Report Overview:
Total Clips (26)
Athletics (5)
College of Business Administration (COBA) (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (2)
Commencement (2)
Entrepreneurship (1)
Health Sciences (1)
KSU at Ashtabula (1)
KSU at Stark (4)
KSU Museum (2)
May 4 (1)
Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Physics (1)
Safety (1)
Technology (2)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (5)
Kent State set to introduce new football coach 12/20/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Ohio State WR coach Darrell Hazell carries himself a bit like Jim Tressel, ready for Kent State job 12/20/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Sources say OSU's Hazell will coach Kent State 12/20/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KSU ready to name its head football coach: Sources say Darrell Hazell, assistant coach at Ohio State, to be tapped this afternoon 12/20/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Sources: Darrell Hazell hired at Kent St. 12/20/2010 ESPN.com Text Attachment Email


College of Business Administration (COBA) (1)
Thomas Lane named Business Person of the Year by the Twinsburg Chamber of Commerce 12/18/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...Deluxe kit was selected as a finalist by the Toy Industry Association for the 2011 Toy of the Year (T.O.T.Y.) Awards in the specialty-toy category. Kent State University's College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Management was recognized as one of the top 300 outstanding...


College of Nursing (CON) (2)
Honored: Nursing academy inducts 2 professors 12/20/2010 Cleveland Plain Dealer Text Email

Kent State to offer doctorate of nursing practice degree 12/17/2010 MedCity News - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University‘s School of Nursing will begin offering doctorate of nursing practice degrees, which are intended to prepare advanced...


Commencement (2)
More than 1,900 earn degrees from KSU 12/20/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

KSU commencement ceremonies coming 12/17/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Fall 2010 Commencement Ceremonies at Kent State University are scheduled 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday. A ceremony was held Thursday for those receiving doctoral degrees in the...


Entrepreneurship (1)
Launch of entrepreneurial program brings advice, coaching to residents with dreams of owning a business 12/20/2010 Daily Record, The Text Attachment Email


Health Sciences (1)
Oprah lavishes gifts and trip on KSU educator (Kerr) 12/20/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


KSU at Ashtabula (1)
Kent State University-Ashtabula graduates more than 100 Friday (Stocker, Kelly) 12/18/2010 Star-Beacon Text Email

Dec. 18--ASHTABULA -- More than 100 anxious graduation candidates couldn't stand still Friday night as Kent State University-Ashtabula administrators tried to get them into an orderly line. "It's nerve-racking," said Tess Kelly, senior secretary,...


KSU at Stark (4)
Business workshop planned at Kent Stark 12/20/2010 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

with Totally Local Yellow Pages Search provided by local.com JACKSON TWP. — The Ohio Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Stark will sponsor an information session for people interested in starting a small business or those in the early...

Kent Stark offices to close for holiday break 12/17/2010 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

with Totally Local Yellow Pages Search provided by local.com Kent State University at Stark will be closed Dec. 24 through Jan. 2 due to the holidays. During this time, administrative offices, the...

Stark residents see their buying power decline (Engelhardt) 12/18/2010 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...cost of living goes up, and we've got to do something to be at peace with that.” WHY THE DECLINE? Lockwood Reynolds, an economics professor at Kent State University, said real incomes flattened nationwide in the 1980s before being hit hard by the recessions of 2001 and 2008. He...

KSU-Stark to close Dec. 24-Jan. 2 12/17/2010 Independent, The Text Attachment Email

JACKSON TWP, OH — Kent State University at Stark will be closed Dec. 24-Jan. 2, 2011. During this time, administrative offices, the Library, Campus Bookstore...


KSU Museum (2)
Kent State museum exhibits Hepburn's stage, screen costumes (WITH VIDEOS) (Druesedow) 12/19/2010 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

...publicity shots, area also on display. The actress made wearing slacks not only acceptable, but fashionable for women. RPC Photos / April K. Helms The Kent State University Museum acquired legendary actress Katharine Hepburn's costumes in 2008. Many are currently on exhibit at the museum. The...

Kent State museum exhibits Hepburn's stage, screen costumes (WITH VIDEOS) (Druesedow) 12/19/2010 Hudson Hub-Times Text Attachment Email

RPC Photos / April K. Helms The Kent State University Museum acquired legendary actress Katharine Hepburn's costumes in 2008. Many are currently on exhibit at the museum. The...


May 4 (1)
Kent State shootings: Does former informant hold the key to the May 4 mystery? 12/20/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
$500K to Kent Employee Ownership Center 12/20/2010 Business Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Physics (1)
Lunar Eclipse Predicted For Tuesday Night (Graham) 12/20/2010 Wheeling News-Register - Online Text Attachment Email

...residents will be able to see a total lunar eclipse as they officially welcome the winter season. Francis Graham, professor of astronomy and physics at Kent State University, said the show will begin at 12:27 a.m. Tuesday and will continue throughout the entire night until 6:06 a.m. Wednesday....


Safety (1)
KSU students set to make up exams postponed because of the weather 12/19/2010 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Many Kent State University students who planned on being home for the holidays by now are still studying for final exams. KSU postponed all exams...


Technology (2)
Aviation career program opens runway to many opportunities (McFarland) 12/19/2010 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

...School have varying interests and career options at their fingertips through the two-year College Tech Prep Academy. As a result of collaboration with Kent State University's College of Technology Aeronautics Division, some students will begin a pursuit of aviation occupations including private...

Aviation career program open to area students (McFarland) 12/19/2010 Hudson Hub-Times Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's College of Technology Aeronautics Division and the Six District Educational Compact have teamed to offer a two-year...


Town-Gown (1)
OUR VIEW Portage tries to compete in economic development 12/20/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Kent State set to introduce new football coach | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Kent State has called a news conference for Monday to introduce its new football coach.

The school has been searching for its 20th coach since Doug Martin resigned with a few weeks left in the season.

Athletic director Joel Nielsen interviewed a dozen candidates, including four on KSU's campus: Alabama wide receivers coach Curt Cignetti, Texas wide receivers coach Bobby Kennedy, Ohio State assistant head coach/wide receivers coach Darrell Hazell and Kent State defensive coordinator Pete Rekstis.

Kent State went 5-7 in Martin's final season and 29-53 in his seven seasons overall.

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News Headline: Ohio State WR coach Darrell Hazell carries himself a bit like Jim Tressel, ready for Kent State job | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Darrell Hazell spent some time coaching at Army, and it shows. The Ohio State receivers coach has great posture. The bill of his Ohio State cap is always curled just so, and if someone had issued impromptu marching orders inside the Woody Hayes Athletic Center, Hazell always gave the impression that he'd be the first guy in step.

Of the nine assistants on the Ohio State staff, Hazell is the one who most carries himself like Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel, and it may not be close.

Hazell was also a pretty good receivers coach, and that also showed. He spent seven seasons at Ohio State, starting in 2004, and in the six NFL drafts from 2005 through 2010, six Ohio State receivers were drafted, with Santonio Holmes, Ted Ginn Jr. and Anthony Gonzalez all going in the first round. At practice he was crisp and efficient and upbeat, and off the field he was both liked and respected by his players, those in his meeting room and outside of it.

And now he's a head coach, with the Plain Dealer and other outlets reporting that Hazell will be announced as the new boss of the Kent State football program today, and it's a step that should come as no surprise. He's the first Ohio State assistant to leave to become a head coach since Mark Snyder went to Marshall after the 2004 season.

In 2008 when I tried to write a story about the head coaching candidates on Ohio State's staff, with linebackers coach Luke Fickell and Hazell the most obvious choices among the Buckeyes' assistants, Hazell wouldn't talk about the subject. Just a bright smile under that cap and a polite rejection of the topic. And that wasn't a surprise either.

Hazell didn't talk about himself, but he was quick to praise his players and their potential, maybe too quick at times. He wasn't afraid to drop a big name from the past when assessing one of his young receivers and explaining why this guy was "special," but his enthusiasm was always sincere and his track record was there, so you nodded your head and wondered how good this next guy would be. And many times, they got there. Who's the most improved player on the Buckeyes this season? Senior receiver Dane Sanzenbacher, named the Buckeyes' MVP by his teammates, certainly would be in the mix. And players like Anthony Gonzalez and Brian Robiskie thrived under Hazell as well, doing more in Columbus than maybe outsiders expected.

Not every receiver reached his potential, but nearly all of them left Ohio State saying how much Hazell had helped them.

Hazell also carried the title of assistant head coach at Ohio State, with a salary of $257,000 that also included a one-month bonus of about $21,000 for each Big Ten title and another one-month bonus for every bowl game. That meant Hazell made about $300,000 this season, plus other perks including use of a car. That salary was less than coordinators Jim Bollman and Jim Heacock and in like with Fickell, but higher than others on the staff.

He was part of the offensive gameplanning, though Tressel always was in charge with the most gameday input from Bollman. Last year against Toledo, Hazell seemed to be more active in the direct playcalling on gameday and some made a big deal out of that, but Hazell made it clear that Tressel was at the controls and the show wasn't his.

Now Hazell gets his own show, and he's ready. Ohio State will miss him. After the 2008 season, Nick Siciliano took over as quarterbacks coach after Joe Daniels was moved into an administrative role because of health issues. But Siciliano was promoted from within the staff and the change was fairly seamless.

This change for Ohio State is the first actual departure since Tim Boeckman left as cornerbacks coach after the 2006 season for Oklahoma State and Taver Johnson was hired. Boeckman is now the head coach at Toledo. Before Hazell left, six of the nine Ohio State assistants had been in place for at least six seasons.

As the Buckeyes look to replace Hazell, consider hires that Tressel has made like safeties coach Paul Haynes, Taver Johnson and Hazell himself. Though not directly connected to Tressel or to Ohio State - unlike Bollman, Siciliano, running backs coach Dick Tressel, Fickell or tight ends coach John Peterson - all three played college football in Ohio and had state roots.

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News Headline: Sources say OSU's Hazell will coach Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Michael Beaven
Special to the Beacon Journal

Several Internet sports sites, including ESPN.com, indicate that Darrell Hazell will be introduced as Kent State University's 20th football coach today at a 3 p.m. news conference.

Hazell is the assistant head coach/wide receivers coach at Ohio State University.

''I can't comment on personnel, but we are having a 3 o'clock press conference and it is involving one of our three finalists,'' said Alan Ashby, KSU's assistant athletic director for communication and football media contact.

Ashby would not confirm who the selection is, but did say by telephone Sunday the three finalists for the position are Alabama wide receivers coach Curt Cignetti, Hazell and Texas wide receivers coach Bobby Kennedy.

The announcement will be held at KSU's Student Center in Room 204, according to Ashby. KSU Athletic Director Joel Nielsen and KSU President Lester A. Lefton will attend.

KSU has been searching for a coach since the resignation of Doug Martin.

Hazell has been a college football coach since 1986, with experience at Oberlin, Eastern Illinois, Pennsylvania, Western Michigan, the Army, West Virginia, Rutgers and OSU. He has worked as a position coach for running backs, wide receivers and tight ends, and was Oberlin's offensive coordinator in 1989-91.

OSU coach Jim Tressel hired Hazell in February 2004. Hazell has held his current position for the Buckeyes since 2005.

Hazell, a native of Cinnaminson, N.J., and a 1986 graduate of Muskingum University, was a standout high school and collegiate football player. He was inducted into the Muskingum Hall of Fame in 1993.

Hazell and his wife, Annemarie, have a son, Kyle.

Nielsen interviewed 12 candidates, including four on KSU's campus: Cignetti, Hazell, Kennedy and KSU defensive coordinator Pete Rekstis.

KSU went 5-7 in Martin's final season and 29-53 in his seven seasons overall.

— The Associated Press contributed to this story

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News Headline: KSU ready to name its head football coach: Sources say Darrell Hazell, assistant coach at Ohio State, to be tapped this afternoon | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By David Carducci | staff writer
Kent State University is ready to end a month-long search and introduce its next head football coach at a 3 p.m. press conference today at the Kent Student Center.
While KSU officials would not confirm who has be hired, all signs point to Ohio State assistant head coach and wide receivers coach Darrell Hazell becoming the 20th head coach in the 90-year history of the Golden Flashes football program.
According to multiple sources, Hazell is believed to have been offered and accepted the Kent State job. As of late Sunday night, it was not known if he had signed a contract.
Of the three finalists to interview for the position last week, Hazell has the strongest ties to the state of Ohio – a key asset identified by KSU athletic director Joel Nielsen when he first started his search for a new head coach on Nov. 22.
A native of Cinnaminson, N.J., Hazell first came to Ohio in 1982 to play college football at Muskingum. Following his graduation in 1986, he found his first coaching job in Ohio, working with the running backs at Oberlin College in 1986.
After stops at Eastern Illinois, the University of Pennsylvania, Western Michigan, the United States Military Academy, West Virginia and Rutgers, Hazell returned to Ohio in 2004 when he was hired as the wide receivers coach on Jim Tressel's staff at Ohio State. In 2005, assistant head coach was added to his title.
While Hazell has never served as a head coach during his 24-year career, he has been mentored by one of college football's most successful head coaches in Tressel. A knowledge of the Mid-American Conference in two seasons as a wide receivers coach at Western Michigan (1995-96) also fills a desire Nielsen had for KSU's next head coach.
Nielsen and executive associate athletic director Tom Kleinlein served as a two-man search committee during the last month. Not surprisingly, Hazell has a tie to one of the two. He was assistant head coach at Rutgers in 2003 when Kleinlein was the Scarlet Knights' director of football operations.
Hazell interviewed in Kent on Dec. 16. The other finalists to interview on the KSU campus last week were Texas wide receiver's coach Bobby Kennedy and Alabama wide receivers coach Curt Cignetti.
Kent State defensive coordinator Pete Rekstis also interviewed for the position early in the search.
Doug Martin resigned as the Flashes head coach on Nov. 21. He was 28-53 in seven seasons at the Flashes' helm, including a 5-7 mark in 2010.

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News Headline: Sources: Darrell Hazell hired at Kent St. | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: ESPN.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Joe Schad
ESPN.com

Kent State will name Ohio State assistant Darrell Hazell as its new football coach at a news conference on Monday, school sources said Sunday night.

Hazell has been assistant head coach to Jim Tressel since 2005 and has also coached wide receivers.

The school has been searching for its 20th coach since Doug Martin resigned with a few weeks left in the season.

Athletic director Joel Nielsen interviewed a dozen candidates, including four on KSU's campus: Hazell, Alabama wide receivers coach Curt Cignetti, Texas wide receivers coach Bobby Kennedy, and Kent State defensive coordinator Pete Rekstis.

Hazell has 23 years in coaching, including at schools like Rutgers, West Virginia, the U.S. Military Academy and Western Michigan. He's a native of New Jersey and a former standout player at Muskingum College.

Kent State went 5-7 in Martin's final season and 29-53 in his seven seasons overall.

Information from the Associated Press was used in this report.

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News Headline: Thomas Lane named Business Person of the Year by the Twinsburg Chamber of Commerce | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/18/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Thomas Lane, owner of Red's Place Restaurant in Twinsburg, was named Business Person of the Year by the Twinsburg Chamber of Commerce.

Valley View-based Creativity for Kids' Shrinky Dinks Deluxe kit was selected as a finalist by the Toy Industry Association for the 2011 Toy of the Year (T.O.T.Y.) Awards in the specialty-toy category.

Kent State University's College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Management was recognized as one of the top 300 outstanding educational institutions for business students by the Princeton Review, a publication of college rankings based on how students rank their schools.

OPENING

LifeShare Community Blood Services has opened a computer training laboratory at the regional charity's administrative office building, 105 Cleveland St., Elyria, funded by a $10,000 grant from Cargill Deicing Technology, a producer and distributor of winter snow fighting products and services based in North Olmsted.

RELOCATION

Integrated Financial Concepts moved to its new office at 10235 Brecksville Road, Suite 101, Brecksville. The consulting firm specializes in customized strategies, including financial services, executive benefits, employee benefits and corporate retirement plans.

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News Headline: Honored: Nursing academy inducts 2 professors | Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Plain Dealer clip not posted online from Dec. 18

The American Academy of Nursing has inducted Professor Carol Sedlak of Kent State University and Associate Professor Cheryl Killion of Case Western Reserve University. Killion's research includes health disparities for blacks and for the homeless. Sedlak, who directs Kent State's nurse educator program, has researched osteoporosis prevention among health-care workers who move patients.

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News Headline: Kent State to offer doctorate of nursing practice degree | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/17/2010
Outlet Full Name: MedCity News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University‘s School of Nursing will begin offering doctorate of nursing practice degrees, which are intended to prepare advanced practice nurses as leaders in translating research evidence into clinical practice.

The program will begin in spring 2011, according to a statement from Kent State.

The move was spurred by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), which is requiring that all entry-level advanced practice educational programs be transitioned from the master of science in nursing degree to the doctorate of nursing practice degree by the 2015.

That transition is a “response to changes in healthcare delivery and emerging healthcare needs,” according to the AACN.

Kent State has 12 advanced practice masters concentrations that will transition to the doctorate of nursing practice program, according to the statement.

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News Headline: More than 1,900 earn degrees from KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fall commencement ceremonies were held Saturday in the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center
for those receiving master's and baccalaureate degrees. A ceremony was held Thursday for those receiving
doctoral degrees, during which 52 degrees were granted. More than 1,900 students graduated
universitywide from KSU this fall, about 1,000 of whom participated in Saturday's ceremonies.

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News Headline: KSU commencement ceremonies coming | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/17/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fall 2010 Commencement Ceremonies at Kent State University are scheduled 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday.

A ceremony was held Thursday for those receiving doctoral degrees in the E. Turner Stump Theatre in the Music and Speech Center, which is located on Theatre Drive.

The Saturday ceremonies for those receiving master's and baccalaureate degrees will both occur in the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center.

More than 1,900 students will graduate universitywide from KSU this fall. At the Thursday ceremony, 52 doctoral degrees were granted.

About 1,000 total students will walk at Saturday's ceremonies. The commencement ceremonies may be viewed live at www.kent.edu.

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News Headline: Launch of entrepreneurial program brings advice, coaching to residents with dreams of owning a business | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: Daily Record, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By PAUL LOCHER

Staff Writer

ORRVILLE -- Helping make entrepreneurial dreams come true is the mantra of a new division of Main Street Orrville.

Darrin Wasniewski, executive director of Main Street, said the EntreprenOrrville Center for Business Innovation is where would-be local entrepreneurs can get help turning dreams into reality.

Wasniewski said the center grew out of discussions by the Main Street board related to filling the growing number of vacant downtown storefronts.

He said the board came to the conclusion it had explored most of the traditional economic development methods, and needed to do some outside-the-box thinking.

"We decided that we had to start looking within ... and growing our own entrepreneurs" for the future, in what Wasniewski says amounts to a type of "economic gardening."

This, he said, led to discussions with the Akron-based Service Corps of Retired Executives, which in turn led him to Julie Messing with the Center for Entrepreneurship at Kent State University.

Wasniewski said his interest was piqued by what was going on at KSU.

"Entrepreneurship is a passion of mine, and I love to be a pioneer in things," said Wasniewski, saying after learning about Kent State's entrepreneur-in-residence program, he jumped on that bandwagon.

The entrepreneur-in-residence program involves bringing on board a person trained in entrepreneurship, who can work with people who have an idea for a business venture, and guide them over the hurdles.

"Although this came with a price tag, I felt it was something we could work with," said Wasniewski, who had moved into the arena of promoting local entrepreneurship two years earlier with an Apprentice Challenge program in which two teams -- originally both from within Orrville schools, but later a Wooster High School versus Orrville High School challenge -- took each other on for cash earnings. The challenge grew out of a quarterly "Dream Out Loud" entrepreneurial lecture series for Orrville people Main Street created.

"At that time," said Wasniewski, "an entrepreneur-in-residence program was on the back burner, but not off the radar screen."

In 2009, Wasniewski met with United States Department of Agriculture representatives in Columbus, and as a result applied for a $50,000 rural business enterprise grant he said he never expected to receive.

However, the grant was approved in June, and with the commitment of Kent State to put in a dollar match and Main Street Orrville kicking in various in-kind services in terms of office space and other support, the program was off and running.

Wasniewski said creating the program in eight weeks by the time KSU went into fall session was something of a scramble, especially since an entrepreneur-in-residence had to be hired, and a job description had never ever been written.

Ultimately, Wasniewski said, 40 people applied for the position, resulting in 28 phone interviews by Main Street board members. In August, Main Street conducted four in-person interviews, and ultimately selected Rodd Welker to be the entrepreneur in residence.

Wasniewski said Welker has close ties to KSU, where he helps supervise an entrepreneur-in-residence program in which he works alongside students who launch enterprises or re-launch existing businesses.

"We mentor and monitor the students, who actually do the work," said Welker, who graduated from Smithville High School.

Welker, who works at KSU one day a week and has a Wooster-based business called Eagle Advisor Group, termed his KSU duties "an A-plus experience" that puts students "leap years beyond people trying to start up a business without any experience."

Welker, who has a wife and three children, says he tries to be in the Orrville Main Street office at 133 N. Main St. at least two days a week to meet with entrepreneurs.

He said his responsibilities are "to be a conduit; be a resource in the areas of retention, expansion and marketing and look for experts" would-be entrepreneurs can turn to.

Welker, who has been a lecturer in Main Street's Dream Out Loud series, said, "I couldn't believe it" when the entrepreneur-in-resident position was posted. He said it's the job I've dreamed of."

Wasniewski said although the EIR program is still in its infancy "it has already created a buzz. People are excited about it, and there are already ideas and concepts percolating."

Asked how he would define success for the program, Wasniewski said it would be watching new businesses grow from ideas to "become part of Orrville's fabric."

Wasniewski said due to the high failure rate of businesses coupled with the fact there are always people retiring from businesses, "we always need to keep a flow of entrepreneurs in that churn."

Because of the program's partnership with KSU, Wasniewski said, "we have a connection to five other EIRs which give us expanded research opportunities, and on whose experiences we can also capitalize."

In addition, Wasniewski said the local EIR program will operate in close conjunction with the University of Akron Wayne College.

Welker said as the EIR program moves along it will doubtlessly change and evolve. He said he sees himself in the role of a coach, not as an actual researcher, although he will be able to direct would-be entrepreneurs on where to do needed research.

"We're here to be a safe place to share dreams," said Welker. "We want to see those dreams become reality."

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News Headline: Oprah lavishes gifts and trip on KSU educator (Kerr) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Health professor likely selected for 'Favorite Things' show because of her work to help those with AIDS, breast cancer

By Carol Biliczky
Beacon Journal staff writer

Published on Saturday, Dec 18, 2010

KENT: A Kent State educator was showered with thousands of dollars of gifts at an Oprah Winfrey ''Favorite Things'' taping in November.

But the real thrill was getting to shake the hand of the talk-show host and of her friend, Gayle King.

Dianne Kerr, an associate professor of health education and promotion at Kent State, managed to do both because of good luck: She was sitting in an aisle seat near an exit that Oprah and Gayle used.

The $2,500 diamond watch, a free trip for two to the Caribbean, and even lasagna pans didn't hurt either.

''When you're not expecting anything and you get a surprise like that, it's a total rush. We were hugging people we didn't even know,'' Kerr said. ''It was contagious.''

Kerr, 55, nominated herself online last summer as an ''ultimate fan'' because she uses clips of Oprah's health-oriented programs in her classroom.

But she believes she won a seat on the Nov. 16 taping of the show with her partner, Diana Miller, because of her work. She is an AIDS educator who financially sponsors two children with AIDS in Zambia and Tanzania and runs
a breast cancer support group.

Friends warned Kerr that November is around the time that Oprah springs her ''Favorite Things'' show on an unsuspecting audience. The bonanza of giveaways, complete with fake snow falling from the ceiling, leaves recipients crying and screaming in delight.

Kerr discounted that, not knowing what the focus of the show was until the big reveal, the first of two ''Favorite Things'' shows that Oprah taped at her studio in Chicago to mark her 25 years on the air.

Oprah covered the taxes on the gifts, but Kerr and Miller still had to pay for the flight, hotel and for a suitcase from Macy's to get their gifts home.

Kerr's next flight may be on the all-expenses-paid trip to the Caribbean — after she gets a passport.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

KENT: A Kent State educator was showered with thousands of dollars of gifts at an Oprah Winfrey ''Favorite Things'' taping in November.

But the real thrill was getting to shake the hand of the talk-show host and of her friend, Gayle King.

Dianne Kerr, an associate professor of health education and promotion at Kent State, managed to do both because of good luck: She was sitting in an aisle seat near an exit that Oprah and Gayle used.

The $2,500 diamond watch, a free trip for two to the Caribbean, and even lasagna pans didn't hurt either.

''When you're not expecting anything and you get a surprise like that, it's a total rush. We were hugging people we didn't even know,'' Kerr said. ''It was contagious.''

Kerr, 55, nominated herself online last summer as an ''ultimate fan'' because she uses clips of Oprah's health-oriented programs in her classroom.

But she believes she won a seat on the Nov. 16 taping of the show with her partner, Diana Miller, because of her work. She is an AIDS educator who financially sponsors two children with AIDS in Zambia and Tanzania and runs
a breast cancer support group.

Friends warned Kerr that November is around the time that Oprah springs her ''Favorite Things'' show on an unsuspecting audience. The bonanza of giveaways, complete with fake snow falling from the ceiling, leaves recipients crying and screaming in delight.

Kerr discounted that, not knowing what the focus of the show was until the big reveal, the first of two ''Favorite Things'' shows that Oprah taped at her studio in Chicago to mark her 25 years on the air.

Oprah covered the taxes on the gifts, but Kerr and Miller still had to pay for the flight, hotel and for a suitcase from Macy's to get their gifts home.

Kerr's next flight may be on the all-expenses-paid trip to the Caribbean — after she gets a passport.

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News Headline: Kent State University-Ashtabula graduates more than 100 Friday (Stocker, Kelly) | Email

News Date: 12/18/2010
Outlet Full Name: Star-Beacon
Contact Name: Terry, Shelley
News OCR Text: Dec. 18--ASHTABULA -- More than 100 anxious graduation candidates couldn't stand still Friday night as Kent State University-Ashtabula administrators tried to get them into an orderly line.

"It's nerve-racking," said Tess Kelly, senior secretary, as she worked hard to make sure the line was in proper order.

"I'm really not mean," she laughed as she walked up and down as graduates sneaked off for pictures.

"This morning (Friday) we had them all in line. We go through the whole thing," she said.

In a matter of minutes, the line was in order, and more than 100 candidates for graduation made their way to their seats and were one step closer to receiving their diploma.

As graduates prepared for the ceremony, Chase Carvalho had several leis placed around his neck. Carvalho won the right to speak for his class after passing a videotaped audition. The leis had a special meaning for the graduation speaker, who received an associate's degree in applied business, focusing on computer technology.

"I was born in Honolulu, and I live in Dorset," said the 2008 graduate of Jefferson High School. Carvalho said he was excited about the speech and said he would reflect on the transition from Hawaii to Ashtabula County.

"Every year is different," said KSUA Dean Susan J. Stocker. "It's always exciting. It reminds us every time why we get up every morning to do what we do," she said.

Graduation speaker Fred M. DeGrandis, chairman of the Cleveland Clinic Community Physician Partnership and Quality Alliance, said he got his start in the field of education and enjoys thanking school officials for their role in the students' success.

"It's a connection to my roots. It's an honor," DeGrandis said. He said it is important for graduates not only to enjoy the

Copyright © 2010 Star Beacon, Ashtabula, Ohio

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News Headline: Business workshop planned at Kent Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: GateHouse Media, Inc
News OCR Text: with Totally Local Yellow Pages

Search provided by local.com

JACKSON TWP. —

The Ohio Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Stark will sponsor an information session for people interested in starting a small business or those in the early stages of business formation.

The session is from 5 to 7 p.m. Jan. 4 at the University Center on the Kent Stark campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. The cost is $10 per person. After attending the program, participants may schedule an appointment for a consultation at the Small Business Development Center by calling 330-244-3290 or e-mailing hbolinge@kent.edu.

Registrations and payment must be made online at www.cantonsbdc.org. Click “orientation” and choose “Small Business Orientation Stark County.”

Accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made if requested at least two weeks in advance. Call 330-244-3290 or e-mail hbolinge@kent.edu. Call 330-244-3239 for TDD only.

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News Headline: Kent Stark offices to close for holiday break | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/17/2010
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: GateHouse Media, Inc
News OCR Text: with Totally Local Yellow Pages

Search provided by local.com

Kent State University at Stark will be closed Dec. 24 through Jan. 2 due to the holidays.

During this time, administrative offices, the library, campus bookstore and University Center will be closed. Normal hours for all Kent State Stark offices will resume Jan. 3. The bookstore will resume normal hours Jan. 6.

To apply for Spring 2011 admission, visit www.stark.kent.edu/admissions. The deadline to apply is Jan. 4.

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News Headline: Stark residents see their buying power decline (Engelhardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/18/2010
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Even though it may seem that you're earning more money than you did 10 years ago, there's a good chance that you're actually earning much less.

U.S. Census figures released this week show that across Stark County, many households' incomes have dropped. The purchasing power of the annual income of the median household in Stark County fell more than 12 percent between 1999 and the five-year period from 2005 to 2009.

The Census' American Community Survey data, released Tuesday for the first time for jurisdictions with fewer than 20,000 people, showed significant losses in real income in nearly every township and city throughout Stark County.

The median household income in Canton dropped 20 percent, adjusted for inflation. Alliance took a 15 percent hit. In North Canton, it fell 12.6 percent — slightly worse than the county overall.

“We've seen some real challenges particularly when we lost the Hoover company,” said North Canton Mayor David Held. “Certainly for the people in our city, their income is not keeping up with the day-to-day expenses. It's been a struggle.”

Household income includes most categories of annual gross income for everyone older than 15 who lives in a household whether or not related. Median means the figure in the middle of all the collected income figures.

BROAD TREND

The other three Stark cities — Canal Fulton, Louisville and Massillon — saw declines of 7 to 9 percent. The most populous townships were not immune. Jackson and Canton townships' dropped about 10 percent. Perry's fell 15 percent, Plain's by 13 percent.

“Does our money go as far as it used to? No,” said Matt Stanley, 27, of Plain Township, a teacher whose wife gave birth to a girl Friday.

“It's not hard to believe. Just look around. Look at all the empty buildings.”

Stanley says Plain Local Schools does pay him a step increase every year. While median income figures across the county have jumped since 1999, when income numbers from 1999 are converted into less valuable 2009 dollars due to the rising cost of living, the gains become losses.

The losses in Stark County were part of a statewide and national trend. For the same period, Ohio's median household income, adjusted for inflation, dropped 10.6 percent to $47,144. For the U.S., it fell

4.9 percent to $51,425.

In Stark, only small communities such as Bethlehem Township, Beach City, Hartville, Hills and Dales and Waynesburg experienced gains. But their data may not be as accurate as for larger cities and townships due to the limited sample sizes.

The census sends the American Community Survey to about 1 in 40 Ohio households a year and uses the data to extrapolate to a reasonable certainty the demographic profile of that community.

NOT SURPRISED

At the North Canton Public Library on Friday, none of those interviewed was surprised that rising costs have outpaced the rise in incomes.

Tim Rodgers, 46, of Lake Township, said that while he is grateful to have a job, his pay as a custodian for the Canton City School District has not kept up with rising expenses. He says he gets about a 25-cent-per-hour raise each year. His wife, a pre-school teacher who earns $8 an hour, receives only occasional increases.

With the cost of groceries increasing over the years and higher prices for tires, he said, he and his wife have cut back vacations from twice to once a year. He quit stock car driving.

Kathi Grishaber, 63, of Lake Township, said she hasn't gotten a raise in several years in her part-time job as a server at a Belden Village restaurant. But she said she manages with the help of Social Security survivor benefits.

“I don't do the nails,” she said. “I don't do the hair shop. I don't shop the expensive clothes. ... I don't go to the movies.”

Dave Zona, 71, of North Canton, said his income has declined 10 percent to 15 percent since 1999, when he owned a transportation company. But then business slowed, he said, and he closed the company and retired. Since then, the cost of gas, auto insurance and clothing has gone up.

“A bottle of Mid's spaghetti sauce was $2.48. Now it's $4.08,” he said. “That is the reality of life. People get old. They die. The cost of living goes up, and we've got to do something to be at peace with that.”

WHY THE DECLINE?

Lockwood Reynolds, an economics professor at Kent State University, said real incomes flattened nationwide in the 1980s before being hit hard by the recessions of 2001 and 2008.

He said many economists believe that technology has replaced low-skilled workers, putting a premium on higher-skilled workers with more education.

“The median household you're looking at isn't someone typically with a college degree,” Reynolds said.

Census figures from the 2005 to 2009 surveys estimate 19.6 percent of Stark County residents 25 and older have bachelor's degrees or higher, an improvement over 17.9 percent in 2000.

Lucas Engelhardt, an economics professor at Kent State University Stark campus, said research indicates that employers have spent more on health insurance premiums rather than give raises.

“More of the compensation are in the form of benefits,” Engelhardt said. “Health care is just crowding out a lot of our income effectively.”耀

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News Headline: KSU-Stark to close Dec. 24-Jan. 2 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/17/2010
Outlet Full Name: Independent, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP, OH —

Kent State University at Stark will be closed Dec. 24-Jan. 2, 2011.

During this time, administrative offices, the Library, Campus Bookstore and The University Center will be closed.

Normal hours for all Kent State Stark offices will resume on Jan. 3, 2011. The Bookstore will resume normal hours on Thursday, Jan. 6, 2011.

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News Headline: Kent State museum exhibits Hepburn's stage, screen costumes (WITH VIDEOS) (Druesedow) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2010
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Photo / April K. Helms Katharine Hepburn's more casual wear, which she donned for publicity shots, area also on display. The actress made wearing slacks not only acceptable, but fashionable for women.

RPC Photos / April K. Helms The Kent State University Museum acquired legendary actress Katharine Hepburn's costumes in 2008. Many are currently on exhibit at the museum. The garments include costumes worn in both Hepburn's stage and screen roles.

Special Products Editor

Fans of Katharine Hepburn can see the costumes she wore in many of her stage and screen appearances, as well as view what she donned for publicity pictures at the Kent State University Museum through Sept. 4, 2011.

"Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen" makes its world premiere at the university's fashion museum. The new exhibit showcases the screen legend's performance clothes, which include stage and film costumes spanning Katharine Hepburn's career, as well as apparel she wore for publicity purposes.

James Harris of H/L Communications, which is handling publicity and programming connected with the exhibit, said that after the exhibit closes at the Kent State University Museum, it will go on tour at various museums nationally and internationally.

The museum acquired Hepburn's performance clothes in 2008 from the star's estate, Harris said. Before her death in 2003, she had made clear her collection of performance clothes should be given to an educational institution instead of being sold at auction.

"Katharine Hepburn's costumes were designed or overseen by some of the greatest 20th century designers for fashion, stage and film," said museum director Jean Druesedow, who curated the exhibit. "Valentina, Adrian, Irene, Muriel King, Cecil Beaton, Coco Chanel, Walter Plunkett, Edith Head, Patricia Zipprodt, Jane Greenwood, Noel Taylor -- it's an 'A' list all the way."

Harris said that Hepburn's collection of her own costumes was unusual.

"These were costumes that, from the studio's point of view, were just part of the business," Harris said. "Usually the costumes were recycled for other movies. You'd see costumes that appeared in 'A' movies appearing later in 'B' movies. Katharine had the foresight to save them. It's amazing she was able to save the costumes she was able to save."

The garments that the museum's visitors see "were literally hanging in Hepburn's closets," Harris added. However, there was the challenge of trying to figure out which movie or play, or what situation, Hepburn wore them.

"These were not tagged," Harris said, who added the museum staff watched Hepburn's movies and studied stage stills to identify the garments -- a time-consuming process.

Another challenge for the museum was having to alter the mannequins -- they literally had to shave the mannequins -- so the garments would fit them, Harris said.

"She had a 20 1/2-inch waist," Harris said. "She was about 5 feet, seven inches, in an era when most actresses were about 5 foot, one."

Doreen Lazarus, Harris' wife and business partner, said that it was "hard to get a body double for her" because of her physique.

"She did a lot of her own stunts," Lazarus said. "When she was doing the film 'Summertime,' she fell into the canal -- part of the movie -- and swam back to the side. She got an eye infection from that, which plagued her the rest of her life."

Hepburn's impact on the silver screen and the stage are well-known. According to information provided by the museum, she was nominated by the Motion Picture Academy a record 12 times in the best leading actress category and won four Oscars -- for "Morning Glory" (1933), "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" (1967), "The Lion In Winter" (1968) and "On Golden Pond" (1981), a record for leading actor or actress wins that still stands today. However, Hepburn also had an impact on fashion.

"Katharine Hepburn has had a profound impact on American popular culture and fashion, and she has influenced generations of women," Druesedow said. "On screen and off, she epitomized the modern American woman -- smart, independent, active, honest, feisty, and outspoken. In terms of fashion, Katharine Hepburn blazed trails by popularizing slacks for women, wearing or adapting men's suits as women's apparel, and helping internationalize what is now called 'The American Style.'

Harris said that Hepburn liked to be comfortable when she was off-screen.

"Katharine made wearing slacks more acceptable for women," he said. "This was her image, casual and comfortable. They were her costume."

In fact, one time the studio attempted to try to force Hepburn to wear the more acceptable skirts and dresses for her day, Harris said.

"They took away her slacks, and just left the skirts and dresses," Harris said. "So she walked around the studio in her underwear, which just horrified the studio executives. That was far worse, of course, than her going around in slacks. They gave her back her slacks."

Highlights from the exhibit include:

* Stage costumes from "The Philadelphia Story" and "Without Love," as well as later Broadway shows "Coco," "West Side Waltz" and "A Matter of Gravity."

* Film costumes and publicity clothes include those from "The Little Minister," "Adam's Rib," "The Iron Petticoat," "Long Day's Journey Into Night," "A Delicate Balance," "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner" and "The Lion In Winter."

* Costumes worn in many of her later television movies, including her Emmy-nominated performance as the title character in "Mrs. Delafield Wants to Marry" as well as her Emmy-winning performance in "Love Among the Ruins."

In all, there are about 150 pieces in display, including shoes, makeup and even sets of false eyelashes, Harris said.

"One of the strengths of this exhibit is it puts the costumes in context," Harris said. "We have banners, with a still from the film or play by the costumes. We have the makeup. We have playbills. We have costumes that go from the 1930s to the 1990s."

For more information, call the Kent State University Museum at 330-672-3450, visit www.kent.edu/museum or go to the Kent State University Museum Facebook page.

E-mail: ahelms@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

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News Headline: Kent State museum exhibits Hepburn's stage, screen costumes (WITH VIDEOS) (Druesedow) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2010
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: RPC Photos / April K. Helms The Kent State University Museum acquired legendary actress Katharine Hepburn's costumes in 2008. Many are currently on exhibit at the museum. The garments include costumes worn in both Hepburn's stage and screen roles.

Special Products Editor

Fans of Katharine Hepburn can see the costumes she wore in many of her stage and screen appearances, as well as view what she donned for publicity pictures at the Kent State University Museum through Sept. 4, 2011.

"Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen" makes its world premiere at the university's fashion museum. The new exhibit showcases the screen legend's performance clothes, which include stage and film costumes spanning Katharine Hepburn's career, as well as apparel she wore for publicity purposes.

James Harris of H/L Communications, which is handling publicity and programming connected with the exhibit, said that after the exhibit closes at the Kent State University Museum, it will go on tour at various museums nationally and internationally.

The museum acquired Hepburn's performance clothes in 2008 from the star's estate, Harris said. Before her death in 2003, she had made clear her collection of performance clothes should be given to an educational institution instead of being sold at auction.

"Katharine Hepburn's costumes were designed or overseen by some of the greatest 20th century designers for fashion, stage and film," said museum director Jean Druesedow, who curated the exhibit. "Valentina, Adrian, Irene, Muriel King, Cecil Beaton, Coco Chanel, Walter Plunkett, Edith Head, Patricia Zipprodt, Jane Greenwood, Noel Taylor -- it's an 'A' list all the way."

Harris said that Hepburn's collection of her own costumes was unusual.

"These were costumes that, from the studio's point of view, were just part of the business," Harris said. "Usually the costumes were recycled for other movies. You'd see costumes that appeared in 'A' movies appearing later in 'B' movies. Katharine had the foresight to save them. It's amazing she was able to save the costumes she was able to save."

The garments that the museum's visitors see "were literally hanging in Hepburn's closets," Harris added. However, there was the challenge of trying to figure out which movie or play, or what situation, Hepburn wore them.

"These were not tagged," Harris said, who added the museum staff watched Hepburn's movies and studied stage stills to identify the garments -- a time-consuming process.

Another challenge for the museum was having to alter the mannequins -- they literally had to shave the mannequins -- so the garments would fit them, Harris said.

"She had a 20 1/2-inch waist," Harris said. "She was about 5 feet, seven inches, in an era when most actresses were about 5 foot, one."

Doreen Lazarus, Harris' wife and business partner, said that it was "hard to get a body double for her" because of her physique.

"She did a lot of her own stunts," Lazarus said. "When she was doing the film 'Summertime,' she fell into the canal -- part of the movie -- and swam back to the side. She got an eye infection from that, which plagued her the rest of her life."

Hepburn's impact on the silver screen and the stage are well-known. According to information provided by the museum, she was nominated by the Motion Picture Academy a record 12 times in the best leading actress category and won four Oscars -- for "Morning Glory" (1933), "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" (1967), "The Lion In Winter" (1968) and "On Golden Pond" (1981), a record for leading actor or actress wins that still stands today. However, Hepburn also had an impact on fashion.

"Katharine Hepburn has had a profound impact on American popular culture and fashion, and she has influenced generations of women," Druesedow said. "On screen and off, she epitomized the modern American woman -- smart, independent, active, honest, feisty, and outspoken. In terms of fashion, Katharine Hepburn blazed trails by popularizing slacks for women, wearing or adapting men's suits as women's apparel, and helping internationalize what is now called 'The American Style.'

Harris said that Hepburn liked to be comfortable when she was off-screen.

"Katharine made wearing slacks more acceptable for women," he said. "This was her image, casual and comfortable. They were her costume."

In fact, one time the studio attempted to try to force Hepburn to wear the more acceptable skirts and dresses for her day, Harris said.

"They took away her slacks, and just left the skirts and dresses," Harris said. "So she walked around the studio in her underwear, which just horrified the studio executives. That was far worse, of course, than her going around in slacks. They gave her back her slacks."

Highlights from the exhibit include:

* Stage costumes from "The Philadelphia Story" and "Without Love," as well as later Broadway shows "Coco," "West Side Waltz" and "A Matter of Gravity."

* Film costumes and publicity clothes include those from "The Little Minister," "Adam's Rib," "The Iron Petticoat," "Long Day's Journey Into Night," "A Delicate Balance," "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner" and "The Lion In Winter."

* Costumes worn in many of her later television movies, including her Emmy-nominated performance as the title character in "Mrs. Delafield Wants to Marry" as well as her Emmy-winning performance in "Love Among the Ruins."

In all, there are about 150 pieces in display, including shoes, makeup and even sets of false eyelashes, Harris said.

"One of the strengths of this exhibit is it puts the costumes in context," Harris said. "We have banners, with a still from the film or play by the costumes. We have the makeup. We have playbills. We have costumes that go from the 1930s to the 1990s."

For more information, call the Kent State University Museum at 330-672-3450, visit www.kent.edu/museum or go to the Kent State University Museum Facebook page.

E-mail: ahelms@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

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News Headline: Kent State shootings: Does former informant hold the key to the May 4 mystery? | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — In the four decades since Ohio National Guardsmen fired on students and antiwar demonstrators at Kent State University, Terry Norman has remained a central but shadowy figure in the tragedy.

The 21-year-old law enforcement major and self-described "gung-ho" informant was the only civilian known to be carrying a gun -- illegally, though with the tacit consent of campus police -- when the volatile protest unfolded on May 4, 1970. Witnesses saw him with his pistol out around the time the Guardsmen fired.

Though Norman denied shooting his weapon, and was never charged in connection with the four dead and nine wounded at Kent State, many people suspected he somehow triggered the soldiers' deadly 13-second volley.

In October, a Plain Dealer-commissioned exam of a long-forgotten audiotape from the protest focused new attention on Norman. Enhancement of the recording revealed a violent altercation and four gunshots, 70 seconds before the Guard's fusillade. Forensic audio expert Stuart Allen said the shots are from a .38-caliber pistol, like the one police confiscated from Norman minutes after the Guard shootings.

The newspaper's subsequent review of hundreds of documents from the various investigations of Norman, including his own statements, and interviews with key figures, uncovered more surprising information:

• The Kent State police department's and FBI's initial assessment of Norman was badly flawed, with failures to test his pistol and clothing for evidence of firing, to interview witnesses who claimed Norman may have shot his gun and to pursue the question of whether it was reloaded before police verified its condition.

• The Kent State police detective who took possession of Norman's pistol, and whose investigation ruled out its having been fired, was directing Norman's work as an informant and later helped him get a job as a police officer.

• Norman's various statements about why he drew his pistol are inconsistent on some important details and are contradicted by other eyewitnesses. Also, Norman would barely have had time for what he claims to have done during that crucial period.

Kent State officers knew Norman regularly carried guns, including on campus, even though the department's chief and another local law enforcement official had doubts about Norman's maturity and self-control.

• The FBI initially denied any connection with Norman, although the bureau had paid him for undercover work a month before the Kent State shootings. His relationship with the FBI may have begun even earlier than Norman has acknowledged, and he may later have had ties to the CIA.

• After the May 4 tragedy, Norman transformed from informant to cop to criminal.

Antiwar protest builds on Kent State campus

The tolling of Kent State's Victory Bell, signaling the start of the antiwar protest, drew Norman to the commons just before noon on Monday, May 4, 1970.

A camera hung from his neck. He wore thick-soled "trooper boots," a gas mask he'd bought at a police supply store and a nickel-plated .38 in a holster hidden under his sport jacket.

He said he carried the snub-nosed, five-shot Smith & Wesson for protection. Norman was well known to campus activists, whose meetings he had begun trying to infiltrate in 1968, soon after he arrived as a student.

Norman's conservative, law-and-order outlook clashed with the militantly anti-war, anti-authoritarian politics of groups like the Students for a Democratic Society. He showed up at their gatherings, trolling for information and snapping pictures until he was tossed out. He said he hoped the photos he regularly provided to the Kent State police department would help send activists to jail.

Throughout the weekend, Norman photographed the increasingly raucous protests at the request of campus police Detective Tom Kelley, his regular contact.

He carried his pistol Sunday night, while photographing demonstrators, and again Monday when he headed for class, with plans to take pictures at the noon anti-war rally. Norman said Kelley and FBI Agent Bill Chapin of the bureau's Akron office asked him to attend, and either Kelley or Chapin had given him film.

As the Guardsmen moved out, with orders to sweep protesters off the commons and over Blanket Hill, Norman stuck close.

When the soldiers topped the hill and reached a football practice field on the other side, the protesters' rock-throwing intensified. Norman moved inside a protective semi-circle of Guardsmen, waiting with them as officers discussed what to do.

Several times, Norman hurled stones back at demonstrators. He caught the attention of Guard Capt. John Martin, who wondered, "My gosh, where did that idiot come from and what's he doing there?"

Finally, a commander ordered the Guardsmen to double-time back up Blanket Hill. Norman said he'd been preoccupied photographing some rock-throwers and missed the soldiers' departure. He slipped into the crowd, hoping to blend in with several news photographers.

Terry Norman's statements to police vary

What Norman did next remains in dispute.

Norman said that as the retreating Guardsmen neared the crest of Blanket Hill, he saw them halt, crouch and level their rifles. Like several other witnesses, Norman reported hearing a sharp sound, either a firecracker or perhaps a small-caliber gunshot, followed almost instantly by a torrent of Guard bullets.

He said he dropped to the ground and heard a round go over his head. That would place him on a slope south of Taylor Hall, near the Guard's line of fire.

After the volley, Norman either "stayed put for a couple of minutes," started for the campus police station, or headed up the hill toward the shooting site to take more photos, depending on which of his various statements to Kent State police, the FBI, the State Highway Patrol and lawyers one follows.

Norman said he then knelt to check on a "hippie-style person" whom he saw fall or whom he found lying on the ground. In some accounts, the downed man was bleeding from the face; in others, he was overcome by tear gas and his nose was running.

Norman said he moved to leave after determining the man was OK, but he was attacked. In one statement, he was chased and tackled by a group of demonstrators angered by his picture-taking. In others, his initial assailant was a man who grabbed for his camera and gas mask while someone else clinched him from behind.

Norman said he was pulled to the ground and "completely surrounded" by protesters chanting "Kill the pig!" and "Stick the pig!" In a couple of his statements, he claimed to have been hit by rocks and pummeled by fists.

He pulled his pistol (either from his holster or his pocket, depending on the statement) and told his attackers to back off or they were "going to get it." He struck an assailant with his gun in some accounts but didn't mention that in others. Then he said he ran down Blanket Hill and across the commons to seek shelter with the Guard, which had set up a secure area.

There, chased by two campus officials who yelled that Norman had a gun and may have shot someone, he surrendered his pistol to a Kent State police officer. A TV cameraman filmed the turnover. "The guy tried to kill me!" Norman says, agitated and panting. "The guy starts beating me up, man, tries to drag my camera away, hit me in the face!"

At no time, Norman maintained in all his statements, did he fire his gun. The attack and his defense, he said, happened after the Guard gunfire, meaning his actions could not have provoked the soldiers to shoot.

Audiotape raises questions about Terry Norman's role

The altercation and four .38 pistol shots that analyst Stuart Allen uncovered in October 2010 on the audiotape raise questions about Norman's story that he didn't fire and that the Guard's fusillade preceded his assault.

Seventy seconds before the soldiers shoot, the recording captures shouts of "Kill him!" followed by sounds of scuffling and four distinct discharges. An earlier analysis of the tape also revealed an order for the Guard to prepare to fire. It is not clear how or if the altercation, pistol shots and firing order are related.

But as early as the afternoon of May 4, 1970, there were claims that Norman's gun had been fired four times. There also were available witnesses whose stories contradicted some details -- or raised questions about the timing -- of Norman's assault. However, police and government records indicate that investigators did not quickly, rigorously pursue those leads.

When Norman surrendered his pistol, he handed it to Kent State patrolman Harold Rice, who in turn gave it to Detective Kelley. TV newsmen Fred DeBrine and Joe Butano of Cleveland station WKYC and Guard Sgts. Mike Delaney and Richard Day observed the exchange.

The four said they saw a Kent State officer -- DeBrine and Butano identified him as Kelley, Norman's handler as an informant -- crack open Norman's pistol, look inside and exclaim, "My God, it's been fired four times!" The TV crew and the two Guardsmen also said they heard Norman state that he may have shot someone.

Kent State student Tom Masterson has acknowledged being Norman's assailant. He said the confrontation happened after the Guard stopped shooting, which jibes with part of Norman's story, but insisted he was the only one involved. "There was definitely no group of students that attacked him," Masterson, a retired San Francisco firefighter, said in a recent interview. "There wasn't time."

Another Kent State student, Frank Mark Malick, saw a photographer matching Norman's description waving his pistol as the Guard fired and aiming in the same direction as the soldiers, although Malick said he couldn't tell if the photographer was shooting.

The FBI looked little into Norman's involvement until 1973, three years after the incident, when the Justice Department reopened the investigation. Even then the bureau acted reluctantly, at the insistence of Justice Department lawyers.

There is no evidence in the various investigative agencies' files that anyone attempted to probe the inconsistencies in Norman's various statements or between his versions and other witnesses' accounts. According to Norman, Kent State police allowed him to type his own statement.

The FBI interviewed him twice, on May 4 and May 15, 1970, but in no greater depth than other witnesses. The bureau relied on the Kent State police department's determination that Norman's gun had not been fired.

The audiotape of the Guard shootings and their aftermath, along with TV footage shot by the WKYC crew of Norman surrendering his pistol, provides an improbably tight time frame within which Norman's assault and his run for safety would have to fit for his story to be true.

In less than 1 minute and 49 seconds, Norman would have had to check on the injured student, be attacked, draw his gun, free himself from his assailants, then cross more than a quarter-mile of steep terrain to reach the Guard's rope line.

Norman testified before a federal grand jury in December 1973 as part of the revived investigation. His testimony remains sealed, as is typical. But whatever was said, and whatever additional facts were uncovered, the grand jury did not indict him.

Federal investigators "never left a stone unturned" about Norman, former Assistant Attorney General Stanley Pottinger, who directed the inquiry, insisted in a recent interview.

Although neither Pottinger nor his second-in-command on the Kent State probe, former federal Prosecutor Robert Murphy, recalls details of what Norman said, they both were satisfied his actions on May 4 played no role in the Guard's shootings. "As far as we were concerned at the time, it was a non-issue in the overall events of what happened that day," Murphy said recently.

Terry Norman's gun changes hands

Terry Norman's .38-caliber pistol represented the best chance for investigators to determine if he fired shots on May 4, but there were abnormalities in its handling from the moment it was confiscated.

Norman gave his weapon to Harold Rice, a Kent State patrolman he knew well enough to call "Hal."

In his report of the incident, Rice wrote that he popped open the cylinder to confirm the gun was still fully loaded and sniffed the barrel to rule out that it had been fired, before handing the weapon to Detective Kelley. The TV footage shows none of this; in fact, the plastic face shield on Rice's riot helmet precludes bringing a gun close to his nose.

Kelley, who directed Norman's informant work for the department, carried Norman's pistol back to the police station. Kelley, in his official statement and later interviews, was adamant that he'd never said Norman's gun had been fired four times and that examination showed it was fully loaded. Other officers whom Kelley directed to sight- and smell-check the weapon backed him up.

In Norman's sworn deposition from 1975, he said he had loaded his gun before May 4 with three hollow-point bullets, one armor-piercing round and one tracer round. When Kent State police turned Norman's pistol over to the FBI on May 5, the bureau noted that it contained four hollow-point bullets and one armor-piercing round. The investigative record does not indicate that anyone noted or probed the discrepancy.

No one tested Norman's hands or clothing for gunpowder traces, and there is no record that campus police questioned him about whether he had reloaded or searched him for extra bullets or expended shells.

The FBI later noted the Kent State police department's failure to preserve a chain of custody of Norman's gun, reporting that it had passed through four officers' hands, and that at least one of them couldn't recall when he'd had the pistol.

That casual police attitude extended to Norman's overall gun-handling. Norman said campus police "unofficially" knew he often brought weapons to school -- one had bartered with him on the premises for a rifle or shotgun -- even though Police Chief Donald Schwatzmiller considered Norman "gun-happy and very immature" and wanted to bar him from campus. Northampton Police Chief Larry Cochran, who knew Norman from his part-time security job at the Blossom Music Center, had similar concerns.

An FBI check in 1973 determined that Norman lacked the proper paperwork to legally carry a concealed weapon during the May 4 rally. A former Portage County prosecutor told the bureau that Norman could have been charged, but the case would have been difficult to win.

Terry Norman's FBI connection

Whether due to miscommunication, embarrassment or an attempted coverup, the FBI initially denied any involvement with Norman as an informant.

"Mr. Norman was not working for the FBI on May 4, 1970, nor has he ever been in any way connected with this Bureau," director J. Edgar Hoover declared to Ohio Congressman John Ashbrook in an August 1970 letter.

Three years later, Hoover's successor, Clarence Kelley, was forced to correct the record. The director acknowledged that the FBI had paid Norman $125 for expenses incurred when, at the bureau's encouragement, Norman infiltrated a meeting of Nazi and white power sympathizers in Virginia a month before the Kent State shootings.

Norman insisted his FBI work lasted only about a month, including the Virginia mission and his photographing of campus dissidents.

But a Kent State classmate, Janet Sima, said recently that she accompanied Norman on a day trip to Washington, D.C., in December 1968 so he could attend a meeting he told her involved the FBI. "I felt like he couldn't talk about it," said Sima, who didn't press Norman for details about the 90-minute appointment.

Tom Kelley, the Kent State detective who oversaw Norman's campus informant work, told lawyers in 1975 that he suspected Norman had worked much more regularly for the FBI than the bureau had publicly acknowledged.

Terry Norman: From D.C. cop to former convict

Disillusioned with campus unrest and uncomfortable with his notoriety, Norman quit Kent State in August 1970 to become a Washington, D.C., policeman. His references included Detective Kelley and Akron policeman Bruce Vanhorn, with whom he had traded for the .38 pistol.

Alan Whitney, a labor leader who helped unionize the D.C. police force in 1972, said recently that Norman was one of about a dozen officers he worked closely with on the two-month campaign. Whitney said another officer told him that Norman sometimes boasted of playing a consequential role in the Kent State tragedy, including firing a gun. When Whitney asked Norman directly, Norman said he couldn't talk about it.

Norman's second wife, Sherry Millen, said she had no idea he had been on campus on May 4. Millen, who met Norman in the early 1980s when he was still a cop, said he was estranged from his family.

He told Millen that he'd helped get his first wife, Amy, a job with the CIA and that he had done occasional work for the spy agency. Norman liked shooting guns and talked about wanting to move to Costa Rica, become a mercenary and hunt down drug lords, Millen said.

After Millen and Norman divorced in the early 1990s, he ran into major legal trouble. In 1994, federal prosecutors accused Norman of leading a four-year scheme to bilk nearly $700,000 from the electronics company he worked for as a telecommunications manager.

At first with a partner, and later on his own, the ex-policeman set up shell companies and authorized payments for phony work. He used the money to buy a plane, a 41-foot boat, a recreational vehicle and a 20-acre homestead in Texas and to pad his and his new wife's mutual funds.

By the time federal agents came after Norman and his third wife in the spring of 1994, Norman had already learned of the investigation. The couple had packed their RV with computers, passports, $10,400, and their four dogs and three cats. With Norman's weapons and undercover training, the government considered him a serious flight risk.

Norman pleaded guilty to charges relating to conspiracy, mail fraud and money laundering. He served three years in prison. Reporters occasionally have tried to contact him, as the anniversaries of the May 4 tragedy come and go. He never has broken his silence. He and his wife live in a secluded area of North Carolina, on the edge of the Pisgah National Forest.

How this story was reported
Documents used in reporting this story include witness statements, correspondence and investigative reports of the May 4 shootings, generated by the Kent State University police department, the Ohio National Guard, the Ohio Highway Patrol, the FBI and the U.S. Department of Justice. All of those records are in Kent State University Libraries' May 4 Collection. The Plain Dealer also reviewed a 166-page sworn deposition given by Terry Norman in 1975 as part of the shooting victims' civil lawsuits against the state of Ohio and the Ohio National Guard. That deposition is part of Yale University's May 4 archive. Additionally, the newspaper examined the extensive case file from Norman's 1994 indictment on federal conspiracy, mail fraud and money laundering charges. The Plain Dealer interviewed people who knew Norman as a student and later in life, or who had contact with him as part of the various investigations of May 4.
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Related coverage
Truth is elusive in regard to the Kent State deaths: Ted Diadiun
Political changes may imperil congressional probe into shootings (Nov. 4, 2010)
Revelations from Kent State tape prompt inquiry (Oct. 9, 2010)
Tape indicates altercation, pistol fire preceded National Guard shootings (Oct. 8, 2010)
Commotion that 'didn't sound right' leads to re-examination of tape (Oct. 8, 2010)
New analysis of recording indicates National Guard was given order to prepare to fire (May 9, 2010)
More coverage of the Kent State shootings

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News Headline: $500K to Kent Employee Ownership Center | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: Business Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- The Ohio Employee Ownership Center based at Kent State University has been awarded $500,000 to be a partner in the Ohio Department of Development's Early Warning Network. The purpose of the network is to avert layoffs and job loss in Ohio through timely intervention in at-risk companies.

The center was awarded the largest amount out of the 11 recipients.

The department's announcement praised the center and the other grant recipients for their "strong track record in working with employers, maintaining stable relationships with regional partners and administering layoff aversion activities," according to Bill McIntyre, program director at the center.

The funds will be used in three major areas:

Assisting business owners seeking an orderly exit from their business through its business succession planning program, thereby minimizing business disruption and job loss;
Assisting in the creation of employee-owned businesses, either through employee- or community-led buyouts under threat of relocation or shutdown, or sale by an existing owner;
Helping existing employee-owned companies to preserve their jobs and to grow and expand the business by fully utilizing the benefits of employee ownership through the programming of Ohio's Employee-Owned Network.
The funding also will allow the center to continue the administration of its prefeasibility study grant program, which provides funds for owners and employees of companies facing possible job loss to explore whether converting to an employee-owned company can help avoid closure and layoffs.

