Report Overview:
Total Clips (22)
Urban Design Center (1)
Finance (3)
Technology (2)
Athletics (2)
College of Arts and Sciences ( AS) (2)
Town-Gown (3)
Museum (2)
Student Life (1)
Recreational Services (2)
May 4 (1)
WKSU-FM (1)
Anthropology (1)
Psychology (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Urban Design Center (1)
Knock On Wood: Creative discussions anticpated for Creative Voices summit 05/28/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Terry Schwarz of Cleveland Heights, the interim director of Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, will be one of five panelists talking about what it means to be a creative city. ...


Finance (3)
WECO Fund holding financial management classes: Business Calendar (Holder) 05/30/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...County Public Library, Main Library Building, Room 2AB, 60 S. High St. Mark Holder, director of the master of science financial engineering program at Kent State University, will speak on ways individuals may invest using derivative contracts, index options contracts and futures options. Free. Parking...

Investors to have June 1 meeting 05/31/2010 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

...membership is required. Parking is free after 6 p.m. Professor Dr. Mark Holder, director of the master of science financial engineering program at Kent State University, will speak on some of the less complicated ways individual investors may invest using derivative contracts, index options contracts...

Bulletin Board (May 30) (Holder) 05/30/2010 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...membership is required. Parking is free after 6 p.m. Professor Dr. Mark Holder, director of the Master of Science Financial Engineering Program at Kent State University, will speak of the less complicated ways individual investors may invest using derivative contracts, index options contracts...


Technology (2)
Local news briefs - May 29 05/29/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...is elated about what he calls a ''fair and just'' verdict. Calderwood will be sentenced on Wednesday and faces a maximum of five years in prison. KENT STATE KSU lands award The Loening Trophy is the oldest of all collegiate aviation awards and recognizes the best collegiate aviation program...

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S PRECISION FLIGHT TEAM WINS PRESTIGIOUS TROPHY (McFarland) 05/29/2010 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, May 28 -- Kent State University issued the following news release Kent State University's Precision Flight Team recently attended the National Intercollegiate...


Athletics (2)
Kent State course offers perfect challenge 06/01/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Celebrating Laing Kennedy's career 06/01/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Arts and Sciences ( AS) (2)
ALONG THE WAY 06/01/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Ohio universities try to figure out how to get and keep vets on campus (Drew) 06/01/2010 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (3)
PARTA moves on buying property in Kent 06/01/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

PARTA moves on buying property in Kent: Offers made for land on DePeyster Street for transit center 05/30/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...for the lot. Which, if you compare the properties around that have sold, its a ridiculously low amount, she said. She pointed to purchases the city and Kent State University have made in the past two years. In 2008, the city paid $399,999 for three parcels owned by Right Dimensions at the corner of...

KSU hotel plan moves forward: Exchange of properties between city, university puts pieces into place (The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio) 05/28/2010 Hotel Online Text Attachment Email

The Akron Beacon Journal, OhioMcClatchy-Tribune Regional News May 28--The pieces are now in place for Kent State's effort to construct a university-affiliated hotel and conference center in downtown Kent. Kent State trustees have voted to...


Museum (2)
Graham Road resurfacing nearly finished 06/01/2010 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

... Greek heritage seen in Stavropoulos' designs (WITH VIDEO) Greek heritage seen in Stavropoulos' designs by April Helms Special Products Editor The Kent State University Museum opened an exhibit of about 50 George Stavropoulos' dresses in the Broadbent Gallery, to coincide with what would have...

FASHION SHOW BENEFITS KENT STATE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM (Druesedow) 05/29/2010 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, May 28 -- Kent State University issued the following news release "Lunch With Kate Celebrating Katharine Hepburn's Influence on Fashion" heralded original...


Student Life (1)
Tyler Norris /Kent State University junior 40- 45 "I'm realistic about the fact that I might not have a job as soon as I come out. 05/30/2010 News 5 Today Weekend at 6:30 AM - WLWT-TV Text Email

...BEFORE HIS SUMMER BREAK, TYLER BEGAN BREAKING OPEN BOXES TO MOVE BACK HOME. AND WHERE HE MOVES AFTER IS SCHOOL IS LEAVING HIM NERVOUS. Tyler Norris /Kent State University junior 40- 45 "I'm realistic about the fact that I might not have a job as soon as I come out. I would love to. IS THAT...


Recreational Services (2)
Fun in the sun (Rufra) 05/31/2010 WBNS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...canoe and kayak livery in downtown Kent will take place July 3 during the town's Heritage Festival. But Crooked River Adventures, sponsored by the Kent State University Department of Recreational Services, has already begun offering rides daily from John Brown Tannery Park. The livery also rents...

Fun in the sun (Rufra) 05/30/2010 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

...canoe and kayak livery in downtown Kent will take place July 3 during the town's Heritage Festival. But Crooked River Adventures, sponsored by the Kent State University Department of Recreational Services, has already begun offering rides daily from John Brown Tannery Park. The livery also rents...


May 4 (1)
national register of historic places 05/31/2010 Tampa Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

... Banquet to support historic school Life in the Bealsville community traditionally has centered on work, its churches and its school. ...more Kent State creates walking tours of '70 shootings Kent State University has created a walking tour to commemorate the 40th anniversary of...


WKSU-FM (1)
Audio-Technica Selected For WKSU'S Mobile Folk Alley Studio (Bartholet, Gunderman, Fahey) 06/01/2010 ProSoundWeb Text Attachment Email

...take its show on the road with the vehicle which was paid for through a generous grant from a Folk Alley fan. The show helps to promote FolkAlley.com and Kent State University. ProSoundWeb Poll Which subject would you like to know more about? Total Votes 267 Mixing consoles 30% (81)...


Anthropology (1)
Paleo Patrol: Was mankind's first leap in a forest or savanna? (Lovejoy) 05/28/2010 Earth - Online Text Attachment Email

...efficient way for early hominins to travel between clumps of forest when grasslands were first expanding. In 1981, C. Owen Lovejoy, an anthropologist at Kent State University in Ohio, came up with an explanation for the origin of bipedalism that didn't involve the savanna; instead, he said, walking...


Psychology (1)
Reports from Kent State University highlight recent research in obesity 05/29/2010 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week Text Email

...An obesity index by age interaction emerged in multiple domains, including memory and attention/executive function," wrote J. Gunstad and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded "Obesity indices showed similar associations to cognitive function, and further work is needed...


News Headline: Knock On Wood: Creative discussions anticpated for Creative Voices summit | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Jane Wood
News OCR Text: Terry Schwarz of Cleveland Heights, the interim director of Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, will be one of five panelists talking about what it means to be a creative city.

The discussion will be held at the Creative Voices Summit from 9:30-11 a.m. on June 7 at downtown's Idea Center.

The event is free, but reservations are required: (216) 687-5018.

DOING GOOD: Open your wallets and attend this year's twilight benefit, “Gracious Gardens of Shaker Heights,” at 6 p.m. June 18 at the Shaker Heights home of Andrew and Robin Schachat.

Dinner is by the incomparable J. Pistone, and there will be Brazilian jazz as well as three types of auctions.

Honorary chairs are Mary Kay DeGrandis and Edward Donnelly; the benefit and garden tour chairs are Ann Cicarella and Margaret Ransohoff. Silent auction chair is Leslye Arian.

For information, call (216) 921-1201.

•Tipple to your heart's content at this year's Cleveland Wine Festival from 4-10 p.m. June 25 and from 3-9 p.m. June 26 at the Nautica Pavilion on the west bank of the Flats, 2014 Sycamore St.

Guests can sample 200 international, domestic and Ohio wines and enjoy food from Northeast Ohio establishments. There will be live entertainment on the main stage.

Proceeds benefit the Bright Side of the Road Foundation, founded by Barry Winovich to help find a cure for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Adult wine-tasting tickets are $25 in advance or $35 at the gate; designated-driver tickets are $10, and those younger than 21 are admitted free when accompanied by a paid adult.

For more information, call (847) 382-1480.

ARTS TALK: The Cleveland Arts Prize presents its much-anticipated awards at 7 p.m. June 15 at the Cleveland Museum of Art's refurbished Gartner Auditorium.

VIP ticket holders begin the evening at 6:30 p.m. at a reception with Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson in the glass-enclosed Art Allee. Cleveland Heights resident Dennis Barrie is the host.

For information, visit clevelandartsprize.org.

Send tips to kownews@sbcglobal.net.

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News Headline: WECO Fund holding financial management classes: Business Calendar (Holder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/30/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Eileen Zakareckis
News OCR Text: JOBS HELP

TUESDAY

Auburn Career Center's Job Hunters' Resource Group: 6 to 7 p.m. at the Auburn Career Center, Technology Learning Center, 8221 Auburn Road, Concord Township. "Acing the Interview." Free. For more information call 440-357-7542, ext. 8168 or 8625.

Job-search experts to teach networking skills: 6:30 p.m. at the Hudson Library & Historical Society, 96 Library St., Hudson. "How to Network: In Person and Online," presented by Donald Wayne McLeod and Teresa Simons. Also held Tuesday, July 13. Free. Registration required. E-mail askus@hudson.lib.oh.us or call 330-653-6658, ext. 1010.

Northeast Ohio Job Search Summit: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Plain Dealer, 1801 Superior Ave., Cleveland. Presentations and speakers include: "Job Market Update," Randy Samsel, eSearch; "Free Job Search Programs and Training," Bonnie Dick, the Employment Connection; "Professional Appearance and Your Resume," Dawn Zima, president of Cleveland SHRM and owner of 10 Second Impression; "Leveraging Social Media," Susan Burton Lowry, Squareone Consulting; and "What to do with your money -- 401(k), severance benefits, COBRA and retirement plans," Kurt Mears, Advance Capital. $5. Seating is limited. Register by Friday. Go to tinyurl.com/333w84r to register.

"Insider Secrets to Supercharge your Job Search": 6:30 p.m. at the Hudson Library & Historical Society, 96 Library St., Hudson. Nicole Pearch, career placement coordinator. Free. To register, e-mail askus@hudson.lib.oh.us or call 330-653-6658, ext. 1010.

CALENDAR

TUESDAY

The American Association of Individual Investors Akron Sub-Chapter: 6:30 p.m. at the Akron-Summit County Public Library, Main Library Building, Room 2AB, 60 S. High St. Mark Holder, director of the master of science financial engineering program at Kent State University, will speak on ways individuals may invest using derivative contracts, index options contracts and futures options. Free. Parking is free after 6 p.m. E-mail questions to aaii-neo@googlegroups.com

WEDNESDAY

WECO Fund Inc. financial management class, "Credit Smart": 6 to 7 p.m. at KeyBank Financial Education Center, 11461 Buckeye Road, Cleveland. Free. To register, call 216-370- 5630.

