Report Overview:
Total Clips (7)
Art; Wick Poetry Center (1)
Biological Sciences (2)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Sustainability (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Art; Wick Poetry Center (1)
Artwork from Vietnamese children shown 08/30/2010 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

" onclick="return hs.expand(this)" vocusinstance="0"> Photo courtesy of Kent State University; The Vietnamese Children's Art Exhibit will debut in the United States at Kent State University's Downtown Gallery Sept....


Biological Sciences (2)
Researchers from Kent State University, Department of Biological Sciences detail findings in obesity (Novak) 08/31/2010 Science Letter Text Email

...PEPCK-C in both groups of rats. Differences in muscle PEPCK were not secondary to the differing amount of activity," wrote C.M. Novak and colleagues, Kent State University, Department of Biological Sciences (see also ). The researchers concluded "This suggests the possibility that intrinsic...

Researchers from Kent State University, Department of Biological Sciences detail findings in obesity (Novak) 08/31/2010 Life Science Weekly Text Email

...PEPCK-C in both groups of rats. Differences in muscle PEPCK were not secondary to the differing amount of activity," wrote C.M. Novak and colleagues, Kent State University, Department of Biological Sciences (see also ). The researchers concluded "This suggests the possibility that intrinsic...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Polling powerhouse says Ohio is this November's bellwether state 08/30/2010 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...management. Great Lakes Towing is doing the work under an $8.2 million contract financed by federal stimulus money, according to the AP. Great job by Kent State University to line up some new-media heavy-hitters for a coming conference. The sixth annual Poynter Kent State Media Ethics Workshop,...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Commissioners OK proposal to seek AEP grant (Comanitz) 08/31/2010 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

...commissioners Monday approved a resolution of support to seek the $100,000 grant as requested by Pat Comanitz, director of Business and Community Services for Kent State University at Tuscarawas at New Philadelphia. Her department would partner with The Employment Source at New Philadelphia and the county...


Sustainability (2)
KSU launches new bike sharing program (Rufra) 08/30/2010 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - Flash Fleet is a new program at Kent State that lets students on or off campus grab a bike and ride to and from class. The students can use the bikes from 8 a.m. till 9 30 p.m....

Reporter IT'S THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY. 08/30/2010 Live on 5 - WEWS-TV Text Email

...BIKE SHARE PROGRAM AND IT IS ALREADY GETTING HIGH MARKS. WHY STUDENTS ARE NOW ENCOURAGED TO USE PEDAL POWER. Reporter IT'S THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY. BACK TO THE HUSTLE AND BUSTLE OF GOING TO CLASS, DEALING WITH TRAFFIC BY FOOT AND CAR. WHAT'S A PERSON TO DO? HOW ABOUT...


News Headline: Artwork from Vietnamese children shown | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2010
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: " onclick="return hs.expand(this)" vocusinstance="0">

Photo courtesy of Kent State University; The Vietnamese Children's Art Exhibit will debut in the United States at Kent State University's Downtown Gallery Sept. 1 through 25.

Kent State University's Downtown Art Gallery and Wick Poetry Center, in collaboration with Soldier's Heart, the veterans' support organization based in Albany, New York, will exhibit Speak Peace American Voices Respond to Vietnamese Children's Paintings.

The Vietnamese Children's Art Exhibit, in partnership with Viet Nam's War Remnants Museum will debut in the United States at Kent State University's Downtown Gallery Sept. 1 through 25.

A free and open-to-the-public reception will take place Sept. 16 from 5 to 8 p.m.

Speak Peace will pair Vietnamese children's paintings of peace and war with poetry collected by the War Remnants Museum in Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam written by American children, veterans, and poets in response to those images. Roughly one third of the poems included in the exhibit are from Northeast Ohio, including works from students or teachers from Kent, Ravenna, Akron, and Cleveland.

The exhibit will then be featured at the 2010 International Peace and War Summit at Case Western Reserve University in October, then travel nationally.

The Downtown Gallery, at 141 E. Main Street in downtown Kent, is open Wednesday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

For more information, call 330-676-1549 or visit http //galleries.kent.edu.

