Report Overview:
Total Clips (40)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Athletics (1)
Chemistry (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (2)
College of Nursing (CON); Office of the President; Residence Services (1)
English (1)
Fashion Design (1)
Geology (1)
History (1)
Institutional Advancement (2)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (2)
Pan-African Studies (1)
Regional Campuses (1)
Residence Services (3)
Safety (1)
Sociology (1)
Student Success (2)
Theatre and Dance (2)
Town-Gown (3)
University Press (3)
WKSU-FM (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Are Online Degree Completion Programs Worth Student Loan Debt? 12/31/2010 Blissful Style Text Attachment Email

...few semesters, under their belts. Online degree completion programs like the University Without Walls program at the University of Massachusetts or the Kent State University online continuing education program offer busy parents what seems to be a lifeline. Study from home, transfer many of...


Athletics (1)
Kent State hires Ohio St assistant Darrell Hazell 12/24/2010 WHIZ-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio (AP) — Darrell Hazell is the new Kent State coach after developing receivers Santonio Holmes and Ted Ginn Jr. into first-round draft picks during seven seasons as an Ohio State...


Chemistry (1)
KSU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry gets grant for $327,753 01/03/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
State to 'grade' university education programs (Mitchell) 12/28/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...Deans and the Ohio Association for Private Colleges of Teacher Education have come out in favor of the plan. Steve Mitchell, acting associate dean of Kent State Universitys College of Education, Health, and Human Services, said KSU is behind any plan that could lead to improvements in the...


College of Nursing (CON) (2)
Kent State to offer new doctorate of nursing practice degree 01/02/2011 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT -- Kent State University's College of Nursing now offers the Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree, one of two terminal degrees in nursing....

Findings from Kent State University in osteoporosis reported (Doheny) 12/24/2010 NewsRx.com Text Attachment Email

...beliefs. Men with higher levels of health motivation tended to have higher initial levels of daily calcium intake," wrote M.O. Doheny and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "Personal knowledge of DXA results relate significantly to increased calcium intake."...


College of Nursing (CON); Office of the President; Residence Services (1)
School Notes (Joseph) 12/31/2010 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

Classes to resume on Jan. 3 KSU to close two buildings at the Allerton Apartments Kent State University announced last week it will close two Allerton apartment buildings in July 2011 as part of a plan to phase out the complex....


English (1)
Vatican appoints American in probe of U.S. nuns, raising hopes among area faithful (Culbertson) 01/02/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...and traditional church. "The heart of the issue is not about nuns," said Sister Diana Culbertson, a retired professor of literature and Scripture at Kent State University. "It's about the interpretation of Vatican II. The current hierarchy of the church does not have the same interpretation...


Fashion Design (1)
2 from KSU fashion faculty receive honor (Campbell, Quevedo) 12/25/2010 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University School of Fashion Design and Merchandising School's director and an associate professor were awarded the International...


Geology (1)
KSU prof. on climate study team (Ortiz) 12/28/2010 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

For more than a decade, Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University and part of an international team of National Science Foundation-funded researchers, has been studying long-term climate...


History (1)
Dolls That Carried the News of Fashion 12/24/2010 New York Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...personalities. But it took years to reach this moment.'' From the time that the collection was rediscovered by Stanley Garfinkel, a history professor at Kent State University in Ohio, the idea of a new show was born. But it was not until Ms. Train found documents here proving that the dolls had...


Institutional Advancement (2)
Cleveland-area college fundraisers try harder and succeed in spite of economy 12/26/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...Bernstein, The Plain Dealer in their own right • Series index Tom Kessler, special to The Plain Dealer The Roe Green Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Roe Green in the building that bears her name. The lobby of the performing arts center Lisa DeJong, PD Green building...

Area colleges enjoy fundraising success 12/28/2010 Plain Dealer Text Email

...checks that had been in the works for years finally got written. Another factor is that some colleges have beefed up their fundraising departments. Kent State University added 10 people to its staff three years ago. CSU doubled its advancement team from 20 to 40 in 2009. Several college officials...


KSU at Stark (2)
New year brings new minimum wage for Ohioans (Engelhardt) 01/01/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...boyfriend was recently laid off from his job. Their joint income is $600 a month. And they're getting food stamp assistance as she works on her degree at Kent State University Stark campus. “Personally, I think (the minimum wage) should be at least $8 an hour. It's ridiculous to live on $7.30...

Minimum wage goes up today (Engelhardt) 01/01/2011 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

...wage from $5.15 to $5.85 an hour in July 2007, to $6.55 an hour in July 2008 and to $7.25 in July 2009. Lucas Engelhardt, a professor of economics at Kent State University Stark campus at North Canton, said he opposes the concept of a minimum wage, which he said leads to smaller profits, higher...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Teaching Students Stress Reduction 12/30/2010 Tribune Chronicle Text Attachment Email

The Trumbull County Educational Service Center in conjunction with Kent State University is holding ''TEACHING STUDENTS STRESS REDUCTION, Anxiety Management and Guided Imagery: A Guide for Classroom Teachers,...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
What's your pick for the top stories of 2010? 12/25/2010 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

...center, plus a fund-raising effort. • Performing Arts Center opens: After months of construction and waiting, the new Performing Arts Center opened at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in late Nobember. The inaugural concert of the Tuscarawas Philharmonic's 75th anniversary sold out all of...


KSU Museum (1)
EXCLUSIVE: The Clothes That Helped Make Kate Great: Hepburn Costume Exhibit Is an Eyeful in Ohio 12/31/2010 Playbill - New York Text Attachment Email

Katharine Hepburn Photo by Bryn Mawr College Libraries A Kent State University Museum exhibition of Katharine Hepburn's film and theatre costumes offers a dazzling display of the legendary actress'...


Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
Cleveland's going up: New projects, pioneers poised to give city a lift: Joe Frolik 12/25/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...seeds sustainable prosperity. One of Greater Cleveland's great missed opportunities came in the 1970s, when liquid crystal technology developed at Kent State University ended up in a new generation of electronic devices made in Asia. Now the region's universities are helping to perfect...

WIPO ASSIGNS PATENT TO KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FOR "TUNABLE ELECTRO-OPTIC LIQUID CRYSTAL LENSES AND METHODS FOR FORMING THE LENSES" (AMERICAN INVENTORS) 12/28/2010 Federal News Service Text Email

...was published on Dec. 23. Title of the invention: "TUNABLE ELECTRO-OPTIC LIQUID CRYSTAL LENSES AND METHODS FOR FORMING THE LENSES." Applicants: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY (US). Inventors: Philip Bos (US), Douglas Bryant (US), Lei Shi (US) and Bentley Wall (US). According to the abstract...


Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (2)
Bright Spots: Dec. 27, 2010 (McIntyre) 12/27/2010 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...layoffs and job loss in the state through timely intervention in at-risk companies. The employee ownership center, a nonprofit outreach center based at Kent State University, supports the development of business across the Ohio and around the world by its efforts to save jobs, create wealth...

KSU center wins $500,000 grant to identify businesses at risk for layoffs (Cooper, Simecek) 01/03/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Pan-African Studies (1)
Free Kwanzaa celebrations begin Sunday in Akron area 12/25/2010 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Market St., Akron. The host is Akron African United Front. Monday's Kujichagulia (Self-Determination) program will be 6 p.m., at Oscar Ritchie Hall, Kent State University. The host is Kent State Center for Pan African Culture. Tuesday's Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility)...


Regional Campuses (1)
Best community colleges in Ohio 12/27/2010 Helium Text Attachment Email

...aid each year. Well over 20,000 students attend Sinclair's main campus each year making it one of the largest community colleges in the United States. Kent State has two year campuses located in Salem, Stark, Trumbull, Tuscarawas, Geauga, East Liverpool and Ashtabula. Kent State is known for...


Residence Services (3)
Allerton complex at KSU to close (Joseph) 12/24/2010 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Dec. 24--KENT -- Kawther Hamash of Jordan can list a lot of things she likes about Kent State's Allerton Apartments: good outdoor lighting, a nice staff and a safe environment. But that won't be enough to save the 164 on-campus...

KSU to tear down campus apartments 12/25/2010 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Kawther Hamash of Jordan can list a lot of things she likes about Kent State's Allerton Apartments: good outdoor lighting, a nice staff and a safe environment. But that won't be enough to save the 164 on-campus...

Kent State University plans to demolish aging apartments 12/28/2010 American School and University Text Attachment Email

From Crain's Cleveland Business: Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, will demolish a group of apartment buildings that officials say have reached the end of their life cycle....


Safety (1)
KSU police reaccredited by law enforcement unit (Buckbee) 01/03/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Sociology (1)
Needs, interests of middle class take back seat (Mastriacovo) 12/27/2010 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...winning, for too many years now. Attorney Paul A. Mastriacovo of Plain Township is a faculty member in the Department of Sociology at the main campus of Kent State University...


Student Success (2)
Local musician releases CD, prepares for second 01/02/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

...we would work around the house, we would sing and do harmonies. It made the chores go faster." So it's little surprise that Goines, who now attends Kent State University, is studying vocal music. The aspiring singer has performed for Family Unity in the Park at Luke Easter Park, The Ingenuity...

Local musician releases CD, prepares for second 01/02/2011 Hudson Hub-Times Text Attachment Email

...we would work around the house, we would sing and do harmonies. It made the chores go faster." So it's little surprise that Goines, who now attends Kent State University, is studying vocal music. The aspiring singer has performed for Family Unity in the Park at Luke Easter Park, The Ingenuity...


Theatre and Dance (2)
Top Cleveland theater stories of 2010 12/26/2010 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...signs to appear in this spring's production of "Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo," Cleveland Heights writer Rajiv Joseph's Broadway debut. November: Kent State University opens the Roe Green Center for the School of Theatre and Dance, thanks to a $6.5 million grant from alum Green. December:...

Welty fund hands out grants 01/03/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Service, $7,500 to repair a backup power generator at Hospice Care Center. • Humane Society of Greater Akron, $5,000 to expand medical facilities. • Kent State University Foundation-Porthouse Theatre, $2,619 to buy an electronic piano/keyboard for the School of Theatre and Dance. • Mental...


Town-Gown (3)
Hearing set to pave way for PARTA project in Kent 01/01/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...open in 2012 and be a key piece in downtown Kent's $100 million renaissance. The parking will also support a hotel and conference center being built by Kent State University, as well as other new retail and office buildings to be built one block away. PARTA needed 12 properties for the project...

Hearing set to pave way for PARTA project in Kent 01/02/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...open in 2012 and be a key piece in downtown Kent's $100 million renaissance. The parking will also support a hotel and conference center being built by Kent State University, as well as other new retail and office buildings to be built one block away. PARTA needed 12 properties for the project...

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS 12/25/2010 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...county assessor. Real estate transfers for the 5th week of August, 2010 PORTAGE COUNTY KENT CITY 416 College Ave, Lkg Inc (An Ohio Corp) to Kent State University Board Of Trustees, $115,300 325 Erie, Smith Michael W to Kent State University Board Of Trustees, $93,300...


University Press (3)
'Ohio Outback': Writer fishes for humor in the Great Black Swamp 01/02/2011 Toledo Blade - Online Text Attachment Email

...acknowledges this up front, consciously drawing on Sherwood Anderson and James Thurber as his muses for the series of stories that comprise Ohio Outback (The Kent State University Press, 176 pages, $24.95). Smith, a professor of English at Ohio Northern University from 1986 to 2006, said that when...

Beggars of Life, by Jim Tully, back in print 12/29/2010 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

...literature, could only be found in second hand bookshops. Used copies often commanded a premium. Now, the book is back in print thanks to the efforts of Kent State University Press and two dedicated Tully scholars, Paul Bauer and Mark Dawidziak. Over the last year and a half, the university...

D. Blankenship gave 5 stars to: Civil War Prisons 12/26/2010 Suomen Kuvalehti Text Attachment Email

...War Prisons: A Study in War Psychology." The book being reviewed here is "Civil War Prisons," which is the small volume published and released by The Kent State University Press in 1962. We are addressing two quite different works. Hesseltine's original work, which as noted was issued about...


WKSU-FM (1)
Jim Blum 12/31/2010 NPR - Online Text Attachment Email

Jim Blum has been sharing his love of folk music as a radio host on WKSU-FM for more than 25 years and, since 2003, also on FolkAlley.com. Blum graduated...


News Headline: Are Online Degree Completion Programs Worth Student Loan Debt? | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/31/2010
Outlet Full Name: Blissful Style
Contact Name: Melanie Zoltan
News OCR Text: When two of the biggest trends in higher education merge, the result is - what else? - student loans for most families. As the non-traditional student population swells the ranks of college students at the same time that online college degrees expand dramatically, parents are flocking to online degree completions program. But is the debt worth it?



Online Degree Completion Programs



Most parents age 25 and older (the primary definition of a "non-traditional" student) have a few college credits, or even a few semesters, under their belts. Online degree completion programs like the University Without Walls program at the University of Massachusetts or the Kent State University online continuing education program offer busy parents what seems to be a lifeline. Study from home, transfer many of the old credits, and have that B.A. or B.S. on the resume.



In addition, as more non-profit colleges and established institutions like Bay Path College, Penn State, University of Northern Colorado, Western Governors University and more roll out online degree completion programs, prospective students have choices to turn toward known-name colleges and universities - often at a fraction of the cost of for-profit schools.



Online College Degrees and Family Budgets




So is it worth it? Do online degrees balance out when it comes to the debt incurred while completing a degree? You could face costs as low as $3,000 per semester, or as much as $10,000 per semester, and if Mom or Dad is returning to college when the oldest child is 16, the double whammy of parent/child tuition might stretch your family budget to the breaking point.



On the other hand, federal financial aid considers all students in a family, so you might find that grants and subsidized loan amounts increase when parent and child are student colleagues. Check your FAFSA and run some financial models to see whether the increased financial aid makes it possible for the non-traditional adult learner to go back.



Non-traditional Students Go Back to College



What about work? If you need to work full-time and be in school full-time to maximize student aid, take a good look at your coursework. Talk to an academic advisor to get a reality check on workload and - just in case - what happens if you have to withdraw, drop out, or take an incomplete. You don't want to be left holding the bag for thousands in grants because you didn't understand the intricacies of enrolment and federal financial aid.



Adult learners with clear career or financial goals have the greatest success with online degree completion programs and taking on student loan debt. Whether you're seeking an RN to BSN nursing degree, teacher licensure, or a B.A. or B.S. that guarantees a raise, having a specific reason for going back to college - and a financial plan that makes sense - is critical for making the grade.