WECO Fund Inc. financial management class, "To Your Credit": 7:15 to 8:15 p.m. at KeyBank Financial Education Center, 11461 Buckeye Road, Cleveland. Free. To register, call 216-370-5630.

"Conducting Effective Workplace Investigations": 9 a.m. to noon at the ERC Workplace Center, Third Floor, 6700 Beta Drive, Mayfield. $100 for members, $120 for nonmembers. To register, go to tinyurl.com/3ynypha or call 440-947-1300.

THURSDAY

WECO Fund Inc. business development class, "Insurance 101": 6 to 8 p.m. at Rutledge Group Inc., 13124 Shaker Square, Cleveland. Free. To register, call 216-458-0250, Ext. 215.

ERC Orientation: 9 to 10 a.m. at the ERC Workplace Center, Third Floor, 6700 Beta Drive, Mayfield. Free. To register, go to tinyurl.com/26df8u6 or call 440-947-1300.

FRIDAY

Business Volunteers Unlimited seminar, "Role of the Board": 8 to 11:15 a.m. at the Dr. Harry E. Eastridge Professional Development Center, Building B, 5700 W. Canal Road, Valley View. $65 for members, $95 for nonmembers. Go to ennect.com/e1011? to register.

Finding Financing for Exporters Conference: 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Embassy Suites, 5800 Rockside Woods Blvd., Independence. The conference is hosted by the U.S. Department of Commerce/U.S. Commercial Service. $95 for full-day conference, $45 for luncheon only. Register by Wednesday. Go to tinyurl.com/22ox4o8 to register.

WECO Fund Inc., "Microloan Packaging Workshop": 5:30 to 7 p.m. at KeyBank Financial Education Center, 11461 Buckeye Road, Cleveland. Free. To register, call 216-370- 5630.

WECO Fund Inc. business development class, "Lending Through a Banker's Eyes": 5:30 to 7 p.m. at KeyBank Financial Education Center, 11461 Buckeye Road, Cleveland. Free. To register, call 216-370-5630.

WECO Fund Inc. business development class, "Pitch Then Plan I -- Business Plan Writing": 2 to 4 p.m. at KeyBank Financial Education Center, 11461 Buckeye Road, Cleveland. "Pitch Then Plan II" will be 2 to 4 p.m. June 16, and "Pitch Then Plan III" will be 2 to 4 p.m. June 23. Free. To register, call 216-370-5630.

Lake Communicators Luncheon: 11:30 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. at the Lake Metroparks Pine Ridge Country Club, 30610 Ridge Road, Wickliffe. "Integrating Print & Social Media to Maintain Your Brand," presented by Tom Ruffner, Villa Beach Communications. $15 for members, $25 for nonmembers. Register by Friday. E-mail Shirley Wolfe at wolfeshirley@yahoo.com or call Diana Lewis at 440-255-8932.

Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland's eighth annual Policy Summit: 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (reception follows) June 9, and 9 a.m. to noon (lunch follows) June 10 at the Cleveland Marriott Downtown at Key Center, 127 Public Square, Cleveland. "Housing Policy: Who Pays, Who Plays, Who Wins." $195 per person, $135 for nonprofit organizations. Go to tinyurl.com/yjmc6pw to register.

"Foundations for Business Success I -- Starting a Business in Ohio": 6 to 8 p.m. at WECO Fund Inc., 3209 Chester Ave., Cleveland. Free. To register, call 216-458-0250.

Webinar on "Flexibility Matters: Advantages Impacting the Bottom Line": 2 to 3 p.m. at your computer. The webinar, sponsored by NFS Hospitality, is presented by Diane Stegmeier of Stegmeier Consulting Group. Free. Go to myrendezvous.net/webinar.html to register.

Forming a Nonprofit Organization: 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Shaker Library, 16500 Van Aken Blvd., Shaker Heights. Representatives of the Service Corps of Retired Executives will review the organizational aspects of forming a nonprofit, and David Holmes of the Cleveland Foundation will review what you need to do before seeking a grant and will provide a checklist for new nonprofits to follow in seeking funding. Free. Must register; call 216-991-2030, ext. 6.

Labor Law Basics Roundtable: 7:45 to 9:30 a.m. at Walthall, Drake & Wallace LLP CPAs, Suite 100, 6300 Rockside Road, Independence. "Hiring and Firing 101," presented by Jennifer Corso, a certified specialist in labor & employment law, KeyBank and Walthall, Drake & Wallace LLP CPAs. Free. Register by June 11. E-mail Sharlene_silva@keybank.com or call 216-828-8678.

Northeast Ohio Relocation Roundtable breakfast: 8 a.m. at the Holiday Inn, 6001 Rockside Road. Independence. "Worldwide ERC Industry Updates," presented by Susan Schneider, vice president of Worldwide ERC and president of Plus Relocation Services Inc. $20. To register; go to neorr.org/meeting-registration.html or call 216-583-8926.

Lake/Geauga Area Chapter of the Society for Human Resource Management: 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Dino's Restaurant (inside the Days Inn), 4145 Ohio 306, Willoughby. "Basic HR Law & Procedures & Employee Free Choice Act," presented by Karen Neilsen, of the National Labor Relations Board. $20 for members, $30 nonmembers. Go to tinyurl.com/2d3yfv7 to register.

SATURDAY, JUNE 19

Computer Assisted Genealogy Group-Cleveland Area meeting: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Fairview Park Regional Library, 21255 Lorain Road, Fairview Park. Morning Session: "Interactive Tech Toy Fair," with Jean Hoffman; Afternoon Session: "Latest Online Goodies," with Jean Hoffman. Go to rootsweb.com/~ohcagg/ or call Bill Frank, 440-734-2021.

Cleveland Council on World Affairs Annual Meeting: 6 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza Hotel & Conference Center, 5300 Rockside Road, Independence. Keynote speaker is Christopher Connor, chairman and chief executive officer of Sherwin-Williams Co., "How World Affairs Shape the Actions of Global Companies: The Sherwin-Williams Company Perspective." Free. Must RSVP. Go to tinyurl.com/28wh823 to register.

Barberton Community Development Corp. 25th Anniversary Luncheon: Noon to 2 p.m. at the Active Adult Center, Lake Anna YMCA, 500 W. Hopocan Ave., Barberton. "Clean Energy Perspective from an Industry Leader," presented by Rich Killion, president and chief operating officer of Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group Inc. $25. Register by June 17. E-mail info@bcdc.org or call 330-745-3070.

Business Volunteers Unlimited seminar: 9 to 11 a.m. at the Penton Media Building, Conference Center, 1300 East Ninth St., Cleveland. "Investments and Governance: A Discussion of Benchmarks and Best Practices," presented by Tom Hartland, founder and chief executive officer of Hartland & Co., and J.T. Mullen, former senior vice president and chief financial officer of the Cleveland Foundation. $45 for members, $75 for nonmembers. Go to tinyurl.com/26bzosf to register.

College Planning Seminar: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Skoda Minotti, 6685 Beta Drive, Mayfield. Free. Go to tinyurl.com/y4hotso to register.

Lake County Entrepreneurs Club luncheon: 11:30 a.m. at Andrews Osborne Academy, 38588 Mentor Ave., Willoughby. Speakers are Mike Clark and Steve Orlando of Cell-A-Spot. $16.45. Go to lcjune.eventbrite.com/ to register.

CFA Society of Cleveland Healthcare Panel Discussion: 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Cleveland Clinic Intercontinental Hotel's Ballroom. "The Future of U.S. Healthcare and Implications for Investors." Free for CFASC members, $30 for nonmembers. RSVP by June 23. E-mail Katie Khoury, cfa@cleveland.cfasociety.org or call, 216-696-8066.

Labor Law Basics Roundtable: 7:45 to 9:30 a.m. at Walthall, Drake & Wallace LLP CPAs, Suite 100, 6300 Rockside Road, Independence. "Red Flags in Employment Issues -- How to Spot Them and What to Do When They Arise," presented by Jennifer Corso, a certified specialist in labor and employment law; KeyBank; and Walthall, Drake & Wallace LLP CPAs. Free. Register by July 16. E-mail Sharlene_silva@keybank.com or call 216-828-8678.

College Planning Seminar: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Skoda Minotti, 6685 Beta Drive, Mayfield. Free. Go to tinyurl.com/y6mamnb to register.

American Red Cross of Greater Cleveland Business Continuity Seminar: 8 a.m. to noon at the American Red Cross, 3747 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. "Is Your Business Prepared for When 'What If?' Becomes 'What Now?' " $39. Must register; go to redcross-cleveland.org or call 216-431-3076.

American Red Cross of Greater Cleveland Business Continuity Seminar: 8 a.m. to noon at the American Red Cross, 3747 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. "Is Your Business Prepared for When 'What If?' Becomes 'What Now?' " $39. Must register; go to redcross-cleveland.org or call 216-431-3076.

Send new items at least two weeks in advance to Eileen Zakareckis, Business Calendar, The Plain Dealer, 1801 Superior Ave., Cleveland, OH 44114, or e-mail her at bizlists@plaind.com. Include "BizCal" in the subject line.

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News Headline: Investors to have June 1 meeting | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/31/2010
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The American Association of Individual Investors meets June 1 at 6:30 p.m. at the Akron-Summit County Public Library, Main Library Building, 60 S High St. Room 2AB. The meeting is open to the public. No membership is required. Parking is free after 6 p.m.

Professor Dr. Mark Holder, director of the master of science financial engineering program at Kent State University, will speak on some of the less complicated ways individual investors may invest using derivative contracts, index options contracts and futures options. He will do a quick review of the basics and then discuss speculating and hedging with index contracts. Prior to joining KSU, he was a senior economist and group manager at the Chicago Board of Trade where he participated in the design, launch, and marketing of the Dow Jones Industrial Average futures and futures options contracts. Dr. Holder is also engaged as a training consultant for numerous leading investment banks.

E-mail Akron AAII Sub-Chapter at aaii-neo@googlegroups.com for information or questions.

