Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Advancement Opportunities; University Communications and Marketing (1)
Campus Environment and Operations; KSU at Stark (1)
Computer Science; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Economics; KSU at Stark (1)
Fashion Design (2)
Graduate Studies (1)
Kent State University Foundation (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (3)
KSU at Stark; KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
Pan-African Studies (1)
Political Science; Scholarship Programs (1)
Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Research (1)
Student Success (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Advancement Opportunities; University Communications and Marketing (1)
Kent State receives 5 awards in competition (Crimmins, Neumann) 01/22/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University recently received five awards, including three golds, for achievements in communications and marketing from the Council...


Campus Environment and Operations; KSU at Stark (1)
Life's work takes root in passion for trees 01/22/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...recover from the Sept. 16 tornado that hit Wooster. Here are a few treeisms from Tuesday. Tree campuses Many colleges across the country, including Kent State University main campus, Kent State Stark campus and Mount Union University, have achieved Tree Campus status. Ohio State...


Computer Science; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Journalism students, computer scientists join forces at Kent State (Marino, Wang) 01/24/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Economics; KSU at Stark (1)
End of year brings higher Stark sales tax collections (Engelhardt, Wilson) 01/23/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...still have their jobs are feeling more secure and are more willing to go out and spend their income,” said Lucas Engelhardt, an economics professor at Kent State University Stark Campus. Kathy Wilson, a Kent State economics professor at Kent, said the county's numbers on spending...


Fashion Design (2)
Fashioning a future at Kent State (Campbell, Schofield-Tomschin) 01/24/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The Fashion School at Kent State University announces Paris program 01/23/2011 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

Beginning in the summer of 2011, students studying at Kent State University's renowned fashion school will enjoy yet another option to broaden their horizons and study overseas. Students currently...


Graduate Studies (1)
Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? (Stephens) 01/24/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


Kent State University Foundation (1)
Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? (Neiheiser) 01/24/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (3)
BRIEFLY 01/22/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

Free FAFSA workshop offered SALEM-A free FAFSA workshop, "Filling Out the FAFSA," will be held at 6 p.m. Feb. 10 in room 209 at Kent State Salem City Center, 230 N. Lincoln Ave. Reservations may be made by calling 330-337-4246. The FAFSA is the Free Application for...

Kent State Columbiana Campuses again see an increase in enrollment (Nolte) 01/23/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

SALEM-The Kent State Columbiana County Campuses, which include Kent State University at East Liverpool and Salem, again saw an increase in...

KSU Salem's Communiversity Choir to celebrate 20th anniversary (Fucci) 01/23/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

Salem - Kent State Salem's Communiversity Choir, which is made up of members of the community and university students, is inviting past vocalists and...


KSU at Stark; KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
State grant to help prevent business closures in region 01/22/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Adult Education; Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce; Canton Community Improvement Corp.; City of Canton Economic Development; Dominion East Ohio; Kent State University Stark and Tuscarawas campuses; Massillon Area Chamber of Commerce; Massillon Development Foundation; Workforce directors...


KSU Museum (1)
10 things to do for $10 or less 01/24/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
Kasich to visit GM's Lordstown plant 01/24/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...corridor and the transformation of the former Ravenna Army Ammunition Plant into a training center. He also highlighted research into polymers at the University of Akron and liquid crystal technology at Kent State University. ''Regardless of party affiliation, I will work with Governor...

Grow jobs in clusters 01/23/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...economic development organization, is seeking to accelerate the growth of the flexible electronics industry. The region has much history in this realm. Kent State University led the way in the development of liquid crystal displays. The lucrative manufacturing element emerged elsewhere, the...


Pan-African Studies (1)
West African Muslims focus of KSU program (Wilson-Fall) 01/24/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Political Science; Scholarship Programs (1)
Merritt D. Betts Leaves Thousands to Kent Nonprofits 01/24/2011 kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
The Economics of E-Government Services Are Far From Simple 01/21/2011 Government Technology - Online Text Attachment Email

...administrative staff, said Brian Kelley, CIO of Portage County, Ohio. As a research affiliate with the Center for Public Administration and Public Policy at Kent State University, Kelley recently participated in a project that examined county and municipal e-government services in 13 Ohio counties....


Research (1)
Business Incubator is in the spotlight 01/24/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Student Success (1)
Kent State Student Donates Kidney Over Winter Break 01/24/2011 kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Kent State receives 5 awards in competition (Crimmins, Neumann) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University recently received five awards, including three golds, for achievements in communications and marketing from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education.

Kent State received gold awards for its efforts in showcasing the university in its centennial year with the release of Kent State's economic impact study and the 40th commemoration of the May 4, 1970, shootings, for the publication “100 Years, 100 Facts” and for the Kent State website www.kent.edu.

The university also picked up a silver award for a gala event celebrating the public phase of the university's Centennial Campaign and a bronze honor for the Campaign for Change.

The Pride of CASE V District Awards program honors institutions and individuals who demonstrate outstanding achievement in the concept and execution of advancement programs and communications. CASE is an international association of education advancement officers, who include alumni administrators, fundraisers, public-relations managers, publications editors and government-relations officers.

“These awards are the culmination of years of planning and working diligently to advance the mission of Kent State, and they are a fitting and well-deserved recognition for a job well done,” said Cindy Crimmins, Kent State's associate vice president for advancement operations. “We have an incredibly talented staff who knows what it takes to create cutting-edge and top-notch programs.”

The awards were presented Dec. 14 at a conference in Chicago. The CASE V District includes universities and colleges in Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

“To be recognized in these categories by our peers in higher education is especially gratifying,” said Tom Neumann, Kent State's associate vice president for university communications and marketing.

The CASE V District Awards received by Kent State in the 2010 competition:

Teresa Du Bois Exline Award for Best Practices in Communications and Marketing, Gold Award: Celebrate Centennial: Showcasing Kent State in its 100th Year.

Best Institutional Web site, Gold Award: www.kent.edu.

Best Program in Case Statements/Cultivation Publications, Gold Award: “100 Years, 100 Facts”

Excellence in Special Events, Individual Event, Silver Award: Centennial Campaign.

Best Practices in Fundraising and Development, Bronze Award: The Campaign for Change.

For more information on the CASE V District, go to www.casefive.org/.

Return to Top



News Headline: Life's work takes root in passion for trees | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Jim Chatfield
News OCR Text: Earlier this week some members of our Ohio State University tree team in Wooster experienced a hint of April's Arbor Day festivities to come.Tuesday was for trees.

In the morning, we had the OSU Wooster Tree Campus Committee met, then went to the College of Wooster as the first visitors to the new and wonderful College of Wooster Tree exhibit.

Later, Secrest Arboretum curator Kenny Cochran and I resumed the treetorials we started this summer: In our tree walks, we reviewed our educational and research plans at the arboretum of OSU's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.

We resumed these curatorial walks after a bit of a hiatus

enforced by efforts to recover from the Sept. 16 tornado that hit Wooster.

Here are a few treeisms from Tuesday.

Tree campuses

Many colleges across the country, including Kent State University main campus, Kent State Stark campus and Mount Union University, have achieved Tree Campus status. Ohio State University in Columbus and the OARDC in Wooster are working on applications for 2012.

Criteria for tree campus status include developing a comprehensive tree-care, focusing money on a sustainable community forest, creating a campus tree committee, involving students (in our case, from OARDC and the Agricultural Technical Institute) in tree-oriented service-learning projects and enhancing Arbor Day activities.

This week we moved forward on Arbor Day planning for OSU this spring.

Arbor Day is traditionally held on the last Friday of April. That will be the day for the Arbor Day celebration at the OSU campus in Columbus.

As with the swaying limbs of trees, though, there is flexibility with Arbor Day scheduling, and at OSU's Secrest Arboretum in Wooster, a public Arbor Day 2011 will be celebrated on April 23.

The 70 percent of crab apples that remain following the tornado will probably be in full bloom then. We will have arborists from the Ohio Chapter of the International Society of Arboriculture doing work and providing demonstrations in the arboretum with structural pruning and other remedial efforts following September's wind damage.

We will have presentations in the John Streeter Amphitheater dealing with trees, streams, watersheds and the effects of wind. The presentations will incorporate music and literature.

There will be walks in the arboretum. Join us.

Wooster tree exhibit

After our meeting, we furthered our educations by being the first visitors to the College of Wooster's Trees: an interdisciplinary dialogue in the Sussel Gallery and the Burton D. Morgan Gallery of Ebert Art Center at 1220 Beall Ave.

We were welcomed by College of Wooster Art Museum director and curator Kitty McManus Zurko.

Zurko writes in the introduction that ''the tree has long been a repository of human emotion, ideas, and beliefs. In both ancient and contemporary cultures, trees are powerful symbols of growth, decay, resurrection, with dendrolatry, or the worshiping and mythologizing of trees, taking many forms.''

The exhibit, which runs through March 6, features works by contemporary artists, including Robert Voit, Joan Nelson and David Nash; prints from Wooster's John Taylor Arms Print Collection and student drawings and photographs of campus trees.

Arboretum treetorial

Tuesday's meeting concluded with Cochran's curatorial walk.

From the inside, Tuesday was one of those afternoons that seem foreboding, bone-chilling and dank — until you go out and immerse yourself. When you do, a day like Tuesday becomes something almost mystical as you turn corners and the fog and the mist part to reveal the next scene:

• Views of the dawn redwood grove directly from the winter solstice opening of the Discovery Pavilion, now an open line after the clearing caused by the September tornado.

• New views in that tornado path of the glistening, cinnamon-curled bark of 7-inch diameter paperbark maples, with the digging (from the old Shade Tree Plot), moving, and transplanting donated by the Davey Tree Nursery and its 90-inch tree spade.

• Views of the 216 new trees already planted in the arboretum since that September day.

• Views of the 25-foot Japanese stewartia tree, which withstood the tornado, with its mottled bark standing out in winter.

• Views of our still-standing Crablandia II plot, from which OSU Extension ''crabonauts'' Cheryl Fischnich and Vicki Myers recently collected seeds. NASA will send those seeds into space on a shuttle launch.

Crab apples in space! But that is another story for another column.

Trees

I have a colleague from Penn State University, Larry Kuhns, a weed-control scientist and horticulturist, who often intones: ''weeds are my life.''

As my growth rings accumulate, I realize more and more, that for me ''trees are my life,'' a sentiment Kenny Cochran and I shared during our ramblings Tuesday.

I was reminded of that the very next day while teaching and learning in Columbus, when our OSU Tree Campus Columbus Committee came up with ideas for a tree walk on campus featuring the favorite trees from all of Ohio's 88 counties. We also hatched a plan to increase the number of trees on campus so that there's one for each of the school's more than 50,000 students, with a special one on Arbor Day for OSU President Gordon Gee.

We will call it the Tree for Gee and a Tree for Thee Program. Treeism after treeism.

Jim Chatfield is a horticultural educator with Ohio State University Extension. If you have questions about caring for your garden, write: Jim Chatfield, Plant Lovers' Almanac, Ohio State University Extension, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691. Send e-mail to chatfield.1@cfaes.osu.edu or call 330-466-0270. Please include your phone number if you write.

Return to Top



News Headline: Journalism students, computer scientists join forces at Kent State (Marino, Wang) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For the first time at Kent
State University, student
journalists and computer
scientists will collaborate
on real-world projects in
a single course, Web Programming
for Multimedia
Journalism.
Student media outlets
KentWired and The Burr
magazine, as well as professional
media, including
Cleveland Magazine and
Akron's the330.com, have
expressed interest in publishing
projects the class
produces.
Offered jointly this spring
by the university's Department
of Computer Science
and the School of Journalism
and Mass Communication,
the new course has 22
students. There are 10 computer
science majors and 12
student reporters and photojournalists.
“We're not trying to turn
journalists into computer
scientists or computer
scientists into journalists,”
said Jacqueline Marino, assistant
professor in KSU's
School of Journalism and
Mass Communication.
“We want each student
to excel in his or her chosen
area of expertise in a collaborative
way. I often hear
‘Wow, that's cool' when I
show some whiz-bang news
application in class. This is
the course where journalism
students stop admiring
from afar. They're finally
going to be with people
who can help them make
their own whiz-bang news
app,” Marino said.
Professor Paul Wang from
KSU's Department of Computer
Science said, “When
faculty from the Department
of Computer Science
and JMC get together to
create and teach this interdisciplinary
course, students
from both departments
benefit, and the
university benefits. The
class will certainly make
students strong candidates
for a growing area of employment.”
Wang and Marino, along
with Sue Zake (who advises
KentWired and will be the
class multimedia coach),
want to increase literacy
among student journalists
and computer scientists.
Journalism students will
learn basic programming
skills, including HTML and
CSS. Computer science students
will learn journalism
basics, such as news values
and ethics.
By the end of the semester,
the students will create their
own news-related websites
or interactive features that
will include original journalistic
content to be published
on existing websites.
The course was developed
with the help of a summer
teaching development grant
from the Kent State University
Teaching Council.

Return to Top



News Headline: End of year brings higher Stark sales tax collections (Engelhardt, Wilson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Robert Wang
News OCR Text: Higher sales tax collections during the last few months of 2010 indicate that consumers are recovering their confidence to buy again.

The trend is taking place more than a year after area residents substantially cut back on spending in 2009.

The results back then were plunging sales for retailers and significantly less sales tax revenue for Ohio, which collects a 5.5 percent tax, and the Stark Area Regional Transit Authority, which gets 0.25 percent countywide to fund public buses. The Stark County government was spared the brunt of the shortfall because county commissioners imposed an increase in its countywide sales tax rate from 0.25 to 0.75 percent in late 2008 to help fund a 911 system.

SARTA's 2009 sales tax revenue, which serves as a key economic indicator, fell by 10 percent from the prior year and by as much as a third in one month. SARTA had anticipated getting $12.3 million that year. It ended up getting $10.5 million. The agency was forced to lay off 19 bus drivers and severely cut service.

Stark County Commissioner Janet Weir Creighton has seen the signs recently that the frugality of 2009 has waned.

“Most nights I go out to dinner, it doesn't look like a recession. The restaurants are full,” she said. “If you take an opinion poll on the street, they would tell you things aren't better, but someone's spending money.”

IMPROVING NUMBERS

SARTA said it received $11 million from the sales tax in 2010, about 4.6 percent more than the prior year. The rebound began with the April tax payment, which generally reflected sales from the prior January. (Both SARTA and Stark County generally get sales tax money about three months after it's collected at the register.)

The trend picked up momentum the last three months of last year. The transit agency's revenue soared nearly 20 percent from the last quarter of 2009, as sales between July and September including the back-to-school season took off. Sales tax revenue for this month, which generally reflects sales from October, increased about 7 percent. SARTA's sales tax reports indicate that motor vehicle sales in Stark County in September and October rose about 18 percent, driving much of the overall increase.

Other numbers indicate the area economy is recovering. The county's unemployment rate in November dropped to 10.2 percent from 11.7 percent in November 2009. In addition, SARTA says its ridership has rebounded about 12 percent since the start of September. Before, it had had 17 straight months where ridership was less than that month for the prior year.

“The people who still have their jobs are feeling more secure and are more willing to go out and spend their income,” said Lucas Engelhardt, an economics professor at Kent State University Stark Campus.

Kathy Wilson, a Kent State economics professor at Kent, said the county's numbers on spending reflect what's happening nationally. Despite the high unemployment, those who are working are loosening their purse strings.

“It tends to be much more winners and losers,” she said. “Rather than everyone taking a hit, there's some taking big hits and others who aren't taking a hit at all.”

EXPIRING TAX

If thecounty sales tax increase, which took effect in April 2009, had not been imposed and the rate had remained at 0.25 percent, the Stark County government would have experienced declines and increases in sales tax collections that would have been similar to SARTA's.

The county government's sales tax receipts rose 4.5 percent in 2010 from 2009. Voters ended up repealing the sales tax increase, and the county's rate returned to 0.25 percent in April, restoring the total sales tax rate to 6 percent.

For the county, any further increase in sales won't help after September. The commissioners will allow its remaining eight-year, 0.25 percent tax to expire in June, due in part to the public's anger about a county employee's theft of nearly $3 million from the county treasury. With several months of income from the higher tax, the county got $21.75 million in 2010, $750,000 more than anticipated. It now expects to get only $8 million from the sales tax in 2011, while it could be zero in 2012.

“It's good news that the sales tax dollars are up,” Creighton said. “It still does not negate the fact that we have serious financial hurdles in this county.”

While sales have substantially recovered from 2009, they still haven't returned to the levels of six years ago. If there had been no sales tax increase, the county's sales tax revenue last year would have been slightly below the $11.15 million of 2004 and less than the 2008 peak of $11.75 million.

“Yes, when you compare 2010 to 2009, we have more income,” said Stark County Commissioner Tom Bernabei, who was SARTA's interim executive director in 2009. “But 2009 isn't a very good benchmark for contrasts and comparisons because 2009 was so low.”

Despite the higher-than-expected revenue, Kirt Conrad, SARTA's executive director, isn't ready to sound the all-clear. His agency is planning to receive about $10.5 million in 2011 from the sales tax, about half a million dollars less than last year.

“We don't want to be caught in a position that if the economy crashes again, we're cutting service,” said Conrad, who noted that his agency for 2011 has locked in fuel prices that are 18 percent higher than 2010.

SARTA income from sales tax

2004 $11.22 million

2005 $11.48 million

2006 $11.44 million

2007 $11.72 million

2008 $11.78 million

2009 $10.53 million

2010 $11.02 million

Note: Though SARTA and the county had the same sales tax rate of 0.25 percent since 2003, except for April 2009 to March 2010, the revenue numbers between SARTA and the county can differ. According to the Ohio Department of Taxation, SARTA is not entitled to tax revenue from the sale of vehicles in Stark County to residents of Indiana, Michigan and residents of states without a tax agreement with Ohio. The county does receive those taxes.

Return to Top



News Headline: Fashioning a future at Kent State (Campbell, Schofield-Tomschin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fashion is for anybody, any time you're not naked.

“From the moment you're born, you're in constant contact with some form of fabric,” said J.R. Campbell, the director of Kent State University's School of Fashion Design and Merchandising, recently called one of the best in the world by a prominent fashion website.

“We have a really strong associative understanding of fabric,” he said, “but we have very little knowledge of textiles.”

When Campbell said “we,” he wasn't necessarily including himself. He's traveled the world — from Glasgow, Scotland, to Beijing — researching, designing and teaching about fabric. So he knows a little bit about textiles.

In 2009, he brought that knowledge to his KSU job, and since then, the department has been changing.

They've hired a fashion technologist. They've created an industry-caliber TechStyleLAB that can do commercial jobs for clients. And under 15 years of leadership from Campbell's predecessor, the late Elizabeth Rhodes, they've grown the school to about 1,500 students and established outposts in New York and Italy.

“This is a school that's really poised to be a leader,” Campbell said.

Now Campbell, 39, is trying to start master's and doctoral degree programs that would be more industry-comprehensive than any other in the U.S. He called it his biggest goal and said it would “create the new thinkers and leaders.”

“We are definitely moving,” said Sherry Schofield-Tomschin, associate professor of fashion design.

Campbell's technology- and industry-driven approach, she said, “was his vision, and I believe that's why he was hired.”

Fashion has come a long way from sewing machines.

In a recent interview, Campbell remarked on things like “digital textile printing,” and he cites as one of his research interests: “Inkjet deposition technologies for textiles.”

“What I was really trying to explore as an artist, on fine fabrics like silk and cotton, is how to get photorealistic graphics on fabric,” Campbell said.

Fabric isn't paper. Try printing a picture on wool.

That's the kind of technology-based education — along with artistry, business savvy and experiences beyond Northeast Ohio — that the Fashion School is pushing its students toward.

And that's the kind of stuff Fashionista.com recognized last month by naming KSU's program the third-best fashion school in the United States and 13th in the world.

“Our industry sources praised it, and the (Council of Fashion Designers of America) affiliation validates this,” said beauty editor Cheryl Wischhover in an e-mail. “The study abroad options, particularly the New York City garment center studio, are impressive.”

She said Fashionista's top 50 list was designed to acknowledge schools that best prepare students for careers.

Despite that recognition, Campbell said, “I think it's still probably true to say that professionals outside of the U.S. have never heard of the Kent State Fashion School.”

For a landlocked state school in Ohio, far from the fashion industry capitals, that's not a bad problem to have.

But other problems are coming into view — “hurdles to overcome,” Schofield-Tomschin said.

“We have limited space,” she said. “And it takes lot of time for each individual student to print their fabrics.”

