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Total Clips (36)
Headline Date Outlet
(Theatre) Kent shootings are focus of play 03/13/2010 Plain Dealer Text Email

HAPPENINGS "Blanket Hill," a play about the fatal shootings of May 4, 1970, will be featured in Kent State University's annual Student Theatre Festival at 8 p.m. Friday, March 19; 8 p.m. Saturday, March 20; and 2 p.m. Sunday, March 21,...

NOOCO) CO-OP START-UPS SUBJECT OF FORUM 03/12/2010 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...business owners determine if a cooperative is the best business structure for them will be hosted by the Northern Ohio Center for Cooperative Ownership at Kent State University, Mid American Cooperative Council, and Braintree Business Development Center. The Cooperative Start-Up Forum will be...

(LGBT) Answering census helps area get fair share (Merryman) 03/14/2010 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...or owner. The census is the first that will count the numbers of same-sex couples who identify themselves as married. Molly Merryman, who coordinates Kent State University's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender studies program, approved of the change, but said it falls short because only...

(Diversity, Admissions) Author, businessman Stedman Graham speaks to area high school students 03/12/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

(Diversity, Admissions) Stedman Graham: First step is love Author stops in Portage County 03/12/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...work for you, instead of working for the world, he said.Earlier in the day, Graham gave a similar address to 450 high school students gathered at the Kent State University ballroom, discussing the importance of higher education, setting goals and overcoming adversity. Both presentations were...

Nursing faculty member receives Fulbright grant (Ross) 03/13/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Dr. Ratchneewan Ross, an associate professor in Kent State University's College of Nursing, has received a Fulbright Scholar grant to teach and conduct research in Thailand. Ross will teach...

(Centennial) Cleveland Orchestra to perform at Kent State (Seachrist) 03/14/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

As part of the Kent State University Centennial Celebration, the Cleveland Orchestra, with conductor James Feddeck, returns to Kent State to perform...

(Anthropology) Ardi researchers to discuss their discovery on March 24 at KSU 03/14/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...of the professors who took part in researching Ardipithecus ramidus, a 4.4 million-year-old hominid skeleton unveiled last year, will speak March 24 at Kent State University. C. Owen Lovejoy, an anthropology professor at KSU; Bruce Latimer, a professor of anthropology at Case Western Reserve...

(Centennial) Cleveland Orchestra performs benefit concert at Kent State (Seachrist) 03/14/2010 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

As part of the Kent State University Centennial Celebration, the Cleveland Orchestra, with conductor James Feddeck, returns to Kent State to perform...

(Aviation) Kiwanis Club to hosts Indians manager of ticket services 03/14/2010 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

...seats on the committee, and nearly all Kiwanians will be involved -- this year on the 5th of July (since the Fourth falls on a Sunday). Partnering with Kent State University, Kiwanis of SMF has seen to the re-establishment of the Aviation Day Heritage Fair each September at the Kent State...

(Kent State at Stark) Chambers sweeten pot for existing businesses 03/12/2010 Independent, The Text Attachment Email

...developing programs to benefit them. One example of the chamber's efforts to promote member businesses is the annual Business Expo held each March at the Kent State Stark University Center, according to Wilkoff. She also noted the Jackson chamber offers a variety of networking groups designed...

(Kent State at Stark) Study shows KSU generates $130 million to local economy (Capasso) 03/15/2010 Independent, The Text Attachment Email

...into their careers make a big difference on the local community. A $130 million dollar difference. A recent study regarding the economic impact the Kent State University system has on Northeast Ohio indicated that, by itself, Kent Stark significantly impacts the community that surrounds...

(Centennial) Cleveland Orchestra performs benefit concert at Kent State (Seachrist) 03/14/2010 Hudson Hub-Times Text Attachment Email

As part of the Kent State University Centennial Celebration, the Cleveland Orchestra, with conductor James Feddeck, returns to Kent State to perform...

(Kent State at Salem) One last bee (Figg) 03/14/2010 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

...Kristen Figg, this year will be the last. She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989. For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking...

(Kent State at Salem) County bee says f-a-r-e-w-e-l-l to retiring pronouncer (Figg) 03/14/2010 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

...Kristen Figg, this year will be the last. She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989. For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking...

(Kent State at Salem) Pronouncer closing the book on serving Columbiana County Bee (Figg) 03/14/2010 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

...Kristen Figg, this year will be the last. She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989. For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking...

(Psychology) Neal-Barnett selected for conference (Neal-Barnett) 03/15/2010 Tallmadge Express Text Attachment Email

(Kent State at Salem) Pronouncer closing the book on serving Columbiana County Bee (Figg) 03/14/2010 Salem News Text Attachment Email

...Kristen Figg, this year will be the last. She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989. For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking...

(Kent State at Salem) One last bee (Figg) 03/14/2010 Salem News Text Attachment Email

...Kristen Figg, this year will be the last. She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989. For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking...

(Kent State at Salem) County bee says f-a-r-e-w-e-l-l to retiring pronouncer (Figg) 03/14/2010 Salem News Text Attachment Email

...Kristen Figg, this year will be the last. She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989. For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking...

(Kent State at Salem) One last bee (Figg) 03/14/2010 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...Kristen Figg, this year will be the last. She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989. For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking...

(LGBTQ) AUDIO Gay Students Focus Of New Center (Merryman) 03/12/2010 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State University has opened its new Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Student Center. Co-coordinator Molly Merryman...

(Centennial) Cleveland Orchestra performs benefit concert at Kent State (Seachrist) 03/14/2010 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

As part of the Kent State University Centennial Celebration, the Cleveland Orchestra, with conductor James Feddeck, returns to Kent State to perform...

(Centennial) Cleveland Orchestra performs benefit concert at Kent State (Seachrist) 03/14/2010 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

As part of the Kent State University Centennial Celebration, the Cleveland Orchestra, with conductor James Feddeck, returns to Kent State to perform...

(Fashion) KSU professor earns textile design award (Ohrn-McDaniel) 03/15/2010 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

Linda Ohrn-McDaniel, a faculty members of Kent State University's School of Fashion and a resident of Tallmadge recently garnered an award at the 2009 International Textile and Apparel...

(Diversity, Admissions) Stedman Graham to Speak Today at Kent State University and NEOUCOM 03/11/2010 Boston Business Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...pharmacy health care provider in the United States, is pleased to sponsor nationally known author, educator and entrepreneur Stedman Graham to speak today at Kent State University and Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM) as part of the company's commitment to...

(Diversity, Admissions) Stedman Graham to Speak Today at Kent State University andNEOUCOM 03/11/2010 Business First of Columbus - Online Text Attachment Email

...pharmacy health care provider in the United States, is pleased to sponsor nationally known author, educator and entrepreneur Stedman Graham to speak today at Kent State University and Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM) as part of the company's commitment to...

(Diversity, Admissions) Stedman Graham to speak at Kent State University and NEOUCOM 03/11/2010 Associated Press (AP) Text Email

...health care provider in the United States, is pleased to sponsor nationally known author, educator and entrepreneur Stedman Graham to speak today at Kent State University and Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM) as part of the company's commitment ...

(Diversity, Admissions) Stedman Graham to Speak Today at Kent State University and NEOUCOM 03/11/2010 PR Newswire Text Email

...pharmacy health care provider in the United States, is pleased to sponsor nationally known author, educator and entrepreneur Stedman Graham to speak today at Kent State University and Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM) as part of the company's commitment to...

(Fashion) KSU's Fashion School is Competing for sideRACK's June Featured Designer Slot 03/12/2010 pr-usa.net Text Attachment Email

Remember me The 2010 senior design students of Kent State University's Fashion School are sharpening their scissors for the opportunity to be chosen as the Featured Designer in the newly...

(NOCCO) KENT STATE UNIVERSITY PARTNERS WITH MID AMERICAN COOPERATIVE COUNCIL (Messing) 03/12/2010 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY PARTNERS WITH MID AMERICAN COOPERATIVE COUNCIL, BRAINTREE BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER TO PRESENT COOPERATIVE START-UP...

(McGruder Lecture Series) Riley to be honored 03/12/2010 Freep.com Text Attachment Email

(LGTBQ) Ohio News Nuggets: New center opens 03/12/2010 Diverse Issues in Higher Education Text Attachment Email

(Biostatistics) Data from Kent State University advance knowledge in HIV/AIDS risk factors (Bhatta) 03/13/2010 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week Text Email

...diagnosed with HIV <6 months (OR 3.5; CI 1.4-8.9) and not being on any antiretroviral therapy (OR 2.5; CI 1.1-5.7)," wrote M.P. Bhatta and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded "Poorer HIV-1 viral control in black women at enrollment may indicate suboptimal access to...

(COPH) Findings from Kent State University advance knowledge in infarction (Zullo) 03/14/2010 Heart Disease Weekly Text Email

...nonattendees (CI 0.20-0.85). CR attendance was associated with healthy behaviors, though maintenance diminished over time," wrote M.D. Zullo and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded "Understanding the factors associated with healthy behaviors, and the time when...

(Fashion) KSU's Fashion School is competing for sideRACK's June "Featured Designer" slot 03/14/2010 24-7PressRelease Text Attachment Email

www.sideRACK.net, a new concept online fashion site specializing in showcasing indie designers has announced its collaboration with Kent State University for an emerging designers contest. KENT, OH, March 14, 2010 /24-7PressRelease/ -- The 2010 senior design students of...


News Headline: (Theatre) Kent shootings are focus of play | Email

News Date: 03/13/2010
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HAPPENINGS
"Blanket Hill," a play about the fatal shootings of May 4, 1970, will be featured in Kent State University's annual Student Theatre Festival at 8 p.m. Friday, March 19; 8 p.m. Saturday, March 20; and 2 p.m. Sunday, March 21, in Room B005 of the Music and Speech Building, 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent. Seats are free but must be reserved. Call 330-672-2497.
Copyright © 2010 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: NOOCO) CO-OP START-UPS SUBJECT OF FORUM | Email

News Date: 03/12/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A session to help small- business owners determine if a cooperative is the best business structure for them will be hosted by the Northern Ohio Center for Cooperative Ownership at Kent State University, Mid American Cooperative Council, and Braintree Business Development Center.
The Cooperative Start-Up Forum will be held 8 45 a.m. to noon Thursday at Dairy Farmers of America, 1035 Medina Road, Suite 300, in Medina.
The workshop will address what cooperatives are, how they function, and their strengths and weaknesses compared to other business structures.
Cost to attend is $35. To register, contact Roy Messing at rmessin2@kent.edu or at 330-672-3028.
Copyright © 2010 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: (LGBT) Answering census helps area get fair share (Merryman) | Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Byard, Katie
News OCR Text: Mar. 14--Letters arriving this week in local mailboxes are offering a big payoff for a few minutes work.
The envelopes contain the 2010 census questionnaire, which is used to determine how many federal dollars every community in the nation will get in the coming years.
The stakes are high. A Brookings Institution study found that $688 million flowed into the Akron metro area -- Summit and Portage counties -- in 2008.
The report's author, Andrew Reamer, said he hoped his study will encourage residents to participate in the every-10-year head count.
The U.S. Census Bureau touts that more than $400 billion in federal dollars a year will be distributed nationwide based on census figures. The money is spent on infrastructure, such as roads, and services, including health care for poor.
The data also guide local planning efforts, such as where to build hospitals and schools.
Reamer said the Akron area's share works out to about $1,000 for every resident.
The census also will affect Ohio's political clout. That's because the count will determine how the 435 members of the House of Representatives are divvied up among the states.
Ohio is expected to lose one -- and perhaps two -- of its 18 seats in Congress.
"That's one or two less people batting for us in Washington," said Akron city planner Helen Tomic.
Census officials want residents to mail the forms by April 1, but there's no official deadline.
Beginning in early May, residents who haven't responded can expect a knock on their door, said David DeShon, manager of the Akron area U.S. Census Bureau office. The office covers Summit, Medina and Wayne counties.
About 1,000 census workers will be hired from a list of more than 5,000 applicants who have passed a mandatory test.
DeShon said he hoped that the census takers knocking on doors in hard-to-count areas will be residents of those neighborhoods themselves.
The top five hard-to-count areas in Summit include two neighborhoods near the University of Akron campus and an area east of Summit Lake in Akron.
The others are a neighborhood just west of the city's downtown and a section of Lakemore, where residents have post-office boxes instead of home mailboxes. Census workers have dropped off forms at area homes without mailboxes.
DeShon said residents shouldn't have to spend that much time with this year's form, one of the shortest ever.
There are only 10 questions for the head of each household and seven questions for each additional resident.
In addition to the person's name, other questions concern age, gender, race, whether the person is of Hispanic origin and how the household members are related.
The head of the household also is asked whether he or she is a renter or owner.
The census is the first that will count the numbers of same-sex couples who identify themselves as married.
Molly Merryman, who coordinates Kent State University's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender studies program, approved of the change, but said it falls short because only cohabitating gays will be counted.
"One of the struggles that we've had as a minority group -- being counted and accounted for -- is that there is no cataloging of us," she said.
In another change, about 30,000 census forms nationwide will include black and African-American as racial categories, but not "Negro," as part of a test.
Ophelia Averitt, president of the Akron chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, says it's time for the term to be dropped.
"It isn't used anywhere else," she said. "I have to tell people, 'look beyond that.' "
Data confidential
DeShon, a retired Akron city economic development official, said every census has its critics, but said challenges to the legality of the census are unwarranted.
DeShon said he has heard this year's buzz that the Constitution only requires answering how many people are living in the residence.
That's not true, DeShon said. "The Constitution says we shall enumerate and it gives Congress the power to describe how that should be done."
DeShon reassured residents concerned that their information might be used in identity theft.
"We stand up and take an oath of confidentiality," DeShon said.
Personal data from the census is kept secret for 72 years, said Billy Soule, assistant to Akron Mayor Don Plusquellic for community relations.
The latest personal data to be released is from the 1930 census -- a gold mine for people trying to trace their family roots.
Soule said the push for an accurate count is more intense this year, with dozens of questionnaire assistance centers opening locally.
A local Complete Count Committee also is urging employers to e-mail workers and is asking ministers to talk about the census from the pulpit, Soule said.
The message also will be written in the sky A Goodyear blimp will hover over the Akron area, promoting the census.
Katie Byard can be reached at 330-996-3781 or kbyard@thebeaconjournal.com.
Copyright © 2010 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: (Diversity, Admissions) Author, businessman Stedman Graham speaks to area high school students | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: High school students can start defining themselves now by getting their education, setting goals, overcoming adversity and using that education and information to build a purpose in life.