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News Headline: Bulletin Board (May 30) (Holder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/30/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LWVAA celebrates 90th anniversary in Memorial Day Parade

As part of its 90th anniversary celebration, the League of Women Voters of the Akron Area will have a unit in the Cuyahoga Falls Memorial Day Parade on May 31. Sporting a new banner carried by league members and followed by a 1920s era Model T with two Hudson league members and two Akron league members in vintage dress walking along beside it with a 1926 red and white Auburn boat tail speedster carrying presidents from Akron, Hudson and Tallmadge leagues, LWVAA has chosen this venue to remind citizens of the importance of registering to vote and exercising their right to vote. The League of Women Voters membership is open to all citizens, male and female. It is a nonpartisan political organization whose purpose is to encourage informed and active participation in government and to influence public policy through education and advocacy.

Hampton/Falls AARP offers trips

On Aug. 3 there will be a trip to Erie Station Dinner Theater to see "The Chicago Speakeasy," a roaring musical comedy, and have lunch. Afterward, they will spend four hours at the Presque Isle Casino and Racetrack.

On Aug. 25 there will be another trip to the Erie Station Dinner Theater to see "Embraceable Gershwin," a musical showcase of the music of George and Ira Gershwin with lunch and then four hours at the Presque Isle Casino and Racetrack.

On Nov. 10 and 11, there will be an overnight trip to the Belterra Riverboat Casino. Call Dick Casto at 330-923-3506 for information, reservations, and cost.

Meetings take place the second Tuesday of each month at the Cathedral Buffet at 12 p.m. for lunch and entertainment.

Professor Holder shares investing information

The American Association of Individual Investors meets June 1 at 6:30 p.m. at the Akron-Summit County Public Library, Main Library Building, 60 S. High St. Room 2AB. The meeting is open to the public. No membership is required. Parking is free after 6 p.m.

Professor Dr. Mark Holder, director of the Master of Science Financial Engineering Program at Kent State University, will speak of the less complicated ways individual investors may invest using derivative contracts, index options contracts and futures options. He will do a review of the basics and discuss speculating and hedging with index contracts.

E-mail Akron AAII Sub-Chapter at aaii-neo@googlegroups.com for information or questions.

Summit Veterans Council hosts Memorial Day program May 30

The Summit County Veterans Council (which includes all VFW, American Legion and Army and Navy posts) will host a Memorial Day ceremony on May 30 at 1 p.m. at Akron Glendale Cemetery Cathedral with Copley VFW and Kenmore American Legion Honor Guard Unit Deployments.

For more information, call George Manos at 330-668-2205.

Silver Lake Garden Club plans Garden Tour for June 12

Silver Lake Garden Club will have its Garden Tour on June 12 from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Tickets are required and cost $5.

This is a tour of four outdoor living environments and gardens in Silver Lake.

Addresses and directions are printed on the ticket.

To purchase tickets, call Diane Micheller at 330-688-1540 or Janet Dodsen at 330-923-5926.

Tickets also will be available at the boathouse parking lot along Silver Lake Boulevard on June 12 from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Caring for Kids Presents informational sessions

Caring for Kids Inc., a non-profit foster care and adoption agency is hosting informational sessions at 650 Graham Road, Suite 101, Cuyahoga Falls. Information regarding foster care, adoption from the foster care system, and infant adoption will be presented. To R.S.V.P. e-mail megan@cfkadopt.org or call 330-928-0044.

The next informational session will take place June 19 from 10 a.m.-noon.

Caring for Kids Inc. has been serving the community for more than 15 years and provides support to families and children. Caring for Kids Inc.'s services include birth parent services, pre-service training for domestic and international adoption, foster care, home studies, etc. For additional information, visit the website at www.cfkadopt.org, e-mail info@cfkadopt.org or call 330-928-0044.

Hill & Vale Garden Club plans trip

The Northampton Hill and Vale Garden Club is sponsoring a day trip by bus to the Youngstown Mill Creek Park on June 3.

The day will begin as the club loads the bus at the old Tops grocery store on Graham Road at 8:45 a.m. The group will arrive at Mill Creek Park and visit the many gardens in bloom. Lunch will be included at the Riverside Gardens Cafe. Following the tour of the park, the club will reach the White House Fruit Farm for a time of browsing and shopping.

The club will return to the Graham Road parking lot at approximately 4 p.m.

Cost is $32 for the trip. Make reservations with June Truax at 330-928-8131 or with Carolyn Szachta at LifeCenter Plus at 5133 Darrow Road. Her number is 330-655-7487.

Falls Travel Club meets

The next Cuyahoga Falls Travel Club meeting is on June 3 at 1 p.m. at the Quirk Cultural Center. Trip sign-ups begin at 12:30 p.m. with a meeting, speaker Mayor Don Robart, and refreshments scheduled. June trips include: Mackinac Island -- enjoy a ferry ride, lunch at Grand Hotel, gamble at Kewadin Casino, lunch at Zehnders and browse or shop at Mackinac Crossings and Bronner's Christmas Store. Trip is June 7 - 9. $371 double occupancy includes two nights, two continental breakfasts, a lunch and dinner. Call Escort Eunice Foster at 330-688-1545. Vaud -villities is a show where Broadway meets Hollywood. The trip is June 27. $59 per person.

Call 330-971-8425 for more information.

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News Headline: Local news briefs - May 29 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AKRON

Deaths investigated

Clara Wilfong, 72, of the 800 block of Brown Street, was found dead in her apartment about 12:45 p.m.

A police spokesman said when family members came to check on Wilfong, a burglar was in the apartment. The black man jumped out of a second story window and was hit by a car, but kept on running.

The autopsy will determine the cause of death.

The burglar is between 35 and 45 years old and was wearing black denim shorts and gray tennis shoes.

Also on Friday, Anthony Felding, 21, of Glendora Ave., was pronounced dead at Akron City Hospital a little before 7 p.m. from gunshot wounds. No other information was available late Friday.

Man shot in leg

AKRON: An Akron man was shot by a masked assailant early Friday on the city's east side.

The 39-year-old victim is being treated at a local hospital for a single gunshot wound to the leg. He is expected to recover, police said.

The victim told police he was at Cole Avenue and Andrus Street about 2 a.m. when the masked man approached and opened fire without uttering a word.

The suspect is a black male standing about 5-foot-6 and weighing about 130 pounds. He wore a black hooded sweatshirt and black sweat pants.

Anyone with information is asked to call Akron police detectives at 330-375-2490. Anonymous tips for this or any crime can be made at http://ci.akron.oh.us/ASP/tip.html.

CLEVELAND

Explosion case

Fifty-seven-year-old William Calderwood was acquitted Friday of 55 counts of aggravated arson in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court. He was convicted of one count of burglary.

The fiery Jan. 25 blast damaged 72 homes on Cleveland's west side. Prosecutors say Calderwood stole appliances, furniture and pipes from the vacant house and tampered with its gas line before the explosion.

Calderwood's attorney, Patrick Leneghan, says he is elated about what he calls a ''fair and just'' verdict.

Calderwood will be sentenced on Wednesday and faces a maximum of five years in prison.

KENT STATE

KSU lands award

The Loening Trophy is the oldest of all collegiate aviation awards and recognizes the best collegiate aviation program in the nation.

The competition was held May 17 through 22 at Indiana State University in Terra Haute, Ind.

More than 450 students representing 29 aviation colleges and universities competed against each other in 13 different flying and nonflying events.

Kent State's team consists of 20 students.

PORTAGE COUNTY

Suicide at park

Christopher Poland, 29, was pronounced dead about 7:30 p.m. at Robinson Memorial Hospital.

Portage County sheriff's Lt. Gregory Johnson said Poland wrote a note at his Akron home indicating he was going to end his life because of money problems and left at about 2:30 p.m. Poland had two daughters, ages 3 months and 4.

After leaving his home, Poland visited some friends, but never indicated he was suicidal, Johnson said.

At about 6 p.m., he arrived at the park near the beach, stopped his Ford Mustang convertible at the picnic area and subsequently shot himself with a .40-caliber handgun. Witnesses heard the gunfire and called 911, Johnson said.

Poland, who was raised in the Ravenna area, was treated at the scene and then taken to the hospital.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S PRECISION FLIGHT TEAM WINS PRESTIGIOUS TROPHY (McFarland) | Email

News Date: 05/29/2010
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, May 28 -- Kent State University issued the following news release

Kent State University's Precision Flight Team recently attended the National Intercollegiate Flying Association's 2010 SAFECON (Safety and Flight Evaluation Conference) competition and walked away with the prestigious Loening Trophy. The Loening Trophy is the rarest and oldest of all collegiate aviation awards. It is a perpetual trophy presented annually to the outstanding all-around collegiate aviation program in the nation.

The SAFECON competition was held May 17 through 22 at Indiana State University in Terra Haute, Ind. More than 450 students representing 29 aviation colleges and universities from across the country competed against each other in 13 different flying and non-flying events. Events included landing, navigation, planning and aircraft recognition.

The Kent State Precision Flight Team consists of 20 students. After placing second in a regional competition, the team advanced to the national event. The team began practices in January 2010 for the May contest. In addition to being awarded the Loening Trophy, Kent State placed ninth overall in the nation and finished sixth in flying events.

Individual team members received high honors for their performance in the 2010 SAFECON competition. Senior Evan Taylor placed first in the Power-Off Landing, making it the second year in a row that Kent State won that event. Sophomore Kelly Merwin and senior Brian Myers took second place in the Message Drop event. Overall, Taylor placed 13th out of 290 men, senior Thomas Thompson finished 34th overall for men and Merwin finished second overall for women.

The pure silver, Tiffany-designed Loening Trophy was commissioned and first awarded in 1929 when aviation pioneer and inventor Dr. Grover Loening saw a need to annually recognize the most outstanding achievements of today's college aviation programs. Dr. Loening, who was the first aeronautical engineer for the Wright Brothers, asked his friends and famous pilots Charles Lindbergh, Amelia Earhart and Navy Commander John Towers to assist Loening in judging the first competition. The original Loening Trophy is still awarded today and is considered the most prestigious award at the annual SAFECON competition.

The award represents superb achievement in aeronautical skills and represents the current benchmark for an overall outstanding collegiate aviation program. Keys for selecting the award recipient include emphasis placed on academics, community involvement, aviation skills and their advancement, a comprehensive safety program and professionalism combined with a proactive enhancement of the future of aviation.

"The team's success is a testament to not only our students' efforts, but also to all of the faculty and staff who have helped make Kent State's aeronautics program so excellent," said Maureen McFarland, academic program director of aeronautics and assistant professor at Kent State. "Congratulations to the team, their captains Brian Myers and Jeff Adelman, and their faculty advisors and coaches Dr. Richard Mangrum and Professor Timothy Palcho for being the 2010 recipient of the Loening Trophy."

