Report Overview:
Total Clips (10)
Admissions (1)
Alumni (1)
College of Business Administration (COBA) (1)
College of the Arts (CotA) (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Mathematical Science (1)
Political Science (1)
Recreational Services (1)
Residence Services (1)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Admissions (1)
School Notes (Lefton) 08/26/2010 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...visit www.neoucom.edu. For details, call the office of admissions and student services at 330-325-6270. KSU gets a high rating from news magazine Kent State University ranks among the nation's best universities, according to U.S. News and World Report. The media conglomerate released its...


Alumni (1)
Kent State Alumni Association Appoints National Board of Directors’ Officers and New Members 08/27/2010 Portage County News Text Attachment Email

08-27-2010 Kent, OH - The Kent State University Alumni Association Inc. announces the following new members for its National Alumni Board of Directors Nicholas Sucic, of...


College of Business Administration (COBA) (1)
Workers Encouraged to Balance the Books (Schroath) 08/26/2010 AllBusiness Text Attachment Email

...to gain a close connection, he said, and by having the program at Allstate, the company is able to build loyalty with employees. Pros and cons Kent State University has one of the oldest executive MBA programs in the country, said Rick Schroath, associate dean and special adviser to the dean...


College of the Arts (CotA) (1)
'Speak Peace' 08/26/2010 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Ticket system hi-tech (Morelli) 08/26/2010 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

Not only is the new Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas considered cutting edge, so is the ticketing system selected for the facility. When tickets go on sale in...


Mathematical Science (1)
PUZZLING BEHAVIOR (Davidson) 08/26/2010 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Morley Davidson got a special birthday present in the seventh grade a Rubik's Cube. He was hooked. Now the Kent State University faculty member is part of a headline-making team that has proved that the mind-bending mechanical puzzle can be solved in 20...


Political Science (1)
Suffragists paved way for women in local politics (Tudor) 08/26/2010 Independent, The Text Attachment Email

...the United States almost doubled, but its impact wouldn't truly be seen until 50 years later. Dr. Jarrod Tudor, a professor of political science at Kent State University Stark, says it wasn't until the 1970s that women defined their own voice in politics and government. “Early on, women who...


Recreational Services (1)
KSU program to share bikes hits ground rolling (Rufra) 08/27/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Residence Services (1)
KSU students move in (Joseph) 08/27/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (1)
Major changes to downtown Kent plan eyed: CIty, Kent state weigh combined conference center, hotel; current plans have separate sites (Floyd) 08/27/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...downtown Kent redevelopment project, arguably the key element, could change drastically from its current proposal before construction begins. The city, Kent State University and their private development partners, the Pizzuti Companies and Fairmount Properties, are discussing the idea of combining...


News Headline: School Notes (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Buildings' hours listed

Students are attending school for the first day of the 2010-11 year today (Aug. 25). Here are the daily starting and ending times for each school

Miller -- morning kindergarten and preschool, 9 05 to 11 35 a.m.; afternoon kindergarte and preschool, 12 55 to 3 30 p.m.; all-day kindergarten, 9 05 a.m. to 3 30 p.m.

Craddock -- 8 55 a.m. to 3 20 p.m.; Leighton -- 9 05 a.m. to 3 30 p.m.; Harmon -- 7 55 a.m. to 2 30 p.m.; and Aurora High School -- 7 40 a.m. to 2 25 p.m.

District lists policy on

free lunches for needy

Aurora schools have announced their 2010-11 policy for free and reduced price meals for students unable to pay the full price of meals or milk served under the National School Lunch and School Breakfast, After School Care Snack or Special Milk Program.

Each school office and the central office has a copy of the policy, which can be viewed by any interested party. Federal income eligibility guidelines will be used for determining eligibility.

Application forms are being distributed to all homes in a letter to parents and guardians To apply, the form should be filled out and return to the school.

Families with children eligible for school meals also may be eligible for free health care coverage through Medicaid and/or Ohio's Healthy Start & Healthy Families programs. Information is available at http //jfs.ohio.og/OHP/consumers/familychild.stm.>

Band show scheduled

The Aurora Band Boosters are planning "Thunder Over Aurora A Marching Band Spectacular" on Sept. 25 at 7 p.m. at Veterans Stadium.

