Report Overview:
Total Clips (6)
Geology (5)
Renovation at KSU (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Geology (5)
Creationists mistake stone for flesh 12/02/2010 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

...It is based in part on an erroneous understanding of fossilization, and what scientists mean when they say an ancient organism has been preserved. A Kent State University news release highlights the work of geologists, Rodney M. Feldmann and Carrie E. Schweitzer, who studied a specimen from...

El Nino: Better understanding of long-term changes in climate system (Ortiz) 12/02/2010 ScienceDaily Text Attachment Email

ScienceDaily (Dec. 2, 2010) — For more than a decade, Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University and part of an international team of National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded researchers, has been studying long-term...

Research provides better understanding of long-term changes in the climate system (Ortiz) 12/02/2010 PhysOrg.com Text Attachment Email

...points in the vicinity of Soledad Basin on a high-resolution bathymetric map off the coast of Baja California. Credit: Photo courtesy of Dr. Joseph Ortiz/Kent State University For more than a decade, Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University and part...

Research provides better understanding of long-term changes in the climate system (Ortiz) 12/02/2010 EurekAlert! Text Attachment Email

...prediction of this global climate phenomenon and help mitigate associated natural disasters IMAGE:Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University, is part of an international team of National Science Foundation-funded researchers whose findings on solar linkages in...

Research provides better understanding of long-term changes in the climate system (Ortiz) 12/02/2010 e! Science News Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Photo courtesy of Dr. Joseph Ortiz/Kent State University For more than a decade, Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate...


Renovation at KSU (1)
EDITORIAL: Impasse over facelift hurts not only KSU, but area, too 12/03/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Creationists mistake stone for flesh | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/02/2010
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Trudy Sassaman, Riverside Atheism Examiner
News OCR Text: Recent articles by the Institute of Creation Research reveal a depth of scienctific illiteracy that would be laughable except that so many people swallow this kind of argument.
One particularly egregious case can be seen in a Nov. 19 article that questions scientists' findings that a shrimp fossil found in Oklahoma is 350 million years old, the oldest decapod ever found. The Creation Institute article contends that the research "has uncovered clear features that not only refute an evolutionary context for this find, but also confirm the creation model."
This contention could not be further from the truth. It is based in part on an erroneous understanding of fossilization, and what scientists mean when they say an ancient organism has been preserved.
A Kent State University news release highlights the work of geologists, Rodney M. Feldmann and Carrie E. Schweitzer, who studied a specimen from the Devonian Woodford Shale in the Ryan Quarry, near Ada, Oklahoma. Their work was published in the November issue of the Journal of Crustacean Biology. The news release refers to a fossil "preserved with muscle,"
The reference to muscle is to fossilized substance: What was preserved was the structure of the muscles -- the muscles themselves are long gone, replaced by calcium phosphate that later hardened so that the shape, not the actual organic material of the original can still be seen.
The Creationist paper cites a previous ICR article, titled "Fresh tissues Show Fossils are Recent." Fresh tissue? Not this shrimp.
Strangely, the argument against the 350 million-year-old age of the fossil begins with the statement:
"First, the fossil was found in a layer far below the level of the one in Madagascar in which the previously known lowest shrimp fossils were discovered."
Contrary to the implication that this somehow disproves the age of the fossil, it is evidence for it. Scientists are not surprised that the deeper a fossil is found, the older it is likely to be, absent activity, such as a volcano, that shuffles the layers.
Another alleged indictment involves the similar appearance to shrimp of today:
"Since modern shrimp look just like the one discovered in Oklahoma (it was easily identifiable as a 'shrimp'), critical thinkers are asked to believe that 350 million years' worth of mutations and natural selection has had zero effect on the shrimp body plan! A more likely interpretation is that it's not as old as the researchers claimed."
Or maybe it is. If an environment is relatively stable, a species has no pressure to evolve. Any mutations would most likely die out, so that the original organisms do not have to compete for survival. The body plan worked, so it survived.
Beyond that, the Kent State researchers classify the ancient shrimp as members of a different family and species than any modern shrimp, indicating that change has occurred.
The Creationist article concludes with the most ridiculous statement of them all:
"Were those investigating this fossil willing to consider the biblical Flood of Noah as a causative agent of rapid burial and recent preservation, they would be much more satisfied with the good fit between this data and the Bible's historical model."
Of course, real scientists don't consider the biblical flood as the causative agent. Science works on facts not myths.