For more information on Kent State's aeronautics program, visit www.kent.edu/tech/aero. For more information about USfednews please contact Sarabjit Jagirdar, US Fed News, email - htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2010 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Kent State course offers perfect challenge | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is a
popular course and favorite
destination of many golfers.
The course offers the perfect
challenge for golfers
with a short, tight front nine
and a long back nine, allowing
players to use most of the
clubs in their bag.
The shortest hole on the
course, the par 3, second
hole, looks simple enough.
From the back tees, the approach
shot is only 145
yards. The hole is the 17th
handicap on the course but
many players might disagree.
In scrambles, accuracy shots
are not prevalent on the small
green as golfers often find
not many fellow players have
managed to hit the green in
one shot.
Attempting to master the
second hole, the players often
have an audience as golfers
on the third tee have the perfect
view of a golf balls flight
to the second green.
Following the second
hole, golfers are met with
the shortest par 4 hole on
the course. The third hole
is only 265 yards from the
back tees. The fifth handicap
hole on the course is tough
with an elevated green and a
small stream running the full
length of the fairway.
Golfers at Kent State have
to play the back nine to find
the longest hole.
At 509 yards, the 16th hole
is the sixth handicap hole on
the course.
A blind shot to the top of
the hill gives golfers a view
of the green that is nestled
into the pine trees.
On this day, Jeremy Tawney
of Cuyahoga Falls was
trying to master the front
nine at Kent State in only his
fourth time at the course.
Jeremy attended graduate
school in education at
Kent State and is currently a
teacher in Hudson.

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News Headline: Celebrating Laing Kennedy's career | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University celebrated the 16-
year career of Laing Kennedy on Sunday at
the Kent State Student Center Ballroom.
Kennedy recently retired from his position
as athletic director, closing out a successful
career that included a long list of Mid-American
Conference championships under his
guidance.
Kennedy, a native of Woodstock, Ontario,
was hired on Aug. 1, 1994, by former university
president Carol Cartwright and strengthened
athletics across the board at KSU. He
championed women's inter-collegiate athletics
and became known for his ability to create
great relationships with everyone, especially
KSU's student-athletes.
Many former Kent State athletes and
coaches, along with a group of family and
friends, joined Kennedy's retirement celebration.
One of Kennedy's first coaching hires in
1996, Gary Waters, helped the university's
men's basketball team soar to another level
— one they are still enjoying today under
current head coach Geno Ford.
In 1997, Kennedy helped add women's
golf as a sport at KSU. The team would go on
to win the next 12 MAC titles.

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: I was a little surprised when
Earth Day came and went in
April with what seemed like little
more than a whimper.
Aside from our own coverage,
which included a full page of
coverage and two feature stories
on an Earth Day-based festival in
Kent, I saw little else about the
40th anniversary of the start of
this historic movement except on
local public television.
Ironically, the week in which
people marked the start of the
“green” movement also saw stories on the national
and local level suggesting we've taken steps backward
in the way in which we think about, and interact,
with the environment.
Somewhat ironically on Earth Day, BP's Deepwater
Horizon oil rig exploded in the Gulf of
Mexico and set in motion the events that could end
up creating the world's largest oil spill — an environmental
catastrophe on many levels that now
seems to have surpassed the Exxon Valdez disaster.
That happened just weeks after one of the nation's
deadliest coal mining accidents highlighted
our sometimes deadly dependence on coal-fired
electric plants.
Locally, I reported days later on the city of
Kent's plans to move forward with a state-approved
natural gas well that will likely destroy a
handful of vegetable gardens maintained by residents
on city land with the city's permission.
———
These stories show we have a ways to go before
mankind learns to maintain a more symbiotic
relationship with our environment.
But I took heart reading last month that the
federal government is proposing stricter regulations
for coal ash ponds. The ponds are used
by power companies to store coal ash, a harmful
byproduct of our thirst for electric power
that is created by coal-burning power plants.
In 2008, a dike holding back one of these
ponds in Tennesse burst and unleashed a thick,
toxic sludge upon more than 300 acres of land.
That disaster prompted the EPA review, which
resulted in the proposed regulations.
The proposed EPA regulations would require
power companies to empty their ponds to install
plastic liners to help keep the sludge from
permeating the ground.
Ohio's powerplants maintain 28 of these such
ponds, the largest of which can hold 9.1 billion
gallons of coal ash sludge, the Columbus Dispatch
reported this month.
In about three months, the EPA will finalize
the new regulations, which could be one small
victory for environmentalists everywhere.
———
The city of Kent's efforts to auction off some
surplus inventory proved successful.
This year, the city chose to conduct its annual
auction online in the virutal realm rather than hire
an auctioneer and do an in-place auction somewhere
in the city. The result was sales “almost
five times greater than any of our previous local
auctions,” according to Kent City Manager Dave
Ruller's office.
The city reported total online auction sales having
generated $54,744 in new revenue. By comparison,
the average total revenues for 2008 and
2009 was $9,583.
———
Kent State University has developed a new international
exchange program with Germany's
University of Wurzburg. The new partnership
will allow undergraduate Kent State students to
study abroad at the German university, located
in a picturesque region of northern Bavaria, according
to the university.
The new exchange partnership allows students
to pay tuition to their home institutions
while taking classes for credit at the host university.
To accommodate American students,
officials at the University of Wurzburg offered
to arrange for a series of courses to be taught
in English and to hire an instructor to develop
new courses of this type.
———
Main Street Kent needs volunteers for its upcoming
Masterpieces on Main Art and Winfe Festival,
which will take place Saturday, June 5, from
noon to 10 p.m. at Home Savings Plaza and the
adjacent portions of North Water Street.
Interested volunteers for selling tickets, set-up
and clean-up can contact Mary Gilbert at 330-677-
8000 or by e-mail at mary@mainstreetkent.org.

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News Headline: Ohio universities try to figure out how to get and keep vets on campus (Drew) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2010
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Nearly a million military veterans live in Ohio. Many qualify for federal GI college benefits, and Ohio is now offering in-state tuition to any military vet from any state. But for some, the barrier is not cost. WKSU's M.L. Schultze has more from a statewide conference today on some of the unique issues that come with vets and a college education.
Click to Listen

Other options:
Realplayer / Windows Media / MP3 Download (2:03)

Kent blended services

Other options:
Realplayer / Windows Media / MP3 Download (1:12)

Daniel Eakins, head of Ohio Department of Veterans Services on attitude changes

Other options:
Realplayer / Windows Media / MP3 Download (0:19)

Eakins on vets who don't know they're vets

Other options:
Realplayer / Windows Media / MP3 Download (0:26)

Veteran Nathan Lahota on personal difference

Other options:
Realplayer / Windows Media / MP3 Download (0:19)

Don Hunt on Case Western Reserve's inclusiveness

Other options:
Realplayer / Windows Media / MP3 Download (0:22)

Veteran Richard Sears on vets and other students

Other options:
Realplayer / Windows Media / MP3 Download (0:19)

Web Resources

Kent Center for Adult and Veteran Affairs

Cuyahoga Community College's Upward Bound for Veterans

Ohio tuition assist for veterans

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News Headline: PARTA moves on buying property in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Offers made for land
on DePeyster Street
for transit center

The Portage Area Regional
Transportation Authority is moving
to acquire the land needed
for its planned $21 million transit
center in downtown Kent.
PARTA needs a total of 1.39
acres for the center, which will
have 300 parking spaces, 10
bus bays and 22,000 square feet
of first floor retail space when
completed.
Bryan Smith, PARTA planning
director, said the transit authority
has $1.3 million budgeted
for the approximately 12 parcels
required for construction.
Smith said TranSystems, the
Columbus firm hired to design
and engineer the center, has
contracted with an appraisal
firm to determine each property's
value. PARTA then has an
independent appraiser examine
the first set of appraisals, per
federal law, to determine fair
market value before an offer is
made to a property owner.
Ohio Revised Code permits
state transit authorities to use
eminent domain to acquire the
properties if both parties are unable
to agree on a price.
“Our goal is to come to a
negotiated property settlement
with the owners so we don't
have to use eminent domain,”
Smith said. “We want to pay fair
price because we're sensitive to
the idea of a government entity
coming in and saying, ‘We're
taking your property.' That's
not a pleasant thing to have to
do, and that's why our goal is
to come to a negotiated settlement
for everybody.”
But that process has already
left one property owner
unsatisfied with an offer.
Jean Gavriloff, a retired
Ravenna City Schools teacher
who now lives in Florida,
owns a 7,500-square-foot
parcel with her husband,
Glen, just east of the Car
Parts Warehouse building on
South DePeyster Street in the
middle of the site.
Gavriloff said PARTA offered
her $51,200 for the lot.
“Which, if you compare
the properties around that
have sold, it's a ridiculously
low amount,” she said.
She pointed to purchases
the city and Kent State University
have made in the past
two years. In 2008, the city
paid $399,999 for three parcels
owned by Right Dimensions
at the corner of DePeyster
Street and Haymaker
Parkway. That same year, the
city paid $690,000 for the
former Bar'N night club and
what was Jerry's Diner and
$137,000 for the house west
of the old club.
And in 2009, KSU paid
$300,000 for the former
Record-Courier Kent office
property across the street. All
of the properties are being
targeted for redevelopment
projects.
Gavriloff said her property
has been of interest to
developers in recent years
and has been appraised multiple
times at a much higher
amount than PARTA offered.
“It's insulting,” she said.
Smith said the Gavriloffs
were offered the fair market
value for the lot. TranSystems'
appraiser determined
that amount to be 70 percent
of the square footage of their
property because a portion of
it is not buildable, he said.
Since making the offer,
crews drilled test wells on
the property for the geothermal
heating aspect of the
project. Smith said the Federal
Transit Administration,
which is providing funding
for the project, and the Ohio
Revised Code grant permission
to test the properties to
identify any potential contaminants
and clear the site
for construction.
“And the same thing applies
for the geo-technical
drilling,” he said.
All land owners were sent
letters notifying them of the
need for testing, surveying
and other aspects necessary
for the project, Smith said.
He said he doesn't dispute
the Gavriloffs' claims and
is hopeful both parties can
reach an agreement.
“There will be people who
believe their land is worth a
lot more than what we determine
the fair market value
to be,” Smith said. “Our ultimate
goal is to have a negotiated
settlement. But if
we can't come to an agreement,
we do have the ability
to file for eminent domain
action and occupy the property
after a statutory length
of time.”
Gavriloff said she and her
husband plan to hire a lawyer
to debate the offer even
after PARTA acquires the
property in what's called
a “quick-take” in order to
keep the project from being
delayed.
“That's the only choice we
have,” she said.