Additionally, the center plans on continuing work in two new areas:

Expanding the Evergreen Cooperative Initiative, a project in the University Circle area of Cleveland designed to create jobs and wealth by linking new employee-owned businesses that employ residents of inner-city neighborhoods with large nearby anchor institutions.
Expanding services and programs to farmers, agribusinesses and other companies in the many rural areas around the state. Services will include farm/agribusiness succession planning assistance and technical support from the center's new Cooperative Development Center.
SOURCE: Kent State University Employee Ownership Center.
Published by The Business Journal, Youngstown, Ohio

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News Headline: Lunar Eclipse Predicted For Tuesday Night (Graham) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: Wheeling News-Register - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: If the snow and clouds can ease off the Ohio Valley tonight, then residents will be able to see a total lunar eclipse as they officially welcome the winter season.

Francis Graham, professor of astronomy and physics at Kent State University, said the show will begin at 12:27 a.m. Tuesday and will continue throughout the entire night until 6:06 a.m. Wednesday.

Darryl Baynes, president of Interactive Science Programs in Wheeling and an advocate of scientific learning, said the best way to appreciate the eclipse is to understand it.

In one of his dozens of presentations on astronomy, he showed that a total lunar eclipse only happens about every sixth full moon, when the Earth is between the sun and moon. This is because the moon's orbital plane shifts with every revolution. An eclipse occurs when the moon's orbital plane lines up with the sun and Earth's plane.

In this event, the Earth's shadow, or umbra, falls upon the moon and causes little light to reflect to our eyes. The moon appears to be a dim orange in this state.

Graham released precise predictions for each lunar event. At the start, the moon will turn a slight gray as it passes into the penumbra, or outer shadow. The moon's color will progressively shift until it reaches the umbra at about 1:32 a.m. and by 2:40 a.m., the moon will be completely engulfed in the shadow.

At 3:53 a.m., the moon will begin to emerge from the shadow and then completely leave it at about 5:01 a.m. Like at the beginning of the sequence, the moon will be partially obscured until 6:06 a.m., when the moon will continue as usual.

Viewing the event may be difficult, however, as predictions from the National Weather Service for Tuesday call for heavy cloud cover over the entire Ohio Valley.

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News Headline: KSU students set to make up exams postponed because of the weather | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Many Kent State University students who planned on being home for the holidays by now are still studying for final exams.

KSU postponed all exams after noon Dec. 13 and all exams on Dec. 14 because of the snow. The make-up exams will be held at the same time and location on Dec. 20 and 21.

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News Headline: Aviation career program opens runway to many opportunities (McFarland) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2010
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students pursuing the aviation career path at Stow-Munroe Falls High School have varying interests and career options at their fingertips through the two-year College Tech Prep Academy. Pictured are class members and their instructors.

Students pursuing the aviation career path at Stow-Munroe Falls High School have varying interests and career options at their fingertips through the two-year College Tech Prep Academy. As a result of collaboration with Kent State University's College of Technology Aeronautics Division, some students will begin a pursuit of aviation occupations including private pilots and aviation medical examiners, as well as in areas of air traffic control and aviation mechanics, allowing them to earn college credit while attending high school.

The two-year aviation program is designed to allow students the opportunity to explore a variety of careers in aviation before graduation.

The program, which is housed at SMFHS and is now in its second year, attracts students from the Six District Educational Compact -- some of whom will attend college, as well as those who plan to enter the military and two-year higher education institutions.

Juniors and seniors are eligible for enrollment in the Academy, although some sophomores may be admitted to the program of study as well.

"We saw this as an opportunity to work with the Six District in early identification of students who have a passion for aviation," said Kent State University's Academic Program Director of Aeronautics and Assistant Professor Maureen McFarland.

"It seemed like a natural fit considering we own and operate our own airport. Aeronautics students tend to be very focused and career minded - the partnership gives us an opportunity to encourage those students in the pursuit of their dreams, in a field that is very dynamic and exciting."

The Aviation College Tech Prep Academy allows students the option of earning 11 credits toward an aeronautics degree at KSU.

Through the training and education they receive within the program, this is a cost savings of nearly $4,000 in tuition.

Students also have the opportunity to interact with others on a college campus where their passion for aviation is encouraged and kept alive.

Aviation careers are commonly known to be held predominantly by males; however, three female students are currently involved in the SMFHS program. Olivia Zeller, a junior, began exploring aviation when she realized her favorite movies had one thing in common -- aviation.

"I really like aviation," Olivia explains.

"We do groundwork in the program, and I want to begin flying as soon as possible at the KSU airport. Ultimately I would like to become a bush pilot or be a missionary pilot, which would also require me to get a mechanic's license."

For more information on the Aviation College Tech Prep Academy, students can talk with a guidance counselor at their home school, visit www.sixdistrict.com or call 330-689-5300 ext. 6821.

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News Headline: Aviation career program open to area students (McFarland) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2010
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's College of Technology Aeronautics Division and the Six District Educational Compact have teamed to offer a two-year aviation program to allow students to explore a variety of careers in aviation before graduation.

The program, which is housed at Stow-Munroe Falls High School and is now in its second year, attracts students from Six District Educational Compact schools, including Hudson. Juniors and seniors are eligible for enrollment, although some sophomores may be admitted to the program of study as well.

"We saw this as an opportunity to work with the Six District in early identification of students who have a passion for aviation," said Kent State University's Academic Program Director of Aeronautics and Assistant Professor Maureen McFarland. "... the partnership gives us an opportunity to encourage those students in the pursuit of their dreams, in a field that is very dynamic and exciting."

The Aviation College Tech Prep Academy allows students the option of earning 11 credits toward an aeronautics degree at KSU. Through the training and education they receive within the program, this is a cost savings of nearly $4,000 in tuition.

For more information, students can talk with a guidance counselor at their home school, visit www.sixdistrict.com or call 330-689-5300 ext. 6821.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW Portage tries to compete in economic development | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/20/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP MAY
SPUR PROACTIVE APPROACH TO GROWTH

THE NEW PORTAGE DEVELopment
Board received a major
boost from the Portage County
commissioners when the commissioners
voted 2-1 to fund the board with $200,000
per year for three years and have it replace
Portage County's economic development
office.
The idea is to have
the PDB become a
public-private development
effort, although
at the outset its funding
remains a public
undertaking. The board will have to find
a way to attract private funding, too.
Given the talent involved in this latest
effort to get a public-private development
program off the ground, we think the commissioners
have done the right thing.
Some major players in Portage County
are in support. Steve Colecchi, president
and CEO of Robinson Memorial Hospital,
is serving as chairman of the development
board. Tom Chema, president of Hiram College,
has agreed to serve on the board. He
has done a great job of strengthening Hiram
College despite several “a-ginners” in Hiram
Township who would just as soon have the
college relocate (Ravenna would make a
lovely college town if relocation is ever seriously
discussed). Yank Heisler, dean of the
College of Business at Kent State University,
is on board. Major employers such as
Davey Tree, Allen Aircraft and Delta Systems
are involved.
A collection of talent of this caliber willing
to donate its time and energy for Portage
County's welfare is a rare event and
the commissioners are wise to accept
their offer of assistance.
Portage County has had some notable
achievements in industrial development.
Bringing water to the Streetsboro industrial
parks along S.R. 14 in the 1980s was
accomplished by the county's assistance
with industrial revenue bonds. Outgoing
Commissioner Chuck Keiper's negotiation
of a water contract for Aurora and
Streetsboro with the city of Cleveland
was a helpful step. With state assistance,
Portage County developed its own airport
on S. R. 44 in 1968. That was more than
40 years ago. Since then, county officials
have been timid about its expansion, responding
to the “anti” voices of people
who either live near the airport or have
since its contruction built or purchased
homes near it.
Overall, Portage County has not kept
pace with Akron and Summit County,
Canton and Stark County, or the cities of
Wooster, Medina and Twinsburg, to name
a few. That's because Portage is reactive
rather than proactive. The citizen push
to start a Portage Development Board
has grown out of frustration with that. It
wants a more pro-active approach.
Public-private initiatives are functioning
well in many communities that compete
with Portage County for industrial
development. Governor-elect Kasich has
signaled he favors public-private partnerships.
Could the Portage Development Board
make a difference?
It is certainly worth a try.
On a more local level, Streetsboro has
been aggressive and brought in industry
and business by capitalizing on its great
access and by using tax incentives. Kent
and Kent State University have lately
been partnering and both are benefiting
from the sterling efforts of Ron Burbick,
the entrepreneur and philanthropist.
The city of Ravenna has a mayor who
is honest and passionate about economic
development. Curiously, Tallmadge, a
Summit County city with a sliver of itself
in Portage County, is one of the most aggressive
political subdivisions in Portage
County, working with Brimfield Township
in a joint economic development district.
Aurora excels at planned development in
its efforts to grow.
At the county level, Portage has been
hospitable to what comes its way, but unaggressive
in recruitment and in its work
to retain industry. That's not a strategy
for winning in the competition to attract
or retain business.
We hope a development board can supply
the energy and direction to make Portage
a more aggressive player.

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