Report Overview:
Total Clips (17)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (2)
Alumni (1)
College of Business Administration (COBA) (2)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Fashion Design (2)
Geology (2)
Higher Education (1)
Human Resources (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Music (1)
Renovation at KSU (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (2)
Free tuition attracts vets to Akron area 12/05/2010 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...members packed their bags and moved to the Akron area. The reason: To take advantage of a fledgling state program that qualified for free tuition at the University of Akron. They were among 1,340 out-of-state veterans and family members who attended 36 tax-supported colleges and universities through...

Vets flocking to Ohio for free college 12/06/2010 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

...packed their bags and moved to the Akron area. They came to take advantage of a fledgling state program that qualified them for free tuition at the University of Akron. They were among 1,340 out-of-state veterans and their family members who attended 36 tax-supported colleges and universities...


Alumni (1)
WKYC's Mark Nolan finds Burton, Ohio, to be a bit of Mayberry: My Cleveland 12/06/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


College of Business Administration (COBA) (2)
ON THE MOVE 12/06/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Kent State makes list of best business schools (Heisler) 12/04/2010 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

The Princeton Review, a publication of college rankings based on how students rate their schools, recognized Kent State University's College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Management as one of the top 300 outstanding educational institutions...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
CELEBRATION NEWS 12/06/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design (2)
CELEBRATION NEWS 12/06/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Fashion-book gift ideas (Palomo-Lovinski) 12/03/2010 Los Angeles Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...and labels she's inspired include Phillip Lim and Proenza Schouler. Exhaustively assembled by Palomo-Lovinski, an assistant fashion design professor at Kent State University, the book is full of "aha" moments (how did we ever miss the shared sensibilities between Stella McCartney and sharp-line-loving...


Geology (2)
Research provides better understanding of long-term changes in the climate system (Ortiz) 12/03/2010 RedOrbit Text Attachment Email

...global climate phenomenon and help mitigate associated natural disasters For more than a decade, Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University and part of an international team of National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded researchers, has been studying long-term...

Research provides better understanding of long-term changes in the climate system (Ortiz) 12/03/2010 Science Centric Text Attachment Email

...last 11 years, his contributions to the team include assisting with measurements and in the statistical analysis of the data sets. As a researcher in the Kent State geology department, Ortiz has involved Kent State graduates and undergraduates in his NSF-funded research, providing...


Higher Education (1)
Sortable Tables: Graduation Rates Over Time, by Institution 12/06/2010 Chronicle of Higher Education - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...St. Louis Rutgers U, Newark Clemson U U of Texas, Austin Virginia Commonwealth U Washington State U New Jersey Inst of Tech Old Dominion U Florida State U U of North Texas U of Georgia U of Connecticut U of Cincinnati main campus U of Washington...


Human Resources (1)
BUSINESS NOTEBOOK 12/06/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Public gets inside look at Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center 12/06/2010 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

Justice Moran, 14, of Dover sits at the mirror of the chorus dressing room at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas during the open house Sunday. NEW PHILADELPHIA, OH — Kent State University at Tuscarawas...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
ON THE MOVE 12/06/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


Music (1)
AROUND RAVENNA 12/06/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Renovation at KSU (1)
$250M Kent State Construction Project on Hold 12/04/2010 School Construction News - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — A financing snag has derailed the proposed renovation and construction plan at Kent State – at least for the time being. According to reports, Eric Fingerhut, chancellor of the Board of Regents, was against the implementation...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Dance 12/03/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...440-775-8169, 800-371-0178 or http://www.oberlin.edu/artsguide. Dance '10 TranscenDANCE ? 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, E. Turner Stump Theatre, Kent State University Music and Speech Center, 1325 Theatre Drive. $16, $12 for KSU faculty, staff, alumni and seniors, $8 students. 330-672-2497....


News Headline: Free tuition attracts vets to Akron area | Email

News Date: 12/05/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Dec. 05--Last spring, 99 out-of-state military veterans and family members packed their bags and moved to the Akron area.

The reason: To take advantage of a fledgling state program that qualified for free tuition at the University of Akron.

They were among 1,340 out-of-state veterans and family members who attended 36 tax-supported colleges and universities through the Ohio GI Promise, according to a report the Ohio Board of Regents released Friday.

The state program confers Ohio residency on out-of-state veterans and family members who move to Ohio to go to college.

That, in turn, qualifies them for free tuition,

as the federal government pays 100 percent of in-state tuition for veterans.

The state program is "an invitation to America's veterans to come and build their lives in our state," said Bill Hartnett, director of the Ohio Department of Veterans Services.

It was the first program of its kind nationwide when it was announced in 2008.

At the same time, the federal government has greatly expanded educational benefits in the new Post-9/11 GI Bill for many veterans, sweetening the pot for those who want to go to college.

That is another reason the number of in-state and out-of-state veterans attending college in Ohio rose from 8,637 in fall 2008 to 10,876 in spring 2010, a 26 percent increase.