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News Headline: PARTA moves on buying property in Kent: Offers made for land on DePeyster Street for transit center | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/30/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: By Matt Fredmonsky

Record-Courier staff writer

The Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority is moving to acquire the land needed for its planned $21 million transit center in downtown Kent.

PARTA needs a total of 1.39 acres for the center, which will have 300 parking spaces, 10 bus bays and 22,000 square feet of first floor retail space when completed.

Bryan Smith, PARTA planning director, said the transit authority has $1.3 million budgeted for the approximately 12 parcels required for construction.

Smith said TranSystems, the Columbus firm hired to design and engineer the center, has contracted with an appraisal firm to determine each propertys value. PARTA then has an independent appraiser examine the first set of appraisals, per federal law, to determine fair market value before an offer is made to a property owner.

Ohio Revised Code permits state transit authorities to use eminent domain to acquire the properties if both parties are unable to agree on a price. Our goal is to come to a negotiated property settlement with the owners so we dont have to use eminent domain, Smith said. We want to pay fair price because were sensitive to the idea of a government entity coming in and saying, Were taking your property. Thats not a pleasant thing to have to do, and thats why our goal is to come to a negotiated settlement for everybody. But that process has already left one property owner unsatisfied with an offer.

Jean Gavriloff, a retired Ravenna City Schools teacher who now lives in Florida, owns a 7,500-square-foot parcel with her husband, Glen, just east of the Car Parts Warehouse building on South DePeyster Street in the middle of the site.

Gavriloff said PARTA offered her $51,200 for the lot. Which, if you compare the properties around that have sold, its a ridiculously low amount, she said. She pointed to purchases the city and Kent State University have made in the past two years. In 2008, the city paid $399,999 for three parcels owned by Right Dimensions at the corner of DePeyster Street and Haymaker Parkway. That same year, the city paid $690,000 for the former BarN night club and what was Jerrys Diner and $137,000 for the house west of the old club.

And in 2009, KSU paid $300,000 for the former Record-Courier Kent office property across the street. All of the properties are being targeted for redevelopment projects.

Gavriloff said her property has been of interest to developers in recent years and has been appraised multiple times at a much higher amount than PARTA offered. Its insulting, she said. Smith said the Gavriloffs were offered the fair market value for the lot. TranSystems appraiser determined that amount to be 70 percent of the square footage of their property because a portion of it is not buildable, he said.

Since making the offer, crews drilled test wells on the property for the geo-thermal heating aspect of the project. Smith said the Federal Transit Administration, which is providing funding for the project, and the Ohio Revised Code grant permission to test the properties to identify any potential contaminants and clear the site for construction. And the same thing applies for the geo-technical drilling, he said. All land owners were sent letters notifying them of the need for testing, surveying and other aspects necessary for the project, Smith said. He said he doesnt dispute the Gavriloffs claims and is hopeful both parties can reach an agreement. There will be people who believe their land is worth a lot more than what we determine the fair market value to be, Smith said. Our ultimate goal is to have a negotiated settlement. But if we cant come to an agreement, we do have the ability to file for eminent domain action and occupy the property after a statutory length of time. Gavriloff said she and her husband plan to hire a lawyer to debate the offer even after PARTA acquires the property in whats called a quick-take in order to keep the project from being delayed. Thats the only choice we have, she said.

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News Headline: KSU hotel plan moves forward: Exchange of properties between city, university puts pieces into place (The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2010
Outlet Full Name: Hotel Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Akron Beacon Journal, OhioMcClatchy-Tribune Regional News

May 28--The pieces are now in place for Kent State's effort to construct a university-affiliated hotel and conference center in downtown Kent.

Kent State trustees have voted to do an exchange of university-owned property on South Water Street appraised at $270,000 for property on Depeyster Street owned by the city and appraised at $280,000.

The city of Kent signed off on the switch earlier this month.

The move gives the Kent State University Foundation ownership of all properties needed to build the hotel and conference center.

The university is working with Pizzuti Co., owned by Kent State alumnus and former university Trustee Ronald Pizzuti, to create an investment entity to act as owner of the development.

The university hopes to begin demolition on the project in September.

As part of the effort to bridge the area between the campus and downtown, trustees this week acquired four properties for $815,000. They are: Kent Campus Rentals LLC at 133 S. Willow St. for $255,000; LKG Corp. and LKG Inc. at 416 College Ave. and 320 E. Erie St. for $165,000 and $170,000 and a property owned by Frank Hornyak at 250 E. Erie St. for $225,000.

The university's effort is part of an $80 million to $85 million redevelopment project in downtown Kent.

The effort includes work by Fairmount Properties to develop a minimum of 75,000 square feet of office space, 56,000 square feet of retail space and 28,000 square feet of residential space downtown.

The Portage Area Regional Transit Authority plans to build a transit center on the northeast corner of Erie and Depeyster streets.

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News Headline: Graham Road resurfacing nearly finished | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Traffic will be maintained on Graham Road while the city's contractor applies the final layer of asphalt and striping the week of May 31, said Falls City Engineer Tony Demasi. Perrin Asphalt of Akron has milled the roadway and placed the... Read Story.

92 Days of Summer

Upcoming June, July and August events in Northeast... Read Story.

Water Works open on Memorial Day weekend

Water Works Family Aquatic Center will be open Saturday, May 29 through Monday, May 31.The aquatic center will be open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. The facility has a zero depth pool, drop slides, water slides and a lazy river. The aquatic center... Read Story.

Sanitation Service Delayed One Day in Cuyahoga Falls During Memorial Day Holiday week

Cuyahoga Falls Service Director Valerie Wax Carr announces that collection crews will not be working May 31 due to the Memorial Day holiday. All customers' collections will be delayed one day. Refuse and recycle crews will work Tuesday... Read Story.

Click it or ticket program runs May 24 through June 6

The Cuyahoga Falls and Silver Lake police departments will participate in the Ohio Traffic Safety Council campaign Click It or Ticket May 24 through June 6.Click It or Ticket (CIOT) is the most successful seat belt enforcement campaign ever, according to... Read Story.

Join Falls News-Press editor for coffee at Falls library on June 14

Cuyahoga Falls News-Press Editor Phil Keren will host “Coffee with the Editor” on June 14 from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the Cuyahoga Falls Library, 2015 Third St. Readers are invited to stop by and offer story ideas. The meeting has... Read Story.

Kent artists take honors for Fresh art (WITH VIDEO)

Kent artists take honors for Fresh art by April Helms Special Products Editor Kent Artist John Smolko said he was inspired to do his series, Dolly Ghraib, after seeing videos and pictures of the prisoner abuse reported at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. ... Read Story.

'American Dream' seen through photographer's lens (WITH VIDEO)

'American Dream' seen through photographer's lens by April Helms Special Products Editor A power plant, visible from the backyard of a suburban home. Neighborhoods that have seen better days, relics of the past industrial age. Manicured streets and... Read Story.

Greek heritage seen in Stavropoulos' designs (WITH VIDEO)

Greek heritage seen in Stavropoulos' designs by April Helms Special Products Editor The Kent State University Museum opened an exhibit of about 50 George Stavropoulos' dresses in the Broadbent Gallery, to coincide with what would have been the fashion... Read Story.

Display highlights the use of patterns in culture, identity (WITH VIDEO)

Display highlights the use of patterns in culture, identity by April Helms Special Products Editor Visitors coming to the Akron Art Museum will see a variety of colors, patterns and images in many forms in its exhibit Pattern ID. The display is open... Read Story.

Hudson theater tackles 'City of Angels' (WITH VIDEO)

Hudson theater tackles 'City of Angels' by April Helms Special Products Editor "Challenging" was the most frequently word heard when the cast and crew at Hudson Players talked about staging the musical "City of Angels." The theater will open "Angels"... Read Story.

'Music Man' includes father-son act (WITH VIDEO)

'Music Man' includes father-son act by April Helms Special Products Editor Neither Rob Albrecht nor his son Robby are strangers to the stage. Robby, 10, most recently was in Aurora High school's production of "Bye Bye Birdie," which his father... Read Story.

Filming begins in Akron for Soap Box Derby movie (WITH VIDEO)

Filming begins in Akron for Soap Box Derby movie by April Helms Special Products Editor The first scenes of a movie centered on the All American Soap Box Derby were filmed April 7 at Derby Downs in Akron. The movie, "25 Hill," spearheaded by Corbin... Read Story.

2010 Summer Camps

2010 Summer Camps General interest Twinsburg Youth Summer Camp 2010 Where: Twinsburg Community Center and area parks When: Weekly sessions, June 1 through Aug. 10, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Age: Entering first grade through sixth... Read Story.

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News Headline: FASHION SHOW BENEFITS KENT STATE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM (Druesedow) | Email

News Date: 05/29/2010
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, May 28 -- Kent State University issued the following news release

"Lunch With Kate Celebrating Katharine Hepburn's Influence on Fashion" heralded original Katharine Hepburn exhibition opening at the fashion museum on Oct. 2, 2010

On May 12, a sold-out fashion show produced by Dillard's, Inc. was held at Sammy's at Legacy Village in Lyndhurst, Ohio, to benefit the Kent State University Museum. The fashion show was applauded by a capacity crowd of 250 guests and raised $8,000 for the museum.

The Kent State University Museum is currently celebrating its 25th anniversary. "Lunch With Kate Celebrating Katharine Hepburn's Influence on Fashion" was the first major pre-opening event for "Katharine Hepburn Dressed for Stage and Screen," the museum's original exhibition opening Oct. 2. Dillard's was the presenting sponsor for the event, with additional support from H/L Communications, Sammy's and WCLV 104.9 FM.

"Kent State University has an excellent, nationally-recognized museum and school of fashion design and merchandising," said David Terry, president of Dillard's Midwest Division. "Dillard's is thrilled to support such a great institution and exhibition."

Hepburn is listed by the American Film Institute as Hollywood's greatest screen legend and universally recognized as a role model for generations of women. During a career that spanned six decades, Hepburn won four Academy Awards as best actress, a record still unequaled.

"Hepburn's mark on 20th century fashion is indisputable," said Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State University Museum and curator of the forthcoming exhibit. "Her sense of style still influences the informal, elegant approach to American style as well as trends and designs seen on today's runways."