Return to Top



News Headline: El Nino: Better understanding of long-term changes in climate system (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/02/2010
Outlet Full Name: ScienceDaily
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ScienceDaily (Dec. 2, 2010) — For more than a decade, Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University and part of an international team of National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded researchers, has been studying long-term climate variability associated with El Niño. The researchers' goal is to help climatologists better understand this global climate phenomenon that happens every two to eight years, impacting much of the world.

El Niño is the periodic warming of central and eastern tropical Pacific waters. The last El Niño occurred in 2009, Ortiz said, and its impact was felt in the United States with flooding in the south and wildfires in California. The research team looked at El Niño-Southern Oscillation (which is often just called "El Niño"), reconstructing sea surface temperature of the equatorial Pacific over the past 14,000 years.

"If we understand how El Niño changes over thousands of years, we can better predict climate changes on societal time-scales of years to decades," Ortiz explained. "El Niño variations lead to drought, famine, landslides, fires and other natural disasters, depending on where in the world you happen to be. Our findings can help lead to better ways to predict El Niño-Southern Oscillations, mitigating the natural disasters associated with it."

In addition to Ortiz, the research team includes the lead author on the paper, Thomas Marchitto (University of Colorado); Raimund Muscheler (Lund University in Sweden); Jose Carriquiry (Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Ensenada in Mexico); and Alexander van Geen (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University). Their findings will appear in the Dec. 3 issue of Science. Their paper helps to establish the linkage between changes in solar intensity and the strength of El Niño on millennial time scales. Their work was funded by the Marine Geology Subdivision of the National Science Foundation's Ocean Sciences Division.

"The climate system is very sensitive to subtle external forcing," Ortiz said. "We determined that the sun has an impact but is not the sole factor driving changes on these millennial time scales. Other studies have tried to show a solar linkage to El Niño-related climate variability, but our study indicates a convincing linkage due to the continuity of our record. This paper confirms the 'ocean dynamical thermostat' theory, showing that solar-forced changes in ocean circulation have on impact on El Niño."

Ortiz began working with the international team of scientists when he was a post-doctoral scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, a research branch of Columbia University. Over the last 11 years, his contributions to the team include assisting with measurements and in the statistical analysis of the data sets. As a researcher in the Kent State geology department, Ortiz has involved Kent State graduates and undergraduates in his NSF-funded research, providing his students with real-world experience on an international level. His students have participated in research projects as close to home as here in Ohio, and as far away as the South Pacific, North Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific Northwest, and off Baja California.

"With my involvement in this project, Kent State geology students have studied core samples collected off of Baja California," Ortiz said. "The students can take what they learn in the classroom out into the field and back to the lab. I feel very fortunate to be able to provide our students with this type of experience and bring international-level research to Kent State."

Disclaimer: Views expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect those of ScienceDaily or its staff.

Story Source:

The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by Kent State University.

Journal Reference:

Thomas M. Marchitto, Raimund Muscheler, Joseph D. Ortiz, Jose D. Carriquiry and Alexander Van Geen. Dynamical Response of the Tropical Pacific Ocean to Solar Forcing During the Early Holocene,". Science, 3 December 2010: Vol. 330 no. 6009 pp. 1378-1381 DOI: 10.1126/science.1194887

Return to Top



News Headline: Research provides better understanding of long-term changes in the climate system (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/02/2010
Outlet Full Name: PhysOrg.com
Contact Name: Kent State University
News OCR Text: A researcher points in the vicinity of Soledad Basin on a high-resolution bathymetric map off the coast of Baja California. Credit: Photo courtesy of Dr. Joseph Ortiz/Kent State University
For more than a decade, Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University and part of an international team of National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded researchers, has been studying long-term climate variability associated with El Niño. The researchers' goal is to help climatologists better understand this global climate phenomenon that happens every two to eight years, impacting much of the world.

El Niño is the periodic warming of central and eastern tropical Pacific waters. The last El Niño occurred in 2009, Ortiz said, and its impact was felt in the United States with flooding in the south and wildfires in California. The research team looked at El Niño-Southern Oscillation (which is often just called "El Niño"), reconstructing sea surface temperature of the equatorial Pacific over the past 14,000 years.

"If we understand how El Niño changes over thousands of years, we can better predict climate changes on societal time-scales of years to decades," Ortiz explained. "El Niño variations lead to drought, famine, landslides, fires and other natural disasters, depending on where in the world you happen to be. Our findings can help lead to better ways to predict El Niño-Southern Oscillations, mitigating the natural disasters associated with it."

In addition to Ortiz, the research team includes the lead author on the paper, Thomas Marchitto (University of Colorado); Raimund Muscheler (Lund University in Sweden); Jose Carriquiry (Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Ensenada in Mexico); and Alexander van Geen (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University).

Their findings will appear in the Dec. 3 issue of Science. Their paper, "Dynamical Response of the Tropical Pacific Ocean to Solar Forcing During the Early Holocene," helps to establish the linkage between changes in solar intensity and the strength of El Niño on millennial time scales. Their work was funded by the Marine Geology Subdivision of the National Science Foundation's Ocean Sciences Division.

"The climate system is very sensitive to subtle external forcing," Ortiz said. "We determined that the sun has an impact but is not the sole factor driving changes on these millennial time scales. Other studies have tried to show a solar linkage to El Niño-related climate variability, but our study indicates a convincing linkage due to the continuity of our record. This paper confirms the 'ocean dynamical thermostat' theory, showing that solar-forced changes in ocean circulation have on impact on El Niño."

Scientists on the Marion Dufresne process core that has been recovered from off the coast of Baja California. Credit: Photo courtesy of Dr. Joseph Ortiz/Kent State University

Ortiz began working with the international team of scientists when he was a post-doctoral scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, a research branch of Columbia University. Over the last 11 years, his contributions to the team include assisting with measurements and in the statistical analysis of the data sets. As a researcher in the Kent State geology department, Ortiz has involved Kent State graduates and undergraduates in his NSF-funded research, providing his students with real-world experience on an international level. His students have participated in research projects as close to home as here in Ohio, and as far away as the South Pacific, North Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific Northwest, and off Baja California.

"With my involvement in this project, Kent State geology students have studied core samples collected off of Baja California," Ortiz said. "The students can take what they learn in the classroom out into the field and back to the lab. I feel very fortunate to be able to provide our students with this type of experience and bring international-level research to Kent State."

Return to Top



News Headline: Research provides better understanding of long-term changes in the climate system (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/02/2010
Outlet Full Name: EurekAlert!
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Contact: Dr. Joseph Ortiz
Better understanding of the long-term history of El Nino will help enhance short-term prediction of this global climate phenomenon and help mitigate associated natural disasters
IMAGE:Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University, is part of an international team of National Science Foundation-funded researchers whose findings on solar linkages in subtropical-tropical climate...
For more than a decade, Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University and part of an international team of National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded researchers, has been studying long-term climate variability associated with El Niño. The researchers' goal is to help climatologists better understand this global climate phenomenon that happens every two to eight years, impacting much of the world.

El Niño is the periodic warming of central and eastern tropical Pacific waters. The last El Niño occurred in 2009, Ortiz said, and its impact was felt in the United States with flooding in the south and wildfires in California. The research team looked at El Niño-Southern Oscillation (which is often just called "El Niño"), reconstructing sea surface temperature of the equatorial Pacific over the past 14,000 years.

"If we understand how El Niño changes over thousands of years, we can better predict climate changes on societal time-scales of years to decades," Ortiz explained. "El Niño variations lead to drought, famine, landslides, fires and other natural disasters, depending on where in the world you happen to be. Our findings can help lead to better ways to predict El Niño-Southern Oscillations, mitigating the natural disasters associated with it."

IMAGE:A researcher points in the vicinity of Soledad Basin on a high-resolution bathymetric map off the coast of Baja California.