Presale admission is $5 and admission at the gate is $8. The Greenmen band and several other area bands will perform.

Fliers with ticket order forms are available at the local schools and other places. Questions can be referred to Lisa Kall at 330-995-9006 or ldkall@roadrunner.com or Diane Kohn at 330-562-3206 or RDKohn5@aol.com.

Open houses slated at

area medical college

High school students interested in pursuing a career in medicine or pharmacy are invited to attend open houses hosted by the Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy.

The open houses at the medical college's Rootstown campus will inform prospective students about the university's unique combined, accelerated bachelor of science-doctor of medicine degree and the doctor of pharmacy program.

The Pharm.D. program open house will take place Sept. 17 from 9 to 11 15 a.m. and the BS-MD program pen house Oct. 16 from 9 to 11 a.m.

Each of the open houses will consist of a formal program featuring information sessions held by a NEOUCOM rep, a student panel session and campus tour.

Students are asked to register two weeks prior to each open house date. To register online, visit www.neoucom.edu. For details, call the office of admissions and student services at 330-325-6270.

KSU gets a high rating

from news magazine

Kent State University ranks among the nation's best universities, according to U.S. News and World Report.

The media conglomerate released its rankings of more than 1,400 colleges and universities nationwide last week.

"Receiving the recognition by U.S. News helps confirm what we already know -- that Kent State is one of the best universities in the country," said KSU President Lester Lefton. "I'm pleased that we earned a spot in the first-tier list."

U.S. News ranked KSU 183rd on the top tier of its national rankings.

In comparison, OSU landed at 56th and Ohio U. ranked 124th. Other Ohio schools, such as the University of Akron and Youngstown State University, did not make the listing.

NEOUCOM gets grant

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy has received $198,000 from the Health Resources and Services Administration to renovate and expand the Gross Anatomy Teaching Laboratory.

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News Headline: Kent State Alumni Association Appoints National Board of Directors’ Officers and New Members | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: Portage County News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 08-27-2010

Kent, OH - The Kent State University Alumni Association Inc. announces the following new members for its National Alumni Board of Directors

Nicholas Sucic, of Hudson, Ohio, continues his role as president of Kent State University’s Alumni Association National Board of Directors. Sucic is vice president and controller of the Davey Tree Expert Company in Kent, Ohio. He earned a bachelor’s of business administration degree in accounting in 1970 and a master’s of science degree in accounting in 2008 from Kent State.

John Garofalo, of Sagamore Hills, Ohio, has been appointed president-elect. Garofalo is senior development officer of University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital in Cleveland. He earned a bachelor’s of science degree in community health education in 1987 and a master’s in education degree in health education in 1993 from Kent State.

Robert Maschke, of Cleveland continues his role as vice president. Maschke is principal of Robert Maschke Architects in Cleveland. Maschke earned a bachelor’s of science degree in architecture in 1988 and a bachelor of architecture degree in 1989 from Kent State.

Kathy Reid, of Hudson has been appointed secretary. Reid is broker/owner of Prudential Kathy Reid Realty in Hudson. Reid earned a bachelor of science degree in elementary education in 1969 from Kent State.

Brian Marino, of Fairview Park, Ohio, has been appointed treasurer. Marino is financial advisor and special care planner with Skylight Financial Group/ Michael Carter Group in Cleveland. He earned a bachelor’s of business administration degree in business management in 2001 from Kent State.

Timothy Eippert, of Concord, Ohio, continues his role as immediate past president. Eippert is owner of MC Sign Company in Mentor, Ohio. He earned a bachelor’s of business in administration degree in marketing in 1999 from Kent State.

In addition, the following new members, all alumni of Kent State, have been appointed to serve a three-year term ending in 2013

James Bailey, of North Olmsted, Ohio, is vice president of Key Bank in Cleveland. Bailey earned his bachelor’s of business administration degree in finance in 2003 and a master’s in science in financial engineering in 2004 from Kent State.