Eric Fingerhut, chancellor for the Regents, pointed out that veterans can qualify for free tuition in their home states, so it is something of a success that they moved to Ohio.

He said the Regents, veterans service agencies and tax-supported colleges and universities have worked to develop "strong veterans service programs on every campus."

"We've found we have a very strong package to sell to veterans," Fingerhut said.

About 60 percent of the Ohio GI Promise students chose to go to state universities. The balance attend community or technical colleges.

In spring 2010, the enrollment leaders were Ohio State, 129; Kent State and UA, each with 99); and the University of Cincinnati, 89.

UA offers many things for veterans, said Mary Rossette, manager of the military service center at Simmons Hall.

UA employs four people and three veterans in a federal work-study program to help veterans and their families do everything from fill out applications for admission to request transcripts from other institutions, Rossette said.

"We're kind of their one-stop shop," she said.

Fingerhut said the extra attention is necessary if many veterans are to succeed.

"They do need support because they've had a very different life experience than the 18-or 19-year-old they're sitting next to in class," he said.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

Copyright © 2010 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: Vets flocking to Ohio for free college | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2010
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name: Carol Biliczky
News OCR Text: Last spring, 99 out-of-state military veterans and their family members packed their bags and moved to the Akron area.

They came to take advantage of a fledgling state program that qualified them for free tuition at the University of Akron.

They were among 1,340 out-of-state veterans and their family members who attended 36 tax-supported colleges and universities through the Ohio GI Promise, according to a report the Ohio Board of Regents released Friday.

The state program confers Ohio residency on out-of-state veterans and their family members who move to Ohio to go to college.

That, in turn, qualifies them for free tuition, as the federal government pays 100 percent of in-state tuition for veterans.

The state program is "an invitation to America's veterans to come and build their lives in our state," said Bill Hartnett, director of the the Ohio Department of Veterans Services.

It was the first program of its kind nationwide when it was announced in 2008.

At the same time, the federal government has expanded educational benefits in the new Post-9/11 GI Bill for many veterans, sweetening the pot for those who want to go to college.

That is another reason the number of in- and out-of-state veterans attending college in Ohio rose from 8,637 in fall 2008 to 10,876 in spring 2010, a 26 percent increase.

Eric D. Fingerhut, Ohio's higher-education chancellor, pointed out that veterans can qualify for free tuition in their home states, so it is something of a success that they moved to Ohio.

He said the members of the Board of Regents, veterans service agencies and tax-supported colleges and universities have worked to develop "strong veterans service programs on every campus."

"We've found we have a very strong package to sell to veterans," Fingerhut said.

About 60 percent of the Ohio GI Promise students chose state universities. The balance attend community or technical colleges.

In spring 2010, the enrollment leaders were Ohio State University, 129; Kent State University and University of Akron, each with 99; and the University of Cincinnati, with 89.

The University of Akron offers "many things" for veterans, said Mary Rossette, manager of the military service center at Simmons Hall.

The university employs four people and three veterans on a federal work-study program to help veterans and their family members fill out applications for admission, request transcripts and more, Rossette said.

Fingerhut said the extra attention is necessary for many veterans to succeed.

"They do need support because they've had a very different life experience than the 18- or- 19-year-old they're sitting next to in class," he said.

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News Headline: WKYC's Mark Nolan finds Burton, Ohio, to be a bit of Mayberry: My Cleveland | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Channel 3's Mark Nolan with the "Turn Blue" dragster parked in his Burton barn.
Don't be fooled by Mark Nolan, morning anchor at WKYC Channel 3. He really does love the holidays and celebrates them the old-fashioned way in Geauga County. He only pretends not to care much for them.

"I like to go 'Grinch' on the air to counteract Hollie Strano's uber-Christmas vibe but, I live in a 163-year-old house that lends itself to a real colonial Christmas feel," said Nolan, 41.

"The day after Thanksgiving, the giant wreath goes up on the front of the barn, and it's on! At some point, I will make my mom's chocolate chip cookies and smell the place up. Then, it's up to Sunrise Farms on [Ohio] 87 (in Burton) to get my Christmas tree."

What are you doing in your spare time these days?

"Spare time" -- ha, that's funny! I'm just finishing a kitchen and bath remodel at my house with the help of some friends who happen to be subcontractors, too. Convenient!

Where did you grow up? Tell us a childhood story.

Born in Cleveland, I actually grew up in a little town in southeastern Ohio called Calcutta near other large towns like Salem, Lisbon, East Palestine and East Liverpool. We lived in a development just a few hundred yards from farm country.

It was a great place to grow up, with lots of wide open spaces, so much so that I got my first dirt bike when I was 7 years old. On my birthday, my dad told me to go out to the van and get something out of it. When I slid the door open, there sat a brand new Honda XR-75. Laughs and tears!

Funniest fan encounter?

About eight years ago, I had a heart procedure done at the Cleveland Clinic. I went into the operating room (already somewhat sedated) and lay down on the table in the capable hands of a couple of cute nurses. Both said they watch Channel 3 all the time. We carried on a nice, long conversation about the station and how much they like our show. It was at that point I realized I was pretty much naked and being prepped for surgery. Wait -- did you say funny or awkward?

Tell us about your cars.

The whole car thing is quite an escape for me. I've always been into anything with pistons and why they work. I've gotten back into drag racing.

I run a 1938 Chevy Coupe, which does the quarter-mile in about 10 seconds. I also run a Nostalgia front-engine dragster. It's called "Turn Blue" and has an image of Ghoulardi on the front. That will do the quarter in about 8.5 seconds. My home track is Thompson Raceway Park because it's so close and it's such a great, nostalgic track. But, you can't forget Summit Motorsports Park in Norwalk. The Bader family has run a beautiful, top-notch facility there for years. Just beautiful.

What's living in Burton like?

Mayberry -- and, I like it that way. It's just quiet enough and still about 40 minutes from downtown Cleveland.

What are your favorite restaurants, and what do you order there?

I'm a steak-and-potatoes guy. Fleming's, ChopHouse, Bass Lake Inn. At Fleming's, it's the bone-in ribeye, the mac and cheese and creamed corn. ChopHouse -- two words: filet oscar. At Bass Lake Taverne & Inn: New York strip with a side of asparagus oscar.

What's the best Christmas gift you ever received?

Wow! That's a tough one. I think it would be one of the bicycle years. Probably my first BMX bike.

What was it like being a broadcasting instructor at Kent State University right after you graduated from there?

It was a little strange, to say the least. You spend four years working as hard as you can to get the grade, and now you have to pass them out. They were great to bring me back right after graduation, and it was a great experience. The toughest part was being younger than some of the students. Very odd.

Favorite Cleveland landmark?

I trained for two marathons while living in downtown Cleveland, right above Flannery's Pub, so I got to see a lot of the city on those 10-milers. I have to say my favorite landmark is the [Lorain-Carnegie] Hope Memorial Bridge. There's nothing like a night run, coming back across the bridge. That beautiful Art Deco stone masonry in the foreground with our city all lit up in the back. Very cool --- the 1930s craftsmanship against a city that is into a new century.

Tell us something we don't know about WKYC.

No, we do not have a makeup person. Yes, Romona is THAT tall. Eric Mansfield plays a mean piano. Monica Robins is not a doctor, but she plays one on TV. She also has a fantastic singing voice! Maureen Kyle is the daughter of THAT coach Kyle. [St. Ignatius High School coach Chuck Kyle.] Our entire morning-show producing staff -- executive producer Erin Longville, 5 a.m. producer Meg Brutoczky and 6 a.m. producer Brooke Whitney -- are all graduates of Kent State University.

Who is the Cleveland broadcaster you admire?

I think I was born about 30 years too late to be the broadcaster I want to be. My faves include Ernie Anderson [Ghoulardi], Del Donahoo, Tom Haley, Big Jack Armstrong and maybe even Alan Freed. All got to work the craft of being real communicators at the height of the broadcast industry -- voice, diction, expression and gesture -- all extremely important and well done by all of them.

It's Saturday night. What's the plan?

Grab a gal and some friends. Have a good meal. Hang out a bit downtown. Back home at a decent hour. Enjoy the fact that I won't be on TV at 5 a.m. the next day!

What's Hollie really like?

The thing that makes Hollie so watchable is that she's real. You get the same thing on and off camera. I make fun of what I call "The Hollie." It's a smile and a head tilt. The good news is, I can call her out on it on the air and she laughs.

We've really been able to bring out the best (the real) in each other's personality. If I'm having a bad day, you know it. If Hollie is having a bad day, she'll let you know too.

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News Headline: ON THE MOVE | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University: Michael Bice joined the School of Library and Information Science at KSU and Jeff Moelich, a former Eaton Corp. executive, was named the Goodyear executive professor, which KSU, in conjunction with the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., established in 1973.

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News Headline: Kent State makes list of best business schools (Heisler) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2010
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Princeton Review, a publication of college rankings based on how students rate their schools, recognized Kent State University's College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Management as one of the top 300 outstanding educational institutions for business students.

The 2011 edition of the Princeton Review, titled “The Best 300 Business Schools,” was released in October and is available in stores nationwide. The publication created the list based on surveys of 19,000 students attending the 300 business schools. The publication does not rank the schools in a hierarchy, and there is no single school that is best overall.

Yank Heisler, dean of the Kent State College of Business Administration, said the faculty and staff work hard to provide an excellent education that will help distinguish students from others in the work force.

“We added a required soft-skills course that focuses around writing r sum s, public speaking and dining etiquette,” Heisler said.

Heisler said faculty and staff are excited about the recognition but know there is also an opportunity for even greater success.

“We believe our MBA program can be even better, and we hope our graduate program continues to grow and is received in the business community as an excellent program,” Heisler said.

This designation adds to the list of recent KSU awards. Earlier this fall, Kent was recognized by Times Higher Education, a higher-education magazine based in London, as one of the top 200 universities in the world in its 2010-2011 World University Rankings.

The university was also listed in the September issue of U.S. News and World Report as one of the best national universities. Kent State is ranked as the second-largest public university in the state of Ohio. Fall semester enrollment figures were the highest recorded in the university's 100-year history.

For more information about the top 300 list, visit www.princetonreview.com/business-school-rankings.aspx.

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News Headline: CELEBRATION NEWS | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State nursing professor Carol Sedlak was inducted as a fellow into the American Academy of Nursing. Sedlak, director of the nurse educator program, researches bone health and the prevention of osteoporosis in men and women.

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News Headline: CELEBRATION NEWS | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: J.R. Campbell, director of Kent State University's School of Fashion Design and Merchandising, and associate professor Vincent Quevedo together won International Artist of the Year at the 2010 Fashion Art Biennale in Seoul, South Korea, for their piece titled DMZ, which stands for demilitarized zone. The cotton jersey knit fabric was digitally printed in the school's TechStyleLab, and was designed by Campbell in Photoshop, while Quevedo took on the creation of the jacket and garment's pattern.

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News Headline: Fashion-book gift ideas (Palomo-Lovinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/03/2010
Outlet Full Name: Los Angeles Times - Online
Contact Name: Los Angeles Times
News OCR Text: IPads, Nooks and Kindles may be topping wish lists this holiday season, but when it comes to reading about fashion, nothing beats the glossy, full-color grandeur of a coffee-table book.

This season's crop of oversized style tomes is especially alluring. Among them are memoir-esque reads, playfully pedantic books on how to hone personal style and a pair of opulent tomes focusing on men's fashion, encompassing styles from cowboy chic to Savile Row sleek.

Of course, you won't be packing these biceps-building books for your next red eye. But then not all reading has to be on the run. Curling up in front of the fire with a big juicy traditional book is a great way to take a break from the holiday season hubbub. Here are some of our picks for giving or for savoring yourself.

The Fashion File: Advice, Tips, and Inspiration From the Costume Designer of Mad Men

By Janie Bryant with Monica Corcoran Harel. $26.99

"Mad Men" costume designer Janie Bryant is a master of optimizing a woman's figure through wardrobe — just look at what she's done with curvy Christina Hendricks. And in "The Fashion File," co-written by veteran L.A. style writer Monica Corcoran Harel, she offers a bevy of helpful style tips that neither condescend nor confuse. Ideas include picking the right colors for your skin tone, adding drama to any outfit via strategic accessories such as opera-length gloves, and figuring out if you're a Betty [Draper] or a Joan [Holloway]; the book encourages women to find their inner leading ladies — and then festoon them with abandon.

Anna Sui

By Andrew Bolton. Chronicle Books. $60

Legendary New York designer Anna Sui has been melding girlish whimsy with rock 'n' roll attitude in her collections for more than 20 years. And in "Anna Sui," writer Andrew Bolton chronicles the inspiration behind every collection she's sent down the runway — starting with fall 1991, which featured then-baby-faced models Linda Evangelista and Naomi Campbell decked out in prep-school plaids. The book features a flattering forward by photographer Steven Meisel, along with vintage magazine spreads, ads and portraits of celebrities including Sofia Coppola, Stevie Nicks and Lenny Kravitz. And while a few of Sui's vintage collections seem cringe-worthy today (fall '92's pirate-themed collection comes to mind), Meisel elucidates, "Anna will always gild the lily, and I'll be the one saying, 'Anna, does that outfit really need a birthday cake on the shoulder?'"

Isabella Blow

By Martina Rink. Thames & Hudson. $50

Isabella Blow, the famous stylist, editor and muse who nurtured the considerable talents of Alexander McQueen and Philip Treacy, committed suicide in 2007. "Isabella Blow," written by her former personal assistant, says goodbye to the fashion provocateur through heartfelt letters written by industry and celebrity friends, including Paul Smith, Valentino Garavani, Boy George, Manolo Blahnik, Bryan Ferry and Anna Wintour. A true original, she "had no time for anything humdrum, banal or mundane," writes Wintour, who hired Blow to be her assistant at Vogue in the 1980s, "to the extent that the task of cleaning her desk every night had to be done with a bottle of Perrier water and Chanel No.5."

The World's Most Influential Fashion Designers

By Noel Palomo-Lovinski. Barron's Educational Series Inc. $29.99

In fashion, what goes around inevitably comes around again. "The World's Most Influential Fashion Designers" shows us exactly how that ebb and flow works. Through linear graphs detailing 50 major designers — beginning with Parisian pioneer Paul Poiret — the author details who inspired, and was inspired by, each. Miuccia Prada, for example, was influenced by Japanese designer Rei Kawakubo, who also challenged the notion of femininity being "contingent on coquetry"; and labels she's inspired include Phillip Lim and Proenza Schouler. Exhaustively assembled by Palomo-Lovinski, an assistant fashion design professor at Kent State University, the book is full of "aha" moments (how did we ever miss the shared sensibilities between Stella McCartney and sharp-line-loving '80s designer Claude Montana?). And it connects the dots in a smart, style-savvy way.

Harper's Bazaar Fashion: Your Guide to Personal Style

By Lisa Armstrong. Hearst Books. $24.95

Fashion books on achieving personal style seem antithetical. After all, how can so many general rules apply to creating an individual wardrobe? Which is why "Your Guide to Personal Style," a metallic gold-covered tome written by fashion journalist Lisa Armstrong, doesn't delve too much into fashion do's and don'ts. Instead, it offers tips on how to choose the best looks for your shape (for instance, curvy girls shouldn't wear voluminous looks), how to buy accessories (invest in that Cartier Tank watch — it will gussy up every outfit, every day) and the kind of garb to don for a night out, a daytime party and even a backwoods cabin getaway.

Bespoke: The Men's Style of Savile Row

By James Sherwood. Rizzoli. $65

"Bespoke," a fully illustrated history of bespoke (or custom) tailoring, charts the ascendance of Savile Row, a small street in London that's known globally as the epicenter of men's tailoring. Moving chronologically from the late 1700s onward, the book tells the story in part through profiles of 26 master tailors and tailoring firms from Savile Row — including stalwarts such as Gieves & Hawkes and relative newbies including Ozwald Boateng. Chapters such as "Savile Row at War: Tailoring for Heroes" and "Savile Row in Hollywood" cover wide swaths of eras, adding richness to an already storied subject.

American Fashion Menswear

By Robert E. Bryan. Assouline. $50

The third volume in the Council of Fashion Designer's American Fashion series, "American Fashion Menswear" tackles men's fashion by movement, such as Ivy League style and Western wear, and by archetype, such as "the dandy" (think rock star Prince or Vogue's Andre Leon Talley). There are also lengthy chapters on Hollywood actors and musical artists, featuring a phenomenal collection of historic photographs of Paul Newman, Steve McQueen, Bob Dylan and Iggy Pop (among others). The history of American menswear is told in short essay format in between the book's splashy photos, but the real story here is told visually.

Louis Vuitton: 100 Legendary Trunks

By Pierre Léonforte and Éric Pujalet-Plaà. Preface by Patrick-Louis Vuitton. Abrams Books. $125

It stands to reason that the first book about Louis Vuitton trunks would be sturdy-yet-luxurious, like the very luggage it chronicles. And despite its hyper-niche focus, the 496-page book is actually a delightful read, imparting short stories about very personal pieces of luggage. Standouts among the custom-made trunks (and other cases) include a suitcase especially made for the dolls of Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret of England in 1938; monogrammed trunks for the Wes Anderson movie "The Darjeeling Limited," in 2007; a trunk that pops open into a cot-like bed made for Italian-French adventurer Pierre Savorgnan de Brazza; and a trunk that turns into a shower, specially made by the company for an invention competition in 2004.

image@latimes.com

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News Headline: Research provides better understanding of long-term changes in the climate system (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/03/2010
Outlet Full Name: RedOrbit
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Better understanding of the long-term history of El Nino will help enhance short-term prediction of this global climate phenomenon and help mitigate associated natural disasters

For more than a decade, Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University and part of an international team of National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded researchers, has been studying long-term climate variability associated with El Niño. The researchers' goal is to help climatologists better understand this global climate phenomenon that happens every two to eight years, impacting much of the world.

El Niño is the periodic warming of central and eastern tropical Pacific waters. The last El Niño occurred in 2009, Ortiz said, and its impact was felt in the United States with flooding in the south and wildfires in California. The research team looked at El Niño-Southern Oscillation (which is often just called "El Niño"), reconstructing sea surface temperature of the equatorial Pacific over the past 14,000 years.

"If we understand how El Niño changes over thousands of years, we can better predict climate changes on societal time-scales of years to decades," Ortiz explained. "El Niño variations lead to drought, famine, landslides, fires and other natural disasters, depending on where in the world you happen to be. Our findings can help lead to better ways to predict El Niño-Southern Oscillations, mitigating the natural disasters associated with it."

In addition to Ortiz, the research team includes the lead author on the paper, Thomas Marchitto (University of Colorado); Raimund Muscheler (Lund University in Sweden); Jose Carriquiry (Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Ensenada in Mexico); and Alexander van Geen (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University). Their findings will appear in the Dec. 3 issue of Science, the prestigious journal published by AAAS, the world's largest science society. Their paper, "Dynamical Response of the Tropical Pacific Ocean to Solar Forcing During the Early Holocene," helps to establish the linkage between changes in solar intensity and the strength of El Niño on millennial time scales. Their work was funded by the Marine Geology Subdivision of the National Science Foundation's Ocean Sciences Division.

"The climate system is very sensitive to subtle external forcing," Ortiz said. "We determined that the sun has an impact but is not the sole factor driving changes on these millennial time scales. Other studies have tried to show a solar linkage to El Niño-related climate variability, but our study indicates a convincing linkage due to the continuity of our record. This paper confirms the 'ocean dynamical thermostat' theory, showing that solar-forced changes in ocean circulation have on impact on El Niño."

Ortiz began working with the international team of scientists when he was a post-doctoral scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, a research branch of Columbia University. Over the last 11 years, his contributions to the team include assisting with measurements and in the statistical analysis of the data sets. As a researcher in the Kent State geology department, Ortiz has involved Kent State graduates and undergraduates in his NSF-funded research, providing his students with real-world experience on an international level. His students have participated in research projects as close to home as here in Ohio, and as far away as the South Pacific, North Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific Northwest, and off Baja California.

"With my involvement in this project, Kent State geology students have studied core samples collected off of Baja California," Ortiz said. "The students can take what they learn in the classroom out into the field and back to the lab. I feel very fortunate to be able to provide our students with this type of experience and bring international-level research to Kent State."

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Image Caption: A researcher points in the vicinity of Soledad Basin on a high-resolution bathymetric map off the coast of Baja California. (Credit: Dr. Joseph Ortiz/Kent State University)

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On the Net:

Kent State University Department of Geology National Science Foundation Science

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News Headline: Research provides better understanding of long-term changes in the climate system (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/03/2010
Outlet Full Name: Science Centric
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For more than a decade, Dr Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at and part of an international team of National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded researchers, has been studying long-term climate variability associated with El Nino. The researchers' goal is to help climatologists better understand this global climate phenomenon that happens every two to eight years, impacting much of the world.

El Nino is the periodic warming of central and eastern tropical Pacific waters. The last El Nino occurred in 2009, Ortiz said, and its impact was felt in the United States with flooding in the south and wildfires in California. The research team looked at El Nino-Southern Oscillation (which is often just called 'El Nino'), reconstructing sea surface temperature of the equatorial Pacific over the past 14,000 years.

'If we understand how El Nino changes over thousands of years, we can better predict climate changes on societal time-scales of years to decades,' Ortiz explained. 'El Nino variations lead to drought, famine, landslides, fires and other natural disasters, depending on where in the world you happen to be. Our findings can help lead to better ways to predict El Nino-Southern Oscillations, mitigating the natural disasters associated with it.'

In addition to Ortiz, the research team includes the lead author on the paper, Thomas Marchitto (University of Colorado); Raimund Muscheler (Lund University in Sweden); Jose Carriquiry (Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Ensenada in Mexico); and Alexander van Geen (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University). Their findings will appear in the Dec. 3 issue of Science, the prestigious journal published by AAAS, the world's largest science society. Their paper, 'Dynamical Response of the Tropical Pacific Ocean to Solar Forcing During the Early Holocene,' helps to establish the linkage between changes in solar intensity and the strength of El Nino on millennial time scales. Their work was funded by the Marine Geology Subdivision of the National Science Foundation's Ocean Sciences Division.

'The climate system is very sensitive to subtle external forcing,' Ortiz said. 'We determined that the sun has an impact but is not the sole factor driving changes on these millennial time scales. Other studies have tried to show a solar linkage to El Nino-related climate variability, but our study indicates a convincing linkage due to the continuity of our record. This paper confirms the 'ocean dynamical thermostat' theory, showing that solar-forced changes in ocean circulation have on impact on El Nino.'

Ortiz began working with the international team of scientists when he was a post-doctoral scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, a research branch of Columbia University. Over the last 11 years, his contributions to the team include assisting with measurements and in the statistical analysis of the data sets. As a researcher in the Kent State geology department, Ortiz has involved Kent State graduates and undergraduates in his NSF-funded research, providing his students with real-world experience on an international level. His students have participated in research projects as close to home as here in Ohio, and as far away as the South Pacific, North Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific Northwest, and off Baja California.

'With my involvement in this project, Kent State geology students have studied core samples collected off of Baja California,' Ortiz said. 'The students can take what they learn in the classroom out into the field and back to the lab. I feel very fortunate to be able to provide our students with this type of experience and bring international-level research to Kent State.'

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News Headline: Sortable Tables: Graduation Rates Over Time, by Institution | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2010
Outlet Full Name: Chronicle of Higher Education - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ANALYSIS: Graduation Rates Fall at One-Third of 4-Year Colleges

SORTABLE TABLES: Graduation Rates Over Time, by Type of Institution:

Public Research | Private Research | Public Master's | Private Master's | Private Baccalaureate Arts & Sciences

We compare here the graduation rates at four-year colleges for the six years ending in 2008 with the rates for the six years ending in 2003. Because rates can spike up or down in a particular year, we also show a separate comparison that tends to reduce the effect of those outliers on differences in colleges' rates over time. To make this comparison, we averaged each college's rates in 2003 and 2008 with rates in the immediately preceeding years, then compared the averages. To further illustrate changes over time at each college, we show in boldface type any rate that increased over the one in the immediately preceeding year. Figures are rounded. About These Data

* Change in averaged graduation rates: the difference, in percentage points, of the average of the rates for 2001 and 2002 compared with the average of the rates for 2007 and 2008.

Change in percentage points, 2003-8

Change in averaged graduation rates*

Change in admissions selectivity

San Diego State U

George Mason U

Georgia State U

Temple U

U of Pittsburgh main campus

U of Minnesota-Twin Cities

U of Maryland, College Park

Utah State U

Illinois State U

U of Louisville

Texas Woman's U

Ohio State U

Ball State U

U of Louisiana, Lafayette

U of Central Florida

U of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Indiana U-Purdue U, Indianapolis

U of Massachusetts, Lowell

North Carolina State U

Georgia Southern U

U of California, Santa Barbara

U of Oklahoma, Norman

Georgia Inst of Tech

U of Missouri, St. Louis

Rutgers U, Newark

Clemson U

U of Texas, Austin

Virginia Commonwealth U

Washington State U

New Jersey Inst of Tech

Old Dominion U

Florida State U

U of North Texas

U of Georgia

U of Connecticut

U of Cincinnati main campus

U of Washington

U of California, Santa Cruz

Purdue U, West Lafayette

U of Oregon

Michigan State U

U of West Florida

Jackson State U

U of South Carolina, Columbia

U of Wisconsin, Madison

U of Delaware

U of Texas, El Paso

Central Michigan U

Texas A&M U, Kingsville

U of Massachusetts, Amherst

SUNY, Stony Brook

U at Buffalo

Wichita State U

U of Maryland-Baltimore County

U of Memphis

U of Florida

Indiana State U

Virginia Tech

U of Nebraska, Lincoln

U of California, Berkeley

Florida Atlantic U

Arizona State U, Tempe

U of Toledo main campus

Montana State U, Bozeman

Michigan Tech U

U of Alabama, Huntsville

Texas Tech U

East Tennessee State U

U of Idaho

Texas A&M U, College Station

U of Nevada, Las Vegas

U of Michigan, Ann Arbor

U of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Wright State U, Dayton

Louisiana State U, Baton Rouge

U of Northern Colorado

U of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

U of Arkansas, Little Rock

U of Illinois, Chicago

U of Alaska, Fairbanks

Wayne State U

U of Missouri, Columbia

U of California, Los Angeles

U of Arizona

Mississippi State U

Rutgers U, New Brunswick

U of California, Irvine

Colorado Sch of Mines

U of California, San Diego

U of North Carolina, Greensboro

Penn State, U Park

U of New Mexico, Albuquerque

U of Texas, Dallas

U of Rhode Island

SUNY C of Environmental Science and Forestry

Southern Illinois U, Carbondale

U of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

Kansas State U

U of Kansas

Iowa State U

U of Houston main campus

U of North Carolina, Charlotte

Florida International U

Oklahoma State U, Stillwater

Oregon State U

U of Vermont

U of Alabama, Birmingham

Indiana U, Bloomington

U of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

U of Virginia

Colorado State U, Fort Collins

Missouri U of Science and Tech

U of Tennessee, Knoxville

C of William and Mary

Northern Arizona U

East Carolina U

Portland State U

Miami U, Oxford

U of North Dakota

U of New Hampshire, Durham

Indiana U of Pa

U of California, Davis

Texas A&M U, Commerce

U of Nevada, Reno

Kent State U main campus

U of California, Riverside

New Mexico State U, Las Cruces

U of Utah

Oakland U

U of Mississippi

U of Texas, Arlington

Ohio U, Athens

West Virginia U, Morgantown

U of Maine, Orono

Cleveland State U

South Dakota State U

U of Massachusetts, Boston

Western Michigan U

U of South Florida

U of Colorado, Boulder

U of New Orleans

Northern Illinois U

Binghamton U

SUNY, Albany

University of Colorado Denver (Health Sciences Program)

U of Colorado, Denver and Health Sciences Ctr

U of Southern Mississippi

U of South Dakota

U of Hawaii-Manoa

U of Kentucky

Auburn U main campus

South Carolina State U

Florida A&M U

U of Wyoming

Louisiana Tech U

U of Montana, Missoula

U of Missouri, Kansas City

Idaho State U

North Dakota State U

North Carolina A&T State U

U of Akron main campus

Bowling Green State U main campus

Morgan State U

Tennessee State U

About These Data

The Chronicle analyzed changes in graduation rates reported by more than 1,000, four-year public and private nonprofit colleges and universities. We examined only institutions classified as research, master's, or Baccalaureate Colleges—Arts & Sciences by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in 2005.

These rates are calculated as the percentage of all first-time, full-time students entering in the fall seeking bachelor's degrees who completed bachelor's degrees within six years.

We compared rates for the six years ending in 2008, the most-recent period for which comprehensive data are available, against rates from five years earlier, in 2003. The six-year period ending in 2002 was the first for which all colleges participating in federal-aid programs were required to report the data to the Education Department.

A college's graduation rate sometimes spikes up or down in a particular year. To account for such fluctuations, The Chronicle also averaged the graduation rates for 2002 and 2003 and compared those sums with the averages of the 2007 and 2008 rates. That approach yielded results similar to those shown when only 2003 and 2008 were compared.

Colleges typically describe their graduation rates using a similar but slightly different set of data, which includes students who completed any degree program, such as associate degrees. The Education Department recommends examining only students seeking bachelor's degrees when comparing four-year institutions because it facilitates consistent comparisons and because producing bachelor's recipients is a core mission of those institutions.

The Chronicle's analysis recognizes that a college's graduation rate may rise if its admissions become more selective. Greater selectivity typically brings more academically prepared students, who in turn are more likely to complete degrees within six years. Conversely, graduation rates can slip when institutions become less selective. We labeled institutions that became more or less selective during the period covered by these graduation rates. The source was Barron's Profile of American Colleges, which assigns colleges among seven tiers of selectivity. We recorded whether a college changed tiers from 1996-7 to 2001-2.

Other changes in student demographics could also have increased how each institution's rate changed over time, and this analysis did not further account for those effects.

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News Headline: BUSINESS NOTEBOOK | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's Alvin Evans, associate vice president for human resources, has received the 2010 Kathryn G. Hansen Publication Award from the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources for a book, "Bridging the Diversity Divide: Globalization and Reciprocal Empowerment in Higher Education," co-written by Dr. Edna Chun, vice president for human resources and equity at Broward College.

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News Headline: Public gets inside look at Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2010
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name: GateHouse Media, Inc
News OCR Text: Justice Moran, 14, of Dover sits at the mirror of the chorus dressing room at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas during the open house Sunday.

NEW PHILADELPHIA, OH —

Kent State University at Tuscarawas held an open house Sunday to give area residents an opportunity to view the new Performing Arts Center on the campus at New Philadelphia.

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News Headline: ON THE MOVE | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University: Michael Bice joined the School of Library and Information Science at KSU and Jeff Moelich, a former Eaton Corp. executive, was named the Goodyear executive professor, which KSU, in conjunction with the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., established in 1973.

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News Headline: AROUND RAVENNA | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Gospel
Choir & Step Team will have a Celebrating
Diversity Concert, “Dancing
With The Gospel” from 7:30 to
9:30 p.m. on Friday in the Carol A.
Cartwright Hall at KSU.
The concert will feature choreography
of Olanike Olabisi, Imani
Thomas and JaRel Clay. The doors open at 7 p.m.,
the concert is free, no tickets required and donations
will be accepted. Parking is free in designated
lots (call 330-672-4444). For further information,
call Dr. Linda Walker at 330-672-2431 or
e-mail lwalker@kent.edu.

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News Headline: $250M Kent State Construction Project on Hold | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2010
Outlet Full Name: School Construction News - Online
Contact Name: Stephen Doyle
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — A financing snag has derailed the proposed renovation and construction plan at Kent State – at least for the time being.

According to reports, Eric Fingerhut, chancellor of the Board of Regents, was against the implementation of a new student fee that would have been use to pay off $210 million in bonds from the Federal Stimulus Build America Bonds program. Unless it's renewed, the federal bonds program is slated to sunset at the end of the year. University officials say the delay could result in another $57 million in construction costs.

Kent State President Lester Lefton, who advocated for the student fee increase on the ground that tuition is comparably low at the university, said that the school is committed to the construction program. He said the university won't make any decisions on the matter until the state budget is issued by the governor's office in March.

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News Headline: Dance | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/03/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: FLY: Five First Ladies of Dance ? 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Oberlin College, Hall Auditorium, 67 N. Main St., Oberlin. With Germaine Acogny, Carmen de Lavallade, Dianne McIntyre, Bebe Miller and Jawole Willa Jo Zollar. $15-$30, $11-$26 seniors. All tickets $3 more at the door. 440-775-8169, 800-371-0178 or http://www.oberlin.edu/artsguide.

Dance '10 TranscenDANCE ? 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, E. Turner Stump Theatre, Kent State University Music and Speech Center, 1325 Theatre Drive. $16, $12 for KSU faculty, staff, alumni and seniors, $8 students. 330-672-2497.

Dancing Wheels Company presents Pinocchio ? 2 p.m. Sunday, St. Ignatius Breen Center, 1911 W. 30th St., Cleveland. $20, $15 children; $65 family ticket pack of four. 216-432-0306 or http://www.dancingwheels.org.

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