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News Headline: Kent State hires Ohio St assistant Darrell Hazell | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2010
Outlet Full Name: WHIZ-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio (AP) — Darrell Hazell is the new Kent State coach after developing receivers Santonio Holmes and Ted Ginn Jr. into first-round draft picks during seven seasons as an Ohio State assistant.

Hazell becomes the Golden Flashes' 20th head coach. He replaces Doug Martin, who resigned with a few weeks left in a 5-7 season and went 29-53 in seven years overall. He also helped design Ohio State's offensive game plans.

Kent State athletic director Joel Nielsen interviewed a dozen candidates, including four on KSU's campus: Hazell, Kent State defensive coordinator Pete Rekstis and wide receivers coaches Curt Cignetti of Alabama and Bobby Kennedy of Texas.

The last assistant to leave Buckeyes coach Jim Tressel for a head coaching job was Mark Snyder, to Marshall after the 2004 season.

Copyright 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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News Headline: KSU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry gets grant for $327,753 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University
announced the Department
of Chemistry and
Biochemistry received a
$327,753 grant to improve
its Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
Spectrometer.
NMR technology is similar
to Magnetic Resonance
Imaging technology but it
is used to examine smaller
structures.
According to the university,
the new equipment
will be installed in early
2011.

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News Headline: State to 'grade' university education programs (Mitchell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/28/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Thomas Gallick | Staff Writer

The state of Ohio adopted a new report card earlier this month to judge how effective education programs at public and private universities are at training new teachers.

The Ohio Board of Regents has developed 14 standards it will use to analyze the performance of education colleges, and the teachers they produce, beginning in 2011.

Rob Evans, press secretary for the Ohio Board of Regents, said the General Assembly directed the board to develop the report card. The way we look at it, if you go to school in the state your parents pay taxes in, you should have confidence in the education you receive in that state, Evans said. Criteria that will be evaluated include: How a universitys graduates score on the states new Teacher Performance Assessment, how well the university places teachers in hard-to-staff Ohio school districts and how much students learn during a one-year period in a particular teachers class. Groups representing both private and public education programs in Ohio, the State University Education Deans and the Ohio Association for Private Colleges of Teacher Education have come out in favor of the plan.

Steve Mitchell, acting associate dean of Kent State Universitys College of Education, Health, and Human Services, said KSU is behind any plan that could lead to improvements in the way it educates future teachers. I think certainly Kent State supports any effort to increase accountability, he said. Mitchell said he hopes the new steps taken by the state will help the College of Education, Health and Human Services better monitor how its students perform after college.

He said the college currently tries to follow up on graduates but does nothing formal to evaluate them. Evans said data will be collected on individual teachers but only in order to create an accurate picture of how the colleges and universities they attended prepared them. Were interested in the (scores) of the institutions, Evans said. Were looking at the pipeline that created that teacher and delivered them to a school, Evans said. The Board of Regents will release its first comprehensive report on all education preparation programs by the end of 2012, but will start collecting and releasing some data immediately. Evans said the late 2012 estimate reflects the large amount of research and work that will go into the report.

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News Headline: Kent State to offer new doctorate of nursing practice degree | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: Monica Robins
News OCR Text: KENT -- Kent State University's College of Nursing now offers the Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree, one of two terminal degrees in nursing.

Kent State already offers the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) and beginning in Spring 2011 will offer the DNP, which prepares advanced practice nurse clinical scholars as leaders in translating research evidence into clinical practice.

According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), transitioning advanced practice nursing programs from the master's level to the doctoral level serves as a response to changes in health care delivery and emerging health care needs.

It supports advanced practice nurses in securing the knowledge required to provide leadership in the discipline of nursing, a discipline that is complex and rapidly changing.

The AACN requires that all entry-level advanced practice educational programs be transitioned from the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree to the DNP degree by the year 2015.

Kent State currently has 12 advanced practice MSN concentrations that will transition to the DNP. Applications for this innovative program will be accepted for Spring 2011. At the present time, the degree will be offered as a part-time, post advanced practice master's program.

It will incorporate 37 didactic credit hours, 540 clinical hours, and a capstone project. For more information about the new Doctorate of Nursing Practice degree at Kent State, please contact Dr. Karen Budd, director of nursing graduate programs, at kbudd@kent.edu or 330-672-8776.

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News Headline: Findings from Kent State University in osteoporosis reported (Doheny) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2010
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: -- Investigators publish new data in the report 'Structural model for osteoporosis preventing behavior in men.' According to a study from the United States, "This longitudinal study evaluates the effect of bone mineral density screening on calcium intake and daily exercise of 196 healthy men older than 50 years over a period of 1 year. In this randomized clinical trial, the experimental group received personal bone density information via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)."

"The men completed measures addressing knowledge, health beliefs, calcium intake, and exercise behaviors. Outcome measures were collected by a questionnaire at three time points: initial (Time 1 [T1]; pre-DXA), 6 months (Time 2 [T2]), and 12 months (Time 3 [T3]). Using structural equation modeling for data analysis, results indicated that men in the experimental group had a significantly higher T2 calcium intake than the control group, with no additional direct effect at T3. T1 daily calcium intake was significantly predicted by T1 health beliefs. Men with higher levels of health motivation tended to have higher initial levels of daily calcium intake," wrote M.O. Doheny and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "Personal knowledge of DXA results relate significantly to increased calcium intake."

Doheny and colleagues published their study in American Journal of Men's Health (Structural model for osteoporosis preventing behavior in men. American Journal of Men's Health, 2010;4(4):334-43).

For more information, contact M.O. Doheny, Kent State University, Kent, OH USA.

Publisher contact information for the American Journal of Men's Health is: SAGE Publications, USA , 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320, USA.

Keywords: City:Kent, State:OH, Country:United States, Metabolic Bone Diseases, Osteoporosis.

This article was prepared by NewsRx editors from staff and other reports.

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News Headline: School Notes (Joseph) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/31/2010
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Classes to resume on Jan. 3

KSU to close two buildings

at the Allerton Apartments

Kent State University announced last week it will close two Allerton apartment buildings in July 2011 as part of a plan to phase out the complex.

KSU will close Allerton buildings L and M. According to the university, 38 apartments in those buildings are occupied.

Betsy Joseph, director of residence services at KSU, said the residents of the two buildings who wish to stay at Allerton can.

"We're not pushing anybody out," she said. "We'll relocate anyone who wants to stay to one of the remaining buildings."

Kent State leases the apartments upper-class students and students with families. The university estimates one-third of the residents are international students.

Joseph said residents moving from buildings L and M to a different Allerton buildings will receive a month of free rent in July 2011 when they sign their lease.

11 Kent State employees get

$1,000 bonuses for excellence

Kent State University President Lester Lefton visited 11 KSU employees before they left for break to give them president's excellence awards and $1,000 bonuses.

KSU established the awards in 2009 for exceptional performance in advancing the university's excellence agenda.

Honored were special events manager Jennifer Arnold; information technology manager Eve Dalton; Sherry Ernsberger, senior secretary; Rachael Esterly, lead IT user support analyst at East Liverpool and Salem; Jeff Futo, police officer.

Dana Lawless-Andric, director of pre-college Trio Upward Bound programs; head locksmith Tony Licata; Michelle Parrish, special assistant to the finance department; Brian Pickering, project manager for university architect's office; custodial worker William Stevens; and Emily Vincent, director of university media relations.

KSU adds a nursing degree

Kent State University will offer a new nursing doctorate program in spring 2011.

The Ohio Board of Regents approved KSU to offer a doctorate of nursing practice last week. KSU already offers a Doctor of Philosophy degree in nursing.

KSU is offering the program as a response to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing requirement that masters of science in nursing programs be converted into Doctorate of Nursing by 2015.

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News Headline: Vatican appoints American in probe of U.S. nuns, raising hopes among area faithful (Culbertson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Michael O'Malley, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: Archbishop Joseph Tobin

A recent development in the Vatican's investigation of U.S. nuns has the sisters and their supporters breathing a little easier.

Archbishop Joseph Tobin, an American who acknowledges the investigation has caused "anger and hurt" among U.S. nuns, has been named secretary of the Vatican panel conducting the investigation.

Tobin, who grew up in Detroit, has said he will work to heal any rifts between American sisters and the Catholic hierarchy in Rome. He also hopes to lift a shroud of secrecy surrounding the probe.

"We're very excited by his appointment," said Sister Mary Ann Flannery, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Parma. "He's coming from an American culture that believes you have a right to defend yourself, a right to have your voice heard."

The investigation, officially known as an "apostolic visitation," is meant to "look into the quality of life" in sisters' religious communities, according to the Vatican.

Currently, the investigative reports are to be kept confidential and turned over to the Vatican panel. Not even the nuns will be allowed to see them.

"That is so offensive," said Flannery. "We basically don't trust any of this."

But Tobin, who took over his new position in September, said in an interview this month with National Catholic Reporter, a biweekly newspaper in Washington, D.C., that he will work to make the investigation more transparent.

He told the newspaper he will "strongly advocate" for the rights of nuns to know the findings of the investigation and to respond to them.

"I'm hoping he will be allowed to fulfill his goal of working for more transparency," said Flannery. "I hope no power [in Rome] finds a way to stifle his voice."

The investigation, begun in December 2008 and to continue until the end of next year, has been criticized by many U.S. Catholics who see it as oppressive and unnecessary.

The critics believe it's a way for Rome to rein in U.S. nuns because they are regarded by church hierarchy as too independent and generally too liberal on social issues.

Many sisters answered the call of the church's Second Vatican Council, which, more than 40 years ago, encouraged social activism, freedom of expression and conscience and respect for other religions.

They shed their habits, rolled up their sleeves and took their works of mercy to the streets, feeding the hungry, sheltering the homeless and visiting the sick. Some moved out of convents and lived independently.

Critics believe the hierarchy in Rome is trying to turn the clock back to a more conservative and traditional church.

"The heart of the issue is not about nuns," said Sister Diana Culbertson, a retired professor of literature and Scripture at Kent State University. "It's about the interpretation of Vatican II. The current hierarchy of the church does not have the same interpretation of Vatican II as we do."

Culbertson, who refers to the investigation as the "nunquisition," said: "They see us as Marxist-feminist radicals. Rome has a picture of American nuns that doesn't correspond to the picture we have of ourselves.

"They want us in our place. But we don't make vows to the hierarchy. We make our vows to God."

Though Culbertson welcomes the appointment of Tobin to the Vatican panel, she challenges his call for a "reconciliation" between the Vatican and U.S. nuns.

"Reconciliation suggests we both have something to apologize for," she said. "Nuns have no apologies to make."

The investigation was ordered by Cardinal Franc Rod , the prefect of the Vatican panel. Tobin, as secretary, is in the No. 2 position on the panel.

Rod appointed Mother Mary Clare Millea, superior of the Connecticut-based Apostles of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, to carry out the investigation.

Millea has mobilized teams of investigators to visit and take notes in sisters' communities across the nation. Those conducting the investigation have declined to comment about it.

Earlier this month, five investigators spent five days at the Cleveland-based Sisters of the Congregation of St. Joseph.

"We weren't apprised of the reason for it or what they were looking for," said Gina Sullivan, spokeswoman for the congregation. "We still don't know what the outcome will be. Whether we will ever know remains to be seen."

Sullivan said the investigators were polite, gracious and well-received by the congregation. Investigators met with nuns in groups and individually.

A prepared statement by Sister Nancy Conway, head of the St. Joseph congregation, said, "We are hopeful that the Apostolic Visitation will offer an opportunity for the institutional Church to learn more about our spirituality and ministry, which our sisters have lived in fidelity to the spirit of our foundresses for more than 350 years."

One of the questions investigators ask, according to the Visitation's Web site, is: "What is the process for responding to sisters who dissent publicly from church teaching and discipline."

That question, says the Rev. Thomas Reese, a Jesuit theologian at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., shows what the inquiry really is all about -- the idea that nuns should not think for themselves or question church authority.

Reese, an outspoken critic of the investigation, said the appointment of Tobin, a Redemptorist who had been the superior of his order, is "extraordinary."

"It's also extraordinary how he has been outspoken about the visitation," said Reese. "This guy has been forthrightly acknowledging that the visitation has upset people tremendously in the United States and that the Vatican has to respond. It's obvious he has heard the concerns."

Another Vatican panel is investigating the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, an organization that represents 95 percent of the nation's 59,000 nuns.

The investigation, begun in spring 2009, is called a "doctrinal assessment of the activities and initiatives" of the leadership conference.

According to a letter the conference sent to its members announcing the assessment, the Vatican doesn't think nuns have adequately addressed three issues: Allowing only men to become priests; the idea that Jesus and the Catholic Church are central for achieving salvation; and "the problem of homosexuality."

Officials of the conference, based in Silver Spring, Md., have declined to discuss details of the investigation.

However, Sister Annmarie Sanders, spokeswoman for the conference, said this month that leaders of her group have had no communication with the Vatican panel since April.

Asked whether she feels the nuns' conference is being kept in the dark regarding the investigation, Sanders said, "Very much so."

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: momalley@plaind.com, 216-999-4893

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News Headline: 2 from KSU fashion faculty receive honor (Campbell, Quevedo) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/25/2010
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University School of Fashion Design and Merchandising School's director and an associate professor were awarded the International Artist of the Year.

School Director J.R. Campbell and Vincent Quevedo, associate professor of fashion design, were collaboratively awarded the honor at the 2010 Fashion Art Biennale in Seoul, South Korea, for their piece “DMZ,” which stands for demilitarized zone.

The winning piece is made up of two knit dresses on dress forms connected by a large section of fabric printed with optical-illusion imagery.

The middle section has vents and tubes sewn into it, incorporating photos taken from a military submarine's control panel.

“The piece is meant to invoke a somewhat voyeuristic response to investigating the tubes, which mimics the Western hemisphere's cultural response to the DMZ between North and South Korea,” Campbell said.

Campbell and Quevedo conceived of, designed and created the piece, down to the fabric. Campbell graphically designed the cotton jersey-knit fabric and digitally printed it in the school's TechStyleLAB.

Campbell attended the Biennale as one of only four American speakers at the weeklong event.

The event drew 104 artists from 17 nations and included a symposium of various speakers, performances and the main exhibition on the theme of “Fashion Art — War/Peace,” which was in honor of the 60th anniversary of the Korean War.

The event took place during the G-20 Summit in Seoul last month.

One outcome of Campbell and Quevedo's participation was an invitation extended to the university's fashion school by the Chinese government to send 10 Kent State fashion-design students to show their work during China's Fashion Week in March in Beijing.

The chosen students will enjoy an all-expenses paid trip and the opportunity to feature their designs before an international audience.

Students will be chosen during a competitive process by Campbell and the faculty of Kent State's School of Fashion Design and Merchandising.