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News Headline: Researchers from Kent State University, Department of Biological Sciences detail findings in obesity (Novak) | Email

News Date: 08/31/2010
Outlet Full Name: Science Letter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Scientists discuss in 'Spontaneous activity, economy of activity, and resistance to diet-induced obesity in rats bred for high intrinsic aerobic capacity' new findings in obesity. According to recent research from the United States, "Though obesity is common, some people remain resistant to weight gain even in an obesogenic environment. The propensity to remain lean may be partly associated with high endurance capacity along with high spontaneous physical activity and the energy expenditure of activity, called non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT)."

"Previous studies have shown that high-capacity running rats (HCR) are lean compared to low-capacity runners (LCR), which are susceptible to cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Here, we examine the effect of diet on spontaneous activity and NEAT, as well as potential mechanisms underlying these traits, in rats selectively bred for high or low intrinsic aerobic endurance capacity. Compared to LCR, HCR were resistant to the sizeable increases in body mass and fat mass induced by a high-fat diet; HCR also had lower levels of circulating leptin. HCR were consistently more active than LCR, and had lower fuel economy of activity, regardless of diet. Nonetheless, both HCR and LCR showed a similar decrease in daily activity levels after high-fat feeding, as well as decreases in hypothalamic orexin-A content. The HCR were more sensitive to the NEAT-activating effects of intra-paraventricular orexin-A compared to LCR, especially after high-fat feeding. Lastly, levels of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in the skeletal muscle of HCR were consistently higher than LCR, and the high-fat diet decreased skeletal muscle PEPCK-C in both groups of rats. Differences in muscle PEPCK were not secondary to the differing amount of activity," wrote C.M. Novak and colleagues, Kent State University, Department of Biological Sciences (see also ).

The researchers concluded "This suggests the possibility that intrinsic differences in physical activity levels may originate at the level of the skeletal muscle, which could alter brain responsiveness to neuropeptides and other factors that regulate spontaneous daily activity and NEAT."

Novak and colleagues published their study in Hormones and Behavior (Spontaneous activity, economy of activity, and resistance to diet-induced obesity in rats bred for high intrinsic aerobic capacity. Hormones and Behavior, 2010;58(3) 355-67).

For additional information, contact C.M. Novak, Kent State University, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Kent, OH 44242 USA.

Copyright © 2010 Science Letter via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Researchers from Kent State University, Department of Biological Sciences detail findings in obesity (Novak) | Email

News Date: 08/31/2010
Outlet Full Name: Life Science Weekly
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Scientists discuss in 'Spontaneous activity, economy of activity, and resistance to diet-induced obesity in rats bred for high intrinsic aerobic capacity' new findings in obesity. According to recent research from the United States, "Though obesity is common, some people remain resistant to weight gain even in an obesogenic environment. The propensity to remain lean may be partly associated with high endurance capacity along with high spontaneous physical activity and the energy expenditure of activity, called non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT)."

"Previous studies have shown that high-capacity running rats (HCR) are lean compared to low-capacity runners (LCR), which are susceptible to cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Here, we examine the effect of diet on spontaneous activity and NEAT, as well as potential mechanisms underlying these traits, in rats selectively bred for high or low intrinsic aerobic endurance capacity. Compared to LCR, HCR were resistant to the sizeable increases in body mass and fat mass induced by a high-fat diet; HCR also had lower levels of circulating leptin. HCR were consistently more active than LCR, and had lower fuel economy of activity, regardless of diet. Nonetheless, both HCR and LCR showed a similar decrease in daily activity levels after high-fat feeding, as well as decreases in hypothalamic orexin-A content. The HCR were more sensitive to the NEAT-activating effects of intra-paraventricular orexin-A compared to LCR, especially after high-fat feeding. Lastly, levels of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in the skeletal muscle of HCR were consistently higher than LCR, and the high-fat diet decreased skeletal muscle PEPCK-C in both groups of rats. Differences in muscle PEPCK were not secondary to the differing amount of activity," wrote C.M. Novak and colleagues, Kent State University, Department of Biological Sciences (see also ).

