Report Overview:
Total Clips (45)
Admissions (1)
Alumni (1)
Anthropology (1)
Architecture (1)
College of Business (COB) (2)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; Town-Gown (1)
Hospitality Management (2)
Journalism and Mass Communications (4)
KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
KSU at Stark (3)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Materials Informatics, Center for (2)
Music (2)
Political Science (3)
Regional Academic Center (1)
Scholarship Programs (3)
Small Business Development Center (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Town-Gown (1)
University Press (1)
WKSU-FM (3)
Other (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Admissions (1)
Economy, incentives fuel YSU growth 02/21/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...continue to be popular with more than 800 students taking at least one class via the Internet. That's up 31 percent from last year's 614 students. Kent State University reported a 4.56-percent increase from spring semester 2010 to this spring. Spring 2011 enrollment of 39,936 students compares...


Alumni (1)
Arsenio Hall gained fame hosting late-night TV show: Black History Month 02/21/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


Anthropology (1)
What's happening 02/18/2011 Athens News, The Text Attachment Email

Lecture:The Ohio Anthropology Club presents professor Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, in a special Darwin lecture at Baker Ballroom titled, "Ardi, Lucy and the Origins of Humans." 4 p.m. Professor Lovejoy...


Architecture (1)
KSU seeks more space, degrees for architecture: College applying for new master's program, wants to be in 1 building (Steidl) 02/21/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...Isaacson wants to do, the famous architecture in and around the Windy City wasn't enough to keep her there. Instead, she left Chicago to study at Kent State University. “Kent's program is one of the best in the country,” said Isaacson, a sophomore architecture major and the student...


College of Business (COB) (2)
Business Calendar 02/19/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

THURSDAY, MARCH 10 "Spirit of Women in Business Conference": 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Kent State University, Kent Student Center; from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. a resource fair will be held in the second-floor rotunda of the Kent Student...

Women's Business Conference at Kent State (Bujorian) 02/18/2011 Business Journal, The Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- Kent State University's College of Business is hosting its first Spirit of Women in Business Conference on March 10. Students, professionals...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Shaker family brings home plight of girls in rural China 02/19/2011 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

...visitors from Shaker Heights they were the first foreigners anyone could remember seeing in An Jing Gou. Vilma Seeberg, a professor of education at Kent State University, made this trip in June with her husband, documentary filmmaker Tom Jacobs, and their 13-year-old daughter, Zoë Guanlan....


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Data on HIV/AIDS Described by Researchers at Kent State University, College of Nursing (Ross) 02/21/2011 Mental Health Weekly Digest Text Email

...depressive symptoms. Self-esteem, infant health status, and education were negatively associated with depressive symptoms," wrote R. Ross and colleagues, Kent State University, College of Nursing. The researchers concluded: "Because of the high rates of depression in our study, all HIV-positive...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Malaria topic of Monday talk at KSU 02/18/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's College of Public Health will sponsor a lecture by Dr. Joseph Keating, an assistant professor at Tulane University's...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; Town-Gown (1)
Greater Kent college, town communities celebrate together 02/20/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...Kent Community Dinner. The dinners were formed for the purpose of attracting a cross section of Kent's global population (thanks in large part to Kent State University). This "ya'll come" American-style potluck, a revitalized tradition from the 1970s, has grown in numbers, diversity...


Hospitality Management (2)
Kent State University's Campus Kitchen will provide meals to agencies (Gosky, Hoegler) 02/19/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...kitchen on the second floor of Beall Hall. Each week, student volunteers will prepare 75 meals to be delivered to a social service agency. KENT, Ohio -- Kent State Universitystudents will help feed the hungry by recovering excess food from restaurants and grocery stores, cooking meals and delivering...

KSU Students Planning To Feed The Hungry 02/19/2011 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Beginning next week, Kent State University students will help to feed the hungry in and around campus. The new Campus Kitchen will recover excess food from restaurants...


Journalism and Mass Communications (4)
TELEVISION: The 'bold, crazy' world of Adult Swim (Russo) 02/20/2011 Los Angeles Times Text Email

...action shows. Traditionally "you were a freak if you were an Adult Swim fan -- not a majority sort," said Ron Russo, an adjunct professor of film at Kent State University who teaches an Adult Swim course and published the book "Adult Swim and Comedy." If these new shows with their recognizable...

Journalism, media teachers can apply for free training 02/18/2011 Daily Press - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...programs are especially encouraged to apply. The sites are journalism schools at Arizona State University in Phoenix, the University of Texas at Austin, Kent State University in Ohio, University of Nevada in Reno, and the University of Missouri in Columbia...

Free Training for High School Teachers 02/19/2011 pr-usa.net Text Attachment Email

...Foundation. The Institute will take place at five accredited journalism schools: Arizona State University, Phoenix University of Texas at Austin Kent State University, Ohio University of Nevada, Reno University of Missouri, Columbia Details and an online application form are...

TELEVISION: The 'bold, crazy' world of Adult Swim (Russo) 02/20/2011 Chicago Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...live-action shows. Traditionally "you were a freak if you were an Adult Swim fan — not a majority sort," said Ron Russo, an adjunct professor of film at Kent State University who teaches an Adult Swim course and published the book "Adult Swim and Comedy." If these new shows with their recognizable...


KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
Local Kent State branch gets grant 02/19/2011 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

EAST LIVERPOOL - The local Kent State University - East Liverpool campus is one of seven northern Ohio-based schools or nonprofit organizations to receive a UnitedHealth...

Residents get some computer insights (Golden) 02/20/2011 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

...of seminars to help take some of the mystery out of modern technology. The event was held at the Ohio Valley College of Technology. Shawn Golden, Kent State University - East Liverpool technology assistant professor, and Bruce White, Calcutta Elementary fourth-grade teacher, led the seminar....


KSU at Stark (3)
Rep review -- KSU's 'Songs' a showcase for young voices 02/19/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...sat on the sofa watching “American Idol” and felt mightily impressed by the vocal talent on display. Friday night, I sat in the Fine Arts Theatre at Kent State University Stark Campus feeling the very same. The young cast of “Songs For a New World,” the new concert-style stage production...

Second Bomb Threat in 1 Month Closes Stark State 02/19/2011 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

...police will handle the investigation. This is the second bomb threat at Stark State in one month. The Stark State campus and Fine Arts building of Kent State Stark evacuated Jan. 24 after a bomb threat intended for Stark State. Police found no evidence of a bomb then, either. Kent...

Upcoming MTI Shows for Cleveland - Week of 2/20 02/20/2011 Broadway World - Vermont Text Attachment Email

SONGS FOR A NEW WORLD KENT STATE UNIVERSITY-STARK CAMPUS 2/18-2/27/2011 Says the author of this gripping revue, ?it?s about one moment. It?s about hitting the...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
YWCA will host student career fair 02/20/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...be representatives from local universities, colleges and trade or technical schools to talk with students about the programs they offer. Included are Kent State University Trumbull Campus, National College, ITT Technical Institute, The Academy of Dental Assisting & Smile Design, Staff Right...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
ODOT workers to participate in Engineers Week 02/19/2011 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

...traffic safety, ODOT's sign shop, drainage and plan development, roadway design and maintenance of traffic. STUDENT INVOLVEMENT ODOT will team with Kent State University in Tuscarawas, the Tuscarawas County Engineer's staff and area businesses to provide high school students an opportunity...

Engineering expo will be at Kent Tusc 02/21/2011 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

NEW PHILADELPHIA — In celebration of National Engineers Week, Kent State University at Tuscarawas will have its 29th annual Engineering Technology Opportunity Expo from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday in the...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Nikki Giovanni to be honored at literature conference at KSU (Brodie) 02/20/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Liquid Crystals 02/20/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent The Northeast Ohio International Business Network and the Liquid Crystal Institute at Kent State are sponsoring a program covering liquid-crystal research and the business opportunities within the industry. The program is...


Materials Informatics, Center for (2)
Iowa State Scientist to Describe Latest Ideas in Superconductivity at AAAS Annual Meeting 02/21/2011 R&D Magazine Text Attachment Email

...series of talks is 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 20, in Room 102A of the Washington Convention Center. Laura Bartolo, professor and director of Kent State University's Center for Materials Informatics, will speak about the materials science collaboration...

Physicist talks superconductivity at AAAS annual meeting 02/20/2011 PhysOrg.com Text Attachment Email

...The series of talks is 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 20, in Room 102A of the Washington Convention Center. Laura Bartolo, professor and director of Kent State University's Center for Materials Informatics, will speak about the materials science collaboration. Provided by Iowa State University...


Music (2)
The Frequency of Color: Halim El-Dabh 02/21/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...Halim El-Dabh proved to be musically adept as a child and was called a prodigy by some. El-Dabh is an emeritus professor of African Ethnomusicology at Kent State University, where he has taught for 42 years. In Kent, his birthday has become an annual celebration with Standing Rock Cultural...

Canton Symphony presents The Barber of Seville (Lamb) 02/18/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...in love with him and not his money. They are both playing other parts,? says Lamb, who is a professor of opera and director of the opera department at Kent State University. ?There?s a nice battle of wits between Rosina and Figaro, who is spry and smart about things.? A HILARIOUS ROMP Small,...


Political Science (3)
US nervously follows a tale of two 'brothers' (Stacher) 02/19/2011 The Australian Text Email

...more-moderate wing will, in fact, have lasting clout "It's never entirely clear with the brothers," says Josh Stacher, a political science professor at Kent State University in the US who spent years in Egypt studying the organisation. "It's a big group, with lots of different points of view...

'One-third of Egypt's economy under army control' (Stacher) 02/20/2011 Daily News South Africa Text Attachment Email

...members.” As much as one-third of Egypt's economy is under military control, says Joshua Stacher, an Egyptian-military expert and assistant professor at Kent State University in Ohio. Revenues from military companies are a state secret, along with the armed forces budget, he says. It isn't...

Military's business interests run wide, deep (Stacher) 02/20/2011 Buenos Aires Herald - Online Text Attachment Email

...members." As much as one-third of Egypt's economy is under military control, said Joshua Stacher, an Egyptian-military expert and assistant professor at Kent State University in Ohio whose work has been published in five academic journals. Revenues from military companies are a state secret,...


Regional Academic Center (1)
Mayor Believes Twinsburg Moving In Right Direction 02/18/2011 Twinsburg Patch Text Attachment Email

...city such as the addition of a 24 hour emergency unit at University Hospitals, the opening of the Cleveland Clinic Family Health and Surgery Center , Kent State's Twinsburg Regional Academic Center and additions and innovations with the General Electric plant. “These industries are...


Scholarship Programs (3)
KSU to begin scholarship match (Garcia, Lefton) 02/20/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Feb. 20--Kent State has unveiled a scholarship program that could provide up to $1,000 for some freshmen. The Kent Scholarship Match Program will...

KSU to start matching scholarship (Vincent, Garcia, Evans) 02/19/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Starting this fall, Kent State University will match non-university scholarships for incoming freshmen up to $1,000. Students who receive scholarships from...

New scholarships at Kent St defray costs 02/18/2011 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - Kent State University announced a new scholarship program Thursday in anticipation of cuts in state and federal aid in the next school year....


Small Business Development Center (1)
Ravenna business strategy targeted (Carrington-Matthews) 02/19/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...assistance if they were to expand, including cutting through red tape. Gavin Carrington-Matthews, director of the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University, said his agency provides free business consulting to new and existing businesses...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Kent Stage serves up 'Music on Main Street' 02/20/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...songs from "Grease," the 1971 musical by Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey that set records on Broadway for its 3,888-performance run. The musical opened at Kent State University Friday and performances continue today and then Feb. 23 through 27. Students in the Kent State School of...


Town-Gown (1)
ALONG THE WAY: Eye on upscale housing in Kent 02/20/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Press (1)
"Farm boy' never lost his love of nature (Underwood) 02/19/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...a new book, a collection of essays on plant life that make Kent unique. Most of the essays have been published before, but the 83-year-old retired Kent State University professor infused a literary quality and removed tricky botanical jargon for his compilation, “Botanical Essays from Kent.”...


WKSU-FM (3)
Akron schools among grant winners 02/20/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Park, $52,000 for its summer youth outreach programs. • East Akron Neighborhood Development Corp., $20,000 for its Emergency Home Repair program. • Kent State University Foundation, $20,000 for WKSU's 2011 fund drive and $70,000 for its Partnership for the Minority Business Accelerator....

Radio host deals at WSDP record show 02/20/2011 Plymouth Observer Text Attachment Email

...is also heard on stations across the country. He also is a folk music artist and he serves as an announcer and producer for Folkalley.com and WKSU at Kent State University. “We're excited to have Matt participating in our show,” said Bill Keith, Station Manager of WSDP. “He is a wonderful...

