Report Overview:
Total Clips (19)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Athletics (1)
Budget (1)
College of Business Administration (COBA) (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Geology (1)
KSU Museum (3)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Office of the President (1)
Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Pan-African Studies (1)
Police Department (1)
Psychology (1)
Renovation at KSU (1)
United Way at KSU (1)
University Communications and Marketing (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Kent State Holds Top Rank in Region for Enrolling Student Veterans 12/23/2010 Kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


Athletics (1)
Kent State Names Hazell New Head Football Coach (Lefton, Hazell) 12/23/2010 Kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


Budget (1)
Hiring Freeze at Kent State University (Lefton) 12/23/2010 Kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


College of Business Administration (COBA) (1)
Kent State Ranked Among Top 300 Institutions for Business Students 12/23/2010 Kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
KSU to offer new nursing doctorate 12/23/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Geology (1)
450 geothermal wells to heat, cool 5 OSU dorms (Ortiz) 12/22/2010 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

...circulate water. Earth's temperature at 550 feet deep stays between 55 and 60 degrees year-round, said Joseph Ortiz, an associate professor of geology at Kent State University. Using a heat exchanger, the system pulls the warmth from the ground to heat the buildings on cold days; it removes...


KSU Museum (3)
DRESSED FOR SUCCESS (Druesedow) 12/23/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State museum exhibits Hepburn's stage, screen costumes (Druesedow) 12/22/2010 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...Katharine Hepburn can see the costumes she wore in many of her stage and screen appearances, as well as view what she donned for publicity pictures at the Kent State University Museum through Sept. 4, 2011. "Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen" makes its world premiere at the university's...

Kent State museum exhibits Hepburn's stage, screen costumes (Druesedow) 12/23/2010 Bedford Times Register - Online Text Attachment Email

...Katharine Hepburn can see the costumes she wore in many of her stage and screen appearances, as well as view what she donned for publicity pictures at the Kent State University Museum through Sept. 4, 2011. "Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen" makes its world premiere at the university's...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Kent State Awarded $553,000 Grant to Partner with Libraries in University Circle Area 12/23/2010 Kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
OUR VIEW Good news for NE Ohio, Kent Displays 12/23/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Office of the President (1)
11 KSU employees get $1,000 bonus for fostering excellence 12/23/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Ohio Employee Ownership Center of Kent State Awarded $500,000 12/23/2010 Kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


Pan-African Studies (1)
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY HOSTS COMMUNITY CELEBRATION OF KWANZAA, DEC. 27 12/22/2010 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Dec. 22 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The Center of Pan-African Culture at Kent State University holds an...


Police Department (1)
Kent State Police Services Receives Sixth Consecutive Accreditation 12/23/2010 Kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


Psychology (1)
5 Reasons your stress solutions are wrong (Coifman) 12/22/2010 Yahoo! Shine Text Attachment Email

...evidence suggesting that this coping style doesn't work for everybody," explains Karin Coifman, PhD, an assistant professor of clinical psychology at Kent State University. Dr. Coifman and colleagues looked at how people whose spouse or child had just died coped with their loss. They learned...


Renovation at KSU (1)
Lefton 'Irrevocably' Committed to Kent State Campus Renovations (Lefton) 12/23/2010 Kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


United Way at KSU (1)
Kent State University Reaches 2010 Campaign Goal for United Way 12/23/2010 Kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


University Communications and Marketing (1)
Kent State Receives "Best of Show" and Two Gold Awards at the 2010 PRSA Cleveland Rocks Awards 12/23/2010 Kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Kent State Holds Top Rank in Region for Enrolling Student Veterans | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In Northeast Ohio, Kent State University ranks first among other universities for enrolling student veterans. According to Ohio's December report on the GI Promise, KSU takes third place overall in the state for student veteran enrollment.

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News Headline: Kent State Names Hazell New Head Football Coach (Lefton, Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Former Ohio State University assistant, wide receivers coach to replace Doug Martin

Newly named Kent State University head football coach Darrell Hazell has one goal in mind: to change the image of Kent State football.
Hazell, the former assistant head coach and wide receivers coach for Ohio State University, was introduced Monday as the university's 20th head football coach. His first task, he said, is to change the idea among other teams that playing Kent State means an easy win.
"I want to change that image," Hazell said. "I want to make sure they understand when they come in and play here at Kent State that they're in for a battle.
"We need to change it from within, and change it from without," he said. "We need to be positive and understand that the image of this program needs to change immediately."
The Golden Flashes have continually struggled to put together winning football teams. Their last winning season was in 2001 and last bowl appearance was in 1972.
"I've often heard said we have a long, rich tradition of not doing particularly well in football," University President Lester Lefton said at Monday's announcement. "That's about to change."
Hazell spent six years coaching wide receivers at Ohio State. In 2005, he was promoted to assistant head coach under Jim Tressel. In his 25-year coaching career, he's also served at Rutgers, West Virginia, Army, Western Michigan, Penn, Eastern Illinois and Oberlin.
"Darrell Hazell is more than prepared for this opportunity," said Kent State Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen. "We're excited that he's accepted our offer to serve as the head coach at Kent State."
Before fully committing his time to Kent State, however, Hazell will help coach Ohio State in the Sugar Bowl on Jan. 4 against Arkansas. But despite getting a late start on recruiting — he'll have about a month before February's national signing day — Hazell is confident he'll secure the right players.
"I'm not going to rush out and automatically sign 25 guys," he said. "I'm going to make sure we get the right guys in the program. We want to make sure everything fits."
Hazell also touched on his hunt for assistant coaches, saying he plans to recruit from "places you wouldn't think." He has yet to talk to current defensive coordinator Pete Rekstis, who is highly respected among the players.
"I will speak with Pete," Hazell said. "I've heard nothing but great things about Pete Rekstis from everybody. Everyone's sung his praises here in the last week or so."
Hazell, who is the program's first black head coach, replaces former coach Doug Martin, who resigned after helming the team for seven years. He will earn a base salary of $300,000, a significant increase from the $195,000 base Martin earned.
Kent State will open its 2011 season on Sept. 3 in Tuscaloosa, AL, against Alabama.