The researchers concluded "This suggests the possibility that intrinsic differences in physical activity levels may originate at the level of the skeletal muscle, which could alter brain responsiveness to neuropeptides and other factors that regulate spontaneous daily activity and NEAT."

Novak and colleagues published their study in Hormones and Behavior (Spontaneous activity, economy of activity, and resistance to diet-induced obesity in rats bred for high intrinsic aerobic capacity. Hormones and Behavior, 2010;58(3) 355-67).

For additional information, contact C.M. Novak, Kent State University, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Kent, OH 44242 USA.

Copyright © 2010 Life Science Weekly via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Polling powerhouse says Ohio is this November's bellwether state | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2010
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Blog entry August 30, 2010, 10 58 am | Author SCOTT SUTTELL

A few thoughts and links for the day

Ohio is that state to watch in this fall's elections.

So says Peter A. Brown, assistant director of the

Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, in a piece for The Wall Street Journal.

“In a presidential election year, Ohio is arguably the most important state in the country when it comes to the Electoral College,” Mr. Brown writes. “In this November's off-year elections, the Buckeye State may serve a similar function — as the swing state that tells us just how hard the winds are blowing nationally.”

With tight races for governor and senator, not to mention several close congressional contests, “Ohio is likely to tell us not only which political party will be victorious but also how large the anticipated Republican wave turns out to be,” according to Mr. Brown.

If the GOP can win these toss-up Ohio races, “then a repeat of the 1994 Republican landslide might be possible nationally,” he notes. But wins by Democrats in those races “would likely indicate that their losses might be smaller elsewhere, more in line with those typically suffered by a president's party at this point in the calendar.”

New research from a Michigan State University sociologist finds that cities with the best opportunities to build vibrant local economies are those that have extensive connections — both physical and digital — to other places.

Zachary Neal found that although America's largest cities once had the most sophisticated economies, that's no longer necessarily true,

“The rise of commercial aviation, high-speed rail, the Internet and other technological advances have allowed smaller cities to compete with urban powers such as New York and Chicago,” according to a Michigan State summary of Mr. Neal's work.

He examined the population and air-traffic data for 64 U.S. cities from 1900 to 2000 and found that a city's population was the most important factor for its economy until the 1950s, when the spread of commercial air travel fostered more cross-country business networks. That trend continued with advances such as teleconferencing and the growth of the Internet.

“Some large cities – including New York, Los Angeles and Chicago – built on those networks and maintained their economic clout,” Mr. Neal reports. “Other cities – like Detroit, Cleveland and Pittsburgh – were unable to effectively capitalize and now are considered ‘poorly connected.' This holds true for the overall economies of the cities and for specific sectors such as manufacturing and transportation and communication.”

In the last decade, he says, “wired towns” such as the Raleigh/Durham area of North Carolina and Bentonville, Ark. — thanks, Walmart — are seeing fresh economic opportunities that in the past only would have been possible in larger markets.

Great Lakes Towing Co. of Cleveland is building two research vessels for the U.S. Geological Survey's Great Lakes Science Center — the one in Ann Arbor, Mich., not the museum in Cleveland — that are expected to bolster the agency's research on Lake Erie and Lake Ontario.

The boats should be completed in September 2011, according to The Associated Press. The 65-foot vessels will be “modern floating laboratories” and will cruise faster than the ships they're replacing, says Russell Strach, director of the Ann Arbor-based center.

Areas of research by the center include fish populations, aquatic habitats and biological processes in the Great Lakes, the AP reports. The center helps monitor invasive species and its data help guide American state, federal and tribal fisheries management.

Great Lakes Towing is doing the work under an $8.2 million contract financed by federal stimulus money, according to the AP.

Great job by Kent State University to line up some new-media heavy-hitters for a coming conference.

The sixth annual Poynter Kent State Media Ethics Workshop, taking place Sept. 16, is titled “Next Ethics” and will feature as speakers Arianna Huffington, co-founder and editor of the ; Adrian Holovaty, founder and editor of Everyblock.com; Paul Steiger, editor of ProPublica; and Michael Cherenson, immediate past president and CEO of the Public Relations Society of America.