Metro Detroit: Newsmakers Feb. 18, 2011 02/18/2011 Michiguide.com Text Attachment Email

...syndication on other stations across the country. Watroba also is a folk music artist and serves as an announcer and producer for Folkalley.com and WKSU at Kent State University. "We're excited to have Matt participating in our show," said Bill Keith, WSDP station manager. "He is a wonderful...


Other (1)
YWCA will host student career fair 02/20/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...be representatives from local universities, colleges and trade or technical schools to talk with students about the programs they offer. Included are Kent State University Trumbull Campus, National College, ITT Technical Institute, The Academy of Dental Assisting & Smile Design, Staff Right...


News Headline: Economy, incentives fuel YSU growth | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The trend of increasing enrollment at Youngstown State University continued spring semester.

Enrollment for spring semester, which started Jan. 18, is 14,253, up about 400 students from spring 2010, said Ron Cole, university spokesman. Spring 2010 enrollment was 13,837 students.

Since 2000, spring enrollment has increased 31 percent.

Jack Fahey, interim vice president of student affairs, attributed the increase primarily to the economy.

“Historically, any time the economy goes badly, enrollment increases all over the state,” he said.

For the past several years, though, YSU has seen an increase in freshmen applications, transfers and minority applications because of the many initiatives it launched to increase enrollment, Fahey said.

A few years ago, YSU began offering a lower tuition for residents of several western Pennsylvania counties. Besides Mercer and Lawrence, the lower tuition is offered to Butler, Allegheny and Crawford counties.

“That really has helped our enrollment, too,” he said.

Other area universities also see the upward trend.

At Eastern Gateway Community College, enrollment is growing, particularly at expansion counties.

The college is on pace to exceed last spring's enrollment of 2,033 by 4 percent to 9 percent, according to Patty Sturch, dean of enrollment management.

“We are still enrolling dual-enrollment students at several high schools” and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers students, she said. Dual enrollment means taking some classes at the main campus and some at a branch campus.

The target to double enrollment of students in the expansion counties of Columbiana, Mahoning and Trumbull from last spring's 209 has been met and surpassed.

“We targeted 418 and now have 444, which is 6 percent above the goal,” Sturch said at a trustees' meeting earlier this month.

She said EGCC continues to attract new students.

“We have an increase of new students of at least 13 percent,” Sturch said.

Online classes continue to be popular with more than 800 students taking at least one class via the Internet. That's up 31 percent from last year's 614 students.

Kent State University reported a 4.56-percent increase from spring semester 2010 to this spring. Spring 2011 enrollment of 39,936 students compares with 38,196 for spring semester 2010. The head count is 24,909 for the Kent Campus and 15,027 for the regional campuses. Students are counted only once at the campus at which they hold the majority of their course load.

KSU-Trumbull realized a 9.72-percent increase in spring enrollment compared with last spring. The university reported 3,052 students enrolled in the current session, compared to 2,776 for spring 2010.

“Our continued growth continues to show what a valued asset we are as the choice for higher education in the area,” said Kent-Trumbull Dean Robert Sines. “All of our faculty and staff strive to provide an excellent educational experience for all students. We feel strongly that these numbers reflect the summation of value and quality that our student body receives.”

The Salem Campus experienced a 17.34-percent increase in student head count — 2,017 students in spring 2011 compared to 1,719 students in spring 2010 for a net increase of 298 students.

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News Headline: Arsenio Hall gained fame hosting late-night TV show: Black History Month | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As part of Black History Month, we highlight Arsenio Hall, the Cleveland-born comedian and actor who revitalized late-night television in the early 1990s.

Born 56 years ago this month in Cleveland to Anne and Fred Hall, a Baptist minister, he grew up in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood, attended John F. Kennedy High School and graduated from Warrensville Heights High School. The former child magician toured as a stand-up comic after graduating from Kent State University, moved to Los Angeles and began to find success on television. He became friends with Eddie Murphy and co-starred in the 1987 comedy "Coming to America."

Later that year, he served as replacement host of Fox's "Late Show." His popularity led to the syndicated "Arsenio Hall Show," which brought a hip, party atmosphere to an arena dominated by Johnny Carson's "Tonight" show. It introduced the world to the Dawg Pound's fist-pumping "Woof, woof, woof!" cheer, booked rap and alternative artists and even had presidential candidate Bill Clinton playing the saxophone. Hall was TV Guide's first "TV Person of the Year," in 1990.

Sagging ratings ended his show in 1994. He went on to several short-lived series, appears regularly in guest slots and is working on a new TV project.

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News Headline: What's happening | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Athens News, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Lecture:The Ohio Anthropology Club presents professor Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, in a special Darwin lecture at Baker Ballroom titled, "Ardi, Lucy and the Origins of Humans." 4 p.m. Professor Lovejoy will speak about his work on "Ardi," the Science "Breakthrough of the Year" from 2009, as well as his work on our most famous ancestor "Lucy", to examine questions of how our earliest ancestors became bipedal and how humans evolved. The lecture is free and open to the public. Sponsors are the Ohio Anthropology Club, OCEES, Office for Research and Creative Activity, Departments of Sociology & Anthropology, Biological Sciences, Biomedical Sciences, the Colleges of Arts and Sciences and Osteopathic Medicine, The Kennedy Lecture Series and the Student Activities Commission.

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News Headline: KSU seeks more space, degrees for architecture: College applying for new master's program, wants to be in 1 building (Steidl) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: >
Even though making buildings is all Carolyn Isaacson wants to do, the famous architecture in and around the Windy City wasn't enough to keep her there.

Instead, she left Chicago to study at Kent State University.

“Kent's program is one of the best in the country,” said Isaacson, a sophomore architecture major and the student government representative for the College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

When Dean Douglas Steidl took over the college just eight months ago, he knew it was one of the best. And since then he's been pushing to make it better — and bigger, with more research, more work in sustainability and more degree options.

But perhaps the most visible obstacle for the program, ironically, are its buildings.

They have three of them, and that's the problem.

“A good portion of design education has to do with peer-to-peer learning,” Steidl said.

Juniors should be getting insight from grad students, and second-year students should receive comments from fourth-year students, he said.

But squinting through the window of his Taylor Hall office, Steidl looked across campus. “Our fourth years are in Tri-Towers, which in this snow is nearly a quarter-mile away,” he said.

Their other location is the annex of the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center.

The university tried to secure $210 million in bonds to build, among other things, a single home for the architecture college. But the Ohio Board of Regents blocked that plan in September, arguing against the student fees KSU would have imposed to pay the bonds back.

“We really need some facilities,” Steidl said. The effort to get them “hasn't been canceled; it's just plain on hold.”

But the delay hasn't stopped Steidl from pursuing his other goals — they're preparing to apply for a master of science program. That could be in place for the fall semester of 2012, and a doctoral degree another four years after that, he said.

And the lack of new facilities hasn't seemed to drive away talented students. They grew just more than 2 percent between this spring and last to 747 undergraduate students (there are 74 grad students).

“Our incoming freshmen have the highest high school GPA of any college in the university. We have the highest SAT/ACT scores of any college in the university. We make up 11 percent of the Honors College,” Steidl said.

He listed three more statistics then said, “I could go on.”

Some of the college's greatest assets are its outposts in downtown Cleveland and in downtown Florence, Italy, where they operate a building for study abroad students.

The Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, at Playhouse Square, does professional work on downtown projects, but it also runs urban design studios for graduate students.

Their current project is looking at “environmental determinants of health,” said David Jurca, an urban designer leading 10 grad students in the research. They're studying immigrant populations in Cleveland, looking for ways to reverse trends of declining health that often afflict people new to life in America.

For example, Jurca and his students have been interviewing a group of refugees from Bhutan. What they lack in their new West Park neighborhood is a place to practice yoga, something central to their culture.

“That's what one of the students is working on,” he said, “looking at a type of event center or cultural community center.”

Steidl inherited all of that when he took over the program in July.

He has worked in architecture since he received his bachelor's degree in 1971. He went on to found the Akron firm Braun & Steidl Architects in 1983, and in 2003 he was elected president of the American Institute of Architects.

At that time, he said, nobody in architecture other than the U.S. Green Building Council was interested in comprehensive sustainable architecture.

“By the time I left office at the end of 2005 I believe that I had transformed those organizations into being focused on how architects can be effective in sustainable issues,” he said.

Now he wants to do the same thing for his students — most of whom will graduate and find jobs in northeastern Ohio or western Pennsylvania. In an urban landscape of empty buildings here in the post-industrial Midwest, those skills are becoming more useful.

“I'll give an example: How do you transform all these churches that are closed into something viable for the community? They gorgeous buildings,” he said. “What kinds of uses can you put in there? How do you save the structure?”

Those are relatively new questions in the architecture industry. Steidl wants to put his students in place to answer them.

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News Headline: Business Calendar | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Plain Dealer business staff
News OCR Text: THURSDAY, MARCH 10

"Spirit of Women in Business Conference": 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Kent State University, Kent Student Center; from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. a resource fair will be held in the second-floor rotunda of the Kent Student Center. Local businesses and organizations will showcase their services and products to conference attendees. $30, or $12 for students, if registered by March 4; $40, or $15 for students, for on-site registration. Go to www.kent.edu/business/wib to register. Tables for the fair will be available on a first-come, first-served basis, and the registration deadline for tables is March 4.

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News Headline: Women's Business Conference at Kent State (Bujorian) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Business Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Kent State University's College of Business is hosting its first Spirit of Women in Business Conference on March 10. Students, professionals and seasoned business veterans are encouraged to attend and participate in this inaugural event.

The day will be divided into three 60-minute breakout sessions. Participants can choose one of three different presentation options for each session. The sessions will include a wide range of topics, including social media, entrepreneurship and work-life balance. In addition, there will be a continental breakfast, a keynote lunch and a networking reception.

"Our conference planning committee designed a day that will provide career-building and life-skill topics to women at various junctures of their careers, along with the opportunity to network in an informal setting," said Patty Bujorian, chairwoman of the conference planning committee and staff member at the College of Business at Kent State.

Lisa Clarke, Kent State alumna who received a master of business administration degree in 1994, will deliver the keynote speech during the lunch. She is president and CEO of Rally Marketing Group, an integrated marketing and promotions agency in Seattle.

In conjunction with the Spirit of Women in Business Conference, Kent State's College of Business will host a resource fair, providing a venue for local businesses and organizations to showcase their services and products to conference attendees. The fair will be located in the second floor rotunda of the Kent Student Center from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tables will be available on a first-come, first-served basis, and the registration deadline for tables is March 4.

The conference will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Kent Student Center. Pre-registration must be done by March 4, but on-site registration is also available. General pre-registration is $30 and student pre-registration is $12. On-site registration will be $40 for general and $15 for students. Registrants also have the option of earning continuing education units, and simply need to indicate that preference on the registration form.

Conference sponsors include Kent State's Alumni Association, Center for Student Involvement, Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Donor Relations, Institutional Advancement, University Relations and the Women's Center.

For more information on pricing, the resource fair or to register, visit the conference Web site.

Published by The Business Journal, Youngstown, Ohio

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News Headline: Shaker family brings home plight of girls in rural China | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Dawidziak, Mark
News OCR Text: TV PREVIEW

Guanlan's Sisters: A Family Journal

What: A documentary about a Shaker Heights family's work to educate girls in rural China.

When: 10:30 p.m. Sunday; repeats at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 27.

Where: WVIZ Channel 25.

The mountain paths are steep and tricky around the remote village of An Jing Gou. Shale and loose gravel make footing uncertain, so walking sticks are hastily fashioned from the stems of bamboo plants.

They help, particularly since the climb is taking place between 6,000 and 7,000 feet above sea level. Visitors unaccustomed to the thin air are struggling for footing while they're struggling for breath.

But visitors are all but unknown in this rural corner of China. Indeed, villagers told three visitors from Shaker Heights they were the first foreigners anyone could remember seeing in An Jing Gou.

Vilma Seeberg, a professor of education at Kent State University, made this trip in June with her husband, documentary filmmaker Tom Jacobs, and their 13-year-old daughter, Zoë Guanlan. Seeberg was visiting many of the girls who were getting an education through a scholarship fund she started in 2000.

Jacobs couldn't use one of those bamboo walking sticks while climbing from home to home on that mountain. That's because he was toting a camera to chronicle the trip for "Guanlan's Sisters: A Family Journal," a half-hour documentary that premieres at 10:30 p.m. Sunday on WVIZ Channel 25.

"I remember thinking after about three hours walking up those paths, 'I'm really getting too old for this,' " said Jacobs, 62, whose documentary "Mr. Wilson's Kids: From East Cleveland to Beijing" told about the Shaw High School Marching Band's 2008 trip to China.

"And Jing Gou is way out there, about a five-hour trip from Xi'an. And you're going up and up and up. But then you're in this pristine valley with people living close to how they've always lived, and it's really like going back in time."