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News Headline: KSU prof. on climate study team (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/28/2010
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For more than a decade, Dr. Joseph Ortiz, associate professor of geology at Kent State University and part of an international team of National Science Foundation-funded researchers, has been studying long-term climate variability associated with El Niño. The researchers' goal is to help climatologists better understand this global climate phenomenon that happens every two to eight years, impacting much of the world.

El Niño is the periodic warming of central and eastern tropical Pacific waters. The last El Niño occurred in 2009, Ortiz said, and its impact was felt in the United States with flooding in the south and wildfires in California. The research team looked at El Niño-Southern Oscillation, which is often just called “El Niño”, reconstructing sea surface temperature of the equatorial Pacific over the past 14,000 years.

“If we understand how El Niño changes over thousands of years, we can better predict climate changes on societal time-scales of years to decades,” Ortiz said. “El Niño variations lead to drought, famine, landslides, fires and other natural disasters, depending on where in the world you happen to be. Our findings can help lead to better ways to predict El Niño-Southern Oscillations, mitigating the natural disasters associated with it.”

In addition to Ortiz, the research team includes the lead author on the paper, Thomas Marchitto (University of Colorado); Raimund Muscheler (Lund University in Sweden); Jose Carriquiry (Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Ensenada in Mexico); and Alexander van Geen (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University). Their findings appear in the Dec. 3 issue of Science, the prestigious journal published by AAAS, the world's largest science society.

“The climate system is very sensitive to subtle external forcing,” Ortiz said. “We determined that the sun has an impact but is not the sole factor driving changes on these millennial time scales. Other studies have tried to show a solar linkage to El Niño-related climate variability, but our study indicates a convincing linkage due to the continuity of our record. This paper confirms the ‘ocean dynamical thermostat' theory, showing that solar-forced changes in ocean circulation have on impact on El Niño.”

“With my involvement in this project, KSU geology students have studied core samples collected off of Baja California,” Ortiz said. “The students can take what they learn in the classroom out into the field and back to the lab. I feel very fortunate to be able to provide our students with this type of experience and bring international-level research to Kent State.”

Ortiz has been with KSU since 2001. He resides in Hudson.

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News Headline: Dolls That Carried the News of Fashion | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2010
Outlet Full Name: New York Times - Online
Contact Name: ALAN RIDING
News OCR Text: PARIS, May 11 — It was March 1945, the war against Germany dragged on and everything was in short supply. But with France already liberated, Paris found an ingenious way of proclaiming that it was still the world capital of fashion.

In an annex to the Louvre, with all the pomp that the city could muster in those harsh gray days, an exhibition of 228 perfectly attired ''petits mannequins,'' or dolls, brought together the latest work of the prominent Paris fashion designers of the day.

It was a huge success and, after V.E. Day in May 1945, the exhibition traveled to London and Leeds, England; Barcelona, Spain; Copenhagen; Stockholm, and Vienna. The next year, updated with newer designs, it carried the word of French fashion reborn to New York and San Francisco.

Soon, Paris couturiers were back in their stride, Christian Dior's New Look was about to strike and the collection of dolls was forgotten and presumed lost. But in 1983, the collection was found on display at the small Maryhill Museum of Art in Goldendale, Wash., and a new chapter in its life began.

This month, in the same Pavillon de Marsan beside the Louvre where it was first shown 45 years ago, the Theatre de la Mode, as it was named, is again displaying the extraordinary energy and talent of designers who had barely emerged from the shadow of Nazi occupation.

The exhibition will continue here until Sept. 9 and will move in December to the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. After that, it heads home to the Maryhill Museum, although it is already scheduled for Tokyo in 1992 and more invitations are expected.

Dedicated to couturiers of the era, the exhibition is also a tribute to a handful of people today, including Susan Train, the editor of American Vogue in Paris, and Nadine Gasc, curator of the Department of Textile and Fashion at the Musee des Arts Decoratifs, whose sheer affection for the dolls made the exhibition happen.

''When you see them every day the way we have,'' Ms. Train said, ''when you get to know them, when you watch them being put back together, their heads, their arms, their legs, they begin to take on their own personalities. But it took years to reach this moment.''

From the time that the collection was rediscovered by Stanley Garfinkel, a history professor at Kent State University in Ohio, the idea of a new show was born. But it was not until Ms. Train found documents here proving that the dolls had been donated to Maryhill by the Paris Chamber of Couture in 1952 that the museum felt ready to lend them.

The collection returned to Paris in 1987. Then came the labor of love: finding photographs and documents of the original exhibition, overseeing the restoration of damaged dolls and their accessories and organizing the reproduction of the original hand-painted stage decors.

When the exhibition opened last Thursday, with much of the Paris fashion world in attendance, the Theatre de la Mode had 9 copies of the 13 ''stages'' and 171 of the 237 dolls that were first shown in New York in May 1946. It also included photographs and a few items of the original exhibition here.

Made of sculptured wire and angelic molded heads and standing just 27 inches high, the ''petits mannequins'' are of course the stars, frozen in elegant poses to show off what the likes of Balenciaga, Lucien Lelong, Schiaparelli, Nina Ricci and Pierre Balmain had in mind for the spring-summer season of 1946.

There are embroidered evening gowns, striking dresses for the opera, natty daytime suits and, in the most telling reminder of the passage of time, somewhat coy beachwear. Silk, satin and furs were evidently still hard to find because with a few exceptions, the couturiers made do with wool, suede, crepe and synthetic material.

''This shows a moment of fashion history,'' Ms. Train said. ''It is the first collection for export after the war and already you see the movement away from the short skirts, big shoulders and wooden platform shoes of the war years. You already have rounder shoulders, nipped waists, accentuated hips and longer skirts.''

At the time, she said, Christian Dior was still working for the house of Lucien Lelong. ''But Dior's touch can be seen in several of the designs that carry Lelong's name here,'' she said, pointing to a strapless evening dress. ''You can see the New Look on its way. This is a 'we're back in business' show.''

The clothes had been made by their respective houses with the same care as their one-of-a-kind originals, but one of the delights of the exhibition is provided by the ''extras'' - miniature shoes, kid gloves, handbags, jewelry, flowers and a wonderful assortment of hats, many with feathers.

Most dolls have intricately coiffed human hair, which Alexandre de Paris has put back in place. For the New York show in 1946, Cartier made a diamond plastron, which the house of Yves Saint Laurent has had copied as part of its contribution to the new exhibition.

The Theatre de la Mode took its name from the idea of placing the dolls on little stages with theatrical lighting, and while none of the stages survived, most have been reproduced from photographs. There is the little theater designed and painted by Christian Berard and the war-ravaged scene by Jean Cocteau that he called ''My Wife is a Witch.'' Two designers, Andre Beaurepaire and Jean-Denis Malcles, are still alive and have rebuilt their sets.

In 1945 and 1946, entrance fees for the exhibition went to helping war victims. But this time, they will go toward the cost of rescuing the dolls from oblivion. At last week's inauguration, though, no one seemed happier than Linda Bray Mountain, the director of the Maryhill Museum.

''They were never lost, but I'm thrilled with what has happened,'' she said. ''We didn't have the funding, expertise and space to do the mannequins justice. But our trustees want to raise funds to give them proper space. Maryhill's biggest challenge now is to put the mannequins in a place of honor.''

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News Headline: Cleveland-area college fundraisers try harder and succeed in spite of economy | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Margaret Bernstein
News OCR Text: By Margaret Bernstein, The Plain Dealer

in their own right

• Series index

Tom Kessler, special to The Plain Dealer

The Roe Green Performing Arts Center at Kent State University

Roe Green in the building that bears her name.

The lobby of the performing arts center

Lisa DeJong, PD

Green building turns red in sunset

Bucking a recession-era trend of declining donations, many Cleveland-area colleges and universities are achieving stunning success with their fundraising.

At least six of the biggest higher education institutions in Northeast Ohio posted impressive gains in fundraising during the fiscal year that ended in 2009. For most of them, 2010 is looking mighty good too.

Cleveland State University, for instance, pulled in $11.4 million in charitable gifts during the 2010 fiscal year -- its highest total in 20 years.

These upbeat numbers don't reflect the picture painted by Giving USA, an annual survey that found Americans donated 2.4 percent less to education in 2009 than they did the previous year.

Area college development officers are delighted by the figures even though they aren't sure of the reason behind the surge. Some of it is happenstance, they say -- several huge checks that had been in the works for years finally got written.

Another factor is that some colleges have beefed up their fundraising departments. Kent State Universityadded 10 people to its staff three years ago. CSU doubled its advancement team from 20 to 40 in 2009.

More from the series

Several college officials said they are working harder than ever to get alumni to see themselves as donors -- and it's paying off.

At Baldwin-Wallace College, officials wrapped up the Berea school's most successful fundraising year ever, pulling in nearly $15 million. Included in the total is its largest estate gift ever, $7.2 million from alumni Art and Helen Telfer. "It added up to a great year," said spokesman George Richard.

Similar success stories for the 2010 fiscal year are being reported at John Carroll University, which raised $5 million more than last year, and KSU, where giving went up by $3 million.

And at Case Western Reserve University, even a downsized fundraising staff had reason to brag. During the 2010 fiscal year, they raised $7 million more than the previous year. It was the school's second-best year for donations.

Bruce Loessin, CWRU senior vice president for institutional relations and development, said the numbers posted by local colleges are a tribute to the giving spirit of northeast Ohio, which he called a "philanthropic mecca."

Loessin said donors to CWRU seemed to be enchanted by university President Barbara R. Snyder, who has erased a $20 million deficit by making fundraising and fiscal responsibility priorities since getting the job in 2007.

When Snyder embarked on a 32-city tour to meet with alumni and friends, giving to the school rebounded. Loessin's staff continues to follow up with mailings, calls and visits to donors across the country and even overseas.

"There were some contributions that were just amazing," Loessin said. "People had to dig deep to do what they did."

Cleveland Foundation CEO Ronald Richard said he thinks new leadership at the universities is sparking increased giving, plus donors realize they must support anchors like CWRU and CSU to help the region recover economically.

"Every time I give a speech, somebody will say, 'What can we do to keep our children here?' " he said.

Several colleges said they're getting more gifts from alumni than before. At John Carroll, alumni participation has grown steadily, from 12 percent in fiscal year 2008 to 16 percent in 2010.

KSU's 200,000 graduates have donated only modestly in the past, but development officials said they are zeroing in on alumni now and reaping results.

The efforts are bringing in more small donations, and some hefty ones too. A $6.5 million gift from alumna Roe Green, an arts patron with her own foundation, allowed KSU to combine its theater, dance and music programs into a new wing unveiled in early November.

Courtesy of CSUAnand "Bill" Julka donated $6 million to CSU for scholarships.

In May, CSU received its largest single scholarship gift, $6 million from alumnus Anand "Bill" Julka, who earned a master's in industrial technology in 1974 and now owns a Cleveland technology firm.

"No one who gets an admission at CSU should have to forgo a college education because of lack of funding," Julka, once a scholarship recipient himself, told a crowd while speaking at an event earlier this year.

Temporarily running the development shop at CSU is an old hand at the philanthropy business: former Cleveland Foundation head Steven Minter, who took over in May.

Minter said having grateful graduates like Julka tell their story not only encourages more philanthropy, it's a heartening sign that CSU, still relatively young at age 46, is starting to hold its own with more established schools.

"We now have some alumni of prominence and who want to give back," he said.

Minter's office has ramped up efforts to foster a culture of giving among graduates, including launching new alumni groups and activities. The gleaming student center and new residence halls are boosting enthusiasm and contributions, he added.

Two major institutions did lose ground in the 2010 fiscal year. University of Akron's multi-year, $500 million capital campaign reached its goal in 2009, more than a year ahead of schedule, but contributions declined after that. Similarly, giving to Oberlin College rose steadily between 2006 and 2009, but slipped during fiscal year 2010.

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News Headline: Area colleges enjoy fundraising success | Email

News Date: 12/28/2010
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Bernstein, Margaret
News OCR Text: Bucking a recession-era trend of declining donations, many Cleveland-area colleges and universities are achieving stunning success with their fundraising.

At least six of the biggest higher-education institutions in Northeast Ohio posted impressive gains in fundraising during the fiscal year that ended in 2009. For most of them, 2010 is looking mighty good too.

Cleveland State University, for instance, pulled in $11.4 million in charitable gifts during the 2010 fiscal year - its highest total in 20 years.

These upbeat numbers don't reflect the picture painted by Giving USA, an annual survey that found Americans donated 2.4 percent less to education in 2009 than they did the previous year.

Area college development officers are delighted by the figures even though they aren't sure of the reason behind the surge. Some of it is happenstance, they say - several huge checks that had been in the works for years finally got written.

Another factor is that some colleges have beefed up their fundraising departments. Kent State University added 10 people to its staff three years ago. CSU doubled its advancement team from 20 to 40 in 2009.

Several college officials said they are working harder than ever to get alumni to see themselves as donors - and it's paying off.

At Baldwin-Wallace College, officials wrapped up the Berea school's most successful fundraising year ever, pulling in nearly $15 million. Included in the total is its largest estate gift ever, $7.2 million from alumni Art and Helen Telfer. "It added up to a great year," said spokesman George Richard.

Similar success stories for the 2010 fiscal year are being reported at John Carroll University, which raised $5 million more than last year, and KSU, where giving went up by $3 million.

And at Case Western Reserve University, even a downsized fundraising staff had reason to brag. During the 2010 fiscal year, they raised $7 million more than the previous year. It was the school's second-best year for donations.

Bruce Loessin, CWRU senior vice president for institutional relations and development, said the numbers posted by local colleges are a tribute to the giving spirit of Northeast Ohio, which he called a "philanthropic mecca."

Loessin said donors to CWRU seemed to be enchanted by university President Barbara R. Snyder, who has erased a $20 million deficit by making fundraising and fiscal responsibility priorities since getting the job in 2007.

When Snyder embarked on a 32-city tour to meet with alumni and friends, giving to the school rebounded. Loessin's staff continues to follow up with mailings, calls and visits to donors across the country and even overseas.

"There were some contributions that were just amazing," Loessin said. "People had to dig deep to do what they did."

Cleveland Foundation CEO Ronald Richard said he thinks new leadership at the universities is sparking increased giving, plus donors realize they must support anchors like CWRU and CSU to help the region recover economically.

"Every time I give a speech, somebody will say, 'What can we do to keep our children here?'" he said.

Several colleges said they're getting more gifts from alumni than before. At John Carroll, alumni participation has grown steadily, from 12 percent in fiscal year 2008 to 16 percent in 2010.

KSU's 200,000 graduates donated only modestly in the past, but development officials said they are zeroing in on alumni now and reaping results.