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News Headline: Hiring Freeze at Kent State University (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Unclear how decision pegged off state budget shortfall will affect city income tax revenue

A university-wide hiring freeze is in effect at Kent State University as administrators anticipate deep cuts in state funding next year.
University President Lester Lefton announced the "restriction upon university-wide hiring" in an e-mail sent to faculty and staff Dec. 15. In the e-mail, Lefton pointed to the state's anticipated $8 billion budget shortfall in 2011 as the primary reason for stopping almost all hiring at Ohio's second-largest public university.
"Some might see this as a hiring freeze, but I view it as taking a deep breath and reassessing every search so we can conserve resources and ensure that strategic positions are filled, not just those that happen to be open today," Lefton wrote. "There will be limited exceptions, and only for positions mission-critical to the university.
"While Gov.-elect John Kasich has until March 15 to deliver his budget proposals, it is widely anticipated in the higher education community that we will see serious budget reductions," Lefton explained.
The size of Ohio's budget deficit is unclear, though many expect it will be around $8 billion. Kasich told WKSU-FM 89.7 the budget figures are not final.
"We don't really know what the numbers are yet," Kasich said.
Kent State Vice President for Human Resources Willis Walker has been asked to define a process for making exceptions to the hiring restriction.
In a meeting with media members shortly after the announcement, Lefton said officers at the Kent State University police department are the only advance exemptions to the hiring "pause."
"There will be no hiring without my personal signature on the document," Lefton said. "I really can't say how long this pause will take place. Certainly until the budget is released and maybe well beyond.
"We're not talking about 10 years from now," he added. "But at least for the next few months we're going to defer making a decision until we have a better handle on what the budget may look like."
Lefton also said the administration has calculated the impact of reductions of 10 percent to 20 percent in the state share of instruction funding and asked KSU vice presidents to identify ways of dealing responsible with cuts of such magnitude.
Lefton said the vice presidents were not given specific instructions in planning those budget-cut scenarios.
"There instructions were to keep students first," he said. "We're not doing anything now other than putting a pause on hiring."
Whether such cuts could mean job losses is unclear.
Kara Robinson, chapter president of the American Association of University Professors at Kent State, declined to comment on the announcement.
It's also unclear what affect the hiring freeze will have on the city of Kent, which gets a sizable chunk of its income tax revenue come from its biggest employer -- the university. Lefton's announcement came after the city experienced nine straight months of income-tax revenue increases from Kent State sources.

"The amount of that increase has fluctuated up and down, but they've all been increases for the same period in 2009 versus 2010," said Dave Coffee, Kent's budget and finance director. "I do think, however, that it may still be too soon for us to accurately assess the potential impact on city of Kent income tax revenues."
Coffee said the announcement also comes as Kent experiences its fifth straight month of city wide total revenue improvement after several months during which income tax revenue had dropped.
"Our city budget for (fiscal year) 2011 was intentionally conservative with respect to our revenue forecasts, which includes income tax collections," Coffee said. "Obviously, this is something that we will want to continue to monitor."

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News Headline: Kent State Ranked Among Top 300 Institutions for Business Students | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Management was named one of the top 300 business schools by the Princeton Review. The publication, released in October, is available for purchase nationwide.

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News Headline: KSU to offer new nursing doctorate | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University will offer
a new nursing doctorate program
in Spring 2011.
The Ohio Board of Regents approved
KSU to offer a Doctorate of
Nursing Practice last week. KSU already
offers a Doctor of Philosophy
degree in nursing.
KSU is offering the program as
a response to the American Association
of Colleges of Nursing requirement
that Masters of Science
in Nursing programs be converted
into Doctorate of Nursing programs
by 2015.

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News Headline: 450 geothermal wells to heat, cool 5 OSU dorms (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/22/2010
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name: Regina Garcia Cano
News OCR Text: Ohio State University plans to drill 550 feet beneath campus to tap Earth's temperature to heat and cool five dormitories.

The university will drill 450 geothermal wells in the South Oval and the parking lot next to Hale Hall. The system will regulate the temperatures in Park, Siebert, Smith, Steeb and Stradley halls, all located between 11th and 12th avenues, as well as two new 11-story buildings that also will have dorm rooms.

"It will be one big system," said Scott Conlon, director of projects for Facilities Design and Construction.

The five dormitories, built in the 1950s, do not have air conditioning. Providing them with a cooling system has become a priority as the switch from quarters to semesters approaches in 2012, Conlon said.