Created by Jerry Talamantes, Dillard's director of special events and public relations, the Dillard's fashion show presented a myriad of fashion "looks" influenced by or associated with Miss Hepburn. Models were dressed in more than 60 ensembles ranging from sporty to glamorous, Tomboy to ultra feminine, and from linen trousers to strapless gowns.

Talamantes incorporated Hepburn's voice to the fashion presentation and used three models dressed as Hepburn herself. Whenever a Hepburn look-alike appeared on the catwalk, other models would hold and freeze in place, alluding to the fact that the fashion world still stops and pays attention to Hepburn's iconic image and influence.

"Styling the show using Dillard's wide assortment of apparel became easy once I realized that Kate's influence on fashion can be found throughout the store and in any given season," Talamantes said. "Doing this show and supporting the museum has been great fun."

The Katharine Hepburn exhibition will run from Oct. 2, 2010, through Sept. 4, 2011. Before the exhibit officially opens, the museum will be the setting for "25 Years of Dazzle," a gala celebrating the museum's 25th anniversary, on Sept. 25, 2010. The gala will offer guests the chance to tour the Katharine Hepburn exhibit. Special guests include Robert Osborne, the host of Turner Classic Movies, and Ann Rutherford, who played Scarlett O'Hara's sister Careen in "Gone With the Wind."

After the exhibit opens, a full schedule of events created and managed by H/L Communications will cover Hepburn's influence on fashion, her life and artistry, stage and screen costume design, and the impact of the entertainment industry on fashion.

For more information about the gala, the Hepburn exhibit and other exhibits and programs, visit the Kent State University Museum's website at www.kent.edu/museum or the museum's Facebook page (www.facebook.com/pages/Kent-OH/Kent-State-University-Museum/96914435300). For more information about USfednews please contact Sarabjit Jagirdar, US Fed News, email - htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2010 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Tyler Norris /Kent State University junior 40- 45 "I'm realistic about the fact that I might not have a job as soon as I come out. | Email

News Date: 05/30/2010
Outlet Full Name: News 5 Today Weekend at 6:30 AM - WLWT-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BUT FOR KIDS COMING OF AGE IN THIS GREAT RECESSIONS, LIKE JUNIOR TYLER NORRIS, IT'S JUST THE LATEST CORNER THEY'RE CUTTING. ("Everybody has accepted it as a reality. ") AND FOR THE CLASSES OF 2010 AND 2011, REALITY BITES. ("We don't have have cable. I quit going out to eat altogether. ") ("My entertainment budget right now is down to Netflix alone. ")WHEN HIS SUMMER JOB SUDDENLY DISAPPEARED WEEKS BEFORE HIS SUMMER BREAK, TYLER BEGAN BREAKING OPEN BOXES TO MOVE BACK HOME. AND WHERE HE MOVES AFTER IS SCHOOL IS LEAVING HIM NERVOUS. Tyler Norris /Kent State University junior 40- 45 "I'm realistic about the fact that I might not have a job as soon as I come out. I would love to. IS THAT DAUNTING? There's nothing else I can say about that. It's daunting, yeah. ") Chris Tye / Kent, Ohio 50- 55 "Economists say our spending habits in our early 20's, when we're young adults, stick with us through the rest of our lives. It determines what kind of consumer we'll become. And if you don't believe it, experts say the class of 2010 need look no further than their great-great grandparents. ") "The anecdotal example is the the so-called depression babies. " CASE ECONOMICS PROFESSOR NICOLA LACETERA SAYS THE LIFELONG SPENDING HABITS OF CHILDREN OF THE DEPRESSION WERE CHANGED IN THOSE FORMATIVE YEARS. " (S/Prof. Nicola Lacetera / Case Western Reserve University 1 16-1 21 "They actually show lower rate of risk taking for example, in their decision, also late in life. ") LIFE IS JUST STARTING FOR THESE CHILDREN OF THE RECESSION. WHOSE SPENDING HABIT AND FUTURE HABITS CHANGE WITH EVERY MARKET SWING. "My game plan turned from A to F. " THE TIME RIGHT NOW IS IT'S TIME FOR A FINAL UPDATE ON THIS MORNING'S TOP STORIES.

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News Headline: Fun in the sun (Rufra) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/31/2010
Outlet Full Name: WBNS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Feel the elation of vacation with any of these events across the region

The sun is shining. The road is calling.Travelers who heed the call can drive in any direction - for a few minutes or a few hours - and be sure to find some entertaining summertime activity. Here are a few activities that are well worth the drive from Columbus.

A party in Pittsburgh

Travelers will find Pittsburgh's Three Rivers Regatta at the place where the Ohio River begins. But the action at this free event, which takes place July 3 and 4 and attracts about 400,000 visitors annually, isn't just on the water.

Look, up in the sky: BASE jumpers, skydivers and paragliders, oh, my!

And down on dry land: music on multiple stages, kids' play areas, mountain bike demonstrations, food enough to stuff Pittsburgh, vendors of every kind, plenty of games and other fun stuff.

Still, the water is the reason for the event, billed as the largest inland regatta in the United States. The river will host powerboat racing, water-stunt shows, a bass-fishing tournament, dragon-boat racing, personal watercraft demonstrations and a wacky "Anything That Floats" race.

The events are centered on Point State Park. Just look for the giant fountain. Or the confluence of the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers, flowing to form the mighty Ohio. You can't miss it. And you shouldn't.

And don't worry about skipping Columbus' fireworks display. The regatta's Greatest Glow on Earth fireworks display rivals Red, White & Boom for pyrotechnic virtuosity.

• The Valley Gem stern-wheeler will offer daily rides on the Ohio and Muskingum rivers from its dock in Marietta beginning Saturday. Several specialty cruises are also scheduled in the summer and fall. Call 740-373-7862 or visit www.valleygemstern

wheeler.com.

• The Lorena Sternwheeler, based in downtown Zanesville, offers sightseeing rides and dinner cruises on the Muskingum River on selected Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays through fall. Call 1-800-743-2303 or visit www.visit

zanesville.com.

• Several Ohio River cruises and tours are offered in the Cincinnati area. Most of the boats are docked opposite the city in northern Kentucky. Among those offering tours are Queen City Riverboats, 859-292-8687 or www.queencityriver boats.com; BB Riverboats, 1-800-261-8586 or www. bbriverboats.com; and Ride the Ducks Newport, 859-815-1439 or www.newport

ducks.com.

A dino in Chicago

At the Field Museum in Chicago, Sue will be celebrating her 10th anniversary - give or take 67 million years.

Sue is the largest and most complete tyrannosaur fossil ever discovered. She was placed on display 10 years ago and has entertained (in her own, quiet way) more than 16 million visitors.

Now the exhibit has gotten a face-lift worthy of Sue's toothy visage.

New displays include "RoboSUE: The T. rex Experience," billed as a journey back in time, where visitors will encounter a realistic robot version of Sue that senses and reacts to movements. Other robot dinosaurs are also on the prowl, including fierce velociraptors and a maternal triceratops.

The museum will also premiere the 3-D movie Walking the T. rex: The Story of Sue.

• The Toledo Museum of Art will host a very groovy exhibit, "The Psychedelic '60s: Posters From the Rock Era," from June 11 through Sept 12. The exhibit includes 150 posters, including 50 black-light posters, from 1966 to 1971. Call 419-255-8000 or visit www.toledo museum.org.

• Where's opera, doc? How about Wooster? Ohio Light Opera, based at the College of Wooster, will open its 2010 festival season June 19 with a performance of Kismet. Other performances scheduled (all in English, hurray!) include Gypsy, The Count of Luxembourg, El Capitan, Iolanthe, Patience and The Gypsy Princess. For more information, including schedules and ticket prices, call 330-263-2345 or visit www.ohiolightopera.org.

• The works of 17 Ohio ceramics artists will be on display at two museums this summer and fall. "Form, Figure & Function: Contemporary Ohio Ceramics," celebrating Ohio's rich ceramics heritage, will be on display at the Canton Museum of Art (330-453-7666 or www.cantonart.org) through July 25 and at the Zanesville Museum of Art (740-452-0741 or www.

zanesvillemuseumofart.org) from Nov. 6 through Jan. 8.

A cruise on the Cuyahoga

The official ribbon-cutting on a new canoe and kayak livery in downtown Kent will take place July 3 during the town's Heritage Festival.

But Crooked River Adventures, sponsored by the Kent State University Department of Recreational Services, has already begun offering rides daily from John Brown Tannery Park. The livery also rents bicycles for use on the Portage Hike and Bike Trail and the town's other trails. River/bike combination tours are also offered.

The livery is part of a university and city effort to increase recreational use of the Cuyahoga River.

"It's an new opportunity to get on the scenic Cuyahoga," said Kim Rufra, the university's associate director of recreational services.

And don't worry. This stretch of the river hardly ever catches fire. Actually, the river, as it flows out of Kent, is quite lovely and relatively clean.

The trips begin below the old dam downtown and wind through residential and wooded areas.

"Our first paddlers reported seeing deer and heron along the way," Rufra said.

Trips will be offered on a reservation basis Mondays through Thursdays. The livery will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fridays through Sundays, with trips beginning at approximately 9 a.m., noon and 5 p.m.

Kayak rentals start at $20. Canoes start at $18 a person. The livery's 3.5-mile trip, which takes about 21/2 hours to complete, will end at Brust Park in Munroe Falls. A 5-mile trip, which ends at Waterworks Park in Cuyahoga Falls and takes about five hours, will also be available. Shuttles return patrons to Kent.

For information, call 330-541-7467 or visit www.kent. edu/crookedriver.

• The historic hand-operated Muskingum River locks - a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark - will begin summer hours of operation on Friday. The locks, built in 1841, allow rowers and power-boaters to float the river from north of Zanesville all the way to Marietta. (Philo Lock 9 is temporarily closed for repairs). For more information, including fees and hours of operation, call Dillon State Park at 740-453-4377 or visit www.ohiodnr. com.

• Hocking Hills Canoe Livery offers an unusual way to view this scenic Ohio region. The livery offers canoe, kayak and raft rentals on the gentle Hocking River as well as special trips such as moonlight tours throughout the summer. Campsites are also available. Call 1-800-634-6820 or visit www.

hockingriver.com.