Located about 700 miles southwest of Beijing, An Jing Gou does not fit the Western definition of a village. It is more of a community with homes scattered around the mountainous region. Some chickens and pigs might be seen near small patches of crops, but whatever is being grown on these homesteads is not to be sold. It is for food.

You could say there was running water at the first home they visited. It was a creek running past the house. This was the one and only source of water for cooking and washing.

"To them, these conditions are normal," Seeberg said. "It's the only way they know how to live. To us, the poverty is overwhelming, but, everywhere we went, everyone was so generous and outgoing and happy to see you. They're so grateful for what you're trying to do."

Seeberg, the author of two books about literacy and education in China, is trying to make a small difference in a country where boys are valued over girls and families often don't have the option of sending their daughters to school.

"We made this journey last year, but you could say it started in 1979," said Seeberg, 63. "That was an entire year I spent in China at a university. What I expected when I first went to China was that they were doing very well with mass education. And when I got there, I saw that it was just mass rhetoric."

"Guanlan's Sisters" follows Seeberg, Jacobs and their daughter as they travel up the narrow, often harrowing one-lane mountain road to An Jing Gou, where they hike from home to home, calling on the girls and their families.

Mark Smukler, WVIZ's senior director of content, said the station has aired several of Jacobs' documentaries through the years. "We found 'Guanlan's Sisters' to be a compelling story and are privileged to share it with our audience," Smukler said.

'Global family' doing something positive

"A global family" is how this Shaker Heights trio is described in Channel 25's promotional material. Seeberg is a German immigrant fluent in five languages. Jacobs, named news manager at WKYC Channel 3 in 1978, was one of the first black journalists to reach a top management position in a major television market. And in 1998, they traveled to China to adopt Zoë Guanlan (born in Suzhou in 1997).

The Guanlan Scholarship began in 2000, when Seeberg was invited to give a keynote address on education for women at a teachers' college in China.

"That's when it became very real," Seeberg said. "I realized I could actually do something about the problem, not just record it. Maybe it goes back to being part of the '60s generation, where just talking about issues wasn't enough. You had to do something positive to construct a better world."

After being told about the impoverished families of An Jing Gou in 2000, Seeberg took her speaker's honorarium and started the scholarship fund. During the past 10 years, it has helped 70 Chinese girls get an education.

To get to school, these girls must climb down the mountain to where a bus can take them to a provincial center.

"We were there in perfect balmy weather, so I kept thinking, 'What if it was raining and cold, and I was a little girl walking down these rickety little paths to get to a school where there was no heat?'" Seeberg said. "Keeping that in mind, nothing about this trip was difficult."

The trip also helped Seeberg further document what's called "the girl effect."

"This has been noticed in societies around the world," Jacobs said. "When boys get an education, they tend to leave and make money. When girls get an education, they tend to give back to their communities."

According to the documentary, $45 will pay for a girl's elementary school education for an entire year - $90 for middle school and $250 for high school.

"What we do is truly a drop in the bucket, but maybe this documentary will make some people curious enough to look into helping out some girls who need and want an education," said Jacobs, who left local news to pursue independent projects as a writer, director and producer.

Three people, three hopes

It was an emotional journey for Seeberg, Jacobs and their daughter, and each voices a hope for the documentary.

"For me, there was just an overwhelming sense of happiness and joy to finally meet the people my mom has been helping for so long," said Zoë, who helped her father with filming and camerawork. "I hope it shows people living here in America how fortunate we are. We have so much, and we take all these things for granted. I get bored in my room, and it hit me hard how selfish that is when you see girls who don't even have a room."

Jacobs hopes the film will promote a greater understanding of China: "What people know about China is what they see in the media. Or they go on tour to Beijing or Shanghai. I hope people will take away a vision of what China is like behind the scenes. China has come a long way in the last 20 years, but there still is much to be done."

And Seeberg hopes the documentary will prompt more people to check out the scholarship fund's website: guanlanscholarshipfoundation.org. The fund has been receiving between $2,500 and $3,000 a year in donations, Jacobs said.

Funding for the documentary was provided by Kent State University and the Hathaway Brown School's Center for Global Citizenship.

"There clearly was great synergy between our mission and the goals of this documentary," said Terry Dubow, director of communications and marketing at Hathaway Brown, the K-12 girls school in Shaker Heights. "We're all about helping girls get an education, so the opportunity to support this film and foundation was really intriguing to us. Access to education is everything, and that's the message of this film."

"I'm so glad we have the film as a record, because this trip made everything so real," Seeberg said. "The girls write a letter once a year to explain what they're doing. So we knew, but it was all two-dimensional. This was like meeting long-lost cousins. It makes the impact of what you're doing real. They're real people now. They're friends."

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: mdawidziak@plaind.com, 216-999-4249

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: Data on HIV/AIDS Described by Researchers at Kent State University, College of Nursing (Ross) | Email

News Date: 02/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Mental Health Weekly Digest
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Scientists discuss in 'Depressive symptoms among HIV-positive postpartum women in Thailand' new findings in HIV/AIDS. "Depressive symptoms have been linked to faster progression to AIDS in HIV-positive individuals. The purpose of this correlational, cross-sectional study was to examine the prevalence and predictors of depressive symptoms among postpartum women in Thailand who are HIV-positive," scientists in the United States report (see also ).

"Data were collected at postpartum outpatient units in four hospitals in Thailand from June 2005 to December 2007. Eighty-five HIV-positive postpartum women completed questionnaires on depressive symptoms, self-esteem, emotional support, physical symptoms, infant health status, and demographics. Results showed that 74.1% of the participants reported depressive symptoms. Self-esteem, infant health status, and education were negatively associated with depressive symptoms," wrote R. Ross and colleagues, Kent State University, College of Nursing.

The researchers concluded: "Because of the high rates of depression in our study, all HIV-positive postpartum women in Thailand should be screened for depressive symptoms."

Ross and colleagues published their study in Archives of Psychiatric Nursing (Depressive symptoms among HIV-positive postpartum women in Thailand. Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, 2011;25(1):36-42).

For more information, contact R. Ross, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44221 USA.

Copyright © 2011 Mental Health Weekly Digest via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Malaria topic of Monday talk at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's College of Public Health will sponsor a lecture by Dr. Joseph Keating, an assistant professor at Tulane University's School of Public Health and Tropical Disease, at noon Monday in the Moulton Hall Ballroom. His lecture is titled, "Fighting Malaria in Africa and Haiti: Is Elimination Possible?"

Keating is an epidemiologist with a strong focus on Malaria control and prevention in Africa. Malaria is a notorious common infectious tropical disease in developing countries. The event is free and open to the public.

The talk will be streamed live at ksutube.kent.edu and will be available on the college's website at www.kent.edu/publichealth/speakerseries. The speaker series is sponsored by KSU's College of Public Health and the Public Health Student Alliance.

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News Headline: Greater Kent college, town communities celebrate together | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The greater Kent college and town communities got together to celebrate both their diversity and commonality at the recent Fifth Year Anniversary Kent Community Dinner.

The dinners were formed for the purpose of attracting a cross section of Kent's global population (thanks in large part to Kent State University).

This "ya'll come" American-style potluck, a revitalized tradition from the 1970s, has grown in numbers, diversity and programming over the last half decade.

This particular dinner was hosted by the United Church of Christ in Kent, which provided its Fellowship Hall, a kitchen manager and volunteers.

Also serving to make this dinner possible were Kent's Boy Scout Troop No. 253, Ravenna's Maplewood Career Center students, KSU's vice president and assistant vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion, Dr. Alfreda Brown and Dr. Geraldine Nelson, KSU's International Student and Scholar Department, KSU Honors College students, KSU's Tri Sigma Sorority, and some graduate dietetic students.

KSU provided funds for the more than 200 pounds of turkey that was prepared by community volunteers. Beckwith Orchards donated 100 pounds of apples, which Maplewood student chefs turned into 40 pies.

Kent-Dudince (Slovak Republic) Sister Cities Association led the Bread Breaking Ceremony.

Then local singer/songwriter Hal Walker was joined by Maurice Drake in singing "Widening the Circle," a song about inclusion. Finally, a leader in the local Muslim community, Mohammad Abdul-Aziz, offered the blessing.

The Celtic Clan from Kent provided instrumental music before and during dinner.

The after-dinner program included Kent's own Rockin' Robin (Robert Montgomery) together with former Kent musician Andy Cohen playing the blues.

Hal Walker sang "Kent, Ohio," Kent's own song, and more, and KSU student Liling Sun of China sang two Japanese songs, followed by KSU student Rumbidzai D. Mupinga of Zimbabwe, who danced to a Congolese piece of music.

An Honors component was part of the Fifth Year Anniversary Dinner evening program. The Burbick Foundation, the city of Kent, Kent Floral, and KSU were presented with a plaque for their contributions to the Kent Community Dinner.

Also acknowledged were longtime supporters of the Kent Community Dinner: Acme Fresh Market, Advanced Display, the Baeckerei, City Bank Antiques, the Girl Scouts of Northeast Ohio, the Great Trail Boy Scouts, Kent-Dudince Sister Cities Association, Kent Lions, Kent Kiwanis, Kent Rotary, Marizita Graphics, ProStar Specialty Co., Skribbles Coffee Co., Sue Nelson Design Inc., Tarpco Inc., and the Ricciardi family with the Venice Cafe.

Laura Mazur, director of the nonprofit, said, "The people in these organizations, together with countless unsung individual volunteers from the community, make these dinners possible. Thanks and thanks for giving Kent the opportunity to make its small but important contribution to the creation of peace on earth, one diverse friendship at a time."

John Gwinn, Chrystal or Fu Yingjie (visiting Chinese teacher at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Kent), Liling Sun (KSU student and Chinese performer of two Japanese songs), and Maurice Drake.

Kent-Dudince Sister Cities officers and members, from left, Rudy Bachna, Slovak dress; Becky Gorczyca, Polish dress; Bob Stevenson, Scottish dress; Polly Germer, German dress; and John Keleciny, Slovak dress.

Maurice Drake and Hal Walker sing "Widening the Circle" preceding the Kent Community Dinner.

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News Headline: Kent State University's Campus Kitchen will provide meals to agencies (Gosky, Hoegler) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Karen Farkas
News OCR Text: By Karen Farkas, The Plain Dealer

Thomas Ondrey l The Plain DealerChef Ed Hoegler shows measuring cups for wet and dry ingredients as he identifies the items in the kitchen on the second floor of Beall Hall. Each week, student volunteers will prepare 75 meals to be delivered to a social service agency.

KENT, Ohio -- Kent State Universitystudents will help feed the hungry by recovering excess food from restaurants and grocery stores, cooking meals and delivering them to a social service agency.

The new Campus Kitchen is the first in Ohio and one of 30 at high school and college campuses across the country.

"Within a mile from campus almost 200 hot meals are served to people in need," said Ann Gosky, an assistant to the vice president of student affairs and project coordinator. "[Students] have a responsibility to help."

The Campus Kitchens Projectwas founded by Robert Egger, who opened D.C. Central Kitchen in 1989 in Washington to collect recovered food and deliver meals to local agencies. Egger, with support from foundations and other companies, expanded his program to college campuses in 2001.

Last spring, a group of Kent students on an alternative spring break to volunteer in Washington, D.C., visited the Central Kitchen and met Egger.

"Everyone was inspired by it," said Claire Rosenwasser, 19, a pre-med psychology major from Kent. She and others vowed to start at Campus Kitchen program at Kent.

Last fall, a core group of students and Gosky received approval from university officials, who submitted a formal application to the Campus Kitchens Project. Dining services offered the students use of a large fully-equipped kitchen -- with walk-in coolers and freezers -- that it is no longer used since food is now prepared on-site in cafeterias.

Egger announced Kent State was chosen as a Campus Kitchen at an on-campus event in November. The Campus Kitchens Project provided a $15,000 grant, of which some will be used to purchase food and stock a pantry until places are found to recover food.

Gosky said students will recover excess food from campus dining halls and are talking to grocery stores, restaurants and farmers markets to seek commitments. Students will pick up the food. About two dozen students are actively involved and they will solicit help from student organizations.

The first meals will be prepared Feb. 23. Students plan to make 75 meals each Wednesday afternoon during the school year and deliver them the next day to Kent Social Services.

Students already volunteer at the agency, within walking distance of campus, so adding Campus Kitchen was easy, said Christie Anderson, the agency's manager.

"It will certainly be a savings for us," she said. The agency provides lunch four days a week and dinner on Thursdays.

Ed Hoegler, a chef and instructor in the university's hospitality management program, is creating menus and training students. He led about a dozen students on a 90-minute tour of the kitchen last week.

He identified all the items they would use to prepare and cook food, discussed sanitation and proper temperatures and stressed safety, including how to carry a knife.

Kevin Kraus, 21, of Mentor, said he initially volunteered to obtain service hours but now plans to stay and work on the project.

"I really like it -- it's a great idea," said Kraus, a special education major. "I've worked in grocery stores and restaurants that got rid of good food. Here's a chance to recover it."

Any restaurant, grocery store or vendor interested in providing food to the Campus Kitchen can contact Gosky at agosky@kent.edu.

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News Headline: KSU Students Planning To Feed The Hungry | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Beginning next week, Kent State University students will help to feed the hungry in and around campus.

The new Campus Kitchen will recover excess food from restaurants and grocery stores. Then, the group will cook meals and deliver them to area social service agencies.

The Campus Kitchen at Kent State is the first in Ohio and is only one of 30 at high schools and colleges across the country.

Kent State has been given a $15,000 grant by the Campus Kitchens Project to purchase food and stock a pantry until places are found from which the Campus Kitchen can recover food.

The first meals will be prepared this coming Wednesday afternoon. KSU Students plan to deliver those meals on Thursday to Kent Social Services.

Christie Anderson, of Kent Social Services, tells the Plain Dealer that the food delivery from the students will provide them a financial savings.

On the Web: www.cleveland.com

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News Headline: TELEVISION: The 'bold, crazy' world of Adult Swim (Russo) | Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Los Angeles Times
Contact Name: Fennessey, Sean
News OCR Text: A masked man in the witness protection program fights for the future of his family. A band of unorthodox physicians works tirelessly to save sick children. A cabal of forensic ninjas solves crimes while refusing to play by the rules. And, finally, a vengeful U.S. marshal exercises a predilection for hard justice and cowboy hats.

This is not a list of pitches for pilot season. No, these are the premises of four live-action programs currently active or in production on the Cartoon Network's nightly Adult Swim block.

They are all comedies -- namely, "Delocated," "Childrens Hospital," the forthcoming "NTSF: SD SUV" and "Eagleheart," the new Chris Elliott vehicle that premiered earlier this month, a not-so-subtle lampoon of "Walker, Texas Ranger"-style action dramas. Thanks to such offbeat, irreverent series, Adult Swim has begun to evolve from a cultish backroom curio to a ratings blockbuster.

Adult Swim "is just a haven for the kind of bold, crazy, innovative comedy that we love," says David Kissinger, president of Conaco, Conan O'Brien's production company and the creative team behind "Eagleheart," which airs on Thursdays at midnight. "It just seemed like a sensibility fit."

With its brash, acutely observed take on Chuck Norris territory, "Eagleheart" arrives at a key moment for the network. This September marks the 10th anniversary of Adult Swim, which launched in 2001 as a single-night block: Sundays at 10 p.m. Armed with a minuscule budget and a reserve of Hannah-Barbera cartoons (owned by parent company Turner Broadcasting), the small Adult Swim team quietly launched a universe of its own, creating absurd fare such as "Space Ghost Coast to Coast" (in which an obscure cartoon superhero interviewed celebrities) and "Aqua Teen Hunger Force" (featuring anthropomorphic fast food heroes). The shows often aired in 15-minute spurts.

In the nearly 91/2 years since, Adult Swim has become the proudly goofy gold standard for unconventional comedy on basic cable. The network -- which became officially recognized as distinct from the Cartoon Network in 2005 by Nielsen and extended its start time to 9 p.m. this year, seven days a week -- routinely dominates the adults 18-24 demographic, but recently it has made significant strides in adults 18-49. For the second week in February, the block won total day delivery for all basic cable channels in that demographic.

"It was shocking," says Mike Lazzo, the senior executive vice president and paterfamilias of Adult Swim, of the wide age range. "What we discovered was, actually, our audience just stayed with us. We always get painted with this stoner comedy thing, and we just laugh at that."

As it ages, the network's formula, and perhaps its tone, has changed. Animated originals like "Robot Chicken" and syndicated reruns of "Family Guy" and "Futurama" (two shows that were canceled and then reordered by other networks after huge success on Adult Swim) constitute the bulk of the programming. But Adult Swim has begun to steadily incorporate live-action shows that feature well-known or emerging comedy stars, such as Elliott, "Childrens Hospital" creator and star Rob Corddry, and "Human Giant" alumnus Paul Scheer, whose "CSI" parody "NTSF: SD: SUV" will premiere in June.

--

So surreal

Lazzo and his team have done it cannily, always emphasizing creator-driven projects and identifying partners who match their lust for surrealism, like the discomfiting and nightmarishly funny meta-sketch program "Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!," a cult hit that ended its five-season run last May.

"They don't seem to care about advertisers or audience," says Corddry, a former "Daily Show" correspondent who created the mock-medical dramedy "Childrens Hospital." "They just guide us to be more creative. They've never said, 'You can't do that.' They've never given us negative notes. It's always positive or nudges in a certain direction. Like, 'More nudity.' Which we've done."

"Childrens Hospital," with an impressive cast that includes Megan Mullally and Henry Winkler, began as a Web series produced by TheWB.com during the writers' strike, jumping to Adult Swim in 2009. Last year it was one of the network's five highest-rated original programs among total viewers. (Animated stalwarts such as "Robot Chicken" and "Aqua Teen" still lead the pack.)

--

Bigger is better

But not every show has such a smooth trip to air. "Eagleheart," inspired by a Dadaist "Late Night With Conan O'Brien" sketch, was originally conceived as a 30-minute "Larry Sanders Show"-esque look behind the scenes of an action drama called "Eagleheart." But Adult Swim "wanted something that was just a bigger, more in-your-face comedy experience," Kissinger says.

The producers eventually came around to the network's suggestions, including the early recommendation of cult star and comedic forefather Elliott ("Cabin Boy," "Saturday Night Live") for the lead.

"When I first heard they were going to do it in 15-minute portions, I thought, that sounds crazy," Elliott said. "But then I realized that's not that much longer than the little remotes I used to do on ['Late Night With David Letterman.'] It is a little old school for me, but there's an Adult Swim audience that has no idea what I did back in 1986."

It's Elliott's first lead role on a series since his oddball '90s Fox sitcom, "Get a Life," and he says, "This is the first thing since 'Get a Life' that I've done that is a perfect fit for me."

Still, the process of getting to its compact and sharply honed format was disorienting at times.

"It is like ingesting hallucinogens and going into the development process," Kissinger said of birthing "Eagleheart." "And I say that with gratitude. [Because] once we got our minds around it, it became really exciting when we realized, 'Well, this could be very extreme and bold and basically a live-action cartoon.' It gave us license to create a heightened kind of comedy where there really were no rules."

--

Rule-breaker

Adult Swim continues to distort the rules with 15-minute shows, reruns and anime. (The network has also developed unique ways of marketing programs via tie-in albums, toys and allowing fans to make custom DVDs.) But as live-action seeps into its identity and ratings continue to grow, there is the threat that longtime fans may retreat. Message boards on their website routinely feature mixed reviews and resistance to the live- action shows.

Traditionally "you were a freak if you were an Adult Swim fan -- not a majority sort," said Ron Russo, an adjunct professor of film at Kent State University who teaches an Adult Swim course and published the book "Adult Swim and Comedy." If these new shows with their recognizable stars push the network closer to the mainstream, "they could alienate the base."

Now that Adult Swim has established itself as cable's go-to spot for smart, off-kilter late-night comedy, its expansion into primetime indicates loftier aims. But as the network reaches for a wider audience, it is faced with quality quirky comedy lineups sprouting all over cable. IFC is building a stronghold with the sketch show "Portlandia" and with "Onion News Network," which air alongside reruns of "The Larry Sanders Show" and "Mr. Show." FX has jumped into the game with the animated series "Archer," created by Adult Swim graduate Adam Reed. Even Adult Swim's sister network TBS is going after a similar audience with "Conan," "Lopez Tonight" and its own successful block of syndicated reruns of shows, including "The Office."

"It doesn't bother me -- that's just America," said Lazzo, who has been at the helm of Adult Swim since he co-created "Space Ghost" in 1994. "It would be awesome if we lived in a Communist country and I could crush all competitors."

Kidding aside, Lazzo said he's happy to see creativity on the air -- on his network or elsewhere.

"I gotta tell you: 'Portlandia'? Great! Let's see new sketch voices. 'Onion News'? The hardest I've laughed all week. I don't really have an issue unless they beat me every night. And then I'm not going to have an issue with them, I'm going to have an issue with us."

--

calendar@latimes.com

PHOTO: 'EAGLEHEART': Chris Elliott portrays a Chuck Norris-like action guy.

PHOTOGRAPHER:Adult Swim

PHOTO: CHILDRENS HOSPITAL: Seth Morris, left, and Rob Corddry clown around in the medical series.

PHOTOGRAPHER:Warner Bros. / Adult Swim

PHOTO: 'DELOCATED!': He's in witness protection.

PHOTOGRAPHER: Giovanni Rufino Cartoon Network

PHOTO: LAUGHABLE: Chris Elliott, a notable 1990s comedy presence, leads the spoofy "Eagleheart" on Cartoon Network's Adult Swim. He says it's "a perfect fit for me."

PHOTOGRAPHER: Ricardo DeAratanha Los Angeles Times

Copyright © 2011 Los Angeles Times

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News Headline: Journalism, media teachers can apply for free training | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Daily Press - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Applications are being accepted for an expenses-paid, two-week summer institute for high school teachers. Deadline for applications is March 1 for the 165 teachers who will be selected to attend the 2011 Reynolds High School Journalism Institute.

Details and an online application can be found at http://hsj.org/reynolds.

Teachers from high schools that lack online student media or have struggling journalism programs are especially encouraged to apply. The sites are journalism schools at Arizona State University in Phoenix, the University of Texas at Austin, Kent State University in Ohio, University of Nevada in Reno, and the University of Missouri in Columbia.

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News Headline: Free Training for High School Teachers | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: pr-usa.net
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: To publish a PR you need to Register As part of its national effort to help teens develop and embrace 21st century literacy skills, my.hsj.org and hsj.org seek high school teachers for an expenses-paid, two-week summer institute.

One hundred and seventy-five teachers will be selected to attend the 2011 Reynolds High School Journalism Institute. The deadline for applications is March 1.

There is no cost to the teacher or high school. Students, especially those who take part in journalism classes or clubs are the ultimate beneficiaries, emerging as stronger readers, writers, critical thinkers and communicators. Teachers from high schools that lack online student media or have struggling journalism programs are especially encouraged to apply.

Transportation, lodging, meals, materials, tuition and continuing education credits are covered by a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation.

The Institute will take place at five accredited journalism schools:

Arizona State University, Phoenix

University of Texas at Austin

Kent State University, Ohio

University of Nevada, Reno

University of Missouri, Columbia

Details and an online application form are available at: http://hsj.org/reynolds

Read Institute testimonials at: http://hsj.org/testimonials

The Donald W. Reynolds Foundation is a national philanthropic organization founded in 1954 by the late media entrepreneur for whom it is named. Headquartered in Las Vegas, Nevada, it is one of the largest private foundations in the United States.

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News Headline: TELEVISION: The 'bold, crazy' world of Adult Swim (Russo) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Chicago Tribune - Online
Contact Name: Los Angeles Times
News OCR Text: That's how one show supplier describes the cable programming block that is grabbing more viewers and attention. Guys, 18-49, this is for you.

Actor Chris Elliott of the Adult Swim show "Eagleheart," photographed at in Los Angeles, (Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times / February 20, 2011)

By Sean Fennessey, Special to the Los Angeles Times

A masked man in the witness protection program fights for the future of his family. A band of unorthodox physicians works tirelessly to save sick children. A cabal of forensic ninjas solves crimes while refusing to play by the rules. And, finally, a vengeful U.S. marshal exercises a predilection for hard justice and cowboy hats.

This is not a list of pitches for pilot season. No, these are the premises of four live-action programs currently active or in production on the Cartoon Network's nightly Adult Swim block.

They are all comedies — namely, "Delocated," "Childrens Hospital," the forthcoming "NTSF: SD SUV" and "Eagleheart," the new Chris Elliott vehicle that premiered earlier this month, a not-so-subtle lampoon of "Walker, Texas Ranger"-style action dramas. Thanks to such offbeat, irreverent series, Adult Swim has begun to evolve from a cultish backroom curio to a ratings blockbuster.

Adult Swim "is just a haven for the kind of bold, crazy, innovative comedy that we love," says David Kissinger, president of Conaco, Conan O'Brien's production company and the creative team behind "Eagleheart," which airs on Thursdays at midnight. "It just seemed like a sensibility fit."