Ms. Huffington will appear at the workshop via cyber-connection to talk about “What's Next for Citizen Journalism?” Mr. Holovaty will appear in person to discuss data-mining and access to government information.

Mr. Steiger, former editor of The Wall Street Journal, will deliver the luncheon keynote address. And Mr. Cherenson will lead a discussion about the influence PR people can have by reaching out to bloggers.

The workshop takes place at Kent State's Franklin Hall, home of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. It's only $25 for media and public relations professionals, $15 for educators and free for students.

You also can follow me on Twitter for more news about business and Northeast Ohio.

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News Headline: Commissioners OK proposal to seek AEP grant (Comanitz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/31/2010
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name: Lee Morrison
News OCR Text: Training to help 70 women obtain jobs will be available if a grant is obtained through AEP Ohio's Putting Ohioans to Work for Economic Recovery, or POWER program.

Tuscarawas County commissioners Monday approved a resolution of support to seek the $100,000 grant as requested by Pat Comanitz, director of Business and Community Services for Kent State University at Tuscarawas at New Philadelphia. Her department would partner with The Employment Source at New Philadelphia and the county Department of Job and Family Services to operate the program, which would provide office skills to help companies achieve green movement goals of improving the environment.

The program offers initiatives for work force development for entry-level office jobs targeting low-income residents in AEP's service territory. Proposals are due Sept. 3, with a decision due about Oct. 4. If the grant is obtained, the 50-hour online class would begin Oct. 11.

“The purpose of this training is to educate the students in a core of sustainability topics to enable them to stand out individually among other candidates applying for jobs in any field,” Comanitz said.

She said the skills would be valuable for any company, not just those striving to be green.

Sustainability professional training certification would provide fundamental office skills in green purchasing, sustainability, carbon strategies, leadership training and environmental management systems.

Classes can be taken online in the woman's home at any time or in a computer lab on campus. Comanitz and another staff member will be available by appointment to help the women use the technology needed.

“They could start as soon as they get registered,” she said, adding that there would be a six-month time frame to finish.

The Tuscarawas County Department of Jobs and Family Services and The Employment Source, which covers Tuscarawas and Stark counties, will help to identify the women who meet the economic guidelines of the POWER grant.

It's anticipated that of the 70 women starting the program, 80 percent will complete it.

“That will be 56 unemployed or underemployed women receiving this certification,” Comanitz said, adding that 45 of them should find employment immediately and the rest within a year.

The Employment Source will be available to help the women develop resumes, interview skills and job leads.

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News Headline: KSU launches new bike sharing program (Rufra) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2010
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name: Steve Cummings
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - Flash Fleet is a new program at Kent State that lets students on or off campus grab a bike and ride to and from class.

The students can use the bikes from 8 a.m. till 9 30 p.m. ,seven days a week with a valid university ID.card. The plan is to relieve car traffic congestion, with student enrollment at 25,000.

"It's an alternative form of transportation, a great method of transportation, so we're looking at the sustainability side of things with hopes that we could increase the bike culture here at Kent State, where students and facility, staff members wouldn't have to rely on car transportation," Kim Rufra with Kent State said.

"For students like me, who don't have their own car and who don't have their own bike, it's a great program and it's free. You can go to numerous locations on campus," student Sam Chambers said.

The university has invested $30,000 to buy 50 hybrid bikes, and there has already been long lines to try out the bikes.

"If we could get a few of these people to get out of their cars, park them and use these bikes, it would be a lot more helpful," student Marie Supanich said.