Elizabeth Zoe Bartz, of Akron, Ohio, is president & CEO of State and Federal Communications in Akron. Bartz earned a bachelor of arts in journalism in 1980 and a master of arts in political science in 1982 from Kent State.

Barton Bixenstine, of Shaker Heights, Ohio, is an attorney with Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P. C. in Cleveland. Bixenstine earned a bachelor of arts in political science in 1971 from Kent State.

John Daley, of Stow, Ohio, is technical sales manager with AT&T Foundation in Cleveland. Daley earned a bachelor of arts in English in 1997 from Kent State.

Renee DeLuca Dolan, of Chardon, Ohio, is president/owner of CBC Publishing LLC/Contemporary Design Group Inc. DeLuca Dolan earned a bachelor of arts in telecommunications in 1988 from Kent State.

For more information about the Kent State University Alumni Association, visit www.KSUalumni.org

Photo Caption

Nicholas Sucic, of Hudson, Ohio, continues his role as president of Kent State University’s Alumni Association National Board of Directors. Sucic is vice president and controller of the Davey Tree Expert Company in Kent, Ohio.

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News Headline: Workers Encouraged to Balance the Books (Schroath) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: AllBusiness
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Larry Schlifke didn't have to go far from his desk at work in order to graduate with his MBA in 2005.

Mr. Schlifke, a manager of instructional design at Progressive Corp., is one of 87 Progressive employees who have completed a graduate business program held on the insurance company's campus in Mayfield Village, taught in conjunction with Cleveland State University.

Across Northeast Ohio, colleges and businesses have teamed up to offer degree programs at work sites to employees who have families and jobs, but still want to get additional education.

Mr. Schlifke said in his case, he always knew he wanted to get his MBA. But with a 2-year-old and a pregnant wife, he didn't think he would be able to until the program started at Progressive.

I was working a full-time job, supporting a family, Mr. Schlifke said. It was really nice not to have to commute downtown, to have the expense of gas and other things.

Kathleen McGauley, senior manager of training for Progressive, said the on-campus program - which also is open to non-Progressive employees - supports the company's culture of continuous learning. The on-campus MBA began in 2003 and an undergraduate business degree was added in 2006.

It really helps us get a better, well-rounded, educated work force, Ms. McGauley said.

Progressive's program has a broad mix of people from inside and outside the company; 95 of the 182 graduates since the program began have been Progressive employees.

At a new program at Allstate's Hudson campus, administered by the University of Phoenix, 11 students are vying for MBAs, including one non- Allstate employee. Students there said they appreciate not only the proximity to their workplace, but also the fact that lessons can be tailored to connect to their industry.

It's very relevant, said Lori Schley, a senior division leader in Allstate's accounting department and a student in the MBA program. They keep it current. It's very beneficial.

While initial enrollment was less than the school had hoped, University of Phoenix vice president of academic alliances Jim Hutcherson said the program has been a success. Students are able to gain a close connection, he said, and by having the program at Allstate, the company is able to build loyalty with employees.

Pros and cons

Kent State University has one of the oldest executive MBA programs in the country, said Rick Schroath, associate dean and special adviser to the dean of the College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Management.

In workplace programs, traditional content remains, he said, but is wrapped in terms that are more relevant to students at a company.

Kent's executive MBA programs can be offered on campus or off, Dr. Schroath said; however, health care MBA programs are designed to take place on employers' campuses.

Dr. Schroath said Kent benefits from having a program on an employer's campus since it helps strengthen relationships with a business. That makes it easier to place interns there or help graduates find a job.

Dale Kramer, director of MBA and executive MBA programs at Baldwin-Wallace College, said the school used to do a number of on-site programs at employers, but has since discontinued them. It's important that the partner be a strategic fit, he said. Currently, Baldwin-Wallace is exploring the possibility of two such programs.

It's really right sometimes and not a perfect fit other times, Mr. Kramer said. We're not out there with a shotgun trying to create a lot of these things. We do it on a selective basis.

Benoy Joseph, associate dean for academic affairs and professor of marketing at the Nance College of Business at Cleveland State University, said the school has had on-site classes at places like NASA and Lincoln Electric. Next year, he's hoping to start a program at MetroHealth Medical Center.

