Report Overview:
Total Clips (15)
College of Business (COB) (1)
College of Business (COB); Institutional Advancement (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
College of Nursing (CON); Institutional Advancement (1)
Fashion Design (1)
Human Resources (1)
KSU at Geauga; Regional Academic Center (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
Political Science (4)
Visual Communication Design (VCD) (1)


Headline Date Outlet

College of Business (COB) (1)
Business news briefs 02/16/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

LOCAL BUSINESS KSU event for businesswomen Social media, entrepreneurship and balancing work and personal life will be among the topics discussed at Kent State University's inaugural Spirit of Women in Business conference March 10. The all-day event is open to students, professionals and...


College of Business (COB); Institutional Advancement (1)
KSU gift helps pay business interns (Williams, Sokany) 02/16/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...make $500,000 donation that will benefit students By Carol Biliczky Beacon Journal staff writer Published on Wednesday, Feb 16, 2011 KENT: Kent State University is using a $500,000 donation to ramp up paid internships for undergraduate business students over the next five years....


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
I will be there for you 02/15/2011 Morning Call - Online Text Attachment Email

...less likely to report feeling depressed and find that dogs help them cope with stress, according to a study published in Society & Animals in 2008. At Kent State University, "canine therapists" visit campus dorms. Dozens of groups train and provide helpful canines, sometimes for free. Here's...


College of Nursing (CON); Institutional Advancement (1)
UZIT is first program of its kind Partners KSU with Urban Zen Foundation for Nursing Wellness Education (Dzurec, Motter, Pratt) 02/16/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

The notion of a partnership between Kent State University and fashion mogul Donna Karan isn't such a strange thing to imagine. KSU's School of Fashion Design and Merchandising...


Fashion Design (1)
Kent State fashion design students chosen to show at China Fashion Week 02/15/2011 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

The Fashion School at Kent State University is globally recognized for their "forward-looking and rigorous curriculum in fashion, an aggressive approach to the use...


Human Resources (1)
College tuition perk slashes costs for 10,000 across Ohio 02/16/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


KSU at Geauga; Regional Academic Center (1)
Keep costs under control 02/16/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


KSU at Stark (2)
Gasoline prices go down, then back up (Engelhardt) 02/16/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...since Jan. 1 — the cost of crude oil increased slightly Tuesday to $85.70, Schwind said. Lucas Engelhardt, assistant professor of economics at the Kent State University Stark Campus, said the threat of protests in Mideast countries could create some uncertainties in the oil market and lead...

Gasoline prices go down, then back up (Engelhardt) 02/16/2011 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...recorded since Jan. 1 ? the cost of crude oil increased slightly Tuesday to $85.70, Schwind said. Lucas Engelhardt, assistant professor of economics at the Kent State University Stark Campus, said the threat of protests in Mideast countries could create some uncertainties in the oil market and lead...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
News in brief 02/16/2011 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...Representatives will be on hand from local universities, colleges and trade or technical schools to talk with students about the programs they offer, including: Kent State University Trumbull Campus, National College, ITT Technical Institute, The Academy of Dental Assisting & Smile Design, Staff Right...


Political Science (4)
Revolution in Egypt (Stacher) 02/16/2011 WVIZ-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Egypt Generals Running Child Care Means Transition Profit Motive (Stacher) 02/15/2011 Bloomberg BusinessWeek - Online Text Attachment Email

...military. As much as one-third of Egypts economy is under military control, said Joshua Stacher, an Egyptian-military expert and assistant professor at Kent State University in Ohio whose work has been published in five academic journals. Revenues from military companies are a state secret,...

Glenn Beck says Muslim Brotherhood wants to declare war on Israel (Stacher) 02/15/2011 PolitiFact Text Attachment Email

...all agreed. "The MB is a massive organization with many different ideological trends within it," explained Dr. Joshua Stacher, a political scientist at Kent State. "I have never heard anyone on or off the record say they ‘wish to declare war on Israel.' " None were familiar with Ghannem, who...

After Mubarak: What's next for Egypt? (Stacher) 02/15/2011 Mmegi Online Text Attachment Email

...sympathetic, or even protective of the protestors. But very little is known about who controls the armed forces. Egypt specialist Joshua Stacher of Kent State University recently told CNN that 'the military's refusal to act is a highly political act which shows that it is allowing the Egyptian...


Visual Communication Design (VCD) (1)
Kent State University Listed As Top-Ranked Communications Design School 02/15/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Homepage Community Reader News UPublish story by jlkramer POSTED: 02:54 p.m. EST, Feb 15, 2011 Kent State University's School of Visual Communication Design (VCD) was recently featured as a "Top-Ranked Communications Design School" by...


News Headline: Business news briefs | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LOCAL BUSINESS KSU event for businesswomen

Social media, entrepreneurship and balancing work and personal life will be among the topics discussed at Kent State University's inaugural Spirit of Women in Business conference March 10.

The all-day event is open to students, professionals and business veterans.

The day will be divided into three 60-minute sessions. Participants can choose one of three different presentation options for each session.

A continental breakfast as well as lunch will be served. A networking reception also is on the agenda.

Kent State graduate Lisa Clarke, president and CEO of Rally Marketing Group, will talk during lunch.

Clarke received her Master of Business Administration from Kent State in 1994.

When registering by March 4, cost is $30 or $12 for students. After that date, cost is $40 or $15 for students. Participants can receive continuing education credits. For more information, to register or reserve a table, visit http://www.kent.edu/business/wib.

In conjunction with the event, Kent State's College of Business will host a resource fair in which local businesses and organizations may showcase services and products.

The fair will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 10 on the second-floor rotunda of the Kent Student Center. Tables will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Registration deadline for tables is March 4. FirstEnergy sets dividend

FirstEnergy Corp. (NYSE: FE) declared an unchanged quarterly dividend of 55 cents per share for the second quarter of 2011.

The company provided updated scenarios to synchronize the payments of the FirstEnergy and Allegheny Energy Inc. (NYSE: AYE) dividends as of the effective date of the companies' proposed merger. The company said the scenarios are similar to the plan announced in December for payment of the first quarter 2011 dividend.

If the merger is not completed before the payment date of June 1, 2011, the full 55 cent-per-share second-quarter dividend would be payable June 1 to shareholders of record May 6.

If the merger is completed before June 1, FirstEnergy will pay two separate dividends that will total 55 cents per share. The timing and amount depend on the merger effective date.

TAXES IRS begins processing

The Internal Revenue Service on Tuesday said it has started processing individual tax returns affected by legislation enacted in December and reminded taxpayers that they may begin filing electronically immediately.

On Monday, IRS systems began to accept and process both e-file and paper tax returns claiming itemized deductions on Form 1040, Schedule A, as well as deductions for state and local sales tax, higher education tuition and fees, and educator expenses.

In late December 2010, the IRS announced it would delay processing of some tax returns in order to update systems to accommodate the late tax law changes. These tax law provisions were extended by the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization and Job Creation Act of 2010, which became law on Dec. 17.

ENTERTAINMENT Cedar Fair has success

America's third-largest amusement park chain said it hit an all-time high in attendance in 2010 despite the tough economy and changes in its front office.

Sandusky-based Cedar Fair drew 22.8 million people to its parks, the company said.

Better weather and an increase in season pass and group sales helped attendance rebound 7.8 percent from 2009. Many of its parks were hit hard by the recession.

AIRLINES Ticket prices going up

Delta and American are two airlines raising the price of some tickets favored by business travelers up to $120 per round trip.

Fare experts said Delta started the latest increase on Monday, which was matched immediately by American and a day later by United, Continental and US Airways.

It's the second big increase in fares in as many weeks.

WALL STREET Exchange to be acquired

The parent company of the New York Stock Exchange said it agreed to be acquired by the operator of the Frankfurt, Germany, stock exchange in a deal that will create the world's largest financial markets company.

The new company, a combination of NYSE Euronext Inc. and Deutsche Boerse, will have dual headquarters in Frankfurt and New York.

Compiled from staff and wire reports

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News Headline: KSU gift helps pay business interns (Williams, Sokany) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: February 16,2011 07:30 AM GMT Carol Biliczky Beacon Journal Publishing Co. 1961 graduate and wife make $500,000 donation that will benefit students

By Carol Biliczky Beacon Journal staff writer

Published on Wednesday, Feb 16, 2011

KENT: Kent State University is using a $500,000 donation to ramp up paid internships for undergraduate business students over the next five years.

As many as 40 juniors and seniors each year could receive up to $4,000 apiece for a semester's work through money provided by Walt Van Benthuysen, a 1961 graduate of KSU's business school, and his wife, Judy.

A Canton native, Van Benthuysen is retired from marketing and management jobs in the food industry. He and his wife now live in Hinsdale, Ill., and Indian Wells, Calif.

''The goal is to increase the number of students who get business internships,'' said Kristin Williams, who coordinates internships in KSU's College of Business Administration.

The first students in the program are interning with the Cleveland Cavaliers; Via680, a technology startup in Youngstown; and the Global ThinkTank Institute in Stow, among others.

They are in the minority of Kent State's 1,450 declared business majors, many of whom do not get internships before they graduate.

One reason is that 60 percent of available internships are unpaid, which can put students with paying jobs between a rock and a hard place: Should they quit their job to work for free in an internship?

Perhaps even worse, if they want the internship to count for three hours of college credit, they must come up with the money to pay for the class while not working at a paying job or being paid for an internship.

KSU has been trying to find solutions to this dilemma for two years. Williams' job was created as a touch point for students and companies alike.

Through the new program, the business college is offering three kinds of awards based on the amount of hours worked.

Students who work 10 to 15 hours a week, with or without college credit, are eligible for $2,000 awards.

A $3,000 award is available to students who work 15 to 20 hours a week, and a $4,000 award is available to those who work 25 hours or more a week.

Students seeking the latter awards must tie the internship to college credit, which requires KSU faculty to be involved in designing the internship's goals and monitoring the job to ensure the interns are doing something meaningful.

''We want this to be relevant business experience,'' said Steve Sokany, senior associate vice president for institutional advancement.

This is KSU's second donation for unpaid internships.

A $25,000 gift from the Kenneth L. Calhoun Trust is available in $1,500 awards to students who are from, and who still live in, Summit County. Being more restrictive, it is tapped less often, Williams said.

The new award is one of the 10 largest from individuals ever received by the business college, Sokany said.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

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News Headline: I will be there for you | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Call - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dogs can be more than man's best friend ? they can be lifesavers.

From Chihuahuas to Labrador retrievers, dogs are increasingly complementing modern medicine, learning to defuse panic attacks, carry juice bottles to diabetics with low blood sugar, even dial 911.

"So many people with disabilities or medical conditions could benefit from a dog, and they don't always realize it," says Darlene Sullivan, an animal trainer who founded the nonprofit training group Canine Partners For Life.

Dogs like those paired with people who are visually- or hearing-impaired are specifically trained to head off problems and detect and ease symptoms among those with conditions that put them at risk or compromise their life skills, such as paralysis, seizure disorders and diabetes. Others make a difference just by being there.

College students who spend time with a dog are less likely to report feeling depressed and find that dogs help them cope with stress, according to a study published in Society & Animals in 2008. At Kent State University, "canine therapists" visit campus dorms.

Dozens of groups train and provide helpful canines, sometimes for free. Here's a sampling of conditions and situations that make use of dogs:

Physical disabilities

Groups like Canine Partners For Life (CPL) train dogs to assist people with arthritis, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, and spinal injuries. They provide balance and support to people who have trouble walking and lend their retrieval skills.

For people confined to a wheelchair, dogs can open and close doors, push elevator buttons and help their patients navigate from the chair to the bed. Training is tailored to each recipient's condition. CPL spends roughly $22,000 on each dog and requests a $1,000 to $3,000 donation, depending on a person's ability to pay.

Autism

New research suggests that dogs reduce anxiety and improve socialization skills of autistic children. After dogs were placed in 42 children's homes, their stress-hormone levels dropped and they had fewer outbursts, according to a study published in October in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology.

"One mother told us she wasn't able to take walks with her autistic son because it was just too difficult," says Sonia Lupien, scientific director of the Fernand-Seguin Research Centre in Montreal and the study's senior researcher. "But after the dog joined the family, they could all walk together. Something happened between the boy and the animal; a connection formed."

The nonprofit 4 Paws for Ability trains dogs to respond to behavior typical of autistic children: If a child jumps around and flaps his hands in the dog's face, for example, the dog will lay its nose or foot on the child, gently nudging him until he calms down. And the dogs are trained to stop and sit at the parent's request; doing so encourages the child to stop, too, which can be particularly helpful if, say, a child has a tendency to bolt across busy streets.

Diabetes

No matter how well people with Type 1 diabetes manage their disease, hypoglycemia ? or low blood sugar ? is always a danger that can lead to seizures, coma, brain damage and even death. Dogs are being trained to identify subtle changes in body scent caused by hypoglycemia and alert their handlers 20 to 60 minutes before an episode occurs ? even at night when the diabetic is asleep. That allows time to fend off the attack with juice or a snack; some dogs even learn to carry these objects to their handlers. Visit dogs4diabetics.com for more information.

Post-traumatic stress disorder

Research suggests veterans with PTSD experience fewer symptoms and need less medication when paired with dogs. The canines help veterans ease back into society by sensing panic attacks before they begin, gauging the safety of surrounding areas, and jolting their handlers out of flashbacks.

A noisy, crowded restaurant might make a veteran panic because he associates crowds with snipers, hidden bombs and other dangers, for example. But he has been taught to touch his dog, and that sensation helps bring him back to the present. And he looks to his dog to determine whether his fear is realistic.

"A veteran will do a body read of (his) dog to see if there's any evidence of danger in that situation ? like if (its) tail is between (its) legs, or (it's) emitting a low growl," says Joan Esnayra, founder of the Psychiatric Service Dog Society, a research and education group.

The turning point is when the veteran believes his dog and not his initial PTSD-induced reaction.

"That's a victory," says Esnayra. Some groups, like Operation Wolfhound, believe so strongly in the dogs' abilities that they provide dogs to veterans at no cost.

Epilepsy

Seizure-alert dogs detect slight changes in body chemistry that signal an oncoming attack and warn their handlers by whining or pawing the handler's leg to buy enough time to take anti-seizure medication, reach a safe place, or call for assistance. Exactly how dogs sense oncoming seizures is unclear, but it's an instinctive ability that cannot be taught ? only identified and encouraged, experts say. About 20 organizations nationwide provide seizure-alert dogs, charging recipients anywhere from $5,000 to $25,000.

Crisis survivors

Crisis-response dogs are trained to be patient and affectionate, look directly at people, and remain calm in chaotic, unpredictable situations. In the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the shootings at Virginia Tech, Hurricane Katrina, and other tragedies, HOPE Animal-Assisted Crisis Response therapy dogs were on the scene.

In November, a HOPE team spent two weeks at a school where there had been a playground shooting.

"Our dogs were the bridge that helped those children retake the playground," says Amy Rideout, the nonprofit's president. "One student told us she felt really safe with Oz, who happened to be a very large dog. That steady presence made her feel comfortable, and took her focus off the bad stuff."

Distributed by Tribune Media Services

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News Headline: UZIT is first program of its kind Partners KSU with Urban Zen Foundation for Nursing Wellness Education (Dzurec, Motter, Pratt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The notion of a partnership between Kent State University and fashion mogul Donna Karan isn't such a strange thing to imagine. KSU's School of Fashion Design and Merchandising is recognized as one of the top fashion schools in the country.

So it may come as surprising to learn that the new collaboration between KSU and Karan involves not fashion, but the university's College of Nursing.

KSU and Karan's Urban Zen Foundation are working together on a program focused on nursing wellness and self-care. The goal is to address issues such as nursing burnout and job-related stress.

"Nurses are on the front lines of patient care and we realized that we needed to introduce our students to modalities that can reduce stress," said Tracey Motter, senior undergraduate program director for KSU's College of Nursing.

Karan founded the Urban Zen Foundation to advocate for combining Eastern and alternative healing therapies with Western medicine.

In 2009, the foundation launched the Urban Zen Integrative Therapy Program (UZIT) to advance a more holistic approach to health care.

The UZIT program includes training in yoga, essential oil therapy, Reiki, nutrition and contemplative care giving.

The collaboration started as a pilot project last September. About 30 students in KSU's accelerated nursing program participated in the first "Care for the Caregiver" program in the fall 2010 semester.

They met for an in-person class on a monthly basis, taught by UZIT's Ed Dailey, RN, RNPA, E-RYT 500. Students also participated in weekly webinars and tracked their progress though regular journaling.

"The many stresses nurses face open them up to fatigue and potential burnout," said Laura Dzurec, dean of KSU's College of Nursing. "This effort attempts to help nurses take care of themselves and advance quality care for patients."

The partnership with KSU is the Urban Zen Foundation's first collaboration with a university nursing program in the country.

The pilot program also may help break down resistance to alternative approaches to self care.

"This collaboration is a good fit because, as one of the largest nursing schools in the country, we have an opportunity to impact a lot of students," Motter said.

"Being located in the Midwest, we may be able to influence perceptions about alternative therapies."

As is often the case, this collaboration came about as a result of personal connections.

A member of the university's foundation board mentioned to KSU President Lester A. Lefton that he might be able to help reach out to the fashion icon to establish a relationship with its School of Fashion Design and Merchandising.

A meeting was set up between Karan and representatives from the university.

Gene Finn, KSU's vice president for Institutional Advancement, learned about the Urban Zen Foundation a few days before the group's trip to New York City.

Finn asked David Pratt, director of advancement for the College of Nursing, to prepare a summary of what KSU was doing with alternative medicine and therapies.

In June 2010, a small group of KSU representatives met with Karan at her Greenwich Village loft. "Donna was extremely interested with what we were doing," Pratt said.

"She felt it was a great fit for her foundation." The meeting led to the establishment of the self-care curriculum at KSU for the fall 2010 semester.

Eventually, the hope is that the care for the caregiver program could be offered to all students at the college.

"It is important for nurses to understand all healthcare modalities that their patients may be using," Motter said. "We also want to look at who else in the community is doing work in this area and investigate if we might collaborate with them."

Dzurec feels the timing is right for the program.

"These types of therapies have now been around long enough to be a part of the mainstream," she said. "There has been a paradigm shift."

For more information about KSU's College of Nursing, visit www.kent.edu/nursing.

For more information about the Urban Zen Foundation, visit www.urbanzen.org.

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News Headline: Kent State fashion design students chosen to show at China Fashion Week | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Stacey Thomas, Cleveland Women's Fashion Examiner
News OCR Text: The Fashion School at Kent State University is globally recognized for their "forward-looking and rigorous curriculum in fashion, an aggressive approach to the use of digital technologies, and access to a broad range of international and study away experiences (http://www.kent.edu/news/announcements/success/internationalfashionaward.cfm)." Recently ranked 3rd in the nation by popular online fashion magazine, Fashionista.com, the school has again surprised with yet another prestigious program certain to catapult its students forward in the industry.

New director, J.R. Campbell successfully secured an all expenses paid offer from the Chinese government for 10 individuals (students and faculty) to travel to China during March and show in Beijing for China Fashion Week. The offer comes as part of a partnership with China's Central Academy of Fine Arts.

Fashion design students at Kent State University learned of this opportunity in January, and then were critiqued by Campbell and fellow fashion faculty. Finalists were chosen based on the quality and aesthetic of their designs, based on input from the critiquing committee and peer popular vote. 13 semi-finalists were chosen out of the 49 competing senior design majors, and then were subjected to an interview process, of which 7 finalists were selected.

The 7 finalists will travel with 3 faculty members to Beijing during their spring break. They are set to show their estimated 28 garments alongside CAFA's 40 as their 'international partner' at a location TBA on March 29th. As an American fashion school, it is extremely rare to receive the honor to show at fashion week, so Kent State will join ranks with prestigious UK based Central Saint Martens, who show student design work every year at London Fashion Week.

The 7 finalists are Zachary Hoh, Samantha Woodard, Vanecia Kirkland, Caitlin Nugent, Staci Moening, Abigail Drake, and Bethany Clark. To see more information about these individuals and their collections, visit http://kentwired.com/fashion-forecast-kent-students-to-show-at-china-fashion-week/.

For more information about The Fashion School at Kent State University, visit http://www.fashionschool.kent.edu/. The Fashion School currently offers a Bachelor program in fashion design and fashion merchandising, with the opportunity for students to minor in relevant areas such as magazine journalism, marketing, advertising, international business, foreign languages and more. Merchandising students can also complete an MBA as part of a five-year program with Kent's School of Business Administration, and Graduate programs will be available in the near future. Kent State University is one of the only prestigiously ranked fashion schools that can boast the traditional American college experience, as well as a multitude of international and domestic study away programs.

Never miss an article! Subscribe to Cleveland Women's Fashion Examiner.

Have a local fashion announcement or event that you would like to appear on Examiner.com/Cleveland? Email the author.

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News Headline: College tuition perk slashes costs for 10,000 across Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Employees at tax-supported universities, families enjoy benefit of free or reduced-fee education

As a single mother with two young children, Kristina Artino doesn't have money to throw around.

So she's grateful that her job as an administrative assistant at the University of Akron comes with a pleasant benefit: fee remission.

She finished her bachelor's degree in technical education with free tuition, will wrap up her master's in technical education this spring with free tuition and might go on to pursue a doctorate — after she catches her breath, that is — with free tuition.

If she's still employed at UA when her children go to college and benefits don't change, they could attend for free, too.

Across Ohio, tax-supported universities remitted more than $20 million in tuition — and often other fees — for more than 10,000 employees and their family members for last fall's term alone, according to a Beacon Journal survey.

When annualized for the rest of the academic year, the total probably exceeds more than $40 million.

Benefits allow the employee and a broad range of family members — spouses, same-sex partners, dependent children, retirees and sometimes even foster children and spouses of deceased employees — to attend college for free or a reduced price at every level of academia, from associate degrees through doctorates.

The benefit helps to recruit and retain employees, said Provost Mike Sherman of UA, which provided about $2.5 million in free tuition to almost 1,000 employees and family members last fall.

His daughter is attending UA on fee remission, although she had chosen to go to there before he got the job at the university, he said.

''You can think of it as equiv
alent for a scholarship,'' he said. ''It contributes to the quality of a community.''

Remission a cornerstone

The start of tuition remission appears to be buried in the annals of individual institutions. Many have remitted fees for years upon years upon years, said Rob Evans, spokesman for the Ohio Board of Regents, which coordinates higher education statewide.

''I wouldn't be surprised if they've always had it,'' he said.

Tuition remission appears to have started as a way to help pad the pocketbooks of poorly paid academics.

Fast-forward to today, when some form is available to all full-time university employees, from kitchen staff and groundskeepers making minimum wage to faculty who are paid an average of $72,000 at UA and Kent State and $103,000 at Ohio State, according to a yearly OSU survey. Top university officials who make $200,000 and up regularly use the benefit to send their children to college.

In fact, tuition remission remains a cornerstone of just about every college and university in America, public and private, according to a survey by the College and University Professionals Association.

Last year it found that 98 percent of 340 responding institutions provide free tuition to full-time employees, the benefits varying widely among institutions.

In Ohio, Kent State's generous policy waives up to 18 credit hours of instruction and general fees each semester for full-time employees and family members and waives the out-of-state surcharge that would double the cost, if applicable. KSU allows dependent offspring up to age 28 to qualify for the remission.

At Youngstown State, eligible employees can take up to 24 credit hours a year without paying tuition or general fees; surviving spouses can take courses as long as they remain unmarried. Part-time employees receive prorated benefits.

Big benefit

Tuition remission is an especially valuable benefit to employees with college-age children. The regular tuition bill for a full-time undergraduate in Ohio is about $9,000 a year, or $36,000 for a four-year degree.

The four sons of Richard A. Lewis, a UA emeritus associate professor of electrical engineering, have earned nine degrees and certificates from UA, some through graduate assistantships that offer free tuition.

''He made it clear that UA was our family's education plan unless we wanted to self-finance our own educations,'' said Matt Williams of Green, who heads a national nonprofit that is working to improve pay and benefits for part-time instructors.

''I've never totaled up the bill, but [the benefit] was of considerable assistance.''

UA's studies of its policy conclude it doesn't cost the university anything to provide.

''Every year the university's enrollment is increasing and that has included enough buffer to accommodate growth in fee-remission students,'' Provost Sherman said.

The university studied the issue in 2000. ''If we redid it, I think that is what we would find at this point in time.'' Sherman said.

Ohio State strictest

Some universities restrict their tuition remission plans.

Ohio State has the strictest policy in the state, providing only 10 credit hours a term for employees, requiring them to pass the course or repay the money and limiting the amount of the benefit to 200 credit hours. Family members qualify for smaller benefits: 50 percent off tuition if one parent is employed and 75 percent if both are.

Larry Lewellyn, vice president of human resources, said the university pays attention to the benefits offered by the 62 public and private peers in the elite Association of American Universities.

''We're competitive at that level, but we're still conservative,'' he said. ''We believe that Ohio is generally a conservative state.''

OSU has resisted calls to broaden its family policy to the standard in Ohio of 100 percent payment:

''We don't believe in 100 percent tuition payment for dependents. We don't believe it needs to be,'' Lewellyn said.

The private New York University curbed its benefits this spring, delaying eligibility from three months to a year and levying a 10 percent co-payment on employees making $50,000 and up who take courses or whose family members do. The university says that's more in line with its peers, which include Brown and Columbia.

Discussion in Senate

The subject of tuition remission has caught the attention of Ohio's Senate majority leadership as well.

Chris Widener, R-Springfield, said he and fellow legislators are interested in looking at stricter tuition remission policies as a way to help close Ohio's budget gap.

''This is something that we want to pursue,'' said Widener, chairman of the Senate finance committee. ''We have been talking about this for more than a month.''

If the state takes any steps to limit tuition remission, it could prove expensive to employees like Artino, the administrative assistant in UA's School of Communication.

She said she wouldn't have been able to accomplish as much without the fee remission.

She will use her degrees as steppingstones: to teach part time at UA this fall, possibly to be promoted and maybe to pursue a doctorate in education. The university is enabling her to achieve her dreams.

''I'm finally almost through with what I never thought I could do,'' she said.

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News Headline: Keep costs under control | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: College costs do not have to break the bank.
Kent State University at Geauga and the
Regional Academic Center in Twinsburg offer
a quality education at an affordable price. Regional
campus tuition is 40 percent less than
attending the Kent Campus. March 1 is the priority
deadline for filing the FAFSA (Free Application
for Federal Aid) at www.fafsa.gov. The FAFSA
will determine if students qualify for grants,
loans, or the work-study program. For details, call
440-834-4187 or 330-487-0574. You can also email
GeaugaAdmissions@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Gasoline prices go down, then back up (Engelhardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Doug Staley
News OCR Text: After flirting with prices under $3 Tuesday morning, the cost of regular-grade gasoline rose to $3.15 a gallon in the Massillon area by the afternoon drive.

It's difficult to say what caused prices to jump after they dipped below $3 a gallon at some Massillon-area stations for the first time since December, according to Kimberly Schwind, spokeswoman for AAA Ohio Auto Club.

“There are some thoughts that this would be a short-term drop. ... It's dangerous to make a direct link between retail and crude oil prices. (Prices) do not always catch up as fast,” she said.

Crude oil prices had dropped recently following last week's resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. However, after closing at $84.81 a barrel Monday — the lowest price recorded since Jan. 1 — the cost of crude oil increased slightly Tuesday to $85.70, Schwind said.

Lucas Engelhardt, assistant professor of economics at the Kent State University Stark Campus, said the threat of protests in Mideast countries could create some uncertainties in the oil market and lead to higher prices. However, Engelhardt added he had not “noticed anything (specifically) over the past day to explain the (jump).”

As of Tuesday afternoon, AAA still was reporting that the average price for a gallon of regular gasoline in Northeast Ohio was $3.06, a drop of 7.4 cents from the previous week. Schwind said prices could be higher in Massillon due to local market conditions. A year ago, prices averaged $2.45 a gallon locally.

Some experts are predicting gasoline could approach $4 a gallon this summer. AAA officials believe prices could reach as high as $3.75 a gallon, according to Schwind.

“We typically see a dip in the winter and then go back up during the driving season. That is still our prediction,” Schwind said.

Schwind said prices could be driven higher if unrest develops throughout the Middle East or if demand for oil in China escalates. Last week, however, China took steps to slow inflation, which could help to strengthen the dollar by encouraging investors to turn to the U.S.

That scenario could cause prices to fall, Schwind said.

“There are a lot of variables,” she said.

Despite recent steps taken by the government, Englehardt believes the Chinese economy could continue to grow for the foreseeable future. He also noted prices could spike if the U.S. economy improves over the next several months.

Engelhardt, however, was hesitant to say gasoline prices will hit $4 a gallon.

“I would be surprised, but not shocked,” he said.

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News Headline: Gasoline prices go down, then back up (Engelhardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name: Doug Staley
News OCR Text: After flirting with prices under $3 Tuesday morning, the cost of regular-grade gasoline rose to $3.15 a gallon in the Massillon area by the afternoon drive. It?s difficult to say what caused prices to jump after they dipped below $3 a gallon at some Massillon-area stations for the first time since December, according to Kimberly Schwind, spokeswoman for AAA Ohio Auto Club. ?There are some thoughts that this would be a short-term drop. ... It?s dangerous to make a direct link between retail and crude oil prices. (Prices) do not always catch up as fast,? she said. Crude oil prices had dropped recently following last week?s resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. However, after closing at $84.81 a barrel Monday ? the lowest price recorded since Jan. 1 ? the cost of crude oil increased slightly Tuesday to $85.70, Schwind said. Lucas Engelhardt, assistant professor of economics at the Kent State University Stark Campus, said the threat of protests in Mideast countries could create some uncertainties in the oil market and lead to higher prices. However, Engelhardt added he had not ?noticed anything (specifically) over the past day to explain the (jump).? As of Tuesday afternoon, AAA still was reporting that the average price for a gallon of regular gasoline in Northeast Ohio was $3.06, a drop of 7.4 cents from the previous week. Schwind said prices could be higher in Massillon due to local market conditions. A year ago, prices averaged $2.45 a gallon locally. Some experts are predicting gasoline could approach $4 a gallon this summer. AAA officials believe prices could reach as high as $3.75 a gallon, according to Schwind. ?We typically see a dip in the winter and then go back up during the driving season. That is still our prediction,? Schwind said. Schwind said prices could be driven higher if unrest develops throughout the Middle East or if demand for oil in China escalates. Last week, however, China took steps to slow inflation, which could help to strengthen the dollar by encouraging investors to turn to the U.S. That scenario could cause prices to fall, Schwind said. ?There are a lot of variables,? she said. Despite recent steps taken by the government, Englehardt believes the Chinese economy could continue to grow for the foreseeable future. He also noted prices could spike if the U.S. economy improves over the next several months. Engelhardt, however, was hesitant to say gasoline prices will hit $4 a gallon. ?I would be surprised, but not shocked,? he said.

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News Headline: News in brief | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: YWCA to host career fair

WARREN The YWCA of Warren, in partnership with 4-H and Goodwill GoodGuides, will host a free career fair for students, grades 7-12, from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at the YWCA Warren Community Room.

Representatives will be on hand from local universities, colleges and trade or technical schools to talk with students about the programs they offer, including: Kent State University Trumbull Campus, National College, ITT Technical Institute, The Academy of Dental Assisting & Smile Design, Staff Right Services and Randstad Work Solutions.

The following activities have been scheduled:

l Meet and greet, 6 to 6:30 p.m.

l Mock interview sessions, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

l Break, pizza and drinks provided, 7:30 to 7:45 p.m.

l Break-out sessions debriefing from mock interviews, 7:45 to 8:15 p.m.

l Career-building activities, 8:15 to 8:45 p.m.

l Question and answer period: 8:45 to 9 p.m. Interested vendors should contact Michelle Adkins with 4-H Youth Development at 330-638-6783 or Katie Sechler with Goodwill GoodGuides at 330-759-7921.

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News Headline: Revolution in Egypt (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: WVIZ-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: After eighteen days of protests and unrest in the streets of Cairo and throughout Egypt, the people there changed not only their government, but the landscape of leadership across the Middle East. The authoritarian rule of Hosni Mubarak has ended. But what will take its place? How will that affect the rest of the Arab world. How will it affect us? We'll be joined by a panel of guests from Northeast Ohio to talk about the revolution in Egypt and we'd love your thoughts, Tuesday at 9 on the Sound of Ideas.

Please click on link for audio.
http://www.ideastream.org/soi/entry/38545#

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News Headline: Egypt Generals Running Child Care Means Transition Profit Motive (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Bloomberg BusinessWeek - Online
Contact Name: Cam Simpson and Mariam Fam
News OCR Text: By Cam Simpson and Mariam Fam

(See EXTRA for more Middle East turmoil news.)

Feb. 16 (Bloomberg) -- The Egyptian military, which promises to steer the nation to a new democratic future after the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, has its own economic interests to protect as well.

The armed forces have a substantial stake in the civilian economy through a host of government-owned service and manufacturing companies, at least 14 of them under the auspices of the Ministry of Military Production. Their websites list product lines that include civilian goods.

Military-run companies are in such businesses as janitorial services, household appliances, pest control and catering. El Nasr Company for Services and Maintenance, for instance, has 7,750 employees in such sectors as child care, automobile repair and hotel administration, according to its website. Other military companies produce small arms, tank shells and explosives -- as well as exercise equipment and fire engines.

These companies add up to a very large, unaccountable, non-transparent Military Inc., said Robert Springborg, a professor in the department of national security affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, and author of Mubaraks Egypt: Fragmentation of the Political Order. The generals will try to massage the new order so that it does not seek to impose civilian control on the armed forces, he said. Its not just a question of preserving the institution of the Army. Its a question of preserving the financial base of its members. Mubarak on Feb. 11 answered 18 days of protests involving hundreds of thousands of Egyptians by relinquishing his 30-year hold on the nations presidency, handing interim authority to Egypts Supreme Council of the Armed Forces.

The council dissolved parliament two days later and suspended the constitution, saying it will rule for six months or until elections are held. The body said on Feb. 12 that it intends to lead the nation through a democratic transition. Mubarak, like Egypts three other leaders since the 1952 revolution, came to power from a career in the military.

As much as one-third of Egypts economy is under military control, said Joshua Stacher, an Egyptian-military expert and assistant professor at Kent State University in Ohio whose work has been published in five academic journals. Revenues from military companies are a state secret, along with the armed- forces budget, he said. It isnt uncommon for governments and militaries to own or run their own defense-related industries and arms makers. In Singapore and Israel, for example, nationalized production of fighting hardware has been seen as a way to protect national security by avoiding dependence on foreign producers.

What sets apart the Egyptian military, the Arab worlds largest, is that its companies also offer an array of products or services in the domestic consumer economy -- and without civilian oversight.

The latest assessment of defense production and military companies in Egypt from defense-information firm IHS Janes in London, and a 1998 report produced by the U.S. embassys commercial affairs section in Cairo, list three military-owned firms that sell to both armed forces and the public.

One is El Nasr Company for Services and Maintenance, which operates under the brand Queen Service. It has at least 18 service businesses, including child care centers, according to its website.

General Ahmed El-Banna, general manager of El Nasr, said in a telephone interview that the military owns 75 percent of the company while the rest is held by a group of shareholders made up of retired officers. Families of retired officers can inherit shares after the principals die, El-Banna said.

Two other consumer companies were named by the reports: El Nasr Company for Intermediate Chemicals, whose website says it produces chemicals, fertilizers, industrial and medical gases and household pesticides, and Arab International Optronics, a lens and advanced-optical maker.

No one answered the phone at Arab International Optronics and the number given by telephone information for El Nasr Company for Intermediate Chemicals didnt answer. The Ministry for Military Production lists on its website more than a dozen military production companies, including Abu Zaabal Co. for Engineering Industries, Benha Co. for Electronic Industries and Maadi Co. for Engineering Industries. Abu Zaabal was established to secure the armed forces artillery needs, according to the website. It also produces water and fuel tanks.

Maadi makes parts for medical and agricultural equipment as well as home appliances, radiators and exercise equipment, including bench and leg presses. Benha owns factories and produces telecommunication equipment, microwaves and personal computers. Egyptian Tank Plant makes red fire-fighting vehicles.

In a 2008 cable signed by U.S. Ambassador Margaret Scobey, the embassy in Cairo told Washington that the Egyptian military was becoming a quasi-commercial enterprise itself. The secret cable was dated September 2008 and was released last December by WikiLeaks, the anti-secrecy group that publishes classified documents on its website.

Although the cable didnt detail individual firms, it said the embassys sources told us that military-owned companies, often run by retired generals, are particularly active in the water, olive oil, cement, construction, hotel and gasoline industries. The cable quoted one professor at a university whose name was redacted speculating that the business ties helped ensure regime stability and security by gaining armed-forces cooperation.

It also offered this view from embassy staff: We see the militarys role in the economy as a force that generally stifles free market reform by increasing direct government involvement in the markets. The armed forces business interests would be at risk if demands for opening up the economy ran too deep, said Samer Shehata, an assistant professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University in Washington, before Mubarak stepped down. Born in Egypt, Shehata is the author of Shop Floor Culture and Politics in Egypt. The military as an institution, the high-ranking officer corps, certainly has vested economic interests that could be changed or could be put in jeopardy, he said. If the military was completely removed from politics, then there is no question that these interests would be put in jeopardy. Egypts 1979 peace treaty with Israel has brought the country an average of about $2 billion per year in economic and military aid. About $1.3 billion is designated for defense, according to reports from the U.S. Congressional Research Service and the Government Accountability Office. The armed forces council says all international treaties will be honored.

El Nasr Company for Services and Maintenance is one of those benefitting from the nations close relationship with U.S. armed forces. El-Banna said it provides food services and accommodations for visiting U.S. personnel during operation Bright Star, a massive joint combat exercise held in Egypt every two years. Personnel from France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Jordan, Kuwait, Pakistan and Turkey also participate.

Military companies play a significant role in consumer food production, said Springborg, the Naval Postgraduate School professor.

Because the Egyptian military wanted to be self-sufficient in meeting the dietary needs of personnel, it runs chicken farms, dairy farms, horticultural operations. And it of course has its own bakeries, he said. The militarys business interests are very large, said Bassma Kodmani, executive director of the Paris-based Arab Reform Initiative and a senior adviser at the French National Research Council. Those businesses, though, help build the nation and help keep capital within its borders. The army is not seen as corrupt, she told a group of reporters in Paris last week. It might seem strange to people in the west, but in Egypt its not considered shocking that the army builds highways or new housing projects. --With assistance from Mahmoud Kassem in Cairo, Gregory Viscusi in Paris and Viola Gienger in Washington. Editors: Anne Swardson, Melissa Pozsgay

To contact the reporters on this story: Cam Simpson in London at csimpson13@bloomberg.net Mariam Fam in Cairo at mfam1@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Andrew J. Barden at barden@bloomberg.net.

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News Headline: Glenn Beck says Muslim Brotherhood wants to declare war on Israel (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: PolitiFact
Contact Name: Lucas Graves
News OCR Text: The Truth-O-Meter Says:

One of the thorniest questions to emerge from the tumult in Egypt has been what to make of the Muslim Brotherhood. Western observers have characterized the enigmatic group -- also called Al-Ikhwān -- as everything from democratic reformers to Islamic Socialists bent on global dominion.

On his Fox News Channel program for Feb. 4, 2011, Glenn Beck wrapped up five days of frightening Egypt forecasts with this blunt assessment:

"We told you this week how if (President Hosni) Mubarak does step down, however, the Muslim Brotherhood would be the most likely group to seize power. They've openly stated they want to declare war on Israel and they would end the peace agreement with Israel and they would work towards instituting something we told you about, a caliphate."

That's a lot to unpack. We decided to check Beck's claim that the Brotherhood has "openly stated they want to declare war on Israel," because so much of the debate in the United States revolves around the Muslim Brotherhood's' intentions toward the main U.S. ally in the region.

Beck neglected to name a source in that Feb. 4 broadcast, so we took a look through the rest of his transcripts for the week. Sure enough, three days earlier he informed viewers that "a top official in the Muslim Brotherhood has just said that … ‘The people should be prepared for war against Israel.'"

Who was that top official? Beck's website pointed to a Feb. 1, 2011, item in the Jerusalem Post that had a "leading member" of the Brotherhood, Muhammad Ghannem, declaring that "the people should be prepared for war against Israel." The next day a Washington Times editorial picked up the quote, saying it "succinctly summed up" the Muslim Brotherhood's foreign policy. Then Sen. Mark Kirk, R-Ill., repeated the fiery words in a floor speech.

The Jerusalem Post piece cited an interview Ghannem gave to an Arabic-language Iranian network, Al-Alam. With deft use of Google Translate we were able to verify that Ghannem was quoted saying something along those lines in a Jan. 31, 2011, piece on Al-Alam's website. The key question then becomes whether Ghannem can speak for the sprawling Muslim Brotherhood.

"I have never heard of him," said Dr. Jason Brownlee, a scholar with the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, D.C. "It's a big organization, and there may be people who say things like that, but that doesn't mean it's policy. It doesn't jibe with my experience visiting Egypt and doing research on the Muslim Brotherhood for over a decade."

Three other experts on the Muslim Brotherhood all agreed. "The MB is a massive organization with many different ideological trends within it," explained Dr. Joshua Stacher, a political scientist at Kent State. "I have never heard anyone on or off the record say they ‘wish to declare war on Israel.' " None were familiar with Ghannem, who we confirmed is not among the the Brotherhood's policy elite, the 16-member Guidance Bureau.

Still, there's no doubt that the Brotherhood officially condemns Israel, its neighbor across the Sinai Peninsula. According to a report on the group's own website, a controversy erupted in 2007 when spokesman Essam El-Erian was quoted in London-based paper Al-Hayat saying that the Brotherhood would recognize Israel if it came to power.

In response, then-Supreme Guide Mohamed Mahdy Akef clarified that "the Brotherhood does not and will never recognize Israel. ... Israel does not exist in the Brotherhood's dictionary."

El-Erian maintained that he had been misquoted and was only calling for a referendum on the peace treaty between Egypt and Israel. That's still the official line since the protests in Tahrir Square began.

At a press conference in Cairo on Feb. 9, 2011, El-Erian and Mohammed Musri -- both of whom do sit on the Brotherhood's Guidance Bureau -- declared that the group respects the treaty and any changes would be up to a democratically elected government.

Brownlee pointed out that many Egyptians believe the 1979 treaty lacks legitimacy; it passed with nearly unanimous approval in what was seen as a fraudulent vote. Opinions vary as to how it would fare today, but, as George Washington University professor Nathan Brown pointed out, revoking a peace treaty is a far cry from declaring war.

In a Feb. 2 interview on NPR's All Things Considered, El-Erian confirmed that view. He called again for revising the terms of the treaty but, asked what that would mean, dismissed fears of armed conflict.

"Oh, no threat of war," El-Erian told Robert Siegel. "The people are not pushing for war. But it is not our duty to protect Israel from Palestinians. We are not guards for Israel."

So some members of the Muslim Brotherhood may be calling for war. But the ones who say that don't speak for the group; and the ones who do speak for the group, don't say that. We rate Beck's claim False.

About this statement:

Subjects: Foreign Policy, Israel, Terrorism

PolitiFact, "Glenn Beck on al-Qaida links to Muslim Brotherhood,"by Robert Farley, Jan. 31, 2011

Transcript of Glenn Beck Program, Feb. 4, 2011, accessed through Nexis

Transcript of Glenn Beck Program, Feb. 1, 2011, accessed through Nexis

Glenn Beck Program website, "Study Guide: TSA, Trumka, and Muslim Brotherhood," Feb. 2, 2011

Jerusalem Post, "Muslim Brotherhood: ‘Prepare Egyptians for war with Israel,'"by Yaakov Lappin, Feb. 1, 2011

Al-Alam News Channel website, "Egyptian Politicians Accuse the Army Leadership of Coordination with Washington,"Jan. 31, 2011

Ikhwanweb, the Muslim Brotherhood's Official English website, "El-Erian says Al-Hayat misquoted him, confirms Brotherhood position on Israel,"Yasmine Saleh, Oct. 19, 2007

Council on Foreign Relations, "Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood," by Jayshree Bajoria, Feb. 3, 2011

Foreign Affairs, "The Muslim Brotherhood After Mubarak," by Carrie Rosefsky Wickham, Feb. 3, 2011

Washington Times, "Egypt's blood on Obama's hands?," Feb. 2, 2011

Office of Sen. Mark Kirk, "Senator Kirk Statement On Muslim Brotherhood," Feb. 2, 2011

CNN, "Muslim Brotherhood: 'We are not seeking power,'" Feb. 10, 2011

AFP, "Egypt's Muslim Brothers "do not seek power," Feb. 9, 2011

National Public Radio, "Brotherhood Spokesman Discusses Egypt's Future," Feb. 2, 2011

Interview with Jason Brownlee, Woodrow Wilson Center Fellow and Associate Professor, Department of Government, University of Texas at Austin, Feb. 9, 2011

E-mail interview with Nathan J. Brown, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, Elliott School of International Relations, George Washington University, Feb. 9, 2011

E-mail interview with Joshua Stacher, assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Kent State University, Feb. 9, 2011

E-mail interview with Samer S. Shehata, Assistant Professor of Arab Politics, Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University, Feb. 9, 2011

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News Headline: After Mubarak: What's next for Egypt? (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Mmegi Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As global attention remains focused on events in Egypt, KHADIJA SHARIFE considers the role of the country's military in the uprising and its political role in planning for the future

The lessons for the authorities in Cairo echo those learned too late in Tunis: cracking down on dissent is not so easy when social network sites and citizen bloggers can gain a global audience in a matter of days. But how does Egypt's low-profile military actually view the changes now sweeping the country?

There was probably no way for the authorities to prevent the uprising of millions of citizens in Egypt, a country characterised by staggering inequality, human rights violations and corruption. This was especially true after the uprising in neighbouring Tunisia toppled the dictatorship of President Zine el Abidine Ben Ali with such astonishing speed. In Cairo alone, there may have been as many as two million protestors at some recent rallies. A nation of usually non-confrontational people has awoken to reclaim the streets, their human rights, and their dignity.

In many ways, the sustained resistance of the youth, drawing strength from their courage and conviction, their rage and despair, is a genuine intifada borne of the old and the new. Traditional methods of communication such as pamphlets, faxes, landlines and 'stealth meetings' in homes, street corners and mosques, have been augmented by virtual congregations on social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter.

These cyber-rallies have the obvious advantage of bypassing the dangers inherent to geographically fixed meeting points. In an age where information moves at the speed of light, the internet has become both a brawny social muscle that can be collectively flexed, as well as a vehicle used by repressive states to track and counter activists.

In Iran, where internet penetration rates are estimated at 35%, most service has been disrupted during periods of unrest. However, the government has usually allowed citizens to continue accessing Twitter as a means of intelligence gathering to monitor protests.

In Tunisia, Facebook proved critical when 26-year-old Tunisian fruit vendor Mohamed Bouazizi, who fatally set himself alight in protest at constant police harassment, left a message on the networking site asking his mother for forgiveness. After this was picked up by the Al Jazeera news network, global awareness of the mounting Tunisian rebellion was generated, becoming instrumental in the uprising gaining such swift momentum.

Citizen narratives vs. Government backlash

The extraordinary recent events in Tunisia and Egypt have been documented in large part through the use of citizen-generated social media - a substitute for traditional reporting following the suspension of many publications - allowing ordinary people to 'narrate' their own struggles.

Moreover, traditional media outlets have often used citizen narratives as a form of transmitting information, leveling the playing field in countries like Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran and Israel where news outlets are often heavily influenced by, or in favour of, the regimes in power.

Unlike Tunisia, where over a third of the population has internet access, penetration is much lower in Egypt at around 15 percent. And those accessing the internet in Egypt, such as followers of the April 6 Facebook movement, face a number of obstacles. Among the biggest of these is that operating licenses for internet services are provided by the government, allowing them to access data and know the locations of users, as well as being able to cut connectivity without prior warning.

This makes life very difficult for people such as Wael Ghonim, Google's head of marketing for the Middle East and North Africa. Ghonim was released on Monday having spent a week in custody after attending a protest organised by the April 6 movement on 25 January. He rejoined protests in Tahrir Square and went straight back on Twitter.

As in Tunisia, where leaked cables provided by WikiLeaks disclosed that the US did not consider Ben Ali an 'ally' and preferred his removal from power, Washington has long been collaborating with key leaders from the April 6 movement. The WikiLeaks cables confirmed a change of government in Egypt was predicted in 2011, allowing for negotiations with other parties.

Generally portrayed by the American media as the lesser of two possible evils, President Hosni Mubarak's rule has long been justified by the US as a bastion against militant Islam. But in recent years, bloggers pushing for democratic change have peeled back the myth of the regime. One of Egypt's best-known English-language bloggers, Sandmonkey, was arrested on February 2 while delivering medical supplies to Tahrir Square. He claims he was then roughed up in prison and his blog suspended until his release the next day.

Activists can achieve global profiles

In one of his previous blog posts, he described his extreme fatigue, having been on the run for days. He wrote how 'the situation here is bleak to say the least. It didn't start out that way.

On Tuesday January 25 it all started peacefully, and against all odds, we succeeded to gather hundreds of thousands and get them into Tahrir Square, despite being attacked by anti-riot police who are using sticks, tear gas and rubber bullets against us.'

Sandmonkey went on to write: 'I was shot at twice that day, [once] with a semi-automatic by a dude in a car that we, the people, took joy in pummeling. The government announced that all prisons were breached, and that the prisoners somehow managed to get weapons and do nothing but randomly attack people.

One day we had organized thugs in uniforms firing at us, and the next day they disappeared and were replaced by organized thugs without uniforms firing at us. Somehow the people never made the connection.'

Ahmed Maher, a leader of the April 6 movement whose protest plans have been regularly intercepted by security agents, was also presumed to have been arrested or detained.

In an interview with Maher on February 2, Wired magazine learned he had not been arrested, but would not say whether or not he had been roughed up by the police.

Rewind two years. On February 6, 2009, Philip Rizk, an Egyptian-German filmmaker, was abducted from a police station by secret service agents in the city of Qalyubia, north of Cairo.

Rizk had been arrested while campaigning for humanitarian support to Gaza.

He claims he was taken to a secret location three floors beneath the surface in unidentified facilities and constantly interrogated about 'my activism, my writing, everything.' He was released after being held for four days.

In all likelihood, Rizk may not have been freed so soon, if at all, had his friends and colleagues not mounted an international campaign that caught the attention of the New York Times.

Such abductions are par for the course in Egypt, where detainees are routinely held without trial or access to legal representation.

What is the present role of egypt's military?

Under the guise of 'reform' at the state level, the military has further embedded itself within Egypt's newly appointed cabinet. When asked about the elevation to vice president of Omar Sulieman, Egypt's former chief of intelligence and Mubarak's right-hand man, Rizk told The Africa Report that 'Egyptians understand this for what it is. It represents no change. As soon as the announcement was made, protestors began chanting against Sulieman, identified as a man of the regime.' The military has been portrayed by international media as sympathetic, or even protective of the protestors. But very little is known about who controls the armed forces.

Egypt specialist Joshua Stacher of Kent State University recently told CNN that 'the military's refusal to act is a highly political act which shows that it is allowing the Egyptian regime to reconstitute itself at the top and is highly, utterly against the protesters.'

But will the US listen? If the military is the power backing the regime, and is financed annually to the tune of $1.3bn by the US government - the US's second largest aid recipient in the world, after Israel - who is responsible for Mubarak's dictatorship?

According to Na'eem Jeenah, executive director of the Johannesburg-based think tank Afro-Middle East Centre, 'the whole notion that we've been exposed to recently of these soldiers as benevolent protectors is a myth.

In the lower and middle ranks, there is certainly potential for soldiers to switch sides. But it has been a move by those on top to provide a good image of the military, and those from below, who want to win over the soldiers. Some thought it was a great thing when the cabinet was dissolved, but what we're really seeing is the removal of business people and the entrenchment of the military, to ensure that they have the control in the new government.'

Jeenah told The Africa Report that the military had long been in control of key sectors of the country's political economy. In his view, it has 'a well designed plan to pace the process and timing of change, to secure the army's role in government and the economy.'

'Once the sun sets,' said Jeenah, 'the army will go in and clean up the protestors. 'Even without its figurehead, the Mubarak machinery will be able to ensure the continuation of the same repressive and brutal tactics.

Social media can act as the watchdog, when and if the Egyptian government allows it, but who in Egypt will respond to the watchdog? (Pambazuka)

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News Headline: Kent State University Listed As Top-Ranked Communications Design School | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Homepage Community Reader News UPublish story by jlkramer

POSTED: 02:54 p.m. EST, Feb 15, 2011

Kent State University's School of Visual Communication Design (VCD) was recently featured as a "Top-Ranked Communications Design School" by the popular "how-to" website, eHow.com. eHow.com is the British-based, online community dedicated to providing visitors with "the ability to research, share and discuss solutions and tips for completing day-to-day tasks and projects. We combine the experiential knowledge of certified experts with the practical knowledge of everyday people to help you discuss, plan, and complete projects." Along with Kent State VCD, eHow.com listed Carnegie Mellon University, Virginia Commonwealth University and Pratt Institute as leading communications design schools. VCD is Kent State's fourth largest major and provides students with professional preparation, development of conceptual and aesthetic skills, a knowledge of design history, basis for individual style and the transformation of theory into practice. The school is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design, an achievement that is gained only through a rigorous review process of accreditation. It is also recognized as a Center of Excellence among Ohio universities by the Ohio Board of Regents. VCD is home to Glyphix, an award-winning student-staffed design studio. The studio provides a professional atmosphere, both in philosophy and physical space, where exceptional student designers develop creative solutions for real-world design projects. Kent State offers a variety of different degrees in visual communication design, including a Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts and Fine Arts, a Master of Arts and Fine Arts and a distinctive combination Bachelor of Science and Master of Arts degree. For more information on Kent State's School of Visual Communication Design, visit http://vcd.kent.edu/ or call 330-672-7856. To see eHow.com's complete list of "Top-Ranked Communications Design Schools," visit http://www.ehow.co.uk/info_7864182_topranked-communications-design-schools.html.

TO READERS: This story was provided by an individual or organization for use on the Ohio.com community site, http://www.ohio.com/upublish. We do not endorse and cannot guarantee the accuracy of this posting, though we do reject announcements with inappropriate content. You can read our full user agreement here.

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