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News Headline: Reporter IT'S THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY. | Email

News Date: 08/30/2010
Outlet Full Name: Live on 5 - WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: % PENN STATE STUDENTS NOW DON'T HAVE AS MANY EXCUSES FOR SHOWING UP LATE TO CLASS. THE UNIVERSITY HAS A PILOT BIKE SHARE PROGRAM AND IT IS ALREADY GETTING HIGH MARKS. WHY STUDENTS ARE NOW ENCOURAGED TO USE PEDAL POWER. Reporter IT'S THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY. BACK TO THE HUSTLE AND BUSTLE OF GOING TO CLASS, DEALING WITH TRAFFIC BY FOOT AND CAR. WHAT'S A PERSON TO DO? HOW ABOUT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S NEW BIKE SHARING PROGRAM? IT'S A GREEN METHOD OF TRANSPORTATION. ALTERN THATTIVE METHOD OF TRANSPORTATION. SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM WHERE WE ARE HOPING TO WHERE STUDENTS AND STAFF WOULDN'T HAVE TO RELY SO MUCH ON CAR TRANSPORTATION. Reporter THE UNIVERSITY HAS INVESTED $50,000 TO BUY HYBRID BIKES. WE WANT STUDENTING TO BE ABLE TO TAKE THEM DOWNTOWN. OUR GOAL IS TO EVENTUALLY INVOLVE THE CITY WITH THIS PROGRAM. Reporter THIS IS A WELCOME RELIEF. FOR STUDENTS WHO DON'T HAVE THEIR OWN CARS, LIKE ME AND DON'T HAVE THEIR OWN BIKES, IT'S A GREAT PROGRAM. IT'S FREE. YOU CAN GO TO NUMEROUS LOCATIONS ON CAMPUS. IF WE CAN GET A FEW OF THOSE PEOPLE TO GET OUT OF THEIR CARS, PARK THEM AND USE THE BIKES, IT WILL BE MORE HELPFUL. Reporter IT WILL HELP PEOPLE GET TO CLASS ON TIME WITHOUT ALL OF THE FRUSTRATION OF TRAFFIC. THE PROGRAM IS SCHEDULED TO RUN THROUGH OCTOBER 31st DEPENDING ON THE WEATHER AND REOPEN AGAIN IN THE SPRING. LIVE LOOK DOWNTOWN. LET'S LOOK AT OUR BIG BOARD WEATHER MAPS. 89 RIGHT NOW, SANDUSKY. A LITTLE COOLER MARBLE HEAD, 86. 90 HURON. OBSERVERLAND INCREDIBLE HEAT FOR LATE AUGUST. WE'LL WELCOME IN SEPTEMBER ON THE WARM SIDE AS WELL. CUYAHOGA FALLS AT 90, UNIONTOWN. A COUPLE OF SHOWERS TRYING TO MOVE INTO INDIANA, THERE IS THE CENTER OF THE HIGH PRESSURE THERE. CIRCULATION IS CLOCK WISE, SO, AGAIN, THE HIGH JUST TO OUR EAST, PULLING IN THE HAZY, HOT AND HUMID AIR. TODAY, IT'S HOT. BUT THE HUMIDITY WAS MANAGEABLE. BUT AS WE HEAD IN TOWARDS WEDNESDAY, I THINK THE HUMIDITY WILL GO WAY UP AS DEW POINTS TRACK BACK INTO THE 70S, SO, GET READY. HERE IS EARL, MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS RIGHT NOW AT 135-MILES PER HOUR. IT'S A STRONG CATEGORY 4 HURRICANE PULLING AWAY FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE U. VIRGIN ISLANDS. LET LOOK AT WHERE WE EXPECT EARL TO BE. GRAZING THE EASTERN SEABOARD AND IF THIS TRACK SHIFTS ANY MORE. POOR LONG ISLAND, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS AND DOWN EAST MAINE, THEY MAY BE HOOKING AT A DIRECT HIT AS WE HEAD INTO FRIDAY AND SATURDAY. 91 TUESDAY, 92 ON WEDNESDAY. THURSDAY, A FEW SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS MAY SEE 90 EARLY, DEPENDS ON HOW QUICKLY THE FRONT GETS IN. BUT THEN WE COOL DOWN. LOOK AT THE WEEKEND, NOT BAD. LOWER AND MIDDLE 70S, JUST IN TIME TO CELEBRATE LABOR DAY. MONDAY, 77 AND DRY WEATHER. UV INDEX TOMORROW, A 12.

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