With its brash, acutely observed take on Chuck Norris territory, "Eagleheart" arrives at a key moment for the network. This September marks the 10th anniversary of Adult Swim, which launched in 2001 as a single-night block: Sundays at 10 p.m. Armed with a minuscule budget and a reserve of Hannah-Barbera cartoons (owned by parent company Turner Broadcasting), the small Adult Swim team quietly launched a universe of its own, creating absurd fare such as "Space Ghost Coast to Coast" (in which an obscure cartoon superhero interviewed celebrities) and "Aqua Teen Hunger Force" (featuring anthropomorphic fast food heroes). The shows often aired in 15-minute spurts.

In the nearly 91/2 years since, Adult Swim has become the proudly goofy gold standard for unconventional comedy on basic cable. The network — which became officially recognized as distinct from the Cartoon Network in 2005 by Nielsen and extended its start time to 9 p.m. this year, seven days a week — routinely dominates the adults 18-24 demographic, but recently it has made significant strides in adults 18-49. For the second week in February, the block won total day delivery for all basic cable channels in that demographic.

"It was shocking," says Mike Lazzo, the senior executive vice president and paterfamilias of Adult Swim, of the wide age range. "What we discovered was, actually, our audience just stayed with us. We always get painted with this stoner comedy thing, and we just laugh at that."

As it ages, the network's formula, and perhaps its tone, has changed. Animated originals like "Robot Chicken" and syndicated reruns of "Family Guy" and "Futurama" (two shows that were canceled and then reordered by other networks after huge success on Adult Swim) constitute the bulk of the programming. But Adult Swim has begun to steadily incorporate live-action shows that feature well-known or emerging comedy stars, such as Elliott, "Childrens Hospital" creator and star Rob Corddry, and "Human Giant" alumnus Paul Scheer, whose "CSI" parody "NTSF: SD: SUV" will premiere in June.

Lazzo and his team have done it cannily, always emphasizing creator-driven projects and identifying partners who match their lust for surrealism, like the discomfiting and nightmarishly funny meta-sketch program "Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!," a cult hit that ended its five-season run last May.

"They don't seem to care about advertisers or audience," says Corddry, a former "Daily Show" correspondent who created the mock-medical dramedy "Childrens Hospital." "They just guide us to be more creative. They've never said, 'You can't do that.' They've never given us negative notes. It's always positive or nudges in a certain direction. Like, 'More nudity.' Which we've done."

"Childrens Hospital," with an impressive cast that includes Megan Mullally and Henry Winkler, began as a web series produced by TheWB.com during the writers' strike, jumping to Adult Swim in 2009. Last year it was one of the network's five highest-rated original programs among total viewers. (Animated stalwarts such as "Robot Chicken" and "Aqua Teen" still lead the pack.)

But not every show has such a smooth trip to air. "Eagleheart," inspired by a Dadaist "Late Night With Conan O'Brien" sketch, was originally conceived as a 30-minute "Larry Sanders Show"-esque look behind the scenes of an action drama called "Eagleheart." But Adult Swim "wanted something that was just a bigger, more in-your-face comedy experience," Kissinger says.

The producers eventually came around to the network's suggestions, including the early recommendation of cult star and comedic forefather Elliott ("Cabin Boy," "Saturday Night Live") for the lead.

"When I first heard they were going to do it in 15-minute portions, I thought, that sounds crazy," Elliott said. "But then I realized that's not that much longer than the little remotes I used to do on ['Late Night With David Letterman.'] It is a little old school for me, but there's an Adult Swim audience that has no idea what I did back in 1986."

It's Elliott's first lead role on a series since his oddball '90s Fox sitcom, "Get a Life," and he says, "This is the first thing since 'Get a Life' that I've done that is a perfect fit for me."

Still, the process of getting to its compact and sharply honed format was disorienting at times.

"It is like ingesting hallucinogens and going into the development process," Kissinger said of birthing "Eagleheart." "And I say that with gratitude. [Because] once we got our minds around it, it became really exciting when we realized, 'Well, this could be very extreme and bold and basically a live-action cartoon.' It gave us license to create a heightened kind of comedy where there really were no rules."

Adult Swim continues to distort the rules with 15-minute shows, reruns and anime. (The network has also developed unique ways of marketing programs via tie-in albums, toys and allowing fans to make their own custom DVDs.) But as live-action seeps into its identity and ratings continue to grow, there is the threat that longtime fans may retreat. The message boards found on their website routinely feature mixed reviews and resistance to the live-action shows.

Traditionally "you were a freak if you were an Adult Swim fan — not a majority sort," said Ron Russo, an adjunct professor of film at Kent State University who teaches an Adult Swim course and published the book "Adult Swim and Comedy." If these new shows with their recognizable stars push the network closer to the mainstream, "they could alienate the base."

Now that Adult Swim has established itself as cable's go-to spot for smart, off-kilter late-night comedy, its expansion into primetime indicates loftier aims. But as the network reaches for a wider audience, it is faced with quality quirky comedy lineups sprouting all over cable. IFC is building a stronghold with the sketch show "Portlandia" and with "Onion News Network," which air alongside reruns of "The Larry Sanders Show" and "Mr. Show." FX has jumped into the game with the animated series "Archer," created by Adult Swim graduate Adam Reed. Even Adult Swim's sister network TBS is going after a similar audience with "Conan," "Lopez Tonight" and its own successful block of syndicated reruns of shows, including "The Office."

"It doesn't bother me — that's just America," said Lazzo, who has been at the helm of Adult Swim since he co-created "Space Ghost" in 1994. "It would be awesome if we lived in a Communist country and I could crush all competitors."

Kidding aside, Lazzo said he's happy to see creativity on the air — on his network or elsewhere.

"I gotta tell you: 'Portlandia'? Great! Let's see new sketch voices. 'Onion News'? The hardest I've laughed all week. I don't really have an issue unless they beat me every night. And then I'm not going to have an issue with them, I'm going to have an issue with us."

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News Headline: Local Kent State branch gets grant | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - The local Kent State University - East Liverpool campus is one of seven northern Ohio-based schools or nonprofit organizations to receive a UnitedHealth HEROES grant for developing programs to combat childhood obesity and encourage healthy lifestyles in their communities.

Ohio received 37 grants this year, the highest number awarded to any state, according to information from Kent State officials.

Each grant ranges from $500 to $1,000, and the grants will be used for unique, local hands-on projects implemented during the spring semester, according to college officials.

The projects will culminate on Global Youth Service Day (GYSD) set for April 15-17.

Now in its third year, UnitedHealth HEROES is a service-learning, health literacy initiative that is part of UnitedHealth Group's partnership with Youth Service America.

Obesity is one of the leading health threats for youth today, and rates of obesity in children have more than doubled in the last three decades, and Ohio is no stranger to this epidemic, officials said.

According to information from the United Health Group, grants were awarded to schools and youth-focused, community-based programs that have demonstrated a clear understanding of the health risks associated with pediatric obesity; proposed creative solutions to fighting obesity in their neighborhoods and communities; and can be easily implemented, scaled and measured.

Kent State University at East Liverpool received a $1,000 grant for the Moving Youth2Youth program, a service learning project in which students enrolled in the Social Problems course for the spring semester will organize and train several youth groups, ages 14-17, to work with elementary age students and improve their knowledge about healthy eating habits and the importance of physical activity.

"With UnitedHealth HEROES, we are helping young people take action to improve their overall health and quality of life in a way that's not only educational, but beneficial for their communities. As people become more aware of health issues through health literacy and advocacy initiatives, they will make positive changes to live better lives," Rob Falkenberg, CEO of UnitedHealthcare of Ohio, stated in a press release associated with the grant awards.

"We believe these grants will empower teams of students to collaborate with teachers and community leaders to develop their own awareness of how to make their schools and neighborhoods healthier. In reviewing the grant applications, we were inspired by the creative ideas young people came up with to help fight obesity and encourage healthier living," Falkenberg added. "The UnitedHealth HEROES grants are part of UnitedHealth Group's overall commitment to help stem the rising tide of obesity, and related chronic health conditions like diabetes."

Other area grant recipients included:

- HandsOn Northeast Ohio

- YMCA of Greater Cleveland

- Mobile Meals Inc. of Akron

- MyCom Healthy Kids-Healthy Community

- Ravenna Parks and Recreation

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News Headline: Residents get some computer insights (Golden) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name: MICHAEL D. McELWAIN
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Some local residents got a crash course in computer nuts and bolts Saturday.

The Ohio Valley Technology Council kicked off another round of seminars to help take some of the mystery out of modern technology.

The event was held at the Ohio Valley College of Technology.

Shawn Golden, Kent State University - East Liverpool technology assistant professor, and Bruce White, Calcutta Elementary fourth-grade teacher, led the seminar. Both are council members and have more than 27 years of technology experience between them.

"Whether you need it for home, school or your business, a new computer can be a major purchase," White told the group. "There are a lot of factors to consider like price, reliability, warranty, memory, CD or DVD drives and the value of pre-installed software packages."

"We hope we can help you figure out what you want and how to get it," Golden added.

One important goal is to know why you want or need a new computer and then determine what configuration is best to fulfill those needs, Golden said.

"If you need one for work or as a home computer, a simple but high-quality system with Microsoft Office, or OpenOffice, will probably work out," White said.

That same system will not be as robust for other users, however.

"If you're a huge media fanatic, or if you work a lot with digital photography or editing video footage, then a more high-end computer is probably right," White said.

An even more advanced system is needed for high-end gaming. Often gamers will use multiple monitors driven by quick graphics cards.

The presenters handed out information sheets for a variety of computer configurations including hardware and software combinations for the average home user, a corporate user, a media entertainment system and a gaming system.

Motherboards, memory expansion modules and other hardware were passed around for a more hands-on experience.

Golden and White talked about software, monitors, routers, the differences between laptop and desktop computer systems and the value of extended warranties.

"Sometimes, an extended warranty is nice, however most of the time it's not needed," White maintained.

The end user's comfort level plays a big role in whether an extended warranty is important, Golden added. Opening a computer Saturday and showing some of the inner workings and components was one way to become more comfortable, Golden and White said.

Both presenters took questions on a variety of topics after the initial presentation.

The Ohio Valley Technology Council used Saturday's presentation to kick off its new year with the first in a series of monthly sessions to encourage local citizens to use technology.

Each month, the council will delve into more advanced and niche topics like computer security, social networking and video creation, according to council representatives.

The sessions are free to join, and anyone interested in becoming a member of the Ohio Valley Technology Council is urged to attend any free seminar. Becoming a council member is not a requirement.

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News Headline: Rep review -- KSU's 'Songs' a showcase for young voices | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Kane, Dan
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. —

Thursday night, I sat on the sofa watching “American Idol” and felt mightily impressed by the vocal talent on display.

Friday night, I sat in the Fine Arts Theatre at Kent State University Stark Campus feeling the very same.

The young cast of “Songs For a New World,” the new concert-style stage production at Kent Stark, is filled with excellent singers. The talent level is established in the show's powerful opening sequence, when these 15 bright, hopeful voices blend in glorious multipart harmonies.

That the excellent five-piece band, including musical director Laurel Seeds on keyboards, is visible onstage throughout only adds to the rich sound.

“Songs For a New World” is a collection of contemporary pop-flavored songs by Jason Robert Brown, an undeniably gifted composer and lyricist. There is no plotline nor continual characters in the show, and emotionally, the show veers widely.

There are big choral songs with an uplifting, gospel feel and lyrics along the lines of, “Nobody told you the best way to steer when the wind starts to flow.” There's a broadly comic number that is sung to St. Nick by four women angered by his shenanigans, as reindeer and elves cluster around him. A funky song titled “The Steam Train” includes a spoken vignette by a girl whose dad burned down the family home when she was 5.

A song played for laughs, titled “Just One Step,” has a desperate woman threatening to jump to her death from the 57th floor due to a neglectful husband, who just ignores her threats. There is a multi-song sequence about a deeply worried mother whose son is away at war. There are songs about couples and relationship insecurity, and regular references to God and faith.

As a stage musical, “Songs For a New World” sometimes feels like parts of various shows pasted together. Brown has described the musical as being “about hitting the wall and having to make a choice, or take a stand, or turn around and go back.” I felt no such cohesive thread.

Best to enjoy the production, directed by Brian Newberg, as a musical showcase for these fine, committed singers. In multiple sequences, cast member Brett Parr is passionate and expressive, and his vocals soar. In her solo number “I'm Not Afraid of Anything,” lovely Tosca Rolf displays poise and a clear, understated way with a song. Maureen Thomas shines brightly in “Stars and the Moon,” a musical monologue about a gold-digging woman that turns from comedic to thoughtful in its final twist. Jody Lanzer, as the aforementioned military mom, connects emotionally in her song “The Flagmaker.”

Others worthy of note for their impressive spotlight moments are Mandy Dennis, Paul Cowan, Bryant Campbell, Kris North and Eva Robertson.

“Songs for a New World” is presented on a virtually bare stage. Kudos to Susan Blurton for the stylish street-clothes costumes, Louis Williams for the evocative lighting design, and Ron Jarvis for the crisp sound mix.

Performances continue through Feb. 27 at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets, available at the door, are $12 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. To make reservations, call 330-244-3348.

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News Headline: Second Bomb Threat in 1 Month Closes Stark State | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name: Morgan Day
News OCR Text: Updated 11:15 a.m.


Jackson Township police said someone called in a bomb threat to Stark State College of Technology today, leading it to close for the day and cancel all activities.


The campus, at 6200 Frank Ave. NW, will reopen tomorrow, said Irene Motts, director of marketing and communications for Stark State.


Jackson Township police officials said someone in downtown Canton called Stark State security officers from a pay phone and said a bomb was on the campus. Police found no bomb or evidence of a bomb upon searching the campus this morning.


Jackson Township and Canton police will handle the investigation.


This is the second bomb threat at Stark State in one month. The Stark State campus and Fine Arts building of Kent State Stark evacuated Jan. 24 after a bomb threat intended for Stark State. Police found no evidence of a bomb then, either.


Kent State University Stark Campus also alerted its students via a text alert this morning. On its website, it tells viewers of a "situation" at Stark State, but advises them Kent Stark still is open today.





Original update:


Stark State College of Technology closed today and announced all classes and activities are canceled for the day.


The campus, at 6200 Frank Ave. NW, will reopen tomorrow, said Irene Motts, director of marketing and communications for Stark State. She declined to release more information as to why the campus is closed.


"All I've been told is we're closed today and we've canceled all of our activities and classes," she said.


"There are a variety of things that came up today, and we thought it was best to close campus."


Kent State University Stark Campus also alerted its students via a text alert this morning. On its website, it tells viewers of a "situation" at Stark State, but advises them Kent Stark still is open today.


The Stark State campus and Fine Arts building of Kent State Stark evacuated Jan. 24 after a bomb threat intended for Stark State.

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News Headline: Upcoming MTI Shows for Cleveland - Week of 2/20 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Broadway World - Vermont
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SONGS FOR A NEW WORLD

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY-STARK CAMPUS

2/18-2/27/2011

Says the author of this gripping revue, ?it?s about one moment. It?s about hitting the wall and having to make a choice, or take a stand, or turn around and go back.? Newcomer Jason Robert Brown (composer-lyricist of the critical smash ?Parade?) has had the whole theatre community talking about his blend of savvy showmanship and exciting contemporary sound for years, starting with this revue. brbrBrown transports his audience from the deck of a 1492 Spanish sailing ship to a ledge 57 stories above Fifth Avenue to meet a startling array of characters ranging from a young man who has determined that basket-ball is his ticket out of the ghetto to a woman whose dream of marrying rich nabs her the man of her dreams and a soulless marriage. These are the stories and characters of today, the songs for a new world.

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News Headline: YWCA will host student career fair | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WARREN

The YWCA of Warren, in partnership with 4-H and Goodwill GoodGuides, will be hosting a career fair for students in grades seven through 12 from 6 to 9 p.m. March 4. This free event is open to the public.

On hand will be representatives from local universities, colleges and trade or technical schools to talk with students about the programs they offer. Included are Kent State University Trumbull Campus, National College, ITT Technical Institute, The Academy of Dental Assisting & Smile Design, Staff Right Services and Randstadt Work Solutions.

Students will be able to speak with representatives from a variety of careers and be able to participate in mock interviews with potential employers. Career-building activities will also take place.

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News Headline: ODOT workers to participate in Engineers Week | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA —

Employees of Ohio Department of Transportation District 11, headquartered in New Philadelphia, will participate in National Engineers Week, which ends Saturday.

To kick off the celebration, ODOT District 11 recently hosted a Garaway High student, who job-shadowed design engineers for a day, learning about structures, traffic signals, traffic safety, ODOT's sign shop, drainage and plan development, roadway design and maintenance of traffic.

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

ODOT will team with Kent State University in Tuscarawas, the Tuscarawas County Engineer's staff and area businesses to provide high school students an opportunity to explore the field of engineering.

Up to four area high school students will spend Tuesday with District 11 designers and planners as well as bridge, construction and highway engineers as part of the Engineer for a Day program.

District 11 engineers will attend the Engineering Opportunities Expo at Kent State-Tuscarawas on Thursday as part of the wood bridge competition.

Founded in 1951 by the National Society of Professional Engineers, National Engineers Week is among the oldest of America's professional outreach efforts.

It's dedicated to ensuring a diverse and well-educated future engineering work force by increasing the understanding of and interest in engineering and technology careers among students and by promoting pre-college literacy in math and science. Engineers Week also raises public understanding and appreciation of engineers' contributions to society.

ODOT and the Tuscarawas Valley Society of Professional Engineers focus their efforts during National Engineers Week on sharing the importance of engineering with young people.

ODOT District 11 Deputy Director Lloyd MacAdam said, “The sooner young people consider engineering as a viable career option, the earlier they can begin to make educational choices — such as joining programs like ‘Project Lead the Way' and other STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Education) Initiatives in middle school and high school — which will ultimately assist them as they pursue engineering and technical studies in college.”

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News Headline: Engineering expo will be at Kent Tusc | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name: GateHouse Media, Inc
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA —

In celebration of National Engineers Week, Kent State University at Tuscarawas will have its 29th annual Engineering Technology Opportunity Expo from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday in the Performing Arts Center.

The expo is free and public.

The Kent State Tuscarawas Cyber Center is co-sponsoring with the cyber clubs at New Philadelphia, Dover, Indian Valley, Tuscarawas Valley, Claymont, Strasburg, Sandy Valley, Newcomerstown and Carrollton high schools.

The expo is intended to increase student awareness of opportunities in manufacturing-related fields and in interactive digital technology.

Companies will have representatives from management, personnel and manufacturing sectors to address questions regarding availability of jobs, skill requirements and career opportunities in engineering. There will be displays featuring information on products they manufacture.

KSU admission staff will be available to discuss the academic preparation needed for jobs in various fields of engineering and technology.

During the exposition, KSU will present awards to the winners of six competitions for high school students. Participants from 21 area high schools were trained in digital electronics, computer-aided drafting, multimedia, robotics, animation design and video game design.

Awards to the top five winners, which include cash and scholarships, will be presented at about 6:30.

In addition, students from the high schools named above will participate in a bridge contest, sponsored by the KSU Engineering Technology Department and the Tuscarawas Valley Society of Professional Engineers.

Testing and judging of the submitted bridges will take place at the expo. First- and second-place winners can compete in the international contest in Chicago in April.

For more information, call Kamal Bichara, director of engineering technologies, at 330-339-3391 ext. 47457.

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News Headline: Nikki Giovanni to be honored at literature conference at KSU (Brodie) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Poet and
activist Nikki
Giovanni will
receive the Virginia
Hamilton
Literary Award
at Kent State
University.
The award
will be presented
at the 27th
Annual Virginia
Hamilton Conference on
Multicultural Literature for
Youth, where Giovanni will
deliver the keynote address
at 7 p.m. April 7, in the ballroom
of the Kent Student
Center.
The conference provides a
forum for discussion of multicultural
themes and issues
in literature for children and
young adults. In addition to
Giovanni, this year's program
features Coretta Scott
King award-winning author
and photographer Charles
R. Smith Jr. and Caldecott
Honor Book award-winning
illustrator Chris Raschka.
The conference opens
April 7, with Giovanni's address,
followed by a special
poetic performance by
the Kent State Wick Poetry
Center and area elementary
and middle school
students, with musical accompaniment.
On April 8, the program
includes presentations by
Smith and Raschka, as well
as workshops on a variety
of topics.
“Nikki Giovanni's work
speaks for itself,” said Dr.
Carolyn Brodie, conference
director and professor in the
School of Library and Information
Science at Kent
State University. “We're delighted
to be able to honor
her in this way. She truly
speaks to what this conference
is about and what Virginia
Hamilton stood for.”
Giovanni is a world-renowned
poet, writer, commentator,
activist, and educator.
She published her first
book of poetry, “Black Feeling
Black Talk,” in 1968.
Most recently, her children's
picture book, “Rosa,”
about the civil rights legend
Rosa Parks, became a
Caldecott Honor Book, and
Bryan Collier, the illustrator,
was given the Coretta
Scott King Award for best
illustration.

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News Headline: Liquid Crystals | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent

The Northeast Ohio International Business Network and the Liquid Crystal Institute at Kent State are sponsoring a program covering liquid-crystal research and the business opportunities within the industry.

The program is from 3 to 5 p.m. Wednesday in the Samsung Auditorium at the Liquid Crystal Institute. Registration is $15 for members and $20 for nonmembers. To reserve a space, e-mail admin@neoibn.org or call 216-771-1200.

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News Headline: Iowa State Scientist to Describe Latest Ideas in Superconductivity at AAAS Annual Meeting | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: R&D Magazine
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An Iowa State theoretical physicist will describe the latest ideas in high-temperature superconductivity during the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Feb. 17-21 in Washington, D.C.

Jörg Schmalian, an Iowa State professor of physics and astronomy and an associate of the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, will be part of a symposium addressing the 100-year history of superconductivity. The session, "Superconductivity: From 1911 to 2021," is 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 19, in Room 146B of the Washington Convention Center.

Superconductors are materials that conduct electricity without slowing electrons. For decades, superconductors would only work at temperatures approaching minus 425 degrees Fahrenheit. But advancements have raised that temperature to minus 190 degrees Fahrenheit.

Schmalian's talk, "Superconductivity Without Phonons: From Heavy Electrons to the Cuprates and Pnictides," will address the microscopic mechanism of those higher-temperature, unconventional superconductors.

Schmalian said electrons in conventional superconductors interact with sound waves to overcome their mutual repulsion to produce frictionless electricity.

"But that doesn't work at higher temperatures," he said. "We have to replace sound waves with something else."

One candidate is magnetism. And a better understanding of how that might work could have implications for MRI scans and other technologies that rely on superconductors.

"We want to understand how we can design and understand these novel materials that will hopefully allow us to increase the temperature where superconducting happens," Schmalian said. "The dream is superconductivity at room temperatures."

Materials science collaborations

Iowa State University will also be mentioned in a symposium describing the Materials Digital Library Pathway, a multi-university collaboration for materials students, teachers and researchers. The collaboration is designed to offer resources that can connect materials research and teaching programs.

Krishna Rajan, an Iowa State professor of materials science and engineering and director of Iowa State's Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, said the idea was to build an Internet repository of data, simulation tools, virtual labs, teaching archives and other materials that could be used by students and teachers. The project was supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Science Digital Library.

"The Materials Digital Library project helped us showcase our work in materials informatics for materials discovery and design, to both researchers and educators," Rajan said. "It has been a good example of using cyberinfrastructure in materials science"

The presentation about the collaboration will be part of a symposium about "Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age: Reliable Resources Across the Disciplines." The series of talks is 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 20, in Room 102A of the Washington Convention Center.

Laura Bartolo, professor and director of Kent State University's Center for Materials Informatics, will speak about the materials science collaboration.

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News Headline: Physicist talks superconductivity at AAAS annual meeting | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: PhysOrg.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An Iowa State theoretical physicist will describe the latest ideas in high-temperature superconductivity during the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Feb. 17-21 in Washington, D.C.

Jörg Schmalian, an Iowa State professor of physics and astronomy and an associate of the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, will be part of a symposium addressing the 100-year history of superconductivity. The session, "Superconductivity: From 1911 to 2021," is on Saturday, Feb. 19, in Room 146B of the Washington Convention Center.

Superconductors are materials that conduct electricity without slowing electrons. For decades, superconductors would only work at temperatures approaching minus 425 degrees Fahrenheit. But advancements have raised that temperature to minus 190 degrees Fahrenheit.

Schmalian's talk, "Superconductivity Without Phonons: From Heavy Electrons to the Cuprates and Pnictides," will address the microscopic mechanism of those higher-temperature, unconventional superconductors.

Schmalian said electrons in conventional superconductors interact with sound waves to overcome their mutual repulsion to produce frictionless electricity.

"But that doesn't work at higher temperatures," he said. "We have to replace sound waves with something else."

One candidate is magnetism. And a better understanding of how that might work could have implications for MRI scans and other technologies that rely on superconductors.

"We want to understand how we can design and understand these novel materials that will hopefully allow us to increase the temperature where superconducting happens," Schmalian said. "The dream is superconductivity at room temperatures."

Materials science collaborations

Iowa State University will also be mentioned in a symposium describing the Materials Digital Library Pathway, a multi-university collaboration for materials students, teachers and researchers. The collaboration is designed to offer resources that can connect materials research and teaching programs.

Krishna Rajan, an Iowa State professor of materials science and engineering and director of Iowa State's Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, said the idea was to build an Internet repository of data, simulation tools, virtual labs, teaching archives and other materials that could be used by students and teachers. The project was supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Science Digital Library.

"The Materials Digital Library project helped us showcase our work in materials informatics for materials discovery and design, to both researchers and educators," Rajan said. "It has been a good example of using cyberinfrastructure in materials science"

The presentation about the collaboration will be part of a symposium about "Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age: Reliable Resources Across the Disciplines." The series of talks is 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 20, in Room 102A of the Washington Convention Center.

Laura Bartolo, professor and director of Kent State University's Center for Materials Informatics, will speak about the materials science collaboration.

Provided by Iowa State University

This PHYSorg Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from PhysOrg.com staff.

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News Headline: The Frequency of Color: Halim El-Dabh | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Nicole Hennessy
News OCR Text: On February 11, 2011, after an 18-day protest fueled by Egypt's fed-up youth, President Hosni Mubarak stepped down, ending his decades-long dictatorship. In many ways, this marks a new era in Egypt's history.


Born in Egypt in 1921, seven years before President Hosni Mubarak and just one year before Egypt gained its independence, Halim El-Dabh proved to be musically adept as a child and was called a prodigy by some. El-Dabh is an emeritus professor of African Ethnomusicology at Kent State University, where he has taught for 42 years.


In Kent, his birthday has become an annual celebration with Standing Rock Cultural Arts. They will celebrate it again this March 4th, when El-Dabh will turn 90. The following story details one aspect of his multifaceted life.


Music in bloom


“I feel it within me – how it bursts, how it grows,” Halim El-Dabh once said.



The air El-Dabh sucked into his infant lungs was laced with sound. The scent of roses lingered at his nostrils as he exhaled, and their frequencies dripped from his ears as he watched his mother sever petals from their thorny stems, turning them into jam.

As a child, El-Dabh was sensitive to all the plants around him, but the flowers' voices mesmerized him the most. He could sense the symphonies they produced just above his hearing range. Each color had a frequency all its own.


Feeling the vibrations of his surroundings, his tiny hands drummed on an empty water jug as he gazed at Cairo's landscape. The music fermented in his consciousness as he ran, jumped and danced on the baked ground.


Conceptualizing sound, El-Dabh's then 11-year-old mind applied it to composition for the first time. His first musical piece, “Misri-yaat,” utilized clusters – similar sounding keys simultaneously – in order to increase the song's vibration rather than drown it in pools of its own resonance.


While one of his brothers, Michael, figure skated, Halim played his piece. Quick, jutting notes escaped his piano as his fingers slammed down on its keys. The notes progressed from bliss to intensity as Michael stretched his arms and balanced on one thin metal blade. Notes, which formed their own shapes in Halim's mind, gave reverberation to, and took it from, the people around him.


That same year, in 1932, Egyptian King Fuad invited everybody who knew anything about music to Cairo. Halim's brother Bushra said to him, “Hey, let's go.”


Squinting in the Egyptian sun at the festival, Halim could make out the shape of Bella Bartok's weighted gaze and Paul Hindemith's slight sneer. He could not comprehend being in the presence of some of the 20th century's greatest musicians – so he just listened for enjoyment's sake.


After the festival, at his brother's insistence, Halim started to learn formally. He studied at a conservatory a few times a week, yet he decided to become an agriculturist.


Still, music continued to bloom in his mind.


Unwitting international composer


Sixteen years later, in 1948, still studying occasionally at a conservatory in Cairo, El-Dabh created a piece called “It Is Dark and Damp on the Front.”


He continued to work as an agriculturalist. Traveling around Upper Egypt, he farmed in places like Zagazig and Beni Suef. While traveling the country, unbeknownst to him, a committee comprised of members from all over the world was meeting to decide the next musician to play at the prestigious All Saints Cathedral.


“What about contemporary Egyptian composers?” Kamal Iskander, one of the committee members, asked.


“We don't know any,” the committee members replied.


“I know one,” Iskander said. “His name is Halim El-Dabh.”


Shortly after the committee met, there was a knock on Halim's door. One of the committee members had tracked him down. Halim shared tea with the Englishman, who asked if he could play some of Halim's music.


The man chose a piece from a mass of compositions scattered all around the piano. But when he tried, he found he couldn't string together the phrasing – he was overwhelmed.


He went back to the committee, insisting Halim was “the real deal,” and they agreed he would play at the cathedral.


Entering its archway the night of the performance, El-Dabh's nervousness dissipated.


Sitting behind the piano, he pressed the keys and allowed the sound of “It Is Dark and Damp On The Front('s)” first notes to fade before introducing more, slowly building toward a seamless intertwining of manipulated sound.


After his last note, the audience erupted into applause.


And that night, as he slept, ink soaked into the fibers of newspapers as they ran through presses. The headlines waited in stacks for eyes of any language to read: “Halim El-Dabh, international composer.”


Leaving Egypt


Halim had become famous overnight.


“Why don't you come to France?” one of the committee members asked him. “Why don't you come to Italy?” another asked. “Come to the conservatory in Paris.” “Come to England.” The inundation of invitations made his head spin.


Halim never thought about becoming a professional composer. He enjoyed farming and he had a good job. He loved traveling all over Egypt listening to its rich folk music, and he relished the fact that musical traditions changed every 20 miles.


A few months after his performance, he received a letter from the American University in Cairo: “We read the newspaper; would you like to repeat some of your music at our hall?”


Accepting the invitation, he prepared for the show. This time he would be the only person performing.


The show received little press attention other than a brief announcement in the newspaper the day before. Still, the night of the concert people arrived in droves. Sitting and standing, they occupied any space they could to see the farming composer from Upper Egypt.


Halim had never seen so many people. He feared he could not fulfill the crowd's expectations. It seemed suddenly the world looked at him as a composer and Zagazig's soil was still caked beneath his nails.


Once he began to play, nothing existed except for him, the music, and his belief of the energy within himself. The vibrations of the audience seemed different than that of the last, and he realized the music also was different this time even though he was playing the same songs.


After the concert, a tall, well-dressed man walked up to him.


“Hey, I'm Mr. Black, I'm the cultural attaché of the U.S. Embassy,” Halim recalled the man saying. “How do you do; I like your music very much. Have you ever thought about going to the United States of America?”


“No,” Halim replied in broken English. “Everybody's trying to get me to France right now.”


Shortly after their introduction, Mr. Black informed him of an exchange program made possible through funding acquired from scrapped war materials.


“Fill out these forms and come back to me,” he said, handing him the applications. Halim went home, called his brother Salim and asked him to help fill out the forms. But Salim couldn't understand the bureaucratic language either, so Halim went back to Mr. Black.


“I don't understand these forms,” he said, growing frustrated. “They're going to choose seven people from 500 applicants. I'm not gonna be one of seven, no way, don't count on me …”


“Sit down,” Mr. Black said. “Let me help you.”


So Halim sat and watched as Mr. Black filled out every form. But after failing an English test he knew for sure that he wasn't meant to go to America.


A few days later, Mr. Black informed El-Dabh that he had indeed been selected to go to America — to Julliard.


“What's Julliard?” El-Dabh wondered. He'd received an additional grant to study English in Colorado.


The next day, he rushed to the library looking for recordings of American music. The girl working at the counter handed him a stack of Native American LPs, which she assumed represented the sound of mainstream America. Halim took the recordings home and listened to them. What he heard inspired him so much that he decided to attend the University of New Mexico instead of Julliard.


New country, new friends



It was 1950 and the July sun was high in the Denver sky. El-Dabh was in the streets doing a Native American snake dance when he encountered and befriended members of the Denver Symphony Orchestra.


“Oh, you're a composer,” they said. “Just come to the orchestra from the back door, you don't have to pay. Just come and see us.”


He watched the concert, absorbing the music intently. After the show, the musicians told him they were going to Aspen to perform there. “Come with us,” they said, inviting Halim on their bus.


The next morning he gazed out over the snow-covered mountains – a landscape unlike anything he'd seen in Egypt.


With his thumb pointed in the direction of the tent, which served as the cultural center, El-Dabh stood on the road, taking the advice of his new friends who went ahead of him to practice.


Soon, a black limousine pulled up and its back window went down. Peering at him was the famous composer Igor Stravinsky, who picked El-Dabh up and took him to the festival. After a short, uphill ride the two parted with El-Dabh thanking Stravinsky.


The realization of color


Two years later, while visiting New York, Halim sat on a subway watching people as they came in and out, going to and from their destinations.


Out of the corner of his eye, he noticed a torn magazine sitting next to him. He picked it up to examine a picture of colors on its glossy page. As he read the words “ancient Egyptian music notations,” his grip tightened and an inner spark ignited the fuel within him. He knew he had found something of value, right there on the subway floor.


After a short trip back to Cairo, Halim settled into an artist community in Rockport, Massachusetts. Thinking about colors again, he began using them to teach the neighborhood children how to play the piano and dance. Their parents paid him a small amount of money to do so. But in order to afford his rent, El-Dabh began scribbling messages and sending them to universities: “I'm Halim El-Dabh. I'm in Rockport, Massachusetts. Would you like me to visit your university?”


Traveling all around the country, lecturing and performing earned him enough money to live comfortably. Still, El-Dabh continued to work with the children and the colors they produced. To him, the evolution of his recognition of color represented his stages of awareness. Though he had heard colors rather than see them his whole life, he was becoming increasingly conscious of their frequencies.


He began to paint compositions. The torn color notation article from the subway still wandered in his mind along with memories of the rose petal jam of his infancy and the frequencies he perceived in nature.


Sitting down on the floor, with pigment all around him, he looked at the canvas and delved inward. He started creating with a force that came through him, painting with a flow. When he was finished he read the painting – it sang to him, calling him. The colors were somehow innate; they inspired emotion. These paintings, which had their own lives, poured through him in order to obtain existence. Reading the paintings, he composed. The sounds came to him in a language and not just separate notes, but a collective thing, like clusters of objects – the color of realization.


A career's culmination


In 2006, in Montreal, an audience gathered to hear Halim play his paintings.


Before the concert, Halim guided the sextet he created (The Barking Dog Sextet) to play from color with one of his paintings projected on a huge screen. The crowd engaged in conversation. Someone laughed, a man cleared his throat. The sextet practiced while Halim directed them. A flute cut through the babbling.


“This is a world premier of “The Dog Done Gone Deaf,”” El-Dabh told the crowd. He dedicated it to the city of Montreal. “According to legend,” he said, “the dog is man's best friend.”


The audience listened as he continued telling the Native American story of how man fell into the abyss and the dog jumped in after him, risking his own life. But man became bossy and forgot he was in an abyss. This caused the dog to go deaf out of an unwillingness to obey. Still, the dog pushed man out of the abyss because of the mutual realization that they are both creatures of the earth.

“We stand with you, the barking dog sextet. We stand with you, the barking dog sextet," he chanted and barked. “The wisdom is color – color. And we'll all together … we're going to breathe. I'm going to ask you to close your eyes.”


The audience breathed with him three times – in and out. Their bodies absorbed a large splotch of red pigment as the music began moving like a sunken ship might – forever, in vibration.


Accompanied by the sextet's bells, sax and string instruments, in fury and then, again, relaxed, El-Dabh continued guiding breathing between songs so everyone could experience the color frequencies.


“Keep your eyes closed until you hear the first sound that's realized from the frequencies of color,” he said.


The next song, “Canine Wisdom,” became manic half way through. The audience ingested the sound through their ears, the backs and tops of their heads, their jaws – their entire bodies.


Unorganized conceptualization of instrumental color leaked into every orifice in the room. After the music concluded, a green splotch on the screen worked its way through people's bodies while continuing to stare them in the face.


The audience clapped and shouted as loud as they could. They clapped until the sound of it became its own symphony, propelled by the colors they had absorbed.


El-Dabh continues to teach African cultural expressions at Kent State University. In the class, he and his students make instruments out of materials such as simple planks of wood and bobby pins. When encountered at the local coffee shops he frequents, he emanates a radiance not typical of an 89-year-old man. Many musicians around the world play his music in honor of him.