There are some downfalls, though, to the corporate school structure. The richness and variety of discussions may not be as strong if classes lack the variety of a traditional school setting, Mr. Joseph said. People from other companies would bring new and different perspectives to learning. But he also said because cohort groups stay together throughout the course of such programs, they are able to get to know each other.

Not just for executives

Not all programs are for executives - or MBAs. Cuyahoga Community College partners with the Ford Motor Co. to offer 10 credits on-site toward an associate's degree during company time as employees are trained on new equipment and learn about electricity or hydraulics.

Those students have the option to go to Tri-C to finish their degrees, said John Gajewski, executive director of manufacturing training for the workforce and economic development division at Tri-C.

Mr. Gajewski said the curriculum is largely the same as what students would learn on Tri-C's campus, but lessons tend to be more hands-on. The school has a full-time employee based at Ford's Brook Park facility.

Jim Robinette, launch planning work force readiness leader at Ford's Brook Park Cleveland engine Plant One, said the collaboration helps the company upscale its employees. Mr. Robinette said the classes follow the manufacturing schedule, which is particularly useful.

Most schools don't start at 6 o'clock in the morning, but we do here, he said. They don't sacrifice personal or family time.

Mr. Robinette also said making it a college class adds legitimacy to the training workers are receiving.

Lakeland Community College has a similar program, in conjunction with First Energy. Patricia Hoyt, dean for work force development and the continuing education division at the school, said she is seeing increased interest in the programs, and expects to see more specialized programs in the future.

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News Headline: 'Speak Peace' | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 8:06 am, August 26, 2010

Event: “Speak Peace: American Voices Respond to Vietnamese Children's Paintings”

Venue: Kent State University's Downtown Art Gallery

When: Opens Wednesday, Sept. 1 (Gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday)

Why you might be interested: If you're up for an intriguing cultural exchange. “Speak Peace” will pair Vietnamese children's paintings of peace and war with poetry written by American children, veterans and poets in response to those images, according to information from Kent State. The project “encourages creative dialogue between image and world, fostering cross-cultural understanding and reconciliation,” the university says. A free and open-to-the-public reception will take place on Thursday, Sept. 16, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The exhibition is sponsored in part by the Kent State University Honors College.

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News Headline: Ticket system hi-tech (Morelli) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name: Rex Huffman
News OCR Text: Not only is the new Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas considered cutting edge, so is the ticketing system selected for the facility.

When tickets go on sale in early Sept-ember, patrons will purchase seats using the center's Vendini ticketing system.

“It's amazing” said Mike Morelli, general manager of the facility at New Philadelphia. “We wanted something cutting edge, and this is it.”

Morelli, who has worked with a number of ticketing systems over the years, said he looked at between 30 and 40 systems before narrowing it to the final nine or 10 for demonstration purposes.

“We wanted something world class, but we also wanted a system that would not scare away our box office volunteers,” said Morelli. “This is the system.”

With Vendini, tickets can be scanned at the door with an iPod, at about a third of the cost to use a traditional scanner.

“The system will allow us to re-seat people, look people up and go through the list of those who have purchased tickets,” said Morelli.

The center's box office will be managed by Tom Flood, who was formerly with the Columbus Symphony, and staffed with student workers and volunteers.

“We wanted to give people the opportunity to work, so we will be hiring people,” Morelli said, who added Flood is “very excited” about the ticket system and all it will be able to do.

Morelli said Vendini will be equally friendly to those purchasing tickets to attractions for the center's coming season.

“People will be able to purchase tickets online, in person, by mail order or by calling,” said Morelli. “The online capability is nice for people who don't want to leave the house. They will be able to look at a seating chart online and will see what's available. They will be able to pick the seat they want.”

All of the traditional payment options – Visa, Mastercard, check or cash – also will be available.

Tickets sales for packages will begin Sept. 7 followed by individual event ticket sales beginning Sept. 13. Ticket prices, which vary per event, will range from $16 to $75.

The Vendini system also has a “print-at-home” feature that will allow patrons to select the seats they want and then print the tickets at home, complete with the proper bar code.