The efforts are bringing in more small donations, and some hefty ones too. A $6.5 million gift from alumna Roe Green, an arts patron with her own foundation, allowed KSU to combine its theater, dance and music programs into a new wing unveiled in early November.

In May, CSU received its largest single scholarship gift, $6 million from alumnus Anand "Bill" Julka, who earned a master's in industrial technology in 1974 and now owns a Cleveland technology firm.

"No one who gets an admission at CSU should have to forgo a college education because of lack of funding," Julka, once a scholarship recipient himself, told a crowd while speaking at an event earlier this year.

Temporarily running the development shop at CSU is an old hand at the philanthropy business: former Cleveland Foundation head Steven Minter, who took over in May.

Minter said having grateful graduates like Julka tell their story not only encourages more philanthropy, it also is a heartening sign that CSU, still relatively young at age 46, is starting to hold its own with more established schools.

"We now have some alumni of prominence and who want to give back," he said.

Minter's office has ramped up efforts to foster a culture of giving among graduates, including launching new alumni groups and activities. The gleaming student center and new residence halls are boosting enthusiasm and contributions, he added.

Two major institutions did lose ground in the 2010 fiscal year. The University of Akron's multiyear $500 million capital campaign reached its goal in 2009, more than a year ahead of schedule, but contributions declined after that. Similarly, giving to Oberlin College rose steadily between 2006 and 2009 but slipped during fiscal year 2010.

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: mbernstein@plaind.com, 216-999-4876

Copyright © 2010 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: New year brings new minimum wage for Ohioans (Engelhardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Robert Wang
News OCR Text: Thousands of Stark County residents earning minimum wage are getting a raise today.

For many working full-time, the extra $4 a week before taxes would be enough to buy a double burger at Wendy's or an extra gallon of gas.

While some local residents say any amount is welcomed, the increase will have little impact on their standard of living.

Nearly everyone who earned the 2010 minimum wage of $7.30 an hour (or slightly above) as of Friday, will get the pay raise — and it's not due to the generosity of their employers.

With the new year, nearly every Ohio employer has to pay their non-tipped workers at least $7.40 an hour, an increase of 10 cents. The new minimum wage for tipped workers is $3.70 an hour plus the tips, up from $3.65.

An Ohio constitutional amendment, approved by voters in 2006, mandates an automatic increase each Jan. 1 in the state's minimum wage. The raise is equal to the percentage increase in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for the 12 months before the prior September. Because the CPI for working households went up 1.4 percent, the minimum wage also went up 1.4 percent.

MINIMAL EFFECT

It's not clear how many people in Stark County earn the minimum wage.

But the U.S. Census estimated that in 2009, about 68,000 Stark residents ages 16 and over who earned some type of income were paid less than $15,000 the prior year.

Corey Smith, 33, of Canton, said he earns the minimum wage rate as a security guard for a housing complex in downtown Canton.

“With the cost of living, 10 cents is not going to help us out (that much) as far as gas, groceries, the basic essentials we need,” he said. But, “I personally feel every little bit helps.”

Ashley Kinsinger, 22, of Massillon, who earns minimum wage as a supermarket cashier, said the increase will have a minimal effect on her finances.

“Even if they raise the minimum wage, they're just going to cut back in hours,” she said, adding that she can't get more than 30 hours of work per week.

She said her boyfriend was recently laid off from his job. Their joint income is $600 a month. And they're getting food stamp assistance as she works on her degree at Kent State University Stark campus.

“Personally, I think (the minimum wage) should be at least $8 an hour. It's ridiculous to live on $7.30 when gas is above $3 a gallon,” she said. “Rent and everything is so expensive.”

Bryan Trough, 41, of Canton, says he's been earning minimum wage without benefits during the past year as part of a temp job placing inserts into CD and DVD cases during 12-hour shifts. He said it's a drastic pay cut since he was laid off from his $13.49-an-hour job at Owens Corning Cultured Stone in Navarre in 2007.

Trough said his 10-cent-per-hour increase, assuming he's called back to the temp job this month, would go to his child support payments.

“I guess it's a start,” he said. But, “I'm not able to meet all my needs. I'm not able to fix my vehicle. ... I can't barely pay the rent as it is.”

COST TO BUSINESSES

Tim Maloney, the chairman of Canton Chair Rental, says the increase will have some effect on his event equipment rental business, which employs about six teens who earn the minimum wage. He has to pay them an extra 10 cents an hour, but also has to pay extra Social Security, Medicare, unemployment insurance and workers' comp insurance taxes on the higher wages. And that doesn't include the costs of providing raises for workers just above minimum wage in order to reconfigure the pay scales.

“I've got to spend more money on inexperienced people,” Maloney said. “It's a cost that a lot of small businesses just have to bear at a time that's really tough.”

Maloney says he has to pay for the raises through price increases, smaller profits, forgoing investing in new equipment for his business or delaying raises for employees earning much more than minimum wage.

In 2006, the group Ohioans for a Fair Minimum Wage, which was comprised of nonprofit, religious and labor organizations, collected enough signatures to put the proposed minimum wage constitutional amendment on the ballot.

The amendment set a minimum wage of $6.85 an hour, an increase of 33 percent from the then-federal minimum wage of $5.15 an hour, which had been in effect since 1997. Ohio's minimum wage in 2006 was $4.25 an hour. The rate would be automatically increased with inflation.

Proponents of what was Issue 2 said the federal minimum wage had not kept up with the rising cost of living. Opponents said passage would result in the mass layoffs of people in low-paying jobs because employers could not afford to raise wages to $6.85 an hour.

And they argued that it was best for the legislature to set a minimum wage, not the state constitution which couldn't easily be changed.

In an election that mostly favored Democrats, 57 percent of Ohio voters approved the issue, which also won a majority of the vote in Stark County.

Whether the issue adversely affected local businesses as much as critics predicted amid the economic downturn that followed is not clear.

Maloney estimated the initial increase cost Canton Chair Rental about $15,000 to $20,000 in 2007.

“If I can't afford it, what because of the economy, what can we do?” he said. “What happens is you get hours cut or you lay people off. ... it's suppressed my ability to give increases to everybody else.”

Maloney said having a minimum wage that goes up nearly every year ahead of the federal minimum wage, which is not adjusted for inflation, makes Ohio less attractive to businesses reliant on minimum-wage labor.

Guy Cecchini, who owns seven McDonald's restaurants in Stark County, said, “When you keep increasing minimum wages, you can't afford the person working for you any longer. ... individuals with (disabilities), it's impossible for them to get a job because the employer can't hire somebody at $7.30 an hour or $7.40 an hour and wait for them to learn the job.”

RISING MINIMUM WAGE

In 2008, the state minimum wage automatically increased to $7 an hour. With surging energy and food costs in 2008, the rate jumped to $7.30 an hour in January 2009. However, a decline in the consumer price index in 2009, meant no change in the state's minimum wage in January 2010.

Meanwhile, Congress increased the federal minimum wage from $5.15 to $5.85 an hour in July 2007, to $6.55 an hour in July 2008 and to $7.25 in July 2009.

Lucas Engelhardt, a professor of economics at Kent State University Stark campus, said he opposes the concept of a minimum wage, which he says leads to smaller profits, higher prices, layoffs of low-paid workers and businesses more reluctant to hire additional people.

“You have to produce at least the minimum wages' value of product ... for your employer to bother hiring you or keeping you,” he said. “The higher the minimum wage, the fewer people are going to be able to get over that hurdle.”

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News Headline: Minimum wage goes up today (Engelhardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name: Lee Morrison
News OCR Text: Area residents who make minimum wage will see a dime increase in their pay beginning today.

For those working full time, that translates to another $4 per week before taxes, barely more than the current $3.05.9 to $3.19.9 cost per gallon of gasoline in the Tuscarawas Valley.

The minimum wages in Ohio and six other states will go up between 9 cents and 12 cents an hour today because their consumer price indexes rose in 2010.

Nearly everyone who earned the 2010 minimum wage of $7.30 per hour (or slightly above), will get the pay raise – and it's not due to the generosity of their employers.

With the new year, nearly every Ohio employer has to pay nontipped workers at least $7.40 an hour, an increase of 10 cents. The new minimum wage for tipped workers is $3.70 an hour plus the tips, up from $3.65.

An Ohio constitutional amendment, approved by voters in 2006, mandates an automatic increase each Jan. 1 in the state's minimum wage. The raise is equal to the percentage increase in the Consumer Price Index for the 12 months before the prior September. Because the CPI for working households went up 1.4 percent, the minimum wage also went up 1.4 percent.

It's not clear how many people in the Tuscarawas Valley are paid minimum wage.

Harry A. Eadon Jr., president and executive director of the Tuscarawas County Port Authority, said that the increase would mean another $56 million to $112 million in wages for residents of Ohio.

“The big question is will the mandatory increase cause a decrease of a like percentage – 1.37 percent – in employment,” Eadon said. “Will employers reduce the minimum wage work force from 269,000 workers by 3,685 people?”

He said “the conventional economic theory (price theory) is that an increase in wages without an increase in productivity, or as a result of the effect of supply and demand, will decrease employment. Empirical evidence can be found to support that premise. However, just as much can be found which discounts the effect of changes to the minimum wage on employment.

“The bottom line is the impact – positive, negative or neutral – is on the youngest and least skilled members of our work force. I hope that this latest increase does not have a negative effect on a group that is already significantly impacted by the recession.”

Corey Smith, 33, of Canton said he earns the minimum wage rate as a security guard for a housing complex in downtown Canton.

“With the cost of living, 10 cents is not going to help us out (that much) as far as gas, groceries, the basic essentials we need,” he said. But, “I personally feel every little bit helps.”

Bryan Trough, 41, of Canton said he's been earning minimum wage without benefits during the past year as part of a temp job placing inserts into CD and DVD cases during 12-hour shifts. He said it's a drastic pay cut since he was laid off from his $13.49-an-hour job at Owens Corning Cultured Stone in Navarre in 2007.

Trough said his 10-cent-per-hour increase, assuming he's called back to the temp job this month, would go to his child support payments.

Guy Cecchini, who owns seven McDonald's restaurants in Stark County, said, “When you keep increasing minimum wages, you can't afford the person working for you any longer. ... individuals with (disabilities), it's impossible for them to get a job because the employer can't hire somebody at $7.30 an hour or $7.40 an hour and wait for them to learn the job.”

In 2008, the state minimum wage automatically increased to $7 an hour. With surging energy and food costs in 2008, the rate jumped to $7.30 an hour in January 2009. However, a decline in the consumer price index in 2009 meant no change in the state's minimum wage in January 2010.

Meanwhile, Congress increased the federal minimum wage from $5.15 to $5.85 an hour in July 2007, to $6.55 an hour in July 2008 and to $7.25 in July 2009.

Lucas Engelhardt, a professor of economics at Kent State University Stark campus at North Canton, said he opposes the concept of a minimum wage, which he said leads to smaller profits, higher prices, layoffs of low-paid workers and businesses more reluctant to hire additional people.

“You have to produce at least the minimum wages' value of product ... for your employer to bother hiring you or keeping you,” he said. “The higher the minimum wage, the fewer people are going to be able to get over that hurdle.”

GateHouse Media contributed to this story.

* * *

Exceptions to Ohio minimum wage law

Companies with revenue of less than $271,000 per year are exempt from paying the state minimum wage. Workers younger than 16 also do not qualify for the higher minimum wage. In these situations, the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour applies.

The state minimum wage also does not apply to employees of a business that is owned by a family member or if an employer successfully applies to pay less to a person with a physical or mental disability.

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News Headline: Teaching Students Stress Reduction | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/30/2010
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Trumbull County Educational Service Center in conjunction with Kent State University is holding ''TEACHING STUDENTS STRESS REDUCTION, Anxiety Management and Guided Imagery: A Guide for Classroom Teachers, Counselors and School Psychologists'' from 4 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays in January starting Jan. 5 at the ESC conference room D. 6000 Youngstown-Warren Road, Niles. An audio CD, available first day of class for $14.95, is required. Graduate and undergraduate credit hours are available. Pre-registration is required by calling 330-505-2800, Ext. 133 Provide name, address, telephone number and e-mail.

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News Headline: What's your pick for the top stories of 2010? | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/25/2010
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: You tell us – what was the top local story of 2010?

The Times-Reporter staff has complied a list of our top 10 stories for the Tuscarawas Valley. Now it's your to pick the top story, the one with the most impact on our area over the past 12 months.

Visit www.TimesReporter.com from today Sunday until Wednesday at noon to vote for your pick. We'll run the results on Dec. 31.

Here are the stories under consideration.

• Year of the tornados: Wicked weather produced several twisters in the Valley during tornado season. Two separate storms produced F1 tornados in Carroll County's Fox Township and Sugarcreek in June, while New Philadelphia saw its own F1 tornado in September.

• Arson spree: Firefighters from multiple departments spent hours on an early October morning battling blazes in Strasburg, Beach City and Brewster that were later determined to be the work of an arsonist. The Garver Flea Market was a total loss, and Beach City Lutheran Church, Jer's Pizza and J.B.'s convenience store sustained damages.

• Triple tragedy in Carrollton: A community mourned the deaths of mother Madison Hallett and children Natalya Hallett Carosielle and Drayden Hallett Warnick after Hallett took her own life and the lives of her children in October.

• Dover homicide: Jason L. Gordon of Dover will face trial in March on a charge of murder and two other counts in connection with the death of his girlfriend, Gina Harper, in September.

• Bank robbery spree: Charter One Bank at Wilkshire Hills near Bolivar became the 15th bank to be robbed in the Tuscarawas Valley in April. A rash of bank robberies first began on Aug. 15, 2009.

• 3 die in Holmes fire: Two children and a family friend died in an early morning fire Dec. 23 just outside the tiny community of Holmesville in northern Holmes County. The victims were Aaron Holskey, 5, and Brenda Holskey, 3, children of Richard and Kristin Holskey; and Linzy Guerin, 18, who lived with the family.

• Twin City Hospital financial woes: It was a turbulent year for Twin City Hospital, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in October. The year's events also included the closure and re-opening of the emergency room and different leadership of the medical center, plus a fund-raising effort.

• Performing Arts Center opens: After months of construction and waiting, the new Performing Arts Center opened at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in late Nobember. The inaugural concert of the Tuscarawas Philharmonic's 75th anniversary sold out all of the center's 1,100 seats.

• 18th Congressional upset: Republican Bob Gibbs of Lakeville defeated incumbent Democrat Zack Space of Dover for the 18th Congressional District seat in a race that was watched nation-wide.

• Atwood Lodge closes: Citing financial problems, the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District closed Atwood Resort and Conference Center near Dellroy in October, putting 40 employees out of work. The district has been negotiating to re-open the lodge in 2011.

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News Headline: EXCLUSIVE: The Clothes That Helped Make Kate Great: Hepburn Costume Exhibit Is an Eyeful in Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/31/2010
Outlet Full Name: Playbill - New York
Contact Name: Judy Samelson
News OCR Text: Katharine Hepburn Photo by Bryn Mawr College Libraries

A Kent State University Museum exhibition of Katharine Hepburn's film and theatre costumes offers a dazzling display of the legendary actress' elegance and style. We go on a walking tour of it.

***

In 1985, at its annual awards ceremony saluting the hallmarks of American fashion, the Council of Fashion Designers of America presented Katharine Hepburn with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Katharine Hepburn, you ask? She of the slacks and "so-what" school of fashion? You wouldn't be off base to wonder. And you wouldn't be alone. After all, when she accepted the award, she, too, sounded a humorous, puzzled note. "We're all in a serious spot," she said, "when the original bag lady wins a prize for the way she dresses." But anoint her they did, with two of the most noted purveyors of American design, Perry Ellis and Calvin Klein, leading the applause and pronouncing her the epitome of style. Hepburn's acceptance of an award from the world of fashion (let alone her up-til-then unprecedented acceptance of any award) was a hint that she knew far more about that world than she let on. In her steadfast devotion to casual, comfortable dress from her earlier well-tailored slacks and female versions of men's suits to the later-in-life scruffier, more lived-in "couture" Hepburn crafted a style that was both uniquely personal and quintessentially American. She was one classy bag lady.
In life, she liked to look as if she didn't give a rap. "I think you should pretend you don't care," she told Klein in an interview for the CFDA's program. "But it's the most outrageous pretense. I said to Garbo once, 'I bet it takes us longer to look as if we hadn't made any effort than it does someone else to come in beautifully dressed.' . . . I enjoy line. I am very aware . . . although I dress in rags." On screen or on stage, Hepburn's keen awareness not only of what looked good on her but also of how those clothes helped her define the characters she played contributed to dream collaborations with some of the profession's most gifted designers. She had a particular affinity for Adrian, Walter Plunkett and Valentina, artists who understood how to compliment her slender, model-like frame, and sublime examples of the latter two designers' work as well as designs by Chanel, Irene, Muriel King, Howard Greer, Maggie Furse, Cecil Beaton, Motley, Noel Taylor and Jane Greenwood are among the costumes featured in "Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen," the sensational exhibition of Hepburn's performance clothes on view through Sept. 4, 2011, at the Kent State University Museum, housed on the KSU campus (in Kent, OH) in the Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising. Almost 80 years ago a young Rodgers designed the ornamentation on the armor costume Hepburn wore in The Warrior's Husband, the 1932 Broadway vehicle that sent her off to Hollywood and a star part in her first picture, "A Bill of Divorcement." The thought that this extensive collection has come to rest and will be forever preserved in the institution for which he was a benefactor is a pleasing one.

How this trove landed at the museum, which holds one of the country's most comprehensive teaching collections of fashion design from the 18th century to the present, and which is currently celebrating its 25th anniversary, is a classic case of timing and serendipity. In 2007, Gladys Toulis, the retired director of the school, took a call from a neighbor of Hepburn's estate lawyer. Charged by Hepburn before her death in 2003 to find an appropriate home for her performance clothes, her representatives were on the hunt for an educational institution that would accept her remarkable collection. The caller assisting with the search presented Toulis with a list of usual suspects, including such illustrious institutions as New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Fashion Institute of Technology, and asked for her recommendation. Seizing the day, Toulis chimed in with "why not Kent?" The estate contacted the museum, and the offer was one that its director director Jean L. Druesedow simply could not refuse. As she explains in a , "Katharine Hepburn's name is magic."

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News Headline: Cleveland's going up: New projects, pioneers poised to give city a lift: Joe Frolik | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/25/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Joe Frolik, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: Gus Chan, The Plain DealerThe new Cleveland State University Student Center, seen here in front of Rhodes Tower, is helping make the area look like a college campus.

You might call me crazy -- don't worry, you won't be the first -- but I think that in 10 years, we will look back on 2010 as the year that Cleveland turned the corner and began to regain its status as a vibrant American city.

The Census Bureau report that came out last week was the latest grim reminder of how far this region has fallen. While the population of the United States rose 9.7 percent in the past 10 years, Ohio's was almost flat. That'll cost the state two congressional seats. At least one will disappear from Greater Cleveland.

Official population figures for individual cities and counties will come early next year. But after a decade of job losses and a brutal wave of foreclosures that emptied out neighborhoods, its very possible that Cleveland will have fewer than 400,000 residents -- less than half its 1950 population peak. After the relative stability of the 1990s, that would be a huge symbolic blow.

Population growth isn't necessarily the best measure of a region's health, but it is telling. Americans go where they believe they can find jobs and opportunities. That in-migration, in turn, replenishes the energy, creativity and wealth of those lucky places. For much of the last century, Greater Cleveland benefited from that dynamic. But for too long, as Brent Larkin noted in his column a few weeks ago, we have been getting older, smaller and poorer. That dynamic also feeds on itself.

So why am I optimistic? Because even in this Great Recession, the seeds of positive change are beginning to sprout -- and collectively, they can be transformative.

Some are easy to see -- or soon will be. By next Christmas, work on the medical mart and convention center, the Flats East Bank development, the Inner Belt Bridge and the downtown casino (provided its backers don't waste too much time trying to reroute the Cuyahoga River) should all be under way; that alone is more than $1 billion worth of investment and construction jobs. Together these projects will remake downtown. They have already inspired planning about how to connect these new pieces with usable and inviting public spaces that can make the city vibrant and attractive to people with options.

A similar makeover is taking shape at University Circle, where the $300 million mixed-use Uptown project is rising from the ground along both sides of Euclid Avenue. It will help create a real neighborhood for people who are studying, doing research, treating patients, creating art or starting companies there -- and tie together other investments in and around the Circle and Little Italy.

A generation ago, University Circle's institutions saw themselves as islands. Now they see themselves as magnets to attract and retain young talent. That's a huge -- and hugely important -- change.

Another dynamic cluster is blossoming around Cleveland State University. With its new buildings, including student housing along Euclid that opened this fall, CSU at last looks like a real college campus. That's a testimony to the vision of former President Michael Schwartz and his successor, Ron Berkman, and to the determination of their in-house developer, Vice President Jack Boyle. CSU's expansion is bleeding into Playhouse Square, attracting private developers and creating another hub of activity.

View full sizeGus Chan, The Plain DealerThis year has seen a surge in investment around the venerable West Side Market.

This year also has seen a surge in investment around the venerable West Side Market -- much of it by food entrepreneurs who want to be part of what is now being called the Market District. These aren't yet large businesses -- but neither was another Ohio City anchor, the Great Lakes Brewing Co., when Patrick and Daniel Conway set up shop 22 years ago.

The Market District is a showcase for what New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman calls the "artisan economy" -- self-starters who "bring something extra to their jobs." These entrepreneurs tend to thrive around like-minded go-getters who may complement or even compete with their work. You see it in Ohio City, in the Gordon Square Arts District, along Waterloo Road in Collinwood and in Tyler Village, the massive, old elevator factory just east of downtown that's filling up with tech companies, artists, a couple of charter schools and, yes, a microbrewery.

"It really is a community-based way of rebuilding our economy," says Eric Wobser, the executive director of Ohio City Near West Development Corp. "I think we're a lot more likely to find 100 Pat Conways than one Boeing."

View full sizeRodell Hickman / Plain DealerJosaphat Arts Hall, an art gallery, is a converted church in flourishing Tyler Village.

A decade ago, Cleveland's mind-set was still focused on the Boeings of the world. Big companies were in our DNA. But as many large firms declined or moved away, there was a dearth of young high-growth companies to take their place -- in part because the entrepreneurial culture of John D. Rockefeller, Charles Brush and Charles Goodyear had run out of steam.

Since then, we've seen groups emerge to rekindle that can-do culture and help smart people turn ideas into products and companies: BioEnterprise, JumpStart, Magnet, NorTech, TiE, Cleveland Clinic Innovations. It can be painstakingly slow work -- medical-related products take years to get to market -- but these efforts are starting to pay off.

Jump back to Euclid Avenue for a moment. The renovated Baker Building at East 71st Street has filled up with companies graduating from incubators. A suburban-style technology park is going up a few blocks away, because the developer sees a market for offices and labs close to the universities and hospitals along the Euclid Corridor. That continuum of development is what seeds sustainable prosperity.

One of Greater Cleveland's great missed opportunities came in the 1970s, when liquid crystal technology developed at Kent State University ended up in a new generation of electronic devices made in Asia. Now the region's universities are helping to perfect a new wave of flexible electronic devices. Led by NorTech, they're partnering with a cluster of young companies that realize cooperation can bring products to market faster and create a bigger pie than working solo.

But any business success ultimately depends on human capital. So finally, two rays of hope on that front:

• CSU, in collaboration with the Cleveland School District, this fall opened Campus International School, which eventually will offer a rigorous kindergarten-through-12th-grade program in the heart of downtown. Efforts like that keep middle-class families in the city and extend a ladder to the children of low-income families.

• After years of discussion, plans are nearly final for an immigrant welcome center. When Cleveland was the Silicon Valley of the Industrial Age, people came here from all over the globe. We need to invite the world again. That's no rap on the people who are here today; it's simply how to succeed in a global marketplace.

Urban scholar Joel Kotkin recently argued that the future belongs not so much to mega-cities such as Mumbai, Shanghai or even New York -- where congestion reigns, and it's almost impossible for middle-class people to enjoy a satisfying lifestyle -- as to manageable, mid-sized cities. Among those he cited: Columbus, Pittsburgh and Indianapolis.

There is no reason why Cleveland -- given our enviable quality of life -- should not be on that list. Does Cleveland have problems? Sure, every city does. The difference is that not every city chooses to define itself by what's missing.

Call me crazy, but success may be closer than many of us dare imagine.

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News Headline: WIPO ASSIGNS PATENT TO KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FOR "TUNABLE ELECTRO-OPTIC LIQUID CRYSTAL LENSES AND METHODS FOR FORMING THE LENSES" (AMERICAN INVENTORS) | Email

News Date: 12/28/2010
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: GENEVA, Dec. 28 -- Publication No. WO/2010/147664 was published on Dec. 23.

Title of the invention: "TUNABLE ELECTRO-OPTIC LIQUID CRYSTAL LENSES AND METHODS FOR FORMING THE LENSES."

Applicants: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY (US).

Inventors: Philip Bos (US), Douglas Bryant (US), Lei Shi (US) and Bentley Wall (US).

According to the abstract posted by the World Intellectual Property Organization: "Electro-optic lenses, including liquid crystals, wherein the power of the lenses can be modified by application of an electric field. In one embodiment, the liquid crystal-based lenses include ring electrodes having a resistive bridge located between adjacent electrodes, and in a preferred embodiment, input connections for several electrode rings are spaced on the lens. In a further embodiment, liquid crystal-based lenses are provided that can increase optical power through the use of phase resets, wherein in one embodiment, a lens includes ring electrodes on surfaces of the substrates on opposite sides of the liquid crystal cell such that a fixed phase term can be added to each set of electrodes that allows for phase change across each group of electrodes to be the same and also be matched with respect to a previous group."

The patent was filed on June 18, 2010 under Application No. PCT/US2010/001757.

For further information please visit: http://www.wipo.int/pctdb/en/ia.jsp?ia=US2010/001757

For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2010 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Bright Spots: Dec. 27, 2010 (McIntyre) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 4:30 am, December 27, 2010

It's not all bad out there. Here's the latest installment -- the last this year -- of a weekly web feature that highlights positive developments in the Northeast Ohio business community. See you in 2011.

Dawson Cos. of Rocky River, a provider of insurance and employee benefits, said it is acquiring American Agency Inc. in Columbus in a deal that will close this Friday, Dec. 31.

Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

American Agency, founded in 1982, provides a full range of insurance services for the transportation industry.

D. Michael Sherman, CEO of Dawson, said American Agency CEO John E. Burtch and the firm's associates “are experts in the transportation industry and will strengthen our expertise in this vital area.”

The Ohio Employee Ownership Center was awarded $500,000 to be a partner in the Ohio Department of Department's Early Warning Network, which tries to avert layoffs and job loss in the state through timely intervention in at-risk companies.

The employee ownership center, a nonprofit outreach center based at Kent State University, supports the development of business across the Ohio and around the world by its efforts to save jobs, create wealth and grow the economy.

“We are very pleased to have again earned the support of the Ohio Department of Development to assist them in promoting smart strategies to avert layoffs, promote business retention and expansion and anchor jobs and capital in the state of Ohio,” said Bill McIntyre, program director for the Ohio Employee Ownership Center.

The center will use the funds to continue layoff aversion activities in three major areas: assisting business owners seeking an orderly exit from their business through its Business Succession Planning Program, thereby minimizing business disruption and job loss; assisting in the creation of employee-owned businesses, either through employee- or community-led buyouts under threat of relocation or shutdown, or sale by an existing owner; and helping existing employee-owned companies preserve their jobs and to grow and expand the business.

E.W. Scripps Co., a media concern with interests in newspaper publishing, broadcast television stations, and licensing and syndication, and its lead legal counsel, Cleveland law firm Baker Hostetler LLP, received the “Middle-Market Deal of the Year (From $100 million to $250 million)” at the ninth annual M&A Advisor Awards Gala held in New York.

The award was for the sale of Character Licensing, a subsidiary of Scripps responsible for the licensing of the Peanuts characters, along with Dilbert, Fancy Nancy and others, to the Iconix Brand Group and family members of the late Charles Schulz.

The deal also was a finalist in the “Media, Entertainment or Telecom ($500 million and less)” category.

“The competitive nature of this transaction, along with the aggressive timeline, posed significant challenges to completing the deal,” said Steven Goldberg, partner and co-chairman of Baker Hostetler's Transactions Practice Team, in a statement. “Being recognized by the M&A Advisor, a prominent industry organization, underscores the increased profile of our global M&A practice, in particular in advising on middle-market transactions.”

Send information for Bright Spots to managing editor Scott Suttell at ssuttell@crain.com.

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News Headline: KSU center wins $500,000 grant to identify businesses at risk for layoffs (Cooper, Simecek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Ohio Employee
Ownership Center at Kent
State University has been
awarded $500,000 by the
state to become a partner
in Ohio's Early Warning
Network, which works
to identify and then advise
businesses that could close
or lay off employees.
The Ohio Department of
Development awarded $2.4
million to 11 organizations,
with the OEOC receiving
the largest amount of any
recipient. The second highest
amount, awarded to
three other organizations
in early December, was
$250,000.
Chris Cooper, a program
coordinator for the nonprofit
outreach center, said
it specializes in two areas
critical to job retention:
Business succession planning
and Employee Stock
Ownership Plans. Cooper
said the importance of succession
planning is easy to
explain.
“When business owners
don't plan for the future
when they're leaving, that
results in really bad things
happening to the company,”
Cooper said.
Cooper gave the example
of an owner passing away
suddenly, leading his family
to liquidate the company.
The center started working
with Ohio companies on
succession planning about
10 years ago, but has offered
resources on ESOPs
from its inception. John
Logue, a KSU political science
professor who died in
2009, founded the center
in 1987 and worked assisting
small businesses transition
to employee ownership
through ESOPs.
“John's initiative in the
beginning was focused
on saving jobs, especially
in steel and manufacturing
(in Northeast Ohio),”
program coordinator Jay
Simecek said.
Simecek said employee
ownership is a powerful
tool to keep jobs within the
state, but the center may
have been chosen for such
a large grant because it has
expanded its services and
scope since its humble beginnings.
The Early Warning Network
funds three types of
programs: Retention, labor-
management cooperation
and employee ownership.
The OEOC plans to expand
in the near future by
offering its services to more
inner-city employee-owned
businesses through the Evergreen
Cooperative Initiative,
as well as offering
services to more rural businesses
and farmers.

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News Headline: Free Kwanzaa celebrations begin Sunday in Akron area | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/25/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Akron-area's Kwanzaa celebration sponsored by the African-American Cultural Association will begin Sunday and run through Friday.

Sunday's Umoga (Unity) program will be at 4 p.m., Womb Expression Lounge, 915 E. Market St., Akron. The host is Akron African United Front.

Monday's Kujichagulia (Self-Determination) program will be 6 p.m., at Oscar Ritchie Hall, Kent State University. The host is Kent State Center

for Pan African Culture.

Tuesday's Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility) program will be at 6 p.m. at Gus Johnson Community Center, 1015 S. Hawkins Ave., Akron. The host is Ripples/W.A.V.E.S.

Wednesday's Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics) program will be at 6 p.m. at Mount Calvary Baptist Church, 442 Bell St., Akron. The church is the host.

Thursday's Nia (Purpose) will be at 6 p.m. at the Buchtel Cluster/Centenary United Methodist Church, 1310 Superior Ave., Akron. The host is the Methodist church's men's group.

Friday's Kuumba (Creativity) program will be at 2 p.m. at Saferstein Towers II, 585 Diagonal Road, Akron. The hosts are Saferstein Towers Residents Council and Greater Akron-Canton Chapter Association of Black Social Workers.

The Jan. 1 Imani (Faith) program is to be spent with family and friends.

All the events are free and open to the public.

Kwanzaa is based on the traditional African harvest festival. The word Kwanzaa comes from the Swahili phrase for ''first fruits of the harvest.''

It was created in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga; the celebration reminds African-Americans to combine traditional African practices with their goals.

Each of the seven days of the celebration is designated to stress Nguzo Saba, Swahili words that mean the Seven Principles of Kwanzaa, on which the holiday is based.

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News Headline: Best community colleges in Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: Helium
Contact Name: B. Leslie Baird
News OCR Text: The state of Ohio offers many choices for further education. Four year colleges, universities, trade schools and community colleges can be found for all desired disciplines. Ohio's community colleges are affordable and well rated. As of 2010 many community and some four year colleges are on a quarter system with plans for changing to a semester system within the next few years.

Sinclair Community College located in downtown Dayton Ohio offers associate degrees, certificates, on-line learning as well as transferable credits to four year colleges and universities. Sinclair Community College also has satellite locations for those that want traditional instruction at locations closer to home.

Sinclair is highly rated for academics and offers the lowest tuition cost of community colleges in Ohio. Sinclair also awards an average of 29 million dollars in scholarships and financial aid each year. Well over 20,000 students attend Sinclair's main campus each year making it one of the largest community colleges in the United States. Kent State has two year campuses located in Salem, Stark, Trumbull, Tuscarawas, Geauga, East Liverpool and Ashtabula. Kent State is known for its academic excellence and offers 250 bachelor degree programs. Each satellite campus offers different two year programs with some programs available at all satellites. Students enrolled in two year degree programs can continue on with Kent State for a seamless transition into a four year program. Kent State offers over 200 on-line courses and also has a summer program, College for Kids.

Columbus State Community College:

Columbus State offers degree and certificate programs and also has a variety of non-credit courses for continuing education and personal enrichment. Engineering Technology, Skilled Trades, Construction Science and Health and Human Services are only a few of the major areas of study available for students. Business students at Columbus State Community College can transfer their credits to Walsh College in Michigan through a partnership program for on-line learning. and Ohio University: The has two year programs available at Clermont College and Raymond Walters College. Clermont College offers over thirty associate degree programs as well as one year transitional programs. Raymond Walters College in Blue Ash also offers over thirty programs and includes Veterinary Technology as well as programs in Business, Health, Arts and Science.

Ohio University has five campuses including Chillicothe, Lancaster and Zanesville. Associate programs are available in a range of disciplines including specialized study. Courses can also be taken on-line. Students in some counties of Kentucky can receive the Ohio in-state discount at the Ohio University Southern campus. Learn more about this author, . Click here to send this author comments or questions.

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News Headline: Allerton complex at KSU to close (Joseph) | Email

News Date: 12/24/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Dec. 24--KENT -- Kawther Hamash of Jordan can list a lot of things she likes about Kent State's Allerton Apartments: good outdoor lighting, a nice staff and a safe environment.

But that won't be enough to save the 164 on-campus apartments from the wrecking ball.

The university announced this week it will shutter two Allerton buildings this summer, three in July 2012 and the final four in July 2015 with the goal of eventually knocking them down. Two other units were demolished four years ago.

"Our primary mission is the housing of freshmen and sophomores," said Betsy Joseph, KSU director of residence services. "We believe the community has sufficient facilities available" to absorb the Allerton residents.

The apartments were built in the mid-1960s for married students with families and for international students, like Hamash, who moved here with her husband and 20-month-old daughter to pursue a doctorate in nursing.

The appeal of the brick buildings on the south side of campus has faded over the years.

While KSU opened them to

single upperclassmen about five years ago, occupancy is only at 86 percent.

Improving the complex to boost occupancy didn't seem like a good option, Joseph said. At 45 years old, the apartments are past their useful life, in need of electrical upgrades, new roofs and even air conditioning, which wasn't standard when they were built.

The units are showing some wear; the living rooms are barely big enough for a sofa. They are so far away from academic buildings that students take PARTA buses to get to class.

About four years ago, KSU tried to gild Allerton with an economic benefit. The university partnered with Century 21 Prestige Realty to offer Books to Bricks to encourage residents to buy homes.

By living in the complex, they earned credits of up to $1,000 that could be put toward a down payment on a house with Prestige Realty.

The program was disbanded "due to the lack of interest by residents of Allerton in pursuing home ownership, and the realty company we had partnered with closed," Joseph said.

For Hamash and her husband, Mohammed Hamdan, the apartment has been a great option, though.

The family wants to stay there, so it will take advantage of a special deal KSU is offering residents of the two buildings scheduled to close this summer.

If they sign a lease to stay in Allerton for the 2011-12 school year, they will receive a free month's rent. That is a good deal for them, as Hamdan is not working and the family is making do on Hamash's salary as a graduate assistant.

"Everything is very good," Hamash said.

The university has no plans for the property, Joseph said.

------

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

Copyright © 2010 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: KSU to tear down campus apartments | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/25/2010
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kawther Hamash of Jordan can list a lot of things she likes about Kent State's Allerton Apartments: good outdoor lighting, a nice staff and a safe environment.

But that won't be enough to save the 164 on-campus apartments from the wrecking ball.

The university announced this week it will shutter two Allerton buildings this summer, three in July 2012 and the final four in July 2015 with the goal of eventually knocking them down. Two units were demolished four years ago.

“Our primary mission is the housing of freshmen and sophomores,'' said Betsy Joseph, KSU director of residence services. “We believe the community has sufficient facilities available'' to absorb the Allerton residents.

The apartments were built in the mid-1960s for married students with families and for international students, such as Hamash, who moved here with her husband and 20-month-old daughter to pursue a doctorate in nursing.

The appeal of the brick buildings on the south side of campus has faded over the years.

Though KSU opened them to single upperclassmen about five years ago, occupancy today is still only at 86 percent.

Improving the complex to boost occupancy didn't seem like a good option, Joseph said. At 45 years old, the apartments are past their useful life, in need of electrical upgrades, new roofs and even air conditioning, which wasn't standard when they were built.

The units are showing some wear; the living rooms are barely big enough for a sofa. They are so far away from academic buildings that students take buses to get to class.

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News Headline: Kent State University plans to demolish aging apartments | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/28/2010
Outlet Full Name: American School and University
Contact Name: Mike Kennedy
News OCR Text: From Crain's Cleveland Business: Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, will demolish a group of apartment buildings that officials say have reached the end of their life cycle. Two of the buildings in the Allerton Apartment complex were demolished in 2006, and the nine remaining buildings, which contain 164 apartments, will close by 2015. The complex generally housed upper-class students and those with families. The demolition of the first five buildings is slated for the summer of 2012.

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News Headline: KSU police reaccredited by law enforcement unit (Buckbee) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University
Police Department has
received law enforcement
accreditation for the sixth
consecutive time since 1991
from the Commission on the
Accreditation of Law Enforcement
Agencies.
The department also
was recognized as a Flagship
Agency for an unprecedented
third time. KSU police
and the Lexington, Ky.,
Police Department are the
first and only agencies to be
awarded this status three
times.
CALEA standards require
an agency to establish a management
process for monitoring
and measuring performance
and reviewing and
evaluating policy and procedure.
CALEA audits accredited
agencies every three
years to ensure they continue
to meet the commission's
standards.
KSU Police Lt. Bill Buckbee,
who serves as the department's
accreditation
manager, said CALEA assessors
toured and inspected
the university's police facilities
and equipment and
reviewed its policies and
practices during a four-day
inspection in August.
KSU police were the second
university police department
in the United States
to be accredited by CALEA.

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News Headline: Needs, interests of middle class take back seat (Mastriacovo) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/27/2010
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Is our government moving away from a representative democracy, as set forth in the U.S. Constitution, and toward an oligarchy of corporate interests? Has this shift already occurred? Recent headlines make me wonder.

A new study prepared for The New York Times by scholars at Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, analyzed 1,450 U.S. Supreme Court decisions since 1953.

The study found that the percentage of business cases chosen to be heard by the Supreme Court has grown since Chief Justice John Roberts has presided over the court, as has the percentage of cases won by business interests. Whereas in past years the court decided in favor of business interests on average 42 percent of the time, the court over the past five years has ruled for business 61 percent of the time.

But, to me, that is only one of many signs that your interests and mine, middle-class interests, are taking a back seat to the wealthiest of our neighbors.

I suppose there are some members of the middle class who sleep better knowing that the mega-wealthy will receive their tax cuts along with the rest of us schleps.

I suppose there are some middle-class people thrilled that, as reported in The New York Times, less than one-half of 1 percent of people who die in 2011 will have to pay any estate tax, and even for the few who will be subject to the new tax the increase in the gift tax exemption will allow the mega-wealthy to provide their heirs with “tens of millions of dollars before the estate tax comes into play.”

I suppose these working people believe things just have to get better if the rich get richer. Even though the evidence shows that the exact same tax cuts have existed since 2002 and they haven't helped boost the economy much, these middle-class folks apparently are willing to wait patiently for all of the benefits to trickle down to them.

I hope they don't have to wait too long, because I've been waiting since Ronald Reagan was president and I am getting older and older without seeing a trace of the trickle for most Americans. My patience is wearing thin.

Apparently there are a lot of Americans who don't worry about investment bankers, corporate board members, CEOs and the idle rich, who build nothing and contribute little if any actual productive work to our economy, receiving exponential increases in their income, while, according to a recent article in The Repository, your and my buying power has decreased 12 percent on average over the past 10 years.

I believe in capitalism. I hate socialism. But I believe people should be compensated based on merit and hard work, not on the ability to bamboozle the rest of us.

If you do not believe that big businesses control our government, look at the campaign contribution reports. Look at the money corporate lobbyists spend. Look at the influence the U.S. Chamber of Commerce has had on the U.S. Supreme Court in the past five years.

Currently, China may own a lot of our debt, but U.S. corporate and business interests own our government.

Although I've read the U.S. Constitution recently, I wasn't aware that it had been amended to change our form of government from a representative democracy to an oligarchy. I suppose I should have been paying better attention.

Critics will claim that I am engaged in class warfare. They are right, and too bad. I am only engaging in the war the mega-wealthy have been engaged in, and winning, for too many years now.

Attorney Paul A. Mastriacovo of Plain Township is a faculty member in the Department of Sociology at the main campus of Kent State University.

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News Headline: Local musician releases CD, prepares for second | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: /p>
Photo courtesy of Londyn Goines The cover for Twinsburg musician Londyn Goines' first CD.

Special Products Editor

Londyn Goines grew up with music in her family.

"My mom sings, my dad sings," said Goines, a 2010 graduate of Twinsburg High School and a three-year member of the high school's show choir, Great Expectations. "Ever since I was little, my mom coordinated the music at our church. When we would work around the house, we would sing and do harmonies. It made the chores go faster."

So it's little surprise that Goines, who now attends Kent State University, is studying vocal music. The aspiring singer has performed for Family Unity in the Park at Luke Easter Park, The Ingenuity Fest in downtown Cleveland and The Rock Hall of Fame in Cleveland. She has also opened for national acts, like Eric Roberson, Morris Day and the Time and The Temptations. In 2009, Goines released a three-track CD, "Young Girl," and will be following up with a second CD within about a month. She wrote the songs for her first CD, and has written all of the songs, "around nine or 10," for the second one, which has not been named yet.

"Young Girl," the title song on her first CD, carries a message about being true to oneself and not being afraid to follow your own path.

Goines said she started writing music at an early age.

"I was 9 when I wrote my first song," she said. "I was taking piano lessons, and just playing with the chords and I made up my own song. I had my little sister back me up and we did it for our parents."

For details on Goines, visit http://www.londynent.com.

"My music is on there, and my YouTube videos are on there," she said.

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News Headline: Local musician releases CD, prepares for second | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: /p>
Photo courtesy of Londyn Goines The cover for Twinsburg musician Londyn Goines' first CD.

Special Products Editor

Londyn Goines grew up with music in her family.

"My mom sings, my dad sings," said Goines, a 2010 graduate of Twinsburg High School and a three-year member of the high school's show choir, Great Expectations. "Ever since I was little, my mom coordinated the music at our church. When we would work around the house, we would sing and do harmonies. It made the chores go faster."

So it's little surprise that Goines, who now attends Kent State University, is studying vocal music. The aspiring singer has performed for Family Unity in the Park at Luke Easter Park, The Ingenuity Fest in downtown Cleveland and The Rock Hall of Fame in Cleveland. She has also opened for national acts, like Eric Roberson, Morris Day and the Time and The Temptations. In 2009, Goines released a three-track CD, "Young Girl," and will be following up with a second CD within about a month. She wrote the songs for her first CD, and has written all of the songs, "around nine or 10," for the second one, which has not been named yet.

"Young Girl," the title song on her first CD, carries a message about being true to oneself and not being afraid to follow your own path.

Goines said she started writing music at an early age.

"I was 9 when I wrote my first song," she said. "I was taking piano lessons, and just playing with the chords and I made up my own song. I had my little sister back me up and we did it for our parents."

For details on Goines, visit http://www.londynent.com.

"My music is on there, and my YouTube videos are on there," she said.

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News Headline: Top Cleveland theater stories of 2010 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Tony Brown, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: Great Lakes Theater Festival veteran Tom Hanks made a six-figure gift to the Hanna Theatre renovation campaign.

The busiest season in my 11 years as Plain Dealer theater critic generated a welter of major news and rewarding experiences.

So let's get right to 'em.

January: Great Lakes Theater Festival announces a six-figure gift from alum Tom Hanks that puts the Hanna Theatre renovation campaign over its $19.3 million goal.

February: Turkish playwright Ozen Yula, just arrived for a nine-month Cleveland residency, is threatened by a Muslim fundamentalist newspaper back home.

April: The Cleveland Play House loses associate artistic director Seth Gordon, the theater's go-to mensch.

May: John Lithgow returns to town to do benefits for Great Lakes, founded by Lithgow's father, Arthur, in 1962.

June: PlayhouseSquare, the Play House and Cleveland State University unveil plans to renovate the Allen Theatre into a three-venue home for the Play House and CSU's drama program.

September: Two of Cleveland's leading ladies of the past, Providence Hollander, 84, and Evie McElroy, 75, die within days of each other.

Also, IngenuityFest moves to the long-unused subway level of the Detroit-Superior (Veterans Memorial) Bridge, a piece of Cleveland's forgotten past.

October: Robin Williams signs to appear in this spring's production of "Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo," Cleveland Heights writer Rajiv Joseph's Broadway debut.

November: Kent State University opens the Roe Green Center for the School of Theatre and Dance, thanks to a $6.5 million grant from alum Green.

December: Mark Alan Gordon, largely responsible for the national prominence of the Play House/Case Western Reserve University graduate acting program, announces his departure.

Roger MastroianniEmma (Sarah Nealis) is relieved upon hearing Mr. Knightley's (Mark L. Montgomery) declaration of love in The Cleveland Play House production of Jane Austen's "Emma."

Great shows The Cleveland Play House

"Emma," director Peter Amster's follow-up to "Pride and Prejudice" two seasons earlier, is adapted by Play House artistic director Michael Bloom.

"Bill W. and Dr. Bob" is a surprisingly intoxicating retelling of the founding, in Akron in 1935, of Alcoholics Anonymous.

"A Soldier's Tale." Play House + Cleveland Orchestra + GroundWorks DanceTheater + Kurt Vonnegut + Igor Stravisnky = great theater.

"The 39 Steps" makes fun of Alfred Hitchcock's masterpiece.

"This Wonderful Life," staged by Amster with James Leaming in all roles, explores Frank Capra's classic 1946 film.

Cleveland Public Theatre

"Anna Bella Eema," a 2003 Lisa D'Amour play directed by Theatre Ninjas' Jeremy Paul, takes a deep ocean dive in search of "the eternal feminine."

"Wanderlust," a fascinating adaptation by Matthew Earnest of a nonfiction book on the history of walking, strolls from ancient times to modern.

"Open Mind Firmament" is a dreamlike homage to W.B. Yeats and CSU Yeats scholar Barton Friedman, created by Cleveland Public Theatre artistic director Raymond Bobgan.

"The Book of Grace," Suzan-Lori Parks' exploration of boundaries -- personal, familial, racial and national -- boasts superb performances by Chuck Kartali and Sally Groth.

"Conni's Avant-Garde Restaurant" is not dinner theater! It is, instead, comfort food served by inmates of an insane asylum on LSD.

PlayhouseSquare's Broadway Series

In "August: Osage County," the legendary Estelle Parsons plays angry lush-in-chief in Tracy Letts' 2008 Pulitzer Prize-winning dark family comedy.

Blue Man Group, now 19 years old, re-energizes audiences with a rocking new performance-art extravaganza.

"Billy Elliot: The Musical" wows with its dancing, music and political commentary.

Great Lakes Theater Festival

"Othello" and "An Ideal Husband": The fall repertory is Great Lakes' best work in years. D.A. Smith (Iago in "Othello," Goring in "Husband") carries both.

Off-Euclid Theater

"Inoculations," Theater Ninjas' noirish, intimate take on two very weird plays by Darren O'Donnell, is exciting, original and confounding.

"Humble Boy" (at Dobama Theatre), "Wings" (with Dorothy Silver, at the Beck Center for the Arts) and "A Murder, a Mystery and Marriage" (at Actors' Summit) round out the list.

Great performances

Rosemary Prinz is the draw at the Play House's adequate production of Neil Simon's schmaltzy "Lost in Yonkers."

Harvey Fierstein redefines Tevye in a standard "Fiddler on the Roof" at PlayhouseSquare.

Theater person of the year Jeremy Paul, co-founder and artistic director of the beyond-edgy Theatre Ninjas, is absolutely fearless.

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News Headline: Welty fund hands out grants | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Welty Family Foundation awarded more than $196,000 to Akron-area nonprofit organizations at its December meeting.

The largest award, $19,000, went to OPEN M for support of its free clinic operation.

Three entities will receive $10,000 each: Akron Children's Hospital, to buy a neonatal intensive-care station bed; Battered Women's Shelter, for its Weekday Crisis Intervention program; and the Boy Scouts of America-Great Trail Council, for the Manatoc Fitness and Aquatic Center campaign.

Other recipients include:

• 32nd Degree Masonic Akron Learning Center for Children, $5,000 for tutoring children with dyslexia.

• Access Inc., $5,000 for the Hunger Relief program.

• Akron Art Museum, $5,000 for the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection; Fifty Works for Ohio exhibition.

• Akron Civic Theatre, $2,000 for Festival of Nations Day.

• Akron Community Service Center and Urban League, $6,000 for work-force development programs for unemployed and underemployed.

• Akron Zoological Park, $5,000 to renovate the Farmland exhibit.

• Arc of Summit and Portage Counties, $3,000 for service coordination advocacy efforts.

• Blick Clinic, $2,621 for kitchen remodeling for the P.H. Cafe Therapeutic Group.

• CASA Board Volunteer Association, $3,700 for a training program for child advocacy.

• Children's Concert Society, $3,000 for the In-School and Concert Hall Series.

• Community Pregnancy Center, $8,000 for the Safety First Project for newborns.

• Cuyahoga Valley National Park Association, $3,750 for scholarships for children to attend residential educational program.

• Cuyahoga Valley Youth Ballet, $5,000 for its 35th anniversary and Akron Civic Theatre performances.

• CYO and Community Services, $2,000 to buy furniture for Adult Day Services.

• Friends of 91.3, $3,500 for KIDJAM! Radio to address bullying.

• Good Neighbors-Green Unit, $5,000 to buy food for the needy.

• H.M. Life Opportunity Services, $5,000 for the TAG program to move families from emergency shelters to permanent housing.

• Haven of Rest Ministries, $5,000 for dorm costs.

• Hospice of Visiting Nurse Service, $7,500 to repair a backup power generator at Hospice Care Center.

• Humane Society of Greater Akron, $5,000 to expand medical facilities.

Kent State University Foundation-Porthouse Theatre, $2,619 to buy an electronic piano/keyboard for the School of Theatre and Dance.

• Mental Health America of Summit County, $3,000 for the PEERS Project.

• OASIS Outreach Opportunity, $3,000 to complete the high school education of inner-city students.

• Our Lady of the Elms, $3,000 for Phase II of roof renovations.

• Pegasus Farm, $6,000 to care for therapy horses.

• Rape Crisis Center, $5,000 for the Sexual Assault Outreach Education and Prevention program.

• Society of St. Vincent de Paul, $6,000 for the AIM High program to provide computers to Akron-area children.

• South Street Ministries, $7,500 for programs for Summit Lake neighborhood youth.

• Stewart's Caring Place, $4,000 for the Healing Arts program.

• Summit County Historical Society, $4,000 for educational programs for fourth-graders.

• Tutoring Nurtures Talent, $3,032 to buy computers for the tutoring site.

• Urban Vision, $5,000 for the Set on Success Afterschool Enrichment program.

• Women's Auxiliary Board of Summit County Children's Home, $5,000 for the Beds for Kids Program.

The Welty Family Foundation was established in 1999 by Jerry and Emily Welty to benefit charitable causes. Grant applications are being accepted through May 2 for the foundation's June distribution meeting.

Guidelines and an application may be obtained by writing Brenda J. Moubray, FirstMerit Bank, Grant Administrator-Family Foundation Office, 106 S. Main St., Fifth Floor-TOW 23, Akron, OH 44308. For information, call 330-384-7301, or e-mail brenda.moubray@firstmerit.com.

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News Headline: Hearing set to pave way for PARTA project in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Schleis, Paula
News OCR Text: KENT: A civil court case that is the final obstacle in an effort to start construction on a $26 million transit center in March has been postponed until Feb. 16.

At that time, a jury will be asked to decide what the owners of Car Parts Warehouse should receive for their property, which is being acquired by the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority (PARTA) through eminent domain.

PARTA and property owners Tony and Carolina Difiore have been unable to agree on a sale price.

The agency initially offered about $450,000 for the half-acre property and 10,000-square-foot building.

Bryan Smith, PARTA'S director of planning, said the agency followed federal rules by hiring an appraiser, and then hiring an independent consultant to review the appraisal.

The Difiore's counter offer was $1.5 million, Smith said.

''We're bound to offer (the appraised amount). We're not allowed to pay $1.5 million,'' Smith said. ''We as taxpayers wouldn't want that.''

PARTA told the Difiores that if they can prove the property is worth $1.5 million, there was a process for amending the appraisal.

After PARTA filed an eminent domain action, the Difiores presented an appraisal valuing the property at $750,000, Smith said. The day before last week's trial, they submitted a revised appraisal for $1 million.

PARTA sought a continuance to review the information, and it was granted by Portage County Common Pleas Judge John Enlow.

Portage County auditor records show the property sold for $275,000 in 2005, and was transferred to the Difiores under their company name, TD and CD Kent LLC, in a reorganization the following year.

Richard Drucker, counsel for the Difiores, said the couple opened the Kent store at 115 S. DePeyster St. in 2007. It is one of 19 stores they operate throughout Northeast Ohio.

''When they bought the store, it was basically an empty shell,'' Drucker said. ''They renovated the entire building (with) HVAC, painting, flooring, electrical.''

Car Parts Warehouse's bread and butter is supplying auto-repair shops with parts, Drucker said. While there is a store in Rootstown Township, the company prides itself on filling orders in a half hour and needed a location in Kent to better serve customers there, he said.

PARTA last year received a $20 million federal grant for its proposed Kent Central Gateway, a facility that will include 10 bus bays, bicycle lockers and racks, 350 car parking spaces, and 18,000 square feet of potential retail, restaurant and office space.

The center is expected to open in 2012 and be a key piece in downtown Kent's $100 million renaissance. The parking will also support a hotel and conference center being built by Kent State University, as well as other new retail and office buildings to be built one block away.

PARTA needed 12 properties for the project and came to quick agreement with the owners of seven. Eminent domain action was filed on the other five.

In four of the five cases, PARTA got an ''order of possession'' allowing it to take possession of the land while the debate of the value continues.

Car Parts Warehouse was the lone holdout, Smith said.

Drucker said the Difiores ''understand it's a public project and they don't want to stand in the way of public development,'' but feel strongly that the current offer is not fair compensation.

''They were building the business and then, boom, they were in a position where they are forced to sell it,'' Drucker said.

The Difiores are looking for another Kent home for their store but have not yet found a suitable location, he said.

A jury trial is likely to last two or three days, Drucker and Smith agree, after which it is likely PARTA would take immediate possession and proceed with its goal of beginning construction on the transit center in March.

In the other eminent domain cases, one property owner has settled, two are scheduled for trial and the fourth is still waiting for a court date to be set.

Paula Schleis can be reached at 330-996-3741 or pschleis@thebeaconjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/paulaschleis.

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News Headline: Hearing set to pave way for PARTA project in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Paula Schleis
News OCR Text: KENT: A civil court case that is the final obstacle in an effort to start construction on a $26 million transit center in March has been postponed until Feb. 16.

At that time, a jury will be asked to decide what the owners of Car Parts Warehouse should receive for their property, which is being acquired by the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority (PARTA) through eminent domain.

PARTA and property owners Tony and Carolina Difiore have been unable to agree on a sale price.

The agency initially offered about $450,000 for the half-acre property and 10,000-square-foot building.

Bryan Smith, PARTA'S director of planning, said the agency followed federal rules by hiring an appraiser, and then hiring an independent consultant to review the appraisal.

The Difiore's counter offer was $1.5 million, Smith said.

''We're bound to offer (the appraised amount). We're not allowed to pay $1.5 million,'' Smith said. ''We as taxpayers wouldn't want that.''

PARTA told the Difiores that if they can prove the property is worth $1.5 million, there was a process for amending the appraisal.

After PARTA filed an eminent domain action, the Difiores presented an appraisal valuing the property at $750,000, Smith said. The day before last week's trial, they submitted a revised appraisal for $1 million.

PARTA sought a continuance to review the information, and it was granted by Portage County Common Pleas Judge John Enlow.

Portage County auditor records show the property sold for $275,000 in 2005, and was transferred to the Difiores under their company name, TD and CD Kent LLC, in a reorganization the following year.

Richard Drucker, counsel for the Difiores, said the couple opened the Kent store at 115 S. DePeyster St. in 2007. It is one of 19 stores they operate throughout Northeast Ohio.

''When they bought the store, it was basically an empty shell,'' Drucker said. ''They renovated the entire building (with) HVAC, painting, flooring, electrical.''

Car Parts Warehouse's bread and butter is supplying auto-repair shops with parts, Drucker said. While there is a store in Rootstown Township, the company prides itself on filling orders in a half hour and needed a location in Kent to better serve customers there, he said.

PARTA last year received a $20 million federal grant for its proposed Kent Central Gateway, a facility that will include 10 bus bays, bicycle lockers and racks, 350 car parking spaces, and 18,000 square feet of potential retail, restaurant and office space.

The center is expected to open in 2012 and be a key piece in downtown Kent's $100 million renaissance. The parking will also support a hotel and conference center being built by Kent State University, as well as other new retail and office buildings to be built one block away.

PARTA needed 12 properties for the project and came to quick agreement with the owners of seven. Eminent domain action was filed on the other five.

In four of the five cases, PARTA got an ''order of possession'' allowing it to take possession of the land while the debate of the value continues.

Car Parts Warehouse was the lone holdout, Smith said.

Drucker said the Difiores ''understand it's a public project and they don't want to stand in the way of public development,'' but feel strongly that the current offer is not fair compensation.

''They were building the business and then, boom, they were in a position where they are forced to sell it,'' Drucker said.

The Difiores are looking for another Kent home for their store but have not yet found a suitable location, he said.

A jury trial is likely to last two or three days, Drucker and Smith agree, after which it is likely PARTA would take immediate possession and proceed with its goal of beginning construction on the transit center in March.

In the other eminent domain cases, one property owner has settled, two are scheduled for trial and the fourth is still waiting for a court date to be set.

Paula Schleis can be reached at 330-996-3741 or pschleis@thebeaconjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/paulaschleis.

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News Headline: REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS | Email

News Date: 12/25/2010
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Following are the real estate transactions from all the area real estate companies, as recorded by the county auditor and county assessor.

Real estate transfers for the 5th week of August, 2010
PORTAGE COUNTY
KENT CITY
416 College Ave, Lkg Inc (An Ohio Corp) to Kent State University Board Of Trustees, $115,300
325 Erie, Smith Michael W to Kent State University Board Of Trustees, $93,300
320 Erie, L K G Corporation to Kent State University Board Of Trustees, $103,700


Copyright © 2010 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: 'Ohio Outback': Writer fishes for humor in the Great Black Swamp | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Toledo Blade - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The literary techniques and writing strategies Claude Clayton Smith brings to his book set in Ada, Ohio -- Ohio Outback: Learning to Love the Great Black Swamp -- are very much of the 21st century.

It's creative nonfiction, a relatively new genre that grew out of the "new journalism" movement of the 1960s and most of the book is set in suburban cul de sacs where lawns are chemically treated and the neighbors work at the town university. It is, in short, very much of this time.

But the book owes a huge debt, both in inspiration and tone, to a pair of Ohio authors whose great works were created a hundred years ago. Smith acknowledges this up front, consciously drawing on Sherwood Anderson and James Thurber as his muses for the series of stories that comprise Ohio Outback (The Kent State University Press, 176 pages, $24.95).

Smith, a professor of English at Ohio Northern University from 1986 to 2006, said that when he came to Ohio from his teaching job at Virginia Tech, he studied the works of the great Ohio writers to help him understand his new home. Anderson's famous Winesburg, Ohio was set in Clyde, which is 71 miles north of Ada.

"The literary world knows Ohio, and knows the Midwest, through that book I think more so than people in Ohio know it," he said in a phone interview from his new home in Madison, Wis.

And Thurber, the famous short-story writer and cartoonist from Columbus, provided the inspiration for the sly wit and humor that courses through Ohio Outback's tales of domestic misadventures in a series of pieces Smith has dubbed "Yard Wars." They detail his battles with chipmunks and squirrels, the neighbor's barking dogs, and the waves of children who roamed through his neighborhood, providing fodder for essays that are funny and relatable.

After all, who hasn't fought a pitched battle against rodents intent on invading your home or cringed every time a bird slammed into your picture window?

"That's one of the things that Thurber does so well, just the everyday things that are so common like the birds banging into your windows," Smith said. "So I of course exaggerate in a Thurberesque kind of way, but all of those things happened."

Smith is a Connecticut native and the author of the novel The Stratford Devil, in addition to a number of nonfiction works, poems, and a screenplay. He has a doctor of arts degree from Carnegie Mellon University, a master of fine arts from the University of Iowa Writer's Workshop, and a masters of arts in teaching from Yale University.

He and his wife, Elaine, moved to Ada 24 years ago and felt a bit of a culture shock -- at least geographically -- when they went from living in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains to the flat fields of northwest Ohio. When he checked out the neighborhood, it seemed pastoral and quiet, but when they arrived to move in, they noticed the large number of children roaming the neighborhood.

Here's how he describes it in a piece called "Yard Wars of the Ohio Outback: Christopher Horseshoe":

These kids flocked like pigeons, descending at a moment's notice, then moving on. The were already in the habit of cutting through our backyard -- the most direct route between Christopher Circle and the cul-de-sac -- unless I made a point of standing by the side of the road at the corner of our lot and waving them around like a traffic cop. It was too early to become a cul-de-sac curmudgeon -- even one with a name as lovely as Something Suburban and Pretty. Such a role had to be earned over time. And we'd just moved in.

Smith said the observations are based on coming from a quiet, private community to one that was much more open and friendly. And despite his literary voice as the perpetually put-upon everyman fighting losing battles, he and his family loved the small town about 69 miles from Toledo.

"The thing that everybody tells you as a faculty member as you move to Ada is that Ada is a great place to raise kids. And we certainly found that to be true. It's a small village and everybody knows each other," he said. "It's a lovely small community."

He said humor was a way to draw the reader into stories that are universal and personal at the same time.

"It's really difficult to write about oneself and get a distance from it, so it's helpful to the reader to create a mood and let the reader know that this is frustrating, but the writer's not taking it too seriously and it's funny," he said.

Interspersed through Ohio Outback are pieces about the factory in Ada where footballs are made, trips to Clyde, and other more journalistic works. Smith said he made a conscious decision to break up the Yard Wars stories with his other writing, all of which reflects on his time living here.

He's already moved on to other writing projects, including editing and helping to translate a book on Siberian fiction, and putting together a similar compilation of his creative nonfiction stories from his time in Connecticut. Now retired from teaching, he and his wife moved to Madison a couple of years ago to live in the same city as one of their sons.

As for Ohio Outback, he thinks it will have a market that extends beyond the Great Black Swamp for one simple reason:

"The backyard is a universal place."

Contact Rod Lockwood at:

rlockwood@theblade.com

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News Headline: Beggars of Life, by Jim Tully, back in print | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/29/2010
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Thomas Gladysz
News OCR Text: The 1928 Louise Brooks film, , is based on an earlier bestseller of the same name by Jim Tully, a once-popular “hobo author” and literary celebrity during the Jazz Age.

With the passage of time, however, Tully's reputation declined and his various books fell out-of print. And for decades, – an early classic of hobo literature, could only be found in second hand bookshops. Used copies often commanded a premium.

Now, the book is back in print thanks to the efforts of Kent State University Press and two dedicated Tully scholars, Paul Bauer and Mark Dawidziak.

Over the last year and a half, the university press in Kent, Ohio (Tully's one-time home) has begun reissuing the forgotten writer's long-out-of-print books. So far, they've released Circus Parade (with a foreword by the late comix artist Harvey Pekar), Shanty Irish (with a foreword by film director John Sayles), The Bruiser (with a foreword by critic Gerald Early), and Tully's breakthrough work and what's likely his best remembered book, (with an introduction by series editors Bauer and Dawidziak). Two more titles will follow in 2012.

In the meantime, next year will see the release of Bauer and Dawidziak's long awaited biography, Jim Tully: American Writer, Irish Rover, Hollywood Brawler. The book will include a foreword by the celebrated documentary film maker Ken Burns, who has called it a "wonderful, hugely important biography."

In his heyday, Tully was not only popular but critically acclaimed. His books appeared on bestseller lists, were adapted for the stage, made into movies, and were reviewed in major publications across the country. The famous critic H.L. Mencken was a longtime champion of the hobo writer.

Some consider Tully a precursor to the "hard-boiled" school. In the Twenties, Tully wasn't writing about the glitz and glamour of the Jazz Age. Rather, his singular brand of rough and tumble realism concerned petty criminals, addicts, the down-and-out and other misfits of society. Charles Willeford, one of the leading post WWII hard-boiled crime fiction writers, has praised Tully and written of his influence. Published in 1924, was the first of five autobiographical books Tully regarded as part of a larger single work – an "Underworld Edition" – which told his life story in novelistic terms.

Born near St. Marys, Ohio in 1886, Tully experienced an impoverished childhood. After the death of his mother in 1892, Tully's Irish immigrant ditch-digger father sent the boy to an orphanage in Cincinnati. He remained there for six years until the misery became more than he could bear. Tully ran away – though he was only a teenager.

Thereafter, what education this wild boy of the road received largely came in hobo camps, railroad yards, and small towns scattered across the country. Tully is known to have stolen books by favorite writers (such as Dostoyevsky) from the local libraries in which he often found shelter.

Tully scholars Bauer and Dawidziak have described Tully as "the greatest long shot in American literature." Considering his ramshackle life and lack of formal schooling, it's a miracle he wrote as much and as well as he did. Now, fans of Louise Brooks eager to read the book behind what is fast becoming the actress' best regarded American silent film have the chance. Jump.

More info: Jim Tully's is available from online retailers and Indiebound.

Thomas Gladysz is an arts journalist and author. Recently, he wrote the introduction to a new “” of Margarete Böhme's classic book, The (PandorasBox Press). Gladysz will speak about his new book at the in Paris on January 13, followed by a screening of the film at the nearby Action Cinema.

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News Headline: D. Blankenship gave 5 stars to: Civil War Prisons | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/26/2010
Outlet Full Name: Suomen Kuvalehti
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: D. Blankenship reviewed:Civil War Prisons by William Best Hesseltine EXTREMELY GOOD BASIC WORK. Note that there is quite a lot of confussion amongst reviewers here on which book is being reviewed., December 26, 2010 This review is from: Civil War Prisons (Paperback) First we need to address the issue of just what work is being reviewed here and which book is being sold on this product page. As another reviewer here, Kerry Walters, has so well pointed out, several reviewers have mistaken this work edited by William B. Hesseltine, with a work actually written by Hesseltine around 1930 entitled "Civil War Prisons: A Study in War Psychology." The book being reviewed here is "Civil War Prisons," which is the small volume published and released by The Kent State University Press in 1962. We are addressing two quite different works. Hesseltine's original work, which as noted was issued about 1930 has its own set of problems; if problems you chose to call them, and issues completely separate than those addressed in this work. Readers do take note of this...it makes very big difference in how this book is approached. (Note: Hesseltine's 1930s work is good but, in my opinion, should be approached with caution. Hesseltine has tried his best to be neutral in his assessments, but this sympathies bleed through here and there and again, in my opinion, he does not give a completely balanced overview....but of course each reader should make up their own mind on this subject.)Civil War Prisons, Edited by William B. Hesseltine, the actual book being reviewed here, is a collection of essays (or articles), which address different prisons which existed during the Civil War. These articles and their authors include:Civil War Prisons - Introduction, by William B. HesseltinePrison Life at Andersonville, by Ovid FutchThe Military Prison at Fort Warren, by Minor H. McLainRock Island Prison Barracks, by T.R. WalkerA General Behind Bars: Neal Dow in Libby Prison, edited by Frank L. ByrneThe Scourge of Elmira, by James I. Robertson Jr.Johnson's Island, by Edward T. DownerCahaba to Charleston: The Prison Odyssey of Lt. Edmund E. Ryan, by William M. Armstrong (A distant relative of my wife...of great interest to us personally).This 124 page small volume relies heavily on first hand accounts of selected men who were actual prisoners during the time of the War and shortly after. The compiler has made a good effort in giving a good cross section of experiences, but of course the reader should note that these are stories of a few, attempting to tell the story of literally thousands and as such, the accounts recorded in this volume might quite well be rather myopic in some cases. Like any battle in any war, there are as many opinions of how the battle went as there were men involved...each has his own story and take on the situation.The intention of this work was not meant to be a complete and comprehensive study of Civil War POWs, nor an all inclusive study of each of the infamous prisons involved. No, this is a collection of first hand accounts, enhanced by comments by each of the authors of each of the essays. Despite the notorious inaccuracies of many first-hand accounts, due to dimmed memories, the "war story syndrome," personal prejudices and the like, they are, from my personal likes and dislikes, my favorite. But that being said, the reader should take this into consideration when reading such material as this.Since Hesseltine's 1930s work was published, and indeed since this volume was published, much research has been accomplished and we now have plethora of literature covering this subject with more being offered each year. This work in no way is the beginning and end of such studies but it is a great starting point for those unfamiliar with the subject. It is what I considered a "seed" work; one that should, when planted, encourage the interested reader to grow and seek out other, more in-depth studies on the subject.I am giving this one five stars because I personally feel that it serves the function for which it is meant. It is a scholarly work but presented in a fashion which is highly readable and simply interesting and informative. It is a basic overview and a good beginning of a study of an aspect of our history which we should all be aware. Don BlankenshipThe Ozarks

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News Headline: Jim Blum | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/31/2010
Outlet Full Name: NPR - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jim Blum has been sharing his love of folk music as a radio host on WKSU-FM for more than 25 years and, since 2003, also on FolkAlley.com. Blum graduated with a B.A. from Kent State University, played bass in a bluegrass and swing band and used to be a landscaper. As host and music programmer for Folk Alley and WKSU's weekend folk music, Blum has nearly three decades of experience broadcasting to a folk community that is now, thanks to the Internet, global in scope. His broadcasts include his own mix of musical influences featuring classic folk heroes, acoustic instrumentals, world rhythms, contemporary singer/songwriters, Americana, bluegrass and other roots-based sounds. He also acts as a valuable resource for area venue owners and concert coordinators as well as holding the position of artistic director for the Kent State Folk Festival, the nation's second oldest folk fest held on a college campus.

Blum grew up in Northeast Ohio and still calls the region "home." An avid backcountry skier, he lives in a timberframe house that he helped build set down in a wooded area in the Snow Belt's sweet spot. Along with folk and traditional music, Blum also has a passion for the environment and animals (he's currently "Dad" to four dogs and seven cats). His listeners often come to him for local nature stories and updates on dogs up for adoption at the nearby shelter. They recognize him as a conversational, confident guy who is more of a companion than an announcer. He says, "I look at the folk programs as a meeting place... a place to gather each weekend or like a virtual coffeeshop online." Even though his home and his many folk-related projects keep him very busy, Blum tries to make time each year to head into the mountains with his dogs, "To rebuild my soul."

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