With money tightening up at KSU in anticipation of state budget cuts, making room to grow won't be easy. But donor support is strong, and the school hopes its TechStyleLAB will generate a little income, on top of giving students real-world experience.

“We're able to engage the public and create designs never created before,” Campbell said.

And after all, that's the point of buying big textile printers and introducing the dynamics of the Internet to a formerly one-sided production process: They're making art.

Return to Top



News Headline: The Fashion School at Kent State University announces Paris program | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Stacey Thomas, Cleveland Women's Fashion Examiner
News OCR Text: Beginning in the summer of 2011, students studying at Kent State University's renowned fashion school will enjoy yet another option to broaden their horizons and study overseas. Students currently enrolled in either the merchandising or design tracks and of sophomore or higher standing will be able to take KSU courses at the Paris American Academy.

Kent State University has had a partnership with the Paris American Academy for a number of years, however, this is the first year that students will be able to earn degree required credits at the facility. The program will take place over the course of four weeks, in July, and students will participate in a number of activities ranging from field trips, hands-on workshops, lectures and more.

The Fashion School has had immense success in their past study away programs, including their New York City Studio and Florence campuses. There is also a scholarship based exchange program set up with Hong Kong Polytechnic University, and J.R. Campbell, the school's new director, is rumored to be strengthening ties in Beijing.

Kent State University's Fashion School has recently been ranked third in the nation by a top online fashion magazine Fashionista.com, for its strength in education, high profile alumni, demographics, and more. Of Fashionista.com about KSU,"With study abroad programs in Paris and Milan, a huge endowment for scholarships, and a high-profile program allowing you to complete a fashion-focused undergraduate and MBA in fashion-focused business in just five years, this school is one of the top American fashion schools and keeps getting better."

The fashion program at Kent State brings in many out-of-state students, and both design and merchandising majors are in the top three largest of the entire university.

For more updates on Cleveland Women's Fashion, subscribe here.

Do you know of a local fashion event that you would like covered by Examiner.com? Email me.

Return to Top



News Headline: Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? (Stephens) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University: Mary Ann Stephens, a psychology professor at the university, was named graduate students dean, and Linda Neiheiser was appointed secretary to the university's Foundation board of directors. Neiheiser is manager of psychological services for the Cleveland School District and an adjunct professor at Kent State.

Return to Top



News Headline: Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? (Neiheiser) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University: Mary Ann Stephens, a psychology professor at the university, was named graduate students dean, and Linda Neiheiser was appointed secretary to the university's Foundation board of directors. Neiheiser is manager of psychological services for the Cleveland School District and an adjunct professor at Kent State.

Return to Top



News Headline: BRIEFLY | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Free FAFSA workshop offered

SALEM-A free FAFSA workshop, "Filling Out the FAFSA," will be held at 6 p.m. Feb. 10 in room 209 at Kent State Salem City Center, 230 N. Lincoln Ave. Reservations may be made by calling 330-337-4246.

The FAFSA is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, and it is required for federal student aid as well as most state and college aid. Anyone may attend the event, which is free and open to the public. During the program, Dr. Joe Rottenborn, executive director of the Mahoning Valley College Access Program will assist participants in filling out the FAFSA online. Computers will be provided.

Dr. Rottenborn asks that attendees bring a copy of their 1040 tax return for 2010 (or 2009) and a completed 2011-2012 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet prior to attending. The worksheet is available at high school guidance offices, at the financial aid offices of Kent State University at East Liverpool and Salem, and online at www.fafsa.ed.gov/fotw1112/pdf/fafsaws12c.pdf. For a limited time, the worksheets are also available at the Salem Public Library. For information and to reserve a space call 330-337-4246.

This program is sponsored by the Mahoning Valley College Access Program in partnership with the Columbiana County campuses of KSU and the Salem Public Library.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Columbiana Campuses again see an increase in enrollment (Nolte) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM-The Kent State Columbiana County Campuses, which include Kent State University at East Liverpool and Salem, again saw an increase in students for the 15-week spring semester which began Jan. 10.

Kent State East Liverpool's population augmented 6.8 percent from 1,346 to 1,437 and Kent State Salem's enrollment increased just over 16 percent from 1,754 to 2,036 when compared to the same time last year.

"Our continuing enrollment growth reflects the quality and value of a Kent State education. I look forward to introducing new programs that will provide additional learning opportunities for individuals interested in pursuing careers in our local communities and expanding opportunities local high school students," said Dean Jeffrey Nolte.

"These reasons and many more, make our campuses a smart and attractive option for higher education.

"Whereas the current economic climate has positively affected our enrollment, the fact is we have 28 degrees that students can complete locally, low tuition and great programs for high school students looking to get a leg up on their education," he said.

Students who are interested in attending the campuses, which boast one of the lowest tuition rates in the area at less than $5,200 annually, should call 1-877-KENT-EDU to speak to an admissions representative.

High school students interested in attending college courses for free while still in high school should also call the campus, or log on to www.col.kent.edu/s2s for more information. The website includes requirements and an application.

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU Salem's Communiversity Choir to celebrate 20th anniversary (Fucci) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Salem - Kent State Salem's Communiversity Choir, which is made up of members of the community and university students, is inviting past vocalists and new participants to join in celebrating its 20th year.

Spring rehearsals begin Monday, Jan. 24 at 7 p.m. at the Kent State Salem City Center, which is located at 230 N. Lincoln Ave., in Salem. Students may elect to receive credit for the class, if they choose. It is not required. "We've chosen and All-American theme for our 20th anniversary concert, which will include numerous favorites from the past 20 years," says Director Melisa Fucci.

Although this concert is part of Kent State Salem's Symphonious Sunday Series, the commemorative concert will be a formal affair Saturday May 7 at 7 p.m. Fucci says the free event, which falls on the eve of Mother's Day, is a great event for those looking to treat their mothers.

Past choir directors, including the campus' dean, Dr. Jeffrey Nolte, will conduct as part of the concert. For more information on joining the choir, please contact Fucci at mfucci@kent.edu or at 330-337-4247. The campus' Symphonious Sunday Series kicks-off Sunday, March 6 at 3 p.m. Members of Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will perform pieces from their repertoire before heading off to New York City to audition for agents and casting directors.

The Kent State Columbiana County Campuses, which is comprised of Kent State University at East Liverpool and Kent State University at Salem offers its students 28 programs, including 14 bachelor's degrees locally. For information, please call 1-877-KENT-EDU.

Return to Top



News Headline: State grant to help prevent business closures in region | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: GateHouse Media, Inc
News OCR Text: A $250,000 state grant to The Workforce Investment Board of Stark and Tuscarawas Counties will be used to identify and assist companies at risk of closure or downsizing.

The new program will be called the Regional Business Network (RBN).

“Many economic and workforce development organizations and programs are currently in place in Stark and Tuscarawas counties, and representatives are contacting businesses and offering their assistance on a daily basis,” explained Alice Stephens, executive director of the Workforce Investment Board/The Employment Source.

She said the establishment of a coordinated network of those programs will “exponentially increase our success rate.”

The following organizations have committed to partnering the RBN:

Alliance Chamber of Commerce; Alliance Area Development Foundation; Alliance City Schools Adult Education; Alliance City Economic Development; American Electric Power; Buckeye Career Center Adult Education;, Canton City Schools Adult Education; Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce;

Canton Community Improvement Corp.; City of Canton Economic Development; Dominion East Ohio; Kent State University Stark and Tuscarawas campuses; Massillon Area Chamber of Commerce; Massillon Development Foundation; Workforce directors and business services representatives of Economic Development Regions 9 and 10; Small Business Development Centers of Kent State University Stark and Tuscarawas Counties, Stark State College of Technology;

Stark Development Board; Tuscarawas County Community Improvement Corporation; Tuscarawas County Chamber of Commerce; Tuscarawas County Port Authority; Walsh University; and the Workforce Investment Board No. 6 of the Workforce Initiative Association/The Employment Source.

Return to Top



News Headline: 10 things to do for $10 or less | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Each Thursday, we will give the 10 things worthwhile to do on the weekend. Better yet, all these events and places listed are $10 or under! We hope this helps you find something to do in this tightening economy.

1.) Who Shot Rock & Roll exhibit at the Akron Art Museum.
Spend a day at the Akron Art Museum this weekend exploring the history of rock music through photographs. Organized by the Brooklyn Museum of Art, this exhibit is shown to put the audience into the shoes of the photographers who captured rock music's historic events. Adult tickets are $7, students with a valid ID are $5, seniors (65+) $5, students with a school tour are free, children 12 and under with an adult free and members free. Akron Art Museum

2.) Human Element Art Exhibition
Visit the Summit Artspace for their Human Element exhibition. Eleven artists will showcase their interpretations of the human form. The art comes in a variety of forms from drawing to textiles. The free event during this exhibition is a digital collage demonstration Saturday from 1 to 3 p.m. A free workshop on illustrating the human form will also be offered at a later date Saturday, Feb. 5 from 1 to 3 p.m. To register for these free events, e-mail psargent@neo.rr.com. Summit Artspace

3.) Center for the History of Psychology
The general public can now visit the history of psychology in a museum at The University of Akron's new Center for the History of Psychology. Take a friend and visit this weekend. It is open Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from noon to 4 p.m. Admission is free, but donations are accepted.

4.) Invent Now Museum
Are you thinking innovative? Go to the Invent Now Museum located in downtown Akron and explore patent models, patent drawings, design patents and graphic art illustrated through trademarks. The museum's first exhibit, The Art of Invention shows works of art that have came from inventions, patents and trademarks. The museum is free admission. Head down there Friday, it's open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Invent Now Museum

5.) Everything Akron Store
Checking out this store and all that it has would be something to do even if you have just $10. You can find a lot of cool products like Goodyear blimp erasers for .37 cents, mouse pads for $2, pens for $1, shopping tote bags for $3 and much more. The store is located near the John S. Knight Center. Everything Akron Store

6.) Kent State University Museum
Drive a little east to Kent this weekend and visit Kent State University's Fashion Museum. There are several kinds of exhibits going on right now and general admission is $5. The exhibits currently being shown are: Recent Acquisitions to the Collection, Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen, Collectors and Collecting, Made in India: Indian textiles, global markets and The Kent State University Museum: Celebrating 25 years. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Friday and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 4:45 p.m. Kent State University Museum

7.) Thunderstruck and Stranglehold at the Kent Stage
Why not go to the Kent Stage and listen to America's AC/DC and Ted Nugent tribute bands? The show is Friday at 8 p.m. Admission is $10. If you would like to know more about these bands, just visit the Kent Stage website.

8.) Lock 3 ice skating
Do something to enjoy the winter weather instead of sitting inside and fretting about it. Lock 3 in downtown Akron has their open ice skating. Admission is free and skate rentals are $3 for adults 18 and over and $2 for children under 17. The last day for Lock 3 ice skating is Jan. 30! Lock 3

9.) Great Lakes Brewery tours
If you're of age, drive to Cleveland and take a tour of the brewery. Public tours are free and they are available on the hour Fridays from 5 to 9 p.m. and Saturdays from 1 to 8 p.m. Great Lakes Brewing Company

10.) Cleveland Museum of Natural History
Learn something new this weekend. The museum currently has three exhibits. The three exhibits are Extreme Mammals: The biggest, smallest and most amazing mammals of all time, Disease Detectives and Fieldwork: The rare and the wonderful at Singer Lake Bog. General admission is $10 for adults and the prices are less with children, students and senior citizens. Cleveland Museum of Natural History

Bonus events
11.) PNR Improv
Now in its 10th non-stop, action-packed year, Point of No Return Improv turns audience suggestions into improv comedy suitable for audiences ages 13 and up. Suggested donation $5. Saturday, Jan 22 7:30p at Quirk Cultural Center, Cuyahoga Falls,OH. Event Website

12.) Nature and a Movie
Wake up from hibernation to join Naturalist Meghan Doran for the family-friendly nature movie “A Bug's Life.” Bring your own blanket or preferred seating and drinks; they'll supply the popcorn. Friday, Jan 21 7:00 p.m. at at Firestone Metro Park – Coventry Oaks Area. Free and open to the public. http://www.summitmetroparks.org

Return to Top



News Headline: Kasich to visit GM's Lordstown plant | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: January 24,2011 07:30 AM GMT Democratic lawmakers from region invited to join governor's first official trip to Northeast Ohio

Published on Monday, Jan 24, 2011

Beacon Journal staff and wire report New Gov. John Kasich is planning to visit General Motors' Lordstown plant in Northeast Ohio.

He will tour the assembly plant Tuesday. The governor's office says the Republican has invited U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Niles, state Senate Minority Leader Capri Cafaro, D-Hubbard, and state Sen. Joe Schiavoni, D-Canfield, to join him and talk about economic development in the region.

This will be Kasich's first official trip to Northeast Ohio since he was sworn in as governor for a term that is expected to be challenging because of the continued sluggish economy.

Ryan sent a letter to Kasich Jan. 3, urging him to travel north to talk jobs and economic development. He touted several projects in the area, including the Goodyear headquarters project, Akron's biomedical corridor and the transformation of the former Ravenna Army Ammunition Plant into a training center.

He also highlighted research into polymers at the University of Akron and liquid crystal technology at Kent State University.

''Regardless of party affiliation, I will work with Governor Kasich to continue the progress we have made,'' Ryan said in a news release. ''Northeast Ohio's reputation as a great place to do business is growing. We want to build on that reputation.''

Ryan represents the 17th District, which covers parts of Mahoning, Portage, Summit and Trumbull counties.

Kasich recently met with automakers in Detroit to discuss the industry. He said auto executives told him that Ohio's regulatory and business climate is not competitive with other states and that they perceive the state as uncooperative with the industry.

Return to Top



News Headline: Grow jobs in clusters | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: January 23,2011 08:00 AM GMT Michael Douglas Beacon Journal Publishing Co. The other economic development strategy

By Michael Douglas Beacon Journal editorial page editor

Published on Sunday, Jan 23, 2011

What must Ohio do to create jobs?