Event sponsors also will be printed on the tickets. Morelli said individuals or organizations interested in being a sponsor should contact him at (330) 308-7462, or by e-mailing him at mmorell2@kent.edu.

Following is a description of the packages available |

- Opening Week package

Pick any number of events, minimum of four, from the opening week's events. Package pricing varies by the number of events and the specific events chosen.

- Broadway Series

“Cats,” Nov. 29 at 7 30.

“Oklahoma,” Jan. 16 at 7 30.

“Lord of the Dance,” Feb. 23 at 7 30.

“The Wizard of Oz,” March 6 at 7 30.

Package pricing $159 to $217.

- Laugh Out Loud series

Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood, Dec. 4 at 7 30.

Bill Engvall, March 12 at 6 30 and 9.

“The Improvised Shakespeare Company,” April 26 at 7 30.

Package pricing $84 to $122.

- Pick-A-Plan

Pick any number of events, a minimum of four, from the entire season. Package pricing will vary by number of events and the specific events chosen.

Each ticket is subject to a $2 facility fee.

More information is available on the website at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac, or by calling the box office at (330) 308-6400.

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News Headline: PUZZLING BEHAVIOR (Davidson) | Email

News Date: 08/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Morley Davidson got a special birthday present in the seventh grade a Rubik's Cube.

He was hooked.
Now the Kent State University faculty member is part of a headline-making team that has proved that the mind-bending mechanical puzzle can be solved in 20 moves or less by a computer with desktop software.
Davidson, 40, knows that many people cannot appreciate the advanced math and programming that went into the quest to find ''God's Number,'' the number of moves that an efficient and all-knowing being would use to solve any Cubepuzzle position ? all 43,252,003,274,489,856,000 of them.

But many people have played with Rubik's Cubes over the years, so they can relate to the results, he said.
''I've had e-mails from all over the world. It seems that people are glad to know that this question has been resolved,'' Davidson said.
Davidson has spent the past four years on independent Cube research. With KSU graduate student Joseph Miller of Kent, he sought to find the average number of moves required to solve the Cube using human solution techniques.
That work has been completed and will be submitted to a journal for peer review in the next month. He also will expand on that research with Miller and Boston programmer Bruce Norskog in a new research project.
This spring, Davidson joined three other researchers to nail down the elusive God's Number, a pesky problem in the field of computational group theory that has bugged mathematicians and computer scientists since the Ideal Toy Co. began to mass market Rubik's Cubes in 1980.
It took researchers about 15 years ? until 1995 ? to prove that a single position of the Cube required 20 moves. It took another 15 years to extend the answer to all the other possible positions of the Cube, regardless of how scrambled the multicolored blocks are to start.
Google donated idle computer time to make the quest possible. On a high-quality desktop computer, it would take 35 years running nonstop to perform the calculations, Davidson said.
Every solution required an algorithm, or a sequence of steps, the team explained on its Web site, http //www.cube20.com.

''One algorithm might use a sequence of moves to solve the top face, then another sequence of moves to position the middle edges, and so on.
''There are many different algorithms, varying in complexity and number of moves required, but those that can be memorized by a mortal typically require more than 40 moves.''
Davidson himself is very adept at solving the puzzle. He can solve the Cube in 15 minutes with ''under 40'' moves by hand, thanks to a special memory system of math and mnemonics that he developed and shares freely at cocktail parties ? although he finds that not all that many people are interested.
Thanks to Davidson and his team, free Cube Explorer software to solve the puzzle quickly by computer is available athttp //www.kociemba.org. Herbert Kociemba is a fellow member of the God's Number team and a math teacher from Darmstadt, Germany. Click the ''Cube Explorer'' link.
The other researchers were John Dethridge, an engineer at Google in Mountain View, Calif.; and project leader Tomas Rokicki, a programmer from Palo Alto, Calif.
Davidson is a specialist in number theory and computational mathematics who received a doctorate from the University of Michigan and a bachelor's degree from Carleton College. He joined Kent State in 1996 and was promoted to associate professor in 2002.
Since its creation by Hungarian university lecturer Erno Rubik in 1974, more than 300 million Cubes have been sold worldwide, according to the puzzle's official Web site, http //www.rubiks.com.

