Report Overview:
Total Clips (31)
Headline Date Outlet
Grants attract savings ideas for government 03/05/2010 Plain Dealer Text Email

...unusual proposals this time Affordable solutions for pharmaceutical access for the insured and underinsured in Summit County to promote employability. Kent State University and Hiram College will join Portage County communities and businesses to attract and hire their students and alumni. ...

(CUDC) Cleveland casino a $600 million investment, expert questions sites (Diehl) 03/05/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...discussion organized by a group of young professionals calling itself the Cleveland Coalition. The other speakers were Christopher Diehl, a professor at the Kent State Urban Design Collaborative; Tom Chema, president of Hiram College and former chief executive of the Gateway Economic Development...

(Athletics) Singletary battles his demons armed with hope and faith 03/05/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

(CUDC) Crain's senior reporter Stan Bullard to be part of next NEOtropolis show 03/05/2010 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...Bullard, who has covered real estate for Crain's for 24 years, the panel will include Paul Vernon, an architect, urban designer and co-administrator of the Kent State Urban Design Collaborative; and T. Sharon Woodberry, director of economic development for the city of Youngstown. The panel and...

(Tech Transfer) UA LICENSING INCOME DOWN IN '08 03/05/2010 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...with $13.3 million, followed by Ohio University, $5.8 million; Ohio State, $2.1 million; UA; Miami, $1.1 million; Toledo, $696,000; Cincinnati, $583,000; Kent State, $352,000; and Bowling Green, $8,000. Nationwide, Northwestern University ranked first with $826.4 million in 2008. At UA,...

Dodging for dollars at KSU 03/05/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

(Athletics) KSU senior treats basketball, medical studies with care 03/05/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Dodgeball for Haiti at KSU 03/05/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Robert J. Lucas/Record-Courier From left, Chris Becker, a 2008 Kent State University graduate, throws at Mike Miladore, a student at the Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy in...

(University Relations) Ravenna: Skeels Seniors host program ... Celebrate Black History Month 03/06/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...the program's speaker, Iris Harvey, vice president for University Relations and chief officer for marketing, communications and government relations at Kent State University. The Rev. Phillip Morris of Kent led the benediction to end the program. The program was dedicated in memory of the...

(Architecture) KSU, Akron U battle for bridge: Pedestrian span on Akron campus (Sabini) 03/06/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

By Matt Fredmonsky Record-Courier staff writer A group of architecture students at Kent State University is competing with rivals at the University of Akron to design a pedestrian bridge on the Akron campus. The KSU and Akron...

(Centennial) PORTAGE PATHWAYS: Ravenna, Kent welcomed World War I caravans for liberty 03/07/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...from the community to be wounded in action in France. Another item told of a series of tuition-free evening classes in technical work being offered at Kent State "for men to be drafted." "This war demands an army of skilled workers," the article noted. Both communities took pride in the hospitality...

(Theatre) Newest project at KSU is "thrilling' (Crawford, Bruder) 03/08/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...writerBrian Crowley is among the first students to benefit from the more than $12 million expansion of the School of Theatre and Dances new Roe Green Center at Kent State University.The junior musical theatre major from Mentor said the school is already enjoying some of the completed renovations.And...

(May 4) Play about May 4 set for Kent State 03/08/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

The School of Theatre and Dance at Kent State University will hold its annual Student Theatre Festival, featuring "Blanket Hill," a play about the events at KSU on May 4, 1970....

(Diversity) Center for gay, bisexual students to open Grand opening event is Thursday (Brown) 03/08/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Grand opening event is Thursday; Lefton to bestow first Diversity Trailblazer Award Kent State University will open the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Student Center on Thursday. Located on the second floor of...

(CSIR) Two professors create center to study religious behaviors 03/08/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Two professors in the School of Library and Information Science at Kent State University have created a center to study how people use information in their religious behaviors and thinking. Don Wicks of Ravenna,...

(ILEP) International educators experience the U.S. while at local high school 03/07/2010 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

...Rosina Jeffery Minggu of Malaysia and Hilman Setiawan of Indonesia. The educators are participants in the International Leaders in Education Program at Kent State University, which is hosting 16 teachers from 11 countries at schools near the university. During the five-month program, the scholars...

(Census) Universities push to get students in Census 2010 03/05/2010 phillyburbs.com Text Attachment Email

...sets. At the University of Texas' Arlington campus, students have posted a Census-themed parody of the popular "The Real World" TV show on the Web. At Kent State University in Ohio, a student team pushing the census is planning to hit off-campus bars later this month to stamp the address of...

(Census) College students urged to be counted 03/06/2010 Herald-Sun - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...sets. At the University of Texas' Arlington campus, students have posted a Census-themed parody of the popular “The Real World” TV show on the Web. At Kent State University in Ohio, a student team pushing the census is planning to hit off-campus bars later this month to stamp the address of...

(Fashion) JOINING ME THIS MORNING, KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FASHION PROFESSOR. 03/08/2010 Good Morning Cleveland - WEWS-TV Text Email

...FASHIONS AS WELL. OF COURSE, MILLIONS OF PEOPLE WATCHED AS CELEBRITIES STROLLED DOWN THE RED CARPET FOR HOURS BEFORE THE EVENT. JOINING ME THIS MORNING, KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FASHION PROFESSOR. THANK YOU, SIR. WE APPRECIATE HAVING YOU ON THE SHOW. LET'S TALK ABOUT THE OVERALL FASHION SENSES...

(WKSU) BusinessWire -Richik Sarkar appointed to WKSU Advisory Board 03/05/2010 Forbes - Online Text Attachment Email

...over 650 children and young adults each year through its programming, and holds many public performances for the community throughout the year. WKSU, Kent State University's award-winning national public radio and classical music station, serves more than 20 Ohio counties and parts of Western...

(LCI) LCDs adapt to low-power trends 03/08/2010 EE Times Online Text Attachment Email

...LCD, Pixel Qi looks very good, but if you are satisfied with multisecond page turns for reading books, then E Ink rules the roost for a while longer." Kent State spinoff Kent Displays Inc. uses a a roll-to-roll process to manufacture cholesteric reflective LCDs that are low-cost, flexible and...

(Physics) Kent State researchers play lead role in significant new physics discovery (Keane) 03/05/2010 Innovations Report Text Attachment Email

Home Reports Physics and Astronomy Content Team of international researchers finds most massive antinucleus to date Ten Kent State University researchers are part of a team of international scientists who have discovered the most massive antinucleus discovered...

(Physics) RHIC nets strange antimatter 03/05/2010 Physicsworld.com Text Attachment Email

...previously generated antiprotons, anti-deuterium, anti-tritium and anti-helium-3 in particle collisions but the STAR collaboration, led by Declan Keane at Kent State University in the US, Jinhui Chen of the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics in China and Zhangbu Xu of Brookhaven, have seen the...

(COPH) Findings from Kent State University advance knowledge in infarction (Zullo) 03/08/2010 Respiratory Therapeutics Week Text Email

...nonattendees (CI 0.20-0.85). CR attendance was associated with healthy behaviors, though maintenance diminished over time," wrote M.D. Zullo and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded "Understanding the factors associated with healthy behaviors, and the time when...

(COPH) Findings from Kent State University advance knowledge in infarction (Zullo) 03/08/2010 Cardiovascular Week Text Email

...nonattendees (CI 0.20-0.85). CR attendance was associated with healthy behaviors, though maintenance diminished over time," wrote M.D. Zullo and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded "Understanding the factors associated with healthy behaviors, and the time when...

(COPH) Findings from Kent State University advance knowledge in infarction (Zullo) 03/08/2010 Obesity & Diabetes Week Text Email

...nonattendees (CI 0.20-0.85). CR attendance was associated with healthy behaviors, though maintenance diminished over time," wrote M.D. Zullo and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded "Understanding the factors associated with healthy behaviors, and the time when...

(Biostatistics) Data from Kent State University advance knowledge in HIV/AIDS risk factors (Bhatta) 03/08/2010 AIDS Weekly Text Email

...diagnosed with HIV <6 months (OR 3.5; CI 1.4-8.9) and not being on any antiretroviral therapy (OR 2.5; CI 1.1-5.7)," wrote M.P. Bhatta and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded "Poorer HIV-1 viral control in black women at enrollment may indicate suboptimal access to...

(Biostatistics) Data from Kent State University advance knowledge in HIV/AIDS risk factors (Bhatta) 03/08/2010 Clinical Oncology Week Text Email

...diagnosed with HIV <6 months (OR 3.5; CI 1.4-8.9) and not being on any antiretroviral therapy (OR 2.5; CI 1.1-5.7)," wrote M.P. Bhatta and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded "Poorer HIV-1 viral control in black women at enrollment may indicate suboptimal access to...

(Biostatistics) Data from Kent State University advance knowledge in HIV/AIDS risk factors (Bhatta) 03/08/2010 Mental Health Weekly Digest Text Email

...diagnosed with HIV <6 months (OR 3.5; CI 1.4-8.9) and not being on any antiretroviral therapy (OR 2.5; CI 1.1-5.7)," wrote M.P. Bhatta and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded "Poorer HIV-1 viral control in black women at enrollment may indicate suboptimal access to...

(Biostatistics) Data from Kent State University advance knowledge in HIV/AIDS risk factors (Bhatta) 03/08/2010 OBGYN & Reproduction Week Text Email

...diagnosed with HIV <6 months (OR 3.5; CI 1.4-8.9) and not being on any antiretroviral therapy (OR 2.5; CI 1.1-5.7)," wrote M.P. Bhatta and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded "Poorer HIV-1 viral control in black women at enrollment may indicate suboptimal access to...

(Biostatistics) Data from Kent State University advance knowledge in HIV/AIDS risk factors (Bhatta) 03/08/2010 Pharma Business Week Text Email

...diagnosed with HIV <6 months (OR 3.5; CI 1.4-8.9) and not being on any antiretroviral therapy (OR 2.5; CI 1.1-5.7)," wrote M.P. Bhatta and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded "Poorer HIV-1 viral control in black women at enrollment may indicate suboptimal access to...


News Headline: Grants attract savings ideas for government | Email

News Date: 03/05/2010
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Galbincea, Pat
News OCR Text: One of the boldest ideas in the 50 applications for grants that encourage government cooperation in Northeast Ohio is to combine every fire dispatch center in a county into one operation.
The idea comes not from Cuyahoga, Lorain or Medina counties, where communities are strapped for cash and searching for ways to save money. It comes from Stark County.
As in the first round of applications last year, the most far-reaching ideas appear to come from outside Greater Cleveland.
The Fund for Our Economic Future, which sponsors the grants, awarded most of the money far from Cleveland - in Youngstown and Warren.
Some of the more unusual proposals this time
Affordable solutions for pharmaceutical access for the insured and underinsured in Summit County to promote employability.
Kent State University and Hiram College will join Portage County communities and businesses to attract and hire their students and alumni.
Six Stark County communities that use the county Engineers Department will establish sites for contaminated street sweepings and debris until they can be disposed of in an approved landfill.
Cuyahoga County communities did come up with a few novel ideas, such as a shared brine operation in Brecksville, Broadview Heights, Independence and North Royalton; inner-ring school districts standardizing school records so student information can be easily transferred when they switch districts; and a road-paving cooperative in Pepper Pike, Gates Mills, Moreland Hills and Bentleyville.
Proposals, which needed to be submitted by Feb. 26, will be scrutinized by the Fund for Our Economic Future, and the finalists will be announced April 30. Residents can then vote between May 1-31 online when the finalists are posted at EfficientGovNow.org, and the winners will be announced in early June.
Up to four grants totaling $330,000 could be awarded. More than 65 applications were submitted in the first round last year, and nine finalists were chosen in July.
Three groups were awarded financial boosts from the fund, which is a collaboration of 69 foundations, organizations and philanthropists from across Northeast Ohio.
Stark County wants to consolidate 37 government emergency dispatch functions, including a new 9-1-1 call system, into one dispatch center.
The county is seeking $100,000, which would be used to hire consultants to set up a computer-aided dispatch system.
"Our proposal didn't make the final nine the first time around," said Joe Concatto, the countywide 9-1-1 coordinator. "I believe it's because our overall budget is too high."
The 15 First Ring School Districts, a collaboration of superintendents representing 15 inner-ring districts including Cleveland Heights-University Heights, East Cleveland and Warrensville Heights, is also seeking $100,000.
The group is proposing a new student electronic registration process that will quickly exchange information between schools, particularly when a student transfers.
"A common registration form and an electronic registration program will standardize the process of transferring," said Jim Connell, facilitator for the group. "It helps the student get into a school and place appropriately much quicker and more efficiently."
The group has budgeted $150,000 for the project.
Brecksville, Broadview Heights, Independence and North Royalton proposal calls for a "Better Than Margarita Salt" plan that would enable the four communities to purchase equipment to make salt brine and change their salt truck equipment to spread it.
South Euclid and Lyndhurst are proposing a similar idea. They want to build a regional facility to make salt brine to spread on roads.
To reach this Plain Dealer reporter pgalbincea@plaind.com, 216-999-5159
Copyright © 2010 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: (CUDC) Cleveland casino a $600 million investment, expert questions sites (Diehl) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Evelyn Theiss
News OCR Text: Cleveland's casino will be a $600 million investment.