"Students will be moving in in the third week of August - instead of the third week of September - when the temperature in the upper reaches of the high-rises would be unbearable."

The well field will be part of a closed-loop geothermal system that will circulate water. Earth's temperature at 550 feet deep stays between 55 and 60 degrees year-round, said Joseph Ortiz, an associate professor of geology at Kent State University.

Using a heat exchanger, the system pulls the warmth from the ground to heat the buildings on cold days; it removes heat from the buildings and transfers it into the ground on warm ones, Ortiz said.

The system will cost $4 million but will save Ohio State money in the long run, Conlon said. It will use 34 percent less energy than the natural-gas system at a savings of $200,000 a year, which will help the university recoup its investment in 12 1/2 years.

The wells also will help warm tap water.

"The system heats up domestic water that comes from the taps halfway for free, and then we'll use gas to heat it up the rest of the way," Conlon said. "This will also save money because the cost of heating the water supply will be lower."

The central cooling and heating plant for the well system will be in the basement of a soon-to-be-constructed 11-story building between Stradley and Park halls that also will contain dorm rooms. The geothermal system is part of a $170 million project to renovate dorms and build the two towers.

Contractors already dug the space for the plant. They are to begin drilling in the South Oval soon. Hale Hall's parking lot, which will become green space, will be drilled last.

"Using geothermal wells was by far the most cost-effective measure compared to others we considered, like solar panels and wind turbines," Conlon said. "Geothermal wells work well in open spaces, and they won't be visually obstructive."

The wells are not Ohio State's first. The Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, on the north side of campus, was built two years ago with a 70-well system.

"In general, it has worked beyond our expectations," Conlon said.

Erin Wingfield, director of development of 4-H Youth Development, said her office is comfortable.

"It feels nice and cool during the summer, and it doesn't feel as dry as other buildings during the winter," she said. "It's plenty warm. The difference is when you enter the building, you warm gradually because you don't get that blast of heat on you."

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News Headline: DRESSED FOR SUCCESS (Druesedow) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Museum
exhibits Katharine
Hepburn's costumes

FANS OF KATHARINE HEPBURN CAN SEE THE
costumes she wore in many of her stage and screen
appearances, as well as view what she donned for
publicity pictures at the Kent State University Museum
through Sept. 4, 2011.
“Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen”
makes its world premiere at the university's fashion museum.
The new exhibit showcases the screen legend's performance
clothes, which include stage and film costumes
spanning Katharine Hepburn's career, as well as apparel
she wore for publicity purposes.
James Harris of H/L Communications, which is handling
publicity and programming connected with the exhibit, said
that after the exhibit closes at the Kent State University
Museum, it will go on tour at various museums nationally
and internationally.
The museum acquired Hepburn's performance clothes
in 2008 from the star's estate, Harris said. Before her death
in 2003, she had made clear her collection of performance
clothes should be given to an educational institution instead
of being sold at auction.
“Katharine Hepburn's costumes were designed or overseen
by some of the greatest 20th century designers for fashion,
stage and film,” said museum director Jean Druesedow,
who curated the exhibit. “Valentina, Adrian, Irene, Muriel
King, Cecil Beaton, Coco Chanel, Walter Plunkett, Edith
Head, Patricia Zipprodt, Jane Greenwood, Noel Taylor —
it's an ‘A' list all the way.”
Harris said that Hepburn's collection of her own costumes
was unusual.
“These were costumes
that, from the studio's point
of view, were just part of the
business,” Harris said. “Usually
the costumes were recycled
for other movies. You'd
see costumes that appeared
in ‘A' movies appearing later
in ‘B' movies. Katharine had
the foresight to save them.
It's amazing she was able to
save the costumes she was
able to save.”
The garments that the
museum's visitors see “were
literally hanging in Hepburn's
closets,” Harris added.
However, there was the
challenge of trying to figure
out which movie or play, or
what situation, Hepburn
wore them.
“These were not tagged,”
Harris said, who added the
museum staff watched Hepburn's
movies and studied
stage stills to identify the
garments — a time-consuming
process.
Another challenge for the
museum was having to alter
the mannequins — they literally
had to shave the mannequins
— so the garments
would fit them, Harris said.
“She had a 20 1/2-inch
waist,” Harris said. “She was
about 5 feet, seven inches, in
an era when most actresses
were about 5 foot, one.”
Doreen Lazarus, Harris'
wife and business partner,
said that it was “hard to get
a body double for her” because
of her physique.
“She did a lot of her own
stunts,” Lazarus said. “When
she was doing the film ‘Summertime,'
she fell into the
canal — part of the movie —
and swam back to the side.
She got an eye infection
from that, which plagued
her the rest of her life.”
Hepburn's impact on the
silver screen and the stage
are well-known. According
to information provided by
the museum, she was nominated
by the Motion Picture
Academy a record 12
times in the best leading
actress category and won
four Oscars — for “Morning
Glory” (1933), “Guess
Who's Coming to Dinner”
(1967), “The Lion In Winter”
(1968) and “On Golden
Pond” (1981), a record
for leading actor or actress
wins that still stands today.
However, Hepburn also had
an impact on fashion.
“Katharine Hepburn has
had a profound impact on
American popular culture
and fashion, and she has
influenced generations of
women,” Druesedow said.
“On screen and off, she epitomized
the modern American
woman — smart, independent,
active, honest,
feisty, and outspoken. In
terms of fashion, Katharine
Hepburn blazed trails
by popularizing slacks for
women, wearing or adapting
men's suits as women's apparel,
and helping internationalize
what is now called
‘The American Style.'
Harris said that Hepburn
liked to be comfortable
when she was off-screen.
“Katharine made wearing
slacks more acceptable for
women,” he said. “This was
her image, casual and comfortable.
They were her costume.”
In fact, one time the studio
attempted to try to force
Hepburn to wear the more
acceptable skirts and dresses
for her day, Harris said.
“They took away her
slacks, and just left the
skirts and dresses,” Harris
said. “So she walked around
the studio in her underwear,
which just horrified the studio
executives. That was far
worse, of course, than her
going around in slacks. They
gave her back her slacks.”
Highlights from the exhibit
include:
■ Stage costumes from
“The Philadelphia Story”
and “Without Love,” as well
as later Broadway shows
“Coco,” “West Side Waltz”
and “A Matter of Gravity.”
■ Film costumes and publicity
clothes include those
from “The Little Minister,”
“Adam's Rib,” “The Iron Petticoat,”
“Long Day's Journey
Into Night,” “A Delicate Balance,”
“Guess Who's Coming
To Dinner” and “The
Lion In Winter.”
■ Costumes worn in many
of her later television movies,
including her Emmynominated
performance as
the title character in “Mrs.
Delafield Wants to Marry”
as well as her Emmy-winning
performance in “Love
Among the Ruins.”
In all, there are about 150
pieces in display, including
shoes, makeup and even
sets of false eyelashes, Harris
said.
“One of the strengths of
this exhibit is it puts the
costumes in context,” Harris
said. “We have banners,
with a still from the film or
play by the costumes. We
have the makeup. We have
playbills. We have costumes
that go from the 1930s to the
1990s.”
For more information, call
the museum at 330-672-3450,
visit www.kent.edu/museum
or go to the Kent State University
Museum Facebook
page.