Copyright © 2010 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Suffragists paved way for women in local politics (Tudor) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Independent, The
Contact Name: ERIN PUSTAY
News OCR Text: Generations of American women rallied around the same battle cry Votes for Women.

Victory finally came 90 years ago today when the 19th Amendment was formally adopted into the United States Constitution by proclamation of Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby. The amendment was ratified on Aug. 18, 1920.

Perhaps it's the long and wary battle they fought that makes women's right to vote so sacred.

“They should have been permitted a vote a long time before (1920), but sometimes you have to fight for the things that are most important to you,” Massillon City Councilwoman Kathy Catazaro-Perry said. “To have the opportunity to vote and run for office is a wonderful thing because women have unrelentless strength and there are many, many wonderful women leaders in the world.”

1970s bring change

With the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920, the voter population in the United States almost doubled, but its impact wouldn't truly be seen until 50 years later.

Dr. Jarrod Tudor, a professor of political science at Kent State University Stark, says it wasn't until the 1970s that women defined their own voice in politics and government.

“Early on, women who did choose to vote had a tendency to vote with their husbands,” Tudor said. “As more women started to go to college and defined their political identity, that is when you started to see the punch of the 19th Amendment.”

As women began to speak out on issues that mattered to them and their gender, their political voice began to influence politics on local, state and federal levels, Tudor said.

“Suddenly, male candidates had a whole new voting block to keep in mind,” he said, “and you saw more women running for the House of Representatives and running for the Senate – more women wanting to be a part of the political scene.”

Dr. Bill Cunion, chair of the Political Science Department at the University of Mount Union, noted that women, with their votes alone, have shaped national discussions.

“They have a different set of priorities and different perspectives,” Cunion said. “If they thought about things the same way as men, and if they ranked things the same way that men did, then the outcomes of elections would be the same whether they voted or not.”

A voting majority

In 2008, 53 percent of voters were women. While that doesn't seem like a large majority, Cunion contends it is. Because women have voted more faithfully in recent decades, they have forced candidates to talk to them and address their concerns.

“If you are running for office, you have to market your message – just like you would market a product,” Cunion said. “That completely changes the dynamic of running for office because you cannot win without winning women's votes. That is also why, in recent years, discussions have been dominated more by issues such as health care, which matter more to women, than issues such as immigration, which tend to matter more to men.”

Women need to have their voices heard at all levels of government, according to Perry Township Trustee Anna Capaldi. The perspectives, ideas and diverse points of view that women bring allow for government to work better for all citizens, Capaldi said.

“Our families are directly affected by the decisions that are made in government and that's why it is so important for women to be involved,” Capaldi said. “It's imperative that women exercise that right to vote.”

Cunion points out that the greatest impact women have had on politics has been their vote. Women are vastly under-represented in government, he said, noting that roughly 17 percent of congressional seats are held by women.

Female candidates

Tudor believes that women's voting records will continue to impact government on all levels because he sees women engaged in politics like never before.

Behind the 2008 presidential election and the emergence of figures including Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, women have become even more active in defining what government means to them and how they will let their voices be heard. Tudor believes that America will see more women seeking public office because of their renewed passions for politics.

“Before 2008, there was a drought in national female candidates,” Tudor said. “I suspect that drought is gone. You are going to see more and more women involved in politics and women actively seeking national office.”

Catazaro-Perry believes a trend like that can only propel America toward new and greater things.

“What I really like about today's world is that anyone can vote and you can elect anyone to public office,” Catazaro-Perry said. “That kind of diversity makes us stronger.”

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News Headline: KSU program to share bikes hits ground rolling (Rufra) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (PHOTO) KSU Provost Bob Frank, center, rides university-owned bikes to
show off the school's new ‘Flashfeet' bike-sharing program.