That's what casino developer Dan Gilbert's representative told the crowd of more than 100 at a public dialogue on casino design, held at Cleveland's City Club Friday evening.

Len Komoroski, representing Gilbert's Rock Ventures LLC, said that Gilbert and his partners want to make sure "this is a first class destination and entity. We are committed to investing more than $600 million here in the Cleveland casino project."

Komoroski was one of four panelists at the discussion organized by a group of young professionals calling itself the Cleveland Coalition.

The other speakers were Christopher Diehl, a professor at the Kent State Urban Design Collaborative; Tom Chema, president of Hiram College and former chief executive of the Gateway Economic Development Corp., and David M. Schwarz of Washington, D.C., a well-known architect who designed the expansion of Severance Hall in Cleveland in the late 1990s. Schwarz is currently working on a project for Harrah's Entertainment Inc. in Las Vegas.

Schwarz, who flew into Cleveland for this event and also spent part of the day meeting with Kent design students, shared his puzzlement of the four sites selected as possible casino locations in Cleveland.

The four were part of the Issue 3 measure that voters passed in November. They include the east bank of the Cuyahoga River behind Tower City Center; a site on the W. 3rd St. Peninsula underneath the Lorain-Carnegie bridge, the Scranton Road Peninsula and the Higbee building.

Komoroski left before the other panelists spoke, to head to Quicken Loans arena for the potentially Guinness world-record-breaking "Snuggie" event.

Though Schwarz said he wasn't taking any position on casino locations in Cleveland, he later dismissed two sites out of hand -- the peninsula locations -- as being inconsistent with the pledge he'd been told Gilbert made, that the casino be a place that encourages the flow of traffic in and out of it.

"I don't think you'll have a white elephant, people love to game and it will be used wherever you put it," Schwarz said. "But you may have a great risk of having something that is nothing for downtown, which is a real lost opportunity.

"I'm quite surprised listening to the goals by this group and by the representatives of the developer that the sites are what they are. Two clearly do nothing for downtown.

"The 600 million number wouldn't get you close because the infrastructure to get you to those sites would be so expensive it wouldn't happen. You don't have four sites that would impact downtown. How you site this thing is absolutely critical to what you get. Don't confuse yourselves about this."

Gilbert has said publicly that the measure of success for the casino will not just be how well it does, but how it contributes to the well-being of downtown.

Most casinos -- in Las Vegas and other cities -- have been built as bunkers that discourage gamblers from leaving the building.

And as Komoroski reiterated, the proposed casinos would not be a "bunker," and he mentioned again the importance of "how it's integrated into the downtown fabric."

Diehl mentioned that his students have been coming up with creative ideas for how a casino might look, and mentioned the views of the river that several would have.

Schwarz said bluntly that no casino owners wanted patrons to look at views from the casino. He mentioned casinos built next to the beach in Biloxi, Miss., and that not a single one has a back door to allow patrons to get to the beach.

Of all the casino locations he's studied, Biloxi is the place, Schwarz said, where gaming has had the least positive impact on the city. There, the Beau Rivage casino, for example, is separated by the city by a major 12-lane roadway

In most places like that, "Casino life and city life have nothing to with each other. Municipalities have at best viewed gaming as a necessary evil, and operators have viewed city dwellers as an unfortunate occurrence. There's a mutual distrust," he said.

"Most casinos are on edges, on tracks, on the other side of the river, and the isolation makes them not central to urban life. "

Of the four locations, Schwarz said the one on the Cuyahoga River's east bank behind Tower City and the Higbee's were the only two that would serve the purpose of integrating with city life; he added that he didn't know much about the Higbee's building.

That has mainly been mentioned as the site of a temporary casino, should there be one.

During a question and answer session, Gilbert's Rock Ventures was represented by former U.S. Rep. Dennis Eckart. One of the questions was whether the casino design would fall under Cleveland's building and zoning restrictions and guidelines, even though it would be in a special designated district.

Eckart said that it would.

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News Headline: (Athletics) Singletary battles his demons armed with hope and faith | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: To outsiders, Chris Singletary comes off as brooding, moody and volatile. The stories about his background, his youth and his Kent State basketball career have piled high, like snow in a blizzard.

During his four seasons at Kent, Singletary has been arrested for drinking and driving. He has been arrested for a noise violation and for resisting arrest.

He was suspended for the first game of his freshman season for academic reasons. He was suspended for the first game of his sophomore season for letting a friend try to sneak into the KSU Recreation Center using Singletary's ID card. He was suspended for the first game of his junior year for a noise violation and for resisting arrest over Labor Day weekend.

On the basketball court, Singletary has been suspended various times for not playing hard. He also was suspended near the end of last season for punching an Akron player just after tipoff.

Tonight, Singletary will lead Kent State into another rivalry game against Akron, this time for the Mid-American Conference regular-season championship. And this spring, he will graduate with a degree in general studies.

It's not out of line to wonder, after everything that has happened, how Chris Singletary has made it to this point.

"There are 24,000 students at Kent State," said Lt. Jayme Cole of the Kent Police Department, "and 23,500 of them make it through without being arrested. It is not that hard."

But for Singletary, 21, it has been hard.

He came to Kent State four years ago carrying troubles and burdens, many of which have stayed with him.

Singletary's guiding light, his grandmother, who helped raise him, died when he was 14. He struggled with the loss for years.

His best friend was incarcerated for life before high school. He had a daughter, Makayla, when he was 16. His father, Darrin Malone, didn't become a constant in his life until high school, right around the time his grandmother died.

On the streets of his rough Chicago neighborhood, he saw relatives, friends and acquaintances beat up or gunned down.

It was too much for him to handle.

So, Singletary withdrew. He told everyone to leave him alone. He was angry all the time, and his mother, Catrina, noticed that "a violence" had come over him. In Singletary's mind, if the people around him could be gone in a flash, maybe it was better not to need people at all.

He wouldn't accept help, though. He would do it alone. He was young, tough and strong enough to handle anything, protected by the flex of his muscles and the scowl on his face.

This was the Chris Singletary who in 2006 left Chicago with that toughness and tenacity to help bring more championships to Kent State's basketball program.

As it turns out, Kent State wound up helping him.

Reputation, heavy baggage: On the basketball court, 7-footers abound and offensive linemen masquerade as power forwards. Somehow, though, the 6-4, 225-pound Singletary always looks like the biggest player out there. If his ax-handle shoulders, sledgehammer arms, wheelbarrow chest and anvil thighs don't make someone stop in his tracks, the glare on his face will.

That "just leave me alone" persona kept friend and foe at a distance.

"It's always been tough for Chris to accept help, and that has hurt him," said William "Wolf" Nelson, his coach at Farragut High School in Chicago.

And it wasn't just off the court.

During Singletary's junior year, Nelson told his team to help Singletary on defense so they could contain an opposing player. Singletary made it clear he didn't want the help, and after he picked up his fourth foul, Nelson benched him.

The coach and player bickered, and then Singletary stormed off floor and went to the locker room. Nelson suspended him for the next game.


The urban legend about that incident is that Singletary spat on Nelson during that disagreement. It never happened.

"Chris is way more respectful than that," Nelson said. "But that story has stayed with Chris since high school. First, they said he spit at me. Then they said he hit me. . . . Chris had done nothing to be perceived like that."

At Kent, Singletary earned his reputation of being difficult.

Singletary was living in Kent, but still carrying all of his Chicago stress -- with more piling on constantly. His mother was laid off from work while raising Singletary's half-brother and taking custody of a half-sister. His daughter wanted her daddy to come home.

Underneath it all, death and loss were at the core of Singletary's emotions. The night he was arrested in Kent as a sophomore for driving while intoxicated, he was distraught because he could not return to Chicago -- for the wake and funeral of a 16-year-old cousin who had been murdered.

"He takes that all in, like, 'It could have been me,' " his mother said. "That's how he is. Because it didn't happen to you, won't mean it doesn't affect you."

Singletary's junior season culminated in the last regular-season game against Akron. He was so wound up in the rivalry, the crowd, the atmosphere, the importance of the game, he went over the top. Less than 90 seconds after the opening jump ball, he punched Akron's Nate Linhart in the chest, sending Linhart to the floor, and Singletary to the locker room, ejected.

"The video is out there," Singletary said, looking back at the incident. "I punched the guy. You can fast-forward it. You can slow it down. You can change the angle. When you see it, it's easy to say I just went out there and punched him. But I'm here to tell you, truly, to punch him in the stomach was not my intentions at all."

Seeds of change: College is not just ABCs. It's as much about finding your own path as about academics, and from Singletary's first day on campus, he found a core of people who believed in him.

Each time Singletary acted out, Kent officials stuck with him instead of sending him packing, despite pressure from outsiders that he should be sent home.

"There has been that push," KSU Athletic Director Laing Kennedy said. "But it has been manageable. There are many, many people here who believe in Chris."

"The players have a saying: 'Both feet in,' " said Cathy O'Donnell, KSU's executive associate AD for student and academic services. "It's no different for us as administrators."

Or the professors. Two instructors were also key to Singletary's survival at Kent State: Mwatabu Okantah, an African Studies instructor, and Linda Piccirillo-Smith, an English instructor. They took extra time with Singletary starting when he was a freshman, investing themselves in him as a person, not just as a basketball player.

"Okantah asked me once: 'When you get done playing professional basketball, what will you do?'

"Understand how he said it. He didn't say, 'What if?' He empowered my dreams, but at the same time he got in his message: 'What are you going to do?' "

The punch at the end of last season made Singletary realize how much he was in jeopardy of losing a lot. So he issued this challenge for himself heading into his senior season: make it to the end incident-free.


"I know it's something I can control -- all those past situations, me getting suspended, was something I could control," Singletary said. "And I chose not to control it the right way. Really, for all the things I've done, all the lessons I've learned, I owe it to myself and to my teammates to play with them . . . instead of having to be on the sidelines."
Kent's 2009-10 basketball season began Nov. 6 with an exhibition game at Wooster. Kent had agreed to travel to Wooster in support of Scots assistant coach Doug Cline, who had lost his 3-year-old son, Corey, in a car accident in February 2009. Money from the game was targeted for a fund named in Corey's honor.

Kent coach Geno Ford spoke during the pregame ceremony.

"Then suddenly," Ford recalls, "this guy jogs past me, and it's Chris, who goes to hug coach Cline. Then the team follows him.

"A lot of the night was scripted," Ford said. "But not that."

"I'm not going to lie. I was touched," Cline said. "The way they reached out, Chris especially. . . . Even after the game, Chris went out of his way to talk to me. He went out of his way to talk to my other son, J.J., introduced him to the other Kent players and got them all to sign autographs for him. It was pretty emotional."

A new beginning: This spring, Chris Singletary will earn his degree, and those who have been with him from beginning to end and suffered through the bad times, feel it is now time to recognize what he has done right.

"He could have said, 'See ya' a long time ago, but he didn't," Assistant Athletic Director Bob Heller said. "He's the one who did the classwork. He's the one who studied. He's the one who went to tutors and who worked on his papers and did what his professors wanted. He's the one who passed his tests. It's him. It's all him."

Okantah says he has seen Singletary mature into someone who still struggles with the emotions churning inside him, but is now able to channel it in a positive way.

"The guy I saw last spring was more confident and more at ease with himself than the freshman," said Okantah. "He seemed more in control. More at peace. He had figured it out. The challenge was to get him to see his life as a complete picture."

When Singletary thinks about his future, he thinks about working with kids, showing them that "help" is not a four-letter word.