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News Headline: Kent State museum exhibits Hepburn's stage, screen costumes (Druesedow) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/22/2010
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fans of Katharine Hepburn can see the costumes she wore in many of her stage and screen appearances, as well as view what she donned for publicity pictures at the Kent State University Museum through Sept. 4, 2011.

"Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen" makes its world premiere at the university's fashion museum. The new exhibit showcases the screen legend's performance clothes, which include stage and film costumes spanning Katharine Hepburn's career, as well as apparel she wore for publicity purposes.

James Harris of H/L Communications, which is handling publicity and programming connected with the exhibit, said that after the exhibit closes at the Kent State University Museum, it will go on tour at various museums nationally and internationally.

The museum acquired Hepburn's performance clothes in 2008 from the star's estate, Harris said. Before her death in 2003, she had made clear her collection of performance clothes should be given to an educational institution instead of being sold at auction.

"Katharine Hepburn's costumes were designed or overseen by some of the greatest 20th century designers for fashion, stage and film," said museum director Jean Druesedow, who curated the exhibit. "Valentina, Adrian, Irene, Muriel King, Cecil Beaton, Coco Chanel, Walter Plunkett, Edith Head, Patricia Zipprodt, Jane Greenwood, Noel Taylor -- it's an 'A' list all the way."

Harris said that Hepburn's collection of her own costumes was unusual.

"These were costumes that, from the studio's point of view, were just part of the business," Harris said. "Usually the costumes were recycled for other movies. You'd see costumes that appeared in 'A' movies appearing later in 'B' movies. Katharine had the foresight to save them. It's amazing she was able to save the costumes she was able to save."

The garments that the museum's visitors see "were literally hanging in Hepburn's closets," Harris added. However, there was the challenge of trying to figure out which movie or play, or what situation, Hepburn wore them.

"These were not tagged," Harris said, who added the museum staff watched Hepburn's movies and studied stage stills to identify the garments -- a time-consuming process.

Another challenge for the museum was having to alter the mannequins -- they literally had to shave the mannequins -- so the garments would fit them, Harris said.

"She had a 20 1/2-inch waist," Harris said. "She was about 5 feet, seven inches, in an era when most actresses were about 5 foot, one."

Doreen Lazarus, Harris' wife and business partner, said that it was "hard to get a body double for her" because of her physique.

"She did a lot of her own stunts," Lazarus said. "When she was doing the film 'Summertime,' she fell into the canal -- part of the movie -- and swam back to the side. She got an eye infection from that, which plagued her the rest of her life."

Hepburn's impact on the silver screen and the stage are well-known. According to information provided by the museum, she was nominated by the Motion Picture Academy a record 12 times in the best leading actress category and won four Oscars -- for "Morning Glory" (1933), "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" (1967), "The Lion In Winter" (1968) and "On Golden Pond" (1981), a record for leading actor or actress wins that still stands today. However, Hepburn also had an impact on fashion.