That was the message motivational speaker, author and business entrepreneur Stedman Graham offered 450 area high school students Thursday at Kent State University.

Graham's visit was sponsored by CVS Caremark, an advocate of pharmacy education. The event, through the Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy and Kent State, was aimed at minority students to introduce them to careers in health care, a field predicted to grow over the next two decades.

Kent State, the University of Akron, Cleveland State and Youngstown State are the feeder schools to NEOUCOM in Rootstown, which offers degrees in medicine and pharmacy.

Graham is the author of 10 books and chief executive of S. Graham and Associates, a Chicago-based management and marketing consulting company specializing in corporate and education markets.

''You have to think outside of the box to overcome adversity and reach your full potential,'' Graham said. ''Don't let the world define you by the color of your skin, or label you in any way, telling you that you can't make it because you are black, or because you are a woman or don't have a mother or father. You define yourself. Take your own identity.''

Graham, a longtime companion of Oprah Winfrey, said he still doesn't let people define him.

''I know people said Oprah's man is coming to speak to you, but you can't put me in a box. You can't define me.''

He engaged the audience, leaving the podium and approaching students for their input. ''What is freedom? What happens when you're not free?'' he asked.

He said he had been looking for freedom all of his life, trying to discover who he was as a human being and learning to organize his life and create his thinking process.

''People don't know how to think. The school experience is more than memorization and taking tests,'' he said. ''It's applying the information to what is relevant to your life. I had a lot of rage growing up and didn't know how to deal with the layers of pain.''

He said basketball helped him get away from his circumstances and work through his adversity. He went to college on a scholarship and was able to travel. He played ball in Europe.

''I learned late in life. I was about 33 or 34 when I realized it wasn't about race; it was my lack of knowledge. I realized I had the ability to create my own life.''

Graham encouraged the students to create their own future by applying what they learn in school and life to their passions and becoming an expert in the field of their choice.

He said the one thing everyone has in common is 24 hours in the day. ''How you organize your 24 hours is the key to your success.''

Rodney Gist, a junior at Akron's Garfield High School, said he was encouraged to hear he can lead his own life and no one else can control it.

''He showed me I can shape my own future. I can be who I want to be if I put my mind to it.'' said Gist, who is on the varsity football and wrestling teams.

Solei Brazile, 16, a junior at Garfield, hopes to become a pharmacist.

''He encouraged me to do what I love and not what other people want me to do,'' Brazile said.

East High School seniors Keisha Mitchell and Timmy Moore, both 18, said Graham's speech was inspirational.

''He got my attention, especially when he said before you can be a leader, you have to lead yourself and know what direction you want to go,'' Mitchell said. ''Follow yourself first.''

Moore said his mother always tells him that he has to love himself to have the confidence to believe in himself. ''But it felt good to hear someone who is successful telling me the same things I grew up hearing.''

Self-esteem and peer pressure are concerns for Blake Lewis, 17, a junior at Buchtel High School and Tyra McTyeire, 18, a senior at Buchtel.

''He opened my eyes to a lot of things,'' McTyeire said. ''I am going to just be myself and not worry about the small stuff, which will be a little challenging for me.''

She was thrilled to find out there were scholarships available. Graham's company offers scholarships and NEOUCOM/CVS has a Pathways to Pharmacy program, which offers high school students a 25-hour-a-week paid internship.

Lewis said he wants to go into the medical field or engineering. He said Thursday's program was helpful because he was not aware of all of the options available in the health field.

''Graham was convincing,'' Lewis said. ''I am going to be more of a leader. I spend too much time looking on the outside instead of looking from within.''

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News Headline: (Diversity, Admissions) Stedman Graham: First step is love Author stops in Portage County | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Motivational speaker Stedman Graham talked about life, love and losing his identity and offered some advice Thursday at a diversity luncheon at the Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy. The longtime companion of Oprah Winfrey encouraged the audience not to be defined by outside forces, including their jobs, their backgrounds or even their relationships.I know some of you define me by my relationship, he said. Graham encouraged the audience to break out of the box, noting that many people are not even conscious of allowing themselves to be defined by their culture, their race or even the daily grind.He encouraged the group to follow his nine step process to learn their identity.I lost my identity several times, he said. When you're in Oprahs space, you lose it all the time. You've got to get it back. The first and most powerful step, he said, is love. He called love the highest form of development. Diversity is about love, he said.He encouraged those attending to develop a vision and to plan. My girl says Success is where preparation meets opportunity, he said. She's always preparing. She reads two or three books a week, just preparing.It also is important have a good attitude, courage and flexibility, and to build a dream team, seek information, and commit to their vision, he said.Its a beautiful process to have the world work for you, instead of working for the world, he said.Earlier in the day, Graham gave a similar address to 450 high school students gathered at the Kent State University ballroom, discussing the importance of higher education, setting goals and overcoming adversity. Both presentations were sponsored by CVS Caremark, creator of the Pathways to Pharmacy program that includes instruction at the NEOUCOM campus.Honored at the luncheon at NEOUCOM were Leona Farris of Stow, recipient of the Community-Based Diversity partnership Award; Marsha Mills of Cuyahoga Falls, recipient of the Faculty/Staff leadership and Excellence Award; and Alexandria Howard of Cleveland, recipient of the Rising Star Student Achievement Award.

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News Headline: Nursing faculty member receives Fulbright grant (Ross) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/13/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dr. Ratchneewan Ross, an associate professor in Kent State University's College of Nursing, has received a Fulbright Scholar grant to teach and conduct research in Thailand.

Ross will teach research methodology to graduate students and doctoral candidates at five universities in Thailand from June to October. While in Thailand, she also will conduct seminars for nursing faculty and conduct her own research project.

"I'm quite honored to receive this prestigious grant," said Ross, who is in her eighth year at Kent State. "I will be very busy -- teaching in four different regions of the county -- but I am really looking forward to this opportunity."

The Fulbright grant will cover travel expenses and the costs of living abroad, and it also will provide a stipend.

Ross also will receive financial support for her research project.

Established in 1946, the Fulbright Scholar Program sends approximately 800 U.S. faculty and professionals to 140 countries.

to lecture, research or participate in seminars.

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News Headline: (Centennial) Cleveland Orchestra to perform at Kent State (Seachrist) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As part of the Kent State University Centennial Celebration, the Cleveland Orchestra, with conductor James Feddeck, returns to Kent State to perform a benefit concert at 8 p.m. Friday. The evening's highlight will be Schubert Symphony No. 5, in addition to works by Beethoven and Mozart.

Proceeds from the concert will benefit Kent/Blossom Music, a program that draws young musicians from all over the world to Kent State for six weeks of intensive chamber-music study alongside members of the Cleveland Orchestra, as well as Kent State's music faculty.

"This benefit is important as it will help us begin to raise the funds needed to create a $1-million endowment over the next three years," said Dr. Denise Seachrist, interim director for the School of Music. "This will allow us to provide student scholarships and continue community outreach."

The concert will be held in Cartwright Hall, located on Hilltop Drive on the university's Kent Campus. Tickets are $80, $50 and $30, and student tickets are available for $5 for those under 18 years of age or with a valid university ID.

To order tickets, call the box office at 330-672-2497 from noon to 5 p.m. weekdays or purchase online at www.tix.com. Free parking is available, and Cartwright Hall is wheelchair accessible.

With a faculty equally respected as world-class soloists, orchestra and chamber music artists, the list of alumni is a "Who's Who" in the chamber and orchestral music circuit. The more than 2,250 alumni perform with such notable institutions as the Cleveland and Philadelphia orchestras; the Boston, Atlanta and Minnesota symphonies; the Los Angeles and New York philharmonics; the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra; and nationally and internationally acclaimed ensembles such as the Arriana, Emerson, Turtle Island, Euclid and Miami String quartets.

"The significant numbers of musicians from Kent/Blossom Music who are now in major orchestras, including 20 currently with the Cleveland Orchestra, provide the great testament to the program's impact and success," said Gary Ginstling, general manager of the Cleveland Orchestra.

Faculty members include principal musicians of the Cleveland Orchestra: Frank Rosenwein (oboe), Joshua Smith (flute), John Clouser (bassoon), Richard King (horn), Joela Jones (keyboard), and Robert Vernon (violist). Other major artists include members of the highly-respected Miami String Quartet - Ivan Chan and Cathy Meng-Robinson (violin); Yu Jin (Viola); and Keith Robinson (cello) - who teach private lessons, coach chamber music and lead master classes. Additionally, Steinway Artists-in-Residence Donna Lee and Jerry Wong round out the world-class faculty. There are 26 faculty members in all.

In addition to serving as faculty members for Kent/Blossom Music and the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music, Ivan Chan and Keith Robinson were recently announced as interim co-artistic coordinators for the program. They replace Jerome LaCorte, who resigned in January. LaCorte had been the director of the program for 14 years.

Kent State University and the Musical Arts Association (the governing body of the Cleveland Orchestra) have been long-time institutional partners, beginning with their mutual efforts to create and manage one of the country's finest summer performing arts centers: Blossom Music Center in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. As part of that partnership, every few years, the orchestra performs a benefit concert with proceeds to benefit Kent/Blossom Music.

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News Headline: (Anthropology) Ardi researchers to discuss their discovery on March 24 at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Four of the professors who took part in researching Ardipithecus ramidus, a 4.4 million-year-old hominid skeleton unveiled last year, will speak March 24 at Kent State University.

C. Owen Lovejoy, an anthropology professor at KSU; Bruce Latimer, a professor of anthropology at Case Western Reserve University; Scott Simpson, an anatomy professor at Case Western; and Linda Spurlock, a biological anthropologist at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History all will speak at the Kiva beginning at 7 p.m.

They took part with 47 other researchers in studying skeletal remains of Ardi, which the journal Science called the "2009 Breakthrough of the Year." Their discussion will focus on possible insights into human origins, including evidence that humans did not evolve from chimpanzee-like apes.

The event is free and open to the public.

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News Headline: (Centennial) Cleveland Orchestra performs benefit concert at Kent State (Seachrist) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As part of the Kent State University Centennial Celebration, the Cleveland Orchestra, with conductor James Feddeck, returns to Kent State to perform a benefit concert March 19, at 8 p.m.

The evening's highlight will be Schubert Symphony No. 5, in addition to works by Beethoven and Mozart.

Proceeds from the concert will benefit Kent/Blossom Music, a program that draws young musicians from all over the world to Kent State for six weeks of intensive chamber-music study alongside members of the Cleveland Orchestra, as well as Kent State's music faculty.

"This benefit is important as it will help us begin to raise the funds needed to create a $1 million endowment over the next three years," says Dr. Denise Seachrist, interim director for the School of Music. "This will allow us to provide student scholarships and continue community outreach."

The concert will be in Cartwright Hall, on Hilltop Drive on the university's Kent Campus. Tickets are $80, $50, and $30, and student tickets are $5. To order tickets, call the box office at 330-672-2497 weekdays from noon to 5 p.m., or purchase online at www.tix.com. Free parking is available and Cartwright Hall is wheelchair accessible.

With a faculty equally respected as world-class soloists, orchestra and chamber music artists, the list of alumni is a "Who's Who" in the chamber and orchestral music circuit. The more than 2,250 alumni perform with such notable institutions as the Cleveland and Philadelphia orchestras; the Boston, Atlanta and Minnesota symphonies; the Los Angeles and New York philharmonics; the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra; and nationally and internationally acclaimed ensembles such as the Arriana, Emerson, Turtle Island, Euclid and Miami String quartets.

"The significant numbers of musicians from Kent/Blossom Music who are now in major orchestras, including 20 currently with the Cleveland Orchestra, provide the great testament to the program's impact and success," says Gary Ginstling, general manager of the Cleveland Orchestra.

Faculty members include principal musicians of the Cleveland Orchestra: Frank Rosenwein (oboe), Joshua Smith (flute), John Clouser (bassoon), Richard King (horn), Joela Jones (keyboard), and Robert Vernon (violist. Other major artists include members of the Miami String Quartet - Ivan Chan and Cathy Meng-Robinson (violin); Yu Jin (Viola); and Keith Robinson (cello). Additionally, Steinway Artists-in-Residence Donna Lee and Jerry Wong round out the world-class faculty.

For more information about Kent/Blossom Music, visit http://dept.kent.edu/blossom online.

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News Headline: (Aviation) Kiwanis Club to hosts Indians manager of ticket services | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kiwanis Club of Stow-Munroe Falls is sponsoring a special meeting in March as a membership information/recruitment night, for members of the community, grade 7 and older, who desire to become more involved in community service.

Whether through Builders Club at Kimpton Middle School, Key Club at SMF High School or Kiwanis itself, the group is always looking for volunteers dedicated to changing the world, one child and one community at a time.

Kiwanis regularly meets on the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at Silver Lake Country Club, with a luncheon meeting and speaker.

This month, however, there will be a special evening meeting on March 26 at 7 p.m. in Campbell Lodge at Adell Durbin Park.

The special "Learn about Kiwanis" social/meeting will be highlighted with a member of the Cleveland Indians Speakers Bureau, Manager of Ticket Services David Pike, as guest speaker. He will present a highlight DVD, a State of the Indians discussion, a "Q & A" session and a raffle drawing. All ages, from grade 7 up, are invited to enjoy the speaker and learn about Kiwanis.

The local Kiwanians work nearly year-round on one of its major activities: Co-sponsoring the annual 4th of July Parade with the city. New members of Kiwanis often fill seats on the committee, and nearly all Kiwanians will be involved -- this year on the 5th of July (since the Fourth falls on a Sunday).

Partnering with Kent State University, Kiwanis of SMF has seen to the re-establishment of the Aviation Day Heritage Fair each September at the Kent State Airport in Stow.

Other activities include S.O.A.R. Playground at Silver Springs Park, Cleanup Day at Camp Manatoc, Stow Adopt-a-Spot, Munroe Falls River Day, Breakfast With Santa and the annual Prayer Breakfast in May.

In order to fulfill its defining statement, the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club will continue to chair, co-chair, or otherwise participate in many large and mid-level community events, and always remains diligent about finding new, dedicated members to participate as well.

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News Headline: (Kent State at Stark) Chambers sweeten pot for existing businesses | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2010
Outlet Full Name: Independent, The
Contact Name: DOUG STALEY
News OCR Text: Massillon Chamber of Commerce President Bob Sanderson stands outside of Backlist Books in downtown Massillon.

Local chamber of commerces target retention of existing companies for a reason: They create most of a community's economic growth.

Officials at both the Massillon Area Chamber of Commerce and the Jackson-Belden Chamber of Commerce strive to strengthen its current membership to help them grow.

Robert Sanderson, president of the Massillon Area Chamber of Commerce, said 80 percent to 85 percent of a community's business growth comes through existing businesses.

“Any chamber's impact is its ability to provide support as needed to help their members be successful and grow,” he said.

Although recruitment of new businesses is important, the Jackson-Belden Chamber of Commerce also focuses on retaining current members, said chamber president Ruthanne Wilkoff.

Wilkoff is an advocate for businesses and provide a positive economic climate by serving the needs of members and developing programs to benefit them.

One example of the chamber's efforts to promote member businesses is the annual Business Expo held each March at the Kent State Stark University Center, according to Wilkoff.

She also noted the Jackson chamber offers a variety of networking groups designed to help its members attract new business. Advertising opportunities also are offered at minimal cost to members as well as premium discounts on health insurance, discounts on workers' compensation and bulk mail permits and Merchant Services discounts.

“We promote those who are members as well as refer to those members,” Wilkoff said. “Our chamber community has strengthened over the years, and that is what keeps Jackson Township an ideal place to live, work and play.”

Sanderson views the Massillon chamber's role as a “conduit for its member businesses to connect, interact and access pertinent information to help their companies grow.” He said the chamber realizes the importance of working with government at all levels – local, state and federal – to foster economic development.

“Through our network of economic development partners in both the government and private sectors we receive and follow up on potential and prospective new businesses looking to locate in Ohio, by promoting the benefits of making the Massillon area as their relocation choice,” Sanderson said. “... Our members are in business to be profitable. It is our business to help them be profitable.”

Wilkoff said the Jackson chamber's diverse mixture of people, industries and services all contribute to the organization's success.

“We have the best members who do just that. They introduce themselves and the Chamber to new businesses in the area and invite them to become a part of not only a chamber, but also a family,” Wilkoff said. “Our members are always there to give of their time and services when we have community events and are in need of volunteers.

Wilkoff said the chamber works closely with the Small Business Development Center located at the Kent State Stark University Center as well as township trustees. When a new business expresses an interest to relocate to the township, for example, Wilkoff said she gets involved in negotiations.

“If a company contacts me here at the chamber, I include the trustees and our fiscal officer in all discussions.  It's a win-win relationship and one that I truly value,” she said.

In the current economic downturn, Sanderson believes it has never been more important for area businesses to join the chamber. He said the organization can inform members of new laws and regulations affecting issues such as health care, environmental regulations, workers' compensation and transportation regulation.

Sanderson added chambers can be a source for  “delivering pertinent, timely and up to date information to assist them (businesses) in their decision making. The chamber's assistance can be of crucial importance to member businesses.”

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News Headline: (Kent State at Stark) Study shows KSU generates $130 million to local economy (Capasso) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/15/2010
Outlet Full Name: Independent, The
Contact Name: ERIN PUSTAY
News OCR Text: Education is priceless.

It'd be a very tough sell to convince Dr. Ruth C. Capasso, interim dean and chief administrative officer at Kent Stark, of anything else.

Today, however, Kent Stark has some proof that the effort its students put into their degrees and the work the alumni put into their careers make a big difference on the local community.

A $130 million dollar difference.

A recent study regarding the economic impact the Kent State University system has on Northeast Ohio indicated that, by itself, Kent Stark significantly impacts the community that surrounds it. According to release issued by Kent Stark, the comprehensive study, done by Economic Modeling Specialists, Inc., found that an estimated $129.5 million of state and local economic growth and impact can be directly tied to the local campus.

Capasso noted that the reason for the impact is multi-layered. Through education, alumni attain better-paying jobs which allows them to invest more in local economies while the businesses they work for thrive as a direct result of the education.

Most of the time, the students at Kent State Stark graduate and stay local, allowing their skills and abilities to contribute to the local community.

“I think the people who come to us want to be in the area,” Capasso said. “They may have already committed to be in this community with their families or their work. For a lot of them, its about coming to a university that is close by for a quality education.”

In addition, Capasso said, the university is a large employer in Stark County, which makes it a vital part of the community in terms of business.

Speaking of business, that is something the university is proud to be a part of. As Kent Stark continues to grow and expand – adding courses of study and degree programs – it makes sure it does so with its pulse on the needs of local business.

“We are always looking for internship opportunities and ways we can be partnering with local business to enrich academic experiences,” Capasso said.

Kent Stark also happens to house the Small Business Development Center and SCORE. Both the Small Business Development Center and SCORE provide local small business owners with support, advice, education and links to resources they need to help their businesses thrive.

Although neither are officially connected to the university, the two organizations are part of a larger picture of economic growth and development that Kent State is part of. That is why the university has offered their facilities as a central location for the two organization.

“While they are not directly related to our academic mission,” Capasso said. “We feel it is important for us, as a member of the Stark County community, to be giving back in that way.”

As the local economy continues to change and technology continues to open new avenues for career exploration, Kent State University Stark will be there every step of the way to ensure that its students and community are best prepared through education.

“We want to encourage people in their pursuit of higher education and help them understand the value of education,” Capasso said. “It is accessible and it is attainable and we try a great deal to get that information to people so they can take advantage of quality educational opportunities.”

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News Headline: (Centennial) Cleveland Orchestra performs benefit concert at Kent State (Seachrist) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As part of the Kent State University Centennial Celebration, the Cleveland Orchestra, with conductor James Feddeck, returns to Kent State to perform a benefit concert March 19, at 8 p.m.

The evening's highlight will be Schubert Symphony No. 5, in addition to works by Beethoven and Mozart.

Proceeds from the concert will benefit Kent/Blossom Music, a program that draws young musicians from all over the world to Kent State for six weeks of intensive chamber-music study alongside members of the Cleveland Orchestra, as well as Kent State's music faculty.

"This benefit is important as it will help us begin to raise the funds needed to create a $1 million endowment over the next three years," says Dr. Denise Seachrist, interim director for the School of Music. "This will allow us to provide student scholarships and continue community outreach."

The concert will be in Cartwright Hall, on Hilltop Drive on the university's Kent Campus. Tickets are $80, $50, and $30, and student tickets are $5. To order tickets, call the box office at 330-672-2497 weekdays from noon to 5 p.m., or purchase online at www.tix.com. Free parking is available and Cartwright Hall is wheelchair accessible.

With a faculty equally respected as world-class soloists, orchestra and chamber music artists, the list of alumni is a "Who's Who" in the chamber and orchestral music circuit. The more than 2,250 alumni perform with such notable institutions as the Cleveland and Philadelphia orchestras; the Boston, Atlanta and Minnesota symphonies; the Los Angeles and New York philharmonics; the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra; and nationally and internationally acclaimed ensembles such as the Arriana, Emerson, Turtle Island, Euclid and Miami String quartets.

"The significant numbers of musicians from Kent/Blossom Music who are now in major orchestras, including 20 currently with the Cleveland Orchestra, provide the great testament to the program's impact and success," says Gary Ginstling, general manager of the Cleveland Orchestra.

Faculty members include principal musicians of the Cleveland Orchestra: Frank Rosenwein (oboe), Joshua Smith (flute), John Clouser (bassoon), Richard King (horn), Joela Jones (keyboard), and Robert Vernon (violist. Other major artists include members of the Miami String Quartet - Ivan Chan and Cathy Meng-Robinson (violin); Yu Jin (Viola); and Keith Robinson (cello). Additionally, Steinway Artists-in-Residence Donna Lee and Jerry Wong round out the world-class faculty.

For more information about Kent/Blossom Music, visit http://dept.kent.edu/blossom online.

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News Headline: (Kent State at Salem) One last bee (Figg) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name: MARY ANN GREIER
News OCR Text: Dr. Kristen Figg prepares for her final spelling competition

SALEM - Columbiana County will hold its 51st spelling bee at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, but for pronouncer Dr. Kristen Figg, this year will be the last.

She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989.

For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking it twice, keeping the good words, throwing out the bad, and reading the words, their definitions and accompanying sentences aloud in preparation for the bee, an event close to her heart since childhood.

"It's kind of a natural interest for me because one of my research areas is history of language," Figg said. "I just love words."

Besides focusing on English, she's also taught French and has training in German, Italian and Latin. She compiles the word list using two books from the Scripps National Spelling Bee and the student practice books.

"We're permitted to make decisions on what words we're going to use and in what order," she explained.

She'll take a word out if it's something the students here wouldn't be familiar with, such as some words with Japanese or Hawaiian origin which would be more familiar to students on the west coast. She tries to keep the list fair. She described the job of pronouncer as crucial for the spellers.

"I think a good pronouncer works hard to create a good list so the good spellers don't go out early on difficult words that other students aren't getting," she said.

During the bee, when she pronounces a word, the speller usually says the word before trying to spell it. Figg said she finds herself listening carefully to what the student is saying so she can tell if they recognize the word.

"I want to make sure if they're going out that it's because they don't know how to spell the word, not because of my pronunciation or a bad list," she said. "A good speller should be able to work out the spelling of a word that he or she doesn't know."

She suggested the spellers study the practice book because it contains words that would be unfamiliar to them. They also need to think about how a word can take different forms. By being familiar with some simple words for various origins, they can start recognizing patterns. Students who read a lot have seen a lot of words and the image of the word may come back to them.

Her favorite part of the bee is watching the reactions of the students when they hear their word - some of them are funny. Some of the expressions reveal confidence and others surprise.

"I really try not to torture them," she said.

Figg knows what the spellers go through from her own experience and the experience of her daughter. They're both former spelling champions who represented their schools in the county contest, but neither one of them made it to the national bee.

She even remembers what words tripped them up. For Figg, it was "loathsome." For her daughter, who finished in the top three two years in a row, one of the words was "jambalaya."

In Figg's case, knowing the root word led to her spelling demise because she spelled it "loathesome."

She didn't have a least favorite part of the bee, but added "I'm always sorry to see a student who's really upset about going out."

She takes the job seriously because she said if students are going to put an effort into preparing, then she should take it seriously.

"They train the way an athlete trains," she said.

The spelling bee has become more popular in recent years since it's being televised during primetime and there's been a movie made based on the bee. Figg said it's a good opportunity for students to learn how to be on a stage and help them overcome a fear of public speaking. It's also a good opportunity for parents to spend quality time with their children helping them prepare.

She didn't rule out acting as a pronouncer again if asked. She missed 2005 because she was out of the country. She's also been the pronouncer for the Salem City bee since 2004. Her teaching career began as a grad student at the University of Akron, then at the KSU main campus in Kent and then the Salem campus.

She and her husband, John Friedman, a retired English professor from the University of Illinois, are moving to Columbus. They'll be working together on the translation commentary for a Medieval French travel book manuscript. They're both medievalists - she studies the 14th century and he studies the 14th and 15th centuries. Their son is a doctor in Columbus and their daughter is a freelance writer who's also a small market organic farmer.

Figg spoke highly of the county organizers for the bee from the Educational Service Center, saying they've been great to work with over the years. They've already started searching for her replacement. She said the person should have a good voice, should like the students and want to help them do well and should possess expertise with words.

Spelling Bee coordinator Judy Herron of the ESC said Figg has been a "top-notch pronouncer." She noted that she's good with words, recognizing her English and French background. She agreed that Figg's replacement will need to be someone who understands the language and origins enough to know which words will be good for the bee.

Co-sponsored again by the ESC, the Salem News, Morning Journal and Review, this year's bee will take place at Lisbon David Anderson High School and involve 58 students from grades 5 though 8. No home-schooled students will take part this year because the rules require participation in a bee involving several students in order to qualify for the county bee.

The winner will represent the county in the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C., just like last year's champion, Lisbon student Mitchel Kessler. This year's event will be held June 2-4.

Besides winning a free trip to D.C. with a chaperone, the champion will receive a trophy, a Samuel Louis Sugarman Award Certificate for a $100 savings bond, Webster's Third New International Dictionary and a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online.

The second place winner will receive a trophy, a Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card.

The third place winner will receive a trophy, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card.

The Ohio Lottery paid the entrance and materials fees for Ohio schools participating in the national bee.

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News Headline: (Kent State at Salem) County bee says f-a-r-e-w-e-l-l to retiring pronouncer (Figg) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name: MARY ANN GREIER
News OCR Text: > News Elsewhere > Elsewhere in Columbiana County

SALEM — Columbiana County will hold its 51st spelling bee at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, but for pronouncer Dr. Kristen Figg, this year will be the last. She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989. For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking it twice, keeping the good words, throwing out the bad, and reading the words, their definitions and accompanying sentences aloud in preparation for the bee, a event close to her heart since childhood. “It's kind of a natural interest for me because one of my research areas is history of language,” Figg said. “I just love words.” Besides focusing on English, she's also taught French and has training in German, Italian and Latin. She compiles the word list using two books from the Scripps National Spelling Bee and the student practice books. “We're permitted to make decisions on what words we're going to use and in what order,” she explained. She'll take a word out if it's something the students here wouldn't be familiar with, such as some words with Japanese or Hawaiian origin which would be more familiar to students on the west coast. She tries to keep the list fair. She described the job of pronouncer as crucial for the spellers. “I think a good pronouncer works hard to create a good list so the good spellers don't go out early on difficult words that other students aren't getting,” she said. During the bee, when she pronounces a word, the speller usually says the word before trying to spell it. Figg said she finds herself listening carefully to what the student is saying so she can tell if they recognize the word. “I want to make sure if they're going out that it's because they don't know how to spell the word, not because of my pronunciation or a bad list,” she said. “A good speller should be able to work out the spelling of a word that he or she doesn't know.” She suggested the spellers study the practice book because it contains words that would be unfamiliar to them. They also need to think about how a word can take different forms. By being familiar with some simple words for various origins, they can start recognizing patterns. Students who read a lot have seen a lot of words and the image of the word may come back to them. Her favorite part of the bee is watching the reactions of the students when they hear their word - some of them are funny. Some of the expressions reveal confidence and others surprise. “I really try not to torture them,” she said. Figg knows what the spellers go through from her own experience and the experience of her daughter. They're both former spelling champions who represented their schools in the county contest, but neither one of them made it to the national bee. She even remembers what words tripped them up. For Figg, it was “loathsome.” For her daughter, who finished in the top three two years in a row, one of the words was “jambalaya.” In Figg's case, knowing the root word led to her spelling demise because she spelled it “loathesome.” She didn't have a least favorite part of the bee, but added “I'm always sorry to see a student who's really upset about going out.” She takes the job seriously because she said if students are going to put an effort into preparing, then she should take it seriously. “They train the way an athlete trains,” she said. The spelling bee has become more popular in recent years since it's being televised during primetime, and there's been a movie made based on the bee. Figg said it's a good opportunity for students to learn how to be on a stage and help them overcome a fear of public speaking. It's also a good opportunity for parents to spend quality time with their children helping them prepare. She didn't rule out acting as a pronouncer again if asked. She missed 2005 because she was out of the country. She's also been the pronouncer for the Salem City bee since 2004. Her teaching career began as a grad student at the University of Akron, then at the KSU main campus in Kent and then the Salem campus. She and her husband, John Friedman, a retired English professor from the University of Illinois, are moving to Columbus. They'll be working together on the translation commentary for a Medieval French travel book manuscript. They're both medievalists - she studies the 14th century and he studies the 14th and 15th centuries. Their son is a doctor in Columbus and their daughter is a freelance writer who's also a small market organic farmer. Figg spoke highly of the county organizers for the bee from the Educational Service Center, saying they've been great to work with over the years. They've already started searching for her replacement. She said the person should have a good voice, should like the students and want to help them do well and should possess expertise with words. Spelling Bee coordinator Judy Herron of the ESC said Figg has been a “top-notch pronouncer.” She noted that she's good with words, recognizing her English and French background. She agreed that Figg's replacement will need to be someone who understands the language and origins enough to know which words will be good for the bee. Co-sponsored again by the ESC, the Salem News, Morning Journal and Review, this year's bee will take place at Lisbon David Anderson High School and involve 58 students from grades 5 though 8. No home-schooled students will take part this year because the rules require participation in a bee involving several students in order to qualify for the county bee. The winner will represent the county in the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C., just like last year's champion, Lisbon student Mitchel Kessler. This year's event will be held June 2-4. Besides winning a free trip to D.C. with a chaperone, the champion will receive a trophy, a Samuel Louis Sugarman Award Certificate for a $100 savings bond, Webster's Third New International Dictionary and a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online. The second place winner will receive a trophy, a Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card. The third place winner will receive a trophy, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card. The Ohio Lottery paid the entrance and materials fees for Ohio schools participating in the national bee. mgreier@salemnews.net

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News Headline: (Kent State at Salem) Pronouncer closing the book on serving Columbiana County Bee (Figg) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: > News Elsewhere > Elsewhere in Columbiana County

By MARY ANN GREIER Staff Writer Columbiana County will hold its 51st spelling bee at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, but for pronouncer Dr. Kristen Figg, this year will be the last. She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989. For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking it twice, keeping the good words, throwing out the bad, and reading the words, their definitions and accompanying sentences aloud in preparation for the bee, a event close to her heart since childhood. "It's kind of a natural interest for me because one of my research areas is history of language," Figg said. "I just love words." Besides focusing on English, she's also taught French and has training in German, Italian and Latin. She compiles the word list using two books from the Scripps National Spelling Bee and the student practice books. "We're permitted to make decisions on what words we're going to use and in what order," she explained. She'll take a word out if it's something the students here wouldn't be familiar with, such as some words with Japanese or Hawaiian origin which would be more familiar to students on the west coast. She tries to keep the list fair. She described the job of pronouncer as crucial for the spellers. "I think a good pronouncer works hard to create a good list so the good spellers don't go out early on difficult words that other students aren't getting," she said. During the bee, when she pronounces a word, the speller usually says the word before trying to spell it. Figg said she finds herself listening carefully to what the student is saying so she can tell if they recognize the word. "I want to make sure if they're going out that it's because they don't know how to spell the word, not because of my pronunciation or a bad list," she said. "A good speller should be able to work out the spelling of a word that he or she doesn't know." She suggested the spellers study the practice book because it contains words that would be unfamiliar to them. They also need to think about how a word can take different forms. By being familiar with some simple words for various origins, they can start recognizing patterns. Students who read a lot have seen a lot of words and the image of the word may come back to them. Her favorite part of the bee is watching the reactions of the students when they hear their word - some of them are funny. Some of the expressions reveal confidence and others surprise. "I really try not to torture them," she said. Figg knows what the spellers go through from her own experience and the experience of her daughter. They're both former spelling champions who represented their schools in the county contest, but neither one of them made it to the national bee. She even remembers what words tripped them up. For Figg, it was "loathsome." For her daughter, who finished in the top three two years in a row, one of the words was "jambalaya." In Figg's case, knowing the root word led to her spelling demise because she spelled it "loathesome." She didn't have a least favorite part of the bee, but added "I'm always sorry to see a student who's really upset about going out." She takes the job seriously because she said if students are going to put an effort into preparing, then she should take it seriously. "They train the way an athlete trains," she said. The spelling bee has become more popular in recent years since it's being televised during primetime and there's been a movie made based on the bee. Figg said it's a good opportunity for students to learn how to be on a stage and help them overcome a fear of public speaking. It's also a good opportunity for parents to spend quality time with their children helping them prepare. She didn't rule out acting as a pronouncer again if asked. She missed 2005 because she was out of the country. She's also been the pronouncer for the Salem City bee since 2004. Her teaching career began as a grad student at the University of Akron, then at the KSU main campus in Kent and then the Salem campus. She and her husband, John Friedman, a retired English professor from the University of Illinois, are moving to Columbus. They'll be working together on the translation commentary for a Medieval French travel book manuscript. They're both medievalists - she studies the 14th century and he studies the 14th and 15th centuries. Their son is a doctor in Columbus and their daughter is a freelance writer who's also a small market organic farmer. Figg spoke highly of the county organizers for the bee from the Educational Service Center, saying they've been great to work with over the years. They've already started searching for her replacement. She said the person should have a good voice, should like the students and want to help them do well and should possess expertise with words. Spelling Bee coordinator Judy Herron of the ESC said Figg has been a "top-notch pronouncer." She noted that she's good with words, recognizing her English and French background. She agreed that Figg's replacement will need to be someone who understands the language and origins enough to know which words will be good for the bee. Co-sponsored again by the ESC, the Salem News, Morning Journal and Review, this year's bee will take place at Lisbon David Anderson High School and involve 58 students from grades 5 though 8. No home-schooled students will take part this year because the rules require participation in a bee involving several students in order to qualify for the county bee. The winner will represent the county in the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C., just like last year's champion, Lisbon student Mitchel Kessler. This year's event will be held June 2-4. Besides winning a free trip to D.C. with a chaperone, the champion will receive a trophy, a Samuel Louis Sugarman Award Certificate for a $100 savings bond, Webster's Third New International Dictionary and a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online. The second place winner will receive a trophy, a Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card. The third place winner will receive a trophy, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card. The Ohio Lottery paid the entrance and materials fees for Ohio schools participating in the national bee. Mary Ann Greier can be reached at mgreier@salemnews.net

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News Headline: (Psychology) Neal-Barnett selected for conference (Neal-Barnett) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/15/2010
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Angela Neal-Barnett, an associate professor in Kent State University's Department of Psychology, has been selected to participate in the American Psychological Association's Science Leadership Conference. The fifth annual conference, titled "Enhancing the Nation's Health Through Psychological Science," provides a venue for psychology's scientific leadership to gather, develop a shared agenda and plan for the future of scientific psychology. Neal-Barnett is one of 100 psychologists selected for the conference.

As part of her participation in the Conference, Neal-Barnett will receive training in public advocacy and meet with congressional delegates to communicate the priorities and goals of the psychological science community. The conference takes place Nov. 14 through 16 in Washington, D.C.

Neal-Barnett is a clinical psychologist who studies anxiety among African Americans. In particular, her research focuses on African-American women and adolescents. She has more than 20 years of experience and has taught at Kent State for 20 years. Neal-Barnett's research is supported by the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Mental Health, the Kent State University Foundation and the Ohio Commission on Minority Health.

A native of Hubbard, Neal-Barnett resides in Tallmadge.

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News Headline: (Kent State at Salem) Pronouncer closing the book on serving Columbiana County Bee (Figg) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Salem News
Contact Name: MARY ANN GREIER
News OCR Text: > News > Local News

Staff Writer

Columbiana County will hold its 51st spelling bee at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, but for pronouncer Dr. Kristen Figg, this year will be the last.

She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989.

For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking it twice, keeping the good words, throwing out the bad, and reading the words, their definitions and accompanying sentences aloud in preparation for the bee, a event close to her heart since childhood.

"It's kind of a natural interest for me because one of my research areas is history of language," Figg said. "I just love words."

Besides focusing on English, she's also taught French and has training in German, Italian and Latin. She compiles the word list using two books from the Scripps National Spelling Bee and the student practice books.

"We're permitted to make decisions on what words we're going to use and in what order," she explained.

She'll take a word out if it's something the students here wouldn't be familiar with, such as some words with Japanese or Hawaiian origin which would be more familiar to students on the west coast. She tries to keep the list fair. She described the job of pronouncer as crucial for the spellers.

"I think a good pronouncer works hard to create a good list so the good spellers don't go out early on difficult words that other students aren't getting," she said.

During the bee, when she pronounces a word, the speller usually says the word before trying to spell it. Figg said she finds herself listening carefully to what the student is saying so she can tell if they recognize the word.

"I want to make sure if they're going out that it's because they don't know how to spell the word, not because of my pronunciation or a bad list," she said. "A good speller should be able to work out the spelling of a word that he or she doesn't know."

She suggested the spellers study the practice book because it contains words that would be unfamiliar to them. They also need to think about how a word can take different forms. By being familiar with some simple words for various origins, they can start recognizing patterns. Students who read a lot have seen a lot of words and the image of the word may come back to them.

Her favorite part of the bee is watching the reactions of the students when they hear their word - some of them are funny. Some of the expressions reveal confidence and others surprise.

"I really try not to torture them," she said.

Figg knows what the spellers go through from her own experience and the experience of her daughter. They're both former spelling champions who represented their schools in the county contest, but neither one of them made it to the national bee.

She even remembers what words tripped them up. For Figg, it was "loathsome." For her daughter, who finished in the top three two years in a row, one of the words was "jambalaya."

In Figg's case, knowing the root word led to her spelling demise because she spelled it "loathesome."

She didn't have a least favorite part of the bee, but added "I'm always sorry to see a student who's really upset about going out."

She takes the job seriously because she said if students are going to put an effort into preparing, then she should take it seriously.

"They train the way an athlete trains," she said.

The spelling bee has become more popular in recent years since it's being televised during primetime and there's been a movie made based on the bee. Figg said it's a good opportunity for students to learn how to be on a stage and help them overcome a fear of public speaking. It's also a good opportunity for parents to spend quality time with their children helping them prepare.

She didn't rule out acting as a pronouncer again if asked. She missed 2005 because she was out of the country. She's also been the pronouncer for the Salem City bee since 2004. Her teaching career began as a grad student at the University of Akron, then at the KSU main campus in Kent and then the Salem campus.

She and her husband, John Friedman, a retired English professor from the University of Illinois, are moving to Columbus. They'll be working together on the translation commentary for a Medieval French travel book manuscript. They're both medievalists - she studies the 14th century and he studies the 14th and 15th centuries. Their son is a doctor in Columbus and their daughter is a freelance writer who's also a small market organic farmer.

Figg spoke highly of the county organizers for the bee from the Educational Service Center, saying they've been great to work with over the years. They've already started searching for her replacement. She said the person should have a good voice, should like the students and want to help them do well and should possess expertise with words.

Spelling Bee coordinator Judy Herron of the ESC said Figg has been a "top-notch pronouncer." She noted that she's good with words, recognizing her English and French background. She agreed that Figg's replacement will need to be someone who understands the language and origins enough to know which words will be good for the bee.

Co-sponsored again by the ESC, the Salem News, Morning Journal and Review, this year's bee will take place at Lisbon David Anderson High School and involve 58 students from grades 5 though 8. No home-schooled students will take part this year because the rules require participation in a bee involving several students in order to qualify for the county bee.

The winner will represent the county in the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C., just like last year's champion, Lisbon student Mitchel Kessler. This year's event will be held June 2-4.

Besides winning a free trip to D.C. with a chaperone, the champion will receive a trophy, a Samuel Louis Sugarman Award Certificate for a $100 savings bond, Webster's Third New International Dictionary and a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online.

The second place winner will receive a trophy, a Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card.

The third place winner will receive a trophy, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card.

The Ohio Lottery paid the entrance and materials fees for Ohio schools participating in the national bee.

Mary Ann Greier can be reached at mgreier@salemnews.net

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News Headline: (Kent State at Salem) One last bee (Figg) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Salem News
Contact Name: MARY ANN GREIER
News OCR Text: > News Elsewhere > Elsewhere in Columbiana County

Dr. Kristen Figg prepares for her final spelling competition

Article Photos

SALEM — Columbiana County will hold its 51st spelling bee at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, but for pronouncer Dr. Kristen Figg, this year will be the last. She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989. For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking it twice, keeping the good words, throwing out the bad, and reading the words, their definitions and accompanying sentences aloud in preparation for the bee, an event close to her heart since childhood. “It's kind of a natural interest for me because one of my research areas is history of language,” Figg said. “I just love words.” Besides focusing on English, she's also taught French and has training in German, Italian and Latin. She compiles the word list using two books from the Scripps National Spelling Bee and the student practice books. “We're permitted to make decisions on what words we're going to use and in what order,” she explained. She'll take a word out if it's something the students here wouldn't be familiar with, such as some words with Japanese or Hawaiian origin which would be more familiar to students on the west coast. She tries to keep the list fair. She described the job of pronouncer as crucial for the spellers. “I think a good pronouncer works hard to create a good list so the good spellers don't go out early on difficult words that other students aren't getting,” she said. During the bee, when she pronounces a word, the speller usually says the word before trying to spell it. Figg said she finds herself listening carefully to what the student is saying so she can tell if they recognize the word. “I want to make sure if they're going out that it's because they don't know how to spell the word, not because of my pronunciation or a bad list,” she said. “A good speller should be able to work out the spelling of a word that he or she doesn't know.” She suggested the spellers study the practice book because it contains words that would be unfamiliar to them. They also need to think about how a word can take different forms. By being familiar with some simple words for various origins, they can start recognizing patterns. Students who read a lot have seen a lot of words and the image of the word may come back to them. Her favorite part of the bee is watching the reactions of the students when they hear their word - some of them are funny. Some of the expressions reveal confidence and others surprise. “I really try not to torture them,” she said. Figg knows what the spellers go through from her own experience and the experience of her daughter. They're both former spelling champions who represented their schools in the county contest, but neither one of them made it to the national bee. She even remembers what words tripped them up. For Figg, it was “loathsome.” For her daughter, who finished in the top three two years in a row, one of the words was “jambalaya.” In Figg's case, knowing the root word led to her spelling demise because she spelled it “loathesome.” She didn't have a least favorite part of the bee, but added “I'm always sorry to see a student who's really upset about going out.” She takes the job seriously because she said if students are going to put an effort into preparing, then she should take it seriously. “They train the way an athlete trains,” she said. The spelling bee has become more popular in recent years since it's being televised during primetime and there's been a movie made based on the bee. Figg said it's a good opportunity for students to learn how to be on a stage and help them overcome a fear of public speaking. It's also a good opportunity for parents to spend quality time with their children helping them prepare. She didn't rule out acting as a pronouncer again if asked. She missed 2005 because she was out of the country. She's also been the pronouncer for the Salem City bee since 2004. Her teaching career began as a grad student at the University of Akron, then at the KSU main campus in Kent and then the Salem campus. She and her husband, John Friedman, a retired English professor from the University of Illinois, are moving to Columbus. They'll be working together on the translation commentary for a Medieval French travel book manuscript. They're both medievalists - she studies the 14th century and he studies the 14th and 15th centuries. Their son is a doctor in Columbus and their daughter is a freelance writer who's also a small market organic farmer. Figg spoke highly of the county organizers for the bee from the Educational Service Center, saying they've been great to work with over the years. They've already started searching for her replacement. She said the person should have a good voice, should like the students and want to help them do well and should possess expertise with words. Spelling Bee coordinator Judy Herron of the ESC said Figg has been a “top-notch pronouncer.” She noted that she's good with words, recognizing her English and French background. She agreed that Figg's replacement will need to be someone who understands the language and origins enough to know which words will be good for the bee. Co-sponsored again by the ESC, the Salem News, Morning Journal and Review, this year's bee will take place at Lisbon David Anderson High School and involve 58 students from grades 5 though 8. No home-schooled students will take part this year because the rules require participation in a bee involving several students in order to qualify for the county bee. The winner will represent the county in the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C., just like last year's champion, Lisbon student Mitchel Kessler. This year's event will be held June 2-4. Besides winning a free trip to D.C. with a chaperone, the champion will receive a trophy, a Samuel Louis Sugarman Award Certificate for a $100 savings bond, Webster's Third New International Dictionary and a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online. The second place winner will receive a trophy, a Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card. The third place winner will receive a trophy, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card. The Ohio Lottery paid the entrance and materials fees for Ohio schools participating in the national bee.

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News Headline: (Kent State at Salem) County bee says f-a-r-e-w-e-l-l to retiring pronouncer (Figg) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Salem News
Contact Name: MARY ANN GREIER
News OCR Text: > News Elsewhere > Elsewhere in Columbiana County

SALEM — Columbiana County will hold its 51st spelling bee at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, but for pronouncer Dr. Kristen Figg, this year will be the last. She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989. For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking it twice, keeping the good words, throwing out the bad, and reading the words, their definitions and accompanying sentences aloud in preparation for the bee, a event close to her heart since childhood. “It's kind of a natural interest for me because one of my research areas is history of language,” Figg said. “I just love words.” Besides focusing on English, she's also taught French and has training in German, Italian and Latin. She compiles the word list using two books from the Scripps National Spelling Bee and the student practice books. “We're permitted to make decisions on what words we're going to use and in what order,” she explained. She'll take a word out if it's something the students here wouldn't be familiar with, such as some words with Japanese or Hawaiian origin which would be more familiar to students on the west coast. She tries to keep the list fair. She described the job of pronouncer as crucial for the spellers. “I think a good pronouncer works hard to create a good list so the good spellers don't go out early on difficult words that other students aren't getting,” she said. During the bee, when she pronounces a word, the speller usually says the word before trying to spell it. Figg said she finds herself listening carefully to what the student is saying so she can tell if they recognize the word. “I want to make sure if they're going out that it's because they don't know how to spell the word, not because of my pronunciation or a bad list,” she said. “A good speller should be able to work out the spelling of a word that he or she doesn't know.” She suggested the spellers study the practice book because it contains words that would be unfamiliar to them. They also need to think about how a word can take different forms. By being familiar with some simple words for various origins, they can start recognizing patterns. Students who read a lot have seen a lot of words and the image of the word may come back to them. Her favorite part of the bee is watching the reactions of the students when they hear their word - some of them are funny. Some of the expressions reveal confidence and others surprise. “I really try not to torture them,” she said. Figg knows what the spellers go through from her own experience and the experience of her daughter. They're both former spelling champions who represented their schools in the county contest, but neither one of them made it to the national bee. She even remembers what words tripped them up. For Figg, it was “loathsome.” For her daughter, who finished in the top three two years in a row, one of the words was “jambalaya.” In Figg's case, knowing the root word led to her spelling demise because she spelled it “loathesome.” She didn't have a least favorite part of the bee, but added “I'm always sorry to see a student who's really upset about going out.” She takes the job seriously because she said if students are going to put an effort into preparing, then she should take it seriously. “They train the way an athlete trains,” she said. The spelling bee has become more popular in recent years since it's being televised during primetime, and there's been a movie made based on the bee. Figg said it's a good opportunity for students to learn how to be on a stage and help them overcome a fear of public speaking. It's also a good opportunity for parents to spend quality time with their children helping them prepare. She didn't rule out acting as a pronouncer again if asked. She missed 2005 because she was out of the country. She's also been the pronouncer for the Salem City bee since 2004. Her teaching career began as a grad student at the University of Akron, then at the KSU main campus in Kent and then the Salem campus. She and her husband, John Friedman, a retired English professor from the University of Illinois, are moving to Columbus. They'll be working together on the translation commentary for a Medieval French travel book manuscript. They're both medievalists - she studies the 14th century and he studies the 14th and 15th centuries. Their son is a doctor in Columbus and their daughter is a freelance writer who's also a small market organic farmer. Figg spoke highly of the county organizers for the bee from the Educational Service Center, saying they've been great to work with over the years. They've already started searching for her replacement. She said the person should have a good voice, should like the students and want to help them do well and should possess expertise with words. Spelling Bee coordinator Judy Herron of the ESC said Figg has been a “top-notch pronouncer.” She noted that she's good with words, recognizing her English and French background. She agreed that Figg's replacement will need to be someone who understands the language and origins enough to know which words will be good for the bee. Co-sponsored again by the ESC, the Salem News, Morning Journal and Review, this year's bee will take place at Lisbon David Anderson High School and involve 58 students from grades 5 though 8. No home-schooled students will take part this year because the rules require participation in a bee involving several students in order to qualify for the county bee. The winner will represent the county in the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C., just like last year's champion, Lisbon student Mitchel Kessler. This year's event will be held June 2-4. Besides winning a free trip to D.C. with a chaperone, the champion will receive a trophy, a Samuel Louis Sugarman Award Certificate for a $100 savings bond, Webster's Third New International Dictionary and a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online. The second place winner will receive a trophy, a Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card. The third place winner will receive a trophy, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card. The Ohio Lottery paid the entrance and materials fees for Ohio schools participating in the national bee. mgreier@salemnews.net

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News Headline: (Kent State at Salem) One last bee (Figg) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name: MARY ANN GREIER
News OCR Text: > News Elsewhere > Elsewhere in Columbiana County

Dr. Kristen Figg prepares for her final spelling competition

SALEM — Columbiana County will hold its 51st spelling bee at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, but for pronouncer Dr. Kristen Figg, this year will be the last. She's shelving her dictionary and word lists for retirement, from both the bee she's served since 2004 and the Kent State University Salem campus where she's taught as a professor of English since 1989. For now, though, she's scanning her list and checking it twice, keeping the good words, throwing out the bad, and reading the words, their definitions and accompanying sentences aloud in preparation for the bee, an event close to her heart since childhood. “It's kind of a natural interest for me because one of my research areas is history of language,” Figg said. “I just love words.” Besides focusing on English, she's also taught French and has training in German, Italian and Latin. She compiles the word list using two books from the Scripps National Spelling Bee and the student practice books. “We're permitted to make decisions on what words we're going to use and in what order,” she explained. She'll take a word out if it's something the students here wouldn't be familiar with, such as some words with Japanese or Hawaiian origin which would be more familiar to students on the west coast. She tries to keep the list fair. She described the job of pronouncer as crucial for the spellers. “I think a good pronouncer works hard to create a good list so the good spellers don't go out early on difficult words that other students aren't getting,” she said. During the bee, when she pronounces a word, the speller usually says the word before trying to spell it. Figg said she finds herself listening carefully to what the student is saying so she can tell if they recognize the word. “I want to make sure if they're going out that it's because they don't know how to spell the word, not because of my pronunciation or a bad list,” she said. “A good speller should be able to work out the spelling of a word that he or she doesn't know.” She suggested the spellers study the practice book because it contains words that would be unfamiliar to them. They also need to think about how a word can take different forms. By being familiar with some simple words for various origins, they can start recognizing patterns. Students who read a lot have seen a lot of words and the image of the word may come back to them. Her favorite part of the bee is watching the reactions of the students when they hear their word - some of them are funny. Some of the expressions reveal confidence and others surprise. “I really try not to torture them,” she said. Figg knows what the spellers go through from her own experience and the experience of her daughter. They're both former spelling champions who represented their schools in the county contest, but neither one of them made it to the national bee. She even remembers what words tripped them up. For Figg, it was “loathsome.” For her daughter, who finished in the top three two years in a row, one of the words was “jambalaya.” In Figg's case, knowing the root word led to her spelling demise because she spelled it “loathesome.” She didn't have a least favorite part of the bee, but added “I'm always sorry to see a student who's really upset about going out.” She takes the job seriously because she said if students are going to put an effort into preparing, then she should take it seriously. “They train the way an athlete trains,” she said. The spelling bee has become more popular in recent years since it's being televised during primetime and there's been a movie made based on the bee. Figg said it's a good opportunity for students to learn how to be on a stage and help them overcome a fear of public speaking. It's also a good opportunity for parents to spend quality time with their children helping them prepare. She didn't rule out acting as a pronouncer again if asked. She missed 2005 because she was out of the country. She's also been the pronouncer for the Salem City bee since 2004. Her teaching career began as a grad student at the University of Akron, then at the KSU main campus in Kent and then the Salem campus. She and her husband, John Friedman, a retired English professor from the University of Illinois, are moving to Columbus. They'll be working together on the translation commentary for a Medieval French travel book manuscript. They're both medievalists - she studies the 14th century and he studies the 14th and 15th centuries. Their son is a doctor in Columbus and their daughter is a freelance writer who's also a small market organic farmer. Figg spoke highly of the county organizers for the bee from the Educational Service Center, saying they've been great to work with over the years. They've already started searching for her replacement. She said the person should have a good voice, should like the students and want to help them do well and should possess expertise with words. Spelling Bee coordinator Judy Herron of the ESC said Figg has been a “top-notch pronouncer.” She noted that she's good with words, recognizing her English and French background. She agreed that Figg's replacement will need to be someone who understands the language and origins enough to know which words will be good for the bee. Co-sponsored again by the ESC, the Salem News, Morning Journal and Review, this year's bee will take place at Lisbon David Anderson High School and involve 58 students from grades 5 though 8. No home-schooled students will take part this year because the rules require participation in a bee involving several students in order to qualify for the county bee. The winner will represent the county in the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C., just like last year's champion, Lisbon student Mitchel Kessler. This year's event will be held June 2-4. Besides winning a free trip to D.C. with a chaperone, the champion will receive a trophy, a Samuel Louis Sugarman Award Certificate for a $100 savings bond, Webster's Third New International Dictionary and a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online. The second place winner will receive a trophy, a Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card. The third place winner will receive a trophy, a one-year subscription to Encyclopedia Britannica Online and a $20 Amazon.com gift card. The Ohio Lottery paid the entrance and materials fees for Ohio schools participating in the national bee.

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News Headline: (LGBTQ) AUDIO Gay Students Focus Of New Center (Merryman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2010
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has opened its new Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Student Center.

Co-coordinator Molly Merryman says it's an idea that the campus community is ready to accept, even though the center focuses on a relatively small segment of the student population.

"It isn't simply for people who identify as LGBTQ," said Merryman. "Its allies, friends, supporters - anyone wanting to know more about issues of sexual minorities."

Merryman says Kent has a long history of supporting LGBT issues, including the nation's first student organization dedicated to LGBT students. She says the new student center offers a place dedicated to programming that will be of interest to LGBTQ students and other community members.

"In terms of what we're going to be doing, we're actually sitting back and listening to the students to tell us," said Merryman.

It's located on the second floor of the Kent Student Center.

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News Headline: (Centennial) Cleveland Orchestra performs benefit concert at Kent State (Seachrist) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As part of the Kent State University Centennial Celebration, the Cleveland Orchestra, with conductor James Feddeck, returns to Kent State to perform a benefit concert March 19, at 8 p.m.

The evening's highlight will be Schubert Symphony No. 5, in addition to works by Beethoven and Mozart.

Proceeds from the concert will benefit Kent/Blossom Music, a program that draws young musicians from all over the world to Kent State for six weeks of intensive chamber-music study alongside members of the Cleveland Orchestra, as well as Kent State's music faculty.

"This benefit is important as it will help us begin to raise the funds needed to create a $1 million endowment over the next three years," says Dr. Denise Seachrist, interim director for the School of Music. "This will allow us to provide student scholarships and continue community outreach."

The concert will be in Cartwright Hall, on Hilltop Drive on the university's Kent Campus. Tickets are $80, $50, and $30, and student tickets are $5. To order tickets, call the box office at 330-672-2497 weekdays from noon to 5 p.m., or purchase online at www.tix.com. Free parking is available and Cartwright Hall is wheelchair accessible.

With a faculty equally respected as world-class soloists, orchestra and chamber music artists, the list of alumni is a "Who's Who" in the chamber and orchestral music circuit. The more than 2,250 alumni perform with such notable institutions as the Cleveland and Philadelphia orchestras; the Boston, Atlanta and Minnesota symphonies; the Los Angeles and New York philharmonics; the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra; and nationally and internationally acclaimed ensembles such as the Arriana, Emerson, Turtle Island, Euclid and Miami String quartets.

"The significant numbers of musicians from Kent/Blossom Music who are now in major orchestras, including 20 currently with the Cleveland Orchestra, provide the great testament to the program's impact and success," says Gary Ginstling, general manager of the Cleveland Orchestra.

Faculty members include principal musicians of the Cleveland Orchestra: Frank Rosenwein (oboe), Joshua Smith (flute), John Clouser (bassoon), Richard King (horn), Joela Jones (keyboard), and Robert Vernon (violist. Other major artists include members of the Miami String Quartet - Ivan Chan and Cathy Meng-Robinson (violin); Yu Jin (Viola); and Keith Robinson (cello). Additionally, Steinway Artists-in-Residence Donna Lee and Jerry Wong round out the world-class faculty.

For more information about Kent/Blossom Music, visit http://dept.kent.edu/blossom online.

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News Headline: (Centennial) Cleveland Orchestra performs benefit concert at Kent State (Seachrist) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As part of the Kent State University Centennial Celebration, the Cleveland Orchestra, with conductor James Feddeck, returns to Kent State to perform a benefit concert March 19, at 8 p.m.

The evening's highlight will be Schubert Symphony No. 5, in addition to works by Beethoven and Mozart.

Proceeds from the concert will benefit Kent/Blossom Music, a program that draws young musicians from all over the world to Kent State for six weeks of intensive chamber-music study alongside members of the Cleveland Orchestra, as well as Kent State's music faculty.

"This benefit is important as it will help us begin to raise the funds needed to create a $1 million endowment over the next three years," says Dr. Denise Seachrist, interim director for the School of Music. "This will allow us to provide student scholarships and continue community outreach."

The concert will be in Cartwright Hall, on Hilltop Drive on the university's Kent Campus. Tickets are $80, $50, and $30, and student tickets are $5. To order tickets, call the box office at 330-672-2497 weekdays from noon to 5 p.m., or purchase online at www.tix.com. Free parking is available and Cartwright Hall is wheelchair accessible.

With a faculty equally respected as world-class soloists, orchestra and chamber music artists, the list of alumni is a "Who's Who" in the chamber and orchestral music circuit. The more than 2,250 alumni perform with such notable institutions as the Cleveland and Philadelphia orchestras; the Boston, Atlanta and Minnesota symphonies; the Los Angeles and New York philharmonics; the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra; and nationally and internationally acclaimed ensembles such as the Arriana, Emerson, Turtle Island, Euclid and Miami String quartets.

"The significant numbers of musicians from Kent/Blossom Music who are now in major orchestras, including 20 currently with the Cleveland Orchestra, provide the great testament to the program's impact and success," says Gary Ginstling, general manager of the Cleveland Orchestra.

Faculty members include principal musicians of the Cleveland Orchestra: Frank Rosenwein (oboe), Joshua Smith (flute), John Clouser (bassoon), Richard King (horn), Joela Jones (keyboard), and Robert Vernon (violist. Other major artists include members of the Miami String Quartet - Ivan Chan and Cathy Meng-Robinson (violin); Yu Jin (Viola); and Keith Robinson (cello). Additionally, Steinway Artists-in-Residence Donna Lee and Jerry Wong round out the world-class faculty.

For more information about Kent/Blossom Music, visit http://dept.kent.edu/blossom online.

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News Headline: (Fashion) KSU professor earns textile design award (Ohrn-McDaniel) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/15/2010
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel, a faculty members of Kent State University's School of Fashion and a resident of Tallmadge recently garnered an award at the 2009 International Textile and Apparel Association annual meeting in Seattle.

Ohrn-McDaniel, an assistant professor, received the ATEXINC Award for Textile Design, specifically, for Best Sustainable Design by Faculty and was given by Educators for Socially Responsible Apparel Business. The dress, made completely from drier sheets and titled "Poured Out and Dried Up," was created by the layering of used drier sheets, hand tacked together with a transparent thread, then embellished with dyed Pepsi-bottle sequins.

"It was a great honor to receive this award," Ohrn-McDaniel said. "I feel strongly about sustainable design for many reasons in today's environment. It is difficult to not be aware of the need to save and use our resources as effectively we can."

Ohrn-McDaniel, Swedish-born and raised, has been an assistant professor at Kent State since 2004 and currently teaches Fashion Studio III and IV senior-level classes, where students construct their final collections, and machine knitting.

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News Headline: (Diversity, Admissions) Stedman Graham to Speak Today at Kent State University and NEOUCOM | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/11/2010
Outlet Full Name: Boston Business Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WOONSOCKET, R.I., March 11 /PRNewswire/ -- CVS Caremark, the largest pharmacy health care provider in the United States, is pleased to sponsor nationally known author, educator and entrepreneur Stedman Graham to speak today at Kent State University and Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM) as part of the company's commitment to increase diversity in the pharmacy profession, and help high school students take their first steps in health care careers.

Graham will serve as the keynote speaker this afternoon at NEOUCOM's sixth annual Diversity Leadership and Awards Celebration, an event that supports diversity scholarships and recognizes outstanding individuals who have demonstrated a commitment to advancing and improving diversity within the school's Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy and Health Professions.

CVS Caremark and NEOUCOM will also hold a special event at Kent State University for more than 400 northeast Ohio high school students interested in pursuing a career in health care. At this event, Graham will discuss the importance of higher education, setting goals and overcoming adversity. Drawing from his book Diversity: Leaders not Labels, Graham will discuss how students can develop an identity and sense of self, and break out of the box that keeps them from growing to their full potential – revealing that success is truly based on results, performance and excellence.

"Stedman Graham's presence at this year's diversity luncheon brings a new level of excitement to this event. His positive message of setting high standards and overcoming adversity are certain to leave a positive mark on attendees," says Lindsey Loftus, NEOUCOM vice president for institutional advancement.

CVS Caremark has sponsored Graham's youth workshops nationwide since 2006 to help motivate high school students from diverse backgrounds to discover career paths, set high goals and achieve them.

In addition to working with Graham, CVS Caremark has partnered with America's Promise Alliance since 2000 to offer Pathways to Pharmacy, a paid summer internship program, to increase access and diversity in pharmacy careers across the nation. So far the program has reached high school students in more than 40 cities.

"Our goal is to work with young people and to help them take a first step toward a pharmacy career," says Stephen Wing, Director of Workforce Initiatives at CVS Caremark. "Given the growing demand for pharmacy services nationwide, CVS Caremark is taking a proactive step to help educate the next generation of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians through its Pathways program."

The  Pathways to Pharmacy program began at NEOUCOM last summer, where seven students from area high schools participated in 25-hour a week paid internships that included three weeks of experience shadowing pharmacists in CVS/pharmacy stores and two weeks of instruction on NEOUCOM's Rootstown campus. The program will resume at NEOUCOM this summer.

About CVS Caremark

CVS Caremark is the largest pharmacy health care provider in the United States. Through our integrated offerings across the entire spectrum of pharmacy care, we are uniquely positioned to provide greater access, to engage plan members in behaviors that improve their health, and to lower overall health care costs for health plans, plan sponsors and their members. CVS Caremark is a market leader in mail order pharmacy, retail pharmacy, specialty pharmacy, and retail clinics, and is a leading provider of Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans. As one of the country's largest pharmacy benefits managers (PBMs), we provide access to a network of more than 64,000 pharmacies, including approximately 7,000 CVS/pharmacy® stores that provide unparalleled service and capabilities. Our clinical expertise includes one of the industry's most comprehensive disease management programs. General information about CVS Caremark is available through the Company's Web site at http://info.cvscaremark.com.

About Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

The Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM) is a community-based, public institution offering both a doctor of medicine (M.D.) and a doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree.

The Institution's educational partners include teaching hospitals, community pharmacies, two boards of health and four northeast Ohio public universities. Through these and other collaborative arrangements, NEOUCOM participate in the Consortium of Eastern Ohio Master of Public Health program and offers graduate-level coursework and research opportunities leading to master's and doctoral degrees in biomedical sciences and biomedical engineering. NEOUCOM is a founding member of the Austen BioInnovation Institute in Akron.

About Stedman Graham

Stedman Graham has built a strong reputation for helping corporations, organizations and individuals succeed. He is chairman and CEO of S.Graham and Associates (SGA), a Chicago-based management and marketing consulting company specializing in corporate and education markets. Some of SGA's clients include Wells Fargo, CVS Pharmacy, Merrill Lynch, the U.S. Department of Labor's Job Corps and Manpower.

Mr. Graham is the author of ten books including two New York Times bestsellers, You Can Make it Happen: A Nine-Step Plan for Success and Teens Can Make it Happen: Nine Steps to Success. In 2005 he published Who Are You? A Success Process for Building Your Life's Foundation, and in 2006 he released Diversity: Leaders not Labels - A New Plan for the 21st Century.

Contacts:

Carolyn Castel

T.K. Hall

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News Headline: (Diversity, Admissions) Stedman Graham to Speak Today at Kent State University andNEOUCOM | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/11/2010
Outlet Full Name: Business First of Columbus - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CVS Caremark, the largest pharmacy health care provider in the United States, is pleased to sponsor nationally known author, educator and entrepreneur Stedman Graham to speak today at Kent State University and Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM) as part of the company's commitment to increase diversity in the pharmacy profession, and help high school students take their first steps in health care careers.

Graham will serve as the keynote speaker this afternoon at NEOUCOM's sixth annual Diversity Leadership and Awards Celebration, an event that supports diversity scholarships and recognizes outstanding individuals who have demonstrated a commitment to advancing and improving diversity within the school's Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy and Health Professions.

CVS Caremark and NEOUCOM will also hold a special event at Kent State University for more than 400 northeast Ohio high school students interested in pursuing a career in health care. At this event, Graham will discuss the importance of higher education, setting goals and overcoming adversity. Drawing from his book Diversity: Leaders not Labels, Graham will discuss how students can develop an identity and sense of self, and break out of the box that keeps them from growing to their full potential – revealing that success is truly based on results, performance and excellence.

"Stedman Graham's presence at this year's diversity luncheon brings a new level of excitement to this event. His positive message of setting high standards and overcoming adversity are certain to leave a positive mark on attendees," says Lindsey Loftus, NEOUCOM vice president for institutional advancement.

CVS Caremark has sponsored Graham's youth workshops nationwide since 2006 to help motivate high school students from diverse backgrounds to discover career paths, set high goals and achieve them.

In addition to working with Graham, CVS Caremark has partnered with America's Promise Alliance since 2000 to offer Pathways to Pharmacy, a paid summer internship program, to increase access and diversity in pharmacy careers across the nation. So far the program has reached high school students in more than 40 cities.

"Our goal is to work with young people and to help them take a first step toward a pharmacy career," says Stephen Wing, Director of Workforce Initiatives at CVS Caremark. "Given the growing demand for pharmacy services nationwide, CVS Caremark is taking a proactive step to help educate the next generation of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians through its Pathways program."

The  Pathways to Pharmacy program began at NEOUCOM last summer, where seven students from area high schools participated in 25-hour a week paid internships that included three weeks of experience shadowing pharmacists in CVS/pharmacy stores and two weeks of instruction on NEOUCOM's Rootstown campus. The program will resume at NEOUCOM this summer.

About CVS Caremark

CVS Caremark is the largest pharmacy health care provider in the United States. Through our integrated offerings across the entire spectrum of pharmacy care, we are uniquely positioned to provide greater access, to engage plan members in behaviors that improve their health, and to lower overall health care costs for health plans, plan sponsors and their members. CVS Caremark is a market leader in mail order pharmacy, retail pharmacy, specialty pharmacy, and retail clinics, and is a leading provider of Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans. As one of the country's largest pharmacy benefits managers (PBMs), we provide access to a network of more than 64,000 pharmacies, including approximately 7,000 CVS/pharmacy® stores that provide unparalleled service and capabilities. Our clinical expertise includes one of the industry's most comprehensive disease management programs. General information about CVS Caremark is available through the Company's Web site at http://info.cvscaremark.com.

About Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

The Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM) is a community-based, public institution offering both a doctor of medicine (M.D.) and a doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree.

The Institution's educational partners include teaching hospitals, community pharmacies, two boards of health and four northeast Ohio public universities. Through these and other collaborative arrangements, NEOUCOM participate in the Consortium of Eastern Ohio Master of Public Health program and offers graduate-level coursework and research opportunities leading to master's and doctoral degrees in biomedical sciences and biomedical engineering. NEOUCOM is a founding member of the Austen BioInnovation Institute in Akron.

About Stedman Graham

Stedman Graham has built a strong reputation for helping corporations, organizations and individuals succeed. He is chairman and CEO of S.Graham and Associates (SGA), a Chicago-based management and marketing consulting company specializing in corporate and education markets. Some of SGA's clients include Wells Fargo, CVS Pharmacy, Merrill Lynch, the U.S. Department of Labor's Job Corps and Manpower.

Mr. Graham is the author of ten books including two New York Times bestsellers, You Can Make it Happen: A Nine-Step Plan for Success and Teens Can Make it Happen: Nine Steps to Success. In 2005 he published Who Are You? A Success Process for Building Your Life's Foundation, and in 2006 he released Diversity: Leaders not Labels - A New Plan for the 21st Century.

Contacts:

Carolyn Castel

T.K. Hall

Return to Top


News Headline: (Diversity, Admissions) Stedman Graham to speak at Kent State University and NEOUCOM | Email

News Date: 03/11/2010
Outlet Full Name: Associated Press (AP)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CVS Caremark, the largest pharmacy health care provider in the United States, is
pleased to sponsor nationally known author, educator and entrepreneur Stedman
Graham to speak today at Kent State University and Northeastern Ohio Universities
Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM) as part of the company's commitment
to increase diversity in the pharmacy profession, and help high school students
take their first steps in health care careers.
Graham will serve as the keynote speaker this afternoon at NEOUCOM's sixth
annual Diversity Leadership and Awards Celebration, an event that supports
diversity scholarships and recognizes outstanding individuals who have
demonstrated a commitment to advancing and improving diversity within the
school's Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy and Health Professions.
CVS Caremark and NEOUCOM will also hold a special event at Kent State
University for more than 400 northeast Ohio high school students interested in
pursuing a career in health care. At this event, Graham will discuss the
importance of higher education, setting goals and overcoming adversity.
Drawing from his book Diversity Leaders not Labels, Graham will discuss how
students can develop an identity and sense of self, and break out of the box
that keeps them from growing to their full potential - revealing that success
is truly based on results, performance and excellence.
"Stedman Graham's presence at this year's diversity luncheon brings a new
level of excitement to this event. His positive message of setting high
standards and overcoming adversity are certain to leave a positive mark on
attendees," says Lindsey Loftus, NEOUCOM vice president for institutional
advancement.
CVS Caremark has sponsored Graham's youth workshops nationwide since 2006
to help motivate high school students from diverse backgrounds to discover
career paths, set high goals and achieve them.
In addition to working with Graham, CVS Caremark has partnered with
America's Promise Alliance since 2000 to offer Pathways to Pharmacy, a paid
summer internship program, to increase access and diversity in pharmacy
careers across the nation. So far the program has reached high school students
in more than 40 cities.
"Our goal is to work with young people and to help them take a first step
toward a pharmacy career," says Stephen Wing, Director of Workforce
Initiatives at CVS Caremark. "Given the growing demand for pharmacy services
nationwide, CVS Caremark is taking a proactive step to help educate the next
generation of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians through its Pathways
program."
The Pathways to Pharmacy program began at NEOUCOM last summer, where
seven students from area high schools participated in 25-hour a week paid
internships that included three weeks of experience shadowing pharmacists in
CVS/pharmacy stores and two weeks of instruction on NEOUCOM's Rootstown
campus. The program will resume at NEOUCOM this summer.
About CVS Caremark
CVS Caremark is the largest pharmacy health care provider in the United
States. Through our integrated offerings across the entire spectrum of
pharmacy care, we are uniquely positioned to provide greater access, to engage
plan members in behaviors that improve their health, and to lower overall
health care costs for health plans, plan sponsors and their members. CVS
Caremark is a market leader in mail order pharmacy, retail pharmacy, specialty
pharmacy, and retail clinics, and is a leading provider of Medicare Part D
Prescription Drug Plans. As one of the country's largest pharmacy benefits
managers (PBMs), we provide access to a network of more than 64,000
pharmacies, including approximately 7,000 CVS/pharmacy@ stores that provide
unparalleled service and capabilities. Our clinical expertise includes one of
the industry's most comprehensive disease management programs. General
information about CVS Caremark is available through the Company's Web site at
http //info.cvscaremark.com.
About Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy
The Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy
(NEOUCOM) is a community-based, public institution offering both a doctor of
medicine (M.D.) and a doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree.
The Institution's educational partners include teaching hospitals,
community pharmacies, two boards of health and four northeast Ohio public
universities. Through these and other collaborative arrangements, NEOUCOM
participate in the Consortium of Eastern Ohio Master of Public Health program
and offers graduate-level coursework and research opportunities leading to
master's and doctoral degrees in biomedical sciences and biomedical
engineering. NEOUCOM is a founding member of the Austen BioInnovation
Institute in Akron.
About Stedman Graham
Stedman Graham has built a strong reputation for helping corporations,
organizations and individuals succeed. He is chairman and CEO of S.Graham and
Associates (SGA), a Chicago-based management and marketing consulting company
specializing in corporate and education markets. Some of SGA's clients include
Wells Fargo, CVS Pharmacy, Merrill Lynch, the U.S. Department of Labor's Job
Corps and Manpower.
Mr. Graham is the author of ten books including two New York Times
bestsellers, You Can Make it Happen A Nine-Step Plan for Success and Teens
Can Make it Happen Nine Steps to Success. In 2005 he published Who Are You? A
Success Process for Building Your Life's Foundation, and in 2006 he released
Diversity Leaders not Labels - A New Plan for the 21st Century.

Copyright © 2010 The Associated Press

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News Headline: (Diversity, Admissions) Stedman Graham to Speak Today at Kent State University and NEOUCOM | Email

News Date: 03/11/2010
Outlet Full Name: PR Newswire
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CVS Caremark, the largest pharmacy health care provider in the United States, is pleased to sponsor nationally known author, educator and entrepreneur Stedman Graham to speak today at Kent State University and Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM) as part of the company's commitment to increase diversity in the pharmacy profession, and help high school students take their first steps in health care careers.
(Logo )
Graham will serve as the keynote speaker this afternoon at NEOUCOM's sixth annual Diversity Leadership and Awards Celebration, an event that supports diversity scholarships and recognizes outstanding individuals who have demonstrated a commitment to advancing and improving diversity within the school's Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy and Health Professions.
CVS Caremark and NEOUCOM will also hold a special event at Kent State University for more than 400 northeast Ohio high school students interested in pursuing a career in health care. At this event, Graham will discuss the importance of higher education, setting goals and overcoming adversity. Drawing from his book Diversity Leaders not Labels, Graham will discuss how students can develop an identity and sense of self, and break out of the box that keeps them from growing to their full potential – revealing that success is truly based on results, performance and excellence.

"Stedman Graham's presence at this year's diversity luncheon brings a new level of excitement to this event. His positive message of setting high standards and overcoming adversity are certain to leave a positive mark on attendees," says Lindsey Loftus, NEOUCOM vice president for institutional advancement.

CVS Caremark has sponsored Graham's youth workshops nationwide since 2006 to help motivate high school students from diverse backgrounds to discover career paths, set high goals and achieve them.

In addition to working with Graham, CVS Caremark has partnered with America's Promise Alliance since 2000 to offer Pathways to Pharmacy, a paid summer internship program, to increase access and diversity in pharmacy careers across the nation. So far the program has reached high school students in more than 40 cities.

"Our goal is to work with young people and to help them take a first step toward a pharmacy career," says Stephen Wing, Director of Workforce Initiatives at CVS Caremark. "Given the growing demand for pharmacy services nationwide, CVS Caremark is taking a proactive step to help educate the next generation of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians through its Pathways program."

The Pathways to Pharmacy program began at NEOUCOM last summer, where seven students from area high schools participated in 25-hour a week paid internships that included three weeks of experience shadowing pharmacists in CVS/pharmacy stores and two weeks of instruction on NEOUCOM's Rootstown campus. The program will resume at NEOUCOM this summer.

About CVS Caremark

CVS Caremark is the largest pharmacy health care provider in the United States. Through our integrated offerings across the entire spectrum of pharmacy care, we are uniquely positioned to provide greater access, to engage plan members in behaviors that improve their health, and to lower overall health care costs for health plans, plan sponsors and their members. CVS Caremark is a market leader in mail order pharmacy, retail pharmacy, specialty pharmacy, and retail clinics, and is a leading provider of Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans. As one of the country's largest pharmacy benefits managers (PBMs), we provide access to a network of more than 64,000 pharmacies, including approximately 7,000 CVS/pharmacy® stores that provide unparalleled service and capabilities. Our clinical expertise includes one of the industry's most comprehensive disease management programs. General information about CVS Caremark is available through the Company's Web site at .

About Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

The Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM) is a community-based, public institution offering both a doctor of medicine (M.D.) and a doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree.

The Institution's educational partners include teaching hospitals, community pharmacies, two boards of health and four northeast Ohio public universities. Through these and other collaborative arrangements, NEOUCOM participate in the Consortium of Eastern Ohio Master of Public Health program and offers graduate-level coursework and research opportunities leading to master's and doctoral degrees in biomedical sciences and biomedical engineering. NEOUCOM is a founding member of the Austen BioInnovation Institute in Akron.