In addition to Ortiz, the research team includes the lead author on the paper, Thomas Marchitto (University of Colorado); Raimund Muscheler (Lund University in Sweden); Jose Carriquiry (Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Ensenada in Mexico); and Alexander van Geen (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University). Their findings will appear in the Dec. 3 issue of Science, the prestigious journal published by AAAS, the world's largest science society. Their paper, "Dynamical Response of the Tropical Pacific Ocean to Solar Forcing During the Early Holocene," helps to establish the linkage between changes in solar intensity and the strength of El Niño on millennial time scales. Their work was funded by the Marine Geology Subdivision of the National Science Foundation's Ocean Sciences Division.

"The climate system is very sensitive to subtle external forcing," Ortiz said. "We determined that the sun has an impact but is not the sole factor driving changes on these millennial time scales. Other studies have tried to show a solar linkage to El Niño-related climate variability, but our study indicates a convincing linkage due to the continuity of our record. This paper confirms the 'ocean dynamical thermostat' theory, showing that solar-forced changes in ocean circulation have on impact on El Niño."

IMAGE:Scientists on the Marion Dufresne process core that has been recovered from off the coast of Baja California.

Ortiz began working with the international team of scientists when he was a post-doctoral scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, a research branch of Columbia University. Over the last 11 years, his contributions to the team include assisting with measurements and in the statistical analysis of the data sets. As a researcher in the Kent State geology department, Ortiz has involved Kent State graduates and undergraduates in his NSF-funded research, providing his students with real-world experience on an international level. His students have participated in research projects as close to home as here in Ohio, and as far away as the South Pacific, North Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific Northwest, and off Baja California.

"With my involvement in this project, Kent State geology students have studied core samples collected off of Baja California," Ortiz said. "The students can take what they learn in the classroom out into the field and back to the lab. I feel very fortunate to be able to provide our students with this type of experience and bring international-level research to Kent State."

Ortiz has been with Kent State since 2001. He resides in Hudson, Ohio.

For more information about Kent State's Department of Geology, visit www.kent.edu/geology.

Media Contacts:

Joseph Ortiz, jortiz@kent.edu, 330-672-2225

Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.e

Return to Top



News Headline: Research provides better understanding of long-term changes in the climate system (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/02/2010
Outlet Full Name: e! Science News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University
Photo courtesy of Dr. Joseph Ortiz/Kent State University
For more than a decade, Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University and part of an international team of National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded researchers, has been studying long-term climate variability associated with El Niño. The researchers' goal is to help climatologists better understand this global climate phenomenon that happens every two to eight years, impacting much of the world. El Niño is the periodic warming of central and eastern tropical Pacific waters. The last El Niño occurred in 2009, Ortiz said, and its impact was felt in the United States with flooding in the south and wildfires in California. The research team looked at El Niño-Southern Oscillation (which is often just called "El Niño"), reconstructing sea surface temperature of the equatorial Pacific over the past 14,000 years.

"If we understand how El Niño changes over thousands of years, we can better predict climate changes on societal time-scales of years to decades," Ortiz explained. "El Niño variations lead to drought, famine, landslides, fires and other natural disasters, depending on where in the world you happen to be. Our findings can help lead to better ways to predict El Niño-Southern Oscillations, mitigating the natural disasters associated with it."

In addition to Ortiz, the research team includes the lead author on the paper, Thomas Marchitto (University of Colorado); Raimund Muscheler (Lund University in Sweden); Jose Carriquiry (Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Ensenada in Mexico); and Alexander van Geen (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University). Their findings will appear in the Dec. 3 issue of Science, the prestigious journal published by AAAS, the world's largest science society. Their paper, "Dynamical Response of the Tropical Pacific Ocean to Solar Forcing During the Early Holocene," helps to establish the linkage between changes in solar intensity and the strength of El Niño on millennial time scales. Their work was funded by the Marine Geology Subdivision of the National Science Foundation's Ocean Sciences Division.

"The climate system is very sensitive to subtle external forcing," Ortiz said. "We determined that the sun has an impact but is not the sole factor driving changes on these millennial time scales. Other studies have tried to show a solar linkage to El Niño-related climate variability, but our study indicates a convincing linkage due to the continuity of our record. This paper confirms the 'ocean dynamical thermostat' theory, showing that solar-forced changes in ocean circulation have on impact on El Niño."

Ortiz began working with the international team of scientists when he was a post-doctoral scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, a research branch of Columbia University. Over the last 11 years, his contributions to the team include assisting with measurements and in the statistical analysis of the data sets. As a researcher in the Kent State geology department, Ortiz has involved Kent State graduates and undergraduates in his NSF-funded research, providing his students with real-world experience on an international level. His students have participated in research projects as close to home as here in Ohio, and as far away as the South Pacific, North Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific Northwest, and off Baja California.

"With my involvement in this project, Kent State geology students have studied core samples collected off of Baja California," Ortiz said. "The students can take what they learn in the classroom out into the field and back to the lab. I feel very fortunate to be able to provide our students with this type of experience and bring international-level research to Kent State."

Source: Kent State University

Tue, 1 Jul 2008, 15:42:42 EDT

Sun, 17 Oct 2010, 13:32:53 EDT

Fri, 5 Feb 2010, 9:47:31 EST

Tue, 1 Jun 2010, 12:26:44 EDT

Thu, 17 Jul 2008, 13:22:13 EDT

Return to Top



News Headline: EDITORIAL: Impasse over facelift hurts not only KSU, but area, too | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/03/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PLAN FOR MAJOR IMPROVEMENTS
AT UNIVERSITY DESERVES FUNDING

THE APPARENT IMPASSE
between Kent State University
University and Chancellor Eric
Fingerhut of the Board of Regents is an
unfortunate outcome of protracted offers
by Kent State to compromise and
the chancellor either digging in his heels
or sticking to his guns, depending on how
one views it.
It puts on hold a major
campus facelift that
would have provided
hundreds, perhaps
thousands of construction
jobs. It prevents
Kent State from undertaking the improvements
that would make the university
more competitive in its recruitment
of students and doing so at a time when
construction costs would be relatively low.
It adds one more hurdle for Kent and Portage
County as they seek to promote economic
development.
Our sympathies are with Kent State
University. We think it makes a good case
for improving the campus and funding it
with an increase in student fees. The proposal
Kent State put forth would gradually
raise the cost of attending classes
at the university by $24 per credit hour,
but the proposed increase would elevate
Kent State's charges to about at the same
level as what it costs to attend Bowling
Green and far less than what the University
of Miami in Oxford and the University
of Cincinnati charge.
The chancellor, who believes it wrong to
ask students to pay for educational facilities,
so far as we know has not offered any
alternatives to student fee hikes.
The capital budget of the state of Ohio
is tight and, given the state's revenue
difficulties, it is likely to remain so. The
amount of money available from the state
to improve the campus makes it unrealistic
to consider the major improvements
the Lefton administration would like to
undertake by counting on taxpayer generated
reenues.
According to those in higher education,
the state of Ohio pays for about 23 percent
of the costs that state universities incur.
The rest is made up by student tuition,
fees, and private donations so while public
support is extremely important it is not
the factor it once was. At some universities,
Miami in Oxford for instance, which
targets upper middle class students in its
recruiting efforts, state support is even
less of a factor.
In the case of Kent State, without fee
hikes, the upgrades can go on, but only at
a painfully slow pace. Built mostly in the
1950s and 1960s, KSU's buildings need
refurbishing. Some, such as the ill-conceived
building that houses the School
of Art, would probably be better demolished.
Kent State would like to replace it
with a new building and come up with a
new building to house the College of Architecture,
one of the university's marquee
academic programs. Those are the
big proposed changes. Most of the rest involve
utility upgrades and improvements
of existing buildings.
Under the new governor, John Kasich,
the plans for higher education may undergo
change. The governor-elect is proposing
massive cuts to balance Ohio's
budget. Higher education surely will not
escape those funding reductions.
Chancellor Fingerhut, a Democrat unlikely
to be reappointed by the incoming
Republica governor, still has two years
on his term as chancellor and his stance
against student fee hikes is unlikely to
change.
An official at Kent State told Crain's
Business Review, “we're taking a deep
breath.” That's probably not a bad idea at
this point. There is so much uncertainty
in Columbus right now that reading the
tea leaves is an impossible task.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus