Report Overview:
Total Clips (11)
Academic Policies (1)
Alumni (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Fashion Design (1)
Geology (2)
Graduate Studies (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Psychology (1)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Academic Policies (1)
College students who flub a class may have opportunity to take it again (Hanson) 01/11/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


Alumni (1)
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS | Valentine's Day dinner and show 01/11/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...season of their new show will include 13 episodes that offer step-by-step projects and advice for improving living spaces. Both hosts are graduates of Kent State University and earned bachelor of fine arts degrees there — Hiller in interior design, and Fox in theater. They have been collaborating...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Kweisi Mfume headlines King program at KSU 01/11/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design (1)
Going Places: Jan. 10, 2011 01/11/2011 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


Geology (2)
New crustacean biology study results from Kent State University described (Feldmann) 01/11/2011 Science Letter Text Email

...Devonian decapod documents only the second decapod taxon known from the Devonian and the third from the Paleozoic," wrote R.M. Feldmann and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "It is the earliest known shrimp and one of the two oldest decapods, both from...

New crustacean biology study results from Kent State University described (Feldmann) 01/11/2011 Life Science Weekly Text Email

...Devonian decapod documents only the second decapod taxon known from the Devonian and the third from the Paleozoic," wrote R.M. Feldmann and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "It is the earliest known shrimp and one of the two oldest decapods, both from...


Graduate Studies (1)
Going Places: Jan. 10, 2011 01/11/2011 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
Financial aid night set in Leetonia 01/11/2011 Salem News Text Attachment Email

...hosting a free Financial Aid Night at 6:30 p.m. in the Band Room. The event will feature counselors from all three schools and a representative from the Kent State University-Columbiana County Campuses who will provide a presentation and answer questions regarding FAFSA and financial aid in...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
12 area children sought for 'Wizard of Oz' (Morelli) 01/11/2011 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email


Psychology (1)
Mindfulness therapy is no fad, experts say (Fresco) 01/10/2011 Chicago Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...clear that people can improve their health if they can encourage this practice in their lives," said David Fresco, an associate professor of psychology at Kent State University in Ohio. "But we have to be careful not to move beyond the data too quickly." Fresco warns that mindfulness treatment...


Town-Gown (1)
Downtown Hotel, Conference Center Plans Still in Flux (Lefton, Floyd) 01/11/2011 kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


News Headline: College students who flub a class may have opportunity to take it again (Hanson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Some college students received unpleasant news during the holiday break: low grades in fall classes.

But -- in the academic version of the "do-over" -- many can retake those classes and count the higher grade in their overall grade-point average.

Colleges call it "freshman forgiveness," "recalculating grades" or "repeat a course" and the policies are primarily aimed at freshmen taking lower level courses.

Students need to check with an adviser to see if the class can be retaken, if it is worth the cost and time, and if it will affect any financial aid or scholarships.

Every college has a different policy. Some are tied to the number of total credit hours a student has taken and the class in question may also be a factor.

At the University of Akron, the grade to be replaced has to be a C- or less and the student has two chances to repeat it. The new grade, even if it is lower, replaces the earlier grade. The policy is similar at Cleveland State University except the initial grade has to be a D or below. If the CSU student wants to repeat a class in which he or she earned a C- or higher all grades will be calculated in the GPA.

Cuyahoga Community College students can repeat a course if they earn a B or lower and the highest grade from either course is computed in the GPA. A Lorain County Community College student may repeat a course in which less than a C was earned.

Ohio State University and most private universities and colleges allow students to repeat a course only once and in many cases the student must also get approval from a school official.

But Kent State University offers unlimited chances to retake a course.

Students can repeat any lower level class as many times as they want and the highest grade earned will be used for the grade-point average. Students may also repeat any upper level course, but all grades are calculated in the grade-point average.

In January 2008, the university changed its policy of allowing students one chance to retake a lower level class if they received a C- or less.

An editorial in the Daily Kent Stater in October 2007 decried the pending move, saying students were being given unlimited "get out of jail free" cards. It said students repeating popular classes would push others out.

LuEtt Hanson, associate dean of Kent State's college of communication and information, said officials spent almost a year working on a new policy and that it was discussed with faculty and students before being adopted.

"Now they can retake a class theoretically as many times as they want," she said. "How many times a student wants to take the class is the issue and we strongly encourage every student to consult with an academic adviser."

Officials plan to review the policy this year and compare data to see if the current policy is too lenient or strict, she said.

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News Headline: ENTERTAINMENT NEWS | Valentine's Day dinner and show | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Home-decorating show on PBS

KENT

The popular home- decorating team of Matt Fox and Shari Hiller return to television with “Around the House With Matt and Shari,” which premieres at 12:30 p.m. Saturday on Western Reserve PBS. It also airs Sundays at 2 a.m.

Fox and Hiller created the first show to air on HGTV, “Room by Room,” which ran for 12 years. The first season of their new show will include 13 episodes that offer step-by-step projects and advice for improving living spaces.

Both hosts are graduates of Kent State University and earned bachelor of fine arts degrees there — Hiller in interior design, and Fox in theater. They have been collaborating on television series and specials, newspaper columns and books since 1991.

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News Headline: Kweisi Mfume headlines King program at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: F o r m e r
NAACP President
Kweisi
Mfume will
be the guest
speaker at
Kent State
University's
Ninth Annual
Martin Luther
King Jr. Celebration.
The program will be held
from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Jan. 27
in the Kent Student Center.
This year's celebration centers
on the theme “Empowering
the Individual, Strengthening
the Community.”
The porgram begins at 1
p.m. with a cultural celebration
of music, word and dance
at the Student Center Kiva.
The celebration moves to the
Kent Student Center Ballroom
from 2:10 to 3:30 p.m.,
where Mfume will speak.
Mfume, a former congressman,
is a diversity advocate
and TV and radio commentator.
He served in Congress
from 1987 to 1996 and
NAACP president from 1996
to 2005.

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News Headline: Going Places: Jan. 10, 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AWARDS

FASHION ART BIENNALE 2010: J.R. Campbell and Vincent Quevedo (Kent State University) received the International Artist of the Year Award.

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News Headline: New crustacean biology study results from Kent State University described (Feldmann) | Email

News Date: 01/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Science Letter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to a study from the United States, "Discovery of a single specimen of a shrimp fossil from the Devonian Woodford Shale in the Ryan Quarry, near Ada, Oklahoma, documents the oldest occurrence of a penaeoid decapod crustacean, Aciculopoda mapesi n. gen., n. sp. within the Aciculopodidae n. fam. The specimen lacks any diagnostic features of the primitive Paleozoic eumalacostracans, including caudal furca, but possesses the characteristic form and preservational style of the Superorder Eucarida, particularly the Superfamily Penaeoidea."

"The shrimp specimen is remarkably preserved; it has been phosphatized, and the muscles of the pleon have been preserved completely enough that discrete muscle bands are discernable. The cuticle of the cephalothorax is shattered into small fragments, whereas that of the pleon is absent except for the telson. Confirmation that this specimen represents a Devonian decapod documents only the second decapod taxon known from the Devonian and the third from the Paleozoic," wrote R.M. Feldmann and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "It is the earliest known shrimp and one of the two oldest decapods, both from North America."

Feldmann and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Crustacean Biology (The Oldest Shrimp (devonian: Famennian) And Remarkable Preservation Of Soft Tissue. Journal of Crustacean Biology, 2010;30(4):629-635).

For more information, contact R.M. Feldmann, Kent State University, Dept. of Geol, Kent, OH 44242, USA.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Crustacean Biology is: Crustacean Society, 840 East Mulberry, San Antonio, TX 78212, USA.

Copyright © 2011 Science Letter via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: New crustacean biology study results from Kent State University described (Feldmann) | Email

News Date: 01/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Life Science Weekly
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to a study from the United States, "Discovery of a single specimen of a shrimp fossil from the Devonian Woodford Shale in the Ryan Quarry, near Ada, Oklahoma, documents the oldest occurrence of a penaeoid decapod crustacean, Aciculopoda mapesi n. gen., n. sp. within the Aciculopodidae n. fam. The specimen lacks any diagnostic features of the primitive Paleozoic eumalacostracans, including caudal furca, but possesses the characteristic form and preservational style of the Superorder Eucarida, particularly the Superfamily Penaeoidea."

"The shrimp specimen is remarkably preserved; it has been phosphatized, and the muscles of the pleon have been preserved completely enough that discrete muscle bands are discernable. The cuticle of the cephalothorax is shattered into small fragments, whereas that of the pleon is absent except for the telson. Confirmation that this specimen represents a Devonian decapod documents only the second decapod taxon known from the Devonian and the third from the Paleozoic," wrote R.M. Feldmann and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "It is the earliest known shrimp and one of the two oldest decapods, both from North America."

Feldmann and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Crustacean Biology (The Oldest Shrimp (devonian: Famennian) And Remarkable Preservation Of Soft Tissue. Journal of Crustacean Biology, 2010;30(4):629-635).

For more information, contact R.M. Feldmann, Kent State University, Dept. of Geol, Kent, OH 44242, USA.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Crustacean Biology is: Crustacean Society, 840 East Mulberry, San Antonio, TX 78212, USA.

Copyright © 2011 Life Science Weekly via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Going Places: Jan. 10, 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JOB CHANGES

EDUCATION

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY: Mary Ann Stephens to dean, graduate studies.

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News Headline: Financial aid night set in Leetonia | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News
Contact Name: KEVIN HOWELL
News OCR Text: LEETONIA - College bound students and their parents in the Leetonia, Columbiana and Crestview school districts can find answers to those pesky financial aid forms Wednesday night at Leetonia High School.

The school is hosting a free Financial Aid Night at 6:30 p.m. in the Band Room.

The event will feature counselors from all three schools and a representative from the Kent State University-Columbiana County

Campuses who will provide a presentation and answer questions regarding FAFSA and financial aid in general.

According to Angelo Nicotera, Leetonia High School guidance counselor,

the three schools began the combined informational night last year on a rotating basis to encourage greater turnout.

"We decided to work as three partners rather than three individuals,"

he explained, "because we can have more counselors to answer questions and because the more people that are there, the more questions will be raised that others hadn't thought about."

Although the process has grown easier in the past few years, Nicotera said it is still a difficult concept for most people to grasp, so workshops with knowledgeable professionals can ease the anxiety of getting set up for college.

Plus, there are many forms of financial aid beyond just the basics, with a multitude of scholarships available to those who know where to find them, which will be addressed at the event.

"Financial aid is no longer just for those who can't afford college," Nicotera noted.

For information call the school at 330-427-2115.

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News Headline: 12 area children sought for 'Wizard of Oz' (Morelli) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA, OH — Twelve area children will have the opportunity to travel over the rainbow when “The Wizard of Oz” comes to the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas for a March 6 performance.

“We will be holding auditions Jan. 22 for children interested in performing with the touring company,” said Mike Morelli, the center's general manager. “The children will be cast immediately and rehearsals will be held at the center to teach them the songs and choreography.

“When the company arrives, the children will come in for a rehearsal and then will perform with the company that night,” he added.

Children who audition must be between 8 and 13 years old, less than 5-feet-tall and must weigh less than 100 pounds.

For more information call Kent State University at Tuscarawas at (330) 339-3391.

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News Headline: Mindfulness therapy is no fad, experts say (Fresco) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Chicago Tribune - Online
Contact Name: Los Angeles Times
News OCR Text: There is solid evidence that mindfulness therapy, which combines elements of Buddhism and yoga, can relieve anxiety and improve mood.

Mindfulness therapy encourages patients to focus on their breathing and their body, to notice but not judge their thoughts and to generally live in the moment.

By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times

10:36 p.m. CST, January 8, 2011

Of all fields of medicine, psychology seems especially prone to fads. Freudian dream analysis, recovered memory therapy, eye movement desensitization for trauma — lots of once-hot psychological theories and treatments eventually fizzled.

Now along comes mindfulness therapy, a meditation-based treatment with foundations in Buddhism and yoga that's taking off in private practices and university psychology departments across the country.

"Mindfulness has become a buzzword, especially with younger therapists," said Stefan Hofmann, a professor of psychology at Boston University's Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders.

Mindfulness therapy encourages patients to focus on their breathing and their body, to notice but not judge their thoughts and to generally live in the moment. It may sound a bit squishy and New Agey to some, but Hofmann and other experts say mindfulness has something that discredited theories of the past never had: solid evidence that it can help.

"I was skeptical at first." Hofmann said. "I wondered, 'Why on Earth should this work?' But it seems to work quite well."

Hofmann and colleagues burnished the scientific credentials of mindfulness therapy with a review article in the April issue of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. After combining results of 39 previous studies involving 1,140 patients, the researchers concluded that mindfulness therapy was effective for relieving anxiety and improving mood.

The treatment seemed to help ease the mental stress of people recovering from cancer and other serious illnesses, but it had the strongest benefits for people diagnosed with mood disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder and recurring depression.

Jordan Elliott, a 26-year-old marketer for a New York publishing company, said mindfulness training had helped pushed his once-disabling anxiety — about work, the weather, the meaning of life — into the background. "The anxiety is still there, but it's not as bad as it was," he said.

Elliott started getting one-on-one therapy four years ago at the American Institute for Cognitive Therapy in New York. It was hard at first, partly because he was skeptical of the technique and partly because he didn't feel particularly mindful. "I was such a nervous wreck I could hardly sit still for three minutes," he said.

Now he starts every day with a 10-minute meditation. He sits cross-legged in his apartment, TV and music off, and thinks about his breathing.

"When a negative thought pops off in my head, I say to myself, 'There's a thought. And feelings aren't facts.' "

Elliott said he was taking Prozac before he started mindfulness therapy, but he no longer needed medication to keep his anxiety under control.

"It's pretty clear that people can improve their health if they can encourage this practice in their lives," said David Fresco, an associate professor of psychology at Kent State University in Ohio. "But we have to be careful not to move beyond the data too quickly."

Fresco warns that mindfulness treatment is unlikely to help someone suffering from severe and ongoing depression. Those patients, he said, need a more active approach to recovery, perhaps including antidepressants and cognitive behavioral therapy, a type of counseling that encourages patients to question the validity of their negative thoughts.

Once recovery from depression begins, however, mindfulness therapy could provide a valuable defense against future episodes, said Zindel Segal, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto who was one of the pioneers behind mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, or MBCT, a treatment that combines mindfulness with cognitive behavioral therapy.

In December, Segal and colleagues published a study in the Archives of General Psychiatry suggesting that the treatment was as effective as antidepressants for preventing relapses of depression.

The study involved 84 patients who had recovered from at least two bouts of major depression. The patients were broken up into three groups: One had eight weekly group sessions of the therapy, one took an antidepressant and one took a placebo. Over 18 months, about 70% of patients taking a placebo suffered at least one more episode of depression. By comparison, only about 30% of patients receiving therapy or taking an antidepressant had a setback.

Segal said mindfulness therapy could help patients avoid rumination, the process of endlessly chewing on incidents from the past. Rumination is a driving force behind depression, he said, and it just doesn't mesh with mindful thinking. He also believes that by encouraging patients to focus on their current thoughts, mindfulness can discourage anxiety and worry — up to a point.

"If you're having panic attacks in the mall, mindfulness therapy on its own isn't going to be enough," he said.

Segal adds that mindfulness treatment changes the relationship people have with their emotions, so much so that shifts in brain activity even show up in magnetic resonance imaging tests.

"When your mind has a thought, such as, 'My colleague just insulted me at the office,' you can explore the consequences of that thought," he said. "Thoughts have a less intense grip because you are an observer."

Hofmann said most patients could pick up mindfulness fairly easily, but it's not for everyone.

"It takes quite a bit of intelligence," he said. "It's good for people who like intellectual stimulation."

In addition, children, older people (who tend to be more set in their ways) and rigid thinkers may have trouble understanding or embracing the treatment, he said.

Hofmann hopes that the ongoing flood of mindfulness studies will help clarify the benefits and limitations of the approach and ultimately shape the way that the therapy is offered in the real world.

"Some therapists embrace these new and sexy treatments without a lot of critical thinking because they sound cool," he said.

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News Headline: Downtown Hotel, Conference Center Plans Still in Flux (Lefton, Floyd) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Plans for the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center remain under discussion between the university and its development partner, Columbus-based Pizzuti Companies.
Kent State University President Lester Lefton said the partners have officially settled on a site for the facility. The combined hotel and conference center will stand on the triangle of land located between Erie, South DePeyster streets and Haymaker Parkway on the corner opposite from Kent Fire Station One.
Early plans called for a separate, 25,000 square foot conference center on the current site with a six-story, 110-room hotel across from it on South DePeyster Street.
But the partners have since scaled back the size of both the hotel and conference center. The hotel will have closer to 90 rooms, and the conference and banquet facility will be less than 14,000 square feet but is still expected to have seating for 300. Both facilities will be combined in one building either three or four stories tall.
"It was too big for our needs," Lefton said of the original plans. "And you don't want to overbuild, because it's expensive."
Gregg Floyd, vice president for finance and administration at Kent State, said the current focus of the partners is value-engineering the design of the facilities to make the project affordable.
Floyd said construction and opening dates also have not been set. But the hotel will not open until after PARTA opens the Kent Central Gateway transit center in late 2012, so the hotel may not be completed until the first quarter of 2013.
"The original plan was that ... they were going to break ground on the hotel this spring," he said.
The partners have not identified a brand for the hotel. And a name for the facility also has not been chosen. Lefton said the hotel and conference center will include "Kent State" as part of the name.
"I like 'The Inn at Kent State,'" Lefton said. "But that has not been determined. It will have the name Kent State in it some place.
"That's to the advantage of the hotel," Lefton said. "When people go looking for a hotel they're going to type in 'hotel, Kent State.' You want the name in the title."
The university also has not determined exactly how much it will spend as an equity investor in the project. The Kent State University Board of Trustees has authorized an investment of up to $3 million on the project. Lefton said either the university or the Kent State University Foundation will pay for the investment. The university paid $530,000 alone aquiring the land for the hotel through personal philanthropic donations made by Ron Pizzuti, a Kent State alum and owner of The Pizzuti Companies.
For now, one building remains on the site and must be demolished before construction can begin.
Floyd said the hotel has shifted to the forefront somewhat in downtown redevelopment talks as the city, PARTA and Fairmount Properties all make progress on their individual development projects.
"I continue to emphasize the importance of partnership," he said. "This has been one of the more positive examples of large institutions forming a very effective partnership."

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