Report Overview:
Total Clips (27)
Alumni (3)
Anthropology (3)
Architecture (1)
Athletics (1)
Athletics; Student Success (1)
Biomedical Science (1)
Budget (1)
Fashion Design (1)
Geography (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Geauga (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
KSU Ice Arena (1)
Library and Information Literacy Education (ILILE) (1)
Library and Media Services (1)
Music (1)
Psychology (3)
Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Small Business Development Center (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (3)
Kent State University graduate feels super about role on NBC series 'The Cape' 01/08/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...Channel 3. "It just so happened that my character and I kind of met in a really nice way," said Kumar, a graduate of Kent Roosevelt High School and Kent State University. "The character happens to be Indian, and one of the places where I really connected with Ruvi was his sense of mysticism...

KSU grad heading up NPR post 01/08/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Until last week, Kent State graduate Eric Nuzum might have been best known for watching 267 movies about vampires as research for a book. On Friday, he made...

WKSU alum Nuzum moves up at NPR (Burford) 01/10/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Anthropology (3)
Big Babies Helped Shape Early Human Societies (Lovejoy) 01/10/2011 NPR - Online Text Attachment Email

...with the switch to terrestriality is a switch to a more substantive infant that has a higher chance of survival," says Owen Lovejoy, an anthropologist at Kent State University in Ohio. If the trend to proportionally larger babies was nearly complete 2.5 million years ago when the Australopithecus...

Big Babies Helped Shape Early Human Societies (Lovejoy) 01/10/2011 New Hampshire Public Radio - Online Text Attachment Email

...with the switch to terrestriality is a switch to a more substantive infant that has a higher chance of survival," says Owen Lovejoy, an anthropologist at Kent State University in Ohio. If the trend to proportionally larger babies was nearly complete 2.5 million years ago when the Australopithecus...

Big Babies Helped Shape Early Human Societies (Lovejoy) 01/10/2011 Oregon Public Broadcasting - Online Text Attachment Email

...with the switch to terrestriality is a switch to a more substantive infant that has a higher chance of survival," says Owen Lovejoy, an anthropologist at Kent State University in Ohio. If the trend to proportionally larger babies was nearly complete 2.5 million years ago when the Australopithecus...


Architecture (1)
Enterprise Architecture Certification Workshop 01/08/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Date: 01/10/11 Address: KSU Stark Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. North Canton, OH 44720 Description: Kent State University and the Enterprise Architecture Center of Excellence (EACOE) have partnered to present an Enterprise Architecture certification...


Athletics (1)
Kent State adds two assistants 01/08/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State coach Darrell Hazell continues to fill out his coaching staff, adding Thad Jemison as wide receivers coach and Dennis Scuderi as...


Athletics; Student Success (1)
Rugby team donates to Burn Unit 01/10/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Biomedical Science (1)
Data on fibroblasts published by researchers at Kent State University 01/10/2011 Clinical Oncology Week Text Email

...p67/MetAP2 siRNA in both NIH3T3 fibroblasts and C2C12 myoblasts causes activation and activity of ERK1/2 MAP kinases," wrote A. Majumdar and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "Our results thus suggest that ectopic expression of rat p67/MetAP2 in transformed...


Budget (1)
Hiring Freeze No Surprise for Faculty at Kent State (Munro-Stasiuk, Walker, Wyckoff, McVay, Joynes) 01/10/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design (1)
Click-worthy Ohio fashion blogs - best of the web 01/08/2011 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

...boutiques, Cleveland Stylista would be an excellent resource. This is a blog written by none other than J.R. Campbell, the premiere fashion school of Ohio, Kent State University's, director. This blog highlights programs, scholarships, upcoming events, program highlights and all the exciting going-ons...


Geography (1)
Resilience to climate change offers Cleveland opportunities: Jeff Opperman 01/09/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...water-supply sustainability and vulnerability to natural disasters. For heat, I used data developed by Scott Sheridan (professor in the Department of Geography, Kent State University), which identifies the frequency of intense heat within major cities. Based on these data, Cleveland has the lowest...


KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
COLLEGE STUDENTS ATTENDING KENT STATE CLASSES 01/07/2011 21 News at 6 PM - WFMJ-TV Text Email

...for the Community Action Agency of Columbiana County to start a new transit service for local college students. PRIMARILY FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS ATTENDING KENT STATE CLASSES AT THE SALEM AND EAST LIVERPOOL CAMPUS. The Assistant Dean at the Salem Branch says it's a blessing for many young people...


KSU at Geauga (1)
Smithsonian Music Exhibit On 5-state Tour 01/08/2011 CBSNews.com Text Attachment Email

...Fountain Ave.) winds down, nearby Dayton holds its Cityfolk Festival over the July Fourth weekend. A gospel choir will sing during the Burton exhibit (Kent State University Geauga Campus, 14111 Claridon Troy Road, Burton.) That exhibit coincides with a Great Geauga County Fair Band concert....


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
'Oklahoma!' production canceled (Patacca) 01/07/2011 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

The main lobby of the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas. NEW PHILADELPHIA, OH — The Rodgers & Hammerstein musical “Oklahoma!” to be staged in New Philadelphia...

Need a venue? Performing Arts Center might be the place (Morelli) 01/09/2011 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

Mike Morelli, general manager of The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas, says rentals for the facility have been going well. NEW PHILADELPHIA, OH — Need a place to perform...


KSU Ice Arena (1)
2DO ON THE TENS 01/07/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

...2-11. The zoo is open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. It's at 3900 Wildlife Way. Go to clemetzoo.com. . . . If you're looking for a public skate place, think of the Kent State University Ice Arena. The rink is open Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday in January; hours vary. Admission for public...


Library and Information Literacy Education (ILILE) (1)
Free Resources: TRAILSâTool for Real-Time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills 01/08/2011 Internet@Schools Magazine Text Attachment Email

...list for account holders to get news and share ideas TRAILS is a project of the Institute for Library and Information Literacy Education (ILILE) at Kent State University and is directed by the University Libraries. ILILE is funded through the Institute of Museum and Library Services and...


Library and Media Services (1)
KSU library's plans to expand hours hits snag (Sperko, Bracken) 01/10/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Music (1)
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S SCHOOL OF MUSIC ENTERS FINAL PHASE OF STEINWAY CAMPAIGN (Seachrist) 01/07/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Jan. 7 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music embarks on in...


Psychology (3)
Mindfulness therapy is no fad, experts say (Fresco) 01/08/2011 Los Angeles Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...clear that people can improve their health if they can encourage this practice in their lives," said David Fresco, an associate professor of psychology at Kent State University in Ohio. "But we have to be careful not to move beyond the data too quickly." Fresco warns that mindfulness treatment...

Mindfulness therapy is no fad, experts say (Fresco) 01/10/2011 Orlando Sentinel - Online Text Attachment Email

...clear that people can improve their health if they can encourage this practice in their lives," said David Fresco, an associate professor of psychology at Kent State University in Ohio. "But we have to be careful not to move beyond the data too quickly." Fresco warns that mindfulness treatment...

HEALTH & WELLNESS (Fresco) 01/09/2011 Los Angeles Times Text Email

...clear that people can improve their health if they can encourage this practice in their lives," said David Fresco, an associate professor of psychology at Kent State University in Ohio. "But we have to be careful not to move beyond the data too quickly." Fresco warns that mindfulness treatment...


Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Huber Heights to hire new city manager soon 01/09/2011 Dayton Daily News - Online Text Attachment Email

...range is between $89,020 and $133,048. Bensen, who earned $95,000 annually, said she stepped down for personal reasons. The city has contracted with Kent State Universitys Center for Public Administration and Public Policy to oversee the search and screening process, at a cost not to exceed...


Small Business Development Center (2)
Business briefs 01/09/2011 Steubenville Herald-Star Text Attachment Email

...Steuben Mall. The informal organization provides a chance for the 40-and-under business crowd to network and enjoy time together. State honor for Kent State SBA NEW PHILADELPHIA - Steve Schillig, regional director of the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University-Tuscarawas,...

Business Briefs 01/09/2011 Weirton Daily Times, The Text Attachment Email

...Steuben Mall. The informal organization provides a chance for the 40-and-under business crowd to network and enjoy time together. State honor for Kent State SBA NEW PHILADELPHIA - Steve Schillig, regional director of the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University-Tuscarawas,...


News Headline: Kent State University graduate feels super about role on NBC series 'The Cape' | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Mark Dawidziak, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: Anil Kumar, center, gets goofy on the set of "The Cape" with fellow cast members Martin Klebba and Isabella Miko.

Los Angeles -- NBC's "The Cape" has turned into something of a magical mystical tour for Anil Kumar, who grew up in Kent. Kumar has the recurring role of Ruvi, a mentalist helping to mentor the superhero lead character in the series that premieres at 9 tonight on WKYC Channel 3.

"It just so happened that my character and I kind of met in a really nice way," said Kumar, a graduate of Kent Roosevelt High School and Kent State University. "The character happens to be Indian, and one of the places where I really connected with Ruvi was his sense of mysticism -- a fascination with the mysticism of life."

David Lyons ("ER") stars as Vince Faraday, an honest cop framed for murder. Determined to win back his life, he assumes the identity of his son's favorite comic-book superhero.

His unlikely coaches for this assignment are larcenous Max Malini (David Keith) and his carnival gang of bank robbers. This crooked sideshow crew includes Rollo (Martin Klebba) and Ruvi, who teaches Faraday about mentalism.

"Now, of course, Ruvi also is a bank robber and a thief, and I don't fancy myself anything like that, at all," Kumar said. "He is sly, and I don't know that I'd use the word sly to describe myself. I like to use the word charming.

The Cape

What: The premiere of a superhero se ries starring David Lyons as an honest cop framed for murder and presumed dead.

When: 9 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 9.

Where: NBC (WKYC Channel 3).

"Actually, I'm pretty much of a goofball, as any of my friends will tell me. I'm pretty much a happy-go-lucky kind of person and Ruvi is an extraordinarily serious person. And he's a very dangerous person, and that's definitely not me."

Kumar, 41, has assembled an impressive list of prime-time credits over the past 10 years. He had the recurring role of Kalil Hasan on the fourth season of Fox's "24." And he has been a guest star on episodes of HBO's "Oz" and "Six Feet Under," FX's "Nip/Tuck," CBS' "JAG" and "The Agency," Fox's "K-ville" and NBC's "ER," "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," "E-Ring," "Inconceivable," "Miss Match" and "Life."

Viewers will meet Kumar's Ruvi in the two-hour opener of "The Cape" airing tonight and repeating at 9 p.m. Monday (the show's regular time slot).

"I have never had more fun both in front and behind the camera," Kumar said. "Right away, first day on set, the group of us playing Max Malini's carnival crime gang felt an incredible chemistry. There was an immediate rapport, joking with each other, busting each other's chops, so when the camera is rolling, you just feel that much more relaxed and free and spontaneous."

Kumar was born in Minneapolis, but his family moved to Kent when he was 6 months old. After earning his bachelor's degree in psychology at KSU, he received his master of fine arts degree in acting from Rutgers University.

His New York stage debut was alongside Alec Baldwin, Angela Bassett, Liev Schreiber, Zach Braff and Michael Hall in the 1998 Public Theater production of "Macbeth." His other stage credits include Harry Kondoleon's "Saved or Destroyed" at the Cleveland Public Theatre and Tom Stoppard's "Indian Ink" at American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco. He also originated the role of Mohammad in "The Tale of the Allergist's Wife," appearing with Linda Lavin, Valerie Harper, Michele Lee and Tony Roberts during his two-year Broadway run in the comedy by Charles Busch.

"We don't know exactly how many episodes of 'The Cape' Ruvi will appear in, but he'll be in at least 10 of the first 13," Kumar said. "It depends on how the story lines develop. But what's exciting for me is that they're constantly talking to me about ways to develop Ruvi and broaden the character. They seem to foresee great possibilities for him."

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News Headline: KSU grad heading up NPR post | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Until last week, Kent State graduate Eric Nuzum might have been best known for watching 267 movies about vampires as research for a book.

On Friday, he made news of another sort when he was named to lead programming, at least for the short term, at National Public Radio in Washington, D.C.

''It feels strange to be congratulated for something like this because I'm doing it because I love the organization,'' Nuzum, 44, said Friday. ''But I don't consider it to be a promotion.''

Nuzum became NPR's No. 1 person in programming and acquisitions in the wake of the Juan Williams scandal.

NPR fired Williams, a commentator for the organization, in October for remarks he made as a paid commentator on FOX News � that he ''gets nervous'' when he sees Muslims board airplanes.

The comment set off a firestorm of criticism, launched an internal investigation at NPR and led to the resignation on Thursday of the senior vice president who fired Williams.

For Nuzum, the new position escalates the amount of work he does at NPR's national headquarters. Mainly that means, ''a lot of the work of the company that falls outside the news division,'' he said.

That includes program evaluations and development, support for on-air fundraising and operations and management of 18 programs that NPR distributes but does not produce such as On the Media, Car Talk, Fresh Air and The Thistle & Shamrock. His expanded role may last through the summer, as NPR seeks a new staffer to replace senior vice president Ellen Weiss.

He said he gets to make a lot of editorial decisions at NPR, which has helped him in his other life as a pop-culture writer.

The self-professed ''lover, writer and nonsense provocateur'' has written three books, including Parental Advisory: Music Censorship in America and The Dead Travel Fast: Stalking Vampires From Nosferatu to Count Chocula, where he watched as many vampire movies as he could stomach.

According to a 2008 Q and A profile on Washingtonian.com, the most surprising thing he learned for the latter book was that Bram Stoker was infatuated with American poet Walt Whitman.

''I didn't see that one coming,'' Nuzum was quoted as saying. ''In fact, if you look at photos of Whitman, you see many physical similarities to the way that Stoker described his Count.''

His new book, a memoir called Bring Me to Heaven, is about the time that he believed he was being haunted by a ghost, he said.

''The point of the book is to understand whether what I experienced as a child was real,'' he said. He won't reveal his conclusion. It will be published next year.

All this has happened since his days at Kent. He first came to KSU as a student in 1985, left in the late 1980s and returned as WKSU-FM's development producer in 1995.

He finished his bachelor's degree in general studies in 1998, the same year he was named WKSU program director. Six years later, he was hired at NPR.

Nuzum writes about everything from pancakes to babies on his blog, http://www.ericnuzum.com. / Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

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News Headline: WKSU alum Nuzum moves up at NPR (Burford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State University graduate is now a big-shot at NPR -- for a little while.

Eric Nuzum, a former director of programming and operations at WKSU, has moved into an interim vice president post at NPR. That position became available after personnel reshuffling in the wake of news analyst Juan Williams' firing in October.

The vice president for news who fired Williams resigned Thursday following a review by NPR's Board of Directors, prompting Nuzum and his boss to move into six-month interim jobs.

Nuzum will oversee all non-news programming and NPR's acquired programs, such as "Fresh Air" and "Car Talk."

"Who would have thought that the Juan Williams flap would end up having a little ripple effect in Kent?" said Bob Burford, a friend and former colleague of Nuzum. Burford is a weekend announcer at WKSU.

"He's the perfect person for the job," he said. "He has a deep knowledge of public radio and audience, and he's really well respected across the board."

Nuzum said he doubts the temporary promotion will become permanent, and he doesn't want it to.

"I'm very happily filling in for this," Nuzum said Friday. He added that he and his boss, Margaret Low Smith, now senior vice president for news, are looking forward to going back to their normal jobs.

Nuzum graduated from KSU in 1998 after three years as development producer at WKSU. He became WKSU's program director the same year he graduated.

In 2004, Nuzum took his job as program and acquisition manager at NPR in Washington, D.C., where he currently lives. Nuzum has published two books and is finished writing his third, "Bring Me to Heaven."

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News Headline: Big Babies Helped Shape Early Human Societies (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: NPR - Online
Contact Name: Joe Palca
News OCR Text: Newborn babies may be a bundle of joy, but they are a heavy bundle of joy. Scientists say human babies weigh proportionally more at birth than the babies of any other primate species.

Now an anthropologist in Boston has shown that our earliest human ancestors probably had big babies, too — something that may have influenced the development of modern human societies.

"Humans are strange, in all sorts of ways," says Jeremy DeSilva, an anthropologist at Boston University. We walk upright on two legs and our newborns are helpless.

"Our babies are unusually large," he says. "They have unusually large heads; they have unusually large bodies compared to other primates."

A newborn ape typically weighs about 3 percent of what its mother weighs. For humans, that jumps to 6 percent. DeSilva wondered if this were true for a species like Australopithecus that came millions of years before modern humans.

But there's a fundamental difficulty answering that question: "We don't have fossilized remains of newborns," he says.

Sizing Up Skulls

DeSilva came up with a clever way around that problem. It's a two-step process: First, you use adult skulls to estimate the newborn's skull size. That can be done very accurately for all primates, and DeSilva was able to analyze a dozen Australopithecus skulls.

"So once you have the size of the head, there is what researchers have called 'the 12 percent rule,'" he says. The 12 percent rule says that the brain represents 12 percent of the total body weight. "It's not exactly 12 percent; in fact in the apes it tends to be more like 10 percent."

Even with that margin of error, DeSilva says, it was clear that the birth weight of Australopithecus infants was much closer to the 6 percent of modern humans than the 3 percent of apes. He's published these results in the journal, PNAS.

This change in relative birth size was a critical development as DeSilva believes birthing large babies probably influenced human culture.

"The whole expression that it takes a village is in part rooted in the fact that we have really big infants that are pretty helpless," he says. "If we wanted to get anything done, we have to hand them off."

So stable communities developed where some took care of babies while others hunted or did the taxes.

Down From The Trees

Life was changing in other ways for Australopithecus. Two and a half million years ago, they began swapping a life in trees for one on solid ground.

"One of the things I think that goes along with the switch to terrestriality is a switch to a more substantive infant that has a higher chance of survival," says Owen Lovejoy, an anthropologist at Kent State University in Ohio.

If the trend to proportionally larger babies was nearly complete 2.5 million years ago when the Australopithecus showed up, when did it begin? Anthropologist Robert Martin of the Field Museum in Chicago thinks the answer is an even older human relative called Sahelanthropus.

"I did some quick calculations after you sent me the paper, and it looks as though Sahelanthropus was intermediate between the great apes and Australopithecus," he says. "So it looks as though Sahelanthropus had already started along that pathway 7 million years ago."

Martin says there's only one Sahelanthropus skull discovered so far, so that conclusion is preliminary. But it appears that big babies are something humans and our ancestors have been dealing with for a long time.

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News Headline: Big Babies Helped Shape Early Human Societies (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: New Hampshire Public Radio - Online
Contact Name: Joe Palca
News OCR Text: Newborn babies may be a bundle of joy, but they are a heavy bundle of joy. Scientists say human babies weigh proportionally more at birth than the babies of any other primate species.

Now an anthropologist in Boston has shown that our earliest human ancestors probably had big babies, too -- something that may have influenced the development of modern human societies.

"Humans are strange, in all sorts of ways," says Jeremy DeSilva, an anthropologist at Boston University. We walk upright on two legs and our newborns are helpless.

"Our babies are unusually large," he says. "They have unusually large heads; they have unusually large bodies compared to other primates."

A newborn ape typically weighs about 3 percent of what its mother weighs. For humans, that jumps to 6 percent. DeSilva wondered if this were true for a species like Australopithecus that came millions of years before modern humans.

But there's a fundamental difficulty answering that question: "We don't have fossilized remains of newborns," he says.

Sizing Up Skulls

DeSilva came up with a clever way around that problem. It's a two-step process: First, you use adult skulls to estimate the newborn's skull size. That can be done very accurately for all primates, and DeSilva was able to analyze a dozen Australopithecus skulls.

"So once you have the size of the head, there is what researchers have called 'the 12 percent rule,'" he says. The 12 percent rule says that the brain represents 12 percent of the total body weight. "It's not exactly 12 percent; in fact in the apes it tends to be more like 10 percent."

Even with that margin of error, DeSilva says, it was clear that the birth weight of Australopithecus infants was much closer to the 6 percent of modern humans than the 3 percent of apes. He's published these results in the journal, PNAS.

This change in relative birth size was a critical development as DeSilva believes birthing large babies probably influenced human culture.

"The whole expression that it takes a village is in part rooted in the fact that we have really big infants that are pretty helpless," he says. "If we wanted to get anything done, we have to hand them off."

So stable communities developed where some took care of babies while others hunted or did the taxes.

Down From The Trees

Life was changing in other ways for Australopithecus. Two and a half million years ago, they began swapping a life in trees for one on solid ground.

"One of the things I think that goes along with the switch to terrestriality is a switch to a more substantive infant that has a higher chance of survival," says Owen Lovejoy, an anthropologist at Kent State University in Ohio.

If the trend to proportionally larger babies was nearly complete 2.5 million years ago when the Australopithecus showed up, when did it begin? Anthropologist Robert Martin of the Field Museum in Chicago thinks the answer is an even older human relative called Sahelanthropus.

"I did some quick calculations after you sent me the paper, and it looks as though Sahelanthropus was intermediate between the great apes and Australopithecus," he says. "So it looks as though Sahelanthropus had already started along that pathway 7 million years ago."

Martin says there's only one Sahelanthropus skull discovered so far, so that conclusion is preliminary. But it appears that big babies are something humans and our ancestors have been dealing with for a long time. Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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News Headline: Big Babies Helped Shape Early Human Societies (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Oregon Public Broadcasting - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Newborn babies may be a bundle of joy, but they are a heavy bundle of joy. Scientists say human babies weigh proportionally more at birth than the babies of any other primate species.

Now an anthropologist in Boston has shown that our earliest human ancestors probably had big babies, too -- something that may have influenced the development of modern human societies.

"Humans are strange, in all sorts of ways," says Jeremy DeSilva, an anthropologist at Boston University. We walk upright on two legs and our newborns are helpless.

"Our babies are unusually large," he says. "They have unusually large heads; they have unusually large bodies compared to other primates."

A newborn ape typically weighs about 3 percent of what its mother weighs. For humans, that jumps to 6 percent. DeSilva wondered if this were true for a species like Australopithecus that came millions of years before modern humans.

But there's a fundamental difficulty answering that question: "We don't have fossilized remains of newborns," he says.

Sizing Up Skulls

DeSilva came up with a clever way around that problem. It's a two-step process: First, you use adult skulls to estimate the newborn's skull size. That can be done very accurately for all primates, and DeSilva was able to analyze a dozen Australopithecus skulls.

"So once you have the size of the head, there is what researchers have called 'the 12 percent rule,'" he says. The 12 percent rule says that the brain represents 12 percent of the total body weight. "It's not exactly 12 percent; in fact in the apes it tends to be more like 10 percent."

Even with that margin of error, DeSilva says, it was clear that the birth weight of Australopithecus infants was much closer to the 6 percent of modern humans than the 3 percent of apes. He's published these results in the journal, PNAS.

This change in relative birth size was a critical development as DeSilva believes birthing large babies probably influenced human culture.

"The whole expression that it takes a village is in part rooted in the fact that we have really big infants that are pretty helpless," he says. "If we wanted to get anything done, we have to hand them off."

So stable communities developed where some took care of babies while others hunted or did the taxes.

Down From The Trees

Life was changing in other ways for Australopithecus. Two and a half million years ago, they began swapping a life in trees for one on solid ground.

"One of the things I think that goes along with the switch to terrestriality is a switch to a more substantive infant that has a higher chance of survival," says Owen Lovejoy, an anthropologist at Kent State University in Ohio.

If the trend to proportionally larger babies was nearly complete 2.5 million years ago when the Australopithecus showed up, when did it begin? Anthropologist Robert Martin of the Field Museum in Chicago thinks the answer is an even older human relative called Sahelanthropus.

"I did some quick calculations after you sent me the paper, and it looks as though Sahelanthropus was intermediate between the great apes and Australopithecus," he says. "So it looks as though Sahelanthropus had already started along that pathway 7 million years ago."

Martin says there's only one Sahelanthropus skull discovered so far, so that conclusion is preliminary. But it appears that big babies are something humans and our ancestors have been dealing with for a long time. Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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News Headline: Enterprise Architecture Certification Workshop | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Date: 01/10/11

Address: KSU Stark Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave.

North Canton, OH 44720

Description: Kent State University and the Enterprise Architecture Center of Excellence (EACOE) have partnered to present an Enterprise Architecture certification workshop Jan. 10-15, 2011. Visit http://iakm.kent.edu for registration information and more details. The EACOE is the independent, industry-wide practitioner-based source for advancing the implementation and understanding of enterprise architecture. Its models help enterprise stakeholders envision, plan and develop cohesive, flexible and adaptive solutions that become enduring enterprise assets. The techniques, methodologies and processes that make up EACOEÂ's robust body of knowledge are recognized as best practices and are used globally by more than 3,500 companies and 125,000 individuals. For more information about EACOE, visit http://eacoe.org/. EACOE typically offers the certification program only in Washington, D.C., or Los Angeles, but Kent State is bringing this opportunity to Northeast Ohio businesses for the first time as part of its Information Architecture and Knowledge Management program. Cost for the four-and-one-half day workshop is $2,995. Registration is limited to 20 participants. Visit http://iakm.kent.edu for registration information and more details. WHY: In this era of Enterprise change, the need to link sound corporate strategy and information strategy has never been greater. Technical strategies alone canÂ't ensure alignment and provide business value. To benefit from the information resources that are essential to your organizationÂ's growth, you need to have an Enterprise Architecture aligned with your Business Strategy, which aligns with your Business Goals, and is capable of effectively addressing and managing risk. Having a Certified Enterprise Architecture professional on your team –someone whose credentials are known and respected around the world—can help ensure your organizationÂ's success. WHEN: Jan. 10-15, 2011 WHERE: Kent StateÂ's Stark Campus University Center, conveniently located just off I-77 in North Canton (20 minutes from downtown Akron, less than an hour from downtown Cleveland). For more details and to register, visit http://iakm.kent.edu.

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News Headline: Kent State adds two assistants | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State coach Darrell Hazell continues to fill out his coaching staff, adding Thad Jemison as wide receivers coach and Dennis Scuderi as tight ends/recruiting coordinator. Earlier this week, Hazell told the Beacon Journal that he had hired Brian Rock as offensive coordinator and Marcus Freeman as linebackers coach.

Jemison played wide receiver for Ohio State from 1980-83 before being selected by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the 1984 NFL Draft. He brings nearly 20 years of experience coaching at the high school level.

Scuderi joins the staff after a three-year stint as the head coach at Absegami High School in Galloway, N.J. He spent three years at Rutgers, serving as the director of recruiting operations from 2007-08 and was a member of the player development staff in 2004.

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News Headline: Rugby team donates to Burn Unit | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Steve Degyansky, a 20-year-old junior at Kent State University, mobilized
the 30-man rugby team at KSU to donate items to the Metro-
Health's Burn Unit's holiday gift baskets. The team donated dozens
of canned and boxed goods. These items will be added to gift baskets
the Burn Unit staff creates each year to give to their patients who may need
some extra help during Christmas. Degyansky, the rugby team's treasurer,
and Brian Havran, the rugby team's president, delivered the items to Metro-
Health. From left, are Tammy Coffee, nurse practitioner; Bridget Gill, registered
nurse and nurse manager for the Burn Unit; Degyansky; Havran; Shannon
Lentner, registered nurse; and Jillian Zilka, registered nurse. Degyansky
was injured four years ago when he was playing with his friends and a gas can
exploded. He said he's never forgotten the care he received at the Burn Unit
and remembers realizing when he was a patient there how lucky he was.

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News Headline: Data on fibroblasts published by researchers at Kent State University | Email

News Date: 01/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Clinical Oncology Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fresh data on fibroblasts are presented in the report 'p67/MetAP2 suppresses K-RasV12-mediated transformation of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts in culture and in athymic mice.' According to a study from the United States, "In many tumor cells, the activation and activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) are very high because of the constitutive activation of the Ras-mediated signaling pathway. Here, we ectopically expressed the human homologue of rat eukaryotic initiation factor 2-associated glycoprotein, p67/MetAP2, in EGF-treated mouse embryonic NIH3T3 fibroblasts and C2C12 myoblasts and NIH3T3 cell lines expressing the constitutively active form of MAP kinase kinase (MEK) to inhibit the activation and activity of ERK1/2 MAP kinases."

"In addition, we also ectopically expressed rat p67/MetAP2 in oncogenic Ras-induced transformed NIH3T3 fibroblasts and inhibited their transformed phenotype both in culture and in athymic nude mice possibly by inhibiting angiogenesis. This inhibition of ERK1/2 MAP kinases is due to the direct binding with rat p67/MetAP2, and this leads to the inhibition of activity of ERK1/2 MAP kinases both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, expression of p67/MetAP2 siRNA in both NIH3T3 fibroblasts and C2C12 myoblasts causes activation and activity of ERK1/2 MAP kinases," wrote A. Majumdar and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "Our results thus suggest that ectopic expression of rat p67/MetAP2 in transformed cells can inhibit the tumorigenic phenotype by inhibiting the activation and activity of ERK1/2 MAP kinases and, thus, that p67/MetAP2 has tumor suppression activity."

Majumdar and colleagues published the results of their research in Biochemistry (p67/MetAP2 suppresses K-RasV12-mediated transformation of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts in culture and in athymic mice. Biochemistry, 2010;49(47):10146-57).

For additional information, contact A. Majumdar, School of Biomedical Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242, United States.

The publisher of the journal Biochemistry can be contacted at: Springer, 233 Spring Street, New York, NY 10013, USA.

Copyright © 2011 Clinical Oncology Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Hiring Freeze No Surprise for Faculty at Kent State (Munro-Stasiuk, Walker, Wyckoff, McVay, Joynes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: If enrollment keeps rising, lack of new professors could create difficult situation for university

Kent State University faculty were not surprised when they received an e-mail from President Lester Lefton announcing an immediate university-wide hiring restriction starting Dec. 15.
“It was not unexpected,” said Mandy Munro-Stasiuk, chair of the Kent State Geography Department.
“We've been hearing a lot from the university, from the president, from the provost and from our dean as well, that there was potentially going to be this giant cut in funding to the university, so we knew that we're going have to make some kind of cutbacks,” Munro-Stasiuk said.
“It was expected,” she said.
Although he said a hiring freeze is the prudent thing to do, political sciences assistant professor Michael Ensley is worried about the consequences.
Ensley said keeping graduate and doctorate programs running, as well as offering students the right classes, are concerns at the moment.
“If we are losing faculty but not replacing them, I think it is an important concern across the board for students and faculty,” he said.
In an e-mail to the President's Administrative Council on Dec. 16, Willis Walker, Vice President for Human Resources at Kent State, issued guidelines to the hiring restriction.
Walker said positions accepted by candidates prior to Dec. 15 were permitted, but that the candidate should be informed of “the current state budget situation, the potential impact on Kent State and the possibility that the position they have accepted could be subject to elimination in the future.”
Carla Wyckoff, communications and events manager for human resources, said any department that needs to hire while the restriction is in effect must submit a form to Walker justifying the hire. She said the request will be considered and then accepted or denied by Walker and Lefton.
“Exceptions would have to be things that are critical to the university's mission; hires that are going to be strategic in nature,” Wyckoff said. “And a lot of those will be in a case-by-case basis.”
Munro-Stasiuk anticipates the hiring restriction may mean more students in a class, fewer elective options, fewer sections of Kent core classes and less time for research in the next semesters.
Other professors agree.
Chris McVay, professor and past president of the full-time non-tenure track unit of the Kent State Chapter of the American Association of University Professors, said she believes the effects of the restriction won't be felt until fall, when freshmen will be coming in and positions, which are generally filled months before a semester starts, may not be filled.
“When you consider that there will be faculty that will be retiring or going elsewhere, for whatever reasons, faculty numbers could go down,” said McVay, who teaches at the English and Pan-African Studies departments.
In that case, McVay said, faculty are going to have to teach more classes.
“Non-tenure track faculty are required to teach 15 hours a semester,” McVay said. “For most of us that means five classes. I don't see how NTTs can do any more than they are already doing.”
McVay said she thinks tenure track and tenured professors, who usually teach less classes to concentrate on research and other responsibilities, are the ones who are going be asked to take on more courses and sections — which may interfere with research schedules.
“It will certainly be a problem for some of our faculty who are very much engaged in research. Others could probably take on more students and more classes,” McVay said.
Kent State Chapter of the AAUP tenure track unit declined to comment for this story. The full-time non-tenure track unit did not return calls for comment.
Although she is focusing on the needs of the students for this spring semester, Robin Joynes, psychology assistant professor, said there is “a lot of uncertainty” about the restrictions announced just before the winter break, and she expects to hear more from the Faculty Senate when classes are back in session.
But Joynes said teaching more students in the classrooms is one of the changes professors may have to adapt to if hiring restrictions continue beyond the spring semester.
“I think it is just a different approach to the teaching and learning process that faculty are going to have to adapt to. I don't know that we necessarily need more faculty to do that,” Joynes said.
However, Joynes said fewer hires may be linked to less expertise, research and grants at Kent State.
“What faculty does contribute apart from teaching is contributing to the growth of knowledge and bringing their expertise, and that's where you are going to see the growth of the university stall, when you don't have an influx of new people with new ideas,” she said.
“With a hiring freeze you are just depending on what you have right now. But in times of financial crisis that's kind of what you do,” Joynes said. “If we can't keep expanding we have to maybe make the best of what we have and see how we can use that more efficiently.”

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News Headline: Click-worthy Ohio fashion blogs - best of the web | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Stacey Thomas, Cleveland Women's Fashion Examiner
News OCR Text: As blogging snowballs in popularity, there are more and more fashion blogs to discover. Any one person can be following hundreds of blogs from all over the world, each representing a different point of view. From outfit posts, to inspirational photos, to Ebay and Etsy vintage sellers, to fashion photography blogs; blogging has totally revolutionized the fashion industry in the past couple of years, and will undoubtedly continue to shape its future. The following is a list of some click-worthy fashion blogs based right here in Ohio.

Fashionably Cleveland is an excellent resource for all things fashion happening in Cleveland. From editorial insight of local boutiques to designer profiles of local talents, FashionablyCleveland.com should be a must click for the Ohio fashionista. This site also contains a handy events calender of local fashion events happening in Cleveland.

Ohio Fashionista is a blog showcasing all the local fashion events, sales, deals, expos and more. Written by an Akron native, this blog has a friendly vibe, and is a great source for a first hand account on anything fashion.

Written by a Cleveland native, this blog specializes in highlighting local shops, brands, store openings, discounts and more! If you're looking to discover some local boutiques, Cleveland Stylista would be an excellent resource.

This is a blog written by none other than J.R. Campbell, the premiere fashion school of Ohio, Kent State University's, director. This blog highlights programs, scholarships, upcoming events, program highlights and all the exciting going-ons of the globally ranked Jerry Silverman and Shannon Rodgers School of Design and Merchandising. This is an excellent resource to any prospective fashion school students, current students and parents, or people in the community looking to get more involved.

This is a personal style blog written by a fashion school graduate of Kent State University, and provides daily outfit inspiration in an easy to understand format. With inspiration taken straight from the runway, this blogger mimics the looks with clothes she finds at local thrift stores.

Inspiration photo heavy, this fashion blog chronicles the life of a Kent State fashion student. This blog is a must click for anyone looking for an edgy, fashion forward point of view on the industry.

This blog is a mix of daily musings, outfit photos, events, and inspiration photos written by a Kent State fashion student/ Seventeen magazine intern.

A Cincinatti based DIY and fashion blog, this talented author recreates runway jewelry, alters thrift store finds, displays DIY home projects and more - all on a budget! This blog is a must read for any creative soul with a need to be frugal.

Originally started as a blog to connect with other Judy Garland collectors, this Ohio fashion designer's musings now go way beyond. An intriguing, personal read, this blog covers current fashion events, vintage photographs, KSU Fashion School events, Project Runway musings, Lady Gaga clips and much, much more - all from the perspective of a 40 something gay man living with AIDS.

Perhaps the most established and interactive of all sites on the list, this e-zine is a one-stop resource for anything fashion happening in Cincinatti. Sign up for a free account for all the insider information this award winning website has to offer!

Do you have a click-worthy fashion blog that I missed? Email me for inclusion in a future post!

Interested in more from this author? Subscribe to upcoming posts.

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News Headline: Resilience to climate change offers Cleveland opportunities: Jeff Opperman | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Jeff Opperman
News OCR Text: Last year knocked Cleveland around a bit, from Forbes magazine calling us the most miserable city to "decisions" by both a King and a Continental. With winter in full swing, Clevelanders could use a morale booster. I've got an unexpected one: climate change. For a variety of reasons, there could be a silver lining for Cleveland when it comes to climate change.

First, a caveat: Despite the flip first paragraph, I am not rooting for climate change. Although the effects are uncertain, climate change is a dangerous experiment with the planet that we'll leave to our kids. I sincerely hope world leaders forge agreements to avoid heating up the planet further.

But because we're already feeling the effects of a warming planet, and it is not clear that governments will muster the cooperation necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, it's useful to take a look at which parts of the country will be more or less vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.

To examine the relative vulnerability of U.S. cities, I developed a simple ranking reflecting the three most significant predicted impacts from climate change: water-supply disruption, an increase in natural disasters (e.g., floods and hurricanes) and the heat itself (both for general comfort levels and because heat is already the biggest source of weather-related mortality in the United States).

For the first two, I used city rankings from SustainLane on water-supply sustainability and vulnerability to natural disasters. For heat, I used data developed by Scott Sheridan (professor in the Department of Geography, Kent State University), which identifies the frequency of intense heat within major cities.

Based on these data, Cleveland has the lowest vulnerability of any U.S. city to climate change and its associated impacts, followed by Milwaukee, Detroit and Chicago. The most vulnerable cities include Houston, Sacramento, Las Vegas and Miami.

It appears that Americans are collectively moving away from the least vulnerable places and toward the most vulnerable places.

We all know that Cleveland has abundant fresh water and lacks hurricanes, but under more extreme warming scenarios, Cleveland's weather could actually become relatively preferable to other cities. To illustrate: If carbon emissions aren't cut dramatically, by 2080 a typical Atlanta summer could feature 120 days with high humidity and temperatures above 90 degrees Fahrenheit, nearly a fourfold increase from today. Phoenix's average summer high could increase from 107 degrees to 114 degrees -- with heat waves in the upper 120s. (I know it's a dry heat, but that's the cooked temperature of rare steak.) Meanwhile, Cleveland would transition to a winter plant-hardiness zone comparable to today's North Carolina and Tennessee.

At first, this outcome may sound appealing to Clevelanders. However, the changes described above would likely be accompanied by other impacts that could truly destabilize much of the planet's agriculture, coastal cities and ecosystems. Disruption of global food production and economies are not in our best interest.

Further, while Cleveland may be relatively less vulnerable, major climate change would still likely harm local places we hold dear, such as increasing the frequency of toxic algae blooms that could devastate Lake Erie fishing.

But climate change does not just threaten, it also presents new opportunities.

Global leaders have announced a goal of limiting warming to a rise of 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit in the Earth's annual average temperature. Scientists believe that, given current trends, this is a very optimistic goal, and achieving it will require a transition toward newer forms of energy propelled by technological innovation.

There has been much hype about green jobs, but real numbers support the assertion that northern Ohio -- with its industrial base, skilled labor force and location -- is poised to capture a good share of new-energy technology production and jobs. Green jobs are not a panacea but could be an important part of a vibrant and diversified employment base for the region.

Finally, for those who dread winter, Cleveland's temperatures will become milder even if the world successfully holds warming to the 3.6-degree goal set by global leaders -- approximately what separates the annual averages of Cleveland and Washington, D.C., which is not exactly Honolulu but a city not known for brutal winters. Thus a small difference in annual average temperature translates into fairly big differences in how we actually perceive weather.

In other words, even if the world achieves its goal of "halting" climate change, the season that most Clevelanders find unpleasant will get shorter and milder, while the season that is relatively unpleasant in places like Charlotte, N.C., and Phoenix will get longer and hotter.

'However, the fact that Cleveland is less vulnerable to climate change than most cities does not mean we should sit back and complacently wait for things to get relatively worse elsewhere. Instead, we should celebrate that our location provides a very sustainable foundation and then challenge ourselves to make the most of this foundation. Climate change offers Cleveland a great opportunity: the opportunity to help build the new economy that can minimize climate change. Mayor Frank Jackson's Sustainability Initiative should be applauded and supported as a strong move in the right direction.

Opperman is a senior freshwater scientist for The Nature Conservancy. For details about his methodology, go to snipurl.com/1sj6se

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News Headline: COLLEGE STUDENTS ATTENDING KENT STATE CLASSES | Email

News Date: 01/07/2011
Outlet Full Name: 21 News at 6 PM - WFMJ-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 21 News Reporter Glenn Stevens says the aim to is better connect Ohio's next generation to job and education centers. One of the 3-year grants will provide 165-thousand dollars per year for the Community Action Agency of Columbiana County to start a new transit service for local college students. PRIMARILY FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS ATTENDING KENT STATE CLASSES AT THE SALEM AND EAST LIVERPOOL CAMPUS. The Assistant Dean at the Salem Branch says it's a blessing for many young people who want to continue their education in Columbiana county. IT WILL HELP THE STUDENTS IN THE AREA BE ABLE TO COME TO THE COLLEGE THOSE THAT CAN'T CAME BECAUSE THEY HAVE A LACK OF TRANSPORTATION. It will also enable more high school students to participate in KSU's Seniors to Sophomores program. SOME STUDENTS CAN'T ENROLL IN THE PROGRAM BECAUSE THEY DON'T HAVE TRANSPORTATION SO THIS IS GOING TO HELP. A separate grant of 790-thousand dollars per year will allow the WRTA to operate restablish service connecting Youngstown and Warren, with student-friendly schedules. IT'LL COVER FROM 6:10 IN THE MORNING BECAUSE WE WANT TO GET IN THRU WARREN PICK UP GET STUDENTS TO YSU FOR 8 O'CLOCK CLASSES AND THEN OF COURSE RETURN WITH THE LAST RUN AROUND 6:10 IN THE EVENING. It's estimated that close to 1,000 YSU students live along Warren Youngstown corridor. Officials point out that the service is available to everyone, not just students. The grants through the Ohio Dept. of transportation require that the start-up services be in place by June 1st.

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News Headline: Smithsonian Music Exhibit On 5-state Tour | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: CBSNews.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Moving Melodies: Smithsonian Exhibit On American Music Will Travel Through 5 States This Year

(AP) ASBURY PARK, N.J. (AP) - The Smithsonian hears America singing, playing instruments and telling its history through music.

The Washington cultural institution's New Harmonies program will feature this musical history with a traveling exhibit in five states - Minnesota, Mississippi, New Jersey, Ohio and South Carolina. Communities in those states will host performances and other events in conjunction with the exhibit.

The program, which is part of the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street project, showcases some of America's "richest stories," says Carol Harsh, director of Main Street.

"There's a lot of fine music in this country; you kind of take it for granted," says South Carolina's John Fowler, an Appalachian storyteller, musician and radio host. "New Harmonies is a great snapshot."

Venues in the five states include libraries, historical societies and performance spaces in towns, rural areas and small cities, with the first programs scheduled for Asbury Park, N.J. The sites host the New Harmonies traveling exhibit while developing unique, local spinoffs and promoting already-well-established programs. "Connecting the national story with their own personal experience is pretty profound," says Harsh.

Immerse yourself in "America's soundtrack," an intricate cross-pollination of genres.

The core New Harmonies exhibit explores sacred music - "Elvis Presley sang earliest in the church," notes Harsh - as well as the secular: Cajun and Creole influenced Zydeco; Mexican American Tejano; Jewish Klezmer; and folk music (Bob Dylan, Pete Seeger, Joan Baez) that sustained civil rights movements.

Try out instruments born from the innovations of poverty: a cigar box guitar; a Cajun rub board, strummed with a thimble or bottle opener.

Make a diddley bow. "The earliest ones were just two nails in the side of a house, with bailing wire stretched between them," says Mississippi humanities official David Morgan.

Here are some highlights; check websites listed below for more details and updates.

__

NEW JERSEY

This year's New Harmonies traveling exhibit debuts March 12 at the Asbury Park Public Library (500 First Ave.), home of a Bruce Springsteen collection. But programs are already starting.

"It's going to be like Woodstock all year," songwriter and former Styx band member Glen Burtnik proclaimed at a recent Musical Heritage Year fundraiser. In keeping with a Smithsonian focus on the future, the bluegrass and rock show at the legendary Stone Pony music club (913 Ocean Ave.) included a 16-year-old, classically trained violinist, Taylor Hope.

The now-resurrected city's vibrant music scene was an emotional and economic lifeline during an era of decline and despair. "Back when things were bad," says Stone Pony General Manager Caroline O'Toole, the music provided "a glimmer of light."

An important part of Asbury Park's history is drawing people together for a good cause, and the city's heritage year will kick off with a documentary and a concert series, Jan. 13-16, benefiting Light of Day, which raises money worldwide for Parkinson's and related diseases.

"It's like a big family, working together to make it happen," says founder Bob Benjamin, a music executive.

At the centerpiece concert, Springsteen collaborators Alejandro Escovedo, Joe Grushecky and Jesse Malin will be among the headliners at the Paramount Theatre (1300 Ocean Ave.) Springsteen himself sometimes takes the stage.

Asbury Park's storied past is intertwined with John Philip Sousa; Glen Miller, Benny Goodman, Tommy Dorsey, Count Basie, Billie Holiday, Lionel Hampton and Johnny Cash. During New Harmonies, teens will explore elders' favorite musical moments.

Other New Jersey topics include music technology. An exhibit at the West Deptford Free Public Library (420 Crown Point Road) will focus on the RCA record company.

MINNESOTA

Think Minnesota's mostly about polka music? Think again.

The state's New Harmonies tour will accentuate "absent narratives" - musical, written and oral stories that haven't always gotten mainstream attention: Mexican, Somali, Dakota, Ojibwe, Laotian.

"Increasingly, there are more voices in play in the culture, the meaning of this place," says state humanities official Matthew Brandt. "They are part of the Minnesota story."

Lots of people have heard of Minneapolis' Guthrie Theater; this spotlight shines on "energized" smaller communities.

Minnesota gets rolling March 12 at the Austin Public Library (323 4th Ave. NE.) One project will relate how different cultures have used a local ballroom; a dance will bring them all together. Decades ago, the place was called the Terp and hosted big bands; now called El Parral, it's mainly patronized by the local Latino community.

Evansville, Minn., plans open mic nights, and multi-language hymn singing led "by authentic Dakota, Norwegian, German, Swedish and English voices."

The state's tour winds up near the Canadian border in November and December, at the Roseau County Museum (121 Center St. East, Roseau.)

OHIO

Bluegrass - and beyond - are on tap at Ohio's eight host communities, starting March 14 at the Quaker Heritage Center (College and Douglas streets, Wilmington).

Ohio's heritage also hails from Vietnam, India, Croatia and Serbia, according to humanities official Jack Shortlidge.

Performers will discuss their music, its origins and their own life experiences. After World War II, people brought along bluegrass when they moved from the Appalachian regions of Kentucky, Virginia and Tennessee to find work in Cincinnati, Columbus and Dayton.

Scholars are writing essays for a "companion reader" that will be given out at host sites. Topics will include King Records in Cincinnati, the label that launched James Brown's career.

After the Springfield exhibit (117 S. Fountain Ave.) winds down, nearby Dayton holds its Cityfolk Festival over the July Fourth weekend.

A gospel choir will sing during the Burton exhibit (Kent State University Geauga Campus, 14111 Claridon Troy Road, Burton.) That exhibit coincides with a Great Geauga County Fair Band concert.

MISSISSIPPI

Mississippi is hosting a New Harmonies encore; its first got rave reviews, says Morgan.

The blues, with African American roots, influenced jazz, rock and rockabilly; old-timers ran a glass bottle or pocket knife over the strings to play slide guitar. Local music also has French, Spanish, Creole and Jewish flavors.

The Mississippi tour opens April 16 at a renovated, Italian Renaissance-style train depot (downtown Hattiesburg). Its stay there dovetails with Roots Reunion, an annual program of gospel, bluegrass, blues and country.

Pass Christian, an area still recovering from Hurricane Katrina, will celebrate coastal music, including its Hispanic and Vietnamese communities.

In Amory, exhibit topics will range from Chickasaw drums to the song "Blue Suede Shoes." The rockabilly classic was written - surprise! - not by Elvis, but by Carl Perkins, who performed there.

SOUTH CAROLINA

South Carolina organizers are lining up performances, instrument-making workshops, songwriting and singing contests. That two-year New Harmonies tour starts April 9 at the Gaffney Visitors Center (210 West Frederick St.)

"You can't sit down in a laboratory and invent this music," says Fowler, who plays banjo, guitar, harmonica, spoons, washboard and more. "It took generations and generations of hard times and hard luck, wars and so many other influences to give us fine music like Piedmont Blues or gospel or Gullah music."

Gullah is "embedded with the experience of slavery, freedom, of generations of history," says Fowler. "It's part spiritual, part African, and even has native American influences."

The state's roots also include "low country gospel" and "smooth, danceable R&B" beach music.

Hunger for barbecue with your blues? Make a beeline Oct. 7-9 for Abbeville - home of the Piedmont Blues and Hash Bash. Like the music, the hash - a stew that accompanies pit-cooked barbecue - is considered a local delicacy.

Food history tells cultural stories, too. You can explore those in a different time and place - through another Museum on Main Street program called Key Ingredients.

Online:

Smithsonian: www.museumonmainstreet.org

Minnesota: www.minnesotahumanities.org

Mississippi: www.mshumanities.org/index.php/programs/new(underscore)harmonies

New Jersey: www.njch.org/newharmonies.html

Ohio: www.ohiohumanities.org

South Carolina: www.schumanities.org/projects/newharmonies

Asbury Park, N.J.: www.asburyparkmusic2011.com/

Light of Day Foundation: www.lightofday.org/

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News Headline: 'Oklahoma!' production canceled (Patacca) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/07/2011
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The main lobby of the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

NEW PHILADELPHIA, OH —

The Rodgers & Hammerstein musical “Oklahoma!” to be staged in New Philadelphia has been canceled.

“We have just been notified by the tour agency for ‘Oklahoma!' that they have canceled their tour which includes our Jan. 16 performance of ‘Oklahoma!' in our Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas,” said Pam Patacca, public relations coordinator for Kent State University at Tuscarawas. “Their decision to end the show's tour early is a circumstance beyond our control. With a near sell-out crowd, we made every effort to avoid cancellation, which included trying to reschedule the performance. We extend to our patrons our sincerest apologies for this inconvenience. All ticket purchasers will receive immediate full refunds, which have already been processed.”

Ticket purchasers are being notified by e-mails and formal letters regarding the cancellation.

Gary McAvay, president of Columbia Artists Theatricals who are the agents for “Oklahoma!”, extended his apologies.

“I understand that you, your staff and the administration, first and foremost wanted to make every effort to preserve the date,” said McAvay. “I especially understand the importance of this in an inaugural season while you are building the trust and support of an audience. For this very reason, I ultimately believe we reached the right decision, as the logistics, timing and earlier play date, each had the potential of further inconvenience to your patrons and staff.”

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News Headline: Need a venue? Performing Arts Center might be the place (Morelli) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Mike Morelli, general manager of The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas, says rentals for the facility have been going well.

NEW PHILADELPHIA, OH —

Need a place to perform a concert or stage a play? The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas is more than willing to solve the problem.

Mike Morelli, the center's general manager, said rentals have been going well. So well, in fact, that a community events page has been added to the center's website.

“We have some really cool things scheduled,” said Morelli. “In addition to a season of concerts by the center's resident company, the Tuscarawas Philharmonic, the Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop Chorus will perform (its annual concert) here in April.”

A number of special events have also booked the venue in New Philadelphia.

The Eastern Ohio AED Initiative will hold its “Night in New Orleans” fundraiser in the center Feb. 5 beginning at 6:30, and the Tuscarawas County Humane Society's “Cause for Paws” fundraiser is set for March 5.

“This is really nice,” said Morelli. “When the center was planned, it was envisioned as a community resource and it truly is becoming just that.”

In December the Tuscarawas Dance Arts Center presented its annual production of “The Nutcracker Ballet” in the center under the direction of Shelly Beitzel.

“It was just lovely,” said Morelli. “For me personally, since I have daughters who dance, it was so nice to see the dancers come onto the stage and look around in amazement. The performances were very high caliber and the attendance was great.”

As a former executive director of a community theater, Morelli said he could think of nothing better that having the center used for area theatrical productions.

“We have no shops or storage, so theater groups would have to build their sets elsewhere and then load in like the touring companies do,” said Morelli. “Summer would be a great time for an area theatrical production. Many community theaters do a big summer show and this would be a great time to partner up.”

Morelli said high schools in need of a facility to stage a large production also are welcome to use the center.

“We just want people to come here and see for themselves what a great facility it is,” said Morelli. “We are very interested in partnering with the community.”

Morelli said organizations interested in booking the center should contact him or box office manger Tom Flood. “We will walk them through the facility and discuss what they want and their needs.”

Morelli added there are set fees for renting the facility, but fees also are determined depending on what the organization wants.

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News Headline: 2DO ON THE TENS | Email

News Date: 01/07/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: If you want to spend . . .

<$10

When the temperature dips during January, so do prices at the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo. Polar Bear Days happen when the day's predicted high temperature is 32 degrees or below. That means adults can enjoy the zoo for $3.50; $2.50, children ages 2-11. The zoo is open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. It's at 3900 Wildlife Way. Go to clemetzoo.com. . . . If you're looking for a public skate place, think of the Kent State University Ice Arena. The rink is open Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday in January; hours vary. Admission for public skating is $6; $4.50, KSU faculty, staff and alumni; $3, KSU students with ID. Skate rental is $2.50. The arena is at 530 E. Summit St. Go to www.kent.edu/icearena or call 330-672-7465.

<$20

James A. Garfield National Historic Site is opening its doors for a behind-the-scenes guided walk to see areas of the Garfield home and surrounding grounds that regular tour-goers don't see. Peek into the basement, third floor, the interior of the windmill and other spots. The two-hour tour is 11 a.m. Saturday. Admission is $15, and the minimum age is 16. Make reservations by calling 440-255-8722. The historic site is at 8095 Mentor Ave., Mentor. Go to nps.gov/jaga.

Free

Join naturalist Mike Green to learn how to identify trees without their leaves, while hiking the 2-mile Chippewa Trail in the Silver Creek Metro Park in the Summit County Metro Parks. Meet at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Pheasant Run Area, 5000 Hametown Road, Norton. Call 330-865-8065. . . . Did you get a new camera for the holidays? Test it during the "Winterscapes at Carlisle" walk from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Saturday in the Lorain County Metro Parks. You'll find beautiful views on the Sugar Loop and Big Woods Trails and Carlisle Reservation. It's a difficult hike, so dress for the weather. Carlisle Visitor Center is at 12882 Diagonal Road, LaGrange. Call 440-458-5121. . . . Lights still shine at the city of Lorain's Magic of Toyland on Broadway seasonal display. This decorated historic downtown includes more than 100 lit trees, decorated window fronts and 80 8-foot-tall toy soldiers decorating lampposts. It runs today through Sunday on Broadway Avenue downtown. Go to downtownlorainchristmas.com. . . . Experience coffee cupping, a method that professional coffee tasters use to taste coffee quality and other characteristics during "Cold Days, Warm Drinks." This class, 2 p.m. Sunday at the Lee Road Branch of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library, will be taught by staff from Phoenix Coffee, a local chain of coffeehouses. Registration is required. The library is at 2345 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights. Go to www.heightslibrary.org or call 216-932-3600.

Polar Bear Days at Cleveland zoo, Kent State University Ice Arena in this week's 2Do on the Tens

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: Free Resources: TRAILSâTool for Real-Time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Internet@Schools Magazine
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TRAILS (Tool for Real-time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills) is a federally funded project to create a tool for library media specialists and teachers to assess the information literacy skills of their high school students. TRAILS first went live in spring 2006 and was refined this summer. It is now available in its expanded form.

TRAILS is standards-based and freely available on the Web. Student privacy is assured, as the system does not collect any identifying information. The multiple-choice assessment items are based on the 9th grade Ohio Academic Content Standards and AASL's Information Power.

You are invited to try TRAILS at http://www.trails9.org to see whether it might be of use to you.

If you used TRAILS previously, you may find the new features useful:

* five refined information literacy categories, each with two new, 10-item assessments

* improved items on each of the 30-item general assessments

* capability to copy student codes to use in a new session

* capability for students to review their responses after a session is closed

* discussion list for account holders to get news and share ideas

TRAILS is a project of the Institute for Library and Information Literacy Education (ILILE) at Kent State University and is directed by the University Libraries. ILILE is funded through the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the U.S. Department of Education.

Source: Institute for Library and Information Literacy Education (ILILE) at Kent State University, http://www.ilile.org

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News Headline: KSU library's plans to expand hours hits snag (Sperko, Bracken) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HIRING FREEZE PUTS HOLD ON
PLANS TO OPEN 24 HOURS PER DAY

The hiring freeze Kent State University
announced in December may
slow the university library's planned
expanded hours, but it won't stop
them cold.
Diane Sperko, spokeswoman for
The Kent State University Library,
said the library still plans to be open
24 hours on weekdays by some point
in the semester, just not when classes
start.
“Well, it's not starting (today), and
we're scrambling to get it going,”
Sperko said.
When classes start today, the library
will be open 7:30 a.m. to 2
a.m. Mondays through Thursdays.
The library will be open 7:30 a.m. to
8 p.m. Fridays, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. on
Saturdays and 12 p.m. to 2 a.m. on
Sundays.
Sperko said the library is trying
to find a way to schedule its current
employees in a way that would allow
the library to be open for 24 hours
on weekdays, possibly by February
or March.
The transition will be tougher than
anticipated because of a hiring freeze
announced by KSU President Lester
Lefton on Dec. 15 for non-“missioncritical”
employees. The library's administration
introduced a plan last
semester to keep the library
open 24 hours per day, five
days a week for the Spring
semester in response to student
demand. At the time,
James Bracken, dean of Library
and Media Services,
said he wanted to expand
the library hours to twenty-
four hours, seven days a
week, possibly starting as
soon as Fall 2011.
Sperko said the longterm
goal of staying open
for 24 hours, seven days a
week stays the same, but
hiring new employees to
make that possible is off
the table for now.
“It's going to be a stretch
just to get to 24 (hours)
five (days a week),” Sperko
said. “Hopefully the hiring
freeze will eventually
relax as the year goes on
and we can get that off the
ground.”
The library administration
did consider calling
off the plans to expand
hours in reaction to the hiring
freeze, but ultimately
wanted to fulfill a promise
it made to its students.
“The students have told
us how much they like the
extended hours,” Sperko
said.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S SCHOOL OF MUSIC ENTERS FINAL PHASE OF STEINWAY CAMPAIGN (Seachrist) | Email

News Date: 01/07/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Jan. 7 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music embarks on in its final phase of a five-year Steinway Piano Campaign. Once completed, the school will receive an All-Steinway School designation - claimed by only 120 schools and organizations worldwide. Currently, the school has raised more than $1.7 million, allowing the purchase of 47 pianos. Thus far, the newly acquired pianos have been placed in the school's teaching studios, classrooms and practice rooms, as well as the main performance space, Ludwig Recital Hall. The campaign balance is $330,000 for 13 pianos.

"Our goal is to complete this campaign this summer and have the 13 remaining pianos in place for fall 2011," said Dr. Denise Seachrist, director of Kent State's School of Music. "Owning and maintaining the highest quality pianos affects all areas within a school of music. With our students attaining impressive positions in major orchestras and performing in major venues around the world, the All-Steinway School designation is significant."

Recently, the president of Steinway & Sons, Ronald Losby, paid a visit to Kent State. "Becoming an All-Steinway School shows a commitment to educational excellence," Losby told Seachrist. "After my visit, it's very evident that Kent State's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music is serious about its students' experience."

While on the Kent State campus, Losby also met with piano performance majors who performed for him on one of two Steinway grand pianos in the studio of Steinway Artist-in-Residence, Dr. Donna Lee. Lee is one of two Steinway Artists-in-Residence. Lee and Dr. Jerry Wong, both associate professors of music at Kent, were awarded this highly regarded title in 2009 for their exemplary level of performance. Worldwide, there are only 1,600 Steinway Artists-in-Residence. Other notable Steinway artists include Billy Joel, Duke Ellington, Lang Lang, George Gershwin, Sergei Rachmaninoff and Cole Porter, just to name a few.

The Hugh A. Glauser School of Music at Kent State, under the direction of Dr. Denise Seachrist, is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. Degrees in music are offered at the undergraduate level, including music education, vocal and instrumental performance and composition. Graduate-level degrees are available in instrumental and vocal music performance, chamber music, music education, musicology, music theory, conducting and music composition. A completely online master of music degree with a major in music education is currently attracting more than 100 new graduate applications nationwide. Kent State's School of Music is a national and international melting pot, comprised of students from the United States and around the world, including Africa, China, Costa Rica, Japan, Mexico, Ukraine, Taiwan and Venezuela.

For more information on Steinway & Sons, visit www.steinway.com. Information about All-Steinway Schools is available at www.steinwaypianos.com/Institutional/all-steinway-schools.

For more information on the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music at Kent State, visit http://dept.kent.edu/music or call 330-672-2172.

Effie Tsengas, 330/672-8398, etsengas@kent.edu; Emily Vincent, 330/672-8595, evincen2@kent.edu For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Mindfulness therapy is no fad, experts say (Fresco) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Los Angeles Times - Online
Contact Name: Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
News OCR Text: There is solid evidence that mindfulness therapy, which combines elements of Buddhism and yoga, can relieve anxiety and improve mood.

By Chris Woolston, Special to the Of all fields of medicine, psychology seems especially prone to fads. Freudian dream analysis, recovered memory therapy, eye movement desensitization for trauma ? lots of once-hot psychological theories and treatments eventually fizzled.

Now along comes mindfulness therapy, a meditation-based treatment with foundations in Buddhism and yoga that's taking off in private practices and university psychology departments across the country.

"Mindfulness has become a buzzword, especially with younger therapists," said Stefan Hofmann, a professor of psychology at Boston University's Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders.

Mindfulness therapy encourages patients to focus on their breathing and their body, to notice but not judge their thoughts and to generally live in the moment. It may sound a bit squishy and New Agey to some, but Hofmann and other experts say mindfulness has something that discredited theories of the past never had: solid evidence that it can help.

"I was skeptical at first." Hofmann said. "I wondered, 'Why on Earth should this work?' But it seems to work quite well."

Hofmann and colleagues burnished the scientific credentials of mindfulness therapy with a review article in the April issue of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. After combining results of 39 previous studies involving 1,140 patients, the researchers concluded that mindfulness therapy was effective for relieving anxiety and improving mood.

The treatment seemed to help ease the mental stress of people recovering from cancer and other serious illnesses, but it had the strongest benefits for people diagnosed with mood disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder and recurring depression.

Jordan Elliott, a 26-year-old marketer for a New York publishing company, said mindfulness training had helped pushed his once-disabling anxiety ? about work, the weather, the meaning of life ? into the background. "The anxiety is still there, but it's not as bad as it was," he said.

Elliott started getting one-on-one therapy four years ago at the American Institute for Cognitive Therapy in New York. It was hard at first, partly because he was skeptical of the technique and partly because he didn't feel particularly mindful. "I was such a nervous wreck I could hardly sit still for three minutes," he said.

Now he starts every day with a 10-minute meditation. He sits cross-legged in his apartment, TV and music off, and thinks about his breathing.

"When a negative thought pops off in my head, I say to myself, 'There's a thought. And feelings aren't facts.' "

Elliott said he was taking Prozac before he started mindfulness therapy, but he no longer needed medication to keep his anxiety under control.

"It's pretty clear that people can improve their health if they can encourage this practice in their lives," said David Fresco, an associate professor of psychology at Kent State University in Ohio. "But we have to be careful not to move beyond the data too quickly."

Fresco warns that mindfulness treatment is unlikely to help someone suffering from severe and ongoing depression. Those patients, he said, need a more active approach to recovery, perhaps including antidepressants and cognitive behavioral therapy, a type of counseling that encourages patients to question the validity of their negative thoughts.

Once recovery from depression begins, however, mindfulness therapy could provide a valuable defense against future episodes, said Zindel Segal, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto who was one of the pioneers behind mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, or MBCT, a treatment that combines mindfulness with cognitive behavioral therapy.

In December, Segal and colleagues published a study in the Archives of General Psychiatry suggesting that the treatment was as effective as antidepressants for preventing relapses of depression.

The study involved 84 patients who had recovered from at least two bouts of major depression. The patients were broken up into three groups: One had eight weekly group sessions of the therapy, one took an antidepressant and one took a placebo. Over 18 months, about 70% of patients taking a placebo suffered at least one more episode of depression. By comparison, only about 30% of patients receiving therapy or taking an antidepressant had a setback.

Segal said mindfulness therapy could help patients avoid rumination, the process of endlessly chewing on incidents from the past. Rumination is a driving force behind depression, he said, and it just doesn't mesh with mindful thinking. He also believes that by encouraging patients to focus on their current thoughts, mindfulness can discourage anxiety and worry ? up to a point. "If you're having panic attacks in the mall, mindfulness therapy on its own isn't going to be enough," he said.

Segal adds that mindfulness treatment changes the relationship people have with their emotions, so much so that shifts in brain activity even show up in magnetic resonance imaging tests.

"When your mind has a thought, such as, 'My colleague just insulted me at the office,' you can explore the consequences of that thought," he said. "Thoughts have a less intense grip because you are an observer."

Hofmann said most patients could pick up mindfulness fairly easily, but it's not for everyone.

"It takes quite a bit of intelligence," he said. "It's good for people who like intellectual stimulation."

In addition, children, older people (who tend to be more set in their ways) and rigid thinkers may have trouble understanding or embracing the treatment, he said.

Hofmann hopes that the ongoing flood of mindfulness studies will help clarify the benefits and limitations of the approach and ultimately shape the way that the therapy is offered in the real world.

"Some therapists embrace these new and sexy treatments without a lot of critical thinking because they sound cool," he said.

health@latimes.com

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News Headline: Mindfulness therapy is no fad, experts say (Fresco) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Orlando Sentinel - Online
Contact Name: Chris Woolston
News OCR Text: Of all fields of medicine, psychology seems especially prone to fads. Freudian dream analysis, recovered memory therapy, eye movement desensitization for trauma — lots of once-hot psychological theories and treatments eventually fizzled.

Now along comes mindfulness therapy, a meditation-based treatment with foundations in Buddhism and yoga that's taking off in private practices and university psychology departments across the country.

"Mindfulness has become a buzzword, especially with younger therapists," said Stefan Hofmann, a professor of psychology at Boston University's Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders.

Mindfulness therapy encourages patients to focus on their breathing and their body, to notice but not judge their thoughts and to generally live in the moment. It may sound a bit squishy and New Agey to some, but Hofmann and other experts say mindfulness has something that discredited theories of the past never had: solid evidence that it can help.

"I was skeptical at first." Hofmann said. "I wondered, 'Why on Earth should this work?' But it seems to work quite well."

Hofmann and colleagues burnished the scientific credentials of mindfulness therapy with a review article in the April issue of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. After combining results of 39 previous studies involving 1,140 patients, the researchers concluded that mindfulness therapy was effective for relieving anxiety and improving mood.

The treatment seemed to help ease the mental stress of people recovering from cancer and other serious illnesses, but it had the strongest benefits for people diagnosed with mood disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder and recurring depression.

Jordan Elliott, a 26-year-old marketer for a New York publishing company, said mindfulness training had helped pushed his once-disabling anxiety — about work, the weather, the meaning of life — into the background. "The anxiety is still there, but it's not as bad as it was," he said.

Elliott started getting one-on-one therapy four years ago at the American Institute for Cognitive Therapy in New York. It was hard at first, partly because he was skeptical of the technique and partly because he didn't feel particularly mindful. "I was such a nervous wreck I could hardly sit still for three minutes," he said.

Now he starts every day with a 10-minute meditation. He sits cross-legged in his apartment, TV and music off, and thinks about his breathing.

"When a negative thought pops off in my head, I say to myself, 'There's a thought. And feelings aren't facts.' "

Elliott said he was taking Prozac before he started mindfulness therapy, but he no longer needed medication to keep his anxiety under control.

"It's pretty clear that people can improve their health if they can encourage this practice in their lives," said David Fresco, an associate professor of psychology at Kent State University in Ohio. "But we have to be careful not to move beyond the data too quickly."

Fresco warns that mindfulness treatment is unlikely to help someone suffering from severe and ongoing depression. Those patients, he said, need a more active approach to recovery, perhaps including antidepressants and cognitive behavioral therapy, a type of counseling that encourages patients to question the validity of their negative thoughts.

Once recovery from depression begins, however, mindfulness therapy could provide a valuable defense against future episodes, said Zindel Segal, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto who was one of the pioneers behind mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, or MBCT, a treatment that combines mindfulness with cognitive behavioral therapy.

In December, Segal and colleagues published a study in the Archives of General Psychiatry suggesting that the treatment was as effective as antidepressants for preventing relapses of depression.

The study involved 84 patients who had recovered from at least two bouts of major depression. The patients were broken up into three groups: One had eight weekly group sessions of the therapy, one took an antidepressant and one took a placebo. Over 18 months, about 70% of patients taking a placebo suffered at least one more episode of depression. By comparison, only about 30% of patients receiving therapy or taking an antidepressant had a setback.

Segal said mindfulness therapy could help patients avoid rumination, the process of endlessly chewing on incidents from the past. Rumination is a driving force behind depression, he said, and it just doesn't mesh with mindful thinking. He also believes that by encouraging patients to focus on their current thoughts, mindfulness can discourage anxiety and worry — up to a point.

"If you're having panic attacks in the mall, mindfulness therapy on its own isn't going to be enough," he said.

Segal adds that mindfulness treatment changes the relationship people have with their emotions, so much so that shifts in brain activity even show up in magnetic resonance imaging tests.

"When your mind has a thought, such as, 'My colleague just insulted me at the office,' you can explore the consequences of that thought," he said. "Thoughts have a less intense grip because you are an observer."

Hofmann said most patients could pick up mindfulness fairly easily, but it's not for everyone.

"It takes quite a bit of intelligence," he said. "It's good for people who like intellectual stimulation."

In addition, children, older people (who tend to be more set in their ways) and rigid thinkers may have trouble understanding or embracing the treatment, he said.

Hofmann hopes that the ongoing flood of mindfulness studies will help clarify the benefits and limitations of the approach and ultimately shape the way that the therapy is offered in the real world.

"Some therapists embrace these new and sexy treatments without a lot of critical thinking because they sound cool," he said.

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News Headline: HEALTH & WELLNESS (Fresco) | Email

News Date: 01/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Los Angeles Times
Contact Name: Woolston, Chris
News OCR Text: Infobox

Of all fields of medicine, psychology seems especially prone to fads. Freudian dream analysis, recovered memory therapy, eye movement desensitization for trauma -- lots of once-hot psychological theories and treatments eventually fizzled.

Now along comes mindfulness therapy, a meditation-based treatment with foundations in Buddhism and yoga that's taking off in private practices and university psychology departments across the country.

"Mindfulness has become a buzzword, especially with younger therapists," said Stefan Hofmann, a professor of psychology at Boston University's Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders.

Mindfulness therapy encourages patients to focus on their breathing and their body, to notice but not judge their thoughts and to generally live in the moment. It may sound a bit squishy and New Agey to some, but Hofmann and other experts say mindfulness has something that discredited theories of the past never had: solid evidence that it can help.

"I was skeptical at first." Hofmann said. "I wondered, 'Why on Earth should this work?' But it seems to work quite well."

Hofmann and colleagues burnished the scientific credentials of mindfulness therapy with a review article in the April issue of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. After combining results of 39 previous studies involving 1,140 patients, the researchers concluded that the therapy was effective for relieving anxiety and improving mood.

The treatment seemed to help ease the mental stress of people recovering from cancer and other serious illnesses, but it had the strongest benefits for people diagnosed with mood disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder and recurring depression.

Jordan Elliott, a 26-year-old marketer for a New York publishing company, said mindfulness training had helped push his once-disabling anxiety -- about work, the weather, the meaning of life -- into the background. "The anxiety is still there, but it's not as bad as it was," he said.

Elliott started getting one-on-one therapy four years ago at the American Institute for Cognitive Therapy in New York. It was hard at first, partly because he was skeptical of the technique and partly because he didn't feel particularly mindful. "I was such a nervous wreck I could hardly sit still for three minutes," he said.

Now he starts every day with a 10-minute meditation.

"When a negative thought pops off in my head, I say to myself, 'There's a thought. And feelings aren't facts.' "

Elliott said he was taking Prozac before he started mindfulness therapy, but he no longer needed it.

"It's pretty clear that people can improve their health if they can encourage this practice in their lives," said David Fresco, an associate professor of psychology at Kent State University in Ohio. "But we have to be careful not to move beyond the data too quickly."

Fresco warns that mindfulness treatment is unlikely to help someone suffering from severe and ongoing depression. Those patients, he said, need a more active approach to recovery, perhaps including antidepressants and cognitive behavioral therapy, a type of counseling that encourages patients to question the validity of their negative thoughts.

Once recovery from depression begins, however, mindfulness therapy could provide a valuable defense against future episodes, said Zindel Segal, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto who was one of the pioneers behind mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, or MBCT, a treatment that combines mindfulness with cognitive behavioral therapy.

In December, Segal and colleagues published a study in the Archives of General Psychiatry suggesting that the treatment was as effective as antidepressants for preventing relapses of depression.

The study involved 84 patients who had recovered from at least two bouts of major depression. The patients were broken up into three groups: One had eight weekly group sessions of the therapy, one took an antidepressant and one took a placebo. Over 18 months, about 70% of patients taking a placebo suffered at least one more episode of depression. By comparison, only about 30% in the two other groups had a setback.

Segal said mindfulness therapy could help patients avoid rumination, the process of endlessly chewing on incidents from the past. Rumination is a driving force behind depression, he said, and it just doesn't mesh with mindful thinking. He also believes that by encouraging patients to focus on their current thoughts, mindfulness can discourage anxiety and worry -- up to a point.

"If you're having panic attacks in the mall, mindfulness therapy on its own isn't going to be enough," he said.

Segal adds that mindfulness treatment changes the relationship people have with their emotions, so much so that shifts in brain activity even show up in MRI tests.

"When your mind has a thought, such as, 'My colleague just insulted me at the office,' you can explore the consequences of that thought," he said. "Thoughts have a less intense grip because you are an observer."

Hofmann said most patients could pick up mindfulness fairly easily, but it's not for everyone.

"It takes quite a bit of intelligence," he said. "It's good for people who like intellectual stimulation."

In addition, children, older people (who tend to be more set in their ways) and rigid thinkers may have trouble understanding or embracing the treatment, he said.

Hofmann hopes that the ongoing flood of mindfulness studies will help clarify the benefits and limitations of the approach and ultimately shape the way it is offered in the real world.

"Some therapists embrace these new and sexy treatments without a lot of critical thinking because they sound cool," he said.

health@latimes.com

--

(BEGIN TEXT OF INFOBOX)

Getting help

Mindfulness therapy comes in different forms. Patients can receive it through group therapy or one-on-one sessions with a therapist. Some practitioners use CDs or books to help guide the treatment.

The precise structure of a program varies: The one at UC San Diego's Center for Mindfulness, for example, offers an eight-week plan that combines CDs, books and daily home assignments.

For more information, visit the center's website at health.ucsd.edu/specialties/psych/mindfulness.

-- Chris Woolston

PHOTO: PEACE: Mindfulness therapy teaches patients to focus on their breathing and body, to notice but not judge their thoughts and to generally live in the moment. Above, a woman meditates in Venice on New Year's Eve.

PHOTOGRAPHER:Lucy Nicholson Reuters

Copyright © 2011 Los Angeles Times

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News Headline: Huber Heights to hire new city manager soon | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Dayton Daily News - Online
Contact Name: Cornelius Frolik
News OCR Text: HUBER HEIGHTS The search for a new city manager is nearing its final stages, and officials hope to hire a replacement by the end of February.

The city received 61 resumes from candidates across the nation who are interested in filling the position vacated last year by Eileen Bensen, who left after two years on the job. The salary range is between $89,020 and $133,048.

Bensen, who earned $95,000 annually, said she stepped down for personal reasons.

The city has contracted with Kent State Universitys Center for Public Administration and Public Policy to oversee the search and screening process, at a cost not to exceed $20,000.

The center interviewed City Council members, city officials, employees and others about their views and preferences regarding the job. They devised also a rating system and profile of the ideal candidate to gauge applicants, said Tony Rodgers, clerk of council. The candidates who best match the attributes that weve identified (as important) in a city manager candidate will go to the top of the list, Rodgers said. The deadline to apply was on Dec. 17, and Kent State staff are filtering the resumes to identify the top 10 to 12 candidates, Rodgers said. Those candidates will be asked to respond in writing to a set of questions and also provide a 10-minute video resume that City Council will review.

Kent State will also provide the city with criminal and professional background checks.

City Council will select their five favorite finalists for face-to-face interviews, and members hope to hire someone before March.

City officials are waiting until a city manager is hired before making any decisions on how or whether to fill other positions that include human resource director, economic development director and public safety director.

Jim Borland is currently acting as the citys interim city manager and public safety director. Former city manager Bensen has already applied for similar jobs in Sandusky and Delaware County.

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News Headline: Business briefs | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Steubenville Herald-Star
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Chamber trade fair set for Jan. 24

WINTERSVILLE - The Inventor-to-Investor Trade Fair of the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce is scheduled from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Jan. 24 at St. Florian Hall on Luray Drive, Wintersville. The event also will feature an extended version of the chamber's popular monthly Business After Hours networking series.

Various giveaways, promotional coupons, drawings and a treasure hunt for prizes will be featured.

For information, contact the chamber at (740) 282-6226.

Minor Insurance moves in village

WINTERSVILLE - Minor Insurance Agency has moved its branch in Wintersville from 100 Welday Ave. to a new location, 762 Canton Road.

The office is one of eight for Minor Insurance, which also has offices in Toronto, Weirton, East Liverpool, Carrollton, Lisbon and Canfield.

Minor Insurance is locally owned and operated by Tom Minor and has been serving the area since 1990.

For information, visit www.minorinsurance.com.

Young professionals will meet

STEUBENVILLE - The Jefferson County Young Professionals organization will hold its next gathering from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday at The Ville at the Fort Steuben Mall.

The informal organization provides a chance for the 40-and-under business crowd to network and enjoy time together.

State honor for Kent State SBA

NEW PHILADELPHIA - Steve Schillig, regional director of the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University-Tuscarawas, received the Individual Performance Award from the network of Small Business Development Centers of Ohio. He was one of seven individuals and eight centers statewide recognized by the network.

The awards were conferred to those exceeding counseling, training and economic impact goals, as well as outstanding work in advocacy, collaborations, innovations, marketing, mentoring and academic excellence in continuing professional development, according to Karen Shauri, state director of the Small Business Development Centers.

The KSU-Tuscarawas Small Business Development Center provides services in Jefferson County through the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce. New business start-up workshops are scheduled for 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Jan. 12 and Feb. 16 at the chamber offices, 620 Market St. To register, call (330) 308-7434.

Government contracting seminar set

CHARLESTON - The U.S. Small Business Administration will host a free webinar on contracting with the federal government.

The seminar will begin at 2 p.m. Jan. 20. Registration may be made by visiting www.wvscore.org and selecting the "Government Contracting 101" link.

The SBA noted the federal government is the world's largest purchaser of goods and services and all federal agencies are required to do at least 23 percent of their purchases through small business.

Eat 'n Park names general manager

WHEELING - Mark Kaniecki has been promoted to general manager at the Highlands Eat'n Park Restaurant, 80 Fort Henry Road.

Kaniecki, of Wheeling, began his career with the company in 2005 and has worked at the Weirton Eat'n Park and was acting general manager at the Steubenville restaurant.

Kaniecki will manage more than 75 employees at the Highlands location.

Eat'n Park now has 73 locations across Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia.

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News Headline: Business Briefs | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Weirton Daily Times, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Chamber trade fair set for Jan. 24

WINTERSVILLE - The Inventor-to-Investor Trade Fair of the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce is scheduled from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Jan. 24 at St. Florian Hall on Luray Drive, Wintersville. The event also will feature an extended version of the chamber's popular monthly Business After Hours networking series.

Various giveaways, promotional coupons, drawings and a treasure hunt for prizes will be featured.

For information, contact the chamber at (740) 282-6226.

Minor Insurance moves in village

WINTERSVILLE - Minor Insurance Agency has moved its branch in Wintersville from 100 Welday Ave. to a new location, 762 Canton Road.

The office is one of eight for Minor Insurance, which also has offices in Toronto, Weirton, East Liverpool, Carrollton, Lisbon and Canfield.

Minor Insurance is locally owned and operated by Tom Minor and has been serving the area since 1990.

For information, visit www.minorinsurance.com.

Young professionals will meet

STEUBENVILLE - The Jefferson County Young Professionals organization will hold its next gathering from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday at The Ville at the Fort Steuben Mall.

The informal organization provides a chance for the 40-and-under business crowd to network and enjoy time together.

State honor for Kent State SBA

NEW PHILADELPHIA - Steve Schillig, regional director of the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University-Tuscarawas, received the Individual Performance Award from the network of Small Business Development Centers of Ohio. He was one of seven individuals and eight centers statewide recognized by the network.

The awards were conferred to those exceeding counseling, training and economic impact goals, as well as outstanding work in advocacy, collaborations, innovations, marketing, mentoring and academic excellence in continuing professional development, according to Karen Shauri, state director of the Small Business Development Centers.

The KSU-Tuscarawas Small Business Development Center provides services in Jefferson County through the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce. New business start-up workshops are scheduled for 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Jan. 12 and Feb. 16 at the chamber offices, 620 Market St. To register, call (330) 308-7434.

Government contracting seminar set

CHARLESTON - The U.S. Small Business Administration will host a free webinar on contracting with the federal government.

The seminar will begin at 2 p.m. Jan. 20. Registration may be made by visiting www.wvscore.org and selecting the "Government Contracting 101" link.

The SBA noted the federal government is the world's largest purchaser of goods and services and all federal agencies are required to do at least 23 percent of their purchases through small business.

Eat 'n Park names general manager

WHEELING - Mark Kaniecki has been promoted to general manager at the Highlands Eat'n Park Restaurant, 80 Fort Henry Road.

Kaniecki, of Wheeling, began his career with the company in 2005 and has worked at the Weirton Eat'n Park and was acting general manager at the Steubenville restaurant.

Kaniecki will manage more than 75 employees at the Highlands location.

Eat'n Park now has 73 locations across Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia.

New COO named at Morgan Stanley

NEW YORK - Morgan Stanley named Jim Rosenthal to be its new chief operating officer on Tuesday. Rosenthal had been the head of corporate strategy for the investment bank.

The job was formerly held by Tom Nides, who took up a new job with the U.S. State Department as a deputy secretary of state for management and resources under Hillary Clinton.

In a memo sent to Morgan Stanley employees, CEO James Gorman said Rosenthal's responsibilities would also include oversight of human resources, corporate communications, marketing and technology.

AIG works to get out of government

NEW YORK - Insurance giant American International Group Inc. is issuing 75 million warrants as part of its plan to free itself from U.S. government ownership.

The warrants will be distributed on Jan. 19 to shareholders of record Jan. 13. The Treasury Department will not receive any of the warrants.

Each warrant will represent the right to buy one share of AIG at an initial exercise price of $45 per share, according to a filing Friday with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

AIG, based in New York, received the biggest government rescue of any financial company during the recent crisis. Its lifelines from the Federal Reserve and Treasury were worth $182 billion.

Pink Floyd agrees to new contract

LONDON - Pink Floyd and EMI Group Ltd. have settled their legal dispute and agreed a new five-year contract.

Last year the band sued its longtime label for digitally selling individual tracks "unbundled" from their original albums.

Pink Floyd won an early round of the court battle, but the complex case rumbled on as EMI made an unsuccessful appeal.

EMI said Tuesday that "all legal disputes between the band and the company have been settled as a result of this new deal," which will see EMI continue to market and distribute Pink Floyd's catalog.

Pink Floyd signed with EMI in 1967 and became one of its most lucrative acts.

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