• The Mohican River is a popular float trip, and several liveries in the Loudonville area offer canoe and other rentals. Among them are Loudonville Canoe Livery, 1-888-226-6356, www.

loudonvillecanoe.com; and Mohican Adventures Canoe and Fun Center, 1-800-662-2663 or www.mohican

adventures.com.

• In southeastern Ohio, the Little Miami Canoe Rental offers float trips on the Little Miami River, a state and national scenic river. Call 1-800-634-4277 or visit www.littlemiamicanoe. com.

A walk among beauty

June 12 and 13 marks the annual open house at Schnormeier Gardens near Gambier. The beautiful private gardens cover 75 acres.

Visitors will see a waterfall garden framed by a Japanese teahouse and a Chinese-style bridge, a stream garden passing through a planting of rare conifers, a hosta garden surrounded by a 750-foot rock wall, a serenity garden, a meadow garden, a "quarry" garden and many other garden areas.

The owners, Ted and Ann Schnormeier, began construction of the gardens in 1996 and have established a foundation to maintain it and to someday operate it as a public garden.

"It's wonderful," said photographer Jeff Thompson, who has spent many days wandering and photographing the site. "It's an extraordinary piece of work. It's amazing how much they've accomplished in 15 years."

In addition to the open house, Schnormeier Gardens is open by appointment. Call 740-427-2612 or visit www.schnormeier

gardens.org for information.

• The huge, beautiful Dawes Arboretum near Newark covers more than 1,800 acres and includes more than 8 miles of hiking trails and a 4-mile scenic drive. The collection includes more than 4,500 different kinds of trees, shrubs and other plants. Call 1-800-443-2937 or visit www.dawesarb.org.

• Holden Arboretum near Kirtland in northeastern Ohio is a sunny, visitor-friendly oasis with many garden areas linked by trails ranging in difficulty from very easy to rugged. Today, the arboretum covers more than 3,600 acres. Call 440-946-4400 or visit www.

holdenarb.org.

• Kingwood Center Gardens is the former estate of Mansfield industrialist Charles Kelley King. The site covers 47 acres and includes several garden areas, including the historic formal garden near the Kingwood Hall mansion. The mansion is also open for tours on weekends. For more information, call 419-522-0211 or visit www.kingwood

center.org.

sstephens@dispatch.com

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News Headline: Fun in the sun (Rufra) | Email

News Date: 05/30/2010
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name: Stephens, Steve
News OCR Text: The sun is shining.

The road is calling.

Travelers who heed the call can drive in any direction -- for a few minutes or a few hours -- and be sure to find some entertaining summertime activity.

Here are a few activities that are well worth the drive from Columbus.

A party in Pittsburgh

Travelers will find Pittsburgh's Three Rivers Regatta at the place where the Ohio River begins. But the action at this free event, which takes place July 3 and 4 and attracts about 400,000 visitors annually, isn't just on the water.

Look, up in the sky BASE jumpers, skydivers and paragliders, oh, my!

And down on dry land music on multiple stages, kids' play areas, mountain bike demonstrations, food enough to stuff Pittsburgh, vendors of every kind, plenty of games and other fun stuff.

Still, the water is the reason for the event, billed as the largest inland regatta in the United States. The river will host powerboat racing, water-stunt shows, a bass-fishing tournament, dragon-boat racing, personal watercraft demonstrations and a wacky "Anything That Floats" race.

The events are centered on Point State Park. Just look for the giant fountain. Or the confluence of the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers, flowing to form the mighty Ohio. You can't miss it. And you shouldn't.

And don't worry about skipping Columbus' fireworks display. The regatta's Greatest Glow on Earth fireworks display rivals Red, White & Boom for pyrotechnic virtuosity.

More Ohio River (and tributary) activities

* The Valley Gem stern-wheeler will offer daily rides on the Ohio and Muskingum rivers from its dock in Marietta beginning Saturday. Several specialty cruises are also scheduled in the summer and fall. Call 740-373-7862 or visit www.valleygemsternwheeler.com.

* The Lorena Sternwheeler, based in downtown Zanesville, offers sightseeing rides and dinner cruises on the Muskingum River on selected Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays through fall. Call 1-800-743-2303 or visit www.visitzanesville.com.

* Several Ohio River cruises and tours are offered in the Cincinnati area. Most of the boats are docked opposite the city in northern Kentucky. Among those offering tours are Queen City Riverboats, 859-292-8687 or www.queencityriver boats.com; BB Riverboats, 1-800-261-8586 or www. bbriverboats.com; and Ride the Ducks Newport, 859-815-1439 or www.newportducks.com.

A dino in Chicago

At the Field Museum in Chicago, Sue will be celebrating her 10th anniversary -- give or take 67 million years.

Sue is the largest and most complete tyrannosaur fossil ever discovered. She was placed on display 10 years ago and has entertained (in her own, quiet way) more than 16 million visitors.

Now the exhibit has gotten a face-lift worthy of Sue's toothy visage.

New displays include "RoboSUE The T. rex Experience," billed as a journey back in time, where visitors will encounter a realistic robot version of Sue that senses and reacts to movements. Other robot dinosaurs are also on the prowl, including fierce velociraptors and a maternal triceratops.

The museum will also premiere the 3-D movie Walking the T. rex The Story of Sue.

More cultural events and exhibits

* The Toledo Museum of Art will host a very groovy exhibit, "The Psychedelic '60s Posters From the Rock Era," from June 11 through Sept 12. The exhibit includes 150 posters, including 50 black-light posters, from 1966 to 1971. Call 419-255-8000 or visit www.toledo museum.org.

* Where's opera, doc? How about Wooster? Ohio Light Opera, based at the College of Wooster, will open its 2010 festival season June 19 with a performance of Kismet. Other performances scheduled (all in English, hurray!) include Gypsy, The Count of Luxembourg, El Capitan, Iolanthe, Patience and The Gypsy Princess. For more information, including schedules and ticket prices, call 330-263-2345 or visit www.ohiolightopera.org.

* The works of 17 Ohio ceramics artists will be on display at two museums this summer and fall. "Form, Figure & Function Contemporary Ohio Ceramics," celebrating Ohio's rich ceramics heritage, will be on display at the Canton Museum of Art (330-453-7666 or www.cantonart.org) through July 25 and at the Zanesville Museum of Art (740-452-0741 or www.zanesvillemuseumofart.org) from Nov. 6 through Jan. 8.

A cruise on the Cuyahoga

The official ribbon-cutting on a new canoe and kayak livery in downtown Kent will take place July 3 during the town's Heritage Festival.

But Crooked River Adventures, sponsored by the Kent State University Department of Recreational Services, has already begun offering rides daily from John Brown Tannery Park. The livery also rents bicycles for use on the Portage Hike and Bike Trail and the town's other trails. River/bike combination tours are also offered.

The livery is part of a university and city effort to increase recreational use of the Cuyahoga River.

"It's an new opportunity to get on the scenic Cuyahoga," said Kim Rufra, the university's associate director of recreational services.

And don't worry. This stretch of the river hardly ever catches fire. Actually, the river, as it flows out of Kent, is quite lovely and relatively clean.

The trips begin below the old dam downtown and wind through residential and wooded areas.

"Our first paddlers reported seeing deer and heron along the way," Rufra said.

Trips will be offered on a reservation basis Mondays through Thursdays. The livery will be open from 8 30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fridays through Sundays, with trips beginning at approximately 9 a.m., noon and 5 p.m.

Kayak rentals start at $20. Canoes start at $18 a person. The livery's 3.5-mile trip, which takes about 21/2 hours to complete, will end at Brust Park in Munroe Falls. A 5-mile trip, which ends at Waterworks Park in Cuyahoga Falls and takes about five hours, will also be available. Shuttles return patrons to Kent.

For information, call 330-541-7467 or visit www.kent. edu/crookedriver.

More river adventures

* The historic hand-operated Muskingum River locks -- a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark -- will begin summer hours of operation on Friday. The locks, built in 1841, allow rowers and power-boaters to float the river from north of Zanesville all the way to Marietta. (Philo Lock 9 is temporarily closed for repairs). For more information, including fees and hours of operation, call Dillon State Park at 740-453-4377 or visit www.ohiodnr. com.

* Hocking Hills Canoe Livery offers an unusual way to view this scenic Ohio region. The livery offers canoe, kayak and raft rentals on the gentle Hocking River as well as special trips such as moonlight tours throughout the summer. Campsites are also available. Call 1-800-634-6820 or visit www.hockingriver.com.

* The Mohican River is a popular float trip, and several liveries in the Loudonville area offer canoe and other rentals. Among them are Loudonville Canoe Livery, 1-888-226-6356, www.loudonvillecanoe.com; and Mohican Adventures Canoe and Fun Center, 1-800-662-2663 or www.mohicanadventures.com.

* In southeastern Ohio, the Little Miami Canoe Rental offers float trips on the Little Miami River, a state and national scenic river. Call 1-800-634-4277 or visit www.littlemiamicanoe. com.

A walk among beauty

June 12 and 13 marks the annual open house at Schnormeier Gardens near Gambier. The beautiful private gardens cover 75 acres.

Visitors will see a waterfall garden framed by a Japanese teahouse and a Chinese-style bridge, a stream garden passing through a planting of rare conifers, a hosta garden surrounded by a 750-foot rock wall, a serenity garden, a meadow garden, a "quarry" garden and many other garden areas.

The owners, Ted and Ann Schnormeier, began construction of the gardens in 1996 and have established a foundation to maintain it and to someday operate it as a public garden.

"It's wonderful," said photographer Jeff Thompson, who has spent many days wandering and photographing the site. "It's an extraordinary piece of work. It's amazing how much they've accomplished in 15 years."

In addition to the open house, Schnormeier Gardens is open by appointment. Call 740-427-2612 or visit www.schnormeiergardens.org for information.

More gardens to visit

* The huge, beautiful Dawes Arboretum near Newark covers more than 1,800 acres and includes more than 8 miles of hiking trails and a 4-mile scenic drive. The collection includes more than 4,500 different kinds of trees, shrubs and other plants. Call 1-800-443-2937 or visit www.dawesarb.org.

* Holden Arboretum near Kirtland in northeastern Ohio is a sunny, visitor-friendly oasis with many garden areas linked by trails ranging in difficulty from very easy to rugged. Today, the arboretum covers more than 3,600 acres. Call 440-946-4400 or visit www.holdenarb.org.

* Kingwood Center Gardens is the former estate of Mansfield industrialist Charles Kelley King. The site covers 47 acres and includes several garden areas, including the historic formal garden near the Kingwood Hall mansion. The mansion is also open for tours on weekends. For more information, call 419-522-0211 or visit www.kingwoodcenter.org.

sstephens@dispatch.com

Copyright © 2010 THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH and may not be republished without permission.