"Katharine Hepburn has had a profound impact on American popular culture and fashion, and she has influenced generations of women," Druesedow said. "On screen and off, she epitomized the modern American woman -- smart, independent, active, honest, feisty, and outspoken. In terms of fashion, Katharine Hepburn blazed trails by popularizing slacks for women, wearing or adapting men's suits as women's apparel, and helping internationalize what is now called 'The American Style.'

Harris said that Hepburn liked to be comfortable when she was off-screen.

"Katharine made wearing slacks more acceptable for women," he said. "This was her image, casual and comfortable. They were her costume."

In fact, one time the studio attempted to try to force Hepburn to wear the more acceptable skirts and dresses for her day, Harris said.

"They took away her slacks, and just left the skirts and dresses," Harris said. "So she walked around the studio in her underwear, which just horrified the studio executives. That was far worse, of course, than her going around in slacks. They gave her back her slacks."

Highlights from the exhibit include:

* Stage costumes from "The Philadelphia Story" and "Without Love," as well as later Broadway shows "Coco," "West Side Waltz" and "A Matter of Gravity."

* Film costumes and publicity clothes include those from "The Little Minister," "Adam's Rib," "The Iron Petticoat," "Long Day's Journey Into Night," "A Delicate Balance," "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner" and "The Lion In Winter."

* Costumes worn in many of her later television movies, including her Emmy-nominated performance as the title character in "Mrs. Delafield Wants to Marry" as well as her Emmy-winning performance in "Love Among the Ruins."

In all, there are about 150 pieces in display, including shoes, makeup and even sets of false eyelashes, Harris said.

"One of the strengths of this exhibit is it puts the costumes in context," Harris said. "We have banners, with a still from the film or play by the costumes. We have the makeup. We have playbills. We have costumes that go from the 1930s to the 1990s."

For more information, call the Kent State University Museum at 330-672-3450, visit www.kent.edu/museum or go to the Kent State University Museum

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News Headline: Kent State museum exhibits Hepburn's stage, screen costumes (Druesedow) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Bedford Times Register - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fans of Katharine Hepburn can see the costumes she wore in many of her stage and screen appearances, as well as view what she donned for publicity pictures at the Kent State University Museum through Sept. 4, 2011.

"Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen" makes its world premiere at the university's fashion museum. The new exhibit showcases the screen legend's performance clothes, which include stage and film costumes spanning Katharine Hepburn's career, as well as apparel she wore for publicity purposes.

James Harris of H/L Communications, which is handling publicity and programming connected with the exhibit, said that after the exhibit closes at the Kent State University Museum, it will go on tour at various museums nationally and internationally.

The museum acquired Hepburn's performance clothes in 2008 from the star's estate, Harris said. Before her death in 2003, she had made clear her collection of performance clothes should be given to an educational institution instead of being sold at auction.

"Katharine Hepburn's costumes were designed or overseen by some of the greatest 20th century designers for fashion, stage and film," said museum director Jean Druesedow, who curated the exhibit. "Valentina, Adrian, Irene, Muriel King, Cecil Beaton, Coco Chanel, Walter Plunkett, Edith Head, Patricia Zipprodt, Jane Greenwood, Noel Taylor -- it's an 'A' list all the way."

Harris said that Hepburn's collection of her own costumes was unusual.

"These were costumes that, from the studio's point of view, were just part of the business," Harris said. "Usually the costumes were recycled for other movies. You'd see costumes that appeared in 'A' movies appearing later in 'B' movies. Katharine had the foresight to save them. It's amazing she was able to save the costumes she was able to save."

The garments that the museum's visitors see "were literally hanging in Hepburn's closets," Harris added. However, there was the challenge of trying to figure out which movie or play, or what situation, Hepburn wore them.

"These were not tagged," Harris said, who added the museum staff watched Hepburn's movies and studied stage stills to identify the garments -- a time-consuming process.

Another challenge for the museum was having to alter the mannequins -- they literally had to shave the mannequins -- so the garments would fit them, Harris said.

"She had a 20 1/2-inch waist," Harris said. "She was about 5 feet, seven inches, in an era when most actresses were about 5 foot, one."

Doreen Lazarus, Harris' wife and business partner, said that it was "hard to get a body double for her" because of her physique.

"She did a lot of her own stunts," Lazarus said. "When she was doing the film 'Summertime,' she fell into the canal -- part of the movie -- and swam back to the side. She got an eye infection from that, which plagued her the rest of her life."

Hepburn's impact on the silver screen and the stage are well-known. According to information provided by the museum, she was nominated by the Motion Picture Academy a record 12 times in the best leading actress category and won four Oscars -- for "Morning Glory" (1933), "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" (1967), "The Lion In Winter" (1968) and "On Golden Pond" (1981), a record for leading actor or actress wins that still stands today. However, Hepburn also had an impact on fashion.

"Katharine Hepburn has had a profound impact on American popular culture and fashion, and she has influenced generations of women," Druesedow said. "On screen and off, she epitomized the modern American woman -- smart, independent, active, honest, feisty, and outspoken. In terms of fashion, Katharine Hepburn blazed trails by popularizing slacks for women, wearing or adapting men's suits as women's apparel, and helping internationalize what is now called 'The American Style.'

Harris said that Hepburn liked to be comfortable when she was off-screen.

"Katharine made wearing slacks more acceptable for women," he said. "This was her image, casual and comfortable. They were her costume."