John Kasich got his effort started last week. The governor outlined plans to transform the state Department of Development into JobsOhio, a nonprofit operation, led by business executives, free of red tape, sharply focused, ready to move swiftly in arranging incentives and taking other steps to retain and attract companies and jobs.

Listen to the governor, and it soon is clear: The competition is other states. They bear gifts of one business kind or another. The thinking is, Ohio must do better as this type of suitor.

In that way, for all the heady talk about a ''new day,'' the strategy departs little from the past. The traditional model for economic development has involved ''firm attraction,'' promising prospective companies tax relief and other sweeteners to locate in your town, region or state. Kasich wants to field a stronger team in this game.

Yet examine the data, and you find that chasing companies accounts for as little as 2 percent of state job growth across the country. Almost all job gains stem from the expansion of existing businesses or the creation of new ones.

Mark Muro and Kenan Fikri of the Brookings Institution cited these numbers in a report issued last week, ''Job Creation on a Budget: How Regional Industry Clusters Can Add Jobs, Bolster Entrepreneurship and Spark Innovation.'' The timing of the release was fortunate. Muro and Fikri highlight an alternative economic development strategy, one anchored in the existing assets of a region, one looking to build on where the jobs already are.

They define ''clusters'' as ''geographic concentrations of companies, suppliers, coordinating entities and institutions like universities and community colleges'' that ''unleash powerful synergies and efficiencies'' to boost local, regional and state economies. Put simply, an industry pulls together, the whole exceeding the sum of the parts, as the players ''share ideas, start new enterprises and create jobs.''

Muro and Fikri argue persuasively that clusters should become a centerpiece of state economic development strategies. In part, they nod to the financial strains facing states. A cluster strategy is cheap, the state serving more as a catalyst, a small infusion of resources going a long way if targeted, say, to facilitate connections.

Remember, clusters emerge from what is there. The state can fill a key role helping to gather data that identifies potential participants. More, a focus on clusters drives such things as job training and promoting exports. The momentum comes from the ground level, a governor isn't directing all things from the top.

The approach is truly strategic. The activity centers on metropolitan areas, the engines of the state economy, where the related companies, workers and researchers gather. It requires patience, sustained attention and commitment to deliver an enduring result.

The concept of clusters isn't new. Silicon Valley offers the most prominent example of success. Muro and Fikri point to the emergence of others. Colorado has more than 1,500 companies in its clean-energy cluster. Indiana has leveraged the presence of pharmaceutical, agricultural feedstock and medical device companies. In New York, the Albany area has a growing nanotechnology cluster. The Seattle region boasts a video-game industry of 15,000 jobs across 150 companies.

Ted Strickland promoted the idea via the Hubs of Innovation and Opportunity. It echoes in the Austen BioInnovation Institute in Akron and in many development pursuits of Mayor Don Plusquellic.

Muro and Fiki cite the ''Northeast Ohio Polymers Cluster,'' the critical mass here around advanced materials, the universities, manufacturers, suppliers and users. Now NorTech, a regional nonprofit technology-based economic development organization, is seeking to accelerate the growth of the flexible electronics industry.

The region has much history in this realm. Kent State University led the way in the development of liquid crystal displays. The lucrative manufacturing element emerged elsewhere, the displays today practically everywhere.

The next frontier is flexible electronics, products featuring electronics printed on plastic materials. The expectation is, these products will grow into a $250 billion global market by 2025. What NorTech has in mind is seizing the main chance. Its FlexMatters initiative aims to bolster and upgrade the cluster, Northeast Ohio going beyond the research element to secure the manufacturing, becoming a global center for flexible electronics.

Do so, and the region becomes a magnet for talent and capital, a strong cluster featuring multiple opportunities. If a job at one company goes sour, you readily can find a new position with another firm nearby.

Rebecca Bagley, the president and chief executive officer at NorTech, sees her organization's job as knitting the players together, creating those connections that fuel ideas and turn concepts into products. In September, NorTech received $500,000 from the federal government for its cluster work, a measure of how a small amount can make a big difference.

The state's Third Frontier program also has been a supporter. For his part, John Kasich was slow to embrace the Third Frontier, yet now he appears to get it, the value of this public-private partnership in pursuing innovation and jobs. He even has a better idea, pushing the program to accelerate commercialization, research delivering products.

In a similar way, clusters should appeal to the governor. They are cost-effective. They involve the real economy. They carry the promise of jobs. Douglas is the Beacon Journal editorial page editor. He can be reached at 330-996-3514, or e-mailed at mdouglas@thebeaconjournal.com.

Return to Top



News Headline: West African Muslims focus of KSU program (Wilson-Fall) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A panel lecture, “West African
Muslim Societies and their
Contributions to World and U.S.
Culture” will take place at 7 p.m.
Wednesday at Oscar Ritchie Hall
at Kent State University.
The program is part of a series,
“Cosmopolitanism and Diversity
in the African World,” cosponsored
by KSU Department of
Pan-African Studies with support
of the Ohio Humanities Council
and the West African Research
Association.
“The goal of the program is to
provide more understanding of
a new sector of immigrants to
the United States: West Africans,
among whom a good percentage
is Muslim,” said Dr. Wendy Wilson-
Fall, chair of the Department
of Pan-African Studies.

Return to Top



News Headline: Merritt D. Betts Leaves Thousands to Kent Nonprofits | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent resident bequeaths part of estate to library, historical society and other groups

The late Merritt Donaghy Betts of Kent led a private life, but she chose to leave $125,000 in public gifts to causes near and dear to her heart.
Attorneys for the estate of Mrs. Betts, who died Dec. 27 at the age of 70, have notified five Kent-area organizations that they are each beneficiaries of $25,000.
The recipients are Kent Social Services, Kent Historical Society, Kent Free Library Foundation, Robinson Visiting Nurse and Hospice in Ravenna and the George C. Betts WPNI Scholarship Program at Kent State University.
Carmen Zampini, director of the Kent Free Library and secretary of its foundation, knew Mrs. Betts personally from her frequent visits to the library.
“She would come in and we would all chat about books, about her favorite authors, about what she was currently reading or had read before. She loved mysteries, particularly British, and she enjoyed visiting with (fellow readers),” Zampini said.
She said Mrs. Betts' bequest “is very generous and very meaningful, especially after all the cuts libraries across the state have received.”
Zampini explained that Donaghy family members have always been ardent library supporters. Mrs. Betts' late father, Dick Donaghy, was a longtime library trustee.
“Merritt was just a wonderful person with such a beautiful smile. She was an avid reader, an avid library supporter – she was so very popular with all of our staff members. Our circulation and reference staff adored her. They were absolutely heartbroken when they received the news (of her death). She is sorely missed,” she said.
Sandra Halem, president of the Kent Historical Society Board of Trustees, recalled Mrs. Betts as a “great supporter of libraries and museums in the community” who would periodically visit the society's museum.
“She was very interested in us preserving the history of Kent because her family (the Donaghys) is very entrenched in the older history of Kent,” said Halem. “She was excited that we have a library, oral histories and artifacts that tell the history of the community. Those were important to her. She was happy that we were doing our job as a historical society.”
Mrs. Betts' bequest will be used by the society to help fund the recent purchase of the Clapp-Woodward house at 237 E. Main St. as its permanent home.
“To us, this is an incredibly important and generous gift at a critical time when we are purchasing a new home, which I'm sure she would have loved because of its link to the Kent family,” said Halem.
Kathy Korman, hospice manager for Robinson Visiting Nurse and Hospice, said the organization is “so honored to receive this donation. It will allow us to continue to provide quality end-of-life care to those in need. Merritt's passion was to serve others and, through her donation, many lives will be touched."
"Merritt was a very strong and courageous person," Korman said. "She always was looking for ways to help others and she never wanted to burden anyone with her problems. As hospice personnel would visit Merritt in her home, they would often leave feeling as if Merritt had given them pearls of wisdom.”
Brian Thornton, manager of Advancement Communications at Kent State University, said Mrs. Betts' bequest to the George C. Betts scholarship will “provide additional scholarships that will enable more students to ‘study away,' which is one of our president's high-priority programs.”
The Washington Program in National Issues, founded in 1973, is a full-semester program offered each spring in Washington, D.C., in which Kent State students get “on-the ground training about politics on the national scene,” Thornton said.
George Betts, the late husband of Merritt Betts, was an emeritus professor of political science and a former executive dean for public services and publications at Kent State.
Thornton said Mrs. Betts created the scholarship fund in her husband's memory in 1997, and that family and community members have continued to donate to it.
In 1999, Mrs. Betts received a Citation Award from the Kent State Alumni Association for her continued support of university programs, including a donation that year to support a library endowment fund for the purchase of journals and other publications for the College of Arts and Sciences.

Return to Top



News Headline: The Economics of E-Government Services Are Far From Simple | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Government Technology - Online
Contact Name: Merrill Douglas
News OCR Text: David Fletcher, chief technology officer, Utah. Photo by Jonathan Higley.

When constituents serve themselves online, government agencies can offer more services at less expense — at least that's the theory. And it's an appealing one in this budget-slashing era as governments impose furloughs, cut staff and reduce office hours.

The next logical step, it would seem, is to give citizens incentives to skip the service counters and use e-government portals instead. Some governments do. In Virginia, for example, renewing a one-year vehicle registration online costs $1 less than renewing in person or by mail.

In truth, however, the financial implications of e-government are far more complex than they appear. Online services may save a government money and can even create new revenue streams — but they also may generate new costs. And while some governments reward citizens for choosing the self-service option, others charge more for online payments.

Self-Service Equals Smaller Staff?

For some, there's no doubt that online services save governments money by reducing the number of employees needed to interact with citizens. “We have hundreds of examples of that,” said Christopher Neff, vice president of marketing at NIC USA, which builds, hosts and operates Web portals and online e-government services primarily for states.

As an illustration, Neff points to Tennessee, whose statistics NIC has been tracking for 10 years. “They've saved more than $90 million in e-government,” he said, “and that's just calculating the difference in costs between online and offline transactions.”

The wide range of transactions available through Utah's e-government portal was an important factor in the state's decision to implement a four-day workweek in August 2008. “It was a move to enable the state to save money,” said David Fletcher, Utah's CTO. While making the change, Utah emphasized that citizens could still do business with the government on Fridays — or anytime — online.

Popular demand has convinced Utah to resume Friday service at some Division of Motor Vehicles and Driver License Division offices. But the portal remains an important way for residents and companies to do business with the state. And people are using the portal: Traffic increased after the four-day workweek took effect, Fletcher said.

“In 2007, we were averaging about 700,000 unique visitors a month to our website, Utah.gov,” he said. “In 2009 — the year after [the four-day workweek began] — we had our first year with 12 months in a row with at least 1 million unique visitors per month.”

Besides helping the state to economize, the portal has produced financial benefits. For one thing, it promotes economic development. In the past, a person starting a new business dealt with approximately 10 separate state agencies and local government, Fletcher said. Now, thanks to Utah's OneStop Business Registration portal, owners can conduct all the transactions required to start a business through a single Web page.

“We've reduced the barriers to starting a new business,” Fletcher said. Greater convenience translates into more businesses, which has helped keep the state's unemployment rate lower than the national average, he said.

Utah.gov also helped the state earn more revenue from the value-added services it offers to businesses, Fletcher said. One example involves selling driver data to insurance companies.

“The Driver License Division is coming out ahead,” Fletcher said. “They're selling more of that data to insurance companies than they were otherwise, because the insurance companies make those requests more frequently.” That's because company personnel find it easier to purchase the data online than in person or by phone, he said.

Convenience Fees

Each time an insurance company in Utah makes a purchase online, part of the fee helps to offset the cost of paying NIC to operate the state's e-government services. Many governments that outsource their portals underwrite the service by charging an extra dollar or two for fee-based transactions conducted online, Neff said. But they tend to add those “convenience fees” selectively.

“A limited number of services — primarily those that are business facing and support heavily regulated industries that are processing thousands or millions of transactions a year with various states — will have fees attached,” Neff said. “And those dollars are then used to support the entire build-out of these portals.”

It's less common, he said, to attach convenience fees to transactions conducted by private citizens.

But some government websites and some agencies do charge slightly more for online transactions than for fees paid in person or through the mail. In Knox County, Tenn., for example, it costs $60 to renew the registration for a private passenger vehicle in person by cash or check, $61.50 by credit card, $62 by mail and $64.58 online.

The fee for online payment includes a 2.5 percent credit card processing fee and $2 to cover postage for the license plate and/or decal. Local law prohibits Knox County from absorbing those fees in order to charge the same amount for a service no matter the delivery method, said Jon Gustin, manager of e-government services with the county's Office of Information Technology. But the online customer still comes out ahead, he said. “In most cases, it is cheaper and more convenient for the customer to pay the added minimal fees rather than drive, park and stand in line at a government location to complete the transaction in person.”

Nevertheless, Gustin said he still sees a significant number of people lining up for in-person government services. “I would say the online credit card strategy is one of convenience to the constituent that will grow to become more efficient and less costly as more of the population does their business online.”

E-Government, but No Cuts

As local governments have started delivering services online, many have failed to save money because they don't make associated cuts in administrative staff, said Brian Kelley, CIO of Portage County, Ohio. As a research affiliate with the Center for Public Administration and Public Policy at Kent State University, Kelley recently participated in a project that examined county and municipal e-government services in 13 Ohio counties. Survey responses from local government officials indicated that very few think e-government has reduced staff, counter service or overall costs, he said.

Governments don't like to give up funds they've already obtained for ongoing activities, such as in-person customer service, Kelley said. And in general, governments don't reduce head counts as they shift more transactions to the Web. “People have assumed some new responsibilities as we've automated,” he said. “But we've not seen the drastic reduction that one would expect would come with all the efficiency of information technology in the public sector.”

