Report Overview:
Total Clips (36)
Admissions (1)
Art (1)
Campus Closings (2)
Chemistry (1)
College of Communication and Information (CCI) (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Entrepreneurship (1)
Geography (1)
Institutional Advancement (2)
International Affairs (5)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Music (1)
Pan-African Studies (2)
Political Science (8)
Psychology (2)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Town-Gown (1)
Visual Communication Design (VCD) (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Admissions (1)
School Notes: KSU reports enrollment for spring sets a record (Garcia) 02/03/2011 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

More students are attending Kent State University this spring than in any other spring semester, university officials reported last week. The total head count of 39,936...


Art (1)
New York artist Teresita Fernandez's immersive installations in spotlight at MOCA Cleveland 02/02/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...in which six blind people describe an elephant while feeling it, and a series of new small-scale assemblages by Lorri Ott, an adjunct faculty member at Kent State University's School of Art. What: "Teresita Fernandez, Blind Landscape"; "Lorri Ott: Passive Voices"; "Javier Tellez: Letter on...


Campus Closings (2)
Another wintry mess 02/03/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

On-Street Parking Ban in Place; Kent Schools Closed 02/03/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Chemistry (1)
KENT STATE HOSTS 'EXPLORE KENT CHEMISTRY DAY' FOR HIGH SCHOOL JUNIORS AND SENIORS (Tubergen) 02/01/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Feb. 1 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: High school juniors and seniors will have the opportunity to learn about Kent...


College of Communication and Information (CCI) (1)
Kramer earns regional PR award 02/03/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Reporters' Notebook: Jan. 31, 2011(Motter) 02/03/2011 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


Entrepreneurship (1)
Kent State Grad's Internet Site Buys, Sells University Students' Class Notes 02/01/2011 Public Broadcasting - Online Text Attachment Email

Sam Hendren, WOSU Reporter (2011-02-01) COLUMBUS, OH (wosu) - An enterprising graduate of Kent State University is putting his internet-based idea to work. Michael Matousek has started a business that buys and sells class notes to...


Geography (1)
Portage ready for the storm (Schmidlin) 02/03/2011 Record-Courier Text Email


Institutional Advancement (2)
KSU exploring efforts to woo Indian students (Frank, Saunders) 02/03/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT PHILANTHROPY CAMPAIGN AWARDS FIRST SCHOLARSHIP (Schultz) 02/01/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Feb. 1 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University's Campaign for Change, its student philanthropy...


International Affairs (5)
Kent State University to open office in India this spring (Frank, Lefton) 02/01/2011 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is establishing an office in India this spring to expand its global reach and to recruit more students from one of the...

Kent man's assignment is cut short in Egypt (Saunders) 02/01/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...morning, his wife, Mary Anne, said Monday. "He has felt very safe," said Mary Anne Saunders, who is executive director of international affairs at Kent State. "His Egyptian colleagues have been unbelievably generous with their time to make sure he feels protected." Ronald Saunders, 65,...

KSU exploring efforts to woo Indian students (Frank, Saunders) 02/02/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...recruiting office opens to boost enrollment numbers By Carol Biliczky Beacon Journal staff writer Published on Wednesday, Feb 02, 2011 KENT: Kent State hopes that a new recruiting office in India will do what a similar site did in China: build enrollment by more than 500 percent over...

Uprising in Egypt cuts Kent man's job short (Saunders) 02/03/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY CONTINUES INTERNATIONAL INITIATIVE, OPENS OFFICE IN INDIA (Lefton, Frank, Saunders) 02/01/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Feb. 1 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University, Ohio's second largest public university, will...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Kent Trumbull Campus Schedules Job Fair (Zampino) 02/03/2011 Business Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Local news briefs - Feb. 2 02/03/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
OUR VIEW Kent Displays inclusion in trade mission impressive 02/03/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Music (1)
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY PRESENTS 6TH ANNUAL PIANO INSTITUTE ON JULY 17-27 02/02/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Feb. 2 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Students from grades 7-12 will have an opportunity to rub elbows with individuals...


Pan-African Studies (2)
Kent State's African Community Theatre Holds Auditions for Spring Production 02/03/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Location: 800 E Summit St, Kent, OH 44240 When: February 9, 2011 Time: 5:00pm–7:00pm The African Community Theatre at Kent State University will be holding auditions for its spring 2011 production of “Wine in the Wilderness.” “Wine in the Wilderness” takes place...

KENT STATE'S AFRICAN COMMUNITY THEATRE HOLDS AUDITIONS FOR SPRING PRODUCTION (Dorsey) 02/01/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Feb. 1 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The African Community Theatre at Kent State University will be holding...


Political Science (8)
Egypt military may speed Mubarak's exit (Stacher) 02/02/2011 Starkville Daily News Text Attachment Email

...with soldiers on the street. "The Egyptian military is the seat of power in Egypt," said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt. "The Egyptian protesters have a lot of sympathy for the Egyptian officers in those tanks,"...

Long a seat of power, the Egyptian military may speed Mubarak's exit (Stacher) 02/01/2011 CNN.com Text Attachment Email

...with soldiers on the street. "The Egyptian military is the seat of power in Egypt," said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt. "The Egyptian protesters have a lot of sympathy for the Egyptian officers in those tanks,"...

Egypt military may speed Mubarak's exit (Stacher) 02/02/2011 CNN.com Text Attachment Email

...solidarity with soldiers on the street. "The Egyptian military is the seat of power in Egypt," said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt. "The Egyptian protesters have a lot of sympathy for the Egyptian officers in those tanks," Stacher...

As protestors clash, Egyptian military's idleness raises questions (Stacher) 02/02/2011 CNN.com Text Attachment Email

...regime to reconstitute itself at the top and is highly, utterly against the protesters," said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt. He was among more than a dozen Middle East experts who met Monday with three White House National...

Expert On Egypt Discusses Chaos In Cairo (Stacher) 02/02/2011 NPR - Online Text Attachment Email

Joshua Stacher, assistant political science professor at Kent State University, speaks to host Michele Norris about the Egyptian protests and his experience at the Egypt experts meeting at the White...

Who's afraid of the Muslim Brotherhood? (Stacher) 02/02/2011 Toronto Star - Online Text Attachment Email

...millions of Egyptians are pushing forward today.” Joshua Stacher, another prominent American Arabist, lived in Cairo for eight years before joining Kent State University as a political science professor. He describes his many encounters with the Muslim Brotherhood as one might an alternate-universe...

Hyper-Realism To the Rescue (Stacher) 02/03/2011 American Conservative, The Text Attachment Email

...regime to reconstitute itself at the top and is highly, utterly against the protesters,” said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt. He was among more than a dozen Middle East experts who met Monday with three White House National...

The Regime Reconstitutes Itself? (Stacher) 02/03/2011 TheAtlantic.com Text Attachment Email

...regime to reconstitute itself at the top and is highly, utterly against the protesters," said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt. Robert Springborg argues along similar lines: The threat to the military's control...


Psychology (2)
Never Forget a Name (Rawson) 02/01/2011 AARP The Magazine - Online Text Attachment Email

...retrieving information from memory, and that is more useful than merely reviewing the material, report psychologist Jeffrey Karpicke and Janell Blunt of Purdue University. Good test questions require students to reconstruct what they know, which itself enhances learning, the team reports. Despite...

Why Testing Boosts Learning (Rawson) 02/01/2011 Scientific American - Online Text Attachment Email

...that individuals who are tested on material are more likely to remember it than those who simply study. But questions remain about why that is the case. Kent State University psychology researcher Katherine Rawson argues that part of the explanation is that testing gets people to come up with...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Cyber sceptics query Facebook values (Kist) 02/02/2011 Mail & Guardian Online Text Attachment Email

...different kinds of communication that people are using have become something that scares people," said Professor William Kist, an education expert at Kent State University, Ohio. The critics The list of attacks on social media is a long one and comes from all corners of academia and popular...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Kent theater hopes to conquer 'Shakes-fear' 02/03/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (1)
KSU coach to headline Dollars for Scholars 02/03/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Visual Communication Design (VCD) (1)
Top-Ranked Communications Design Schools 02/03/2011 eHow Text Attachment Email


News Headline: School Notes: KSU reports enrollment for spring sets a record (Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: More students are attending Kent State University this spring than in any other spring semester, university officials reported last week.

The total head count of 39,936 is 4.56 percent higher than the previous spring enrollment record, set a year ago.

"The biggest reason for the spring enrollment growth is due to students remaining in college to complete their college program," said Dave Garcia, associate vice president for enrollment management, in an e-mail.

The university hasn't dropped admission standards to build the numbers, he said. That's shown by the number of enrolled freshmen, which stayed about the same.

"The retention of current students is making a difference with our overall enrollment growth," Garcia said. "New freshmen is a very low number compared to graduate and transfer students."

Graduate enrollment increased by 2.63 percent from a year ago, and the number of international students is now at 1,430, a 27 percent increase over last year.

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News Headline: New York artist Teresita Fernandez's immersive installations in spotlight at MOCA Cleveland | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Steven Litt
News OCR Text: New York artist Teresita Fernandez is headlining the winter-spring suite of exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland with her "immersive installations" and large-scale sculptures. Her works include a metallic-looking waterfall made of graphite and steel, and "Vertigo," eight layers of precisely cut polished metal sandwiched together to create a wall-size leafy pattern. Also on view are a film by Javier Tellez in which six blind people describe an elephant while feeling it, and a series of new small-scale assemblages by Lorri Ott, an adjunct faculty member at Kent State University's School of Art.

What: "Teresita Fernandez, Blind Landscape"; "Lorri Ott: Passive Voices"; "Javier Tellez: Letter on the Blind, for the Use of Those Who See."

When: Through Sunday, May 8.

Where: 8501 Carnegie Ave.

Admission: $4. Go to mocacleveland.orgor call 216-421-8671.

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News Headline: Another wintry mess | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: STORM COVERS AREA IN ICE,
SNOW, CLOSES AREA SCHOOLS

Portage County residents
found themselves facing an icy
drive Wednesday,
and all Portage
County students
are facing
the possibility of
a longer school
year as a result.
The big storm
that passed over
Portage County
Tuesday night
and Wednesday
morning
left heavy ice across the county.
Though the ice melted as temperatures
rose in the early morning,
thick ice blanketed sidewalks,
making for slippery walking conditions
and prompting all public
school districts in Portage County,
plus Kent State University, Hiram
College and the Northeastern
Ohio Universities Colleges of
Medicine and Pharmacy to close
for the day.
The Stow Public Library also
closed because of the storm.
Temperatures were in the low
40s as of 8 a.m. but began to drop
soon after, and snowfall appeared
to be in white-out conditions in
some areas.
The Ravenna post of the Ohio
Highway Patrol reported several
crashes but no major injuries.
Those included a pickup truck
that reportedly rolled several
times while traveling I-76 east
near the S.R. 43 exit.
It was the second snow day
this week for all Portage school
districts except Aurora and
Ravenna. Since both those districts
had used three calamity
days as of December, and the rest
had used two or more, every Portage
County student is now facing
the possibility of a shorter spring
break or summer vacation.
The state legislature held
its first hearing Wednesday on
whether to restore Ohio students
back to five calamity days, as they
had last year.
The American Red Cross in
Northern Ohio reported that it
has seen 18 blood drives canceled
Tuesday and Wednesday. That
means the Blood Services Region
has been unable to collect more
than 600 pints of blood, possibly
affecting 1,800 area patients.
The Red Cross urges all eligible
donors to come forward as soon
as it is safe to do so. Appointments
may be made by calling 1-
800-733-2767 or visiting redcrossblood.
org.

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News Headline: On-Street Parking Ban in Place; Kent Schools Closed | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent motorists cannot park their cars on the streets until after today's snowstorm clears out — which likely won't happen until Wednesday afternoon.
Kent Service Director Gene Roberts issued an on-street emergency parking ban effective at 8:30 a.m. today. The ban was put in effect to let the city's snowplow crews clear Kent's streets of snow and ice.
Parking on all city streets is banned until after the storm passes. The city will advise residents when the parking ban has been lifted.
The snowstorm that rolled through late Monday night and early this morning also prompted officials at Kent State University to close the Kent campus. Only essential personnel are asked to report to work. The closing of the Kent campus also means events and programs at the Kent State Student Recreation and Wellness Center are canceled.
Campuses in Liverpool and Salem also are closed.
Kent State also canceled classes at its Tuscarawas and Trumbull campuses, and morning classes were canceled at the Stark campus.
Kent City Schools also closed today due to the storm.
A winter storm warning issued by the National Weather Service remains in effect for much of Northeast Ohio, including Kent, until 7 p.m. Wednesday.
As a second round of the storm passes over, areas south of the lake's shore will likely see a mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain tonight into Wednesday, with ice accumulation of up to half an inch.

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News Headline: KENT STATE HOSTS 'EXPLORE KENT CHEMISTRY DAY' FOR HIGH SCHOOL JUNIORS AND SENIORS (Tubergen) | Email

News Date: 02/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb. 1 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

High school juniors and seniors will have the opportunity to learn about Kent State University's chemistry programs at the "Explore Kent Chemistry Day" on Saturday, Feb. 12, from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Williams Hall on the Kent campus.

"This event provides an excellent introduction to the chemistry and biochemistry programs at Kent State," said Dr. Michael Tubergen, chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Kent State. "Chemistry and biochemistry graduates find opportunities for employment both locally and throughout the United States. Many students choose to pursue graduate education or professional training in medicine, dentistry or pharmacy."

The day's activities include a tour of the department, an outline of degree programs and undergraduate research opportunities, an overview of available scholarships, and a presentation of career opportunities in chemistry. A special demonstration will take place in the department's 3-D visualization classroom. Current Kent State students and faculty will be available to answer questions during an informal lunch, where two $50 Amazon gift cards will be raffled.

Kent State's Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degrees in chemistry, including a B.S. concentration in biochemistry and an interdisciplinary B.S. in biotechnology.

"Explore Kent Chemistry Day" will begin in the lobby area of Williams Hall, located along Risman Drive near East Summit Street. A map of the Kent State campus is available online at www.kent.edu. For more information or to register for the event, call 330-672-2405 or e-mail amcphers@kent.edu. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Kramer earns regional PR award | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kramer earns regional PR award

Jennifer Kramer, APR, director of public relations and marketing communications for the College of Communication and Information at Kent State University, earned a Diamond Award in the 2010 Public Relations Society of America East Central District Diamond Awards competition.

Kramer earned this award for chairing the third annual YouToo Social Media Conference, a professional development event for Akron Area PRSA, which took place on April 16, 2010, at KSU's School of Journalism and Mass Communication in Franklin Hall.

She was the only public relations professional to earn a Diamond Award in the Akron area.

"The members of Akron Area PRSA are proud of the award presented to Ms. Kramer for the leadership she offered to the team of Akron Area PRSA and PRSSA Kent members who worked on this landmark social media conference," said Tom Duke, APR, Fellow PRSA, immediate past president of Akron Area PRSA. "We are planning to sponsor the fourth annual conference in April 2011."

The event was organized through a team effort by Akron Area PRSA and KSU's chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America. Planning and coordination between the groups began several months in advance and involved great cooperation of the members of both organizations. The event featured top-notch speakers such as Phil Gomes, senior vice president of Edelman Digital in Chicago and Kyle Lacy, author of Twitter Marketing for Dummies. The conference reached full capacity in in-person attendance and was streamed live for online participants.

Kent State PRSSA received the 2010 Teahan National Chapter Award as a result of their partnership with Akron Area PRSA.

Kramer is a Stow native who currently resides in Akron.

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News Headline: Reporters' Notebook: Jan. 31, 2011(Motter) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Donna Karan helps fashion new Kent State program

Kent State University has partnered with fashion mogul Donna Karan to form a program to help address the job-related challenges nurses face, such as burnout and stress, with the hope that the effort ultimately will boost the quality of care patients receive.

The collaboration is between the university and Ms. Karan's Urban Zen Foundation, which advocates the introduction of eastern and alternative healing therapies into traditional western medicine. The partnership is the first of its kind in the country.

The initiative launched on a pilot basis last fall when about 30 Kent State nursing students participated in a “Care for the Caregiver” program to learn about ways to cope with the stresses that go along with the health care profession. Eventually, the plan is to offer the program to all the nursing college's students.

“This collaboration is a good fit because, as one of the largest nursing schools in the country, we have an opportunity to impact a lot of students,” said Tracey Motter, senior undergraduate program director for Kent State's College of Nursing. — Timothy Magaw

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News Headline: Kent State Grad's Internet Site Buys, Sells University Students' Class Notes | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Public Broadcasting - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sam Hendren, WOSU Reporter (2011-02-01)

COLUMBUS, OH (wosu) - An enterprising graduate of Kent State University is putting his internet-based idea to work. Michael Matousek has started a business that buys and sells class notes to university students around the country.

FlashNotes works like this. Interested students who would like to earn extra money upload their class notes to the FlashNotes website. Other students who might have missed a class, or who would like extra help preparing for an exam, can buy those notes and download them from FlashNotes.com. FlashNotes founder Michael Matousek says he got the idea as a junior in a Kent State statistics class.

"The students were having a hard time really learning the information that was being presented to them in class and I somehow caught on to the way the teacher was teaching and I took awesome notes," Matousek says. "And whether my buddies missed class or whether they went to class they still were confused, they always asked for my content and material and I sort of saw that there was a business here."

During his senior year, Matousek further developed the idea in an entrepreneurship class. He went on to raise enough money to pay for the design of a website. Now the 22-year-old is recruiting note-takers at various universities around the country. Those who post their notes get 80 percent of the sales price; FlashNotes gets 20 percent.

"The site in a lot of ways works like Amazon and EBay where the students essentially upload their content and set their own price," Matousek says. "We've had notes range anywhere from $1.99 to $36. It's ranged from a day's worth of notes to the entire semester's worth of notes. And the average right now is about $5."

Matousek says some students have earned more than $100 selling their notes.

"It sort of creates a marketplace for the students. In addition to setting your own price you can essentially become an entrepreneur yourself and sell notes and start your own note-selling business within our site."

But that's only part of the equation. Matousek sees FlashNotes as an extremely valuable educational tool. John Cogan, a lecturer in Biology and Biochemistry at Ohio State University, agrees, up to a point.

"I think the upside is that students you now have the availability of the material. And as the website suggests some students are better than others at taking notes and I think it could benefit students that don't have that much skill in that area," Cogan says.

"On the downside you know we are always dealing with students trying to get out of class for a variety of reasons and I think this in some ways does promote that. It makes it a little bit easier," Cogan says.

The number of course notes from Ohio State classes is extremely limited. There's much more material available from Kent State, Matousek's alma mater. It's an enormous challenge for a small company to recruit note takers at colleges around the country. And there's another problem: how do you ensure the accuracy of the notes that are being purchased? I asked Matousek about that.

Q: You talked about taking awesome notes but how are you sure that the people who are selling their notes are also awesome note takers, they could be missing things. How would you verify that what they're saying is accurate?

A: Instantly as you upload your notes, a one-third preview of those notes are generated - one third of the first page. So it reduces some of the risk to the buyer when he sees it. As well as the seller can essentially create a profile of themselves, as well as there's a ranking system like Amazon and E-bay on those users. If a student uploads something at all that is disputed by the person who buys it we offer a full money back refund for those users.

Belton Fleisher, a professor of Economics at Ohio State is another professor who says he has no problem with lecture notes being sold for cash. He says he does not believe that the material presented in his classes verbally or on the board is copyrighted.

"If somebody wants to take notes and sell them or show them to somebody else, that's okay with me," Fleisher says. "If students want to buy those notes and think that they're well-written and represent what went on in class that's the risk they're taking."

But Fleisher does have a problem with the notes that were downloaded by WOSU recently from a course he taught several years ago

"This is a printout of a power point presentation that I made in Economics 201 - Macroeconomics. I should note that if somebody else is copying and posting them, it's illegal. Really these are copyrighted documents. Flashnotes.com will be, I will inform our publisher about that," Fleisher says.

Copyright issues aside, FlashNotes CEO Michael Matousek and Ohio State Lecturer John Cogan agree: online resources are changing the way that students learn. Educator John Cogan:

"We don't necessarily try to make information secretive so I think education like biology is constantly evolving and we have to keep up with these trends because the students have more and more available access to notes, to class material, to websites, and it kind of keeps us challenged to keep up with and kind of modify education as students do as well," Cogan says.

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News Headline: Portage ready for the storm (Schmidlin) | Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MAJOR WINTER BLAST EXPECTED TO
BRING SNOW, WITH ICE OR RAIN, TO AREA

A major winter storm is heading to Portage
County starting today. But we won't
know exactly what is coming until it gets
here, a local meteroologist said.
Thomas Schmidlin, a geography professor
at Kent State University and keeper of local
weather records, said the storm, which is set
to affect about half the nation in some way,
will make its way to Ohio starting today.
By this morning, Schmidlin predicted,
there should already be a couple of inches
of new snow on the ground. By tonight
and Wednesday morning, he said, the storm
should intensify “when the center of this major
storm hovers over Ohio.”
Schmidlin said it's still unclear what kind
of weather the area will get. Much depends
on whether temperatures dip below freezing
or hover around the 32-degree mark, which
could turn snow into rain or ice.
“It looks like we're going to get a little of
everything,” he said.
Brian Ford, general road superintendent
for the Portage County Engineers Office,
said road crews are prepared for whatever
may come.
“We're all ready to go,” he said.
Schmidlin said wind also could be a factor,
potentially downing wires and branches
wherever that hits, and possibly resulting
in extended power outages, though not
necessarily in Portage County.
Total precipitation is estimated
to be an inch to
an inch and a half of liquid,
which translates into
12 to 18 inches of snow, he
said. It's possible that the
area will get about half of
that in snow, and the rest
in the form of ice. More
is expected to the north,
he said.
“Travel in any direction
is bad,” he said.
The storm originated
in the Gulf of Mexico.
Schmidlin said meteorogists
have been watching
it for days and it's reacted
true to predictions. There
are blizzard warnings in
seven states, he said, and
about 20 to 25 states have
some kind of storm warning
or weather advisory.
“It's hitting from Oklahoma
to Illinois,” he said.
The National Weather
Service has issued a winter
storm watch for Portage
County in effect from
Monday evening through
Wednesday morning.
Snow is expected to begin
Monday night with accumulations
of between
2 to 4 inches by Tuesday
morning. More snow is expected
to develop Tuesday
night, with accumulations
of between 3 and
6 inches.
The snow will change
over to a wintry mix
of snow, freezing rain
and sleet overnight into
Wednesday morning.

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News Headline: KSU exploring efforts to woo Indian students (Frank, Saunders) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Delhi recruiting office opens to boost enrollment numbers

KENT: Kent State hopes that a new recruiting office in India will do what a similar site did in China: build enrollment by more than 500 percent over three years.

''We've been very successful in China,'' Provost Bob Frank said. ''If we can replicate that in India, it's good for us in every way.''

Since Kent State opened a recruiting office in Beijing in 2008, the number of Chinese students enrolled at KSU has grown from 91 to 576. That is well above the university's original goal of recruiting 200 Chinese students in five years.

Chinese students comprise the largest international student group at the university. More than 40 percent of the 1,430 students from other countries are from China.

The offices in China and India are part of the university's effort to develop more of a global presence. The university already has academic centers for KSU students and students from other
universities in Florence, Italy, and Geneva, Switzerland.

Starting this semester, the university will subcontract with an Indian resident to lead recruitment at a free-standing office in Delhi, the capital of India.

The recruiter will attend Indian college fairs and work with Indian universities with which KSU has ties.

There is a lot of room for growth. Only 122 students from India are enrolled at Kent State, and India does not have enough room for all of the students who want to go to college.

India might be even more attractive than China as a source of students, said Mary Anne Saunders, Kent State's executive director of international affairs, because most Indians speak English.

That makes the transition a little bit easier compared to other international students who come to Kent State, she said.

But students from all other countries are of particular interest to universities like Kent State because they pay an out-of-state surcharge that elevates their undergraduate tuition to about $17,000 a year, twice what an Ohio student pays.

That helps the university's bottom line, Frank, the provost, said.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT PHILANTHROPY CAMPAIGN AWARDS FIRST SCHOLARSHIP (Schultz) | Email

News Date: 02/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb. 1 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University's Campaign for Change, its student philanthropy initiative, celebrated a major milestone this January in awarding its first scholarship to Kenneth Smith, a junior aeronautical systems engineering major from Streetsboro, Ohio.

Over the course of the fall semester, the campaign enlists student volunteers to educate their peers about the impact of private support on their education and to encourage students to "pay it forward" by supporting an endowed scholarship fund. Smith received weekly e-mails about contributing to the campaign but ignored them because he didn't believe it could achieve its ambitious goals.

"I didn't think raising money from students to help other students would work," he said. "So when I saw they had raised enough for a scholarship, I was impressed."

The committee similarly was impressed with Smith's application, which the group selected from the 168 that were submitted for the $1,250 scholarship. Of particular note to the group was his volunteer work with a local daycare, where he speaks about astronomy and teaches music to the children.

"Kids aren't tainted by anything. It's rare to see that," Smith said. "I like working with them because of that."

Smith said the scholarship came at just the right time. For many students, financial burdens can force them to withdraw from classes, putting their academic dreams in jeopardy.

"I was actually thinking about taking a semester off because I didn't have enough money," he said. "When I read the e-mail saying I had received the scholarship, I was kind of like those people you see on YouTube acting crazy. It was like someone wanted me to go to school this semester."

Smith, who has one sister and three half-siblings, plans to be the first in his family to graduate from college. He hopes to parlay his degree into a career as an astronaut, calling himself a "big astronomy nerd."

"I know it's a crazy dream and people usually lose their dreams," he said. "But you have to aim big and shoot for the stars."

Since its launch in 2007, the Campaign for Change has raised more than $48,000 from students, parents, faculty and staff. Student gifts range from as little as $1 to as large as $200, raising a total of $2,000 from 365 students last fall. That marks a 124 percent increase in gifts and 57 percent increase in student participation since 2007.

In 2009, the fund reached the $25,000 threshold required to endow it, meaning Kent State students have left a legacy that will aid their peers, current and future, in perpetuity.

"We're fortunate to have students who care about one another and the legacy they leave at Kent State," said Tiffany Schultz, associate director for annual giving at Kent State. "Their goodwill is furthering our culture of philanthropy and exceeding even our greatest expectations. The campaign has proven, time and again, that you should never underestimate the power of peers helping peers." For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Kent State University to open office in India this spring (Frank, Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is establishing an office in India this spring to expand its global reach and to recruit more students from one of the world's fastest-growing economies.

So far, university officials have met with more than 10 universities in India and signed memorandums of understanding with several of the institutions to expand their relationships and collaborations. By recruiting more students from India, university officials say it will help solidify Kent State's financial base.

“Opening an office in India will help recruit students to Kent State and help with academic exchange,” Kent State provost Robert Frank said in a statement. “It helps us expand our academic and intellectual pursuits with Indian universities.”

Mr. Frank said there will be an influx of Indian students next year, but the larger increase will be seen in the 2012-2013 academic year. Officials hope to see the same results it saw from opening an office in China in 2008. In spring 2008, for instance, Kent State had only 91 Chinese students, but that number has grown to 576 students.

“One of my strategic priorities for the university is to engage the world beyond our campuses, and this new Kent State office in India is another example of us doing just that,” Kent State president Lester Lefton said in a statement.

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News Headline: Kent man's assignment is cut short in Egypt (Saunders) | Email

News Date: 02/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Feb. 01--Kent resident Ronald Saunders expected to work in Egypt for three years, but his assignment has been cut short by the political turmoil.

His employer is chartering a plane to evacuate him and about 60 colleagues from the Egyptian capital of Cairo this morning, his wife, Mary Anne, said Monday.

"He has felt very safe," said Mary Anne Saunders, who is executive director of international affairs at Kent State. "His Egyptian colleagues have been unbelievably generous with their time to make sure he feels protected."

Ronald Saunders, 65, is newly employed by Chemonix, an international consulting firm based in Washington, D.C., that promotes economic development in third-world countries.

The company is under contract with the U.S. Agency for International Development to promote small- and medium-sized business development in Egypt.

As a "labor skills and productivity result lead," Saunders has been living in an apartment in the wealthy Cairo suburb of Maadi since October, returning home only once, for Christmas.

"He just took over his clothes, personal items, kitchen utensils -- stuff he wanted to live with," when he returned in January, Mary Anne Saunders said.

She said he hasn't seen any violence; he was short of food and water when he ran out of cash, as merchants in the violence-strapped country are not accepting credit cards. But Chemonix came through with cash, and that problem has been resolved.

Cell phone service has been restored, but Internet connectivity remains down.

The couple knew that it would be a challenge to be apart for three years, save vacations, the length of Chemonix' contract with the Egyptian government.

But with 43 years of marriage under their belt, "We are not newlyweds," Mary Anne Saunders said cheerfully. "We both like Egypt very much, and we thought Cairo would be a great city to live in."

She said Chemonix will fly Saunders into Amsterdam today and probably on to Washington, D.C., at the end of the week.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: KSU exploring efforts to woo Indian students (Frank, Saunders) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: February 02,2011 12:54 PM GMT Carol Biliczky Beacon Journal Publishing Co. Delhi recruiting office opens to boost enrollment numbers

By Carol Biliczky Beacon Journal staff writer

Published on Wednesday, Feb 02, 2011

KENT: Kent State hopes that a new recruiting office in India will do what a similar site did in China: build enrollment by more than 500 percent over three years.

''We've been very successful in China,'' Provost Bob Frank said. ''If we can replicate that in India, it's good for us in every way.''

Since Kent State opened a recruiting office in Beijing in 2008, the number of Chinese students enrolled at KSU has grown from 91 to 576. That is well above the university's original goal of recruiting 200 Chinese students in five years.

Chinese students comprise the largest international student group at the university. More than 40 percent of the 1,430 students from other countries are from China.

The offices in China and India are part of the university's effort to develop more of a global presence. The university already has academic centers for KSU students and students from other universities in Florence, Italy, and Geneva, Switzerland.

Starting this semester, the university will subcontract with an Indian resident to lead recruitment at a free-standing office in Delhi, the capital of India.

The recruiter will attend Indian college fairs and work with Indian universities with which KSU has ties.

There is a lot of room for growth. Only 122 students from India are enrolled at Kent State, and India does not have enough room for all of the students who want to go to college.

India might be even more attractive than China as a source of students, said Mary Anne Saunders, Kent State's executive director of international affairs, because most Indians speak English.

That makes the transition a little bit easier compared to other international students who come to Kent State, she said.

But students from all other countries are of particular interest to universities like Kent State because they pay an out-of-state surcharge that elevates their undergraduate tuition to about $17,000 a year, twice what an Ohio student pays.

That helps the university's bottom line, Frank, the provost, said.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

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News Headline: Uprising in Egypt cuts Kent man's job short (Saunders) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When Ronald Saunders
and his wife, Mary Anne, visited
Egypt almost a decade
ago, Ronald said he'd work
there if a job came up.
In October, one did. But
the weeklong protests in
Egypt's major cities have
forced the Kent resident to
evacuate the country four
months into his three-year
assignment.
He boarded a plane to Amsterdam
on Tuesday morning.
“He doesn't feel like he's in
any danger,” said Mary Anne
Saunders, who is the executive
director of Kent State
University's Office of International
Affairs. “In fact, right
now, he said as he was leaving,
the mood could be called
festive.”
Cell phone services had
been cut off but were being
restored Tuesday.
Mary Anne called her husband
at 5 a.m. Tuesday and
was surprised when he answered
at the Cairo airport.
He had abandoned all but a
single piece of luggage but
was otherwise OK.
Ronald had been working
for a development firm called
Chemonix and living in the
Cairo suburb of Maadi. His
company, which is contracted
by the U.S. government to
spur business growth, chartered
the flight to Europe for
its employees.
Mary Anne said it's unclear
whether that contract
would be dissolved if
the Egyptian government
changes.
She said her husband
hasn't seen any violence,
and he characterized the
protests to her like you
might describe a parade.
“A lot of times when
you get protests in Middle
Eastern countries, you
don't see many female
faces,” Mary Anne said.
“But there are women involved.
And now families,
and they're bringing food
with them.”
But resources in Egypt
are becoming tight as the
economy there approaches
a stand still. Major industries
like tourism
and banking have all but
stopped, and ATMs are
out of cash. With the Internet
shut down, retailers
can't accept credit cards.
“The scariest part for
(Ronald) was on Sunday
when he had run out of
money because he lent
his money to people with
families who needed provisions,”
Mary Anne said.
“He had some rice, and
that was it.”
Ronald's credit card
wouldn't work at the grocery
store.
“They never did get
food,” she said.
But he did get on a
plane. Ronald will stay in
Amsterdam indefinitely
until he can board a flight
to Washington, D.C., where
his company is based.
HALIM EL-DABH, 89, WANTS
TO GO BACK TO EGYPT.
Halim El-Dabh, a professor
emeritus at Kent
State University, was born
in Cairo, groomed to be an
agricultural engineer and
then brought to the United
States by Aaron Copland,
who heard his music and
said, “Anyone who writes
music like that should be
my student.”
El-Dabh, 89, who's often
called Egypt's most important
living composer, visited
Egypt most recently in
2007 to perform his symphony
at the Cairo Opera
House.
“I sensed some of the
poverty. I noticed the beginning
of the difficulty there,”
he said. “I felt like the middle
class didn't have the
availability of means like
they did in the past.”
His daughter visited
three weeks ago and returned
before the protests
began Jan. 17. She saw the
same thing.
Particularly among
young people, “there is a
sense of a collective desire
to help,” El-Dabh said.
“When I was growing up,
that's a normal thing:
People help the neighborhood.
“I'm excited about the
energy that's coming up
there. It's a beautiful energy.”
El-Dabh says he thinks
President Barack Obama
has said the right things,
and he observes that Egyptians
generally appreciate
the U.S. president. He
was less positive about the
Egyptian president, Hosni
Mubarak.
“He did very well in the
beginning,” El-Dabh said.
“I can't blame people for
having greed when you
have the availability of
things. He was in there
too long.”
El-Dabh predicts he'll be
back in Egypt soon, performing
or visiting family
in central Egypt.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY CONTINUES INTERNATIONAL INITIATIVE, OPENS OFFICE IN INDIA (Lefton, Frank, Saunders) | Email

News Date: 02/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb. 1 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University, Ohio's second largest public university, will extend its global reach by establishing a location in India, the second most populated country in the world. The Indian office joins the university's growing international presence with its established academic centers in Florence, Italy, and Geneva, Switzerland, an office in Beijing, China, and multiple relationships in Saudi Arabia, Russia, Japan, Turkey and other countries. The new Kent State office in Delhi, India, will be up and running this spring semester.

"The Kent State office in India is part of the globalization of Kent State," Kent State President Lester A. Lefton said. "India is one of the world's largest and fastest-growing economies with 1.2 billion people. It also has a huge college-bound population, and the United States has such a strong reputation for its higher education system. There is a tremendous opportunity for Kent State in India."

Robert Frank, Kent State's provost and senior vice president for Academic Affairs, said the Indian office offers many benefits. "Opening an office in India will help recruit students to Kent State and help with academic exchange. It helps us expand our academic and intellectual pursuits with Indian universities. In addition, by bringing more students to come to Kent State, it helps solidifies our financial base."

Kent State officials have met with more than 10 universities in India, signing memorandums of understanding with several of them. "Together, we want to expand our relationships and collaborations," Frank said.

Mary Anne Saunders, executive director of Kent State's Office of International Affairs, said what also makes India so attractive is that there is no language barrier. "They speak English," she said. "In fact, there are more English speakers in India than there are people in the United States. By speaking the same language, it helps makes the transition a little bit easier compared to other international students who come to Kent State."

Frank said the university expects to see growth in the number of Indian students next year but the larger increase will be seen the following year in the 2012-2013 academic year. "We hope to see the same kind of results in India as what we've experienced in China," he said.

Kent State opened an office in Beijing, China, in 2008. Since then, the number of Kent State students from China has increased significantly. In spring 2008, the university had only 91 Chinese students, representing 12 percent of all Kent State international students. Today, Kent State has 576 students from China, comprising 40 percent of the entire Kent State international student population.

"We know that Kent State's reputation has reached international levels as evidenced by our recent ranking as one of the top 200 universities in the world by Times Higher Education of London," Lefton said. "One of my strategic priorities for the university is to engage the world beyond our campuses, and this new Kent State office in India is another example of us doing just that."

For more information on Kent State's global initiatives, exchange programs and support services for international students and scholars, visit the university's Office of International Affairs online at www.kent.edu/oia. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Kent Trumbull Campus Schedules Job Fair (Zampino) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Business Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CHAMPION TOWNSHIP, Ohio -- The Kent State University Trumbull Campus will host its annual job fair April 28. Representatives from regional business, industry and Kent State will be on hand with information about jobs and academic opportunities.

Those planning to attend are asked to bring copies of their resume, and interview attire is recommended. Kent Trumbull students can take part in mock interviews and have resumes critiqued as well, said Anthony Zampino, assistant professor of computer technology at the campus.

"In these troubled economic times, we are all aware that many local employers are not actively hiring," Zampino said. "However, we strongly urge employers to attend this job fair in order to fortify their files with suitable candidates should the need arise. Our students, as well as the general public, are eager to speak with representatives from companies all over the Mahoning Valley area."

Also, on this day, the campus will hold the annual "Backpack to Briefcase," which provides a service for students who are preparing to enter the work force. "Our intent is to arrange mock interviews for students with representatives from companies in our community and members of the Trumbull Campus community," Zampino noted, adding that the mock interviews will include a review of resumes and cover letters as well.

The job fair will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the campus Technology Building, and Backpack to Briefcase will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Companies interested in participating should call Zampino at 330-675-7613.

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News Headline: Local news briefs - Feb. 2 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NORTHEAST OHIO

Library careers
KENT: The free Library Careers Night is from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Feb. 28 in the Kent State Student Center Ballroom.

The program is hosted by the university's School of Library and Information Science. It will offer information on the job market, internships and practicum opportunities, help with interview skills and resume reviews.

Speakers include Sharon Holderman, director of the Ohio State ATI Library, and Joe Hecht, research analyst at Case Western Reserve University. Local library and information professionals will staff exhibits.

Also in attendance will be representatives from large library systems, representatives from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland Botanical Garden and Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

For information or to RSVP, go to http://www.slis.kent.edu or contact Rhonda Filipan at rfilipan@kent.edu. A similar event will be March 28 at the school's Columbus location in the State Library of Ohio.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW Kent Displays inclusion in trade mission impressive | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HIGH-TECH LOCAL FIRM'S INCLUSION
IN TRIP TO INDIA AFFIRMS INNOVATION

THE SELECTION OF KENT DISplays
as one of 24 firms in a U.S.
Department of Commerce trade
mission to India puts that up and coming
firm in some exciting company.
Among others in the trade mission are
GE Hitachi and Boeing, both industry
giants.
Capitalizing on liquid
crystal research
that originated at
Kent State University,
which pioneered
that field in the 1960s
and 1970s, Kent Displays uses almost no
energy in its creations, taking advantage
of ambient light of which there is plenty
in India to manipulate crystals to form
displays.
It most popular product currently is
called a Boogie Board. They are sold extensively
in this country, Europe and Japan.
The same technology is used in Spain
to display timetables at bus stops.
India's economy, growing at 8 percent
annually, makes the dominant power on
the Asian subcontinent a likely buyer of
Kent Display products.
The fact that India is a nation of laws,
in which contractual rights are respected,
unlike other markets in developing
nations, makes it a good trading partner
for the United States, too.
Selection for the trade mission is a nice
tip of the hat to a local high tech company,
a privately owned firm which is located in
Brimfield Township. It's also fine recognition
for the role of research in liquid crystals
that started in the 1960s, much of it
at Kent State, a good bit of it supported
by the public sector, that some make their
political careers by maligning.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY PRESENTS 6TH ANNUAL PIANO INSTITUTE ON JULY 17-27 | Email

News Date: 02/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb. 2 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Students from grades 7-12 will have an opportunity to rub elbows with individuals from all around the world at this year's sixth annual Piano Institute at Kent State University presented by the Piano Division at Kent State's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music.

Piano Institute offers a unique combination of lessons, master classes and performance opportunities. Students will interact at Kent State for 11 days of inspiration, learning and sharing. Applications are currently being accepted for this highly intensive festival for talented piano students in grades 7-12.

ACTIVITIES FOR PIANO INSTITUTE PARTICIPANTS INCLUDE:

* Performing in a final gala performance at Severance Hall's Reinberger Chamber Hall

* Receiving four hours of one-on-one lessons with Kent State piano faculty

* Participating in master classes with esteemed guest artists, Spencer Myer, international concert pianist, and Joela Jones, principal keyboardist with the Cleveland Orchestra

* Attending workshops on sight-reading, technique, practicing, and audition/competition preparation

In addition, participants will live on campus, enjoy picnics and recreational activities and will have the opportunity to attend field trips to Porthouse Theatre and a Cleveland Orchestra concert at Blossom Music Center.

All classes, lessons and monitored practice sessions will take place in Kent State's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music. The school offers a wide variety of bachelor's and master's degree programs in performance, conducting, music education, composition, ethnomusicology, musicology and theory as well as three doctoral programs in music education, musicology-ethnomusicology and theory-composition.

The cost of the 11-day program is $1,285 and includes:

* Room and board

* All classes

* Four hours of private instruction

* Master classes

* Concerts

* Transportation to field trips

* Recreational activities

* A concert CD

* A T-shirt

The application deadline is April 21. Scholarships are available.

For more information on the Piano Institute, visit www.kent.edu/pianoinstitute or contact Monica Brately at mbratel1@kent.edu or 330-672-3100. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Kent State's African Community Theatre Holds Auditions for Spring Production | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Location: 800 E Summit St, Kent, OH 44240 When:
February 9, 2011
Time: 5:00pm–7:00pm
The African Community Theatre at Kent State University will be holding auditions for its spring 2011 production of “Wine in the Wilderness.” “Wine in the Wilderness” takes place during the Harlem race riots in the 1960s.
Website: http://www.kent.edu/ Phone: (330) 672-3000 Email: fdorsey@kent.edu Price: Free

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News Headline: KENT STATE'S AFRICAN COMMUNITY THEATRE HOLDS AUDITIONS FOR SPRING PRODUCTION (Dorsey) | Email

News Date: 02/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb. 1 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The African Community Theatre at Kent State University will be holding auditions for its spring 2011 production of "Wine in the Wilderness." "Wine in the Wilderness" takes place during the Harlem race riots in the 1960s.

"The play focuses on an artist and his 'so-called' educated, black middle-class friends who try to define black womanhood and articulate brotherhood, sisterhood and togetherness, but have no real love or understanding for poor, un-educated African American," said Dr. Fran Dorsey, resident director of the African Community Theatre. "The play was written by Alice Childress, actress, director, playwright, novelist, columnist, essayist, lecturer, and theater consultant, who refused to promote stereotyped images of Africa-Americans in her writings."

Auditions will be held Feb. 9 through Feb. 11 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Feb. 12 from noon to 2 p.m. at the African Community Theatre, located in Room 230 of Oscar Ritchie Hall on the Kent State University campus, 225 Terrace Dr. in Kent, Ohio. Interested individuals should prepare a three- to five-minute monologue.

The cast consist of three black men ranging from 20 to 60 years of age and two black women ranging from 20 to 40 years of age.

For more information, contact Dr. Fran Dorsey at 330-672-0151 or fdorsey@kent.edu. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Egypt military may speed Mubarak's exit (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Starkville Daily News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: President Hosni Mubarak announces he will step down in September

Angry protesters respond by saying they want Mubarak out now

The military may have to tell him he must exit immediately, analysts say

(CNN) -- If street protesters escalate their demands this week that Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak must surrender power now rather than in September, it may be up to the Egyptian military to nudge him out the door immediately, analysts say.

Already, Egypt's military, the guardian of secular stability in a major corner of the Arab world, has indicated it sympathizes with demonstrators when it announced it won't use force against protesters this week.

If given a choice between Mubarak and the masses who rejected his announcement he'll wait until the September elections to step down, military leaders now in control of a new cabinet won't back the president, some analysts say.

"They could crush the demonstrators, which is what Saddam Hussein did" in Iraq, said analyst William Quandt, a professor of politics at the University of Virginia and a National Security Council staff member in the 1970s who was involved in the Egyptian-Israeli Peace Treaty.

"Sheer repression could work, but there would be a strong reaction, and the United States would respond adversely.

"The alternative is that the military looks after its own corporate interests," Quandt continued. "Mubarak is making things difficult. As long as he refuses to go, the demonstrators won't stop. So if (they) have to choose between (their) interests and his, they would choose theirs. They would say, 'Mr. President, we can't stand up beside you and you have to go.'

"I think that's the way it's going to turn out, but it will take a few more days," Quandt said.

In addressing the Egyptian crisis, U.S. President Barack Obama commended the Egyptian armed forces for their "professionalism" in the face of angry protesters.

"I urge the military to help ensure this time of change is peaceful," Obama said.

The White House is confident of its close behind-the-scenes relationship with the Egyptian military in negotiating the turmoil consuming Egypt, a senior U.S. defense official said Tuesday.

In the last conversation between Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen and his Egyptian counterpart, "both expressed a desire to have this strong partnership continue," the official said.

Mullen hasn't had direct contact with Egyptian military leaders since Mubarak publicly announced he won't run for another term in office, the official said Tuesday.

But in a 10-minute phone call two days ago, Egypt's chief of staff of armed forces, Lt. Gen. Sami Enan, described to Mullen "how he foresees to use the military going forward," the official said.

President Obama "has relied on the chairman's views, and his good relations with Gen. Enan, on how the Egyptian military is handling the crisis so far," the official said.

"He assures me that they're very focused on this, and they will continue to be a stabilizing influence within their country," Mullen said, according to a Defense Department podcast with Mullen.

The Egyptian military is a buffer against sectarian influences such as the Muslim Brotherhood, but the armed forces are also heavily involved in the Egyptian economy.

"You have to understand that the current leadership in Egypt is basically the same leadership that has run the country since 1952," said Brian Katulis, senior fellow at American Progress, a left-leaning think tank.

"Mubarak came after Sadat who came after Nasser," Katulis said, referring to past presidents Anwar Sadat and Gamal Abdel Nasser. "They were all military men who had the support of the military elite. They control a good bit of the security as well as the economy."

Protesters are aware of this, as they often seek solidarity with soldiers on the street.

"The Egyptian military is the seat of power in Egypt," said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt.

"The Egyptian protesters have a lot of sympathy for the Egyptian officers in those tanks," Stacher said. "But one bullet, that sympathy goes."

The larger question is who will lead Egypt once Mubarak is out of the picture, Stacher said.

"Who's going to be in the office of the presidency? It's going to be someone in the military or close to the military. It's not going to be (opposition leader Mohamed) ElBaradei. It's not going to be any of these opposition groups," Stacher said.

In Egypt, the sectarian Muslim Brotherhood is very conscious of the negative connotations associated with its Islamist branding and is now trying to connect with secular opposition leaders such as ElBaradei, said analyst Reva Bhalla of the Austin, Texas-based Stratfor, an online publisher of global intelligence.

Though the armed forces will play an important role running Egypt, it will shun the front stage, much like the Turkish military, Quandt asserted.

But who would lead Egypt is quickly becoming the question of the moment.

"It's not clear who those individuals are going to be," Quandt said. "The Muslim Brotherhood will be part of that because they want influence over social policy and certain domestic issues, but I think they realize if they go for the upper hand, they will be crushed by the military," Quandt said.

Stacher and Katulis were among more than a dozen Middle East experts who met Monday with three White House National Security Council officials to talk about the Egyptian crisis, Stacher said.

CNN's Chris Lawrence contributed to this report.

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News Headline: Long a seat of power, the Egyptian military may speed Mubarak's exit (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: CNN.com
Contact Name: Michael Martinez
News OCR Text: (CNN) -- If street protesters escalate their demands this week that Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak must surrender power now rather than in September, it may be up to the Egyptian military to nudge him out the door immediately, analysts say.

Already, Egypt's military, the guardian of secular stability in a major corner of the Arab world, has indicated it sympathizes with demonstrators when it announced it won't use force against protesters this week.

If given a choice between Mubarak and the masses who rejected his announcement he'll wait until the September elections to step down, military leaders now in control of a new cabinet won't back the president, some analysts say.

"They could crush the demonstrators, which is what Saddam Hussein did" in Iraq, said analyst William Quandt, a professor of politics at the University of Virginia and a National Security Council staff member in the 1970s who was involved in the Egyptian-Israeli Peace Treaty.

"Sheer repression could work, but there would be a strong reaction, and the United States would respond adversely.

"The alternative is that the military looks after its own corporate interests," Quandt continued. "Mubarak is making things difficult. As long as he refuses to go, the demonstrators won't stop. So if (they) have to choose between (their) interests and his, they would choose theirs. They would say, 'Mr. President, we can't stand up beside you and you have to go.'

"I think that's the way it's going to turn out, but it will take a few more days," Quandt said.

In addressing the Egyptian crisis, U.S. President Barack Obama commended the Egyptian armed forces for their "professionalism" in the face of angry protesters.

"I urge the military to help ensure this time of change is peaceful," Obama said.

The White House is confident of its close behind-the-scenes relationship with the Egyptian military in negotiating the turmoil consuming Egypt, a senior U.S. defense official said Tuesday.

In the last conversation between Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen and his Egyptian counterpart, "both expressed a desire to have this strong partnership continue," the official said.

Mullen hasn't had direct contact with Egyptian military leaders since Mubarak publicly announced he won't run for another term in office, the official said Tuesday.

But in a 10-minute phone call two days ago, Egypt's chief of staff of armed forces, Lt. Gen. Sami Enan, described to Mullen "how he foresees to use the military going forward," the official said.

President Obama "has relied on the chairman's views, and his good relations with Gen. Enan, on how the Egyptian military is handling the crisis so far," the official said.

"He assures me that they're very focused on this, and they will continue to be a stabilizing influence within their country," Mullen said, according to a Defense Department podcast with Mullen.

The Egyptian military is a buffer against sectarian influences such as the Muslim Brotherhood, but the armed forces are also heavily involved in the Egyptian economy.

"You have to understand that the current leadership in Egypt is basically the same leadership that has run the country since 1952," said Brian Katulis, senior fellow at American Progress, a left-leaning think tank.

"Mubarak came after Sadat who came after Nasser," Katulis said, referring to past presidents Anwar Sadat and Gamal Abdel Nasser. "They were all military men who had the support of the military elite. They control a good bit of the security as well as the economy."

Protesters are aware of this, as they often seek solidarity with soldiers on the street.

"The Egyptian military is the seat of power in Egypt," said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt.

"The Egyptian protesters have a lot of sympathy for the Egyptian officers in those tanks," Stacher said. "But one bullet, that sympathy goes."

The larger question is who will lead Egypt once Mubarak is out of the picture, Stacher said.

"Who's going to be in the office of the presidency? It's going to be someone in the military or close to the military. It's not going to be (opposition leader Mohamed) ElBaradei. It's not going to be any of these opposition groups," Stacher said.

In Egypt, the sectarian Muslim Brotherhood is very conscious of the negative connotations associated with its Islamist branding and is now trying to connect with secular opposition leaders such as ElBaradei, said analyst Reva Bhalla of the Austin, Texas-based Stratfor, an online publisher of global intelligence.

Though the armed forces will play an important role running Egypt, it will shun the front stage, much like the Turkish military, Quandt asserted.

But who would lead Egypt is quickly becoming the question of the moment.

"It's not clear who those individuals are going to be," Quandt said. "The Muslim Brotherhood will be part of that because they want influence over social policy and certain domestic issues, but I think they realize if they go for the upper hand, they will be crushed by the military," Quandt said.

Stacher and Katulis were among more than a dozen Middle East experts who met Monday with three White House National Security Council officials to talk about the Egyptian crisis, Stacher said.

CNN's Chris Lawrence contributed to this report.

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News Headline: Egypt military may speed Mubarak's exit (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: CNN.com
Contact Name: Michael Martinez
News OCR Text: (CNN) -- If street protesters escalate their demands this week that Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak must surrender power now rather than in September, it may be up to the Egyptian military to nudge him out the door immediately, analysts say.

Already, Egypt's military, the guardian of secular stability in a major corner of the Arab world, has indicated it sympathizes with demonstrators when it announced it won't use force against protesters this week.

If given a choice between Mubarak and the masses who rejected his announcement he'll wait until the September elections to step down, military leaders now in control of a new cabinet won't back the president, some analysts say. "They could crush the demonstrators, which is what Saddam Hussein did" in Iraq, said analyst William Quandt, a professor of politics at the University of Virginia and a National Security Council staff member in the 1970s who was involved in the Egyptian-Israeli Peace Treaty. "Sheer repression could work, but there would be a strong reaction, and the United States would respond adversely. "The alternative is that the military looks after its own corporate interests," Quandt continued. "Mubarak is making things difficult. As long as he refuses to go, the demonstrators won't stop. So if (they) have to choose between (their) interests and his, they would choose theirs. They would say, 'Mr. President, we can't stand up beside you and you have to go.' "I think that's the way it's going to turn out, but it will take a few more days," Quandt said. In addressing the Egyptian crisis, U.S. President Barack Obama commended the Egyptian armed forces for their "professionalism" in the face of angry protesters. "I urge the military to help ensure this time of change is peaceful," Obama said. The White House is confident of its close behind-the-scenes relationship with the Egyptian military in negotiating the turmoil consuming Egypt, a senior U.S. defense official said Tuesday.

In the last conversation between Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen and his Egyptian counterpart, "both expressed a desire to have this strong partnership continue," the official said. Mullen hasn't had direct contact with Egyptian military leaders since Mubarak publicly announced he won't run for another term in office, the official said Tuesday.

But in a 10-minute phone call two days ago, Egypt's chief of staff of armed forces, Lt. Gen. Sami Enan, described to Mullen "how he foresees to use the military going forward," the official said. President Obama "has relied on the chairman's views, and his good relations with Gen. Enan, on how the Egyptian military is handling the crisis so far," the official said. "He assures me that they're very focused on this, and they will continue to be a stabilizing influence within their country," Mullen said, according to a Defense Department podcast with Mullen.

The Egyptian military is a buffer against sectarian influences such as the Muslim Brotherhood, but the armed forces are also heavily involved in the Egyptian economy. "You have to understand that the current leadership in Egypt is basically the same leadership that has run the country since 1952," said Brian Katulis, senior fellow at American Progress, a left-leaning think tank. "Mubarak came after Sadat who came after Nasser," Katulis said, referring to past presidents Anwar Sadat and Gamal Abdel Nasser. "They were all military men who had the support of the military elite. They control a good bit of the security as well as the economy." Protesters are aware of this, as they often seek solidarity with soldiers on the street. "The Egyptian military is the seat of power in Egypt," said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt. "The Egyptian protesters have a lot of sympathy for the Egyptian officers in those tanks," Stacher said. "But one bullet, that sympathy goes." The larger question is who will lead Egypt once Mubarak is out of the picture, Stacher said. "Who's going to be in the office of the presidency? It's going to be someone in the military or close to the military. It's not going to be (opposition leader Mohamed) ElBaradei. It's not going to be any of these opposition groups," Stacher said. In Egypt, the sectarian Muslim Brotherhood is very conscious of the negative connotations associated with its Islamist branding and is now trying to connect with secular opposition leaders such as ElBaradei, said analyst Reva Bhalla of the Austin, Texas-based Stratfor, an online publisher of global intelligence.

Though the armed forces will play an important role running Egypt, it will shun the front stage, much like the Turkish military, Quandt asserted.

But who would lead Egypt is quickly becoming the question of the moment. "It's not clear who those individuals are going to be," Quandt said. "The Muslim Brotherhood will be part of that because they want influence over social policy and certain domestic issues, but I think they realize if they go for the upper hand, they will be crushed by the military," Quandt said. Stacher and Katulis were among more than a dozen Middle East experts who met Monday with three White House National Security Council officials to talk about the Egyptian crisis, Stacher said.

CNN's Chris Lawrence contributed to this report.

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News Headline: As protestors clash, Egyptian military's idleness raises questions (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: CNN.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The fiery, bloody clashes between demonstrators in Cairo -- with soldiers watching with seeming indifference -- is an apparent maneuver by the Egyptian military to raise popular support for their intervention and the old guard police state, analysts say.

Egyptian state television on Wednesday went so far as to portray the protesters as members of a radical fringe and bluntly stated: "Let the military take over and protect you and Egypt." "We have confirmed reports that there are radical elements heading to cause internal strife. They have balls of fire and they want to start fire in the Tahrir (Liberation) Square," Egyptian television said.

Much international media coverage has focused on the violence in Cairo's Liberation Square between antagonists and protagonists for embattled President Hosni Mubarak. It remained unclear whether such confrontations were being repeated elsewhere. Contesting rallies in Egypt's second-largest city, Alexandria, were largely peaceful. Other Cairo neighborhoods also remained calm.

But Wednesday's events in Liberation Square highlighted pro-Mubarak demonstrators charging -- dramatically on horseback and camels -- anti-Mubarak protesters, the first sign of a counter-demonstration after days of mass anti-government protests.

In stark juxtaposition, as the violence unfolded, the army did nothing. "The military's refusal to act is a highly political act which shows that it is allowing the Egyptian regime to reconstitute itself at the top and is highly, utterly against the protesters," said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt. He was among more than a dozen Middle East experts who met Monday with three White House National Security Council officials to talk about the Egyptian crisis.

The absence of military action serves two purposes, Stacher said. "(One,) make the protesters go home, and two, scare the population that isn't protesting," Stacher said. "They want the Egyptian people to submit to the police state, and they want the people to pine for their police state so that they have stability back." "It's getting really ruthless," Stacher added. In Egypt, Vice President Omar Suleiman issued a statement saying that dialogue with opposition forces, as ordered by Mubarak, won't begin until the demonstrations stop. Mubarak had incited another round of protests Tuesday when he said he would wait until the September elections to step down. Demonstrators said they wanted an immediate exit by Mubarak.

Meanwhile, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has begun a round of discussions with Suleiman as the Egyptian government has begun defending the pace of change and pushing back against American criticism, according to a senior U.S. official.

Egypt's president is going to move at his own pace and not be pressured by Obama and other world leaders, an Egyptian government official told CNN.

At the same time, a senior U.S. official is expressing concern about Mubarak's ties to the violence in Cairo.

U.S. officials are suspicious that Mubarak loyalists unleashed pro-Mubarak forces to intimidate protesters, the U.S. official said. "Perhaps" Mubarak is making a mess that only he can "solve," the source added. In a public statement, the spokesman for the State Department called for restraint. "The use of violence to intimidate the Egyptian people must stop. We strongly call for restraint," P.J. Crowley said in a statement Wednesday.

However, an Egyptian government official said the government has a "serious problem" in how the Obama administration has been "spinning" the events yesterday to give the impression that Mubarak's statement was given under pressure or a "nudge" from Obama. Robert Kagan of the Brookings Institute said the military appears to be facilitating the pro-government demonstrators in Cairo. "It tells me that the military doesn't appear to be playing the neutral, benevolent role that we hoped it would," Kagan told CNN. "It does appear to be not only allowing these brutal pro-government thugs to come in and attack the protesters but maybe even facilitating it, which raises very serious questions about what role the military intends to play in this whole period of transition. "It's a very cynical move which I hope the rest of the world, and particularly the United States, don't fall for," Kagan said. Michele Dunne, a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, said it was unclear what the military's agenda is. "Does this mean they're committed to Mubarak, or does it mean that perhaps they're giving him one last chance, one last try to see if he can get control of the streets and get the demonstrators out?" Dunne told CNN. "I think today we saw a very ugly face of this regime. These are tactics that are well-known in Egypt and have been used many times before -- to send regime thugs to break up peaceful demonstrations," she said. CNN's Jill Dougherty and Elise Labott contributed to this report.

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News Headline: Expert On Egypt Discusses Chaos In Cairo (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: NPR - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Joshua Stacher, assistant political science professor at Kent State University, speaks to host Michele Norris about the Egyptian protests and his experience at the Egypt experts meeting at the White House this week.

TRANSCRIPT:

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

And we're going to look back for a moment to an earlier point in this conflict, before yesterday's massive protests and before President Mubarak announced that he would not seek a new term.

Here in Washington, the White House was scrambling to get a handle on the situation and to talk through its options. So it summoned several experts on Egypt for a morning meeting.

Among those in attendance was Joshua Stacher. He's an assistant professor of political science at Kent State University. He says the meeting dealt, in part, with how the White House could navigate the treacherous waters of Mubarak's then hypothetical exit.

Professor JOSHUA STACHER (Political Science, Kent State University): My sense was that they have a relationship with this president for a really long time. He's on the ropes. He's in trouble. And they're trying to find a way that they can communicate with him in a way that they're signaling what they want and they leave no room for maneuver on his part. But at the same time that it's not embarrassing or sends a message to other allies that the U.S. is only your friend when you're in power.

NORRIS: How would you characterize their level of concern about what was happening? 'Cause we're taking it back to the weekend before we saw the massive protests into this week.

Prof. STACHER: Their concern - I mean, this is a sort of major political challenge for this administration, or - and it would be for any administration. I mean, Egypt is a staunch ally. But they were extremely concerned that violence wasn't being used on the protestors. They were extremely concerned about their rights to have access to the Internet and information and to gather an expression.

There was some discussion about how, while their intentions might be very good with these policies, that some of these maybe get lost in translation a little bit for how they're heard on the streets in Cairo. No disrespect to any other media outlets, but Al-Jazeera Arabic and English have owned this movement. I mean, more bandwidth is being used and everybody's watching Al-Jazeera.

And there was some concern about why aren't they going on these news channels to kind of explain their positions?

NORRIS: Why the administration is not actually appearing on Al-Jazeera?

Prof. STACHER: Yeah. They keep denying Al-Jazeera. I've spoken with Al-Jazeera producers and they keep being - their requests were turned down. So, I mean, there's some contradictory signals going on. They're saying some really good things. And then, look, I mean, then there's this reality on the ground. There seems to be a little bit of a disconnect at this moment.

The White House respects the universal rights of the citizens - the right to assemble. What's going on in Tahrir Square at this moment is people that are dressed in plain clothes, some of them have security credentials are attacking protestors violently.

This really puts the Obama administration in an extremely hard corner because twice now, about an hour after President Mubarak has addressed his people, President Obama has come out and basically repeated and agreed with how President Mubarak is handling this. The line in the concrete has been drawn.

NORRIS: What do you mean by that?

Prof. STACHER: It's now time for the administration to decide if it's going to amplify the clear, articulated demands of the protestors that they no longer want Hosni Mubarak and they do not want to be ruled by military generals or not.

NORRIS: Did they talk in the room at all about what democratically held elections might look like?

Prof. STACHER: I actually can't remember that elections came up. And the reason I can't really remember that is because the majority of the time was spent thinking about what powerbrokers were thinking.

NORRIS: Powerbrokers?

Prof. STACHER: The majority of the time was spent thinking about what Egyptian generals were thinking. They're concerned about what the Egyptian military is thinking, as opposed to what protestors who are making rational and articulate demands might say.

NORRIS: Joshua Stacher, thank you very much for coming in.

Prof. STACHER: Thank you very much.

NORRIS: That's Joshua Stacher. He's an assistant professor of political science at Kent State University. And he was speaking with us about a meeting at the White House, where the administration met with several experts on Egypt.

Copyright © 2011 National Public Radio®. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to National Public Radio. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

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News Headline: Who's afraid of the Muslim Brotherhood? (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Toronto Star - Online
Contact Name: Mitch Potter Washington Bureau
News OCR Text: WASHINGTON—At the other end of an increasingly messy revolution, the line of thinking goes, a bogeyman awaits, primed to pounce upon Egypt's emerging democracy and drag the country deeply — irreversibly — into a radical religious corner.

That's how scary the Muslim Brotherhood appears to some — fears built on the notion that Princeton historian Bernard Lewis once famously described as “one man, one vote, one time.” Yes, political Islam will submit to free and fair elections. But once and once only. And once in power, they will never let go.

Those fears cut deeply through Israel today, where Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu has already sounded the public alarm.

And they're coursing through America, too, though in a muted way. The cries of liberty on the streets of Cairo thus far have pulled on a majority of American heartstrings, Democrat and Republican alike. Yet farther to the right, self-styled guardians of liberty like Fox News commentator Sean Hannity trumpet worries of a fundamentalist genie to come.

Those who actually study the Muslim Brotherhood, meanwhile, only shake their heads in wonder at fears they describe as wildly overblown. There are plenty of reasons to worry about Egypt, they say. But the Muslim Brotherhood isn't one of them.

“To be blunt and colloquial, this is not your grandmother's Muslim Brotherhood. And this isn't their revolution,” said Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arab politics at Georgetown University and author of Shop Floor Culture and Politics in Egypt.

“What we talking about is a group with has evolved over the years into a middle-class, conservative organization. They made a bet against radical change and instead became a systemic player. Their goals are limited. And there is not a shred of evidence that they would become radical in an open democracy because it is a sure way to reduce themselves to fringe players. They are very shrewd about. And that's why they're not going to upset the apple cart.”

A similar analysis is shared by the more than 300 U.S. academics, researchers and historians who signed off on an open letter to President Barack Obama this week, calling for the United States “to embark on a new course toward, peace, democracy and prosperity for the people of the Middle East” in the wake of the Egypt uprising.

Jeff Brownlee, the University of Texas professor who initiated the letter based on the cumulative lessons of 15 years of travels and studies in Egypt, told the Star “the Islamic boogieman is a red herring.”

“Even the term Muslim Brotherhood sounds somehow like ‘the brotherhood of evil mutants.' I don't fear them just as I don't fear Egyptian democracy,” said Brownlee, currently a visiting scholar at Washington's Woodrow Wilson Center.

“Let us be frank: the U.S. and Israel may have a lot of anxiety about dealing with a democratically elected Egyptian government. We have the data and the data don't lie — Egyptians feel resentment in the handling of the peace process over the years. And so the prospect now is that we will have to talk to leaders who respond to an actual constituency. We're looking at a more egalitarian relationship.”

But Brownlee and his peers argue that talking to Egyptians as peers rather than clients is actually healthy for America, Israel and the world at large. Because the best way to undercut Al Qaeda-style terror is to engage Islam at the political level, Muslim Brotherhood-style.

“As we approach the 10th anniversary of 9/11, it is clear to me that it would be a huge mistake to try and undo what millions of Egyptians are pushing forward today.”

Joshua Stacher, another prominent American Arabist, lived in Cairo for eight years before joining Kent State University as a political science professor. He describes his many encounters with the Muslim Brotherhood as one might an alternate-universe Tea Party movement: conservative, patriotic but not monolithic — and unlike, say, the militant movements of Hamas and Hezbollah, not armed.

“If you cut through and actually look at the words and actions of the Muslim Brotherhood, they show themselves to be a patriotic movement in step with what Egyptians are looking for,” Stacher told the Star.

“The break came years ago. The Brotherhood renounced violence and became a very successful political and social entity, within the constraints of Mubarak's rule. To the point where today, Al Qaeda actually hates the Muslim Brotherhood. They have publicly denounced them for rejecting violence and turning the other way.

“There are divisions. Some within the Brotherhood today argue, ‘Hey man, let's be out there. Let's write in English, let's deal with foreigners, let's be modern politicians.' And another side is saying that is a waste of energy and money, that instead they should go back to focusing on schools, clinics and helping the poorest parts of Egypt become better places to live.

“So there's your split. And neither trend suggests anyone is thinking, ‘Let's go pick up a gun and take over.' ”

But Stacher and Shehata are hesitant to brand the Brotherhood with the adjective ‘moderate' — both argue the word has been hijacked to mean something its not.

“The tendency after 9/11 in American policy making was to run around and divide the world in black and white — ‘extremist' and ‘moderate,' ” said Stacher.

“And somehow we placed Egypt and Jordan, for example, in the list of ‘moderates.' But when you look at it objectively, there is nothing remotely moderate about Egypt and Jordan — both until now have been extremely repressive police states.

“What we really mean by ‘moderate,' if we are being honest, is friendly. So who is the anti-normalizing force in that equation? The fact is these regimes have been on a collision course with their people. And in Egypt, at least, the people are demanding dignity. We should not risk missing the lessons in all of this.”

None of which is to suggest Israel's fears are baseless. Even if you remove the Muslim Brotherhood from the equation, analysts envision zero possibility of a new Egyptian government anywhere near as pliant as Mubarak's, in terms of Israeli interests.

Said Brownlee: “The fears that a new Egyptian government would abrogate the peace treaty with Israel are inflated. Egypt doesn't have the war-fighting capacity even if it wanted to and Egyptians have expressed no desire to lose a lot more of their sons.”Rather than following in the footsteps of Iran, many Mideast analysts see Turkey as a likelier model for any emerging Egyptian democracy — one in which political Islam coexists within, in Turkey's case, a very secular military allied to NATO.

“In the case of Egypt, the fact is the military is the ace in the hole. The crowds on the street remain a wild card because of their behaviour,” said Stacher.

“But in the event of a complete and utter power vacuum, there is only one force that has the loyalty of the people and also happens to have the guns. And going forward, if it turns out that the secular opposition groups are not quite ready for prime time, well, the military could stick around a bit longer until they are ready to compete in proper elections.

“My heart is with the crowd. But my head is with the military,” he said.

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News Headline: Hyper-Realism To the Rescue (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: American Conservative, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Daniel Larison February 2nd, 2011

Larison has once again let his hyper-realism get the best of him, in arguing that the military has just been playing a clever game and will get behind the exceedingly craven to America and Israel Omar Suleiman as Mubarak's successor. ~Jack Ross

I take the charge of “hyper-realism” as a compliment, since I take it to mean that I am more realistic than most. Better that than hypo-realism, I suppose. More seriously, I am not sure where I have gone wrong in saying that the interests of Suleiman and the military are aligned. Jack says that I am arguing that the military “will get behind” Suleiman, but from everything I have read about him the military is already fully behind him and was before the protests started. After all, he is the person who represents their interests at the top level in the government. There doesn't seem to be any question of whether the military will “get behind” Suleiman. Since Mubarak's announcement that he will not run again, the question has been whether Suleiman and the military will make Mubarak leave sooner or later. The answer seems to be later.

Furthermore, it seems correct that they (i.e., Suleiman and the senior military officers) see their interests being served by a transition in which Mubarak co-opts part of the opposition, hands off the baton to Suleiman, and secures the regime against the current challenge. Maybe this isn't “clever” at all. It is possible that it could backfire, damage the respect Egyptians have for the military, and result in an even bigger mess in a few years' time. Whether it is clever or not remains to be seen, but it does seem to be what is happening. I should add that Springborg regards all of this as a “bad gamble” by the administration. That's possible, but even critics of the decisions that have led to this point should be able to acknowledge what is going on.

There is also the power of precedent. As Issandr El Amrani wrote in his profile of Suleiman two years ago:

Every president of Egypt since 1952 has been a senior military officer, and the military remains, by most measures, the most powerful institution in Egypt.

Meanwhile, Suleiman had already been gaining supporters as the next successor years ago, because he appeared to be a more acceptable alternative to Mubarak than his son:

Publicly, Suleiman has started to gain endorsements for the job from Egyptians across the political spectrum as the increasingly public discussion plays out of who will follow Mubarak. A leftist leader of the Kefaya movement, Abdel Halim Qandil, has urged the military to save the country from a Mubarak dynasty. The liberal intellectual Osama Ghazali Harb — a former Gamal acolyte who turned to the opposition and founded the National Democratic Front party — has openly advocated a military takeover followed by a period of “democratic transition.” Hisham Kassem, head of the Egyptian Organization for Human Rights, also has stated that a Suleiman presidency would be vastly preferable to another Mubarak one. On Facebook, Twitter, and blogs, partisans of a Suleiman presidency make the same argument, often seemingly driven as much by animosity toward the Mubaraks as admiration for the military man.

Meanwhile, here is some reporting from CNN that is worth reading:

“The military's refusal to act is a highly political act which shows that it is allowing the Egyptian regime to reconstitute itself at the top and is highly, utterly against the protesters,” said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt. He was among more than a dozen Middle East experts who met Monday with three White House National Security Council officials to talk about the Egyptian crisis.

The absence of military action serves two purposes, Stacher said.

“(One,) make the protesters go home, and two, scare the population that isn't protesting,” Stacher said. “They want the Egyptian people to submit to the police state, and they want the people to pine for their police state so that they have stability back.”

“It's getting really ruthless,” Stacher added.

In Egypt, Vice President Omar Suleiman issued a statement saying that dialogue with opposition forces, as ordered by Mubarak, won't begin until the demonstrations stop.

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News Headline: The Regime Reconstitutes Itself? (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: TheAtlantic.com
Contact Name: Andrew Sullivan
News OCR Text: by Patrick Appel

A report from an Al Jazerra web producer:

I saw one wounded protester being treated by doctors and then taken away to the ambulances. The doctor who had been working on him told me that the man had been shot in the head but still had a pulse and might survive. There was a puddle of blood on the concrete beneath the man. The doctor said the gunfire came from pro-Mubarak protesters, not from army. I saw second wounded protester also being treated for a gunshot wound, he looked unresponsive. One protester told me six people had died today, however another doctor in the square told me four had died.

Michael Martinez reports on the military's idleness:

"The military's refusal to act is a highly political act which shows that it is allowing the Egyptian regime to reconstitute itself at the top and is highly, utterly against the protesters," said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt.

Robert Springborg argues along similar lines:

The threat to the military's control of the Egyptian political system is passing. Millions of demonstrators in the street have not broken the chain of command over which President Mubarak presides. Paradoxically the popular uprising has even ensured that the presidential succession will not only be engineered by the military, but that an officer will succeed Mubarak. The only possible civilian candidate, Gamal Mubarak, has been chased into exile, thereby clearing the path for the new vice president, Gen. Omar Suleiman. The military high command, which under no circumstances would submit to rule by civilians rooted in a representative system, can now breathe much more easily than a few days ago. It can neutralize any further political pressure from below by organizing Hosni Mubarak's exile, but that may well be unnecessary.

The president and the military, have, in sum, outsmarted the opposition and, for that matter, the Obama administration. They skillfully retained the acceptability and even popularity of the Army, while instilling widespread fear and anxiety in the population and an accompanying longing for a return to normalcy.

(Photo: Anti-government demonstrators hide behind makeshift shields as Molotof cocktails are lobbed by supporters of Egyptian President Honsi Mubarak early on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The two groups skirmished throughout the night. By John Moore/)

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News Headline: Never Forget a Name (Rawson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: AARP The Magazine - Online
Contact Name: Tina Adler
News OCR Text: .textImage table } .textImage th } How often have you heard a funny joke, only to later forget the punch line? If your memory for jokes and other important information isn't as sharp as it used to be, stop doubting yourself and start quizzing yourself instead.Related $j(".v_1033956083").parents("div.articleAddOns, div.dropShadow").css(}); $j( ".v_1033956083" ).parents( "div.articleAddOns" ).addClass( "sb_1033956083" ); you are trying to remember — whether it's a punch line, the name of a person you just met or the request your boss made — is one of the best ways to make sure that information sticks, research shows. In a recent study comparing different strategies for studying for a short science test, college students did best when their studying involved taking , the researchers reported Jan. 20 in the journal Science.

Answering test questions requires retrieving information from memory, and that is more useful than merely reviewing the material, report psychologist Jeffrey Karpicke and Janell Blunt of Purdue University. Good test questions require students to reconstruct what they know, which itself enhances learning, the team reports.

Despite the popularity of playing "brain games" to build mental muscle, games tend to strengthen only the specific skills used in that particular game, recent studies have found. Testing yourself, on the other hand, will help you , according to Henry Roediger III of Washington University and Andrew Butler of Duke University, in an article in the Jan. 15 issue of Trends in Cognitive Science. Experiments have shown that taking a test can more than triple a person's recall, relative to only studying the material, they write.They say an elephant never forgets. Geoff Moore/Gallery Stock

The how-to of self-testing

Testing works equally well if someone tests you or you test yourself. Here's how it works: Before you go into a party (or any event) where you will be introduced to new people whose names you want to remember, remind yourself to test yourself. Then when you first meet someone, use that old trick of saying the person's name right away — even if it's just "nice to meet you, Sam." After a minute or so, say the name to yourself. Repeat as needed, gradually increasing the time between self-quizzes to up to about 10 minutes. "You want to wait long enough that it's difficult to retrieve it, but while you can still get at it," says David Balota of Washington University. "The best procedure is to learn what works with your memory." If you are reading something that you really want to remember, don't bother rereading it numerous times, says David Gallo of the University of Chicago. Instead, read it once, then re-quiz yourself. Consider making flash cards, a time-honored self-testing technique.What Experts Do to Remember At least some memory experts practice what they preach when it comes to self-testing. To improve her French, Katherine Rawson uses flash cards, following two principles:

The number of days you practice is more important than the amount of practice on any given day. Put aside words you remember incorrectly to practice in a few days. But self-testing and other memory cues aren't going to solve all your memory problems, says John Dunlosky. Plus they take effort. So when in doubt, write it down. Or use a computer. Dunlosky says his challenge is remembering his new undergraduate research assistants' names. He tests himself using their online photos and then later in the day retests himself on the names he got wrong, he says. "A day or two of that exercise, and I have everyone's name down easily!" $j(".v_247398957").parents("div.articleAddOns, div.dropShadow").css(}); $j( ".v_247398957" ).parents( "div.articleAddOns" ).addClass( "sb_247398957" );It also helps to talk about what you are trying to remember. can check in with each other and review names of people you just met. Or if you and your spouse like to read aloud to each other interesting snippets from the newspaper, next time just put the information in your own words. Then double-check to make sure you got all the facts straight. As you get older, doing an accuracy check is key, researchers say. Because of age-related changes in the brain, older people are less likely than younger people to recall details, which makes them more susceptible to remembering incorrectly, says Gallo.

Why retesting works

Testing and retesting yourself helps because of the memory cues we form when trying to remember information, a study in the Oct. 15, 2010, issue of Science shows. When you test yourself repeatedly, you are more likely to and they are more likely to trigger your memory, researchers report. Also, successfully recalling those cues may make them easier to remember over time. Finally, getting something wrong on a test may force the brain to shift to a more effective cue.

In the study, researchers asked college students to memorize pairs of words in Swahili and English. The researchers encouraged all the students to think of memory cues, which in this case were words that looked or sounded like the Swahili word but meant something similar to the English word. A hint for the pair "wingu-cloud" could be "wing," for example. On a final exam one week later, students who had been assigned to take practice tests on the word pairings scored better than those who had only restudied the pairs, Katherine Rawson of Kent State University and Mary Pyc of Washington University report. Rawson says their findings apply to older people as well. The importance of these cues is good news for older people, because research shows that aging doesn't impair a person's ability to use them, says Rawson.

Gallo puts everything he needs to remember in his iPhone or e-mail. He tries using memory triggers, such as forming an image of what he needs to remember, "but the problem is I always forget to do that," he says. And he's only 35.

Tina Adler is a freelance writer who covers health, science and the environment.

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News Headline: Why Testing Boosts Learning (Rawson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Scientific American - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For more than a century scientists have known that individuals who are tested on material are more likely to remember it than those who simply study. But questions remain about why that is the case. Kent State University psychology researcher Katherine Rawson argues that part of the explanation is that testing gets people to come up with better keyword clues, which bridge the gap between familiar and new information--and it strengthens ties between these keywords and the newly learned information.

Rawson and former graduate student Mary Pyc asked 118 college students to learn four dozen Swahili words by matching them with their English counterparts, such as wingu , which means “cloud.” After an initial study period, half were given practice tests before studying the words a second time, and half restudied the words without taking a practice test. [More]

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News Headline: Cyber sceptics query Facebook values (Kist) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Mail & Guardian Online
Contact Name: PAUL HARRIS
News OCR Text: The way in which people communicate online via Twitter and Facebook and instant messaging can be seen as a form of modern madness, according to a leading American sociologist. "A behaviour that has become typical may still express the problems that once caused us to see it as pathological," Sherry Turkle, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor, writes in her new book, Alone Together, which is leading an attack on the information age. Turkle's book has caused a sensation in the United States, which is usually more obsessed with the merits of social networking. She appeared recently on Stephen Colbert's late-night comedy show, The Colbert Report. When Turkle said she had been at funerals where people checked their iPhones, Colbert quipped: "We all say goodbye in our own way." Turkle's thesis is simple -- technology is threatening to dominate our lives and make us less human. Under the illusion of allowing us to communicate better, it is actually isolating us from real human interactions. But Turkle's book is far from the only work of its kind. An intellectual backlash in the US is calling for a rejection of some of the values and methods of modern communications. "It is a huge backlash. The different kinds of communication that people are using have become something that scares people," said Professor William Kist, an education expert at Kent State University, Ohio. The critics The list of attacks on social media is a long one and comes from all corners of academia and popular culture. A recent bestseller in the US, The Shallows by Nicholas Carr, suggests that use of the internet is altering the way we think and making us less capable of digesting large and complex amounts of information, such as books and magazine articles. The book was based on an essay that Carr wrote in the Atlantic magazine. It was just as emphatic and was headlined, "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" But Turkle's book has sparked the most debate so far. It is a cri de coeur for putting down the BlackBerry, ignoring Facebook and shunning Twitter. "We have invented inspiring and enhancing technologies, yet we have allowed them to diminish us," she writes. Fellow critics point to many incidents to back up their argument. Recently, media coverage of the death in Brighton of Simone Back focused on a suicide note she had posted on Facebook that was seen by many of her 1 048 "friends" on the site. Yet none called for help. But even the backlash now has a backlash, with many leaping to the defence of social media. They point out that emails, Twitter and Facebook have led to more communication, not less. Some experts believe the debate is so fierce because social networking is a new field that has yet to develop rules and etiquette that everyone can respect and Kist has pointed out that the "real world" that many social media critics hark back to never really existed. Before everyone travelled on the bus or train with their heads buried in an iPad or a smart phone, they usually just travelled in silence. "We did not see people spontaneously talking to strangers. They were just keeping to themselves," Kist said. -- Guardian News & Media 2010

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News Headline: Kent theater hopes to conquer 'Shakes-fear' | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WILL PRESENT ‘OUR HOUR HAMLET' STARTING WEDNESDAY

Hal DuBois knows Shakespeare
can be daunting, something
he hopes to alleviate with
“Our Hour Hamlet.” It's the first
public performance of the Riverside
Reader's Theatre at Kent
State University's Roe Green
Center at 7 p.m Wednesday.
The group, made up of professional
actors, Kent State University
faculty, students and locals
will give a one-hour overview
of “Hamlet” at the center's EZ
Black Box Theatre as part of
the “Our Hamlet” program developed
by DuBois.
Interested in adult education,
DuBois said he wanted to develop
study and reading groups
around the Shakespeare play
in part to help adults who were
reluctant to tackle “the Bard,”
a condition he called “Shakesfear.”
“(The response) has been
overwhelming,” DuBois said. “I
started this as a very simple audience
development project.”
DuBois said he originally envisioned
a group of maybe 12
people interested in studying
the play, possibly with an additional
reading group at the Kent
Free Library.
“I've approached about 60
community groups,” he said. “59
have told me they're interested
in participating in some way, and
we've got several reading groups
forming.”
The original intent of the program
was “audience development”
for KSU's performance of
“Hamlet” directed by Mark Monday,
which will run from April 15
to April 23. Monday has agreed
to give community members a
few “behind the scenes” looks
at the production as they study
and read the play.
On April 13, the group and
KSU will co-host a roundtable
discussion of the play to be
broadcast online to a worldwide
audience for the “Cafe Elsinore”
event at the Roe Green Center.
DuBois said he hopes the Riverside
Reader's Theatre group
stays together after the “Our
Hamlet” events, possibly becoming
a community theater
group.
Although the project has expanded
since its humble origins,
DuBois said the goals are
still simple.
“We just want people to get familiar
with the play, to enjoy the
play” he said. “We're coming up
with a lot of ways to do that.”
Call 330-221-4709 for more information
on the project.

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News Headline: KSU coach to headline Dollars for Scholars | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent
Area Chamber
of Commerce
will host
its semi-annual
Dollars for
Scholars event
from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Feb. 9 in
the Kent Student
Center
Rathskeller.
New KSU Head Football
Coach Darrell Hazell will be
on hand for a meet and greet.
Food will be provided by Damon's.
Tickets are $20 with proceeds
going to the Chamber's
scholarship fund.
“We're very excited to have
Coach Hazell join us for this
year's event,” said Lori Wemhoff,
KACC executive director.
“This will be a great opportunity
for KSU fans to
meet Coach Hazell, ask questions
about the upcoming
season, and help a great
cause all at once.
“Each year we strive to provide
multiple scholarships
to well-deserving, graduating
seniors from Theodore
Roosevelt High School,” she
said.
To make reservations, call
the Kent Chamber office at
330-673-9855 by Friday.

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News Headline: Top-Ranked Communications Design Schools | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: eHow
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For its combination of artistic sensibility with commercial appeal and a competitive job market, the field of
communications design or visual design is an attractive field for many prospective students. The need for skillful web designers versed in the latest digital imaging and illustration software increases all the time. To get the best preparation for a career in this field, seek out the top-ranking colleges that offer communications design program.

Carnegie Mellon University
Founded in 1900, Carnegie Mellon University is voted as the top communications design school by the ranking website College Crunch, in addition to high accolades as one of the Top 200 World Universities as ranked by Times Higher Education, and its MFA Design program was ranked number one by the U.S. News and World Report's 2008 list. Students in the communication design program produce a culminating interdisciplinary project their senior year to encompass all that the program has taught them.

Virginia Commonwealth University
Virginia Commonwealth University also receives a high ranking on College Crunch's list of top Communication Design schools. VCU offers a rigorous arts program, and its degree in Graphic Design prepares students for the field of communications and graphic design. The program trains students in communication, ethics, technology and adaptability. At VCU, students gain an understanding of the history of visual communication and design in addition to cutting-edge technologies, as well as a full range of design techniques.

Pratt Institute
Brooklyn's Pratt Institute, a member of the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design, claims to offer the only program in the country that fully integrates the principles of illustration, advertising and graphic design into its communications design program. The faculty is populated by design professionals able to prepare students for the reality of the industry. With over 40 electives, students have plenty of opportunities to equip themselves with the skills they need.

Kent State University
Ohio's Kent State University happens to be home to a school of Visual Communications Design with national recognition. The visual communications design major is the college's fourth most popular, and graduates go on to take graphic design jobs in every state. The program offers a comprehensive preparation for a professional career in graphic design, and covers conceptual and aesthetic skills as well as design history and theory.

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