In fact, one time the studio attempted to try to force Hepburn to wear the more acceptable skirts and dresses for her day, Harris said.

"They took away her slacks, and just left the skirts and dresses," Harris said. "So she walked around the studio in her underwear, which just horrified the studio executives. That was far worse, of course, than her going around in slacks. They gave her back her slacks."

Highlights from the exhibit include:

* Stage costumes from "The Philadelphia Story" and "Without Love," as well as later Broadway shows "Coco," "West Side Waltz" and "A Matter of Gravity."

* Film costumes and publicity clothes include those from "The Little Minister," "Adam's Rib," "The Iron Petticoat," "Long Day's Journey Into Night," "A Delicate Balance," "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner" and "The Lion In Winter."

* Costumes worn in many of her later television movies, including her Emmy-nominated performance as the title character in "Mrs. Delafield Wants to Marry" as well as her Emmy-winning performance in "Love Among the Ruins."

In all, there are about 150 pieces in display, including shoes, makeup and even sets of false eyelashes, Harris said.

"One of the strengths of this exhibit is it puts the costumes in context," Harris said. "We have banners, with a still from the film or play by the costumes. We have the makeup. We have playbills. We have costumes that go from the 1930s to the 1990s."

For more information, call the Kent State University Museum at 330-672-3450, visit www.kent.edu/museum or go to the Kent State University Museum

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News Headline: Kent State Awarded $553,000 Grant to Partner with Libraries in University Circle Area | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: School: School of Library and Information Science at Kent State University

Award: $553,000 Grant from Institute of Museum and Library Services

In an effort to help recruit future librarians, the School of Library and Information Science at Kent State received a $553,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to form a partnership with 19 libraries in the University Circle area of Cleveland. These libraries belong to educational, medical and cultural institutions.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW Good news for NE Ohio, Kent Displays | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: U.S. COMMERCE DEPARTMENT GRANT
PROVIDES BOOST FOR PORTAGE FIRM

A $3 MILLION GRANT FROM
the U.S. Commerce Department's
National Institute of Standards and
Technology to help fund Kent Displays'
manufacturing of flexible crystal liquid displays
is good news for the area and on a wider
scope Northeastern Ohio, too.
The grant was one
of $22 million awarded
for research nationwide
that the government
estimates will be
partnered with private
funding to total $46 million in research to
assist manufacturing.
In the case of Kent Displays, the hope is
the grant will help the company establish
itself in the flat-panel market that some
estimates show to be a $150 billion businesses
that is continuing to grow.
Curiously, although much of the original
research, pure and applied, in liquid crystals
occurred in the United States, a good
bit of it at Kent State University, most of the
manufacturing of liquid crystal products
has gone overseas, particularly Asia.
Kent Displays, located off Mogadore
Road in Brimfield's Joint Economic Development
District with Kent, has been
an effort to bring some of that manufacturing
back to America's shores. The company
is working on a product that would
provide low-power, high resolution reflex
display for use in credit cards, electronic
paper, low-cost writing tablets and other
mass media offerings. Your next i-Pad or
some such similar device may someday be
using a Kent Displays product to generate
the images you want to read.
The grant recognizes the importance of
Kent Displays, whose success can help the
U.S. become a more competitive player in
the liquid crystals manufacturing game.

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News Headline: 11 KSU employees get $1,000 bonus for fostering excellence | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University
President Lester Lefton
visited 11 Kent State employees
before they left for
break to give them President's
Excellence Awards
and a $1,000 bonus.
KSU established the
awards in 2009 for exceptional
performance in advancing
the university's Excellence
Agenda.”
Honored were Special
Events manager Jennifer
Arnold; Information Technology
manager Eve Dalton;
Sherry Ernsberger, senior
secretary, School of Teaching,
Learning and Curriculum
Studies; Rachael Esterly,
lead IT user support analyst,
East Liverpool and Salem
campuses; Jeff Futo, police
officer; Dana Lawless-Andric,
director of Pre-College Trio
Upward Bound Programs;
head locksmith Tony Licata;
Michelle Parrish, special
assistant to the Finance Department;
Brian Pickering,
project manager for University
Architect's office; custodial
worker William Stevens
and Emily Vincent, director
of University Media Relations.

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News Headline: Ohio Employee Ownership Center of Kent State Awarded $500,000 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: School: Kent State University

Award: $500,000 to join Early Warning Network

The Ohio Employee Ownership Center, based at Kent State University, recently received $500,000 from the Ohio Department of Development. The money was given to the center as a result of partnering with the Early Warning Network. The goal of the network is to avoid layoffs and job loss in Ohio companies at risk.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY HOSTS COMMUNITY CELEBRATION OF KWANZAA, DEC. 27 | Email

News Date: 12/22/2010
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Dec. 22 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The Center of Pan-African Culture at Kent State University holds an open community celebration of Kwanzaa on Monday, Dec. 27, at 6 p.m. in the African Community Theatre located in Oscar Ritchie Hall room 230, on Terrace Drive in Kent, Ohio. The program is free and open to the public.

This year marks the 44th anniversary of Kwanzaa, the only non-heroic and non-religious holiday, created, developed and maintained by the African-American community, which is now being celebrated globally. To help celebrate this year's event, cultural expressions will be provided by Professor and Poet Mwatabu Okantah, Kwame Williams and the Youth Drummers from Akron, Spelman Chapel AME Church Choir of Kent, and Omo Iroko Drum and Dance Society.