But that could change, Kelley added, as fiscal emergencies engender furloughs and staffing cutbacks. “E-government creates the opportunity to expand services even further,” he said. “The physical offices may be closed or understaffed, but with e-government there's 24/7 access.”

E-government could save money for Gaston County, N.C., if only more citizens would apply for permits, pay taxes and conduct other business online. “Utilization is lower than we would like it to be,” said CIO Brandon Jackson, adding that Gaston County can't use convenience fees to recoup the cost of offering services online or taking credit card payments. “In North Carolina, we're not authorized to add any additional fees to transactions.”

Gaston County and its neighbors in North Carolina do gain financially, however, when it comes to the online GIS tools they offer for looking up property information. Though it's not because the counties charge for this service. “There is no way we could charge a fee; people are accustomed to getting it for free,” Jackson said. But it costs much less to deliver this information online than across a service counter.

And since the Web service was launched, demand for the information has soared. “It's probably up tenfold,” he said. So in Gaston County, Web delivery helps meet a growing demand while lowering costs.

But the popular GIS service also comes with a financial downside, Jackson said. “Businesses started to depend on it. Any interruption or outage we had became a political problem.” To satisfy those higher expectations, the county must now use more reliable — and therefore more expensive — servers to host the data, he said.

Although counties in North Carolina must charge the same fee for a transaction conducted online or in person, agencies could, at least in theory, realize savings by making online transactions the norm for certain services. For example, if Gaston County decided it would only accept tax payments online, a citizen who wanted to pay in person would require a special accommodation, Jackson said. Since that accommodation created an extra cost, the county could attach an extra fee to the transaction.

However, using fees to steer people away from service counters is an idea that's time has not come. Floating the concept at a county meeting, Jackson asked agency officials if they had ever considered charging extra for face-to-face services. Not only had they not, but they probably would not. “Our county management said that culturally, that's not possible.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Business Incubator is in the spotlight | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent Regional Business Alliance
touted the continued success
of its Business Incubator on Martinel
Drive in Kent to members of the Kent
Area Chamber of Commerce by introducing
its four current tenants at a reception
Wednesday evening.
Representatives of the Incubator's
tenants were available to tell their
stories to Chamber members as they
walked through the building, which
has about 8,500 square feet that can
be flexibly sectioned off to house startup
companies.
Richard Anderson, founder of Anderson
Aerospace, and Matt Flannery,
a company officer, told of their
company and its product and services.
It designs solutions for companies
in aerospace, medicine and industrial
production.
The company purchases, assembles
and then tests systems of electromechanical
equipment and controls,
antenna point systems, and antenna
control electronics.
Anderson has been invited by the
State of Ohio Department of Economic
Development and Jumpstart to be one
of six of Ohio's representatives in the
renowned Paris Airshow, Jack Crews,
president of KRBA, said.
Michael Mao, founder of Usivir, a laser
technology company, was able to
demonstrate technology equipment he
creates. He is currently working with
Case Western Reserve University on
laser technology applications that can
be used in dentistry.
Scott Karlo, president of Abison,
Inc., a software solutions company,
plus Ren Chirakus and Ruth Zimmerman,
talked with the visiting chamber
members. The company's mission is to
come up with multi-channel marketing
software solutions.
Rodney Mishler, who heads up a certified
public accounting firm, was also
available to answer questions.
According to KRBA President
Crews, 80 percent of the start-up firms
that come to the Incubator for its benefits
of inexpensive rent, shared office
equipment and networking opportunities
eventually go on to bigger facilities
and prove successful on their own.
The incubator's most recent major
success has been Alpha Micron, a technology
firm that uses liquid crystal research
technology to create light-sensitive
goggles for the military and those
who operate sports vehicles.
Alpha Micron relocated to Kent
State's Centennial Park a year ago and
now employs about 40, mostly in scientific
research positions.
KRBA, founded in the early 1990s,
utilizes federal, state and local grants
designed to help start-up companies.
It also receives fees for service.
Originally an outgrowth of Coleman
Professional Services, KRBA, now an
independent organization, has at various
junctures been assisted by Kent
State University and its College of
Business.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Student Donates Kidney Over Winter Break | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Leah Green's gift to her step-grandfather is about saving a life and setting an example

Most Kent State University students spent their winter break relaxing or vacationing with friends and family.
Not Leah Green. She spent her break recovering from a kidney donation.
The 20-year-old early childhood education major went under the knife on Dec. 14 — days after her birthday — while her fellow students were beginning exam week.
"How could you say 'no' to save a life?" Green asked.
This life has special meaning for Green. The recipient of her kidney is her 59-year-old step-grandfather, Paul Thomson.
His kidneys had developed so many cysts that they swelled to weigh a combined 20 pounds. Hemorrhaging of the cysts caused excruciating pain, and because of a family history of kidney problems none of Thomson's blood relatives were eligible to be a donor.
Green said she took no time to make the decision. She knew she would donate her kidney when the family learned she was a match for her grandfather. The discussion started in August, and doctors and counselors talked about the potential for complications and future scenarios in which she may need that second kidney.
"At first I didn't really think anything of it," she said. "I was kind of raised in a family where if you could make somebody's life a little easier, you do it. But it's one of your organs. It didn't really hit me until the week before that I was having surgery. But I didn't really care, because I just wanted my grandpa to feel better. I would do it again in a heart beat."
Doctors at the Ohio State University Medical Center, where the operation took place, removed Thomson's 80 surgical staples Thursday, and he's been improving since the transplant.
"He's doing actually really well," Green said. "The first couple weeks he got home from the hospital, we'd be walking down the hallway together and he'd say 'I bet you I can race you.'"
Thomson must take a strict daily regimen of anti-rejection drugs to keep his body from rejecting the new kidney.
Remarkably, Green has few restrictions on her health and diet as a result of donating her kidney. She must avoid alcohol, in addition to maintaining a healthy diet, and she can't play contact sports. She also has to avoid taking medication that breaks down in her kidneys, so that means aspirin only when she has a headache.
She's also watching her weight now to avoid developing diabetes. Doctors already cleared her to return to aerobic exercise, and she spends hours each week busting stress — Green is a resident assistant on campus in Fletcher Hall — at the Kent State University Student Recreation and Wellness Center. Before the surgery, she weighed 248 pounds. Now, she's down to 213 with the goal of reaching 150 before she graduates in two years.
"The rec is the only quiet place for me," she said. "Even though it's probably the loudest place on campus. You just listen to your iPod and think, 'OK, I've got to get this mile or two miles' on the treadmill."
Green has drawn some attention from local media for her brave act, but she said it's not about the recognition. She may have donated her kidney to help save her grandfather's life, but the regular blood donor also wants to set an example for others to follow.
"To give somebody a life is a big deal, but I think that if you could give a kidney, you should," she said. "Even if it's to a stranger, you're going to help somebody, and you're going to pay it forward. Karma will come back and it will pay you back in the long run."

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus