Report Overview:
Total Clips (29)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Athletics (3)
College of Nursing (CON) (2)
Geology (1)
International Affairs (1)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Safety (18)
Student Success (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
GI Promise draws students to Ohio's colleges: Higher Education 12/14/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...universities and community colleges, in addition to 1,340 under the GI Promise. In Northeast Ohio, 99 GI Promise veterans or dependents enrolled at the University of Akron, 99 at Kent State University, 43 at Cleveland State University, 75 at Cuyahoga Community College, 31 at Lakeland Community...


Athletics (3)
Kent State narrows search for football head coach 12/15/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

FRENCH CONNECTION 12/15/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Tide's Cignetti reportedly 'in the lead' for Kent State job 12/13/2010 NBCsports.com Text Attachment Email

When Kent State opens up the 2011 season with a likely physical and mental lashing at the hands of Alabama, they may have more in common with the...


College of Nursing (CON) (2)
Bright Spots: Dec. 13, 2010 (Sedlak) 12/13/2010 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...is based in Warren. Panera will open this 5,282-square-foot space in spring. Carol Sedlak, a professor and director of the nurse educator program at Kent State University, was among 116 nursing leaders selected as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. “It is an honor to receive...

American Academy of Nursing inducts KSU professor, alumna (Sedlak) 12/15/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Geology (1)
Research provides better understanding of long-term changes in the climate system (Ortiz) 12/13/2010 PhysOrg.com Text Attachment Email

...points in the vicinity of Soledad Basin on a high-resolution bathymetric map off the coast of Baja California. Credit: Photo courtesy of Dr. Joseph Ortiz/Kent State University For more than a decade, Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University and part...


International Affairs (1)
Opinion: Health Care Mandates? Nothing New for Foreign Students 12/13/2010 AOL News Text Attachment Email

...have universal health care. For this reason, the university requires all international students to purchase and maintain health insurance coverage. -- Kent State University The U.S. does not have a nationalized health care system, and medical care here is extremely expensive. If you need...


KSU at Salem (1)
Clearing the walk 12/14/2010 Salem News Text Attachment Email

Stacy Davidson, a Kent State University-Salem Campus employee, clears the start of snow Monday afternoon from the sidewalk in front of the Kent City Center on...


KSU Museum (1)
Kaleidoscope: Portage boasts many museums, interesting structures and places 12/15/2010 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...Atwater Township's historical society maintains a museum next to the Township Hall on Route 183. Many artifacts and photos bring local history to light. Kent State University is the site of the KSU Museum. Opened in 1985 in Rockwell Hall on the front campus -- the college's original library --...


Safety (18)
Weather forces Kent State University to shut down; final exams postponed until next week (Vincent) 12/13/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

View full sizeLisa DeJong, The Plain DealerSwirling snow and limited visibility across Northeast Ohio forced Kent State University to cancel final exams this afternoon. KENT, Ohio -- Winter weather is playing havoc with final exams at three area...

Arctic weather shuts down schools, causes cancellations 12/13/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...resume Tuesday with a special post time of 6:15 p.m. • Tests scheduled for 12:30 p.m. and later Monday at the Geauga campus and Twinsburg satellite of Kent State University were postponed until Dec. 20 at the same times and in the same places. The main campus in Kent closed at 1, so exams scheduled...

Snow piling up across region 12/14/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Finally, some good news for Kent State students who didn't study for their final exams. Tests scheduled for 12:30 p.m. and later Monday at the Geauga campus and Twinsburg...

Bone-chilling cold plods into Northeast 12/14/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...traditional snow belt east of Cleveland. Classes were canceled at Cleveland State University and Tuesday's exams were rescheduled for Christmas week. Kent State University canceled main-campus classes Tuesday, also delaying some finals. Dozens of helicopters were being used on Florida's...

BRIEF: Two KSU satellites, main campus postpone final exams 12/13/2010 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Dec. 13--Finally, some good news for Kent State students who didn't study for their final exams. Tests scheduled for 12:30 p.m. and later Monday at the Geauga campus and Twinsburg...

Riding out the storm as the big chill begins: Heavy snowfall keeps schools, courts closed 12/15/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...Portage County Board of Commissioners closed all county government buildings for the day, including all courts and the Child Support Enforcement Agency.Kent State Universitys main campus was closed and final exams have been postponed until next week. Hiram College also closed for the day.It...

Blast of snow causes whiteouts, nasty roads (Schmidlin) 12/15/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Storm puts off some KSU finals (White, Vincent, Frank) 12/15/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University closed at 1 p.m.; final exams postponed one week 12/13/2010 Review - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University will close today at 1 p.m. today, and all final exams scheduled after noon will be postponed until next week, officials...

Final exams postponed after snow smacks Kent State University (Neumann) 12/15/2010 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT -- For a second day in a row, Kent State's main campus canceled classes after getting clobbered by the second lake-effect snow storm in less than a week. But this is finals...

Snow slams Portage County 12/14/2010 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - Residents in Portage County continued to dig out of the snow on Tuesday. NewsChannel5's Joe McGee spent much of the day checking out weather...

Bone-Chilling Cold Plods Into Northeast 12/14/2010 ABC News - Online Text Attachment Email

...traditional snow belt east of Cleveland. Classes were canceled at Cleveland State University and Tuesday's exams were rescheduled for Christmas week. Kent State University canceled main-campus classes Tuesday, also delaying some finals. Dozens of helicopters were being used on Florida's...

Bone-chilling cold plods into Northeast 12/14/2010 Boston Globe - Online Text Attachment Email

...traditional snow belt east of Cleveland. Classes were canceled at Cleveland State University and Tuesday's exams were rescheduled for Christmas week. Kent State University canceled main-campus classes Tuesday, also delaying some finals. Dozens of helicopters were being used on Florida's...

Snow snarls northeast Ohio, 9 more inches on way 12/15/2010 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

...inches may fall before a winter storm warning expires Wednesday morning. Classes were canceled at Cleveland State University and the main campus of Kent State University. Exams have been pushed to Christmas week...

BRIEF: Two KSU satellites, main campus postpone final exams 12/13/2010 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

Finally, some good news for Kent State students who didn't study for their final exams. Tests scheduled for 12:30 p.m. and later Monday at the Geauga campus and Twinsburg...

Wintry replay in Ohio: feels like subzero 12/14/2010 Associated Press (AP) - Columbus Bureau Text Email

...inches may fall before a winter storm warning expires Wednesday morning. Classes were canceled at Cleveland State University and the main campus of Kent State University. Exams have been pushed to Christmas week. Copyright © 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material...

COLLEGE RANKING FOR BINGE DRINKING AND DRUG ABUSE 12/14/2010 10 TV News HD at 5 PM - WBNS-TV Text Email

...NATIONAL SURVEY BY THE DAILY BEAST IS RANKING CAMPUSES IN TERMS OF DRUG USE. AND IT RANKED OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY 11-TH IN THE COUNTRY. ALSO IN OHIO, KENT STATE RANKED 16TH AND MIAMI UNIVERSITY RANKED 20TH. DENISON UNIVERSITY CAME IN AT 38TH, AND OHIO UNIVERSITY WAS GAGED AT 49TH. THE WORST...

NOW, IN THE MEANTIME HEAVY SNOW IS GIVING KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FITS T. 12/15/2010 Weather Channel, The Text Email

NOW, IN THE MEANTIME HEAVY SNOW IS GIVING KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FITS T. COLLEGE HAS CANCELED CLASSES THIS WEEK DUE TO LAKE-EFFECT SNOW. THEY'VE HAD TO MOVE FINAL EXAMS BACK A WEEK...


Student Success (1)
KSU considers rehabilitation for cheaters (Kairis, Williams) 12/13/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Proposal would place offenders in an anti-plagiarism program KENT: When Kent State students copy someone else's work in the future, they might have...


News Headline: GI Promise draws students to Ohio's colleges: Higher Education | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Karen Farkas, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: More than 1,300 veterans and family members moved to Ohio to attend public colleges last spring under the state's GI Promise, which grants them immediate residency and allows them to pay in-state tuition rates, according to the Ohio Board of Regents.

The program, the first in the nation when it was announced in 2008, allows all service members and veterans who have served at least one year -- along with their spouses and dependents -- to attend state colleges and universities at the in-state rate. And veterans generally pay no tuition because it is covered under the GI Bill.

According to a report released this month by the Board of Regents, 10,876 veterans enrolled at state universities and community colleges, in addition to 1,340 under the GI Promise. In Northeast Ohio, 99 GI Promise veterans or dependents enrolled at the University of Akron, 99 at Kent State University, 43 at Cleveland State University, 75 at Cuyahoga Community College, 31 at Lakeland Community College and 32 at Lorain County Community College.

Donation instead of holiday cards: Notre Dame College administrators are sending e-mail holiday greetings this year and donating the $2,000 the college would have spent on cards and postage to the Collaborative Initiative to End Human Trafficking.

"We believe it will help make a permanent impact on more people than cards, and with technology as advanced as it is today, most of our recipients are accessible by e-mail," said Notre Dame spokesman Brian Johnston - via e-mail. "We are already receiving many positive comments and hope that others who receive our message will consider the good work the Collaborative is doing to fight the atrocities of human trafficking."

The Collaborative is a group of 13 religious congregations and lay professionals in northern Ohio who began working together in 2007 to advocate for the prevention and abolition of human trafficking globally, nationally, and in Ohio.

Universities closing over the holidays: The week between Christmas and New Year's Day is typically one of the quietest times on a college campus and many universities have decided to save money by shuttering buildings for several days - thus saving on energy costs and some staffing costs.

For the first time this year, Cleveland State University is closing most buildings during three days that are not scheduled holidays (Dec. 28, 29 and 30), said spokesman Joe Mosbrook. He said it will save about $50,000 in energy costs.

Some part-time employees will not be paid, he said. Closing those three days was part of the recently negotiated union contracts, Mosbrook said.

'We decided closing was an easy concession in lieu of giving a pay raise," he said. "People wanted the time off and it is very slow that week."

The student center and recreation center are open for limited hours, but people are advised to check hours at those buildings before heading to the campus.

The same holds true at the University of Akron and Kent State University, which will also close most of their buildings that week.

Two honored at CSU: Author and scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Eduardo J. Padr n, president of Miami Dade College, will receive honorary degrees and speak at Cleveland State University's fall commencement on Sunday.

Gates, who will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters, is editor-in-chief of TheRoot.com, a daily online magazine, and the Oxford African American Studies Center, a comprehensive online resource in the field of African American and Africana Studies.

Padr n, who will also receive a honorary Doctor of Humane Letters,represented the U.S. at UNESCO's (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) World Conference on Higher Education at the request of President Barack Obama.

Commencement will be at 1 p.m. at the Wolstein Center, 2000 Prospect Ave.

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: kfarkas@plaind.com, 216-999-5079

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News Headline: Kent State narrows search for football head coach | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: On-campus interviews are underway
at Kent State as athletic
director Joel Nielsen continues
its search for the Golden Flashes'
20th head football coach.
Nielsen is believed to have narrowed
his search to three finalists,
although one or two other candidates
could still find themselves
back in the mix.
Kent State is trying to keep the
names of the finalists a secret,
but it is a good bet Alabama wide
receiver
coach and
recruiting
coordinator
Curt
Cignetti
is one of
the candidates
who
h a s a l -
ready interviewed.
A KSU official said Cignetti has
not made two trips to the Kent
campus, as has been previously reported
on the Internet. It is likely,
however,
that two
meetings
have taken
place. One
in another
city during
KSU's exploratory
meetings
with its initial list of candidates
and then a second time as an official
interview in Kent.
The other two names are likely
to come from a list that includes
Ohio State assistant head coach
and wide receivers coach Darrell
Hazell, Texas wide receivers
coach and assistant recruiting
coordinator Bobby Kennedy and
West Virginia offensive coordinator
Jeff Mullen.
While Mullen's name has been
reported as a likely candidate
for more than a week, he is looking
more and more like a longshot
considering reports he is
about to be replaced at West
Virginia.
On Tuesday, several media
outlets reported Oklahoma
State offensive coordinator
Dana Holgorsen is close to
finalizing a deal that would
make make him West Virginia's
head coach in waiting.
Holgorsen would serve
as offensive coordinator at
West Virginia in 2011, then
replace Bill Stewart as head
coach in 2012.
If that happens, Mullen
could find himself out of a
job.
Akron made a similar hire
last year in Rob Ianello, who
had served as offensive coordinator,
receivers coach
and recruiting coordinator
under Charlie Weis at Notre
Dame. When Weis was fired
on Nov. 30, the Irish named
Ianello interim head coach.
Ianello was then hired by the
Zips on Dec. 10.

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News Headline: FRENCH CONNECTION | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Mother's cross-country
surprise visit boosts
KSU sophomore to
breakout performance

When Tamzin Barroilhet
decided to
play her college
basketball at Kent State, she
chose a school more than
4,000 miles from her home
on the French Riviera.
It would have been only
natural for the talented
guard to feel a little homesick
for Sainte Maxime, a
small town located almost
an hour east of Cannes.
But Barroilhet was more
equipped for her adventure
than the typical foreign
student preparing
to study in the United
States.
“If I was just a French person
with no English (background),
it would have been
very hard,” said Barroilhet,
a 6-foot guard, who is a dual
citizen of both France and
England. “Having an international
background and
being well traveled obviously
made the transition to Kent
very easy.”
The daughter of a British
mother and a Chilean father,
Barroilhet was born in
London and spent the first
few years of her life in Madrid,
Spain, before moving
to Sainte Maxime.
After toying with everything
from ballet to judo, to
horseback riding since she
was three years old, Barroilhet
committed herself to
basketball at the age of 11.
It was a decision that would
open more new worlds to
her.
“At 11 I was selected to
play for our county team,
and we competed against
all of the other counties in
France,” she said. “We won
the championship. I was 12
years old, and I had a gold
medal around my neck.”
She was sold.
By the time she turned
19, Barroilhet was representing
her mother's homeland
while captaining Great
Britain's U-20 national team
in the Republic of Macedonia
to the 2010 FIBA European
Division B Championship.
That victory from
last summer was the firstever
major tournament
title for any British agegroup
team, and Barroilhet
even scored a buzzer-beater
to beat tournament-host
Macedonia.
All of those experiences
should have prepared
Barroilhet for anything
she would face while living
in Kent and playing
in her first season with
the Golden Flashes women's
basketball team. She
had already spent several
years away from home
in boarding school for upand-
coming French athletes.
Last year, she paid
her own tuition as a KSU
freshman, but could not
play for the Flashes because
of a controversial
eligibility ruling by the
NCAA's Initial-Eligibility
Clearing House.
“I've been away from
home for a long time,” said
Barroilhet. “The thing I
miss the most is my family.
Even when I was in (boarding
school), I only got to
see them once every two or
three months.”
That may have been the
reason Barroilhet melted
Nov. 28 just prior to the start
of her first Kent State home
game when, during pregame
warmups, she spotted her
mother joining the M.A.C.
Center crowd.
Mandy Barroilhet had
witnessed every stage of
her daughter's basketball
career in person, and decided
to fly to the United
States on a surprise visit
for Tamzin's opening night
in Kent.
“It was a shock,” said
the younger Barroilhet.
“I was warming up, and
I turned around and saw
her walk through the door.
I just stopped for two seconds,
looked at her, and I
thought. I wasn't sure it
was her, because I really
didn't suspect her coming
to the game.”
KSU sophomore Leslie
Schaefer noticed Barroilhet
frozen in place and
staring in the direction of
a woman at the other end
of the arena. “Is that your
mom?” she asked.
Barroilhet still wasn't
sure, “but then my mom
waved at me, and I think
my face just turned white,
and I had some tears of
joy.”
Ricardo and Mandy
Barroilhet decided long
ago they would always
try to be on hand to support
their children in their
pursuits. Ricardo would
have been in Kent last
week, too, had the oldest
of Tamzin's three bothers
not suffered a serious injury
to his lower leg while
playing professional soccer
in England. Ricardo
made the trip to hearten
their son during his recovery,
while Mandy flew to
the United States to cheer
on their daughter.
“Unfortunately for us,
neither his parents nor my
parents ever came to our
(events). I always remember
the feeling when I was
young that other parents
were in (the stands) and
mine weren't,” said Mandy
Barroilhet. “My husband
and I discussed it, and he
felt the same way. We always
wanted to be there
for our children.
“For us, it is very important
to show that we care
and that we are interested,
that we are there to support.
The higher you go in
sports, it gets very competitive.
There are lots of
highs and lots of lows, and
we want to be there for our
children for the highs and
the lows.”
Barroilhet rewarded
her mother by hitting her
first five shots in the opening
25 minutes of a 79-55
victory over Marshall on
Nov. 28. She finished 6-for-
8 from the field and scored
15 points. Prior to that
breakout performance,
she was 0-for-5 from the
field and still looking for
her first college point after
playing two games for
KSU.
“I think seeing my mom
definitely gave me a boost
of wanting to do my best,”
said Barroilhet.
Barroilhet's mother
had a chance to see two
more KSU games before
her scheduled return to
France on Dec. 5.
If Barroilhet has her
way, her parents will have
several more interesting
trips in their future. Barroilhet's
goal is to one day
represent England in the
Olympics.
“The Olympics are in
London in 2012, so that
would obviously be very
special,” said Barroilhet.
“I'm not considered an under-
20 anymore. I'm considered
a senior player, so
hopefully I'll get an e-mail
this summer saying they
want me for the camps.
Representing England in
London in 2012 is my big
aim. That's in my head.”
Barroilhet has already
proven she can thrive playing
a European brand of
basketball. Learning a different
style in the United
States could make her
even more effective when
she returns to her national
team.
“The European style of
the game is different, and
she'll do some things from
a European standpoint
that we normally don't
do over here,” said KSU
head coach Bob Lindsay.
“Because the rules are different,
she'll sometimes
travel and do some other
things, She is feeling her
way through it and learning
what she can actually
do legally with her footwork.
“But there are also some
things with the European
style of the game that
she can teach our players
to do that will maybe expand
their games a little
bit,” Lindsay said. “I think
she can help us get better,
and we can help her get
better.”

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News Headline: Tide's Cignetti reportedly 'in the lead' for Kent State job | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/13/2010
Outlet Full Name: NBCsports.com
Contact Name: Ben Kercheval
News OCR Text: When Kent State opens up the 2011 season with a likely physical and mental lashing at the hands of Alabama, they may have more in common with the Tide than just being Nick Saban‘s alma mater.

According to TideSports.com, sources close to the Tuscaloosa News said Alabama receivers coach/recruiting coordinator Curt Cignetti is the leading candidate to take the Kent State head coaching vacancy. However, it is unknown whether an offer has been passed to Cignetti and/or if he's accepted/denied anything just yet.

The article also mentions that Kent State AD Joel Nielsen contacted Saban about the potential hire, but Saban, nor Cignetti, was available for comment.

Meanwhile, there are some fans in Morgantown, West Virginia who just can't push offensive coordinator Jeff Mullen out the door hard enough. Mullen has also been considered a finalist for the position, although, according to what JT wrote earlier, West Virginia could find itself with an entirely new coaching staff next year altogether.

Regardless, it appears Cignetti is the leading candidate. However, Kent State has been firmly mum on the matter.

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News Headline: Bright Spots: Dec. 13, 2010 (Sedlak) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/13/2010
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 4:30 am, December 13, 2010

It's not all bad out there. Here's the latest installment of a weekly web feature that highlights positive developments in the Northeast Ohio business community.

Experient, an integrated meeting planner in Twinsburg, is introducing what it calls a “next-generation smart phone-based lead retrieval system.”

The system is called SWAP, and it integrates data collected from traditional lead retrieval devices with smart phones including the iPhone, BlackBerry and Android devices.

“Both SWAP and reader device data is reported together in an easy-to-access DecisionPoint dashboard which is updated within moments of user activity,” Experient says. “The native- or web-based SWAP app also works in offline mode, eliminating dependence upon continuous cellular connectivity to work.”

Shawn Pierce, president of Experient's Registration & Housing Services division, said the system “increases efficiency because each exhibit staff member has his or her own lead device in hand without renting a unit. Now leads can be captured anywhere at the show, like receptions, sessions or chatting in the hallways and follow-up can begin immediately.”

Experient introduced the system last week during the International Association of Exhibitions and Events Expo! Expo! trade show in New Orleans.

The Ohio State Bar Foundation presented David C. Weiner, a partner at Squire, Sanders & Dempsey LLP in Cleveland, with this year's Honorary Life Fellowship Award.

The group describes Mr. Weiner as “one of the original champions for the Ohio Legal Assistance Foundation,” the efforts of which were “instrumental in the statewide establishment of funding for legal aid programs to assist Ohio citizens.”

He continues his pro bono services by hosting an annual Thanksgiving Day fundraiser for the hungry.

This award is given annually to an attorney admitted to the practice of law in Ohio whose career has been exemplified by dedication to the goals and values sought to be furthered by the foundation; a lifetime of service to the public; and integrity, honor, courtesy and professionalism.

Kowit & Passov Real Estate Group, a commercial real estate brokerage firm, announced four new lease deals.

Lady Jane's Haircuts for Men will sign a lease for 1,547 square feet at 1220 Buchholzer Blvd. in Cuyahoga Falls in Buchholzer Crossings. It will be the company's fourth store in Ohio; existing locations are in Parma Heights, Lyndhurst and Toledo. Amy Doroba and Tori Nook with Kowit & Passov represented the landlord on the lease.

Dollar Tree signed a lease for 12,000 square feet at 1526 Golden Gate Plaza in Mayfield Heights at the Golden Gate Shopping Center. Ms. Nook exclusively represents Dollar Tree stores throughout northern Ohio. Brad Kowit of Kowit & Passov represented the landlord.

Republic Alternative Technologies, a manufacturing company of rings for the steel trucking industry, signed a lease at 17295 Foltz Industrial Parkway in Strongsville. Jim Wolf with Kowit & Passov was the dual agent on this 2,600-square-foot lease.

Dalcan LLC, doing business as Panera Bread, leased part of the former Hollywood Video at 36009 Euclid Ave. in Willoughby. The busy Ms. Nook exclusively represents Dalcan (Covelli Enterprises), which is based in Warren. Panera will open this 5,282-square-foot space in spring.

Carol Sedlak, a professor and director of the nurse educator program at Kent State University, was among 116 nursing leaders selected as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing.

“It is an honor to receive recognition from the American Academy of Nursing for my accomplishments in nursing, especially as a leader, scholar and researcher in the area of orthopedic nursing science,” Ms. Sedlak said in a statement. “I am especially grateful for the support that the College of Nursing at Kent State University has provided for my success.”

Ms. Sedlak, a resident of Garfield Heights, conducts research in bone health and the prevention of osteoporosis in men and women. She focuses on work that will reduce health care workers' musculoskeletal injuries while lifting and moving patients, a subject she feels is increasingly important as society ages.

Send information for Bright Spots to managing editor Scott Suttell at ssuttell@crain.com.

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News Headline: American Academy of Nursing inducts KSU professor, alumna (Sedlak) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The American Academy of
Nursing recently selected 116
outstanding nurse leaders for
induction as Fellows.
The induction ceremony
was held during the
Academy's 37th annual
Meeting and Conference
that was held in Washington,
D.C.
Kent State University Professor
of Nursing Carol Sedlak,
director, nurse educator
program, is one of the
professionals who received
the honor.
“It is an honor to receive
recognition from the American
Academy of Nursing
for my accomplishments in
nursing, especially as a leader,
scholar and researcher in
the area of orthopaedic nursing
science,” Sedlak said.
“I am especially grateful for
the support that the College
of Nursing at Kent State University
has provided for my
success.”
Sedlak's research is in
bone health and the prevention
of osteoporosis in men
and women.
She focuses on work that
will reduce health care workers'
musculoskeletal injuries
while lifting and moving patients,
a subject she feels is
increasingly important as society
ages.
A resident of Garfield
Heights, Sedlak said that
she looks forward to advancing
her research in order to
continue to inform health
policy and practice in her
focused area of orthopaedic
nursing.
Being selected for the
academy is one of the most
prestigious honors in the
field of nursing.
“Academy Fellows are truly
experts,” said Catherine
Gilliss, academy president.
“The Academy Fellowship
represents the nation's top
nurse researchers, policymakers,
scholars, executives
and practitioners.”
Selection criteria include
evidence of significant contributions
to nursing and
health care.
Each nominee must be
sponsored by two current
Academy Fellows.
The new Fellows are selected
by a panel composed
of elected and appointed
Fellows, and selection is
based in part on the extent
to which nominees' nursing
careers influence health
policies and health care delivery
for the benefit of all
Americans.
KSU alumna Becky Patton,
past president of the
American Nurses Association,
also was inducted as a
Fellow this year.
For more information
about KSU's College of Nursing,
visit www.kent.edu/nursing

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News Headline: Research provides better understanding of long-term changes in the climate system (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/13/2010
Outlet Full Name: PhysOrg.com
Contact Name: Kent State University
News OCR Text: A researcher points in the vicinity of Soledad Basin on a high-resolution bathymetric map off the coast of Baja California. Credit: Photo courtesy of Dr. Joseph Ortiz/Kent State University

For more than a decade, Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University and part of an international team of National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded researchers, has been studying long-term climate variability associated with El Niño. The researchers' goal is to help climatologists better understand this global climate phenomenon that happens every two to eight years, impacting much of the world.

El Niño is the periodic warming of central and eastern tropical Pacific waters. The last El Niño occurred in 2009, Ortiz said, and its impact was felt in the United States with flooding in the south and wildfires in California. The research team looked at El Niño-Southern Oscillation (which is often just called "El Niño"), reconstructing sea surface temperature of the equatorial Pacific over the past 14,000 years.

"If we understand how El Niño changes over thousands of years, we can better predict climate changes on societal time-scales of years to decades," Ortiz explained. "El Niño variations lead to drought, famine, landslides, fires and other natural disasters, depending on where in the world you happen to be. Our findings can help lead to better ways to predict El Niño-Southern Oscillations, mitigating the natural disasters associated with it."

In addition to Ortiz, the research team includes the lead author on the paper, Thomas Marchitto (University of Colorado); Raimund Muscheler (Lund University in Sweden); Jose Carriquiry (Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Ensenada in Mexico); and Alexander van Geen (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University).

Their findings will appear in the Dec. 3 issue of Science. Their paper, "Dynamical Response of the Tropical Pacific Ocean to Solar Forcing During the Early Holocene," helps to establish the linkage between changes in solar intensity and the strength of El Niño on millennial time scales. Their work was funded by the Marine Geology Subdivision of the National Science Foundation's Ocean Sciences Division.

"The climate system is very sensitive to subtle external forcing," Ortiz said. "We determined that the sun has an impact but is not the sole factor driving changes on these millennial time scales. Other studies have tried to show a solar linkage to El Niño-related climate variability, but our study indicates a convincing linkage due to the continuity of our record. This paper confirms the 'ocean dynamical thermostat' theory, showing that solar-forced changes in ocean circulation have on impact on El Niño."

Scientists on the Marion Dufresne process core that has been recovered from off the coast of Baja California. Credit: Photo courtesy of Dr. Joseph Ortiz/Kent State University

Ortiz began working with the international team of scientists when he was a post-doctoral scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, a research branch of Columbia University. Over the last 11 years, his contributions to the team include assisting with measurements and in the statistical analysis of the data sets. As a researcher in the Kent State geology department, Ortiz has involved Kent State graduates and undergraduates in his NSF-funded research, providing his students with real-world experience on an international level. His students have participated in research projects as close to home as here in Ohio, and as far away as the South Pacific, North Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific Northwest, and off Baja California.

"With my involvement in this project, Kent State geology students have studied core samples collected off of Baja California," Ortiz said. "The students can take what they learn in the classroom out into the field and back to the lab. I feel very fortunate to be able to provide our students with this type of experience and bring international-level research to Kent State."

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News Headline: Opinion: Health Care Mandates? Nothing New for Foreign Students | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/13/2010
Outlet Full Name: AOL News
Contact Name: Rhonda D. Orin
News OCR Text: (Dec. 13) -- Today, U.S. District Court Judge Henry E. Hudson ruled that the "individual mandate" to purchase health insurance -- the centerpiece of the new health care reform law -- is unconstitutional. Judge Hudson is the first judge to make that determination -- to date, fourteen rulings on similar suits have gone the other way.

Curiously, though, individual mandates compelling the purchase of health insurance have been around for decades. For foreign students studying in the U.S., individual mandates are old news.

Other Views on the Ruling

Good News for Reform Backers -- Ian Millhiser

The Constitution Vindicated -- Stephen B. Presser

Federal immigration law has long mandated that exchange visitors with "J visas" must purchase health insurance. Many states, such as Washington, Oregon, Ohio and Florida, extend this requirement to foreign students with "F visas," either by statute or administrative code. Many public and private universities and colleges do the same.

Let's fit this in with Judge Hudson's decision. If you are a foreign student, you have an obligation to purchase insurance in order to protect both yourself, your family and your community from the risk that you might incur health care costs that you could not pay.

But if you are a U.S. citizen, it's your gosh darn right under the U.S. Constitution to impose that risk on others.

Huh?

Individual mandates on international students are nothing new. At Colorado State, for example, the mandate dates back more than 40 years -- to May 22, 1968. It was challenged as discriminatory in the early 1970s but upheld by the school's general counsel on the ground that "no distinction is made among students of different foreign countries." Similar mandates were enacted on Oct. 19, 1972, at the University of Toledo and on Aug. 15, 1978, at the University of Florida.

More Opinion on AOL News

Moreover, these health insurance mandates have been upheld in the court system. For example, the Northern District of Ohio ruled in 1986, in a case called Ahmed v. University of Toledo, that health insurance protects the ability of international students to function within the community, in light of the high costs of health care. That court found support in a 1982 decision of the U.S. Supreme Court, Plyler v. Doe, for the conclusion that "international students do not have a constitutional right to attend American universities without complying with the institutions' reasonable regulations."

Historically, schools justified the mandates upon international students on grounds that the purchase of health insurance was a responsible practice that benefited not only the students and their families, but also their communities. For example:

The United States does not have universal health care. For this reason, the university requires all international students to purchase and maintain health insurance coverage. -- Kent State University

The U.S. does not have a nationalized health care system, and medical care here is extremely expensive. If you need medical care and do not have insurance, you may find yourself owing thousands of dollars. The health insurance system offers you protection against these costs. -- Indiana University

Health insurance is important to anyone living in the United States. Health care in the U.S. is very expensive, and insurance is the best way to be certain that expenses are covered. Unpaid medical bills damage the relationship between the community and students as well as damage the reputation of students as a whole. -- Colorado State University

Sound familiar? It should. These are the same reasons that are given these days to justify the mandates in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act (collectively "PPACA").

So here's the question. What makes the individual mandate seem straightforward, reasonable and moderate when applied to international students living in the United States, but unconstitutional (and the end of democracy as we know it) when applied to U.S. citizens?

No need to answer. There is no difference, really.

U.S. citizens, just like foreign students visiting here, have an obligation to themselves, their families and their communities to buy health insurance so they can pay for their own health needs, without becoming a burden on others. No one should be immune because no one is invincible. It's that simple.

Rhonda D. Orin is managing partner of the Washington, D.C., office of Anderson Kill & Olick and is the author of "Making Them Pay: How to Get the Most Out of Health Insurance and Managed Care" (St. Martin's Press, 2001), as well as many articles on health insurance and business insurance topics.

Tagged: personal finance insurance health, henry e hudson, health care, health care and education reconciliation act, health and medicine, insurance, healthcare, health care ruling, henry hudson, insurance mandate, foreign students, universities, individual mandate

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News Headline: Clearing the walk | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Salem News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Stacy Davidson, a Kent State University-Salem Campus employee, clears the start of snow Monday afternoon from the sidewalk in front of the Kent City Center on North Lincoln Avenue. Snow fell continuously through the evening and night hours, blanketing the area in several inches of accumulation and canceling most activities. The winter weather is predicted to continue through mid-week, with a winter storm warning in effect until 7 a.m. Wednesday for Mahoning County and a winter weather advisory in effect until 7 p.m. today for Columbiana County. (Salem News photo by Kevin Howell)

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News Headline: Kaleidoscope: Portage boasts many museums, interesting structures and places | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2010
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name: Ken Lahmers
News OCR Text: For the past three years, I've been writing about historical attractions, magnificent structures and a variety of museums in the eastern and central portions of Ohio.

Many people tell me they enjoy reading my "road trip" columns -- they give them places to visit that they didn't know about -- so I plan to continue them. There are a lot more fascinating places I want to check out.

But local residents have many historical places to visit without leaving Portage County. I've visited, or at least driven by, many historical sites and will share them with you this week.

Museums are abundant

Portage County has a number of historical societies, many of which have museums which display artifacts of all kinds.

Locals can start right in their own backyard at the Aurora Historical Society's museum on the lower level of the memorial library.

It has a permanent collection of items, including pieces of equipment relating to the town's heyday as a major cheesemaking center.

Founded in 1968, the society has featured numerous special exhibits over the years, including World War II posters and cartoons, buttons and textiles, plus memorabilia from Geauga Lake Park and Sea World.

Kent Historical Society was incorporated in 1972, and one of its first projects was saving the old Erie Railroad depot, built in 1875 and now occupied by the Pufferbelly Restaurant.

The society once was located on the second floor of the depot, but now is on South Water Street just south of Kent Municipal Court. It hopes to move soon to a house on East Main Street built in 1883.

The KHS features a display about schools in Kent from 1880 to 1940, the Wunderle train room, a Gov. Martin Davey room and the Bradstock genealogy room.

Garrettsville's James A. Garfield Historical Society was organized in 1979. Its home/museum since 1990 is in the former Mott Drug Store (built about 1840) at Main and High streets.

Items include old hats and clothing, books, diaries, photos, maps, ledgers, furniture and editions of the Western Reserve Magazine published from 1973-83.

North of the museum stands the village clock tower, completed in 1980 with a restored 1907 clock.

The Brimfield Historical Society maintains the Kelso House museum on Route 43.

It has five rooms of exhi-bits, including an 1843 beam loom, a Victorian-style parlor with an organ and horsehair sofa, a wood-burning stove and Kelso family items such as a low poster bed and old quilt.

Several buildings stand on the park-like grounds, such as a granary with antique tools, corn crib, garden shed with tools, millstone from nearby Plum Creek Mill, the original Township Hall bell and a 19th century barn.

The complex is similar to a proposal Aurora officials have for the Margaret Harmon property on Page Road.

On North Chestnut Street in Ravenna, just south of the new high school, is the Portage County Historical Society's museum and library.

Built in 1968, the cathedral-style stained glass window on the west end of the building came from the 1882 Portage County Courthouse.

The museum features locally made pottery, glass, Indian tools and a village, a Riddle hearse (built in Ravenna), military items, clothing, antique household goods, toys and dolls, old farm equipment including a Case steam tractor and a conestoga wagon.

Mantua Historical Society's museum is in Mantua Center Town Hall at Route 82 and Mantua Center Road.

Atwater Township's historical society maintains a museum next to the Township Hall on Route 183. Many artifacts and photos bring local history to light.

Kent State University is the site of the KSU Museum. Opened in 1985 in Rockwell Hall on the front campus -- the college's original library -- it contains eight galleries of important collections of fashions and decorative arts.

More places to view

In addition to historical museums, Portage County has its share of historic structures, including homes, schools, churches and commercial buildings.

Unlike other counties, there isn't a historic mansion open to the public, but my favorite old house is the Rockwell Masonic Temple.

At West Main and Mantua streets in Kent, the Italianate 7,335-square-foot mansion was completed in 1884 by Marvin Kent at a cost of $80,000, a huge sum then.

It has a ballroom on the third floor, which now is the lodge's meeting room. Four U.S. presidents -- Benjamin Harrison, William McKinley, Warren G. Harding and William H. Taft -- have been guests there.

The lodge acquired the house in 1923. It is only open to the public a couple of times a year during special events.

The 201-year-old Church in Aurora congregation boasts one of Portage County's most impressive and photographed churches, built in 1871.

There are some older church buildings, though. Although altered often over the years, original portions of Christ Episcopal Church in Kent were built in 1838.

Kent's Congregational Church was built in 1858 and now houses R.W. Martin & Sons, while the Unitarian Universalist Church nearby was built in 1868. Its footprint hasn't changed.

Two other beautiful churches dating to the 1800s stand in southern Portage County -- Rootstown First Congregational UCC and Atwater Congregational.

But my favorite is St. Joseph Catholic in Randolph. It was built of brick in 1904 and its rectory dates back to 1887. Behind it built into a hill is an impressive 1927 replica of the grotto at Lourdes, France.

Among Portage County's oldest commercial/industrial buildings are the five-story alpaca mill in Kent, built in 1852, and the Williams Brothers mill -- now Star of the West Mill -- built in 1879, a centerpiece of the downtown Kent skyline.

The alpaca mill, situated along the Cuyahoga River, was built on the site of a former silk mill. In the last few years it has been remodeled into luxury apartments.

THE MANTUA Feed & Grain Mill dates to 1898.

There are a number of Portage County schools which date back 75 to 80 years. Aurora's old high school -- now the Board of Education offices -- goes back to the early 1920s.

The still-used Davey Elementary in Kent and Rootstown Middle School, and the recently vacated Ravenna High School go back into the 1920s-30s.

Several buildings which do not house students anymore that still stand are Kent Depeyster (oldest sections built 1888 and 1920), Paris Township (1912), Mantua Township (1914), Palmyra (1916), Deerfield (1919), Brady Lake (1923) and Mantua Village (1929).

Depeyster houses Kent school district offices, Mantua Village is now doctor offices, and the owner of the Paris building wants to refurbish it into apartments.

Train depots dot the Portage landscape, the most impressive being Kent's Erie (originally Atlantic & Great Western). There are others in Aurora, Mantua and Kent.

The Kent jail built in the late 1860s is preserved in Fred Fuller Park, and the Main Street bridge built in 1877 and Kent dam, reconstructed in 1925 and upgraded in 2008, are two other remaining Kent relics.

In Ravenna are several Riddle blocks built in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

One building I was impressed with while driving around the county is the old Palmyra Center Hotel. Built in 1832, the three-story brick structure was a stage coach stop in the 1800s.

It served as a Knights of Pythias lodge in the late 1800s/early 1900s and a store and residence for most of the 20th century.

According to the Record-Courier, its owner is hoping to renovate it and perhaps open a restaurant there.

Some other old industrial buildings still standing are the former Oak Rubber and Cleveland Worsted Mills in Ravenna and Twin Coach and Gougler Industries facilities in Kent. The old RB&W plant in Kent was torn down earlier this year.

E-mail:

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3155

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News Headline: Weather forces Kent State University to shut down; final exams postponed until next week (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/13/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Karen Farkas, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: View full sizeLisa DeJong, The Plain DealerSwirling snow and limited visibility across Northeast Ohio forced Kent State University to cancel final exams this afternoon.

KENT, Ohio -- Winter weather is playing havoc with final exams at three area universities and colleges.

Kent State University closed its main campus at 1 p.m. today, and postponed scheduled exams until Monday, Dec. 20 -- which could upset travel plans for out-of-state students. Today was the first day of finals week.

Spokeswoman Emily Vincent said the one-week delay was the only way the university could handle the issue, and dorms will stay open if necessary through Dec. 20. If exams must be postponed Tuesday, they will be rescheduled for the following Tuesday, Dec. 21, she said.

"Students can work with their professors to make alternative arrangements if they are unable to stay," she said.

Cleveland State University, which closed Dec. 8 when the city became gridlocked following a snowstorm, remained open today but final exams may be rescheduled at professors' discretion, said spokesman Joe Mosbrook. The exams would likely be held later in the week.

Every college and university has a notification system that can reach just about every student via telephone, text message or e-mail, he said.

Officials at Cuyahoga Community College are monitoring its three campuses -- in Cleveland, Highland Hills and Parma -- which all have different weather patterns, said Pete Ross, vice president of enrollment.

"We are doing everything we can to keep them open," he said this morning. "Our first concern is for the safety of the students and faculty but while you can reschedule classes, it is difficult to reschedule finals."

Ross said he cannot recall weather ever affecting finals week.

"Finals are time-sensitive," he said. "You want to get the grades in because some students need transcripts by the end of the year and some have licensing exams they need to take. Grades also affect financial aid."

Grades are due early next week, Ross said.

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News Headline: Arctic weather shuts down schools, causes cancellations | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/13/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Monday's blast of winter weather caused numerous delays, cancellations and alerts.

Most schools in the area were closed, some for snow and others for the extreme cold.

Some districts have used their allotment of three snow days and any more time off must be made up.

That's the situation in which Crestwood schools in Portage County finds itself: no more are available under a new state law that trimmed ''calamity days'' from five to three.

''Today is Crestwood's third calamity day. Any calamity days beyond three must be made up,'' the district warned parents and students in a message on its Web site.

The Madison school district in Lake County used its second ''calamity'' day Monday, and Superintendent Roger Goudy said the reduced limit isn't realistic in snow-prone Northeast Ohio.

''This is ridiculous,'' he said in a phone interview. ''In Northeast Ohio, we're going to have snow and we're going to have cold and we're going to have wind chill.''

Snow emergencies were instituted in Summit, Medina and Portage counties. Sheriffs asked that drivers limit car travel to only necessary trips.

Summa Health System on Monday opened an old dorm in its former nursing school on the Akron City Hospital campus for employees who were stuck in town after work and needed a place to stay, spokeswoman Jennifer Farquhar said.

Other weather-related news Monday included:

• Summit County Council postponed its regular meeting. The council was to discuss its 2011 budget and a contract with sheriff's deputies. The meeting was rescheduled for 5:30 p.m. Dec. 20.

• Northfield Park canceled live racing and rescheduled the card for 7 p.m. Dec. 30. Weather permitting, live racing will resume Tuesday with a special post time of 6:15 p.m.

• Tests scheduled for 12:30 p.m. and later Monday at the Geauga campus and Twinsburg satellite of Kent State University were postponed until Dec. 20 at the same times and in the same places. The main campus in Kent closed at 1, so exams scheduled after that time were rescheduled for Dec. 20 as well.

• Parking bans were announced in several communities: Tallmadge, until 8 a.m. Thursday; Louisville, until further notice; Wadsworth, until snow is cleared; and Barberton until snow is cleared.

• Delivery times for the Akron Beacon Journal could be affected, said Jim DeLuca, vice president for circulation. ''We ask for patience as our carriers struggle with the winter weather. We apologize for any inconvenience delays may cause our customers.''

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News Headline: Snow piling up across region | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Finally, some good news for Kent State students who didn't study for their final exams.

Tests scheduled for 12:30 p.m. and later Monday at the Geauga campus and Twinsburg satellite were postponed until Dec. 20 at the same times and in the same places.

The main campus in Kent closed at 1, so exams scheduled after that time were rescheduled for Dec. 20 as well.

All other KSU campuses remain open for the time being.

The city of Tallmadge has issued a snow parking ban, effective 10 a.m. Monday.

Vehicles may not be parked on the street and are subject to tow at the owner' expense.

The parking ban will remain in effect until 8 a.m. Thursday, Lt. Ron Williams of the Tallmadge Police Department said in a written news release.

Because of the current weather conditions, the Akron Zoo will be closed today, zoo officials said in a news release.

The zoo will reopen at 11 a.m. Tuesday, weather permitting.

Winter hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

For more information, to to http://www.akronzoo.org or call 330-375-2550.

The Summit County Engineer's Office has cancelled a public meeting planned to discuss projects in Twinsburg Township because of anticipated poor weather conditions.

The meeting was set for 5 p.m. and involved a proposal to replace the Ravenna Road bridge over Tinkers Creek and intersection improvements at Ravenna Road/Old Mill Road and Old Mill Road/Stow Road.

The meeting will be rescheduled at a later date.

At this meeting, maps showing the proposed changes and special features of this project and preliminary engineering drawings will be displayed. Tentative schedules for right-of-way acquisition and construction will be discussed.

The snow is piling up across Northeast Ohio as a winter storm warning remains in effect until Wednesday morning.

The National Weather Service in Cleveland is predicting the storm could bring from 9 to 17 inches of snowfall in the area by the time the warning ends at 7 a.m. Wednesday.

Twelve-hour totals reported by National Weather Service weather spotters as of 10:15 a.m. Monday were: Bath Township, 5 inches; Boston Township, 3; Brunswick, 4.1; Doylestown, 2 inches; Green (at Akron-Canton Airport), 1.8; Kent, 4.8; Ravenna, 3.5; Sagamore Hills, 6.7; Tallmadge, 3.2; and Wooster, 3.

Most public school districts and private schools across the region have shut down for the day due to the snow and cold, including the large public districts of Akron, Cuyahoga Falls, Barberton, Hudson and Stow in Summit County.

The weather service said 3 to 7 inches of snow could fall during the day today, another 3 to 5 inches tonight and 3 to 5 inches more are possible Tuesday.

Along with the heavy snow predicted are frigid temperatures and some dangerous wind-chill readings, the weather service predicted.

Strong wind gusts that will cause drifting of snow will drop wind chills as low as 15 below zero through Tuesday night, the weather service said.

Summit Council postpones meeting - 3:18 p.m.

Summit County Council has postponed its regular meeting Monday night because of dangerous weather.

The meeting has been rescheduled for Dec. 20.

The council caucus begins at 5 p.m., followed by the meeting at 5:30 p.m.

The council meets on the seventh floor of the Ohio Building, 175 S. Main St. in downtown Akron.

UA closes because of weather - 2:54 p.m.

The University of Akron and the Medina County University Center closed at 3 p.m. today because of the inclement weather.

Wayne College in Orrville remained open.

Two KSU satellites, main campus postpone final exams - 1:38 p.m.

Finally, some good news for Kent State students who didn't study for their final exams.

Tests scheduled for 12:30 p.m. and later Monday at the Geauga campus and Twinsburg satellite were postponed until Dec. 20 at the same times and in the same places.

The main campus in Kent closed at 1, so exams scheduled after that time were rescheduled for Dec. 20 as well.

All other KSU campuses remain open for the time being.

Parking ban issued in Tallmadge - 11:30 a.m.

The city of Tallmadge has issued a snow parking ban, effective 10 a.m. Monday.

Vehicles may not be parked on the street and are subject to tow at the owner' expense.

The parking ban will remain in effect until 8 a.m. Thursday, Lt. Ron Williams of the Tallmadge Police Department said in a written news release.

Weather closes Akron Zoo - 11:22 a.m.

Because of the current weather conditions, the Akron Zoo will be closed today, zoo officials said in a news release.

The zoo will reopen at 11 a.m. Tuesday, weather permitting.

Winter hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

For more information, to to http://www.akronzoo.org or call 330-375-2550.

Meeting to discuss Twinsburg Township projects postponed - 10:40 a.m.

The Summit County Engineer's Office has cancelled a public meeting planned to discuss projects in Twinsburg Township because of anticipated poor weather conditions.

The meeting was set for 5 p.m. and involved a proposal to replace the Ravenna Road bridge over Tinkers Creek and intersection improvements at Ravenna Road/Old Mill Road and Old Mill Road/Stow Road.

The meeting will be rescheduled at a later date.

At this meeting, maps showing the proposed changes and special features of this project and preliminary engineering drawings will be displayed. Tentative schedules for right-of-way acquisition and construction will be discussed.

Airports report minor problems amid Ohio storm - 9:28 a.m.

Ohio airports are reporting scattered delays and cancellations in the midst of a winter storm that has pummeled a broad area of the Midwest.

Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky airport spokeswoman Barb Schempf describes Monday morning's problems as minor. She says in a statement that the airport's primary runways are open and that crews continue to work to keep runways, taxi ways and ramp areas clear of snow.

Cleveland Hopkins airport reported on its Web site Monday that flights were delayed 15 minutes or less.

Columbus airport spokeswoman Angie Tabor says she's aware of no ''major hiccups.''

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News Headline: Bone-chilling cold plods into Northeast | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND: A storm that plagued the Midwest for days plodded into the Northeast on Tuesday, dropping heavy snow along already-buried lakeside areas and giving much of the region its first real taste of winter.

The storm, with its bone-chilling cold, continued its trek over the Great Lakes and into Canada. More snow was in the cards or already falling Tuesday in parts of Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. The frigid temperatures stretched into the South, where hard freeze warnings were in effect overnight in much of Florida and several other states. Hundreds of schools were closed or opening late.

In northern Ohio, the wintry blast created risky driving conditions and pushed some university exams to Christmas week.

Commuters walking on snow-encrusted sidewalks clutched hats and tugged scarves tightly against the windy onslaught in Cleveland, where as much as 9 more inches could fall before a winter storm warning expires Wednesday morning. Up to 2 feet of snow has already fallen in parts of the traditional snow belt east of Cleveland.

Classes were canceled at Cleveland State University and Tuesday's exams were rescheduled for Christmas week.

Kent State University canceled main-campus classes Tuesday, also delaying some finals.

Dozens of helicopters were being used on Florida's valuable and sensitive veggie crops, an unusual approach by farmers worried that an uncommon freeze could wipe out their harvests.

The choppers hovered low over green bean and sweet corn fields Tuesday morning to push warmer air closer to the plants � and, the farmers hope, save the plants from a deadly frost.

In western New York, dozens of schools were closed as the storm sent the region into a deep freeze.

About 20 inches of snow fell in Perrysburg, near Lake Erie. Rochester got 10 inches, with up to a foot more possible by Thursday. Winds gusted between 25 mph to 35 mph in some areas along New Yorks' Lake Erie.

For the morning commute in Pittsburgh, the temperature was 12 degrees, with winds that made it feel like 4 below zero.

The slow-moving storm that has been crawling across the Midwest since Friday night caused dozens of accidents, stranded more than 100 motorists in Indiana and collapsed the roof of an NFL stadium made its way out of the Midwest.

The storm brought wind and lake effect snow to Indiana, where more than 100 vehicles were stuck Monday on snow-covered highways. At least 16 deaths have been attributed to the storm, which dumped nearly 2 feet of snow in parts of Minnesota and Wisconsin before moving into Michigan and Indiana.

The cold snap stretched into the South on Tuesday, with parts of Alabama and Georgia hovering just above zero degrees.

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News Headline: BRIEF: Two KSU satellites, main campus postpone final exams | Email

News Date: 12/13/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dec. 13--Finally, some good news for Kent State students who didn't study for their final exams.

Tests scheduled for 12:30 p.m. and later Monday at the Geauga campus and Twinsburg satellite were postponed until Dec. 20 at the same times and in the same places.

The main campus in Kent closed at 1, so exams scheduled after that time were rescheduled for Dec. 20 as well.

All other KSU campuses remain open for the time being.

Copyright © 2010 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: Riding out the storm as the big chill begins: Heavy snowfall keeps schools, courts closed | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By MIKE SEVER | STAFF WRITERHeavy snows and bone-chilling cold closed down Portage County schools and government again Tuesday.All 11 public school districts in the county were closed. For many, it was the second of three snow days allowed by the state. For a few, such as Crestwood, it was the third such closing.The Portage County Board of Commissioners closed all county government buildings for the day, including all courts and the Child Support Enforcement Agency.Kent State Universitys main campus was closed and final exams have been postponed until next week. Hiram College also closed for the day.It was the second blast of snow in three days. A storm that had pummeled the Midwest for days finally moved east Tuesday morning, dropping more snow on Northeastern Ohio.By 11 a.m. Tuesday, the National Weather Service in Cleveland showed Kent with 19 inches of snow on the ground, followed by 17 inches in Streetsboro and 15.5 inches in Ravenna. Hiram had 11.5 inches on the ground.The snow accompanied temperatures that dropped into the low teens overnight Monday across Portage County. Temperatures Tuesday night were expected to drop to about 5 degrees above zero with west winds at 10 mph.The weather service had a winter storm warning in effect until 7 a.m. today for lake effect and blowing snow. Skies should begin clearing later this morning with highes in the lower 20s. Clouds will return tonight with lows around 12 degrees.Kent city Service Director Gene Roberts, said crews were cleaning up Tuesday. The city will have five trucks through the night, and were holding back six (to work Tuesday) afternoon. Were working to keep the main streets open from drifting snow primarily in residential areas, Roberts said.The citys parking ban is still in effect until neighborhoods are cleared, which Roberts said he anticipates having done by late this afternoon.For those who needed to drive Tuesday, nearly all roads were snow covered and slippery.Brian Ford, general road superintendent for the Portage County Engineer, said all roads were open Tuesday morning.Our biggest problem right now is drifting, on both east-west and north-south roads, Ford said.Were fighting drifting pretty heavy in the north end of the county. Currently, all roads are passable, but that could change, he said.Ford said road crews are starting to get tired after multiple days on the road.The salt supply is fine, Ford said.Ford reminded motorists to give plow drivers plenty of room to work.When (the plows) hit the drifts, it makes it difficult for the drivers behind them to see, so give them extra space, he said.Hazardous road conditions contributed to a number of accidents Tuesday.n A tractor-trailer was reported on fire at 3:20 p.m. on the westbound exit ramp of Interstate 76 at S.R. 43 in Rootstown.n One person was injured in a one-vehicle crash at 11:41 a.m. on S.R. 5 near Knapp Road in Charlestown. The Ravenna Post of the Ohio Highway Patrol handled the crash, but had no additional information early Tuesday afternoon.n A tractor-trailer and a U-Haul truck were involved in separate crashes about 11 a.m. on I-76 eastbound near the Tallmadge Road exit.Troopers were kept busy with numerous minor crashes on I-76 Monday through Tuesday, several in the eastbound lanes near the Tallmadge Road exit. The patrol had a total of 25 crashes on record from 5 p.m. Monday to 2 p.m. Tuesday, according to a dispatcher.Portage County Sheriff David Doak said deputies were picking up calls the patrol couldnt cover. Most of those were cars stuck in ditches or drifts, he said.One bright spot in Tuesdays snow was there were no reports of power outages because of the weather.Doak said the county Emergency Management Agency has volunteers on standby if people lose power and need to be moved to shelter, or if stranded residents cant get out for medications.As bad as the weather was, people who experienced the blizzard of 1976 said this storm was no comparison.Oh, no. This isnt anywhere near that, Doak said. We had cars buried in snowdrifts that time.

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News Headline: Blast of snow causes whiteouts, nasty roads (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Winter weather slammed
Portage County on Monday,
dumping at least an inch
or more of snow each hour
and causing whiteout conditions.
And more snow could be
on its way.
Thomas Schmidlin, professor
of geography at Kent
State who researches severe
weather, said this week's
storm is very similar to last
week's, and he expects similar
results.
“When the rain turned to
snow Sunday, it was part of
the general storm that hit
the Midwest,” Schmidlin
said. “This is all lake effect
snow. Kent has gotten 10.5
inches of snow so far, and
I expect another several
inches (Monday) night
and another several inches
(today).”
The National Weather
Service issued a Winter
Storm Warning for Portage
County from Monday
morning to 7 a.m. Wednesday,
warning of eight to 12
additional inches of snow
for “most of the warning
area.”
Roads were treacherous,
with numerous vehicles
sliding into ditches
and wrecks causing major
delays on Interstate 76
and the Ohio Turnpike, in
particular.
Portage County Sheriff
David Doak placed the
county under a Level 2
snow emergency. Drivers
were urged not to go out
on the roads except if necessary.
According to state guidelines,
a Level 2 snow emergency
exists when roads
are hazardous with ice and
blowing and drifting snow.
Drivers were urged to use
“extreme caution” and only
travel on the roads if absolutely
necessary or in the
event of a personal emergency.
Residents were urged to
contact their employers to
see if they should report
to work.
Jack Hogue, manager of
central maintenance for
the city of Kent, said the
conditions made it near
impossible to keep the
streets clear.
“It's bad,” Hogue said.
“We're seeing about an inch
an hour. We plow the snow
off the road, come back,
and it's covered again. It's
so cold the salt doesn't
even have time to react.
When we come back, we're
plowing up the salt.”
Hogue said the city
was sending out “everything
with a plow on it,” 15
trucks in total.
Ravenna service director
David Merleno said eight
plows were working on
clearing the city, and that
most of the city's streets
were snow covered but
passable, with some back
streets impassable Monday
morning.
Kent police Lt. Paul Canfield
said there were no
major crashes in Kent, but
multiple reports of cars
sliding off roads. Kent police
also closed Summit
Road's hill, Stow Street
and Horning Road Monday
afternoon due to unsafe
driving conditions.
“There aren't too many
accidents today because
people can't go fast enough
to slam into each other,”
Canfield said.
As of 2 p.m. the Ravenna
post of the Ohio Highway
Patrol reported I-76 as a
“problem area” with multiple
minor accidents involving
cars sliding off the
road.
A multi-vehicle crash
on I-76 in Rootstown was
slowing traffic as of 10:30
a.m. Monday. A semi and
at least four cars were reported
involved.
The Portage County
Administration Building
on South Meridian Street
closed at noon Monday .
The Portage County
Courthouse did not close.
However, Portage County
Common Pleas Court
Judge John Enlow said he
was not issuing any warrants
for defendants who
failed to appear because
of the weather.
“It's the only fair thing to
do,” he said.

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News Headline: Storm puts off some KSU finals (White, Vincent, Frank) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The snow storm that hit
Portage County Monday
wreaked havoc with Kent
State University students'
schedules along with roads
and sidewalks.
KSU remained open Monday
morning for the first day
of finals week, but closed at 1
p.m. All finals scheduled after
noon were postponed until
Monday Dec. 20 at the same
location and time.
KSU grounds manag-
er Heather White said she
might have recommended
cancellation of morning
classes if it was not finals
week.
“If my staff can't keep up,
that's not good for anyone,
but I think a special light
shone on today because it's
finals day,” White said. “Any
other day I think we would
have asked for a delay, but
we didn't want the kids coming
back next week.”
White said the grounds
crew started working at 3
a.m. and parking services
had plows in “almost every
lot,” but in the end it was not
enough to keep KSU open.
KSU Spokeswoman Emily
Vincent said school officials
eventually decided the combination
of poor road conditions
and severe weather
were too dangerous to hold
exams. She said students
who are unable to attend
exams next Monday should
contact their professors for
possible alternate times.
KSU's website issued the
following advice to student
and staff on its advisory page
before university officials decided
to close the campus.
In an e-maill to KSU staff
sent before classes were postponed,
Robert Frank, provost
and senior vice president for
academic affairs, asked faculty
to be lenient with students
who could not attend exams
because of weather.

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News Headline: Kent State University closed at 1 p.m.; final exams postponed one week | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/13/2010
Outlet Full Name: Review - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University will close today at 1 p.m. today, and all final exams scheduled after noon will be postponed until next week, officials announced this morning.

According to KSU's website, all finals postponed today will be rescheduled for Monday, Dec. 20 at the same location and time. All nonessential employees will be allowed to leave campus at 1 p.m.

KSU opened this morning for the first day of final exams, but posted a message on its website stating, “...students and Kent State employees are expected to exercise good judgment during severe weather conditions. If travel conditions may cause you to arrive late or be unable to travel to the Kent Campus, please notify the appropriate person.”

The city of Kent has also issued a parking ban for all city streets that will last indefinitely.

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News Headline: Final exams postponed after snow smacks Kent State University (Neumann) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2010
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT -- For a second day in a row, Kent State's main campus canceled classes after getting clobbered by the second lake-effect snow storm in less than a week.

But this is finals week in Golden Flashes country. Finals scheduled for Monday and today are sliding back a week, but many professors are offering alternatives.

"We had plans in place last week in case this happened," says Tom Neumann of Kent State's communications office.

Students unable to take a final next week have largely been able to work with professors to come up with alternatives.

"It was a huge help that my professor allowed us to take our exam online today," says Kent State senior Lauren Mazza. "I am getting on a plane for vacation tomorrow, and would have been racing back here next Tuesday to take the test. This makes it a lot easier."

Not all professors have offered the online option.

"I am going to see family in Washington D.C. next week and won't be here for the exam make-up day, which is Tuesday," said Junior Lia Arbogast. "I really hope they come up with another alternative," she said.

"This really is the worst possible timing for a snow event and the snow days here on campus," Neumann said. "But we had a plan in place last Friday, and we're sticking to it."

The school will decide Wednesday morning whether or not another snow day will be needed.

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News Headline: Snow slams Portage County | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - Residents in Portage County continued to dig out of the snow on Tuesday.

NewsChannel5's Joe McGee spent much of the day checking out weather conditions in Portage County. He said traffic at the county line slowed to between 25 mph and 35 mph.

The Kent City School District canceled all activities on Tuesday, expect for the school board meeting.

Kent State canceled classes on Tuesday, which postponed more final exams.

Student Erica Rodenbaugh said this is the only time of the year when students aren't happy about snow days because the weather has pushed back exams. Rodenbaugh was busy digging her car of out the snow.

Makeup exams for Dec. 13 will take place on Dec. 20 and exams originally scheduled for Dec. 14 will now be on Dec. 21.

Morning exams were also postponed at Kent State's Geauga and Stark campuses.

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News Headline: Bone-Chilling Cold Plods Into Northeast | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: ABC News - Online
Contact Name: TOM COYNE A
News OCR Text: A storm that plagued the Midwest for days plodded into the Northeast on Tuesday, dropping heavy snow along already-buried lakeside areas and giving much of the region its first real taste of winter.

The storm, with its bone-chilling cold, continued its trek over the Great Lakes and into Canada. More snow was in the cards or already falling Tuesday in parts of Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. The frigid temperatures stretched into the South, where hard freeze warnings were in effect overnight in much of Florida and several other states. Hundreds of schools were closed or opening late.

In northern Ohio, the wintry blast created risky driving conditions and pushed some university exams to Christmas week.

Commuters walking on snow-encrusted sidewalks clutched hats and tugged scarves tightly against the windy onslaught in Cleveland, where as much as 9 more inches could fall before a winter storm warning expires Wednesday morning. Up to 2 feet of snow has already fallen in parts of the traditional snow belt east of Cleveland.

Classes were canceled at Cleveland State University and Tuesday's exams were rescheduled for Christmas week.

Kent State University canceled main-campus classes Tuesday, also delaying some finals.

Dozens of helicopters were being used on Florida's valuable and sensitive veggie crops, an unusual approach by farmers worried that an uncommon freeze could wipe out their harvests.

The choppers hovered low over green bean and sweet corn fields Tuesday morning to push warmer air closer to the plants — and, the farmers hope, save the plants from a deadly frost.

In western New York, dozens of schools were closed as the storm sent the region into a deep freeze.

About 20 inches of snow fell in Perrysburg, near Lake Erie. Rochester got 10 inches, with up to a foot more possible by Thursday. Winds gusted between 25 mph to 35 mph in some areas along New Yorks' Lake Erie.

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News Headline: Bone-chilling cold plods into Northeast | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Boston Globe - Online
Contact Name: Tom Coyne
News OCR Text: BUFFALO, N.Y.—A storm that plagued the Midwest for days plodded into the Northeast on Tuesday, dropping heavy snow along already-buried lakeside areas and giving much of the region its first real taste of winter.

The storm, with its bone-chilling cold, continued its trek over the Great Lakes and into Canada. More snow was in the cards or already falling Tuesday in parts of Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. The frigid temperatures stretched into the South, where hard freeze warnings were in effect overnight in much of Florida and several other states. Hundreds of schools were closed or opening late.

In northern Ohio, the wintry blast created risky driving conditions and pushed some university exams to Christmas week.

Commuters walking on snow-encrusted sidewalks clutched hats and tugged scarves tightly against the windy onslaught in Cleveland, where as much as 9 more inches could fall before a winter storm warning expires Wednesday morning. Up to 2 feet of snow has already fallen in parts of the traditional snow belt east of Cleveland.

Classes were canceled at Cleveland State University and Tuesday's exams were rescheduled for Christmas week.

Kent State University canceled main-campus classes Tuesday, also delaying some finals.

Dozens of helicopters were being used on Florida's valuable and sensitive veggie crops, an unusual approach by farmers worried that an uncommon freeze could wipe out their harvests.

The choppers hover low over fields to push warmer air closer to the plants -- and, the farmers hope, save the plants from a deadly frost.

It was too windy to use helicopters Tuesday morning, but farmer John Hundley said he would try Tuesday night if winds calmed and temperatures did not warm up.

In western New York, dozens of schools were closed as the storm sent the region into a deep freeze.

About 20 inches of snow fell in Perrysburg, near Lake Erie. Rochester got 10 inches, with up to a foot more possible by Thursday. Winds gusted between 25 mph to 35 mph in some areas along New Yorks' Lake Erie.

For the morning commute in Pittsburgh, the temperature was 12 degrees, with winds that made it feel like 4 below zero.

The slow-moving storm that has been crawling across the Midwest since Friday night caused dozens of accidents, stranded more than 100 motorists in Indiana and collapsed the roof of an NFL stadium made its way out of the Midwest.

The storm brought wind and lake effect snow to Indiana, where more than 100 vehicles were stuck Monday on snow-covered highways. At least 16 deaths have been attributed to the storm, which dumped nearly 2 feet of snow in parts of Minnesota and Wisconsin before moving into Michigan and Indiana.

The cold snap stretched into the South on Tuesday, with parts of Alabama and Georgia hovering just above zero degrees.

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News Headline: Snow snarls northeast Ohio, 9 more inches on way | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2010
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND (AP) - Renewed snow and bone-chilling temperatures are making it feel like below zero in parts of northern Ohio.

At the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, cold-loving wolves, tigers and bears get extra calories during a winter blast. As for polar bears, zoo keeper Travis Vineyard says they love to play in a fresh snowfall.

In the snow belt northeast of Cleveland, the Christmas tree farm owned by Sandy Weiss in Madison has 4-foot drifts. She says a few inches helps business but too much snow can deter customers.

The weather service says as much as 9 more inches may fall before a winter storm warning expires Wednesday morning.

Classes were canceled at Cleveland State University and the main campus of Kent State University. Exams have been pushed to Christmas week.

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News Headline: BRIEF: Two KSU satellites, main campus postpone final exams | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/13/2010
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Finally, some good news for Kent State students who didn't study for their final exams. Tests scheduled for 12:30 p.m. and later Monday at the Geauga campus and Twinsburg satellite were postponed until Dec. 20 at the same times and in the same places. The main campus in Kent closed at 1, so exams scheduled after that time were rescheduled for Dec. 20 as well. All other KSU campuses remain open for the time being. To see more of the Akron Beacon Journal, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.ohio.com. Copyright (c) 2010, The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. For more information about the content services offered by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services (MCT), visit www.mctinfoservices.com. switch (VarBucketNo)}

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News Headline: Wintry replay in Ohio: feels like subzero | Email

News Date: 12/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: Associated Press (AP) - Columbus Bureau
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND_Renewed snow and bone-chilling temperatures are making it feel like below zero in parts of northern Ohio.

At the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, cold-loving wolves, tigers and bears get extra calories during a winter blast. As for polar bears, zoo keeper Travis Vineyard says they love to play in a fresh snowfall.

In the snow belt northeast of Cleveland, the Christmas tree farm owned by Sandy Weiss in Madison has 4-foot drifts. She says a few inches helps business but too much snow can deter customers.

The weather service says as much as 9 more inches may fall before a winter storm warning expires Wednesday morning.

Classes were canceled at Cleveland State University and the main campus of Kent State University. Exams have been pushed to Christmas week.

Copyright © 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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News Headline: COLLEGE RANKING FOR BINGE DRINKING AND DRUG ABUSE | Email

News Date: 12/14/2010
Outlet Full Name: 10 TV News HD at 5 PM - WBNS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: THE LATEST FIGURES SHOW COLLEGE CAMPUS DRUG USE HAS BEEN ON THE RISE FOR DECADES. A STUDY THREE YEARS AGO FOUND NEARLY HALF OF FULL-TIME COLLEGE STUDENTS BINGE DRINK OR ABUSE DRUGS AT LEAST ONCE A MONTH. THE PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS USING ILLEGAL DRUGS IS SAID TO HAVE DOUBLED FROM 1993-TO-2005. ON THE HEELS OF THAT, A NATIONAL SURVEY BY THE DAILY BEAST IS RANKING CAMPUSES IN TERMS OF DRUG USE. AND IT RANKED OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY 11-TH IN THE COUNTRY. ALSO IN OHIO, KENT STATE RANKED 16TH AND MIAMI UNIVERSITY RANKED 20TH. DENISON UNIVERSITY CAME IN AT 38TH, AND OHIO UNIVERSITY WAS GAGED AT 49TH. THE WORST CAMPUS, ACCORDING TO THE SURVEY, WAS THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. OHIO WESLEYAN GAVE US A WRITTEN STATEMENT IN RESPONSE TO THE SURVEY, SAYING IT TAKES AN AGGRESSIVE STANCE ON DRUG USE, REFERRING ALMOST ALL CASES TO DELAWARE CITY POLICE. THIS PROTOCOL HAS RESULTED IN OUR HAVING HIGHER ARREST NUMBERS THAN SOME OF OUR PEER SCHOOLS, THE SCHOOL SAYS IT'S RECOGNITION SHOWS IT IS DOING SOMETHING RIGHT IN ITS EFFORTS TO UNCOVER AND ADDRESS DRUG USE. THREE OHIO COLLEGES RANK IN THE TOP 20, AND FIVE IN THE TOP 50. ANY THOUGHTS ABOUT THAT? SHARE THEM ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER AND WE'LL BRING SOME OF YOUR RESPONSES COMING UP.

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News Headline: NOW, IN THE MEANTIME HEAVY SNOW IS GIVING KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FITS T. | Email

News Date: 12/15/2010
Outlet Full Name: Weather Channel, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NOW, IN THE MEANTIME HEAVY SNOW IS GIVING KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FITS T. COLLEGE HAS CANCELED CLASSES THIS WEEK DUE TO LAKE-EFFECT SNOW. THEY'VE HAD TO MOVE FINAL EXAMS BACK A WEEK DUE TO THE SNOW CANCELLATIONS. HERE IS A STORY YOU HAVE TO TAKE A LISTEN, MEET THE BLIZZARD BABY, BRADLEY LEWIS PORTER WAS BORN IN THE PASSENGER SEAT OF HIS PARENT'S CAR LAST WEEKEND. THE PARENTS TRIED TO MAKE TO IT THE BLIZZARD. DAD DELIVERED SON BRADLEY AFTER PULLING OVER TO THE SIDE OF THE SNOWY ROAD. FIND OUT HOW BOTH PARTS FEEL ABOUT IT RIGHT HERE ON THE WEATHER CHANNEL HERE ON "YOUR WEATHER TODAY" "YOUR WEATHER TODAY.

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News Headline: KSU considers rehabilitation for cheaters (Kairis, Williams) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/13/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Proposal would place offenders in an anti-plagiarism program

KENT: When Kent State students copy someone else's work in the future, they might have to go to school ? plagiarism school, that is.

A proposed policy would keep centralized records on cheaters, streamline the penalty process and send first-time offenders to a special school for re-education.

''Plagiarizing is a lot easier than it used to be'' because of the Internet, said Rob Kairis, director of the library at Kent State's Stark campus. ''A lot of students believe that what is on the Internet is free. Eighty to 90 percent of the students I teach download music and don't pay.''

Kairis is a member of KSU's Commission on Academic Integrity, a faculty committee that has spent the last year looking anew at the university's policy on cheating and plagiarism.

The committee will present its draft proposal, which includes the new plagiarism school, to the Faculty Senate today.

KSU trustees must approve the proposal, so its ideas are a long way from becoming a staple of campus discipline.

Approval could affect a large number of the 40,000 students in the eight-campus KSU
system. While no one knows how many students commit plagiarism, the short answer might be ''a lot.''

According to the Center for Academic Integrity at Clemson University in Clemson, S.C., 37 percent of students surveyed nationwide plagiarize from the Internet and 70 percent of instructors have detected it, director Teddi Fishman said by e-mail.

Kent State students say that 75 to 80 percent of their colleagues plagiarize, said Linda Williams, an associate professor of philosophy at the Kent campus who chairs the faculty committee developing the new policy. But only 25 percent of them will admit to doing so themselves.

Some students legitimately forget to cite a source. Some don't think they have to cite a source plucked from the Internet. In other words, they don't understand the rules.

Bolder students copy from their class textbook or lift uncredited material from an Internet source that prints in a different style and color in their work — an obvious giveaway. Some buy term papers on the Internet; sophisticated software products can detect those.

Many students end up sobbing in a faculty member's office, begging for mercy — and the instructor takes the charitable route and ends the issue there without telling anyone.

''You don't know how many problems have been settled in a faculty member's office. He doesn't tell his chair, he doesn't tell his dean,'' Williams said. ''Getting any kind of reliable numbers is really horrible.''

Tutoring session

At the same time, sending offenders to a plagiarism school seems to be rare.

KSU's Stark campus may be one of the few places that offers remedial instruction to cheaters.

Since spring 2006, the campus has provided a one-on-one tutoring session to help students understand what they did wrong and what they should do the next time, said Kairis, who runs the program.

Nineteen first-time, low-level offenders have opted to go to the one-hour school in something of a plea bargain. For instance, if they sit down with Kairis, the instructor might accept a corrected version of the student's work or agree to let the student repeat the assignment or allow the student to pass the course.

At Pima Community College in Phoenix, about 30 students have been through a similar program run by the journalism and English program at the west campus since 2006.

''Sometimes rehabilitation instead of punishment will prevent plagiarism in the future,'' said department chair Meg Files. ''We go out of our way to help students understand the writing process.''

Offenders, while ashamed of what they've done, offer silly excuses for the slip-up — everything from too much baseball practice to broken computers.

One student said he deliberately plagiarized his paper because he didn't think the instructor was reading his work, Files said. The student explained it this way: ''I took it upon myself to verify and assess my theory, and with lack of reasoning coupled with unimaginative and a sterile ideology lacking in originality, I decided to test my anthropology teacher and found out that in fact my papers were being read and monitored. Oops . . . ''

Still, none has been caught plagiarizing again.

Freshmen sign pledge

At Kent State, the university already has implemented one portion of the fledgling plagiarism policy. Freshmen were asked this fall to sign an optional pledge not to cheat. Most who were asked did sign.

That pledge is going into their files, said KSU Stark's Kairis. ''If they do cheat, it looks doubly bad,'' he said.

Other provisions in the proposed policy would be to simplify the student appeal process while allowing faculty and administrators to appeal as well; to provide automatic reviews for repeat offenders by the newly established Academic Hearing Board; and to require faculty to fill out a plagiarism sanction form each time they rap a student's knuckles for misbehavior.

The last provision would enable the university to get a handle on how many students actually plagiarize, said Williams, the head of the committee.

It would enable the university to track repeat offenders, which isn't possible in the current hit-or-miss disciplinary process when a student's infractions in the English department aren't shared with the history staff.

When the student graduates, the file would be destroyed, she said.

But the biggest and possibly most controversial issue is the plagiarism school, she said.

The proposed policy will be presented twice to the Faculty Senate to ensure adequate time for debate and possible revisions.

''We have no idea how that will go over,'' Williams said.

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