunday, “so it could dribble up to a record.”

Schmidlin, co-author of Thunder in the Heartland: A Chronicle of Outstanding Weather Events in Ohio, said while a “monthly record is always surprising, it's kind of been the pattern lately.”

He noted that last year saw the second-snowiest January, after January 1978. The second-snowiest March was in 2008.

Schmidlin said this month's heavy snow is attributable to a combination of cold temperatures and lots of low-pressure storms moving east from the Pacific Ocean.

Snow flurries are expected to continue today through Sunday with little or no accumulation predicted.

The Akron-Canton area has had 55.9 inches of snow this winter through 5 p.m. Friday.

That snowfall, since Dec. 1, is 24.7 inches above average.

But the Akron-Canton area is a long way from the snowiest winter on record. No. 1 on that list is the 1977-78 season with 82 inches of snow.

And we might not be done yet. Forecasters are watching another low-pressure system that could bring another round of snow to the area.

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News Headline: (Squirrels) Nature Notes | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2010
Outlet Full Name: Frederick News-Post - Online, The
Contact Name: Ginny Brace
News OCR Text: The Eastern gray squirrel has a black phase.

ALL THE FUN about the groundhog seeing his shadow in early February makes us wonder if these rodents, Marmota Monax, really have a time clock that lets them know when it is Feb. 2. In fact, groundhogs don't just start hibernation at a certain date in the year and then come out of it at another date.

Their hibernation both starts and ends gradually, drifting in and out of hibernation and activity. In winter, hibernators like groundhogs drift out of hibernation to elevate their body temperature and receive nutrients from stored body fat, while remaining in their burrows and drifting back into hibernation. The hibernating groundhog's body temperature can drop to around 40, or just above the winter temperature of the burrow.

In early to mid-February in this area, groundhogs start to venture out sporadically to seek mates. Groundhogs have one litter per year. They typically mate soon after hibernation ends, from March to early April, producing a litter of two to six hairless, blind young after a one-month gestation period. Mating too early would result in the litter being born before a plant food supply is readily available. Late mating would not give the newborns enough time to put on weight to get through winter hibernation. Both the male and female remain in the same burrow following mating, with the male leaving the burrow after the young are born.

Groundhogs are great at burrowing, and can excavate up to 50 feet of tunnels, as deep as 5 feet, with several entrances.

Black squirrels

The Eastern gray squirrel, Sciurus carolinensis, has a "melanistic" or black phase that is somewhat common throughout the northern portion of its range. Historical records indicate that the black phase of this squirrel was dominant throughout much of its range prior to European settlement, when large, dark virgin forests blanketed the landscape. It is believed that this color phase provided better camouflage for the squirrel.

Over the years, with deforestation and more hunting pressure, the black phase gave way to the more common gray phase as the gray-colored squirrels became less noticeable than their black counterparts. The black phase continued its dominance in Canada, which still retained its heavy forest cover.

Throughout the 1900s, black squirrels were reintroduced into urban areas, particularly college towns. The black squirrel was imported into Washington in the early 1900s to be displayed at the National Zoo and around the National Mall. Today, nearly 25 percent of the squirrels in Washington display black coloration.

Members of Kent State University's grounds department and a retired executive from Davey Tree Expert Co. legally imported black squirrels from Ontario, Canada, to the campus in 1961. Today black squirrels are the dominant color phase throughout much of Kent, Ohio. The black squirrel is much beloved in this community and each September, Kent hosts the Black Squirrel Festival and 10K road race.

Nature Notes is compiled by Ginny Brace. Contact her at naturenotesfnp@aol.com.

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News Headline: (COPH) DR. MARK A. JAMES FIRST DEAN OF NEW COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH (Frank, James) | Email

News Date: 02/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb. 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release
Dr. Mark A. James, professor and vice chair of the Department of Tropical Medicine at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, will become founding dean of Kent State University's College of Public Health on July 1, 2010, announced Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Robert G. Frank. Frank has served as interim dean of the college since its inception in 2009.
"The opportunity at Kent State University is ideal in that it allows one to build the college in the vision of a founding dean, together with a committed administration, faculty, staff and students," James said.
In addition to his extensive teaching experience, James' distinguished career in public health includes leadership positions as chair of the Tulane University Health Sciences Center Biomedical Institutional Review Board, secretary of General Faculty for the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, and member of the University Senate at Tulane University. Trained as an immunoparasitologist, James' research interests include the immunology of malaria and Chagas' disease in Latin America.
"Kent State University's College of Public Health is poised to prepare students to meet the region's and nation's need for trained public health professionals," Frank said. "Dr. James' knowledge of what it takes to build an accredited program of public health will guide the college to meet those needs and leverage the educational and research strengths of its faculty."
James has been recognized by Tulane University on five separate occasions with the annual Excellence in Teaching Award. He also has received the Teaching Scholar Award in the School of Public Health in Tropical Medicine in 1999 and was recognized with the Chancellor's Teaching Scholar Award at the Tulane University Medical Center. He is an inaugural member of the ASPH/Pfizer Public Health Academy of Distinguished Teachers.
James holds a bachelor of science degree in zoology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a master's degree in zoology and a doctor of philosophy in tropical medicine from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Kent State's College of Public Health is Ohio's second college of public health. It was established to help meet the demonstrated state and national need for public health professionals. In Ohio alone, the projected shortage of educated and trained public health professionals is estimated to be in excess of 10,000 workers by 2020.
Last Friday, Gov. Ted Strickland and Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Eric D. Fingerhut announced Kent State as a Center of Excellence in Biomedicine and Health Care for Ohio. Kent State's Center of Excellence focuses on the health of individuals and communities. The university was awarded this distinction due to its College of Public Health and its College of Nursing.
In October 2009, Kent State received approval by the Ohio Board of Regents to offer a bachelor of science (B.S.P.H.) degree in public health. Currently, 146 students are taking four courses this spring through its Experimental Programs (EXPR) Division, and the university is accepting applications for the B.S.P.H. program for fall 2010. The College of Public Health is also planning an undergraduate certificate in public health. The college has 18 full-time tenure track faculty members with the goal of 25 by 2012.
For more information on Kent State's College of Public Health, visit www.kent.edu/academics/publichealth.For more information please contact Sarabjit Jagirdar, Email - htsyndication@hindustantimes.com.
Copyright © 2010 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: (Nursing) KENT STATE UNIVERSITY NURSING PROFESSOR RECEIVES FULBRIGHT SCHOLAR GRANT (Ross) | Email

News Date: 02/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb. 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release
Dr. Ratchneewan Ross, an associate professor in Kent State University's College of Nursing, has received a Fulbright Scholar grant to teach and conduct research in Thailand. Ross will teach research methodology to graduate students and doctoral candidates at five universities in Thailand from June to October 2010. While in Thailand, she also will conduct seminars for nursing faculty and conduct her own research project.
"I'm quite honored to receive this prestigious grant," said Ross, who is in her eighth year at Kent State. "I will be very busy - teaching in four different regions of the country - but I am really looking forward to this opportunity."
The Fulbright grant will cover travel expenses and the costs of living abroad, and it also will provide a stipend. In addition, Ross will receive financial support for her research project, "Intimate Partner Violence, Social Support and Health Outcomes Among Thai OB/GYN Patients."
"Developing international understanding requires a commitment on the part of Fulbright grantees to establish open communication and long-term cooperative relationships," said Shirley Green, chair of the Fulbright Scholarship Board. "In this way, Fulbrighters enrich the educational, political, economic, social and cultural lives of countries around the world."
The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. Established in 1946, the Fulbright Program provides participants - chosen for their academic merit and leadership potential - with the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.
Each year, the Fulbright Scholar Program sends approximately 800 U.S. faculty and professionals to 140 countries to lecture, research or participate in seminars. More information is available at www.fulbright.state.gov.For more information please contact Sarabjit Jagirdar, Email - htsyndication@hindustantimes.com.
Copyright © 2010 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: (Life Sciences) Data on life sciences published by researchers at Kent State University (Joshi) | Email

News Date: 02/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New investigation results, 'DNA-WT1 protein interaction studied by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy,' are detailed in a study published in Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry. According to recent research from the United States, "Interactions of proteins with DNA play an important role in regulating the biological functions of DNA. Here we propose and demonstrate the detection of protein-DNA binding using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)."
"In this method, double-stranded DNA molecules with potential protein-binding sites are labeled with dye molecules and immobilized on metal nanoparticles. The binding of proteins protects the DNA from complete digestion by exonuclease and can be detected by measuring the SERS signals before and after the exonuclease digestion," wrote B. Joshi and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).
The researchers concluded "As a proof of concept, this SERS-based protein-DNA interaction assay is validated by studying the binding of a zinc finger transcription factor WT1 with DNA sequences derived from the promoter of the human vascular endothelial growth factor."
Joshi and colleagues published their study in Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (DNA-WT1 protein interaction studied by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2010;396(4) 1415-21).
For additional information, contact B. Joshi, Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 USA.
Copyright © 2010 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: (Exercise) New stroke study findings have been reported by researchers at Kent State University | Email

News Date: 02/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Investigators publish new data in the report 'Reliability of the measurement of stroke volume using impedance cardiography during acute cold exposure.' "It is well documented that cardiovascular alterations occur during acute cold exposure (ACE). Interindividual variability is present, due mainly to body size differences, gender, and age," scientists in the United States report (see also ).
"However, no study has evaluated stroke volume in the same individual twice in the same ambient conditions (i.e., test-retest reliability). Impedance cardiography (ICG) has become a popular method to acquire hemodynamic data in both clinical and applied physiology settings. Further, ICG does not interfere with other dependent variables such as oxygen consumption. Therefore, based on the uniqueness of the methodology, we sought to test reliability in this technology at 5 degrees C for 65 min on two separate occasions. Nine young men underwent two 65-min trials of resting ACE, separated by at least 72 h. Volunteers were clothed in approximately one layer of clothing. Core and skin temperatures, oxygen consumption, and central hemodynamics were measured. As expected, core and skin temperature decreased while oxygen consumption showed a modest increase over time. In both trials, stroke volume significantly increased over time as heart rate decreased. There was similarity within subjects and between trials for all variables, as assessed via bivariate correlations. Cold increased stroke volume and decreased heart rate when subjects were pooled together, but each subject retained his individuality (minimal interindividual differences)," wrote M.D. Muller and colleagues, Kent State University.
The researchers concluded "Results suggest that impedance cardiography may be a reliable technique to use during acute cold exposure."
Muller and colleagues published their study in Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine (Reliability of the measurement of stroke volume using impedance cardiography during acute cold exposure. Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine, 2010;81(2) 120-4).
For more information, contact M.D. Muller, Kent State University, Exercise and Environmental Physiology Laboratory, Kent, OH 44242 USA.
Publisher contact information for the journal Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine is Aerospace Medical Association, 320 S Henry St., Alexandria, VA 22314-3579, USA.
Copyright © 2010 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: (Fashion) Swedish designer makes disposable wearable (Ohrn-McDaniel) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2010
Outlet Full Name: Swedish Wire
Contact Name: Johan Nylander
News OCR Text: General - Published Monday, 22 February 2010 06:03 | Author: The Akron Beacon Journal

Linda Öhrn-McDaniel makes women's clothing out of vinyl records, newspapers and plastic bags.

• Swedish ecological burials attract world interest

• Dior and Chanel to go under the hammer

When it comes to thinking green, Linda Öhrn-McDaniel has an edge over most folks. The Tallmadge (U.S.) resident has made women's clothing out of vinyl records, newspapers, the plastic bags in cereal boxes, even bicycle inner tubes.

So maybe it's no surprise when she turned to the most humble of household castoffs for her newest creation.

Öhrn-McDaniel, an assistant professor of fashion design at Kent State University, stitched together used dryer sheets and plastic "sequins" to make a filmy, full-length ballgown with cap sleeves.

The design received the award for the best sustainable design by faculty at the annual meeting of the International Textile and Apparel Association. The award was sponsored by Educators for a Socially Responsible Apparel Business.

"I feel strongly about sustainable design," Öhrn-McDaniel said. "It is difficult not to be aware of the need to save and use our resources as effectively as we can."

Öhrn-McDaniel began experimenting with recycled materials while in college in her native Sweden.

Her first effort -- a bolero jacket made of newspapers collected from the Stockholm subway -- won her first place in a recycle competition and earned her a trip to New York City.

"That's when I got hooked with playing with strange materials," she said.

By the time she earned a master's in fine art at the University of North Texas, she was adept at turning rectangular Swedish milkboxes into purses, cereal bags into raincoats, softened vinyl records and window blinds into bras and a patchwork of inner tubes into a "biker" jacket that resembles leather at first glance.

Then her attention turned to the dryer sheets she so carelessly threw away.

"We don't use dryer sheets in Sweden and I was really amazed by them when I came here," she said. "I realized one day that they were like fabric."

So she layered used, pressed dryer sheets five or six deep onto a dress form. She dyed some sheets red and similar colors fading to white and positioned them at the hem.

Then she stitched the sheets together with transparent thread and topped the bodice with "sequins" punched from plastic pop bottles and sewn to the fabric.

The dress looks like it might have been pulled off the rack at a high-end store.

"I think it's important that it's not too strange," she said. "It's made to function."

Now she's thinking of her next project . . . possibly VHS tape or microfilm, she suggests.

To see more of the Akron Beacon Journal, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.ohio.com. Copyright (c) 2010, The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

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News Headline: (Psychology) Researchers' work from Kent State focuses on visual cognition (Merriman) | Email

News Date: 03/01/2010
Outlet Full Name: Pain & Central Nervous System Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to a study from the United States, "When asked to judge the size of a distant object, older children are more likely than younger ones to report deliberately inflating their judgements to compensate for size underconstancy (Granrud, in press). The current investigation examined whether use of this strategy depends on object distance and whether it is related to individual differences in reasoning, knowledge about size perception, or cognitive style."
"In two studies, children in Grades 1-3 estimated the size of a distant (61 m away) and near (6.1 m away) disc. In each, half of the children reported inflating their judgement of the distant disc to compensate for a tendency to underestimate its size, but only a few reported using this strategy for the near disc. Self-reported strategy users tended to either judge the distant disc accurately or to overestimate its size, whereas the other children tended to underestimate its size. Strategy reporters obtained higher scores on a test of verbal reasoning, but did not differ from the other children in reflectivity-impulsivity. In Study 1, strategy reporters also showed a better understanding of how distance affects the apparent size of objects in photographs. This understanding was strongly related to verbal reasoning ability," wrote W.E. Merriman and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).
The researchers concluded "In Study 2, visuospatial reasoning ability was also found to predict who would report strategy use, and this predictive relation was independent of verbal reasoning ability."
Merriman and colleagues published their study in Visual Cognition (Children's strategic compensation for size underconstancy Dependence on distance and relation to reasoning ability. Visual Cognition, 2010;18(2) 296-319).
For more information, contact W.E. Merriman, Kent State University, Dept. of Psychology, Kent, OH 44242, USA.
Publisher contact information for the journal Visual Cognition is Psychology Press, 27 Church Rd., Hove BN3 2FA, East Sussex, England.
Copyright © 2010 Pain & Central Nervous System Week via NewsRx.com

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