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News Headline: national register of historic places | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/31/2010
Outlet Full Name: Tampa Tribune - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Banquet to raise money for historic Bealsville school

Life in the Bealsville community traditionally has centered on work, its churches and its school. ...more

Banquet to support historic school

Life in the Bealsville community traditionally has centered on work, its churches and its school. ...more

Kent State creates walking tours of '70 shootings

Kent State University has created a walking tour to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Ohio National Guard shootings that killed four students and injured nine others. ...more

Reviving Centro Espanol

The Centro Espanol de West Tampa is a remnant of an inspiring chapter in Tampa's history. ...more

Interest in Baker House heritage renewed

A few things have changed in the 127 years since Samuel Baker built his Cracker house here. ...more

Places to Go

Saturday SANTA'S BIG HELPER: Movies in the Park will feature "Elf" at 8 p.m. at Agnes Lamb Park, located off Meridian Avenue, between Eighth Street and Edwinola Way. The monthly movie presentation is hosted by the Dade City Youth Council. ...more

Celebrate the season in Victorian style

Step back in time at the Heritage Museum Saturday. ...more

Plant City festival mixes heritage, fun for kids

The young and the old will be celebrated Saturday at a combined event. ...more

National Guard armories find new lives after auctions

GLENS FALLS, N.Y. (AP) — The turret offers a great view of the nearby Adirondack Mountains, the weapons bunkers can serve as wine cellars and the cavernous gymnasium could be turned into the ultimate rec room after it is auctioned Wednesday. ...more

Restoration of Tarpon city sponge boat completed

Restoration has been completed on the Tarpon Springs. The city's sponge boat, which has become an attraction and photo opportunity at the Sponge Docks, is once again shipshape. ...more

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News Headline: Audio-Technica Selected For WKSU'S Mobile Folk Alley Studio (Bartholet, Gunderman, Fahey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2010
Outlet Full Name: ProSoundWeb
Contact Name: Bobby Owsinski
News OCR Text: The popular Internet radio stream Folk Alley equipped its new mobile studio with Audio-Technica mics for live music capture, in-studio performances and voiceovers.

The exterior of the new mobile studio for Folk Alley. Photo by Brandon Davis.

Recording, Audio, Microphone, Broadcast, , Radio

Audio-Technica was recently selected as the microphone of choice for the new mobile studio of Folk Alley's live streaming web radio program by Kent, Ohio-based WKSU-FM.

The Audio-Technica microphones are used for announcement/voiceover applications, live music broadcast and in-studio guests/performances in the mobile broadcast vehicle, which has been up and running since August 1, 2009.

WKSU and Folk Alley Executive Director Al Bartholet stated, “When we first developed our plans for Folk Alley's mobile recording studio, we put Audio-Technica microphones on the top of our wish list.”

“Music and radio are industries that revolve around audio, and having the ability to use mics of Audio-Technica's outstanding quality makes it easier for us to do our job well.”

Included in the studio's microphone cabinate are AE5400, AE5100, PRO 35, and AT875R Microphones.

Joe Gunderman, Folk Alley Production Coordinator and Senior Producer commented, “I'm very enthusiastic about the AE5400s.”

“We have in-studio guests, and in the past, we might normally have used a large-diaphragm with shock mount, but the AE5400 sounds just as great and is friendlier visually to put in front of our guests.”

“We've used AE5400s also in the studio and at live events, for recent performances by some really great folk artists – Madison Violet, Solas, The Greencards, Ann Heaton and Natalia Zukerman from Winter Bloom, and lots more.”

“Also, the AE5100s are great too – we use them in front of acoustic guitars, acoustic bass, bouzoukis, mandolins, and more, and they've always given us a real nice response.”

Added Linda Fahey, Folk Alley Director of Programming and Marketing, “We built the FolkAlley.com mobile studio to enable us to capture the best folk and roots music performances at venues and festivals around the country.”

“Using Audio-Technica mics – the best in the business – makes our final audio better and provides an enhanced listening experience for the thousands of people streaming Folk Alley's interviews and concert recordings online.”

With its new Mobile Recording Studio, WKSU's Folk Alley is now able to take its show on the road with the vehicle which was paid for through a generous grant from a Folk Alley fan. The show helps to promote FolkAlley.com and Kent State University.

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News Headline: Paleo Patrol: Was mankind's first leap in a forest or savanna? (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2010
Outlet Full Name: Earth - Online
Contact Name: Erin Wayman
News OCR Text: Last October, scientists formally introduced the world to Ardi the Ardipithecus, the well-preserved skeleton of a 4.4-million-year-old hominin found in Ethiopia. Eight months later, scientists have had time to digest the data from all 11 papers that were published in Science last fall regarding Ardi's biology and ecology, and there is some dissent.

Erin Wayman (pictured in Cardiff, Wales) writes Paleo Patrol for EARTH.

Spencer Wayman

In a paper published in Science today, Thure Cerling, a professor at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City who studies stable isotope ecology and paleoecology, and seven colleagues find fault with the original interpretation of Ardi's paleoenvironment. Ardi's discoverers say she lived in a woodland forest, with monkeys, porcupines and bats for neighbors. Cerling et al. say the paleoecological evidence — which includes stable carbon isotopes recovered from ancient soil, carbon isotopes retained in fossil teeth, and the type and abundance of animals found in association with Ardi — actually suggests that Ardi lived in a “bush-savanna,” a grassland with 25 percent or less forest cover.

Tim White, the University of California at Berkeley paleoanthropologist who led the analysis of Ardi, and colleagues have responded to this criticism by agreeing that Ethiopia was home to a range of habitats 4.4 million years ago, including wooded grasslands. But, they say, the bulk of evidence shows that Ardipithecus preferred to reside in the forest.

So, why does this quibble matter? Well, last fall, when White and colleagues claimed Ardi lived in a forest, they said the finding would once and for all put an end to the savanna hypothesis — one of the main explanations for why our ancestors evolved upright walking, or bipedalism.

The crux of the savanna hypothesis is that bipedalism became an advantageous form of walking when Africa's forests shrank and were replaced by open grasslands (some of the earliest incarnations of the idea suggested standing upright would help our ancestors see over the grass to spy predators). This hypothesis can be traced back to Raymond Dart, an anatomist at the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa, who in 1924 discovered the first Australopithecus specimen. The specimen, dubbed the Taung Child, appeared to have lived in a savanna.

Ardi is not the first challenge to this hypothesis, however. Starting in at least the 1970s, accumulating fossil and paleoecological evidence showed that early hominins lived in at least partially wooded environments. In fact, Lucy's species, Australopithecus afarensis, retained some anatomical features related to climbing, which some researchers say is evidence that the species spent time in trees.

Such evidence led to modifications of the savanna hypothesis, with some anthropologists (including Henry McHenry and my graduate school advisor, Peter Rodman, both now retired from the University of California at Davis) suggesting upright walking was an efficient way for early hominins to travel between clumps of forest when grasslands were first expanding.

In 1981, C. Owen Lovejoy, an anthropologist at Kent State University in Ohio, came up with an explanation for the origin of bipedalism that didn't involve the savanna; instead, he said, walking upright co-evolved with monogamy.

This is a summary of the scenario envisioned by Lovejoy: Early hominins were omnivorous apes who lived in forests. As the environment became more seasonal and climatic changes led to more variable environmental conditions, it became harder for our ancestors to find food; they had to spend more time looking for grub and they had to travel farther to get it.

This was especially a drag for females, who had to bring their offspring with them wherever they went. That was also dangerous, as the greater search for food could expose females and their infants to more hungry predators. But males and females found a mutual solution to this problem: food-for-sex provisioning. Males would go off and gather food for a female and her offspring. In turn, females would mate exclusively with that male and take care of his babies. In essence, Lovejoy was suggesting the classic 1950s nuclear family was born in a dark forest in Africa.

Where does bipedalism fit in? It's a lot easy to gather food and carry it back to your “family” if your arms are free, Lovejoy reasoned, so walking on two legs was an essential adaptation for monogamy to work. Along with this scenario, males no longer needed to fight with each other over access to females; therefore, males' sharp, dagger-like canine teeth — ubiquitous in the ape world — became smaller and smaller over time.

Like many hypotheses regarding bipedalism, and human evolution in general, the food-for-sex explanation was not universally accepted back in the early 1980s. But when Ardipithecus was found in a forest setting — and was an omnivore with small canine teeth — Lovejoy must have felt vindicated, for he wrote an article in Science (one of the 11 papers) that basically restated his argument from 30 years earlier.

And like 30 years ago, it seems that not everyone is backing the idea. In their Science paper, Cerling and colleagues don't endorse the savanna hypothesis outright, but they note that “the connection between bipedalism and … grass expansion … remains a viable idea.” It looks like the savanna hypothesis is not yet dead after all.

Wayman is associate editor of EARTH and blogs about anthropology, paleontology and evolution at Paleo Patrol.

Originally Posted: 28 May 2010

Do you think feathered dinosaurs were brightly colored?

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News Headline: Reports from Kent State University highlight recent research in obesity | Email

News Date: 05/29/2010
Outlet Full Name: Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Obesity indices (i.e. BMI, waist-to-hip ratio) show differential relationships to other health outcomes, though their association to neurocognitive outcome is unclear," investigators in the United States report (see also ).

"We examined whether central obesity would be more closely associated with cognitive function in 1,703 participants from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Longitudinal mixed-effects regression models showed multiple obesity indices were associated with poorer performance in a variety of cognitive domains, including global screening measures, memory, and verbal fluency tasks. Obesity was associated with better performance on tests of attention and visuospatial ability. An obesity index by age interaction emerged in multiple domains, including memory and attention/executive function," wrote J. Gunstad and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded "Obesity indices showed similar associations to cognitive function, and further work is needed to clarify the physiological mechanisms that link obesity to poor neurocognitive outcome."

Gunstad and colleagues published their study in Neuroepidemiology (Longitudinal Examination of Obesity and Cognitive Function Results from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Neuroepidemiology, 2010;34(4) 222-229).

For additional information, contact J. Gunstad, Kent State University, Dept. of Psychology, 221 Kent Hall, Kent, OH 44242, USA.

The publisher of the journal Neuroepidemiology can be contacted at Karger, Allschwilerstrasse 10, CH-4009 Basel, Switzerland.

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