The theme for the 2010 celebration is "Kwanzaa and the Nguzo Saba: An Ethics of Sharing Good in the World." This program is being held on the second day of Kwanzaa and is dedicated to the second principle of the Nguzo Saba, Kujichagulia (self-determination).

Since this is the only community-wide celebration in Portage County, all participants are asked to bring a wholesome food dish to help us celebrate (please, no pork dishes).

For more information about the program, call Kent State's Center for Pan-African Culture at 330-672-2300 or 330-672-0151. The coordinators of the event are Dr. Fran Dorsey and Professors Traci Williams and Mwatabu Okantah. Co-sponsors of this event include: Kent State's Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; Akron African American Cultural Association; Akron African United Front; Kent State's Department of Pan-African Studies; Spelman AME Chapel; Pan-African Faculty and Staff Association; African Community Theatre; and the Center of Pan-African Culture at Kent State.

For more information on Kent State's Center of Pan-African Culture, visit www.kent.edu/CAS/PAS/communityandarts/center-of-pan-african-culture.cfm. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2010 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Kent State Police Services Receives Sixth Consecutive Accreditation | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Police Services was accredited by The Commission on the Accreditation of Law Enforcement Agencies for the sixth time since 1991. The department also was recognized as a Flagship Agency, making it one of only two police departments to receive this status award three times.

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News Headline: 5 Reasons your stress solutions are wrong (Coifman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/22/2010
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! Shine
Contact Name: The Editors of Prevention
News OCR Text: If deep breaths, weekly yoga classes, and venting to your friends aren't helping you to stop stressing out and relax, you have plenty of company—and it's not your fault. New studies show that these supposedly tried-and-true anxiety busters are often just... well, a bust. Here are 5 surprising truths about what really helps manage stress—and what doesn't. 1.You never go to bed angry

Better strategy: Just get some sleep already When you're mid-dustup and about to wring your husband's neck, the last thing you feel like doing is curling up in bed beside him. But deep down, many of us worry that going to bed angry just tempts fate. So we bargain, cajole, and then fight some more in an effort to resolve the dispute, thinking all will be well by the morning if we can just reach a resolution.

The fact is, forcing a discussion by bedtime can actually make things worse, says Andrea K. Wittenborn, PhD, an assistant professor in the marriage and family therapy program at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. When you're upset, a part of the brain called the amygdala cues the fight-or-flight response, limiting your ability to have a calm, rational discussion. So it's a good idea to hold off on any showdown until you cool off. 2. You always keep your cool:

Better strategy: Throw a tantrum now and then From the time we're little girls, we're taught to control our tempers, and as adults—especially women—we still believe that venting anger is unhealthy (not to mention unladylike). In fact, the opposite now appears to be true. According to a study published in Biological Psychiatry that looked at the effect of facial expressions of emotions, such as fear and indignation, on our stress responses, displaying your anger may actually cause your brain to release less cortisol, the stress hormone associated with obesity, bone loss, and heart disease.

And while experts know that chronic anger contributes to hypertension and coronary disease, they've also found that expressing irritation in response to a short-term and unfair frustration, such as being cut off in traffic, can actually dampen the nasty effects of stress. That's because anger confers feelings of control, counteracting the helplessness and frustration we often feel in response to perceived insults and injustices, says lead study author Jennifer Lerner, PhD. 3. You turn to family and friends for support

Better strategy: Cuddle up with your pet

Hanging out with loved ones has long been touted as an instant mood-booster, but according to new scientific evidence, when it comes to managing stress, the calming effects of spending time with a furry friend trump those obtained by hanging out with friends and family. “Having your pet, whether a cat or a dog, with you during a stressful event turns out to be more soothing than a best friend or a spouse," says James J. Blascovich, PhD, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara 4. Express each and every feeling

Better strategy: Keep a few to yourself

In our tell-all, Oprah-fied culture, we've come to believe that sharing our feelings is the only way to deal with life's struggles. But just the opposite is often true. "We've long thought that talking about problems is always better, but there's also evidence suggesting that this coping style doesn't work for everybody," explains Karin Coifman, PhD, an assistant professor of clinical psychology at Kent State University.

Dr. Coifman and colleagues looked at how people whose spouse or child had just died coped with their loss. They learned that many of the subjects who avoided thinking or talking about their sadness—a style psychologists call repressive coping—had fewer short-term health problems, such as sore throats, diarrhea, and shortness of breath, as well as a lower incidence of long-term psychological problems. What's more, they returned to their everyday lives more quickly than those who dwelled upon their grief. That doesn't mean you should just suck it up when something bad happens. While you shouldn't deny yourself natural grieving moments, learning to direct your attention away from the stressor is a powerful coping mechanism. So after experiencing that initial burst of tears, turn to something positive—check in on a friend or rearrange your furniture. It's an important skill to look beyond the bad—we wouldn't survive as a species otherwise, Dr. Coifman adds. 5. You never soothe yourself with food

Better strategy: Treat yourself to chocolate We've been warned that bingeing on cookies and ice cream is a poor way to ease a worried state of mind and can actually create more anxiety. But here's a sweet exception to the rule: Indulging in a little chocolate can actually help. According to new findings published in the Journal of Proteome Research, eating a few pieces of dark chocolate when you're feeling on edge can help calm your nerves. (Unfortunately for you milk chocolate lovers, the researchers believe the flavonoids in dark chocolate are responsible for this soothing effect.) In the study, stressed-out participants who ate 1.5 ounces of dark chocolate a day for 2 weeks had reduced levels of stress hormones. More from Prevention

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News Headline: Lefton 'Irrevocably' Committed to Kent State Campus Renovations (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Proposed upgrades on hold until state releases budget in March.