About Stedman Graham

Stedman Graham has built a strong reputation for helping corporations, organizations and individuals succeed. He is chairman and CEO of S.Graham and Associates (SGA), a Chicago-based management and marketing consulting company specializing in corporate and education markets. Some of SGA's clients include Wells Fargo, CVS Pharmacy, Merrill Lynch, the U.S. Department of Labor's Job Corps and Manpower.

Mr. Graham is the author of ten books including two New York Times bestsellers, You Can Make it Happen A Nine-Step Plan for Success and Teens Can Make it Happen Nine Steps to Success. In 2005 he published Who Are You? A Success Process for Building Your Life's Foundation, and in 2006 he released Diversity Leaders not Labels - A New Plan for the 21st Century.

Contacts Carolyn Castel T.K. Hall CVS Caremark Weber Shandwick Worldwide (401) 770-5717 (617) 520-7258 CCastel@cvs.com TK.Hall@webershandwick.com

SOURCE CVS Caremark

CONTACT Carolyn Castel of CVS Caremark, +1-401-770-5717, CCastel@cvs.com; or T.K. Hall of Weber Shandwick Worldwide, +1-617-520-7258, TK.Hall@webershandwick.com

Copyright © 2010 PR Newswire

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News Headline: (Fashion) KSU's Fashion School is Competing for sideRACK's June Featured Designer Slot | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2010
Outlet Full Name: pr-usa.net
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Remember me

The 2010 senior design students of Kent State University's Fashion School are sharpening their scissors for the opportunity to be chosen as the Featured Designer in the newly launched retail site www.sideRACK.net, which focuses on bringing young design talent to the forefront.

SideRACK.net is expanding their designer pool and, for this reason, has decided to scout the up-coming Fashion Design graduates for new, interesting perspectives and consequently staying true to their company motto “bringing great indie labels to the masses.” In June 2010, sideRACK will be launching their first-ever “Emerging Talent” Design Contest. Kent State's Fashion School was not a coincidental choice.

“The decision came easy; I really wanted to launch this new project at the school that has helped me reach my current level of success. As an Alumna, I wanted to give back to the fashion school as a sign of my appreciation for preparing me so well for the business world” states Cristina Montesinos, founder of sideRACK.net. “While the school truly embraces creativity, it also really teaches students to logically think outside the box, while keeping in mind not just the designer price point, but also the mass-market and everything in between. I believe this is what sets Kent State's Fashion School above the rest.”

Since online retail is becoming a rapidly growing/relevant business sector, this contest will not only help students establish their name to the public, but will also help them understand another retail avenue in the industry. SideRACK.net has already arranged and set up the contest rules with help of the current Fashion School Director J.R. Campbell and will be judging entries on: Design Innovation, Cohesiveness, Market Appropriateness, and Creative Styling.

“We felt that all these criteria elements were important and sometimes underappreciated factors that must be considered, especially when selling online. Many customers have moved to the internet to make their purchases and the designers have to understand that selling in a store is very different than selling through a 3” by 2” inch image. The visual representation has to be impeccable or the customer will not be satisfied enough to make a purchase,” states Montesinos.

Until the final decision is reached on June 2010, sideRACK will be regularly posting entries and updates on their blog www.siderack.net/blog.

For more information visit www.sideRACK.net or email sammi@siderack.net

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News Headline: (NOCCO) KENT STATE UNIVERSITY PARTNERS WITH MID AMERICAN COOPERATIVE COUNCIL (Messing) | Email

News Date: 03/12/2010
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY PARTNERS WITH MID AMERICAN COOPERATIVE COUNCIL, BRAINTREE BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER TO PRESENT COOPERATIVE START-UP FORUM ON MARCH. 18
KENT, Ohio, March 11 -- Kent State University issued the following news release
The Northern Ohio Center for Cooperative Ownership at Kent State University, Mid American Cooperative Council, and Braintree Business Development Center are conducting a Cooperative Start-Up Forum on Thursday, March 18, in Medina. This session will help small business owners determine if a cooperative is the best business structure for existing or potential small business owners.
"We examine what is the best way to organize a new business," said Roy Messing of the Northern Ohio Center for Cooperative Ownership at Kent State. "Recent changes in the Ohio Revised Code not only make it possible to organize as a cooperative, but also provide advantages to those who do so."
The Cooperative Start-Up Forum will provide attendees with the necessary tools to determine if a cooperative is right for their business. It also will identify the next functional steps for cooperative business development. The program will compare and contrast cooperatives with other business models. Attendees will have the opportunity to talk with people who have actually started a successful co-op.
The workshop will address
* What are cooperatives?
* Who owns them?
* How do they function?
* How to establish your business as a cooperative
* Strengths and weaknesses of co-ops versus other business structures
* Common pitfalls to establishing a new cooperative business
* Raising equity How much and when it is needed?
The workshop is on Thursday, March 18, from 8 45 a.m. to noon and will be held at Dairy Farmers of America, 1035 Medina Rd., Suite 300, Medina, Ohio. This is east of Medina on state Route 18, east of Interstate 71 and west of Interstate 77.
Workshop facilitators are Bob Cohen of the Braintree Business Development Center, Roy Messing of the Northern Ohio Center for Cooperative Ownership at Kent State, and Rod Kelsay of Mid American Cooperative Council.
The cost for the program is $35. Refreshments will be provided. Pre-registration is preferred. To register or to obtain additional information, contact Roy Messing at rmessin2@kent.edu or at 330-672-3028.For more information please contact Sarabjit Jagirdar, Email - htsyndication@hindustantimes.com.
Copyright © 2010 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: (McGruder Lecture Series) Riley to be honored | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2010
Outlet Full Name: Freep.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley is to receive the Distinguished Leadership Award for Diversity in Media in a presentation at the Robert G. McGruder Lecture next month at Kent State University, alma mater of former Free Press editor McGruder, who died in 2002.

Riley, a Free Press columnist since 2000, has written extensively about Michigan's adult literacy problem, education reform, foster care and diversity. She has won a national Scripps Howard Award for column writing, and twice been named the state's best local columnist by the Michigan Press Association.

The Ohio university also announced that this year's McGruder Award for encouraging diversity in the field of journalism will go to Richard Prince, columnist for the Maynard Institute of Journalism Education.

The awards are to be presented April 6.

McGruder, a 1963 Kent State graduate, was a Free Press editor for 16 years and a pioneer in diversity and in the field of journalism. He was the first African-American editor of the Free Press and the first to become president of the Associated Press Managing Editors group. The American Society of News Editors also presents a McGruder Award each year for encouraging diversity in newsrooms and in news content.

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News Headline: (LGTBQ) Ohio News Nuggets: New center opens | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2010
Outlet Full Name: Diverse Issues in Higher Education
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Clip from the March 4, 2010, issue of Diverse: Issues in Higher Education magazine re: the LGTBQ Student Center and diversity:

http://mydigimag.rrd.com/publication/?i=32771&p=29

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News Headline: (Biostatistics) Data from Kent State University advance knowledge in HIV/AIDS risk factors (Bhatta) | Email

News Date: 03/13/2010
Outlet Full Name: Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Current study results from the report, 'Human immunodeficiency virus infection in alabama women sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive health characteristics and factors associated with lack of human immunodeficiency virus-1 viral control,' have been published. "Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among women in the southern United States is on the rise. This study examined sociodemographic profile and behavioral risk factors for HIV and sexually transmitted infections and assessed factors associated with HIV-1 viral control in a cohort of 280 HIV-infected Alabama women aged 17 to 66 years," scientists writing in the The American Journal of the Medical Sciences report (see also ).
"Women receiving care for HIV infection at a university outpatient HIV clinic were enrolled in the study. Women completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographics and behavioral risk factors at enrollment. They were followed up with appointments at least every 6 months with Papanicolaou smears, cervicovaginal lavages, cervical and vaginal swabs, and blood specimens collected at each visit. Of the women in the study, 69% were black, had mean age of 36 years, and approximately three fourths were mothers with annual household income <$20,000. White women were likely to have been HIV infected for a longer period (50.2 versus 36.3 months; p=0.02) and had significantly lower viral loads at enrollment (p=0.04) than black women. Factors associated with lack of HIV-1 control (>or=10,000 RNA copies/mL) at enrollment included black race/ethnicity (odds ratio [OR] 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-6.8), CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/microL (OR 20.1; CI 8.6-47.0), being diagnosed with HIV <6 months (OR 3.5; CI 1.4-8.9) and not being on any antiretroviral therapy (OR 2.5; CI 1.1-5.7)," wrote M.P. Bhatta and colleagues, Kent State University.
The researchers concluded "Poorer HIV-1 viral control in black women at enrollment may indicate suboptimal access to HIV testing, delays in receipt of medical care after HIV-1 diagnosis, and/or some underlying biologic or social race-related influence."
Bhatta and colleagues published their study in The American Journal of the Medical Sciences (Human immunodeficiency virus infection in alabama women sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive health characteristics and factors associated with lack of human immunodeficiency virus-1 viral control. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 2010;339(2) 133-40).
Additional information can be obtained by contacting M.P. Bhatta, Epidemiology and Environmental Health Science, Dept. of Biostatistics, Kent State University, OH 44242 USA.
Copyright © 2010 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: (COPH) Findings from Kent State University advance knowledge in infarction (Zullo) | Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Heart Disease Weekly
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to recent research published in the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, "Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a multifactorial program that encourages healthy behaviors in persons with a recent cardiovascular event or procedure. Research on the association between CR and health-behavior maintenance has focused on physical activity."
"Therefore, the purpose of this research was to examine the association of health behaviors (fruit/vegetable consumption and physical activity) and body mass index (BMI) with CR attendance and time since participation in respondents reporting history of myocardial infarction (MI). This was a cross-sectional study using the 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (n = 1,374). Eligible respondents were those with a history of MI. were fruit/vegetable consumption, physical activity, and BMI. Time since CR was based on age at MI and age at survey. Logistic (polytomous) regression was used to identify predictors. CR attendees were 69% more likely to meet fruit/vegetable guidelines than were nonattendees (P = .02). CR was not associated with meeting physical activity guidelines. CR had a protective, yet nonsignificant effect on BMI. Meeting fruit/vegetable guidelines was associated with CR attendance in the past year (odds ratio = 4.64, confidence interval, CI 1.03-20.95). CR attendees were 75% less likely to be overweight 1 to 2 years post-CR (CI 0.08-0.73) and 59% less likely to be obese 2 to 5 years post-CR than were nonattendees (CI 0.20-0.85). CR attendance was associated with healthy behaviors, though maintenance diminished over time," wrote M.D. Zullo and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).
The researchers concluded "Understanding the factors associated with healthy behaviors, and the time when behavior performance decreases, will assist with program planning directed at behavior maintenance."
Zullo and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention (Cardiac Rehabilitation, Health Behaviors, and Body Mass Index Post-Myocardial Infarction. Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, 2010;30(1) 28-34).
For additional information, contact M.D. Zullo, Kent State University, Coll Public Hlth, Kent Hall 136C, POB 5190, Kent, OH 44242, USA.
The publisher's contact information for the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention is Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 530 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621, USA.
Copyright © 2010 Heart Disease Weekly via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: (Fashion) KSU's Fashion School is competing for sideRACK's June "Featured Designer" slot | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: 24-7PressRelease
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News OCR Text: www.sideRACK.net, a new concept online fashion site specializing in showcasing indie designers has announced its collaboration with Kent State University for an emerging designers contest.

KENT, OH, March 14, 2010 /24-7PressRelease/ -- The 2010 senior design students of Kent State University's Fashion School are sharpening their scissors for the opportunity to be chosen as the Featured Designer in the newly launched retail site http://www.sideRACK.net, which focuses on bringing young design talent to the forefront.

SideRACK.net is expanding their designer pool and, for this reason, has decided to scout the up-coming Fashion Design graduates for new, interesting perspectives and consequently staying true to their company motto "bringing great indie labels to the masses." In June 2010, sideRACK will be launching their first-ever "Emerging Talent" Design Contest. Kent State's Fashion School was not a coincidental choice.

"The decision came easy; I really wanted to launch this new project at the school that has helped me reach my current level of success. As an Alumna, I wanted to give back to the fashion school as a sign of my appreciation for preparing me so well for the business world" states Cristina Montesinos, founder of sideRACK.net. "While the school truly embraces creativity, it also really teaches students to logically think outside the box, while keeping in mind not just the designer price point, but also the mass-market and everything in between. I believe this is what sets Kent State's Fashion School above the rest."

Since online retail is becoming a rapidly growing/relevant business sector, this contest will not only help students establish their name to the public, but will also help them understand another retail avenue in the industry. SideRACK.net has already arranged and set up the contest rules with help of the current Fashion School Director J.R. Campbell and will be judging entries on: Design Innovation, Cohesiveness, Market Appropriateness, and Creative Styling.

"We felt that all these criteria elements were important and sometimes underappreciated factors that must be considered, especially when selling online. Many customers have moved to the internet to make their purchases and the designers have to understand that selling in a store is very different than selling through a 3" by 2" inch image. The visual representation has to be impeccable or the customer will not be satisfied enough to make a purchase," states Montesinos.

About sideRACK

Until the final decision is reached on June 2010, sideRACK will be regularly posting entries and updates on their blog http://www.siderack.net/blog.

For more information visit http://www.sideRACK.net or email sammi@siderack.net

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