Kent State University students
have a new way to get
around campus this year
with the creation of a bikesharing
initiative this fall
called “Flashfleet.”
The program will provide
students, faculty and staff
the ability to sign out a rental
bicycle from six locations
on campus with their Flashcard.
The program is free,
and fees are only assessed if
equipment is returned late,
damaged or not at all.
“Bike sharing is a unique
concept that enables multiple
users to borrow bikes for
short-term use,” said Kim
Rufra, associate director of
recreational services. “Our
mission is to provide affordable,
easily accessible and
environmentally sustainable
transportation to Kent
State University.”
Guests, with a valid driver's
license, are also allowed
to participate in the program
as long as the student
or staff member assumes liability.
The bike sharing program
starts Monday, and Flashfleet
will be available at the
following locations: Student
Recreation and Wellness
Center; Kent Student Center;
Dunbar Hall Area Desk;
Twin Towers Area Desk; Tri
Towers Area Desk and the
Stopher Hall Area Desk.
Users will be able to borrow
bikes, helmets and locks
on a daily basis from 8 a.m.
to 9:30 p.m. All equipment
must be returned to its
point of origin before closing.
The program is tentatively
scheduled to operate
until Oct. 31, depending on
weather. It will reopen in the
spring after the last of the
winter storms.

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News Headline: KSU students move in (Joseph) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students moved into the residence halls at Kent State University's Kent
campus Thursday. The university expected between 3,900 and 4,000
students to move in Thursday, and more than 1,200 students had already
settled in prior to Wednesday. Betsy Joseph, director of residence services
at KSU, said 6,327 students will be living in residence halls on campus
this fall.

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News Headline: Major changes to downtown Kent plan eyed: CIty, Kent state weigh combined conference center, hotel; current plans have separate sites (Floyd) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Matt Fredmonsky | staff writer

The conference center component of the downtown Kent redevelopment project, arguably the key element, could change drastically from its current proposal before construction begins.

The city, Kent State University and their private development partners, the Pizzuti Companies and Fairmount Properties, are discussing the idea of combining the conference center facilities within the planned 100-plus room hotel.

Current plans show two stand-alone facilities with the hotel located on the west side of South DePeyster Street and the 15,000-square-foot conference center in a building across the street on the former Record-Courier Kent office site. It seems as if it might be a better fit to put it into the hotel, Kent Economic Development Director Dan Smith said. It still might end up being the way it is. We havent decided anything yet. Smith said combining the facilities under one roof makes sense financially, as it eliminates the duplication of expenses for kitchen equipment and other utilities.

The Kent State University Foundation owns the former Record-Courier site, and KSU also owns the property where the hotel is currently proposed within the redevelopment block.

Gregg Floyd, vice president for finance and administration at KSU, said having both operations under one roof provides for the congruence of both facilities. You dont have to go outside essentially to attend your conference, Floyd said. I think both functions are facilitated better by them being co-located under one roof. This is a positive thing in my view. If the elements are housed together, its unclear whether that single building would stand on the hotels current proposed location or the conference centers proposed lot. Its still being conceptualized with the architects, Floyd said. Were looking to see how it would lay out in a combined form on the east side (of South DePeyster Street) and then how it can be included and added into the west side. Jim Russell, executive vice president for Pizzuti Companies, said the partners will continue to tweak the plan to make sure its the right plan for the project. We hope to have that locked down by early next week, Russell said. Thats the plan as were moving forward with the project. Were optimistic about the project and were working with all the partners to make it happen. Combining both elements into one building would potentially leave KSU with land within the project not currently slated for construction.

If land is vacated, Smith said hes confident the development partners will find a use for it based on the level of interest in the redevelopment. We dont think well have any trouble developing (either) site in a complimentary fashion with the rest of the site, Smith said. He said combining the facilities would likely lead to the hotel expanding from six occupied stories to seven with an elevator equipment tower as the eighth floor. He stressed the discussion does not mean KSU or Pizzuti are considering nixing either element of the project. This doesnt mean the hotel and conference center arent part of the project or arent going to happen, he said. Floyd, who has worked on similar projects elsewhere during his career, said hes never seen the level of partnership and commitment reflected in the Kent project. It makes not only the development aspects easier to work through, but the finished product will be much more properly balanced and responsive to the needs of the community, he said.

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