Report Overview:
Total Clips (17)
Annual Giving Programs; Scholarship Programs (1)
Art (1)
Athletics (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (2)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Fashion Design (1)
Fashion Design; KSU Museum (1)
Financial Aid; Study Abroad (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
Political Science (3)
Psychology (1)
Sociology (1)
Student Involvement, Center for (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Annual Giving Programs; Scholarship Programs (1)
Streetsboro resident receives KSU 'Campaign' scholarship (Schultz) 02/09/2011 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

Streetsboro resident Kenneth Smith is the recipient of Kent State University's first "Campaign for Change" scholarship. Smith said the scholarship came at just the right time. For many students,...


Art (1)
Main Street Kent honors Fuller for role in city's revival 02/09/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...atmosphere. Artists throughout northeast Ohio and beyond send their works to McKay Bricker for exhibition. Their gallery has been enhanced by a decision by the Kent State University School of Art to open a gallery in the same building, parallel to the McKay Bricker Gallery. Accessible from East Main...


Athletics (1)
Former wins leader - now WWE star - makes return to KSU 02/09/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email


College of Public Health (COPH) (2)
Health officials agree to study possible merger (Slenkovich) 02/09/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...a meeting at Ravenna High School Tuesday. Ravenna Mayor Joseph Bica said the departments could take advantage of a unique opportunity by allowing Kent State University's College of Public Health to study the feasibility of such a merger. “I'm not interested in just merging health departments,”...

Kent State to Study Combining Kent, Ravenna and Portage Health Departments (Slenkovich, James) 02/09/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

It looks like the newly created Kent State University College of Public Health is going to take the lead in studying a possible merger of the Kent, Ravenna...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Events scheduled to mark Black History Month 02/09/2011 cantonrep.com Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design (1)
Kent State fashion students bring campus style to you 02/08/2011 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

...site also offers another valuable opportunity - the chance for budding fashion journalists and photographers to begin their careers. Since last year, Kent State University has been participating on the site. Reporting from a globally ranked fashion school can be a lot of pressure, but this...


Fashion Design; KSU Museum (1)
Fashion Museums Found Far From NYC And Paris 02/08/2011 KSBW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...unusual and elaborate use of textiles. The show includes original ballet costumes designed by Rodarte for the movie "Black Swan," http://www.moca.org. Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, is home to a school of fashion design and merchandising, and the focus of the university's museum is on...


Financial Aid; Study Abroad (1)
Case Western Reserve University sees surge in applications: Higher Education 02/08/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...Carroll University, Dolan Science Center, 2007 North Park Boulevard, University Heights; Lorain County Community College, 1005 North Abbe Road, Elyria; Kent State University, 103 Schwartz Center, Kent and the University of Akron, Simmons Hall, 277 East Buchtel Ave. To register for the event,...


Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
In February journal, UC and industry researchers predict future of electronic devices 02/08/2011 R&D Magazine Text Attachment Email

...allows children to draw with electronic ink and erase the whole screen with the push of a button. It was created based on technology developed in Ohio (Kent State University). Stated Heikenfeld, "Ohio institutions, namely the University of Cincinnati and Kent State, are international...

Researchers predict future of electronic devices, see top ten list of expected breakthroughs 02/08/2011 ScienceDaily Text Attachment Email

...allows children to draw with electronic ink and erase the whole screen with the push of a button. It was created based on technology developed in Ohio (Kent State University). Stated Heikenfeld, "Ohio institutions, namely the University of Cincinnati and Kent State, are international...


Political Science (3)
White House calls on KSU professor for help on Egypt 02/09/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Ohio Professor Talks Egypt Crisis (Stacher) 02/09/2011 WBNS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — As the revolt in Egypt reaches day 15, Kent State University Professor Joshua Stacher said that the crisis is something all Americans should be paying attention to. "Our government...

Activism and state tolerance: what's next for Egypt? (Stacher) 02/08/2011 Africa Report - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...sympathetic, or even protective of the protestors. But very little is known about who controls the armed forces. Egypt specialist Joshua Stacher of Kent State University recently told CNN that “the military's refusal to act is a highly political act which shows that it is allowing the Egyptian...


Psychology (1)
Families are needed for KSU research project 02/09/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

p>43 minutes ago Researchers from the Kent State University Psychology Department invite families with a seventh- or eighth-grader to participate in a research project. The study...


Sociology (1)
I Don'T know most of them which is terrible social scientists from Emery Kent state and mit say people using Facebook and Twitter can'T digest large amounts of information and their attention spans are shorter. 02/08/2011 KSL 5 News Daybreak - KSL-TV Text Email

...sister who has a thousand I think like 500, something like that, something crazy. I Don'T know most of them which is terrible social scientists from Emery Kent state and mit say people using Facebook and Twitter can'T digest large amounts of information and their attention spans are shorter. They...


Student Involvement, Center for (1)
Ice carving exhibition, knitting marathon are Saturday in Kent 02/09/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Streetsboro resident receives KSU 'Campaign' scholarship (Schultz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Streetsboro resident Kenneth Smith is the recipient of Kent State University's first "Campaign for Change" scholarship.

Smith said the scholarship came at just the right time. For many students, financial burdens can force them to withdraw from classes, putting their academic dreams in jeopardy.

"I was actually thinking about taking a semester off because I didn't have enough money," he said. "When I read the e-mail saying I had received the scholarship, I was kind of like those people you see on YouTube acting crazy. It was like someone wanted me to go to school this semester."

The "Campaign for Change" is KSU's student philanthropy initiative, aimed at providing scholarships to members of the student body. According to a news release from KSU, a committee reviewed 168 applications for the $1,250 scholarship. The committee was particularly impressed with the aeronautical systems engineering major's volunteer work at a local daycare where he speaks about astronomy.

"Kids aren't tainted by anything. It's rare to see that," said Smith. "I like working with them because of that." Smith, who has one sister and three half-siblings, plans to be the first in his family to graduate from college. He hopes to parlay his degree into a career as an astronaut, calling himself a "big astronomy nerd."

"I know it's a crazy dream and people usually lose their dreams," he said. "But you have to aim big and shoot for the stars."

Since its launch in 2007, the "Campaign for Change" has raised more than $48,000 from students, parents, faculty and staff. Student gifts range from as little as $1 to as large as $200, raising a total of $2,000 from 365 students last fall. That marks a 124 percent increase in gifts and 57 percent increase in student participation since 2007.

In 2009, the fund reached the $25,000 threshold required to endow it, meaning Kent State students have left a legacy that will aid their peers, current and future, in perpetuity.

"We're fortunate to have students who care about one another and the legacy they leave at Kent State," said Tiffany Schultz, associate director for annual giving at Kent State. "Their goodwill is furthering our culture of philanthropy and exceeding even our greatest expectations. The campaign has proven, time and again, that you should never underestimate the power of peers helping peers."

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News Headline: Main Street Kent honors Fuller for role in city's revival | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: E-mail Story | | Comments |

about 1 hour ago

Record-Courier staff report

Architect Doug Fuller and Cass and Bob Mayfield of McKay Bricker Gallery were honored by Main Street Kent Tuesday at the Pufferbelly.

Fuller, a charter member of Main Street Kent who helped bring the organization into existence, received the Ron Burbick Award, so named for the man behind the Phoenix Project and Acorn Alley. The Mayfields were honored as Volunteers of the Year.

Burbick, a successful businessman and philanthropist who has invested his fortune in rejuvenating the downtown, said Fuller, an advocate for downtown Kent's revival for many years, “has done as much as anyone in bringing the downtown back.”

Fuller is serving as the architect for the Phoenix Project, a restoration and revival of three downtown properties as well as the addition of Acorn Alley, a once dusty lane transformed into an attractive pedestrian mall of shops and restaurants.

Burbick already is at work at extending Acorn Alley south of the alley that parallels East Main Street. Called Acorn Alley II, the extension will run into Haymaker Block, most of which is now demolished, but soon will become a three story complex of offices and retail and service space anchored by the Davey Tree Expert Co. and Ametek, both of which are relocating divisions of their company to the downtown.

Mary Gilbert, executive director and founder of Main Street Kent, with the assistance of Burbick and Fuller and numerous other volunteers extolled the investments that are reviving downtown noting that every $1 invested in Main Street in Kent has had a multiplier effect of $32.

Tuesday evening as retailers and service firms converged on the Main Street awards banquet, the multiplier seemed to be working.

Almost as testimony to the progress the downtown is making was the Volunteer of the Year Award bestowed by Gilbert on Bob and Cass Mayfield, who relocated McKay Bricker Gallery from North Mantua Streets, where it had to make way for the new Fairchild Avenue Bridge, back to East Main Street in attractive quarters that for decades housed W.W. Reed.

The Mayfields, in moving to East Main Street, created a gallery of framing, art and gifts that has big city panache and would compliment any college town's artistic and worldly atmosphere. Artists throughout northeast Ohio and beyond send their works to McKay Bricker for exhibition. Their gallery has been enhanced by a decision by the Kent State University School of Art to open a gallery in the same building, parallel to the McKay Bricker Gallery. Accessible from East Main Street or from McKay Bricker, that gallery affords artists on campus or associated with KSU the opportunity to exhibit their works in a lively, but comfortable downtown setting.

Tom Nightengale, who plans to open Wild Earth Outfitters in Acorn Alley II, was among those present. He said he represents 25 years in the business and will open his store probably within the calendar year.

Randy Durant, who plans to move his Zoupworks from Champion near Warren, into downtown Kent also was on hand. Zoupworks, he said, features gourmet soups that are filling and healthy. Durant utilizes a decor from the 1970s that could prove popular with university people. He said his first Zoupworks opened in Ithaca near Cornell University.

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News Headline: Former wins leader - now WWE star - makes return to KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By David Carducci
about 13 hours ago

By David Carducci | Staff writer

Kent State wrestling fans know him as Nick Nemeth (1999-2003), but to much of the world he is WWE superstar Dolph Ziggler.

And on Friday night, he makes his return to the M.A.C. Center.

The three-time Mid-American Conference champion — and former career wins leader — will serve as an honorary captain for his alma mater when it takes on rival Ohio.

Ziggler will be signing autographs following the Flashes' dual with the Bobcats that is slated to begin at 7:05 p.m. He will also be recognized with a video tribute midway through the dual.

Friday night's M.A.C. Center events will begin at 5 p.m., featuring two high school dual meets. Area schools Cuyahoga Falls and Medina will be in action, along with Gahanna Lincoln and Delaware Hayes. KSU will also welcome back former three-year captain Kyle Bentley (1993-97), who serves as head coach at Gahanna Lincoln.

“We're expecting a great atmosphere Friday night,” Kent State head coach Jim Andrassy said. “You're going to see some quality wrestling at both the high school and college levels, a WWE superstar, and we're going to have the pep band, cheerleaders and promotions, so we'll have something for everyone.”

Ranked No. 15 in last week's NWCA Coaches Poll, the Golden Flashes (12-5, 2-0 MAC) will be recognizing their four seniors Friday night as well. For those who cannot make it to Kent to watch the event live on Friday, SportsTime Ohio will be re-broadcasting the meet on Saturday at 9:30 p.m.

•••

Contact David Carducci at dcarducci@recordpub.com

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News Headline: Health officials agree to study possible merger (Slenkovich) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent, Ravenna and Portage County health department officials agreed to study pros and cons of a potential merger of the three departments in a meeting at Ravenna High School Tuesday.

Ravenna Mayor Joseph Bica said the departments could take advantage of a unique opportunity by allowing Kent State University's College of Public Health to study the feasibility of such a merger.

“I'm not interested in just merging health departments,” Bica said. “I'm interested in a discussion about reinventing public health in Portage County and becoming one of the leaders in Ohio.”

Ken Slenkovich, assistant dean of the College of Public Health, said the study likely would look at legal issues, similarities and differences in programs offered by the departments, personnel issues, funding issues and facilities, among other topics.

Portage County Health Commissioner DuWayne Porter said he believed an impartial study was an important part of the discussion.

“I don't want to be the one to say ‘Hey, guys, let's go together. Everything is going to be great,'” Porter said. “I don't think you'd believe me, and (it would be the) same thing if one of you guys wanted to do it. Let's have a separate body, and I believe the Kent State College of Public Health is the body to do that.”

Slenkovich said the study process could take about a year.

One possible positive outcome, from the county's point of view, would be increased support for a new levy. Porter said he believes the county could pass a new health levy, something it has not done in 55 years, if it was tied in with Kent and Ravenna.

He said all three departments will be pressured to meet new state standards soon, which could be hard on each department.

“Accreditation is a big thing coming,” Porter said. “Sooner or later all departments are going to have to be accredited. Where we stand, Portage County will probably not be accredited. It'd be very difficult for us to do that with our current staffing.”

Although he supports the idea of studying the issue, Bica said he is in no way committed to merging departments.

“After this assessment is done, we may not decide to do this,” he said. “That is in the realm of possibility. But I think Portage County deserves to take this look because we have this possibility.”

Porter said he hoped the boards who nominate members for a steering committee involve other local stakeholders.

“We don't want to just have this meeting and walk away from it and have everybody say ‘That's a good idea or a bad idea,'” Porter said. “Let's get some people who are movers who can do it and move on from there.”

Representatives of the departments agreed to meet again in the Community Room at Ravenna High School at 6 p.m. March 8.

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News Headline: Kent State to Study Combining Kent, Ravenna and Portage Health Departments (Slenkovich, James) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: It looks like the newly created Kent State University College of Public Health is going to take the lead in studying a possible merger of the Kent, Ravenna and Portage County health departments.


Members of all four agencies met Tuesday in the Ravenna High School, at the invitation of Ravenna Mayor Joe Bica , to talk about combining the departments with the goal of improving health services and saving costs.


Those who attended the meeting, about 30 people total, took no formal action. But resident members of each health board generally agreed to look to Kent State to collect information and analyze the possibilities for combining departments or sharing services, facilities and staff.


Ken Slenkovich, assistant dean for Kent State's health college, said he worked on a similar analysis that was conducted for the city of Akron and Summit County when they began talks to merge those health departments. Slenkovich said the university would serve only to collect information about the departments and cannot, by state law, take an active role in operating the departments.


"So we laid all that out, looked at all the data and information and kind of presented it to the (Summit County) folks in a fashion that they could make some decisions on," he said. “We couldn't take over anything, even if we wanted to. We have no interest in directing or telling health departments what they can do."


Having said that, both Slenkovich and Mark James, the dean of the College of Public Health, said there are numerous options for Portage County's three health departments to share Kent State's health resources — that could include sharing professors and grad students with special health knowledge.


“We're here to help however we can," James said. "I see a lot of potential for collaboration with all of your health departments.”


Other area health leaders who attended Tuesday's meeting included Portage County Coroner Roger Marcial, five of Kent's six health board members, several of the Portage County and Ravenna health board members, Kent Health Commissioner John Ferlito and Ravenna Health Commissioner Lynette Blasiman.


The next step in the discussion will be for each health department board to identify members in the community who can serve on a steering committee to lead the merger talks.


DuWayne Porter, Portage County's health commissioner, said he wants to see the departments' operations, staff, facilities and services analyzed to find out if combining any of those will prove beneficial to the individual departments.


There is no timeline for completing the analysis or having each community consider the idea of merging health departments. Slenkovich said the actual data analysis in Summit County took about 5 months, and the communities spent about a year considering the idea before the departments actually merged.


And, in the end, Bica said they may decide merging any of the departments is not beneficial enough to do.


"But I think Portage County deserves to take this look," Bica said. "We need to find out what the facts are and how we can improve public health in Portage County."

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News Headline: Events scheduled to mark Black History Month | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: cantonrep.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Several area colleges will recognize February as Black History Month with speakers and events. Here is some of what's planned.

Feb. 10

• African-American Men in Post-Obama America - 5 to 7 p.m., Kent State University Stark campus, Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. The panel-led discussion with audience participation will focus on issues of inclusion and diversity relevant to young African-American males. Panel members include Sandy Womack, principal of Hartford Middle School; Tamiko Hatcher, principal of GlenOak High School's Health Science Academy; William Casterlow, admissions adviser at Kent State Stark; Michael Brown, community program director at Canton's YMCA Teen Center; Lester Sanders, creator of My Young Brotha National Outreach Initiative; Rahman Stokes, Stark State College F.A.M.E. program coordinator, and Damon Young, Stark State College Upward Bound math-science program curriculum coordinator. Details: call 330-499-9600 or visit www.stark.kent.edu/about/diversity.

• Presentation by Monyka Price, chief of education for the city of Cleveland, 7 p.m., University of Mount Union, Hoover-Price Campus Center, East Room, Alliance. Price serves as the liaison between the city of Cleveland and the Cleveland Metropolitan School District and oversees the mayor's educational initiatives. For more information, contact the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs at 330-823-7288.

Feb. 16

• African-American Women Pioneers in Sports - 12:30 to 2 p.m., Kent State University Stark campus, library conference room, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Presentation by Dr. Leslie Heaphy highlights African-American women who have made significant contributions and achievements in sports. The event is co-sponsored by Kent State Stark's History Club. Details: call 330-499-9600 or visit www.stark.kent.edu/about/diversity.

Feb. 19

• Annual Black Student Union Fashion Show, 7 p.m., University of Mount Union, Mount Union Theatre, Alliance. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. The fashion show, sponsored by the Black Student Union, is open to the public. For more information, contact the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs at 330-823-7288.

Feb. 21

• Get to Know Kent State University at Stark - noon, Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. The kick-off event for EMPOWER2 (Exclusive Multicultural Plan on Widespread Engagement, Recruitment and Retention) Week's Multicultural Student Visit Day includes a campus tour and opportunities to speak to representatives from Kent State Stark's admissions and financial aid departments. Details: call 330-499-9600 or visit www.stark.kent.edu/about/diversity.

• EMPOWER2 Oratorical Competition for high school students - 1 p.m., Kent State University Stark Campus, Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Area high school students will deliver speeches on the following topic: “Generation Now: Where do we go from here?” about issues and concerns for helping African-American teens successfully move forward. Winning students will receive monetary prizes. High school students are encouraged to enter the competition by filling out the application located at www.stark.kent.edu/empower2 by Feb. 16, 2011. The competition is limited to the first 20 participants who apply.

• Multicultural Student Visit Day Keynote Address - 2:30 p.m., Kent State University Stark Campus, Main Hall Auditorium, 6200 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Sandy Womack, principal of Hartford Middle School, will present the EMPOWER2 Week keynote address on the topic, “If You Don't Know Where You're Going.” Details: call 330-499-9600 or visit www.stark.kent.edu/about/diversity.

• Reader's Theatre - 7 p.m., Malone University, Stewart Room, Randall Campus Center. Guest musical artists Bryan Paramore and Flute Juice, presenting a history of jazz. Bring literary works or use the books provided for a read-in, celebrating the literary works of African-American authors.

Feb. 22

• EMPOWER2 Week Movie Night, featuring “The Blind Side” - 7 p.m., Kent State University Stark Campus, Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Oscar-nominated film tells the true story of Michael Oher, a homeless and traumatized boy who became an All American football player and first round NFL draft pick with the help of a caring woman and her family. The film stars Quinton Aaron, Sandra Bullock and Tim McGraw. Details: call 330-499-9600 or visit www.stark.kent.edu/about/diversity.

• The Black List, Volume III - 12:30 to 2 p.m. Feb. 22 in the library conference room, Kent State University Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Photographer/filmmaker Timothy Greenfield-Sanders and public radio host, journalist and former New York Times critic Elvis Mitchell video portraits of some of today's most prominent African-Americans from the areas of arts, sports, politics, business and government. The series provides insight on identity, diversity and race in America. Each video will be followed by a moderated discussion. Details: call 330-499-9600 or visit www.stark.kent.edu/about/diversity.

Feb. 23

• EMPOWER2's Soup and Substance Series - noon, Kent State University Stark Campus, Main Hall, Conference Room 1, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Topic: “Sisters are doing it for themselves!” Enjoy a free cup of soup and conversation about the many roles women have in everyday life. Details: call 330-499-9600 or visit www.stark.kent.edu/about/diversity.

• Storytelling by Jocelyn Palmer-Dabney, 7 p.m., University of Mount Union, Campus Grounds of the Hoover-Price Campus Center. Palmer-Dabney is the director of the Creative Arts Ministry at the Rising Star Baptist Church of Youngstown. A 1972 graduate of Alliance High School, was the first African-American to earn a master's degree in storytelling and reading from East Tennessee State University. For more information, contact the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs at 330-823-7288.

Feb. 24

• Electric Blues, featuring the Wallace Coleman Band - 6 p.m., Kent State University Stark Campus, Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Wallace Coleman, a 10-year veteran of the Grammy Award-winning Robert Lockwood Jr. Band, started his own band in 1996. Four years later, he established his own record label, Pinto Blues Music. He has released five CDs, won a Living Blues Award for fan favorite and garnered two nominations for outstanding harmonica. He has been named an Ohio Heritage Fellow. Details: call 330-499-9600 or visit www.stark.kent.edu/about/diversity.

Feb. 25

• Black Men United Presents: A Talent Showcase, 7 p.m., Malone University, Stewart Room, Randall Campus Center First prize of $100 gift card will be awarded to the winner. Contact KC Carter to register at mek2c@yahoo.com.

Feb. 26

• Black Men United Presents: Black Male Caucus, 1 to 4 p.m., Malone University, Johnson Center Chapel, 2600 Cleveland Ave. NW, Canton. Three area pastors will be guest presenters on “How Relationships affect Young Black Males:” Rev. Melford Elliott Greater Bethel Baptist Church of Akron; "The Justice System and its impact on Young Black Males" by Rev. Walter Ratcliffe of Good Shepherd Baptist Church in Cleveland, and “The Role Religion plays in the life of the Young Black Male," by Rev. George Dunwoody of New Life Ministries in Canton.
Copyright 2011 CantonRep.com. Some rights reserved

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News Headline: Kent State fashion students bring campus style to you | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Stacey Thomas, Cleveland Women's Fashion Examiner
News OCR Text: College Fashionista is a fashion blog for those who are interested in fashion trends happening on college campuses around the world. With hundreds of campuses participating, it is the ultimate resource for students to gain valuable insight into what their college peers are wearing. In addition to innovative street style photography and dressing tips, this site also offers another valuable opportunity - the chance for budding fashion journalists and photographers to begin their careers.

Since last year, Kent State University has been participating on the site. Reporting from a globally ranked fashion school can be a lot of pressure, but this year's Style Gurus have been working hard to capture the true essence of Kent State style. Check out their articles and their biographies, and keep an eye on these motivated individuals! They are sure to be making waves in the industry soon enough.

Current Style Gurus -

Angela Vitello is a senior Fashion Merchandising major at Kent State University. Street style is one of her favorite aspects of fashion, and she loves being able to scout out the fashion leaders on campus. Since she was young, fashion has been a huge part of her identity. She grew up in a small, rural town where fashion wasn't exactly a priority, so being able to write for College Fashionista and attending a globally ranked fashion school has been an amazing experience. She also loves vintage costume jewelry, and believes style is a fun way to personalize your identity. You can follow Angela on Twitter, or check out her column on College Fashionista.

Emmalee Poprock is a junior Fashion Merchandising major at Kent State University. Very involved on campus, she is a member of the Fashion Student Organization, the Kent State Honors College, the Fashion Journalism Team, and TV2 Kent State Student Media. Growing up in a suburb of Cleveland, fashion has always been a part of her life. She describes her personal style as 'girly and flirty' and her favorite color is pink. She takes outfit inspiration from the 1940's and 50's, and her favorite TV series, Gossip Girl. In her bio, she states,"I think style is one of the greatest forms of expression; everyone has his or her own unique interpretation of style." After graduation, she plans to move to NYC and work in fashion journalism or marketing. You can follow Emmalee on her personal fashion blog, catch her on Twitter or Facebook, or check out her column on College Fashionista.

Past Style Gurus -

Bernadette Foster is a junior, double majoring in Magazine Journalism and Fashion Merchandising at Kent State University. She is a member of the Fashion Journalism Team, the Fashion Student Organization, Artemis Magazine and Alpha Xi Delta sorority. Of style she states,"Style is the biggest way to express yourself without saying a word. Your style is the first thing people see and is partial determinance to the way they perceive you. Style is a personal way to express to everyone what you want him or her to know about you; it is an art." She loves girly pieces as well as bold colors and prints, as well as fun colored and patterned tights. After graduation, she plans to work for a fashion magazine. You can check out Bernadette's College Fashionista articles here!

Dana Rozum is a sophomore Fashion Merchandising major at Kent State University, a member of the Fashion Journalism Team, and the Public Relations Representative for the Fashion Student Organization on campus. She describes her style as "sophisticated girly-girl", and loves to mix feminine pieces into her outfits. She believes that the expression,"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder," is an excellent way to describe personal style, and also states,"Trends come and go, but that is the exciting part. As time and culture changes, discovering new perspectives of our style is what keeps fashion evolving." Dana will be working on her Masters in Business Administration, and plans to do an internship in New York City this summer. She also has her eye on Kent State's amazing study abroad program in Florence, and will use her experience to gain a minor in International Business. After graduation, she would love to pursue a career in bridal fashions or fashion journalism. You can check out Dana's College Fashionista articles here!

Joslyn Allen is a Fashion Design major at Kent State University. She believes,"Fashion isn't just a pretty picture on the wall. It is an artist's masterpiece that you can live your life in, and that's what makes it so amazing. It is incredible to me that a single garment can give someone more confidence; make them feel more beautiful than they ever thought they could be." She thinks herself a dreamer, and believes that if something makes you happy, that you should share it. One of her favorite experiences include teaching fourth graders how to draw fashion figures and clothes. Her goal is to share her passion with like-minded others, and hopes to work in a design oriented atmosphere with other passionate artists one day. You can check out her College Fashionista column here!

Are you interested in bringing College Fashionista to your campus? Send your resume.

Never miss an article! Subscribe to Cleveland Women's Fashion Examiner.

Have a story suggestion? Local fashion event? Email the author.

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News Headline: Fashion Museums Found Far From NYC And Paris | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: KSBW-TV - Online
Contact Name: BETH J. HARPAZ
News OCR Text: Indianapolis, Kent Host Grand Fashion Exhibits

BETH J. HARPAZ, AP Travel Editor

Images: Fashion Museums Pop Up Far From Paris

NEW YORK -- Boohoo, so you didn't get a front-row seat for New York Fashion Week! Fortunately, for fashionistas who love couture but can't afford to buy it, there are many museums in the U.S. and abroad where you can get your fashion fix without presenting credentials at the door.

Fashion museums and costume institutes offer close-up looks at contemporary designers and cutting-edge trends, as well as classic styles and fashion history. These collections of clothing, accessories and textiles can be found not only in style capitals like New York, Los Angeles and Paris, but also in unexpected places like Indianapolis and Antwerp, Belgium.

In Manhattan, a gem that deserves to be better known - especially among tourists with an interest in fashion - is The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, at 27th Street and Seventh Avenue in the trendy Chelsea neighborhood, http://fitnyc.edu/3662.asp.

The Museum at FIT hosts special exhibits as well as a rotating themed show selected from its permanent collection of 50,000 objects dating back to the 1700s. Through May 10, the museum's first-floor Fashion and Textile History Gallery hosts "His and Hers," a look at 100 items exploring the relationship between gender and fashion. The exhibit ranges from side-by-side displays of men's and women's outfits from the 1700s and 1800s - including 19th century wedding attire - to business suits from the 1980s. The women's power suit on display from that era, by Yves Saint Laurent, has the requisite blouse with pussycat bow, matching skirt and blazer. Other highlights include a Don Johnson outfit from the "Miami Vice" era, a 1945 zoot suit and an Elsa Schiaparelli 1930s women's suit with padded shoulders.

Through April 2 at The Museum at FIT, the "Japan Fashion Now" exhibit looks at contemporary Japanese fashion, from Lolita fashions - sugary-pink little-girl styles for young women that also have a black Gothic Lolita iteration - to the gauzy, flowing Forest Girl look. Works of famous Japanese designers such as Issey Miyake and Yohji Yamamoto are also on display. Visitors often pose for photos in the building lobby next to larger-than-life images of Hangry and Angry, a female pop music act whose spiked hair and bizarre costumes have made them Japanese fashion icons.

Elsewhere in Manhattan, The Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fifth Avenue and 82nd Street, is gearing up for a major exhibition, "Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty," May 4-July 31. The show will look at the late designer's career, from his first collection in 1992, when he was in his early 20s, to designs that debuted on the runway after his suicide last year. His work ranged from romantic to audaciously edgy. If you're at the Met before the McQueen show opens, the museum also has a popular audio guide tour, narrated by Sarah Jessica Parker, focusing on fashion in paintings, sculptures and objects in its permanent collection; http://www.metmuseum.org/.

In Los Angeles, the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising, 919 South Grand Ave., hosts an "Annual Art of Motion Picture Costume Design" show each year during Oscar season. Costumes from over 20 movies from 2010 are on display through April 30; http://www.fidmmuseum.org.

At L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art, "Rodarte: States of Matter" looks at more than 20 pieces from fashion and costume designers Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte, a brand known for unusual and elaborate use of textiles. The show includes original ballet costumes designed by Rodarte for the movie "Black Swan," http://www.moca.org.

Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, is home to a school of fashion design and merchandising, and the focus of the university's museum is on fashion and textiles, though the collection also includes decorative arts; http://www.kent.edu/museum/. Exhibits often feature works by renowned designers. A show of costumes worn by the late actress Katharine Hepburn is on display through Sept. 4.

The Indianapolis Museum of Art, 4000 Michigan Road, has a dedicated fashion and textile arts exhibition space that usually highlights the museum's collection of 7,000 fabric and fashion-arts items, which range from couture to antique silks and lace. "Material World," which opens April 22, examines how extravagant ornamentation of textiles and personal adornment relate to wealth, status and power. The show will include a Buddhist bone apron, Dior and Chanel designs, and items made from luxurious materials including fur and semiprecious stones; http://www.imamuseum.org/.

In Florence, Italy, the Salvatore Ferragamo Museum, located in Palazzo Spini Ferroni, looks at the history of the famous footwear company and its founder; http://www.museoferragamo.it/en/index.php. Paris is home to two fashion museums, though the Musee Galliera is closed for renovation until next year. The other, Les Arts Decoratifs, at 107 rue de Rivoli, is a branch of the Louvre that also houses other design-related items like furniture. Through May 8 is a show on the fashion of the 1990s; http://www.lesartsdecoratifs.fr/.

In Antwerp, the Mode Museum (MoMu) at Nationalestraat 28 - http://www.momu.be - hosts "Unravel: Knitwear in Fashion," March 16-Aug. 14. The exhibit looks at knit garments from classic Schiaparelli and Chanel items to knits in avant-garde, everyday and contemporary designs, including pieces from Vivienne Westwood and Missoni.

Another favorite in Europe for fashion-lovers, the fashion gallery at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, is closed for renovation until next year.

Toronto is home to the Bata Shoe Museum, at 327 Bloor Street West, http://www.batashoemuseum.ca. The building is designed to resemble a lid resting on an open box. The personal collection of its founder Sonja Bata forms the core of the museum's holdings, which include footwear and related items from around the world and across centuries. Exhibits range from contemporary footwear to celebrity fashions to historic artifacts, from ancient Egyptian sandals to moon boots.

In Shanghai, the Museum of Contemporary Art - http://www.mocashanghai.org - is hosting "Culture Chanel" through March 14 looking at the creative heritage of the House of Chanel. If you can't get to Shanghai before then, an evocative online tour looks at the exhibit's five themes, including the designer's inspirations and ideals, from her childhood in an orphanage to her liberated lifestyle breaking conventional rules for women.

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts - http://www.mbam.qc.ca/ - hosts a Jean Paul Gaultier retrospective beginning June 17 that brings together what the designer described in a recent Associated Press interview as his "obsessions: the corset, skin, the cinema, music." Gaultier's designs range from Madonna's cone bra top to classics like a trenchcoat and sailor-style top. The exhibit moves on to the Dallas Museum of Art and the de Young Museum in San Francisco in 2012.

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News Headline: Case Western Reserve University sees surge in applications: Higher Education | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Karen Farkas, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio - Case Western Reserve University recruiters are being credited for a more than 45-percent increase in applications over last year. The 13,636 applications for next school year include a 75-percent surge in minority students, the university said.

Applications have risen at many universities because students are applying to more institutions. But Rick Bischoff, vice president for enrollment at CWRU, attributes the dramatic rise in applications there to recruitment, according to a news release.

He said counselors visited 900 high schools, compared to 300 high schools three years ago. In addition, the university reached out earlier and more frequently to potential applicants through increased email and other communications.

This year, 1,021 freshmen enrolled at CWRU.

Help with FAFSA: Everyone planning to attend college should fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, commonly known as FAFSA. But the form can be daunting to complete, so parents and students are invited to attend the annual College Goal Sunday on Feb. 13 at several locations in Northeast Ohio.

Those who bring tax and ID forms can receive help filling out the forms. The free workshops will be held at 2 p.m. at Cuyahoga Community College's Western Campus, 11000 Pleasant Valley Road, Parma; Fairview Park Library, 21255 Lorain Road; John Carroll University, Dolan Science Center, 2007 North Park Boulevard, University Heights; Lorain County Community College, 1005 North Abbe Road, Elyria; Kent State University, 103 Schwartz Center, Kent and the University of Akron, Simmons Hall, 277 East Buchtel Ave.

To register for the event, go to ohiocollegegoalsunday.org

Kent State extends reach to India: Kent State University will open an office in Delhi, India this spring. It also has international academic centers in Florence, Italy; Geneva, Switzerland; and Beijing, China.

KSU officials, who have met with more than 10 universities in India, hope to see an increase in the number of Indian students who enroll at its campus.

KSU opened an office in Beijing in 2008. In the spring of that year, the university had 91 Chinese students, representing 12 percent of all international students. Today it has 576 students from China, comprising 40 percent of its international student population.

Currently, 122 students from India attend KSU.

Environmental leader to speak: Robert Bullard, widely known as the "Father of Environmental Justice" and a leading campaigner against environmental racism, will speak at Cuyahoga Community College's three campuses Wednesday and Thursday.The event is free and open to the public.

Bullard will give a talk entitled "Race, Place and Environmental Justice after Hurricane Katrina: Struggles to Reclaim, Rebuild and Revitalize New Orleans and the Gulf Coast."

He will speak Wednesday at noon in the Western Campus Theatre, 11000 Pleasant Valley Road, Parma, and at 7 p.m. in the Metro Campus Theatre, 2900 Community College Ave., Cleveland. The presentation will also be offered at noon Thursday at the Eastern Campus Auditorium, 4250 Richmond Road, Highland Hills.

Bullard is the director of the Environmental Justice Resource Center at Clark Atlanta University.

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News Headline: In February journal, UC and industry researchers predict future of electronic devices | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: R&D Magazine
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The just-released February issue of the Journal of the Society for Information Display contains the first-ever critical review of current and future prospects for electronic paper functions – in other words reviewing and critiquing the technologies that will bring us devices like

full-color, high-speed, low-power e-readers;

iPads that can be viewed in bright sunlight, or

e-readers and iPads so flexible that they can be rolled up and put in a pocket.

The University of Cincinnati's Jason Heikenfeld, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering and an internationally recognized researcher in the field of electrofluidics, is the lead author on the paper titled "A Critical Review of the Present and Future Prospects for Electronic Paper." Others contributing to the article are industry researcher Paul Drzaic of Drzaic Consulting Services; research scientist Jong-Souk (John) Yeo of Hewlett-Packard's Imaging and Printing Group; and research scientist Tim Koch, who currently manages Hewlett-Packard's effort to develop flexible electronics.

TOP TEN LIST OF COMING e-DEVICES

Based on this latest article and his ongoing research and development related to e-paper devices, UC's Heikenfeld provides the following top ten list of electronic paper devices that consumers can expect both near term and in the next ten to 20 years.

Heikenfeld is part of an internationally prestigious UC team that specializes in research and development of e-devices.

Coming later this year:

Color e-readers will be out in the consumer market by mid year in 2011. However, cautions Heikenfeld, the color will be muted as compared to what consumers are accustomed to, say, on an iPad. Researchers will continue to work toward next-generation (brighter) color in e-Readers as well as high-speed functionality that will eventually allow for point-and-click web browsing and video on devices like the Kindle.

Already in use but expansive adoption and breakthoughs imminent:

Electronic shelf labels in grocery stores. Currently, it takes an employee the whole day to label the shelves in a grocery store. Imagine the cost savings if all such labels could be updated within seconds – allowing for, say, specials for one type of consumer who shops at 10 a.m. and updated specials for other shoppers stopping in at 5:30 p.m. Such electronic shelf labels are already in use in Europe and the West Coast and in limited, experimental use in other locales. The breakthrough for use of such electronic labels came when they could be implemented as low-power devices. Explained Heikenfeld, "The electronic labels basically only consume significant power when they are changed. When it's a set, static message and price, the e-shelf label is consuming such minimal power – thanks to reflective display technology – that it's highly economical and effective." The current e-shelf labels are monochrome, and researchers will keep busy to create high-color labels with low-power needs.

The new "no knobs" etch-a-sketch. This development allows children to draw with electronic ink and erase the whole screen with the push of a button. It was created based on technology developed in Ohio (Kent State University). Stated Heikenfeld, "Ohio institutions, namely the University of Cincinnati and Kent State, are international leaders in display and liquid optics technology."

Technology in hot-selling Glow Boards will soon come to signage. Crayola's Glow Board is partially based on UC technology developments, which Crayola then licensed. While the toy allows children to write on a surface that lights up, the technology has many applications, and consumers can expect to see those imminently. These include indoor and outdoor sign displays that when turned off, seem to be clear windows. (Current LCD – liquid crystal display – sign technology requires extremely high power usage, and when turned off, provide nothing more than a non-transparent black background.)

Coming within two years:

An e-device that will consume little power while also providing high function and color (video playing and web browsing) while also featuring good visibility in sunlight. Cautions Heikenfeld, "The color on this first-generation low-power, high-function e-device won't be as bright as what you get today from LCD (liquid crystal display) devices (like the iPad) that consume a lot of power. The color on the new low-power, high-function e-device will be about one third as bright as the color you commonly see on printed materials. Researchers, like those of us at UC, will continue to work to produce the Holy Grail of an e-device: bright color, high function (video and web browsing) with low power usage."

Coming within three to five years:

Color adaptable e-device casings. The color and/or designed pattern of the plastic casing that encloses your cell phone will be adaptable. In other words, you'll be able to change the color of the phone itself to a professional black-and-white for work or to a bright and vivid color pattern for a social outing. "This is highly achievable," said Heikenfeld, adding, "It will be able to change color either automatically by reading the color of your outfit that day or by means of a downloaded app. It's possible because of low-power, reflective technology" (wherein the displayed pattern or color change is powered by available ambient light vs. powered by an electrical charge).

Expect the same feature to become available in devices like appliances. "Yes," said Heikenfeld, "We'll see a color-changing app, so that you can have significant portions of your appliances be one color one day and a different color or pattern the next."

Bright-color but low-power digital billboards visible both night and day. Currently, the digital billboards commonly seen are based on LEDs (liquid crystal displays), which consume high levels of electric power and still lose color when in direct sunlight. Heikenfeld explained, "We have the technology that would allow these digital billboards to operate by simply reflecting ambient light, just like conventional printed billboards do. That means low power usage and good visibility for the displays even in bright sunlight. However, the color doesn't really sizzle yet, and many advertisers using billboards will not tolerate a washed-out color."

Foldable or roll-it-up e-devices. Expect that the first-generation foldable e-devices will be monochrome. Color will come later. The first foldable e-devices will come from Polymer Vision in the Netherlands. Color is expected later, using licensed UC-developed technology. The challenge, according to Heikenfeld, in creating foldable e-devices has been the device screen, which is currently made of rigid glass. But what if the screen were a paper-thin plastic that rolled like a window shade? You'd have a device like an iPad that could be folded or rolled up tens of thousands of times. Just roll it up and stick it in your pocket. See a video.

In ten to 20 years, consumers will see e-devices with magazine-quality color, viewable in bright sunlight but requiring low power.

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News Headline: Researchers predict future of electronic devices, see top ten list of expected breakthroughs | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: ScienceDaily
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ScienceDaily (Feb. 8, 2011) In the first published critical review of technical developments related to electronic paper devices (i.e., e-readers like the Amazon Kindle), UC researcher Jason Heikenfeld and industry counterparts review the next generation of these devices. The just-released February issue of the Journal of the Society for Information Display contains the first-ever critical review of current and future prospects for electronic paper functions -- in other words reviewing and critiquing the technologies that will bring us devices like

full-color, high-speed, low-power e-readers; iPads that can be viewed in bright sunlight, or e-readers and iPads so flexible that they can be rolled up and put in a pocket. The University of Cincinnati's Jason Heikenfeld, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering and an internationally recognized researcher in the field of electrofluidics, is the lead author on the paper titled "A Critical Review of the Present and Future Prospects for Electronic Paper." Others contributing to the article are industry researcher Paul Drzaic of Drzaic Consulting Services; research scientist Jong-Souk (John) Yeo of Hewlett-Packard's Imaging and Printing Group; and research scientist Tim Koch, who currently manages Hewlett-Packard's effort to develop flexible electronics.

Based on this latest article and his ongoing research and development related to e-paper devices, UC's Heikenfeld provides the following top ten list of electronic paper devices that consumers can expect both near term and in the next ten to 20 years.

Heikenfeld is part of a UC team that specializes in research and development of e-devices.

Coming later this year:

Color e-readers will be out in the consumer market by mid year in 2011. However, cautions Heikenfeld, the color will be muted as compared to what consumers are accustomed to, say, on an iPad. Researchers will continue to work toward next-generation (brighter) color in e-Readers as well as high-speed functionality that will eventually allow for point-and-click web browsing and video on devices like the Kindle. Already in use but expansive adoption and breakthoughs imminent:

Electronic shelf labels in grocery stores. Currently, it takes an employee the whole day to label the shelves in a grocery store. Imagine the cost savings if all such labels could be updated within seconds -- allowing for, say, specials for one type of consumer who shops at 10 a.m. and updated specials for other shoppers stopping in at 5:30 p.m. Such electronic shelf labels are already in use in Europe and the West Coast and in limited, experimental use in other locales. The breakthrough for use of such electronic labels came when they could be implemented as low-power devices. Explained Heikenfeld, "The electronic labels basically only consume significant power when they are changed. When it's a set, static message and price, the e-shelf label is consuming such minimal power -- thanks to reflective display technology -- that it's highly economical and effective." The current e-shelf labels are monochrome, and researchers will keep busy to create high-color labels with low-power needs. The new "no knobs" etch-a-sketch. This development allows children to draw with electronic ink and erase the whole screen with the push of a button. It was created based on technology developed in Ohio (Kent State University). Stated Heikenfeld, "Ohio institutions, namely the University of Cincinnati and Kent State, are international leaders in display and liquid optics technology." Technology in hot-selling Glow Boards will soon come to signage. Crayola's Glow Board is partially based on UC technology developments, which Crayola then licensed. While the toy allows children to write on a surface that lights up, the technology has many applications, and consumers can expect to see those imminently. These include indoor and outdoor sign displays that when turned off, seem to be clear windows. (Current LCD -- liquid crystal display -- sign technology requires extremely high power usage, and when turned off, provide nothing more than a non-transparent black background.) Coming within two years:

An e-device that will consume little power while also providing high function and color (video playing and web browsing) while also featuring good visibility in sunlight. Cautions Heikenfeld, "The color on this first-generation low-power, high-function e-device won't be as bright as what you get today from LCD (liquid crystal display) devices (like the iPad) that consume a lot of power. The color on the new low-power, high-function e-device will be about one third as bright as the color you commonly see on printed materials. Researchers, like those of us at UC, will continue to work to produce the Holy Grail of an e-device: bright color, high function (video and web browsing) with low power usage." Coming within three to five years:

Color adaptable e-device casings. The color and/or designed pattern of the plastic casing that encloses your cell phone will be adaptable. In other words, you'll be able to change the color of the phone itself to a professional black-and-white for work or to a bright and vivid color pattern for a social outing. "This is highly achievable," said Heikenfeld, adding, "It will be able to change color either automatically by reading the color of your outfit that day or by means of a downloaded app. It's possible because of low-power, reflective technology" (wherein the displayed pattern or color change is powered by available ambient light vs. powered by an electrical charge). Expect the same feature to become available in devices like appliances. "Yes," said Heikenfeld, "We'll see a color-changing app, so that you can have significant portions of your appliances be one color one day and a different color or pattern the next." Bright-color but low-power digital billboards visible both night and day. Currently, the digital billboards commonly seen are based on LEDs (liquid crystal displays), which consume high levels of electric power and still lose color when in direct sunlight. Heikenfeld explained, "We have the technology that would allow these digital billboards to operate by simply reflecting ambient light, just like conventional printed billboards do. That means low power usage and good visibility for the displays even in bright sunlight. However, the color doesn't really sizzle yet, and many advertisers using billboards will not tolerate a washed-out color." Foldable or roll-it-up e-devices. Expect that the first-generation foldable e-devices will be monochrome. Color will come later. The first foldable e-devices will come from Polymer Vision in the Netherlands. Color is expected later, using licensed UC-developed technology. The challenge, according to Heikenfeld, in creating foldable e-devices has been the device screen, which is currently made of rigid glass. But what if the screen were a paper-thin plastic that rolled like a window shade? You'd have a device like an iPad that could be folded or rolled up tens of thousands of times. Just roll it up and stick it in your pocket. Within ten to 20 years:

e-Devices with magazine-quality color, viewable in bright sunlight but requiring low power. "Think of this as the green iPad or e-Reader, combining high function and high color with low power requirements." said Heikenfeld. The e-Sheet, a virtually indestructible e-device that will be as thin and as rollable as a rubber place mat. It will be full color and interactive, while requiring low power to operate since it will charge via sunlight and ambient room light. However, it will be so "tough" and only use wireless connection ports, such that you can leave it out over night in the rain. In fact, you'll be able to wash it or drop it without damaging the thin, highly flexible casing.

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News Headline: White House calls on KSU professor for help on Egypt | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: STACHER MET WITH
NATIONAL SECURITY
COUNCIL MEMBERS
By BEN WOLFORD | STAFF WRITER
The Kent State University
professor sought by
CNN, NPR and the White
House for his Egypt expertise
returned from a
few days in Washington,
D.C., last week.
Joshua Stacher, an assistant
professor of political
science, met with
National Security Council
members at the White
House to talk strategy on
Jan. 31, a Monday, and he
stayed until Wednesday.
“Everybody's calling me
a celebrity, and I don't really
think that,” he said,
mentioning the hundreds
of Egyptians
who
have died
protesting
in the past
two weeks.
“I'm sad
that it took
all that for
people to
have me share my expertise.”
Stacher studied international
relations in Scotland
and has lived in Cairo and
Syria. He has published
papers on Egyptian governance
and the Society
of Muslim Brothers.
He also teaches classes
at KSU, and he hasn't
received any excused absences
in light of the recent
STACHER MET WITH
NATIONAL SECURITY
COUNCIL MEMBERS
By BEN WOLFORD | STAFF WRITER
The Kent State University
professor sought by
CNN, NPR and the White
House for his Egypt expertise
returned from a
few days in Washington,
D.C., last week.
Joshua Stacher, an assistant
professor of political
science, met with
National Security Council
members at the White
House to talk strategy on
Jan. 31, a Monday, and he
stayed until Wednesday.
“Everybody's calling me
a celebrity, and I don't really
think that,” he said,
mentioning the hundreds
of Egyptians
who
have died
protesting
in the past
two weeks.
“I'm sad
that it took
all that for
people to
have me share my expertise.”
Stacher studied international
relations in Scotland
and has lived in Cairo and
Syria. He has published
papers on Egyptian governance
and the Society
of Muslim Brothers.
He also teaches classes
at KSU, and he hasn't
received any excused absences
in light of the recent

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News Headline: Ohio Professor Talks Egypt Crisis (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: WBNS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — As the revolt in Egypt reaches day 15, Kent State University Professor Joshua Stacher said that the crisis is something all Americans should be paying attention to.

"Our government funds the Egyptian government to the tune of $1.5 billion a year in tax payer dollars," said Stacher. "It's an important issue for people to know so if they don't want to participate in authoritarianism, they can let people know. Egypt would rather be a democratic government anyway."

Democracy is what Stacher would like to see in the country, ONN's Cristin Severance reported.

Stacher spent nine years living in Cairo and specializes in Authoritarian Regimes and social movements.

The professor was one of just 20 experts on Egypt invited to a meeting with the senior members of the National Security Council last week at the White House.

"We discussed sort of political developments in Egypt," Stacher said. "We discussed the possible outcomes, and groups they could think about. Members of the security council that were there also presented the media strategy that the policy was based on."

Stacher believed that those strategy's were well intentioned, but said that the meetings neutral tone may mean more of the same in Egypt.

"By remaining neutral and not choosing a side, I felt like we were choosing a side," Stacher said. "So I guess there a difference in opinions between what I thought and what they were trying to do."

Biden also urged in the call with Omar Suleiman that the transitions produce immediate and irreversible progress responding to what the Egyptian people want.

That runs counter to demands of many protesters in Egypt who said that they cannot negotiate with the government while President Hosni Mubarak remains in power.

The U.S. has never called for Mubarak's resignation and now appears to be increasingly endorsing negotiations headed by Suleiman, a Mubarak ally, which some protesters said fall far short of what is needed.

Watch ONN and refresh ONNtv.com for the latest information.

The White House said that Vice President Joe Biden has spoken to his Egyptian counterpart to reiterate the U.S. call for a transition in Egypt that is prompt, meaningful, peaceful and legitimate.

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News Headline: Activism and state tolerance: what's next for Egypt? (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Africa Report - Online, The
Contact Name: Gemma Ware
News OCR Text: Written by Khadija Sharife

The lessons for the authorities in Cairo echo those learned too late in Tunis: cracking down on dissent is not so easy when social network sites and citizen bloggers can gain a global audience in a matter of days. But how does Egypt's low-profile military actually view the changes now sweeping the country?

There was probably no way for the authorities to prevent the uprising of millions of citizens in Egypt, a country characterised by staggering inequality, human rights violations and corruption. This was especially true after the uprising in neighbouring Tunisia toppled the dictatorship of President Zine el Abidine Ben Ali with such astonishing speed. In Cairo alone, there may have been as many as two million protestors at some recent rallies. A nation of usually non-confrontational people has awoken to reclaim the streets, their human rights, and their dignity.

In many ways, the sustained resistance of the youth, drawing strength from their courage and conviction, their rage and despair, is a genuine intifada borne of the old and the new. Traditional methods of communication such as pamphlets, faxes, landlines and ‘stealth meetings' in homes, street corners and mosques, have been augmented by virtual congregations on social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter.

These cyber-rallies have the obvious advantage of bypassing the dangers inherent to geographically fixed meeting points. In an age where information moves at the speed of light, the internet has become both a brawny social muscle that can be collectively flexed, as well as a vehicle used by repressive states to track and counter activists.

In Iran, where internet penetration rates are estimated at 35%, most service has been disrupted during periods of unrest. However, the government has usually allowed citizens to continue accessing Twitter as a means of intelligence gathering to monitor protests.

In Tunisia, Facebook proved critical when 26-year-old Tunisian fruit vendor Mohamed Bouazizi, who fatally set himself alight in protest at constant police harassment, left a message on the networking site asking his mother for forgiveness. After this was picked up by the Al Jazeera news network, global awareness of the mounting Tunisian rebellion was generated, becoming instrumental in the uprising gaining such swift momentum.

Citizen narratives vs. government backlash

The extraordinary recent events in Tunisia and Egypt have been documented in large part through the use of citizen-generated social media - a substitute for traditional reporting following the suspension of many publications – allowing ordinary people to ‘narrate' their own struggles.

Moreover, traditional media outlets have often used citizen narratives as a form of transmitting information, leveling the playing field in countries like Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran and Israel where news outlets are often heavily influenced by, or in favour of, the regimes in power.

Unlike Tunisia, where over a third of the population has internet access, penetration is much lower in Egypt at around 15%. And those accessing the internet in Egypt, such as followers of the April 6 Facebook movement, face a number of obstacles. Among the biggest of these is that operating licenses for internet services are provided by the government, allowing them to access data and know the locations of users, as well as being able to cut connectivity without prior warning.

This makes life very difficult for people such as Wael Ghonim, Google's head of marketing for the Middle East and North Africa. Ghonim was released on Monday having spent a week in custody after attending a protest organised by the April 6 movement on 25 January. He rejoined protests in Tahrir Square and went straight back on twitter.

As in Tunisia, where leaked cables provided by WikiLeaks disclosed that the US did not consider Ben Ali an ‘ally' and preferred his removal from power, Washington has long been collaborating with key leaders from the April 6 movement. The WikiLeaks cables confirmed a change of government in Egypt was predicted in 2011, allowing for negotiations with other parties.

Generally portrayed by the American media as the lesser of two possible evils, President Hosni Mubarak's rule has long been justified by the US as a bastion against militant Islam. But in recent years, bloggers pushing for democratic change have peeled back the myth of the regime. One of Egypt's best-known English-language bloggers,Sandmonkey, was arrested on 2 February while delivering medical supplies to Tahrir Square. He claims he was then roughed up in prison and his blog suspended until his release the next day.

Activists can achieve global profiles

In one of his previous blog posts, he described his extreme fatigue, having been on the run for days. He wrote how “the situation here is bleak to say the least. It didn't start out that way. On Tuesday January 25 it all started peacefully, and against all odds, we succeeded to gather hundreds of thousands and get them into Tahrir Square, despite being attacked by anti-riot police who are using sticks, tear gas and rubber bullets against us.”

Sandmonkey went on to write: “I was shot at twice that day, [once] with a semi-automatic by a dude in a car that we, the people, took joy in pummeling. The government announced that all prisons were breached, and that the prisoners somehow managed to get weapons and do nothing but randomly attack people. One day we had organized thugs in uniforms firing at us, and the next day they disappeared and were replaced by organized thugs without uniforms firing at us. Somehow the people never made the connection.”

Ahmed Maher, a leader of the April 6 movement whose protest plans have been regularly intercepted by security agents, was also presumed to have been arrested or detained. In an interview with Maher on 2 February, Wired magazine learned he had not been arrested, but would not say whether or not he had been roughed up by the police.

Rewind two years. On 6 February 2009, Philip Rizk, an Egyptian-German filmmaker, was abducted from a police station by secret service agents in the city of Qalyubia, north of Cairo. Rizk had been arrested while campaigning for humanitarian support to Gaza. He claims he was taken to a secret location three floors beneath the surface in unidentified facilities and constantly interrogated about “my activism, my writing, everything.” He was released after being held for four days.

In all likelihood, Rizk may not have been freed so soon, if at all, had his friends and colleagues not mounted an international campaign that caught the attention of the New York Times. Such abductions are par for the course in Egypt, where detainees are routinely held without trial or access to legal representation.

What is the present role of Egypt's military?

Under the guise of ‘reform' at the state level, the military has further embedded itself within Egypt's newly appointed cabinet. When asked about the elevation to vice president of Omar Sulieman, Egypt's former chief of intelligence and Mubarak's right-hand man, Rizk told The Africa Report that “Egyptians understand this for what it is. It represents no change. As soon as the announcement was made, protestors began chanting against Sulieman, identified as a man of the regime.”

The military has been portrayed by international media as sympathetic, or even protective of the protestors. But very little is known about who controls the armed forces.

Egypt specialist Joshua Stacher of Kent State University recently told CNN that “the military's refusal to act is a highly political act which shows that it is allowing the Egyptian regime to reconstitute itself at the top and is highly, utterly against the protesters.”

But will the US listen? If the military is the power backing the regime, and is financed annually to the tune of $1.3bn by the US government – the US's second largest aid recipient in the world, after Israel – who is responsible for Mubarak's dictatorship?

According to Na'eem Jeenah, executive director of the Johannesburg-based think tank Afro-Middle East Centre, “the whole notion that we've been exposed to recently of these soldiers as benevolent protectors is a myth. In the lower and middle ranks, there is certainly potential for soldiers to switch sides. But it has been a move by those on top to provide a good image of the military, and those from below, who want to win over the soldiers. Some thought it was a great thing when the cabinet was dissolved, but what we're really seeing is the removal of business people and the entrenchment of the military, to ensure that they have the control in the new government.”

Jeenah told The Africa Report that the military had long been in control of key sectors of the country's political economy. In his view, it has “a well designed plan to pace the process and timing of change, to secure the army's role in government and the economy.”

“Once the sun sets,” said Jeenah, “the army will go in and clean up the protestors.”

Even without its figurehead, the Mubarak machinery will be able to ensure the continuation of the same repressive and brutal tactics. Social media can act as the watchdog, when and if the Egyptian government allows it, but who in Egypt will respond to the watchdog?

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News Headline: Families are needed for KSU research project | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: p>43 minutes ago

Researchers from the Kent State University Psychology Department invite families with a seventh- or eighth-grader to participate in a research project.

The study aims to shed light on how adolescents cope with stress, and will include all types of families (for example, single parent and two parent families).

Participating teens and their mothers will fill out questionnaires and discuss different topics with one another.

Study visits are held in the Psychology Department at KSU, and scheduled at family's convenience. The mother-teen pairs are compensated for their participation.

In accordance with KSU ethics committee rules, all participant information and data are kept confidential.

For more information about the Anxiety and Depression Among Mothers and Adolescents (ADAMA) study, call 330-672-2139 or e-mail adama.study@gmail.com.

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News Headline: I Don'T know most of them which is terrible social scientists from Emery Kent state and mit say people using Facebook and Twitter can'T digest large amounts of information and their attention spans are shorter. | Email

News Date: 02/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: KSL 5 News Daybreak - KSL-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Immigration and customs officials conducted a similar crack down In Minnesota last year and that forced the chain to fire hundreds of workers when their employment eligibility could not be verified. The Obama administration wants to put alternative energies on the fast are track to production. In Virginia the interior secretary and secretary of energy announced plans to spend $50 million to speed up the development of offshore wind farms. The goal is to have at least four wind projects issued off four Atlantic coast states by the end of the year. The goal is to generate 80 percent of the nation's electricity from clean energy sources by 2035. Floorists always get an extra boost this time of year due to Valentine's bay. If You Haven'T wide Flowers In awhile be prepared to fork over the cash when You're buying Valentine's Flowers, that's the most expensive In the period for Flowers. Experts say it's best to talk with with the florist to find an arrangement In your Price rang and if You're ordering on line be prepared for slight variations from a picture. Sometimes they Don'T have the exact same Flowers and will substitute others to get the same effect. Also if You're picking up Flowers at the supermarket make sure You know what day they get deliveries. Delta has a class of airline tickets that gets You more leg room and will offer the option on International flights this summer. The new seats will be available to book starting In may. Top tier frequent fliers and customers that buy full fair Economy tickets will be able to sit at no extra charge. Lower level frequent fliers will get discounts on the premium Economy the kind of not first class but not quite coach seat that's what it sounds like. Whole Foods is showing customers where the meat comes from and how it's raised. The system ranked beef, pork and chic (one to five, one being the best. An independent auditing form looks at welfare practices and conditions of the animals. Shoppers can look for color coded signs and stickers In the meat departments. Whole Foods requires meat sold In the store be raised on a vegetarian tight eel with no hormones or antibiotics do You have old cell phones or gadgets hanging around your home? Some stores are offering to buy them back from You. Radio Shack and Target are offering credit towards new purchases. Best Buy has a buy back program where certain products receive a partial credit. Retailers hope trade ins will generate some foot traffic and of course the loyalty at the same time. Police In Los Angeles busted more than $2 million In counterfeit I phones and I I-pods this week. The products were made In China and shipped to la where they were assembled, packaged and sold at three swap meets and three markets. Police expect to find more as the investigation continues social networking is so common these days some experts say it's effecting our relationships. Just ask someone how Facebook friends they have. 300 Or something like that. As opposed to my sister who has a thousand I think like 500, something like that, something crazy. I Don'T know most of them which is terrible social scientists from Emery Kent state and mit say people using Facebook and Twitter can'T digest large amounts of information and their attention spans are shorter. They say social networking is creating a generation of superficial relationships but many social networkers say it actually makes them smarter. Word of news story and social movements spreads quickly putting power into the hands of ordinary people. While You shouldn'T post anything on line You Don'T want your boss to see employers should think about twice before stopping their employees from talking about their jobs on Facebook. A recent case was settled where a woman was fired for criticizing her boss on Facebook. This case isn'T giving people free reign to discuss work on line but protecting those doing the posting a year ago ago archaeologist excavated an area about to be bulldozed for a dam. They found evidence of a culture that apparently thrived for 800 years and vanished more than a thousand years ago. So far they've found 54 ancient human remains when it comes to human remains those are very, very sacred native Americans and archaeologists and a Utah law maker have been trying to figure out what to do now it's been more than a year since they were discovered and it's not decided what will happen to the remains an exhibit at the BYU museum of art has officials worried about crowd croa.

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News Headline: Ice carving exhibition, knitting marathon are Saturday in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By THOMAS GALLICK | STAFF WRITER
Standing Rock Cultural Arts
is hosting two events this weekend,
one for those who don't
mind the cold and one to help
those trying to escape it.
The group will present the
sixth annual “Make Mine With
Ice,” ice carving exhibition from
1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and the
first “Spread the Warmth” knitting
marathon from 1 p.m. to 5
p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.
Jeff Ingram, director of Standing
Rock Cultural Arts, said
the excitement of watching ice
sculptures appear in real time at
Home Savings Plaza, on the corner
of Water and Main streets,
should be enough to draw
crowds even in cold weather.
“Most people are just fascinated
with how they carve the
sculptures, starting with the
chainsaws and moving down to
the chisels,” Ingram said.
Students and faculty from
Kent State University's Ice
Carving Club and the University
of Akron's Ice Team will
showcase their ice-based artistry
for the public.
Ingram said the sculptures
range from the obvious, like
KSU and Akron U logos and
black squirrels, to the inspired,
like the impressive ice dragon
created for 2008's exhibition.
While the ice carvers are cutting
and chipping away, local
knitters will undertake a more
relaxing challenge.
The two-day knitting marathon
at the North Water Street
Gallery, 257 N. Water St., is open
to the public.
The goal of the marathon is
to knit 40 hats for local homeless
and raise money for local
homeless shelters and Standing
Rock Cultural Arts' education
programs.
Ingram said the initial feedback
has been positive, with six
knitters signed up for the marathon
and others calling in with
interest in learning how to knit
or donating.
Those who wish to donate
can pay for an item made during
the marathon, or sponsor a
knitter and pay a set amount for
each item he or she produces.
Donors or volunteers interested
in participating can call
Ingram at 330-673-4970.

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