Kent State University will not break ground any time soon on $250 million in renovations and upgrades proposed for the main campus during its centennial year.

University administrators have so far been unable to reach an agreement with Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Eric Fingerhut that would allow imposition of a new student fee to pay for the upgrades. Without such an agreement, the university will not be able to use its preferred funding method, the Build America Bond program set to expire Dec. 31.

The bond program, created in 2009 as part of the Recovery Act, allows for the issuance of taxable bonds for which the U.S. Treasury Department pays a direct subsidy of 35 percent of the interest costs to the issuer, which in this case would be Kent State.

Kent State University President Lester Lefton said the renovation plans are on hold until the state releases its budget in March and the university learns how much state support it will lose for 2011. Lefton made that statement shortly after announcing the university-wide hiring freeze Dec. 15.

Still, Lefton said, he remains adamant about improving the Kent campus.

"It's unfortunate that we're not able to, at this juncture, proceed with campus renovations under the Build America Bond program, as that would have saved the students and the taxpayers a whole bunch of money," Lefton said. "I'm committed, irrevocably really, to fixing the campus. We have needed renovations that have to take place. It's just a matter of when, not if."

The proposed renovations include bringing buildings up to code under the Americans with Disabilities Act, updating technology labs and building a $45 million facility for the College of Architecture and Design.

Fee creates stumbling block

Kent State planned to issue Build America Bonds to raise money for immediate construction costs and repay the debt with revenue generated by a new student fee.

The new fee proved to be the stumbling block for the chancellor's office.

Rob Evans, a spokesperson for the Ohio Board of Regents and chancellor Fingerhut, said Kent State's plan to use the student fee did not meet guidelines spelled out in Fingerhut's 10-year Strategic Plan for Higher Education, developed to meet goals set by outgoing Gov. Ted Strickland.

Chief among those goals are affordability and access to higher education, Evans said.

"The first proposal we got didn't meet our standards for affordability and access," Evans said. "We would be excited to get another proposal we could support, because we do think it's an important part of the university's plan."

The fee would have been phased in gradually, starting at $7 per credit hour and reaching a maximum $24 per credit hour. When fully implemented, the fee would have cost a student taking 12 credit hours $576 per year.

Lefton said Kent State's tuition ranks fifth-lowest among Ohio's universities, and because tuition is so low the university can't absorb the cost of the renovations without increasing revenue. That revenue has to come from either a new student fee or a tuition increase, Lefton said.

"Those are the two sources of funds that we have," he said.

Plan B

The university's original plan could move forward if Governor-elect John Kasich proves more accepting of the fee proposal, which would have allowed the university to complete a 10-year renovation plan in three years.

If not, university officials have said they are considering a scaled-back version of the initial proposal: making the same upgrades over a longer period of time and in smaller pieces.

"There's a Plan B, but it's on transparent paper," Lefton said.

The Kent State University Board of Trustees has delayed any further action on bond issues until after the university's next budget is finalized. That means further board action is likely on hold until March.

"It's not clear what we're going to have to do moving forward," Lefton said.

Moving forward

Kent State has gone ahead with unrelated construction and renovation plans despite the stalemate with the chancellor's office.

In November, Kent State broke ground on its Regional Academic Center in Twinsburg. Construction of the 44,000-square-foot, two-story building is being financed by a loan from the Akron Port Authority through the Build America program.

During the life of the loan, Lefton said, the federal rebate on the bond interest is expected to save the university $1.4 million. That savings was used to make the Twinsburg facility larger. University officials estimated the rebate would have saved an estimated $57 million for the main campus renovation plan.

This fall the university also completed renovations to Risman Plaza outside the Kent State Student Center. The $3 million-plus project eliminated the old bus shelter and fountain to create a more spacious plaza.

"Our buildings aren't falling down around our ears," Lefton said. "But we're planning for the future as well as the present."

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News Headline: Kent State University Reaches 2010 Campaign Goal for United Way | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Due to the combined efforts of faculty, staff, and students, the university exceeded its goal of raising $160,000 for this year's United Way of Portage County Campaign. The total amount collected was $160,026.02.

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News Headline: Kent State Receives "Best of Show" and Two Gold Awards at the 2010 PRSA Cleveland Rocks Awards | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2010
Outlet Full Name: Kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: School: Kent State University

Award: "Best of Show" and Two Gold Awards

Kent State University won the top prize at this year's Public Relations Society of America Cleveland Rocks Awards. The university won for its public relations efforts in commemorating the 40th anniversary of the May 4th shootings. The second gold award was to honor the May 4 Newsroom, which releases videos and links to social media sites where people can gather to discuss May 4.

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