"I wouldn't mind coaching, helping someone young who is going through a situation similar to mine," Singletary said. "I would like to be a mentor, help prevent others from going through some of the things I went through."

As Singletary built bonds with the people around him, he realized that loss is something we all must deal with, but that loss often comes with gains. He has lost his grandmother, but gained a growing relationship with his father.

"We have cried together and laughed together over this," Darrin Malone said. "But the big thing has been his ability to mature. And with maturity you understand you have to get help sometimes.""--'"

Last Saturday, Singletary's emotions overcame him during Kent's Senior Night.

As Singletary spoke in the postgame interviews, it was clear he understands he is a different person than the one who came to Kent in 2006.

Over the next two weeks, he wants to give Kent State another championship, because Kent State has given so much to him.

"Guys wonder why I'm so into it," Singletary said in the same interview, crying. "Well, this is all I got.

"The first incident, they could have easily gave up on me, kicked me to the side. But they have seen something in me I probably didn't even see in myself. . . . Through it all, Kent State stuck with me.

"The days when I don't even have faith in myself, just want to give up and go home, be with my daughter and be with my family, you guys have done so much for me.

"I just want to say: Thank you."

- - - -

The Chris Singletary file

Hometown: Chicago.

Position: Guard/forward.

Year: Senior.

Age: 21.

Height: 6-4.

Weight: 225 pounds.

Did you know? Singletary is second on the Golden Flashes in scoring and rebounding this season (11.8 points per game, 4.9 rebounds per game), behind Justin Greene in both categories (14.1 points, 6.8 rebounds); Singletary is fourth in the Mid-American Conference at 4.3 assists per game and third in the MAC at 1.85 steals per game; He has averaged double-figure scoring in three of his four seasons at Kent State, but has never led the team in scoring for a season. . . . He is the only active player in the MAC with more than 1,000 points, 400 rebounds, 300 assists and 150 steals in his career. . . . When Singletary is on the court, Kent State has outscored its opposition by 224 points this season. . . . As a junior, he was honorable mention All-MAC. He ended the season 12th in the league in scoring, eighth in steals and ninth in assists.


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Akron vs. Kent State a big deal around here: Terry Pluto
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Akron vs. Kent State

Tipoff: 8 p.m. at Rhodes Arena, Akron.

TV/radio: ESPN2; WARF AM/1350, WNIR FM/100.1.

Notable: The Zips (22-8, 12-3 Mid-American Conference) were expected to be at the top of the conference at season's end, but few are surprised the Golden Flashes (22-8, 12-3) are as well. While both teams are rested, both have injury issues. Akron's Mike Bardo (ankle) and Kent's Chris Singletary (knee) and Rod Sherman (knee) were unable to practice as late as Wednesday. The Zips are 6-1 at home in MAC games this season. Kent State is 5-2 on the road in MAC games.

Next: MAC Tournament quarterfinals, Thursday.

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News Headline: (CUDC) Crain's senior reporter Stan Bullard to be part of next NEOtropolis show | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2010
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Crain's senior reporter Stan Bullard to be part of next NEOtropolis show

11:43 am, March 5, 2010

Crain's Cleveland Business senior reporter Stan Bullard will be part of the roundtable panel on tonight's edition of NEOtropolis.

This installment's topic is "Strategies for Commercial Real Estate Makeovers." The show airs on Western Reserve PBS, Channels 45 and 49, at 8:30 p.m. It repeats on Saturday at 4:30 a.m. and Sunday at 6:30 p.m. You also will be able to watch video of the show on CrainsCleveland.com next week by clicking the NEOtropolis icon on the right side of our home page.

In addition to Mr. Bullard, who has covered real estate for Crain's for 24 years, the panel will include Paul Vernon, an architect, urban designer and co-administrator of the Kent State Urban Design Collaborative; and T. Sharon Woodberry, director of economic development for the city of Youngstown.

The panel and NEOtropolis host Thomas Mulready of CoolCleveland.com will cover high-profile redevelopments that include the State Road Shopping Center in Cuyahoga Falls, the Hoover plant headquarters in North Canton and a proposed $35 million, mixed-use development for Cleveland's Midtown neighborhood.

Information is available at www.neotropolis.org.

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News Headline: (Tech Transfer) UA LICENSING INCOME DOWN IN '08 | Email

News Date: 03/05/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: The University of Akron was fourth among nine institutions statewide in licensing revenue in 2008, according to a recent report.
The Association of University Technology Managers said UA received $1.1 million, compared to $6.3 million the previous year.
The organization annually surveys public and private universities nationwide to gauge the level of institution-owned licensing of intellectual property. Results from 156 universities were included in the 2008 rankings.
Statewide, Case Western Reserve University was first with $13.3 million, followed by Ohio University, $5.8 million; Ohio State, $2.1 million; UA; Miami, $1.1 million; Toledo, $696,000; Cincinnati, $583,000; Kent State, $352,000; and Bowling Green, $8,000.
Nationwide, Northwestern University ranked first with $826.4 million in 2008.
At UA, the 2008 income fell dramatically from the previous year because 2007 included a one-time $5 million payment for special polymer coatings for pacemaker leads, said Ken Preston, associate vice president for research and director of technology transfer.
The discovery by polymer science professor Joseph Kennedy ''was huge for us,'' Preston said.
With that off the books, the university received income on 14 other licenses.
Two-thirds of the total came from one invention ? a polymer film for flat-panel televisions developed by Frank Harris, a UA emeritus professor of polymer science, and Stephen Cheng, dean of the College of Polymer Science and Polymer Engineering.
Income from the polymer film will further decline, possibly to just thousands of dollars for 2009, Preston predicted, because the technology isn't used as much in the industry.
The rest of UA's 2008 licensing income came from a software program for twin screw extruders in the polymer industry, a technology to devulcanize rubber and a process to use nanofibers to deliver drugs intravenously or through a patch, Preston said.
Forty percent of the licensing income goes to the researchers personally, 10 percent to their research programs, 5 percent to their department, 5 percent to the dean's office, and the remaining 40 percent to the UA Research Foundation, the licensing arm for the university, Preston said.
''If there's an invention that's really a good one, it's a great deal,'' Preston said. ''It's super for the university and super for the inventors.''
Preston said UA's licensing income is significant when compared to the amount of money it spends on research.
The university spent $50 million in research in 2008, compared to $59.5 million at the University of Toledo; $211.3 million at the University of Cincinnati; and $10.7 million at Bowling Green, according to the report.
Copyright © 2010 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Dodging for dollars at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Student dodgeball tourney draws 32 teams to raise money for devastated Haiti

What started out as a small, friendly dodgeball tournament to raise a little money for Haiti quickly grew into a 32-team event with as many as 300 people dodging and heaving a ball to eliminate opponents.

The winning team will earn the title ''Major With the Most Danger.''

''We had amazing support,'' said organizer Matt Matousek, 21, a senior at Kent State University, where the event was held Thursday.

''It was supposed to be a business school thing.'' But, the more the merrier, and the more money that will be raised to help those devastated by the Jan. 12 earthquake in Haiti.



''Each major has its own team. I see the value in knowing people in your major,'' Matousek said.

In addition, members of the faculty, alumni and people in the community joined in, forming the 32 teams. Since there is no limit to the number of members on each team, that encouraged more people to sign up, he said.

Each team member paid a $5 registration fee. In addition, the group accepted donations from individuals and businesses. There also was a post-tournament party.

Matousek said all of the money raised will be given to assist those in Haiti. All administrative costs have been donated.

The money will be combined with
another fundraising effort at the university, the ''10 in 10 in 10 — Kent State United for Disaster Relief.'' (The name stands for $10,000 in 10 weeks in 2010.)

Matousek said the tournament will put the $10,000 goal over the top. That money will then be donated to UNICEF for Haiti relief.

Student Taiwo Adesina, 20, is one of the 10 in 10 in 10 organizers. She said her group had $7,500 before the dodgeball event.

She said UNICEF is a first responder when children are in jeopardy.

''It was for a good cause, and dodgeball's really fun,'' said history major Mike Stapleton, 19.

Elizabeth Dine, 20, came to play with the marketing team. ''I think it's a great idea and I wanted to do something to give back. And what better way than dodgeball?'' she asked.

Dan McGreevy, 22, who played on the finance team, said organizers had first thought of having a basketball tournament. ''Not as many people can be involved with that,'' he said.

Matousek, of Kent, who is majoring in finance with a minor in entrepreneurship, is no stranger to organizing. He already has started two businesses.

Flashnotes.com is a Web site where students from different universities can post class notes and sell them to students who have missed classes.

He also recently got a patent and is working on developing an edible spoon — made from oats — through a new venture named Greenolies.

He said he has had ''a few prototypes made'' but is ''having trouble keeping it cost-effective.''

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News Headline: (Athletics) KSU senior treats basketball, medical studies with care | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Stephanie Storm
News OCR Text: KENT: Frank Henry-Ala has a love-hate relationship with basketball.

Henry-Ala, a Kent State senior, loves the game he grew up with, watching from the sidelines and stands along with his sister as their dad refereed games, and later playing on dad's AAU team — the 4 ''D'' Stars.

Watch the versatile 6-foot-5, 210-pound forward play with the Golden Flashes. Pay attention to how he enjoys defense. There's no doubt why basketball has been so embedded in his life.

But Henry-Ala, who is double-majoring at Kent State in psychology and medicine, also hates the game at times.

He despises the way basketball can be so all-encompassing, making it difficult to study in depth and spend the kind of time pre-med students need on a daily basis to work toward becoming a doctor.

Ironically, doctors also run in the Henry-Ala family. Frank's father, Reinaldo Henry-Ala, comes from a line of them in his native Cuba. Frank Henry-Ala was just a middle schooler when he first realized he wanted to be a doctor.

And therein lies Henry-Ala's life dilemma: Basketball or medicine? Medicine or basketball?

''That's the thing,'' said Henry-Ala, 22. ''I never feel like I do both well. I love basketball, I've played it my whole life. I also feel very strongly that I want to become a doctor. But they always seem to be pulling me in different directions.''

That's the reason Henry-Ala, the salutorian at California's Price High School who, as a senior, led his team to the state championship, has never felt able to give himself fully and reach his full potential in either endeavor.

''Frank's taking classes that I would struggle just to spell,'' KSU coach Geno Ford said. ''Classes like molecular chemistry; I didn't even know (KSU) offered classes like that. He's an incredibly bright kid, but not the kind to whom basketball comes easily. He has to work hard at basketball, just like he does in his classes.''

Doctor quest

When Henry-Ala went to the pediatrician as a kid growing up in Pasadena, Calif., he'd ask Dr. Maria Gokey question after question about what she was doing and why.

Instead of brushing him off, Gokey would explain what she could, never tiring of the young Henry-Ala's inquiries.

''I asked tons of questions,'' Henry-Ala said. ''I was always intrigued by science and how the body works. I like to know why things work the way they do.''

During one visit as a middle-schooler, Henry-Ala gazed around Gokey's office until his eyes settled on a stack of large medical books.

''I said, 'Do you really read all those books?' And she went to the shelf and took one down to let me look through it. I've never had a chance to tell her how much she impacted my life.''

After practicing with the Flashes last year, Henry-Ala volunteered his time at night at Akron City Hospital. This semester, he's shadowing Kent State team doctor Mark Hudak during his evening rounds at Mercy Medical Center's Statcare in Canton.

''Dr. Hudak is amazing,'' Henry-Ala said. ''When I heard he's been at it 16 years, I asked him 'How do you remember all this?' He said, 'You learn it as you go.' ''

That's what Henry-Ala does on many nongame days. He follows Hudak around while he tends to those that need medical help. Toddlers with broken arms. Little girls with ear infections. Seniors with shingles. And with it being winter — lots of sinus and upper respiratory infections.

''His schedule with the team and the academic track he's on makes for a very demanding schedule,'' Hudak said. ''Then throw in the extra work he does on the side with volunteering and shadowing and that's a pretty impressive level of commitment for a young man his age.''

When he was younger, Henry-Ala initially thought he would like to become a veterinarian.

''But in my first biology class, I realized there were too many different animals to learn,'' he said. ''So I thought it'd just be easier to stick with humans.''

During a 10th-grade career day, a local doctor shared what his profession entailed and informed Henry-Ala that he would need volunteer experience to go to medical school. So when he was 16, Henry-Ala began volunteering at Cedar Sinai Hospital during summer weekends, helping out in the oncology department with cancer patients.

In the meantime, he continued to play basketball at school and for the 4 ''D'' Stars because it was a way to remain close with his basketball-loving father.

''My parents weren't together and my dad would drive from an hour and a half away to come coach my team every day,'' Henry-Ala said. ''It was great because basketball was my vehicle to see the world. In eighth grade, the 4 'D' Stars played in Japan.''

But dad wasn't only about basketball. A strict disciplinarian who demanded high grades from his children, Rei Henry-Ala preached hitting the books as much as making 100 baskets per day.

''My dad always told me you have to make sacrifices to be something great,'' Henry-Ala said.

Initially, basketball was the sacrifice he was willing to make when he enrolled at the University of California-Davis for medical school.

But after attending school full time while redshirting his freshman season, Henry-Ala got the itch again. The next season, he served as a reserve on the UC-Davis team, averaging three points per game and shooting 84 percent from the foul line.

''I realized that I wasn't happy just being a student,'' Henry-Ala said. ''It made me realize just how much basketball was a part of me.''

So much so that he began to seek out a better basketball opportunity and transferred to Motlow Community College in Tennessee in an effort to get recruited by a better Division I program such as Kent State. While he was there, Henry-Ala worked in the school's Office of Disabilities.

''It's always been such a delicate balancing act for me,'' Henry-Ala said. ''I can never give 100 percent to basketball or school, so both ends suffer. Who I am is not being reflected in my grades or my basketball stats.''

Hoops in his blood

If Henry-Ala could focus all his attention on basketball, he would be more than just a starter for Kent State known best for his suffocating defense.

''There's no doubt he was overwhelmed with everything last year last season when he got here,'' Ford said. ''With so much on his plate, he put a majority of his focus on academics and his basketball suffered. He'd come to practice and just be out of it. When we'd ask him what's wrong, he'd say he'd been up all night studying for a big test. But this year he's got a better grasp of things on both sides and has found a nice balance.''

If he could focus all of his attention on the game, Henry-Ala would have more nights like Saturday, when he scored a career-high 12 points, pulled down six rebounds and added an assist, a steal and a block in helping KSU dispatch visiting Miami 66-58 in the Flashes' final home game of the season.

''With my respect for the game, I felt it was important that I go out on top,'' he said.

Last year in his first season at Kent State, Henry-Ala averaged just 1.4 points and seven minutes per game. But he rededicated himself in the offseason, knowing there would be no more basketball after college like there would be for some of his teammates.

''A year ago, even Frank will tell you, he wasn't tough enough and he wasn't strong enough, physically or mentally, to really defend like this,'' Ford said. ''But now, Frank is our best defender. He's been our best defender all year.

''He doesn't care if he shoots. Heck, he can go a week of practice without taking a shot. He's not looking for offense. His mentality is, 'Who am I guarding? Ok. I got him. I'll keep him out of the lane. Or, is it a big guy tonight? OK. I'll get around and out in front of him.' ''

Typically, that kind of lockdown defender mentality comes in the game's smaller guards, like point guard Jordan Mincy, who graduated from Kent State after last season.

''It's a different deal because Frank's not a guard,'' Ford said. ''But he gives us a Jordan Mincy factor of a guy everyone likes playing with because he has no agenda and plays hard every play. I mean, he's diving for loose balls always running down long rebounds and then if he's wide open, he'll catch it and won't shoot it so he can throw it into the post to somebody. Frank just wants to win.''

Henry-Ala's teammates have taken notice of his desire to do the little things so everyone looks better. He's started 24-of-30 games this season, averaging 19 minutes a game. He is averaging 3.5 points and 3.4 rebounds, but has contributed 32 steals, 18 assists and 10 blocked shots.

''He doesn't get many shots, but he's always in there flying around for an offensive rebound,'' sophomore center Justin Greene said. ''In practice, he hurts people — on the offensive and the defensive end. He's one of those guys who, to win a championship, we need.''

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News Headline: Dodgeball for Haiti at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Robert J. Lucas/Record-Courier

From left, Chris Becker, a 2008 Kent State University graduate, throws at Mike Miladore, a student at the Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy in Rootstown, during KSUs Dodgeball for Haiti tournament Thursday. All proceeds from the tournament are donated to relief efforts in Haiti. The goal was to raise $10,000.

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News Headline: (University Relations) Ravenna: Skeels Seniors host program ... Celebrate Black History Month | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/06/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Skeels Senior Citizens' annual Black History Program and Soul Food Luncheon was held on Presidents Day at the Skeels-Mathews Community Center in Ravenna.

The theme for the day was 'What motivates you? Your past can push you into your present and move you into your future.' Skeels Senior Artherene Wilmington served as the mistress of ceremonies for the day, and Skeels Senior Herman Counts offered prayer before the lunch was served.

After the meal, Sara Jackson, Skeels Senior, welcomed the 100 people in attendance, who joined in singing 'Lift Every Voice and Sing,' accompanied by Skeels Senior Eddie Mae Prisby on the piano.

Gloria McGahee of Windham spoke about 'Grandma's Church.' Mozelle Trotter of the Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church in Ravenna sang the hymn 'I Love the Lord.' Skeels Senior Deseree Liddell introduced the program's speaker, Iris Harvey, vice president for University Relations and chief officer for marketing, communications and government relations at Kent State University.

The Rev. Phillip Morris of Kent led the benediction to end the program.

The program was dedicated in memory of the late Lou Helen Eichelberger, senior citizen and Advisory Board member.

The Skeels Senior Citizens acknowledged gratitude to those who prepared food, participated in the program and helped out.

(photos)

Enjoying the Skeels Senior Citizens annual Black History Program and Soul Food Luncheon are, from left, Gloria MaGahee holding Grandma from her story about Grandmas Church; Artherene Wilmington, mistress of ceremonies; Herman Counts; and Iris Harvey, guest speaker.

Those participating in the recent Black History Program at the Skeels-Mathews Community Center include, from left in front, Deseree Liddell, Sara Jackson and Mozelle Trotter, and in back, the Rev. Phillip Morris.

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News Headline: (Architecture) KSU, Akron U battle for bridge: Pedestrian span on Akron campus (Sabini) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/06/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: By Matt Fredmonsky

Record-Courier staff writer

A group of architecture students at Kent State University is competing with rivals at the University of Akron to design a pedestrian bridge on the Akron campus.

The KSU and Akron students made it past the first round of judging in a competition to connect the Quaker Square Inn student housing complex, hotel and conference center with the main campus using a titanium span. The competition, sponsored by Defense Metals Technology Center at Stark State College, was opened to college students in Northeastern Ohio with the intent of demonstrating commercial uses for titanium.

Travis Vannoy, a senior architecture major at KSU and part of the design team, said the competition stokes the pre-existing rivalry between KSU and Akron. Yeah, its there, but thats not our main motivation, Vannoy said. Were sort of looking at this as an urban planning issue, as well as we want to integrate design features Quaker Square has incorporated. For now, the team is keeping the details of its proposal a secret, as the group wont present final plans to the judging panel until April 14.

Other entries in the competition came from Ball State University, Western Reserve University, Purdue University and Miami University. The first and second place teams and three designated as honorable mention will be named May 20 at a dinner at InfoCision Stadium.

Defense Metals uses titanium primarily in U.S. military contracts, but the company believes the lightweight, corrosion-resistant metal is a natural fit to span the railroad tracks and other obstacles presented in the Quaker Square project.

Maurizio Sabini, an architecture professor at KSU working with the student team, said titanium is a high-performance metal and bridges are a natural structure to incorporate its use. They did a tremendous job, Sabini said of the KSU team. Its important to talk about this, even though we cant say much for now. Such competitions are very common in Europe, and we need more of that in this country to offer more opportunities for the younger generations of designers. Vannoy said the teams design, if it wins the competition, wont necessarily come to fruition. The winning designs will be sent to a professional design firm, which will re-evaluate the students design aspects and possibly incorporate some of those elements in the final concept. I really liked the opportunity to be able to do something real before we graduate, he said. I really like the freedom we get with it, having a real client.

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News Headline: (Centennial) PORTAGE PATHWAYS: Ravenna, Kent welcomed World War I caravans for liberty | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Roger J. Di Paolo

Record-Courier Editor

The streets of Ravenna were bumper to bumper with traffic in March 1918.

Not with cars, which, even in the second decade of the 20th Century, still remained something of a novelty in Portage County. The traffic jam along Main Street was caused by trucks -- nearly three dozen of them -- moving slowly through town with men in uniform behind the wheel.

"Liberty trucks," convoys of canvas-topped supply vehicles, were making their way in caravans from Detroit to the East Coast in support of Allied forces fighting in Europe in "the war to end all wars."

The United States had entered the war nearly a year earlier, in April 1917, and the entire nation had been mobilized in support of the war effort.

Welcoming the convoys and providing meals and lodging for the men aboard them was one way those on the home front could boost the Allied cause. And, in Ravenna and Kent, that meant enlisting the help of civic organizations, schools and individuals to provide hundreds of meals as the caravans passed through both communities.

The trucks presented quite a spectacle as they transformed the downtown areas into temporary military installations.

"Kent streets were lined with men, women and children to see the trucks go through," the Kent Courier reported when a convoy of 28 trucks made its way through the town in December 1917. "Some of the schools were closed long enough for the children to see the cars."

The article noted that "hundreds of these trucks" needed to be transported from Detroit and other points in the coming months.

Caravans of liberty trucks soon would become a familiar sight in Kent and Ravenna.

In February 1918, both communities received word that more liberty trucks were on their way. With convoys expected to stop every night for 18 nights, obtaining food and lodging for the 75 to 80 men aboard them presented a formidable challenge.

In Kent, a canteen committee headed by William Stewart Kent was in charge of making arrangements to welcome the men. The Rev. John Hull, head of the Kent Red Cross, lined up meals while overnight accommodations were arranged at Kent's Hall on the upper floor of the Kent National Bank.

Only six trucks stopped in Kent, where the men aboard them received dinner from the Red Cross and, in some instances, at private homes. Most continued onward to Ravenna, where they stopped overnight.

Ravenna was nearly overwhelmed by the convoys in March 1918. More than 60 liberty trucks rolled into town in a two-day period as the month began, with nearly 200 men aboard them.

The soldiers ate dinner served by the Junior Tuesday Club and slept in the Ravenna Elks clubrooms in Riddle Block No. 7 on North Chestnut Street.

By mid-March, Ravenna had played host to five truck companies while another company received accommodations in Kent.

A number of Ravenna groups shared responsibility for feeding and lodging the soldiers. Foresters Hall at South Chestnut Street and Spruce Avenue was transformed into a dining hall, where the women of the Junior Tuesday and Senior Tuesday clubs served meals. Old Northwest Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution catered another meal there.

An 80-member contingent ate dinner at the G.A.R. Hall served by women from the Cleveland Worsted Mills and members of the Women's Relief Corps. "Many appreciative words were heard relative to the courtesy of the mill girls, who spared nothing to give the boys a feed that they will remember," the Ravenna Republican reported.

Girls in Lorain Olin's domestic science class at Ravenna City High School handled another dinner. The soldiers entertained the high school juniors and seniors with war songs, the newspaper reported, and the girls responded with songs as well as high school and class "yells."

Two companies of soldiers spent a long weekend in Ravenna, heading out of town on a Sunday morning only to return because of blocked roads down the line.

The convoys turned Main Street into a sea of military vehicles, a scene captured for the Republican in a photo by C.B. Stidsen, captioned "Ravenna In War Time," that dominated the March 18, 1918, issue.

While the presence of the liberty trucks brought the war effort "home" for Ravenna and Kent, there were other reminders as well.

Newspapers in both communities contained items about men serving overseas or enjoying brief furloughs at home. The Feb. 21 edition of the Courier included a story about George Beal of Kent, who became the first "boy" from the community to be wounded in action in France.

Another item told of a series of tuition-free evening classes in technical work being offered at Kent State "for men to be drafted." "This war demands an army of skilled workers," the article noted.

Both communities took pride in the hospitality they were able to offer the men aboard the liberty trucks.

"All that stopped have been welcomed with a meal and a comfortable bed in which to sleep, besides being entertained at the theaters and other places," the Kent Tribune reported, while noting that the community had "nearly 200 of its own boys in the service."

The Republican sounded a similar note in March 1918 after providing meals and lodging for several hundred soldiers.

"Ravenna has been in first readiness with service and hospitality to the defenders of the flag, and as long as German 'Kultur' is in the saddle against the liberties of this country, there is bound to be more and more war truck trains to be cared for in the community," it reported. "Ravenna will be ready for them with open hands and hearts."

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News Headline: (Theatre) Newest project at KSU is "thrilling' (Crawford, Bruder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Matt Fredmonsky Record-Courier staff writerBrian Crowley is among the first students to benefit from the more than $12 million expansion of the School of Theatre and Dances new Roe Green Center at Kent State University.The junior musical theatre major from Mentor said the school is already enjoying some of the completed renovations.And what Im seeing so far, its just thrilling, Crowley said. I know I wont be able to use these spaces for very long, but I feel very lucky that Im here and I will be able to use these spaces.The school is undergoing a massive renovation of the Music and Speech Building that will be completed in time for the fall semester and, for the first time, will unite the schools of theatre and dance under one roof.John Crawford, the interim dean of the College of the Arts at KSU, said students are currently using spaces for lighting labs, set construction and acting studios that were never designed for such uses.Now, weve been able to design spaces for a specific purpose, like an acting studio, Crawford said. Its going to make a big difference in how people think about their majors. This will bring us up to truly being state of-the-art for the area.The addition of a new lobby, a 200-seat black box theatre, new dance studios and classrooms is due in large part to a $6.5 million gift the largest capital gift in the universitys history from Aurora resident and KSU alumna Roe Green. A competitive dancer for more than 12 years, Green has worked with the Cleveland Opera, Cleveland Playhouse, Cain Park in Cleveland Heights, Aurora Blossom Music Center and the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park.The project encompasses a total of 70,000-square-feet, with about half of that in new construction. The work includes a new space on the third floor for music ensemble rehearsals and additional space in the music library for musical theatre. The grand opening for the Roe Green Center is set for Nov. 6, but the work will be done in May. Michael Bruder, director of design and construction at KSU, said approximately 75 percent of the work is complete with crews hanging drywall in some areas.Weve started some finish work in the main lobby area, and weve also started the finishes actually in the theater itself, Bruder said. Thats a pretty significant step. Well be open for classes in the fall.Crawford said the renovations and new space will help attract students to the theatre and dance programs at KSU by increasing its level of legitimacy.We have extremely successful students who come out of the programs ... and this will bring the level of the facilities up to the quality of faculty and staff and student work, Crawford said. I think well really be a jewel.

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News Headline: (May 4) Play about May 4 set for Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The School of Theatre and Dance at Kent State University will hold its annual Student Theatre Festival, featuring "Blanket Hill," a play about the events at KSU on May 4, 1970.

Students will bring their work to the stage at 8 p.m. March 19 and 20, and 2 p.m. March 21.

The festival is free. Reservations are required and can be made by calling the box office at 330-672-2497.

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News Headline: (Diversity) Center for gay, bisexual students to open Grand opening event is Thursday (Brown) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Grand opening event is Thursday; Lefton to bestow first Diversity Trailblazer Award


Kent State University will open the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Student Center on Thursday.

Located on the second floor of the Kent Student Center, the LGBTQ Student Center will serve as the academic and social hub for the university's lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer students.

A grand opening event will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. in Room 204 of the Kent Student Center. It is free and open to the public. The opening reception will include tours of the center's office, remarks from KSU President Lester Lefton, Sue Doerfer, executive director of Equality Ohio and two KSU students, as well as the presentation of the first Diversity Trailblazer Award to emeritus professor of English Delores L. Noll. The award will be presented by Lefton and Alfreda Brown, KSU's vice president of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.

The new center will house the university's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies department and offer varied services and resources to students. The center will serve as a liaison between LGBTQ students and the administration and faculty. The office will also maintain a calendar of activities and events related to the LGBTQ community and coordinate programs with LGBTQ centers at other universities.

"The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Student Center represents a unique collaboration between the College of Arts and Sciences, the divisions of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Enrollment Management and Student Affairs at Kent State," Brown said. "Several students have been asking for this type of center, and to provide support from the collaborations of three major units is to be commended.

"The new center will serve as a gathering place, offering a way for students to feel more connected at the university," she said. "The center will raise awareness of LGBTQ communities and cultures, promote inclusion of and safe spaces for LGBTQ at Kent State and in the community, and promote dialogues about sexuality, gender and race."

KSU's history of supporting LGBT studies goes back almost 40 years when Noll became the first KSU professor to teach a gay and lesbian issues course in 1972. She also is a founding adviser to the Kent Gay Liberation Front, which is now called PRIDE! Kent, one of the oldest gay rights student organizations in the country.

In 2001, KSU began offering the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies minor, becoming the first university in Ohio to do so. The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies minor is designed to allow students to explore sexuality and sexual minorities from a variety of perspectives.

The LGBTQ Student Center is located in Room 226M in the Kent Student Center. It is staffed by volunteers from KSU's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies faculty and directed by Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies co-coordinators Molly Merryman, of the Department of Justice Studies, and Daniel Nadon from the School of Theatre and Dance.

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News Headline: (CSIR) Two professors create center to study religious behaviors | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Two professors in the School of Library and Information Science at Kent State University have created a center to study how people use information in their religious behaviors and thinking.

Don Wicks of Ravenna, and Dan Roland of Kent opened the Center for the Study of Information and Religion in 2009, but the inaugural event was hosted in December.

CSIR strives to facilitate research within the library and information science field that is focused on the various institutions and agents of religion and their effect on social knowledge through the use, dissemination and diffusion of information.

The center has three main goals: Investigate the importance of information in the religious world; understand the relationship between the information-seeking behavior of clergy and the body of knowledge which exists to serve its information needs; and advance the understanding of the role of information in religious practice.

CSIR also will assist library science faculty with its research interests for such areas as research on community informatics and information seeking, the study of Web sites of religious institutions and as a resource for study of the depiction of religion in children's literature.

Currently, CSIR is working on an annotated bibliography of online data sources for research in the area of religion. The bibliography is funded by a publication grant from the American Theological Library Association and will be available on the Center's Web site this year.

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News Headline: (ILEP) International educators experience the U.S. while at local high school | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2010
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name: Alison Lucci
News OCR Text: " onclick="return hs.expand(this)" vocusinstance="0">

Rosina Jeffery Minggu, Mrinali “Mimi” Chowdhary and Hilman Setiawan are shown in a classroom at Stow-Munroe Falls High School, where they are visiting and teaching for five months.

Reporter

Stow-Munroe Falls High School is hosting educators Mrinali "Mimi" Chowdhary of India, Rosina Jeffery Minggu of Malaysia and Hilman Setiawan of Indonesia.

The educators are participants in the International Leaders in Education Program at Kent State University, which is hosting 16 teachers from 11 countries at schools near the university.

During the five-month program, the scholars will observe the education system, present lessons about their country to students and take classes at the university.

Chowdhary and Minggu are working with English instructors Tracy Zappone, Suzanne Theisen and Neelam Bhatia, while Setiawan is teaching with science instructor Carolyn Curtz.

Ironically, Bhatia was accepted into the exchange program and is presently spending two weeks at Setiawan's school in Indonesia.

"It's such a neat opportunity for the students," Zappone said. "They love hearing first-hand accounts of the different cultures."

The international educators agreed on several differences between the school they are visiting and the schools in their countries.

At Chowdhary's school, students must supply their own books and pencils. At Minggu's school, the students wear matching uniforms with color-coded name tags to indicate their grade. In Indonesia, Setiawan's students kiss his hand as a sign of respect, but he has noticed that the student-to-teacher relationship is much less formal in the U.S.

"At my school, it is very formal and strict," Minggu said. "Here, it's very comfortable."

Despite the differences, they all agreed that at least one element of being a teacher never seems to change.

"The students are the same everywhere," Chowdhary said. "You just need to know how to draw out their potential."

Chowdhary, Minggu and Setiawan said it was tough to leave their children, but they are enjoying their first visit to the U.S.

Because all three are from warmer climates, a lot of their time has been spent playing in the snow and taking pictures of it to show to their students and families.

"It was a dream to come here," Chowdhary said. "At first, I thought everything was dull because there are no leaves. I thought, 'This is it?' but now I think it's beautiful."

E-mail: alucci@recordpub.com

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News Headline: (Census) Universities push to get students in Census 2010 | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2010
Outlet Full Name: phillyburbs.com
Contact Name: CHRIS WILLIAMS
News OCR Text: It was 5 p.m. in the lobby of the library of Metropolitan State University, and Clara Ware was sitting behind a table covered with pens, notepads and buttons with the Census 2010 logo, calling out like a sideshow barker.

"Here comes a prospect," she said as a student walked up.

Ware explained that filling out the census form this spring could mean more money for the university and the surrounding neighborhood, one of the oldest and most diverse in the city. The student took some knickknacks and promised to fill out her form. Ware smiled.

"If we could get some more of that funding back, we could get some more services," said Ware, 48, a member of the commuter school's Student Senate who is among a group that has been pushing the census in classrooms, lobbies and hallways.

Colleges, universities and their surrounding communities have a financial interest in making sure all of their students get counted in the census, so public relations campaigns like the one at Metropolitan State are popping up all over the country.

The stakes are high. The government uses census data to apportion seats in Congress and dole out about $400 billion annually in federal funds. It's also used in federal tuition grant and loan programs, so a thorough count of college students in 2010 can mean more money for higher education in the state down the road.

At a Missouri technical university, students are handing out Census-branded screwdriver sets. At the University of Texas' Arlington campus, students have posted a Census-themed parody of the popular "The Real World" TV show on the Web. At Kent State University in Ohio, a student team pushing the census is planning to hit off-campus bars later this month to stamp the address of their Facebook page on the hands of revelers.

And at the University of California at Berkeley, some students will be entered in a raffle to win textbooks when they turn in their census forms.

Still, it's not an easy sell, said Marty Takimoto, a marketing professor and chairman of a committee working to get Berkeley students counted. "College students are notoriously bad at filling out forms of any sort," he said.

The efforts are particularly intense in states on the edge of gaining or losing a U.S. House seat depending on how well they do in the census. Election Data Services, a Virginia firm that crunches census numbers, lists Minnesota, Texas, Missouri and California among those states.

"Some of the states that are on the bubble, and Minnesota is right on the edge of that bubble, have certainly put a lot of effort into it," said Dennis Johnson, director of the Census Bureau's regional office in Kansas City, Mo.

The Census Bureau doesn't estimate how many college students went uncounted in 2000, and to be sure, they're only one of many groups getting special attention this year. Many states will make extra efforts to reach the homeless, non-English speakers, immigrants and other groups.

Nor are all colleges pushing the census equally hard. Even within a single system, some campuses are more aggressive than others.

Under Census Bureau rules, students should be counted where they live and sleep most of the year _ which means where they go to school, including foreign students.

Johnson said one big problem with counting college students is timing. The census forms are mailed in March and April, which means they can arrive while students are distracted by spring break or final exams.

The free census screwdriver sets are being handed out at the Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla, but it's not the only gambit. John Petersen, the city's community development director, plans other giveaways and repeated e-mail blasts.

"Some might think it's overkill, but we're doing enough that hopefully they will get sick and tired of it and just fill it out and send it in," Petersen said.

Texas is already looking at picking up three House seats, but a thorough count of college students and illegal immigrants could get it to four, state Demographer Karl Eschbach said.

At the University of Texas at Arlington, residence hall staff will chase 4,500 residents who live in campus dorms to fill out their forms. But public relations students are helping, too, as part of a national contest to promote the census sponsored by the Public Relations Student Society of America.

Besides the "Real World" Web parody, the Arlington team is passing out candy bars and other snacks with census information printed on the labels. They also plan a contest where students will race each other to fill out giant forms mounted on easels to drive home the idea that it should take less than 10 minutes.

"Maybe they would see it's not that difficult," said Kathelin Buxton, a senior who is part of the effort at Arlington.

At Kent State University in Ohio, Rachel Polchek, 21, and her PRSSA team plan to hit the off-campus bars at the end of February for their census campaign. They intend to stamp the address of their Facebook page, 2010 U.S. Census-Kent State University, on the hands of revelers at Kent's Cabin Fever weekend.

"When they wake up, they'll see it," she said.

On the Net:

US Census Bureau, counting students: 2010.census.gov/campus/

University of Texas-Arlington, Public Relations Student Society of America site: utacensus.com

University of California, Berkeley census site: census2010.berkeley.edu/index.html

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News Headline: (Census) College students urged to be counted | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/06/2010
Outlet Full Name: Herald-Sun - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students at Metropolitan State University in St. Paul, Minn., prepare to hang a banner as other students sign a pledge that they will fill out their census forms.

BY CHRIS WILLIAMS

Associated Press

ST. PAUL, Minn. — It was 5 p.m. in the lobby of the library of Metropolitan State University, and Clara Ware was sitting behind a table covered with pens, notepads and buttons with the Census 2010 logo, calling out like a sideshow barker.

“Here comes a prospect,” she said as a student walked up.

Ware explained that filling out the census form this spring could mean more money for the university and the surrounding neighborhood, one of the oldest and most diverse in the city. The student took some knickknacks and promised to fill out her form. Ware smiled.

“If we could get some more of that funding back, we could get some more services,” said Ware, 48, a member of the commuter school's Student Senate who is among a group that has been pushing the census in classrooms, lobbies and hallways.

Colleges, universities and their surrounding communities have a financial interest in making sure all of their students get counted in the census, so public relations campaigns like the one at Metropolitan State are popping up all over the country.

The stakes are high. The government uses census data to apportion seats in Congress and dole out about $400 billion annually in federal funds. It's also used in federal tuition grant and loan programs, so a thorough count of college students in 2010 can mean more money for higher education in the state down the road.

At a Missouri technical university, students are handing out Census-branded screwdriver sets. At the University of Texas' Arlington campus, students have posted a Census-themed parody of the popular “The Real World” TV show on the Web. At Kent State University in Ohio, a student team pushing the census is planning to hit off-campus bars later this month to stamp the address of their Facebook page on the hands of revelers.

The efforts are particularly intense in states on the edge of gaining or losing a U.S. House seat depending on how well they do in the census. Election Data Services, a Virginia firm that crunches census numbers, lists Minnesota, Texas, Missouri and California among those states.

“Some of the states that are on the bubble, and Minnesota is right on the edge of that bubble, have certainly put a lot of effort into it,” said Dennis Johnson, director of the Census Bureau's regional office in Kansas City, Mo.

Under Census Bureau rules, students should be counted where they live and sleep most of the year — which means where they go to school, including foreign students.

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News Headline: (Fashion) JOINING ME THIS MORNING, KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FASHION PROFESSOR. | Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: Good Morning Cleveland - WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: IT WAS HOLLYWOOD'S BIGGEST NIGHT. THERE IT, IS THE STARS WERE OUT. NOT ONLY TO CELEBRATE THE OSCARS BUT TO SHINE IN THE LATEST FASHIONS AS WELL. OF COURSE, MILLIONS OF PEOPLE WATCHED AS CELEBRITIES STROLLED DOWN THE RED CARPET FOR HOURS BEFORE THE EVENT. JOINING ME THIS MORNING, KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FASHION PROFESSOR. THANK YOU, SIR. WE APPRECIATE HAVING YOU ON THE SHOW. LET'S TALK ABOUT THE OVERALL FASHION SENSES OF THE EVENING. WHAT WERE YOUR THOUGHTS OVERALL? I THOUGHT IT WAS BEAUTIFUL COMPARED TO LAST YEAR'S DRAPEY, VERY GRECIAN LOOK. THIS YEAR IT WAS ARCHITECTURAL, IT WAS METALLIC GOLD AND SILVER WERE THE FAVORITE COLORS OF THE ACTORS AND ACTRESSES. THE NEAT THING ABOUT PEOPLE WATCHING, DON'T HAVE TO WATCH THE SHOW. YOU WATCH THE PRESHOW. THE RED CARPET STUFF. LET'S GET INTO THE PEOPLE THAT PEOPLE ARE TALKING ABOUT. SANDRA BULLOCK WON BEST ACTRESS. THAT HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH THE DRESS. LET'S TALK ABOUT IT ANYWAY. SANDRA BULLOCK WAS WEARING THIS SILVER METALLIC DRESS BY MARK KAZA. I THOUGHT IT WAS BEAUTIFUL. I THOUGHT SHE WORE IT WELL. IT WAS MY FAVORITE DRESS OF THE EVENING. IT WAS VERY ACADEMY AWARD RED CARPET. I GREED. NOT THAT I'M A BIG FASHION EXPERT BUT I THOUGHT SHE LOOKED GREAT. NOT EVERYONE WE'RE TALKING ABOUT HERE THIS MORNING WAS A NOMINEE OR WINNER BUT A LOT OF TALK ABOUT JENNIFER LOPEZ. JENNIFER LOPEZ WAS WEARING AN ARMANI DRESS. IT WAS I THOUGHT IT WAS BEAUTIFUL. IT IS A VERY ARCHITECTURAL. ARMANI'S COLLECTION. AND A LOT OF PEOPLE WERE SURPRISED THAT SHE WORE THIS DRESS. I THINK THEY WERE EXPECTING SOMETHING MORE LOOSE AND FLOWY. BUT THIS IS WHAT'S GOING ON NOW IN FASHION. YOU HAVE SOME THOUGHTS ABOUT THE STAR OF PRECIOUS, GABBY. I LIKED HER DRESS. I THOUGHT SHE PROBABLY COULD HAVE DONE WITHOUT THE APPLIQUES ON THE DRESS AND JUST LEFT IT BLUE. FINALLY, WE'LL GET TO MERYL STREEP. THE MOST NOMINATED ACTRESS IN THE HISTORY OF THE OSCARS. SHE'S WEARING A DRESS DESIGNED BY CHRIS MARCH. AND I THOUGHT THAT IT WAS VERY NICE DRESS. SHE'S NOT VERY WELL-KNOWN FOR FASHION AND SO WHEN SHE CAME IN WITH THIS DRESS, A LOT OF PEOPLE WERE PLEASED WITH IT. COMING UP IN THE NEXT HOUR, WITH VINCENT, WE'LL TALK ABOUT MORE OF YOUR FAVORITES. LET'S SEE IF WE CAN TOUCH ON THE ONES YOU DIDN'T LIKE SO MUCH. I WONDER WHY I'M GUESSING SOME PEOPLE PURPOSELY WEAR SOMETHING THAT PEOPLE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT. MAYBE NOT THE BEST FASHION BUT THEY KNOW PEOPLE WILL BE TALKING ABOUT IT THE NEXT DAY? YEAH, YOU KNOW, IT IS BETTER TO BE TALKED ABOUT THAN NOT TALKED ABOUT. AND SO THAT'S ONE WAY OF DOING IT. MAKE SURE YOU STAND OUT THAT WAY. YEAH. WHETHER IT IS FOR THE BAD SIDE OF THINGS AS WELL. WE APPRECIATE YOUR TIME. WE'LL SEE YOU COMING UP IN THE NEXT HOUR. VINCENT FROM KENT STATE UNIVERSITY. JASON NICHOLAS STANDING BY WITH A LOOK AT OUR FORECAST.

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News Headline: (WKSU) BusinessWire -Richik Sarkar appointed to WKSU Advisory Board | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2010
Outlet Full Name: Forbes - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Rainey Institute is dedicated to positive change for Greater Cleveland's youth and families through education and participation in the visual and performing arts. Children ages 3 and up attend Rainey after school, on Saturdays, and during the summer to explore music, dance, drama, sewing, and art. The organization develops their artistic abilities and their character. Students learn to be leaders and positive role models. Rainey reaches over 650 children and young adults each year through its programming, and holds many public performances for the community throughout the year.

WKSU, Kent State University's award-winning national public radio and classical music station, serves more than 20 Ohio counties and parts of Western Pennsylvania. The Community Advisory Council offers guidance and support to station management in an effort to improve the quality of programming, ensure that disciplines are in place so that pledges and gifts are subjected to proper financial controls, and assist in building relationships with communities of listeners whose lives are enriched with news, information, and cultural offerings that utilize appropriate media platforms.

As an attorney with Ulmer & Berne, Richik focuses his practice on business litigation, complex and class action litigation, and public law with expertise in business torts, contracts, corporate governance, securities and finance, real estate, and real property taxation. He represents financial institutions, school districts, and various public and private corporations. He also advises clients in administrative proceedings and alternative dispute resolution involving commercial, product liability, and public law. Richik is extremely active with the Banking Law, Uniform Commercial Code, and Consumer Financial Services committees of the ABA Business Law Section. He also serves on the Executive Board for the Business Law Section's Young Lawyer Forum. For the past four years, he has been named to Ohio Super Lawyer Rising Stars by Law & Politics magazine.

Ulmer & Berne, established in 1908, is a full-service Midwest regional firm with 175 attorneys in Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and Chicago. Ulmer & Berne represents publicly traded and privately held companies, financial institutions, pharmaceutical companies, family businesses, international joint ventures and affiliations, investor groups, start-ups and emerging businesses, public bodies and nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit www.ulmer.com.

Photos/Multimedia Gallery Available: http://www.businesswire.com/cgi-bin/mmg.cgi?eid=6204302〈=en

SOURCE: Ulmer & Berne LLP

Ulmer & Berne LLP Kimberly G. Schmittel, Marketing Manager, 216-583-7388 direct fax 216-583-7389 kschmittel@ulmer.com

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News Headline: (LCI) LCDs adapt to low-power trends | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: EE Times Online
Contact Name: R. Colin Johnson
News OCR Text: Users of LCD-equipped devices have favored fast colors over the better readability and longer battery life achieved with reflective (non-backlit) displays. But with e-paper encroaching on their turf, several LCD makers are pushing back by resurrecting reflective techniques.

Pixel Qi, a startup spun off from the One Laptop per Child initiative, is providing the display for a $75 laptop that OLPC intends to ship later this year. The Pixel Qi dual-mode transflective LCD doesn't boast the paper-white background of E Ink's Vizplex--text displayed on the screen looks like it's printed on a mirror--but it does have a low-power monochrome mode, plus it can be switched to a color mode that supports full video frame rates at a fraction of the power required by backlit LCDs.

Kent Display's bistable cholesteric LCD locks crystals in either a planar texture state (which reflects ambient light) or a focal-conic state (which scatters it).

"Pixel Qi is very good in bright sunlight but works in dim light as well, plus it offers full-motion video and vivid colors," said Richard Doherty, principal analyst at Envisioneering (Seaford, N.Y.). "If you want the fast response time of an LCD, Pixel Qi looks very good, but if you are satisfied with multisecond page turns for reading books, then E Ink rules the roost for a while longer."

Kent State spinoff Kent Displays Inc. uses a a roll-to-roll process to manufacture cholesteric reflective LCDs that are low-cost, flexible and very thin. Kent has licensed the technology to Varitronix (Hong Kong) and to Fujitsu Frontech, maker of the Flepia color e-book reader (sold only in Japan).

Cholesteric LCDs use bistable states of the bulk LCD material, which can maintain either a planar texture (which reflects ambient light) or a focal-conic texture (which scatters it). The displays achieve a very low cost point by using a passive-matrix backplane that still maintains millisecond refresh times. Kent has demonstrated its cholesteric LCDs on substrates of glass, plastic and even fabric. Hitachi and Kodak have also shown prototypes of cholesteric LCDs.

Nematic chemical formulations use the surface characteristics of the LCD crystals, instead of the bulk state, to enable bistable displays in "twisted" or "untwisted" modes. Nemoptic Displays (Paris) offers nematic displays mounted on glass. ZBD Displays (Windsor, U.K.) uses a similar mechanism to lock pixels in its Zenithal bistable display using inexpensive passive backplanes on plastic or glass.

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News Headline: (Physics) Kent State researchers play lead role in significant new physics discovery (Keane) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2010
Outlet Full Name: Innovations Report
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Home Reports Physics and Astronomy Content

Team of international researchers finds most massive antinucleus to date

Ten Kent State University researchers are part of a team of international scientists who have discovered the most massive antinucleus discovered to date.

They are part of an international team of scientists studying high-energy collision of gold ions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collidor (RHIC), a 2.4 mile-circumference particle accelerator at the U.S Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, N.Y.

The new antinucleus, discovered at RHIC's STAR detector, is a negatively charged state of antimatter containing an antiproton, an antineutron, and an anti-Lambda particle. It is also the first antinucleus containing an anti-strange quark, an exotic antimatter particle.

The STAR detector specializes in tracking the thousands of particles produced by each nucleus-nucleus collision at RHIC. Weighing 1,200 tons and as large as a house, STAR is a massive detector. It is used to search for signatures of the form of matter that RHIC was designed to create.

Kent State physics professor Declan Keane and his postdoctoral researcher Jinhui Chen are lead authors of the new paper outlining the new discoveries. The findings will be published online by the journal Science at the Science Express Web site today. Science and Science Express are published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world's largest general scientific organization.

The search for antimatter in STAR and the study of its properties was begun by Chen in the fall of 2008, under the supervision of Keane.

"Jinhui Chen spent many months at Brookhaven glued to his computer and studying the data," said Keane. "While the findings being released this week are the work of hundreds of scientists, this discovery would not have happened without Chen's diligent research." Chen not only found the first antinucleus of this type, he actually found 70 examples of the new particle which is all the more significant, Keane said.

Dr. Chen's research was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. Keane and Kent State professor Spiros Margetis were principal investigators for the research. Dr. Chen recently accepted a tenured assistant scientist position at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, a unit of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. "Chinese institutes are very quick off the mark when it comes to recruiting top scientific talent," Keane explained.

Since 2000, other teams have looked for exotic antimatter using the STAR detector but there were limitations regarding data collection and the capability of the device. "In the fall of 2008, it seemed like the time was right to begin to search again," Keane said. RHIC's STAR collaboration is now poised to resume antimatter studies with greatly enhanced capabilities. The scientists expect to increase their data by about a factor of 10 in the next few years.

Collisions at RHIC fleetingly produce conditions that existed a few microseconds after the Big Bang, which scientists believe gave birth to the universe as we know it some 13.7 billion years ago.

"This discovery is significant because it plays a role in one of the fundamental puzzles of physics," said Bryon Anderson, professor and chair of the physics department at Kent State and a contributor to the research. "There is no definitive explanation for the asymmetries between matter and antimatter in our universe, and this research opens the door to further exploration of this area."

Brookhaven physicist Zhangbu Xu, another one of the lead authors, agrees this research paves the way for a new frontier of physics. "A solution to this major unsolved problem will require measurements of subtle deviations from perfect symmetry between matter and antimatter, and there are good prospects for future antimatter measurements at RHIC to address this key issue," Xu said.

"This experimental discovery may have unprecedented consequences for our view of the world," said theoretical physicist Horst Stoecker, vice president of the Helmholtz Association of German National Laboratories. "This antimatter pushes open the door to new dimensions in the nuclear chart — an idea that just a few years ago would have been viewed as impossible."

The work reported in Science also has implications for cosmic ray experiments searching for new physics such as dark matter, which is thought to be responsible for about a quarter of the mass of the universe.

Several other members of the Kent State physics department are co-authors of the new paper by virtue of their vital contributions to constructing and operating the various interlocking subsystems of the STAR detector, including Dr. Jonathan Bouchet, Dr. Wei-Ming Zhang, and graduate students Jeremy Alford, Jaiby Joseph, Yadav Pandit and Joe Vanfossen.

The STAR collaboration is composed of 54 institutions from 13 countries. Research at RHIC is funded primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and by various national and international collaborating institutions.

One of 10 national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences, as well as in energy technologies and national security. Brookhaven Lab also builds and operates major scientific facilities available to university, industry and government researchers.

Bryon Anderson | Source: EurekAlert!

Further information: www.kent.edu

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

05.03.2010 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

05.03.2010 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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News Headline: (Physics) RHIC nets strange antimatter | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2010
Outlet Full Name: Physicsworld.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Physicists working in the STAR collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven laboratory in the US have detected antimatter nuclei containing strange quarks for the first time. The antihypertriton – consisting of an antiproton, an antineutron and an antilambda particle – is the heaviest antinucleus yet produced and opens up a new realm of strange antinucluei. It could also shed light on a number of problems in astrophysics and cosmology, including the dominance of matter over antimatter in the universe.

RHIC collides gold ions at high energies, recreating what are believed to have been the conditions in the universe just a few microseconds after the Big Bang. The enormous energy density that existed at that time would have kept quarks separate from one another, in what theory predicts would have been a very hot gas of free quarks, antiquarks and gluons known as a quark-gluon plasma. As the plasma expanded and cooled these quarks would have bound to one another to form a range of different hadrons, including protons and neutrons (consisting solely of up and down quarks), hyperons (which contain strange quarks) and all of the associated antiparticles.

Introducing antihypertriton

With further expansion a small fraction of these hadrons would then have combined to form light nuclei and their antiparticles. Physicists have previously generated antiprotons, anti-deuterium, anti-tritium and anti-helium-3 in particle collisions but the STAR collaboration, led by Declan Keane at Kent State University in the US, Jinhui Chen of the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics in China and Zhangbu Xu of Brookhaven, have seen the first ever antimatter hypernucleus: antihypertriton. In addition to an antiproton and an antineutron, this nucleus contains an antilambda hyperon, which is made up of an up quark, a down quark and a strange quark.

Identifying the new particle required painstakingly sifting through the debris of some 100 million collisions. All of the charged particles within this debris left their mark by ionizing the gas inside RHIC's time projection chamber but the antihypertritons revealed themselves through a unique decay signature – the two tracks left by a charged pion and an anti–helium–3 nucleus, the latter being heavy and so loosing energy rapidly with distance in the gas.

Below the N-Z plane

One of the collaboration members, Lee Barnby of the University of Birmingham in the UK, says that this result "opens up a new area of study” since it shows that “any very light bound nucleus or antinucleus can be formed in heavy–ion collisions". Indeed, the discovery extends graphically our knowledge of the nuclear terrain. Physicists represent this terrain by placing each kind of nucleus on a three-dimensional graph with the three axes being Z, the number of protons in a nucleus; N, the number of neutrons; and S, the degree of strangeness. Each of these three axes has positive and negative sections, allowing for the representation of both particles and antiparticles. As illustrated in the diagram, this latest result extends the nuclear terrain below the N-Z plane for the first time.

The STAR collaboration's production of hypernuclei could also help us better understand the structure of the massive-star remnants known as neutron stars. That is because the kind and extent of strange-matter content within these stars depends on how strongly hyperons interact with nucleons (protons and neutrons), and this interaction strength in turn can be worked out by measuring the lifetime of hypernuclei. The current experiment yielded a value of around 2x10-10 s for hypertritons.

Why more matter than anti-matter?

The findings may also help us understand why the universe appears only to contain matter, whereas equal quantities of matter and antimatter were believed to have been created in the Big Bang. Quarks and antiquarks are generated in equal measure by the heavy–ion collisions at RHIC and this equal abundance of matter and its antimatter partner is observed to persist as the hot gas cools.

The research is a tour-de-force of analysis and highlights the immense power of modern particle physics detector technologies and techniques Mike Charlton, Swansea University

In addition, the number of hypertritons and antihypertritons produced in the RHIC collisions (about 160 and 70 respectively) very closely matched the number of helium–3 and antihelium–3 nuclei generated. Mike Charlton of Swansea University in the UK, who is not a member of the STAR collaboration, points out that this implies that the hot gas must have contained similar amounts of strange quarks and up and down quarks. This, he says, is an indication that the gas is indeed a true quark–gluon plasma, as physicists believe. "The research is a tour-de-force of analysis and highlights the immense power of modern particle physics detector technologies and techniques," he adds.

The STAR collaboration has restarted its antimatter observations at a higher collision rate, hoping to increase their collected data by a factor of ten over the next few years. Keane says that this should allow them to discover yet heavier antinuclei, both strange and non-strange.

The work is described in Science: DOI: 10.1126/science.1183980.

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News Headline: (COPH) Findings from Kent State University advance knowledge in infarction (Zullo) | Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: Respiratory Therapeutics Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to recent research published in the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, "Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a multifactorial program that encourages healthy behaviors in persons with a recent cardiovascular event or procedure. Research on the association between CR and health-behavior maintenance has focused on physical activity."
"Therefore, the purpose of this research was to examine the association of health behaviors (fruit/vegetable consumption and physical activity) and body mass index (BMI) with CR attendance and time since participation in respondents reporting history of myocardial infarction (MI). This was a cross-sectional study using the 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (n = 1,374). Eligible respondents were those with a history of MI. were fruit/vegetable consumption, physical activity, and BMI. Time since CR was based on age at MI and age at survey. Logistic (polytomous) regression was used to identify predictors. CR attendees were 69% more likely to meet fruit/vegetable guidelines than were nonattendees (P = .02). CR was not associated with meeting physical activity guidelines. CR had a protective, yet nonsignificant effect on BMI. Meeting fruit/vegetable guidelines was associated with CR attendance in the past year (odds ratio = 4.64, confidence interval, CI 1.03-20.95). CR attendees were 75% less likely to be overweight 1 to 2 years post-CR (CI 0.08-0.73) and 59% less likely to be obese 2 to 5 years post-CR than were nonattendees (CI 0.20-0.85). CR attendance was associated with healthy behaviors, though maintenance diminished over time," wrote M.D. Zullo and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).
The researchers concluded "Understanding the factors associated with healthy behaviors, and the time when behavior performance decreases, will assist with program planning directed at behavior maintenance."
Zullo and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention (Cardiac Rehabilitation, Health Behaviors, and Body Mass Index Post-Myocardial Infarction. Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, 2010;30(1) 28-34).
For additional information, contact M.D. Zullo, Kent State University, Coll Public Hlth, Kent Hall 136C, POB 5190, Kent, OH 44242, USA.
The publisher's contact information for the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention is Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 530 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621, USA.
Copyright © 2010 Respiratory Therapeutics Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: (COPH) Findings from Kent State University advance knowledge in infarction (Zullo) | Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cardiovascular Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to recent research published in the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, "Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a multifactorial program that encourages healthy behaviors in persons with a recent cardiovascular event or procedure. Research on the association between CR and health-behavior maintenance has focused on physical activity."
"Therefore, the purpose of this research was to examine the association of health behaviors (fruit/vegetable consumption and physical activity) and body mass index (BMI) with CR attendance and time since participation in respondents reporting history of myocardial infarction (MI). This was a cross-sectional study using the 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (n = 1,374). Eligible respondents were those with a history of MI. were fruit/vegetable consumption, physical activity, and BMI. Time since CR was based on age at MI and age at survey. Logistic (polytomous) regression was used to identify predictors. CR attendees were 69% more likely to meet fruit/vegetable guidelines than were nonattendees (P = .02). CR was not associated with meeting physical activity guidelines. CR had a protective, yet nonsignificant effect on BMI. Meeting fruit/vegetable guidelines was associated with CR attendance in the past year (odds ratio = 4.64, confidence interval, CI 1.03-20.95). CR attendees were 75% less likely to be overweight 1 to 2 years post-CR (CI 0.08-0.73) and 59% less likely to be obese 2 to 5 years post-CR than were nonattendees (CI 0.20-0.85). CR attendance was associated with healthy behaviors, though maintenance diminished over time," wrote M.D. Zullo and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).
The researchers concluded "Understanding the factors associated with healthy behaviors, and the time when behavior performance decreases, will assist with program planning directed at behavior maintenance."
Zullo and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention (Cardiac Rehabilitation, Health Behaviors, and Body Mass Index Post-Myocardial Infarction. Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, 2010;30(1) 28-34).
For additional information, contact M.D. Zullo, Kent State University, Coll Public Hlth, Kent Hall 136C, POB 5190, Kent, OH 44242, USA.
The publisher's contact information for the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention is Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 530 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621, USA.
Copyright © 2010 Cardiovascular Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: (COPH) Findings from Kent State University advance knowledge in infarction (Zullo) | Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: Obesity & Diabetes Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to recent research published in the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, "Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a multifactorial program that encourages healthy behaviors in persons with a recent cardiovascular event or procedure. Research on the association between CR and health-behavior maintenance has focused on physical activity."
"Therefore, the purpose of this research was to examine the association of health behaviors (fruit/vegetable consumption and physical activity) and body mass index (BMI) with CR attendance and time since participation in respondents reporting history of myocardial infarction (MI). This was a cross-sectional study using the 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (n = 1,374). Eligible respondents were those with a history of MI. were fruit/vegetable consumption, physical activity, and BMI. Time since CR was based on age at MI and age at survey. Logistic (polytomous) regression was used to identify predictors. CR attendees were 69% more likely to meet fruit/vegetable guidelines than were nonattendees (P = .02). CR was not associated with meeting physical activity guidelines. CR had a protective, yet nonsignificant effect on BMI. Meeting fruit/vegetable guidelines was associated with CR attendance in the past year (odds ratio = 4.64, confidence interval, CI 1.03-20.95). CR attendees were 75% less likely to be overweight 1 to 2 years post-CR (CI 0.08-0.73) and 59% less likely to be obese 2 to 5 years post-CR than were nonattendees (CI 0.20-0.85). CR attendance was associated with healthy behaviors, though maintenance diminished over time," wrote M.D. Zullo and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).
The researchers concluded "Understanding the factors associated with healthy behaviors, and the time when behavior performance decreases, will assist with program planning directed at behavior maintenance."
Zullo and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention (Cardiac Rehabilitation, Health Behaviors, and Body Mass Index Post-Myocardial Infarction. Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, 2010;30(1) 28-34).
For additional information, contact M.D. Zullo, Kent State University, Coll Public Hlth, Kent Hall 136C, POB 5190, Kent, OH 44242, USA.
The publisher's contact information for the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention is Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 530 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621, USA.
Copyright © 2010 Obesity & Diabetes Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: (Biostatistics) Data from Kent State University advance knowledge in HIV/AIDS risk factors (Bhatta) | Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: AIDS Weekly
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Current study results from the report, 'Human immunodeficiency virus infection in alabama women sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive health characteristics and factors associated with lack of human immunodeficiency virus-1 viral control,' have been published. "Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among women in the southern United States is on the rise. This study examined sociodemographic profile and behavioral risk factors for HIV and sexually transmitted infections and assessed factors associated with HIV-1 viral control in a cohort of 280 HIV-infected Alabama women aged 17 to 66 years," scientists writing in the The American Journal of the Medical Sciences report (see also ).
"Women receiving care for HIV infection at a university outpatient HIV clinic were enrolled in the study. Women completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographics and behavioral risk factors at enrollment. They were followed up with appointments at least every 6 months with Papanicolaou smears, cervicovaginal lavages, cervical and vaginal swabs, and blood specimens collected at each visit. Of the women in the study, 69% were black, had mean age of 36 years, and approximately three fourths were mothers with annual household income <$20,000. White women were likely to have been HIV infected for a longer period (50.2 versus 36.3 months; p=0.02) and had significantly lower viral loads at enrollment (p=0.04) than black women. Factors associated with lack of HIV-1 control (>or=10,000 RNA copies/mL) at enrollment included black race/ethnicity (odds ratio [OR] 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-6.8), CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/microL (OR 20.1; CI 8.6-47.0), being diagnosed with HIV <6 months (OR 3.5; CI 1.4-8.9) and not being on any antiretroviral therapy (OR 2.5; CI 1.1-5.7)," wrote M.P. Bhatta and colleagues, Kent State University.
The researchers concluded "Poorer HIV-1 viral control in black women at enrollment may indicate suboptimal access to HIV testing, delays in receipt of medical care after HIV-1 diagnosis, and/or some underlying biologic or social race-related influence."
Bhatta and colleagues published their study in The American Journal of the Medical Sciences (Human immunodeficiency virus infection in alabama women sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive health characteristics and factors associated with lack of human immunodeficiency virus-1 viral control. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 2010;339(2) 133-40).
Additional information can be obtained by contacting M.P. Bhatta, Epidemiology and Environmental Health Science, Dept. of Biostatistics, Kent State University, OH 44242 USA.
Copyright © 2010 AIDS Weekly via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: (Biostatistics) Data from Kent State University advance knowledge in HIV/AIDS risk factors (Bhatta) | Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: Clinical Oncology Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Current study results from the report, 'Human immunodeficiency virus infection in alabama women sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive health characteristics and factors associated with lack of human immunodeficiency virus-1 viral control,' have been published. "Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among women in the southern United States is on the rise. This study examined sociodemographic profile and behavioral risk factors for HIV and sexually transmitted infections and assessed factors associated with HIV-1 viral control in a cohort of 280 HIV-infected Alabama women aged 17 to 66 years," scientists writing in the The American Journal of the Medical Sciences report (see also ).
"Women receiving care for HIV infection at a university outpatient HIV clinic were enrolled in the study. Women completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographics and behavioral risk factors at enrollment. They were followed up with appointments at least every 6 months with Papanicolaou smears, cervicovaginal lavages, cervical and vaginal swabs, and blood specimens collected at each visit. Of the women in the study, 69% were black, had mean age of 36 years, and approximately three fourths were mothers with annual household income <$20,000. White women were likely to have been HIV infected for a longer period (50.2 versus 36.3 months; p=0.02) and had significantly lower viral loads at enrollment (p=0.04) than black women. Factors associated with lack of HIV-1 control (>or=10,000 RNA copies/mL) at enrollment included black race/ethnicity (odds ratio [OR] 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-6.8), CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/microL (OR 20.1; CI 8.6-47.0), being diagnosed with HIV <6 months (OR 3.5; CI 1.4-8.9) and not being on any antiretroviral therapy (OR 2.5; CI 1.1-5.7)," wrote M.P. Bhatta and colleagues, Kent State University.
The researchers concluded "Poorer HIV-1 viral control in black women at enrollment may indicate suboptimal access to HIV testing, delays in receipt of medical care after HIV-1 diagnosis, and/or some underlying biologic or social race-related influence."
Bhatta and colleagues published their study in The American Journal of the Medical Sciences (Human immunodeficiency virus infection in alabama women sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive health characteristics and factors associated with lack of human immunodeficiency virus-1 viral control. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 2010;339(2) 133-40).
Additional information can be obtained by contacting M.P. Bhatta, Epidemiology and Environmental Health Science, Dept. of Biostatistics, Kent State University, OH 44242 USA.
Copyright © 2010 Clinical Oncology Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: (Biostatistics) Data from Kent State University advance knowledge in HIV/AIDS risk factors (Bhatta) | Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: Mental Health Weekly Digest
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Current study results from the report, 'Human immunodeficiency virus infection in alabama women sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive health characteristics and factors associated with lack of human immunodeficiency virus-1 viral control,' have been published. "Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among women in the southern United States is on the rise. This study examined sociodemographic profile and behavioral risk factors for HIV and sexually transmitted infections and assessed factors associated with HIV-1 viral control in a cohort of 280 HIV-infected Alabama women aged 17 to 66 years," scientists writing in the The American Journal of the Medical Sciences report (see also ).
"Women receiving care for HIV infection at a university outpatient HIV clinic were enrolled in the study. Women completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographics and behavioral risk factors at enrollment. They were followed up with appointments at least every 6 months with Papanicolaou smears, cervicovaginal lavages, cervical and vaginal swabs, and blood specimens collected at each visit. Of the women in the study, 69% were black, had mean age of 36 years, and approximately three fourths were mothers with annual household income <$20,000. White women were likely to have been HIV infected for a longer period (50.2 versus 36.3 months; p=0.02) and had significantly lower viral loads at enrollment (p=0.04) than black women. Factors associated with lack of HIV-1 control (>or=10,000 RNA copies/mL) at enrollment included black race/ethnicity (odds ratio [OR] 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-6.8), CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/microL (OR 20.1; CI 8.6-47.0), being diagnosed with HIV <6 months (OR 3.5; CI 1.4-8.9) and not being on any antiretroviral therapy (OR 2.5; CI 1.1-5.7)," wrote M.P. Bhatta and colleagues, Kent State University.
The researchers concluded "Poorer HIV-1 viral control in black women at enrollment may indicate suboptimal access to HIV testing, delays in receipt of medical care after HIV-1 diagnosis, and/or some underlying biologic or social race-related influence."
Bhatta and colleagues published their study in The American Journal of the Medical Sciences (Human immunodeficiency virus infection in alabama women sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive health characteristics and factors associated with lack of human immunodeficiency virus-1 viral control. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 2010;339(2) 133-40).
Additional information can be obtained by contacting M.P. Bhatta, Epidemiology and Environmental Health Science, Dept. of Biostatistics, Kent State University, OH 44242 USA.
Copyright © 2010 Mental Health Weekly Digest via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: (Biostatistics) Data from Kent State University advance knowledge in HIV/AIDS risk factors (Bhatta) | Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: OBGYN & Reproduction Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Current study results from the report, 'Human immunodeficiency virus infection in alabama women sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive health characteristics and factors associated with lack of human immunodeficiency virus-1 viral control,' have been published. "Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among women in the southern United States is on the rise. This study examined sociodemographic profile and behavioral risk factors for HIV and sexually transmitted infections and assessed factors associated with HIV-1 viral control in a cohort of 280 HIV-infected Alabama women aged 17 to 66 years," scientists writing in the The American Journal of the Medical Sciences report (see also ).
"Women receiving care for HIV infection at a university outpatient HIV clinic were enrolled in the study. Women completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographics and behavioral risk factors at enrollment. They were followed up with appointments at least every 6 months with Papanicolaou smears, cervicovaginal lavages, cervical and vaginal swabs, and blood specimens collected at each visit. Of the women in the study, 69% were black, had mean age of 36 years, and approximately three fourths were mothers with annual household income <$20,000. White women were likely to have been HIV infected for a longer period (50.2 versus 36.3 months; p=0.02) and had significantly lower viral loads at enrollment (p=0.04) than black women. Factors associated with lack of HIV-1 control (>or=10,000 RNA copies/mL) at enrollment included black race/ethnicity (odds ratio [OR] 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-6.8), CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/microL (OR 20.1; CI 8.6-47.0), being diagnosed with HIV <6 months (OR 3.5; CI 1.4-8.9) and not being on any antiretroviral therapy (OR 2.5; CI 1.1-5.7)," wrote M.P. Bhatta and colleagues, Kent State University.
The researchers concluded "Poorer HIV-1 viral control in black women at enrollment may indicate suboptimal access to HIV testing, delays in receipt of medical care after HIV-1 diagnosis, and/or some underlying biologic or social race-related influence."
Bhatta and colleagues published their study in The American Journal of the Medical Sciences (Human immunodeficiency virus infection in alabama women sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive health characteristics and factors associated with lack of human immunodeficiency virus-1 viral control. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 2010;339(2) 133-40).
Additional information can be obtained by contacting M.P. Bhatta, Epidemiology and Environmental Health Science, Dept. of Biostatistics, Kent State University, OH 44242 USA.
Copyright © 2010 OBGYN & Reproduction Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: (Biostatistics) Data from Kent State University advance knowledge in HIV/AIDS risk factors (Bhatta) | Email

News Date: 03/08/2010
Outlet Full Name: Pharma Business Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Current study results from the report, 'Human immunodeficiency virus infection in alabama women sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive health characteristics and factors associated with lack of human immunodeficiency virus-1 viral control,' have been published. "Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among women in the southern United States is on the rise. This study examined sociodemographic profile and behavioral risk factors for HIV and sexually transmitted infections and assessed factors associated with HIV-1 viral control in a cohort of 280 HIV-infected Alabama women aged 17 to 66 years," scientists writing in the The American Journal of the Medical Sciences report (see also ).
"Women receiving care for HIV infection at a university outpatient HIV clinic were enrolled in the study. Women completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographics and behavioral risk factors at enrollment. They were followed up with appointments at least every 6 months with Papanicolaou smears, cervicovaginal lavages, cervical and vaginal swabs, and blood specimens collected at each visit. Of the women in the study, 69% were black, had mean age of 36 years, and approximately three fourths were mothers with annual household income <$20,000. White women were likely to have been HIV infected for a longer period (50.2 versus 36.3 months; p=0.02) and had significantly lower viral loads at enrollment (p=0.04) than black women. Factors associated with lack of HIV-1 control (>or=10,000 RNA copies/mL) at enrollment included black race/ethnicity (odds ratio [OR] 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-6.8), CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/microL (OR 20.1; CI 8.6-47.0), being diagnosed with HIV <6 months (OR 3.5; CI 1.4-8.9) and not being on any antiretroviral therapy (OR 2.5; CI 1.1-5.7)," wrote M.P. Bhatta and colleagues, Kent State University.
The researchers concluded "Poorer HIV-1 viral control in black women at enrollment may indicate suboptimal access to HIV testing, delays in receipt of medical care after HIV-1 diagnosis, and/or some underlying biologic or social race-related influence."
Bhatta and colleagues published their study in The American Journal of the Medical Sciences (Human immunodeficiency virus infection in alabama women sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive health characteristics and factors associated with lack of human immunodeficiency virus-1 viral control. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 2010;339(2) 133-40).
Additional information can be obtained by contacting M.P. Bhatta, Epidemiology and Environmental Health Science, Dept. of Biostatistics, Kent State University, OH 44242 USA.
Copyright © 2010 Pharma Business Week via NewsRx.com

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