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News Headline: Canton Symphony presents The Barber of Seville (Lamb) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Kane, Dan
News OCR Text: The last time the Canton Symphony Orchestra mounted an opera production ? ?Madame Butterfly? in April 2009 ? tickets for the 1,400-capacity Umstattd Hall sold out weeks in advance and the performance was a major crowd-pleaser. It?s no wonder then that the orchestra is presenting another beloved opera, Rossini?s comedic ?The Barber of Seville,? on Feb. 27 at 3 p.m. As hoped, ticket sales are moving at lightning speed. Just over 200 seats still are available. As with the successful ?Butterfly,? ?Seville? will be performed in a semi-staged form, with full costuming and minimal scenery. Seven principals and a 17-member male chorus will perform onstage in front of the fully visible orchestra, with Maestro Gerhardt Zimmermann on the podium. ?In Canton, we?ve kind of invented a new art form,? says Thomson Smillie, the ebullient Scotsman who directed ?Butterfly? and is returning to helm ?Seville.? ?Opera can be outrageously expensive, but we?ve come up with this idea of doing it with the orchestra onstage center and the singers downstage,? Smillie says. ?It?s about the music. It brings the opera very much into focus and the audience loves it.? IMMEDIATE AND MULTIFACETED Fenlon Lamb, the mezzo soprano who is starring as Rosina, describes the innovative staging as ?full-value entertainment. ?It?s a great idea. You can see it, you can feel it, it?s the orchestra, it?s the singers,? she says. ?The connection with the audience is a bit more immediate. Sometimes those big productions are all about people in balconies with opera glasses.? A scaled-down production ?makes it more about the drama and the humanity of the characters when you don?t have the distractions of a full stage,? says baritone David Small, who is portraying Figaro. ?It allows for the audience to see how multifaceted opera is. You can actually see the orchestra and the maestro working with the singers.? Operas such as ?Seville? and ?Butterfly? ?are great masterpieces,? says Small. ?You don?t want them to fade into oblivion. In this economic climate, (smaller productions) are one of the ways to keep that going.? Smillie describes ?The Barber of Seville? as ?that very rare thing ? a comic opera which is actually very funny. It has a wonderful story. A young nobleman (Count Almaviva, played by tenor Timothy Culver) disguises himself as a student in order to get into this house to chat up the young girl, Rosina. He?s helped in his plan by Figaro, this guy who can do just about anything.? ?Rosina falls in love with him and not his money. They are both playing other parts,? says Lamb, who is a professor of opera and director of the opera department at Kent State University. ?There?s a nice battle of wits between Rosina and Figaro, who is spry and smart about things.? A HILARIOUS ROMP Small, who estimates he has performed the role of Figaro 120 times to date in numerous productions, says, ?Every time I open the score, I start giggling. It?s a total romp. It?s hilarious and the music is very tuneful.? Even opera novices are likely to find themselves familiar with Rossini?s ?Seville? score. ?You cannot do a TV commercial for spaghetti or meat sauce or Chef Boyardee without music from ?The Barber of Seville,?? Smillie says. ?It?s part of everyone?s cultural armory.? (There?s also the classic 1950 cartoon version, ?The Rabbit of Seville? starring Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd.) Both Lamb and Small were cast members of the local ?Madame Butterfly? in 2009. Small, who teaches at the University of Texas in Austin, also performed with the Canton Symphony last season in John Adams? ?The Wound Dresser,? and in Handel?s ?Messiah? in the late ?80s. ?I love Gerhardt,? Small says. ?He?s fun, he?s funny, an excellent conductor and a great musician. The orchestra here is beautiful. I remember when I came up for ?The Messiah? years ago, I was blown away.? ?The Canton experience is so rich for me,? Smilley says. ?Gerhardt is marvelous and very, very witty. And you?ve got this really fabulous orchestra onstage. Often in opera, you do everything else and at the last minute you remember, ?We need an orchestra.? Here, you?ve got this got this young, eager, finely tuned ensemble to start with, and that makes all the difference in the world.? On stage WHAT: ?The Barber of Seville,? performed by the Canton Symphony, guest vocalists and men of the Canton Symphony Chorus. WHEN: Feb. 27, 3 p.m. WHERE: Umstattd Hall at McKinley High School. TICKETS: $20, $30 and $40, on sale at 330-452-2094 and www.cantonsymphony.org.

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News Headline: US nervously follows a tale of two 'brothers' (Stacher) | Email

News Date: 02/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: The Australian
Contact Name: LEVINSON, CHARLES
News OCR Text: The most famous opposition party in Egypt faces rapid evolution CAIRO MOAZ Abdel Karim, an affable 29-year-old who was among a handful of young activists plotting the recent protests in Cairo, is the newest face of the Muslim Brotherhood

His political views on women's rights, religious freedom and political pluralism mesh with Western democratic values. He is focused on the fight for democracy and human rights in Egypt

A different face of the brotherhood is that of Mohamed Badi, 66-year-old veterinarian from the brotherhood's conservative wing, who is the group's Supreme Guide. He recently pledged the brotherhood would "continue to raise the banner of jihad" against the Jews, which he called the group's "first and foremost enemies". He has railed against American imperialism and calls for the establishment of an Islamic state

After Hosni Mubarak stepped down as Egypt's president last week amid the Arab and Persian region's most dramatic grassroots uprising since the Iranian Revolution in 1979, ranging from Algeria through Bahrain to Iran, the brotherhood became poised to assume a growing role in the country's political life

The question for many is: which brotherhood? It was Karim and his younger, more tolerant cohorts who played a key role organising the protests that began on January 25 and ultimately unseated the president of 29 years. But it's the more conservative, anti-Western old guard that still makes up by far the bulk of the group's leadership

Badi, the present leader, wrote an article in September on the group's website in which he said of the US that "a nation that does not champion moral and human values cannot lead humanity, and its wealth will not avail it once Allah has had his say"

He wrote in that same article that "resistance is the only solution against the Zio-American arrogance and tyranny, and all we need is for the Arab and Muslim peoples to stand behind it and support it . . . We say to our brothers the mujaheddin in Gaza: be patient, persist in [your jihad], and know that Allah is with you." Last Monday at a press conference, Karim stood shoulder to shoulder with youth leaders from a half dozen mostly secular movements to lay out their vision for how Egypt's transition to democracy should proceed and to praise the army for co-operating. Their top demand: a unity government that includes a broad swath of opposition forces

The brotherhood, whose leaders Karim butted heads with in recent weeks, put out a similar message on Saturday calling for free and fair elections. Seeking to allay fears that it would make a power grab, the brotherhood also said it wouldn't run a candidate in presidential elections or seek a majority in parliament

Both Egyptians and outsiders, however, remain wary. They are unsure about how the group will ultimately harness any new-found political gains and whether its more-moderate wing will, in fact, have lasting clout

"It's never entirely clear with the brothers," says Josh Stacher, a political science professor at Kent State University in the US who spent years in Egypt studying the organisation. "It's a big group, with lots of different points of view

"You can find the guy always screaming about Israel and then you got the other guys who don't care about Israel because they're too busy worrying about raising literacy rates." Israel, which shares a long and porous border with Egypt, fears that if a moderate wing of the brotherhood exists -- and many in Israel's leadership are sceptical that it does -- it could be shoved aside by more extreme factions within the group. For years the brotherhood's conservative wing has put out anti-Israel comments and writings, and helped fund Hamas, the Palestinian militant group. It also has spoken out in support of attacks against US soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan

"If the Muslim Brotherhood comes to power, through elections or some other way, that would be a repeat of 1979 in Iran," when moderate governments installed after the shah gave way to the ayatollahs, says a senior Israeli official. "It's something we're looking at with great caution." The US is taking a wait-and-see approach, with officials saying in recent days it should be given a chance. President Barack Obama, in an interview with Fox News, acknowledged the group's anti-American strains but said it didn't enjoy majority support in Egypt and should be included in the political process. "It's important for us not to say that our only two options are either the Muslim Brotherhood or a suppressed Egyptian people," Obama said

The outlawed Islamist opposition group is plagued by rifts between young and old, reformist and hardliner. There are big-city deal-making politicians and conservative rural preachers who eschew politics in favour of proselytising Islam

Egypt's government has long highlighted the group's hardline wing as a threat to the country. Yet its selective crackdowns have empowered the hardliners it has sought to undermine, analysts and brotherhood members say

The conservative leadership's autocratic style within the movement, its lack of tolerance for dissenting opinions and its preference to conduct business behind closed doors have all contributed to deep scepticism among outsiders about the brotherhood leadership's stated commitment to democracy

In recent years, meanwhile, the group's pragmatic wing has forged an alliance with secular opposition activists. Their role in the unseating of Mubarak appears to have given them a boost in a struggle for influence with the brotherhood's fiery old guard

"The Muslim Brotherhood as a whole doesn't deserve credit for this revolution, but certain factions within the movement absolutely do, generally those that have more modern views," says Essam Sultan, a former member of the group who left in the 1990s to form the moderate Islamist Wasat, or Centrist, Party. "That wing should get a massive bounce out of this." Whether that bounce will propel the more moderate brothers to a permanent position of influence -- or what their legislative agenda would be -- is one of the key unknowns in Egypt

In many ways, this faction resembles right-of-centre politicians elsewhere in the Arab world. They espouse a view of Islam as a part of Egyptian heritage and argue that democracy and pluralism are central Islamic values. They are socially conservative and reject the strict secularism that is a feature of most Western concepts of liberal democracy

Last week, when it was unclear whether Mubarak would step down, Essam el-Eryan, one of the only reformists on the group's 12-member ruling Guidance Council, said the group didn't seek the establishment of an Islamic state; believed in full equality for women and Christians; and wouldn't attempt to abrogate the Camp David peace treaty with Israel

Founded in the Suez Canal town of Ismailiya in 1928 by a 22-year-old schoolteacher, the organisation used violence to battle the British occupation in the 1940s

The group allied with some young officers to overthrow the king in 1952 and bring Gamal Abdel Nasser to power, only to become implicated in an assassination attempt on Nasser two years later. He responded with a fierce crackdown, sending the group's leadership to prison for years and its membership into exile

The Muslim Brotherhood abandoned violence in the years that followed, formally renouncing it as a domestic strategy in 1972. But some of its offspring have taken a bloodier path. Some former members established the group responsible for the assassination of Egyptian president Anwar Al-Sadat in 1981, and others have been allied with al-Qa'ida

After the uprising in Tunisia in January, brotherhood youth, including Karim, met the leaders of other youth movements and decided to plan a similar uprising in Egypt

A group of about 12 youth leaders, including Karim, met secretly in the course of two weeks to figure out how to plot a demonstration that would outfox security forces

The brotherhood's senior leadership refused to endorse their efforts at first. They ultimately agreed to allow members to participate as individuals -- and to forgo holding up religious slogans that the brotherhood might have used in the past, such as "Islam is the solution", or waving Korans

SOMEWHERE TO HIDE: WHERE DEPOSED AUTOCRATS TAKE REFUGE 1. Erich Honecker East Germany - Chile Honecker served as head of state of the German Democratic Republic communist East Germany. He fled Berlin for Moscow after reunification in 1990, avoiding prosecution for Cold War crimes. He was extradited to Germany but avoided trial because of ill-health and died in Chile in 1994 2. Mohammad Reza Pahlavi Iran - Egypt The shah of Iran became the nation's ruler after a US-backed coup in 1953

He was overthrown by a popular revolt in 1979. During exile he lived first in Cairo, Egypt, then Morocco, the Bahamas, Mexico and the US, where he received medical treatment. He died in Egypt in 1980 3. Kurmanbek Bakiyev Kyrgyzstan - Belarus Bakiyev ruled the central Asian republic for five turbulent years until April last year, when his government was overthrown by a popular revolt

The Kyrgyzstan government wants to charge him, but after fleeing the country in a deal brokered by Russia and the US, he is in Belarus 4. Ferdinand Marcos Philippines - Hawaii Marcos ruled The Philippines from 1965 to 1986. His regime, which was implicated in the assassination of rival Benigno Aquino, was marked by corruption, nepotism and brutality

Eventually removed from power in 1986, he fled to Hawaii. Accused of embezzling billions, he died in 1989 5. Hosni Mubarak Egypt - Egypt? Mubarak served as president from 1981 until last week, when he fled to the Egyptian resort town of Sharm el-Sheikh. His whereabouts and state of health are unclear. Germany, the US, Britain, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia are possible homes in exile 6. Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali Tunisia - Saudi Arabia Ben Ali ruled Tunisia from 1987 until a popular uprising in January forced him out. Fled to France but his plane was denied permission to land

Instead, he flew to Saudi Arabia, which welcomed him. Interpol has issued an arrest warrant after Tunisia accused him of illegally taking money 7. Mengistu Haile Mariam Ethiopia - Zimbabwe Mengistu, as head of the Derg communist military junta, ruled Ethiopia from from 1974 to 1991. He fled the country for Zimbabwe at the end of the Ethiopian civil war in 1991 and has been found guilty in absentia of genocide during the brutal repression of opponents 8. Idi Amin Uganda - Saudi Arabia Amin ruled Uganda from 1971 to 1979

His murderous regime was blamed for the deaths of 100,000 to 500,000 Ugandans. His regime collapsed after a war with Tanzania. He fled to Libya, one of his prominent backers, and then Saudi Arabia, where he died in exile in 2003 9. Mobutu Sese Seko Congo - Morocca Mobutu ruled the African republic from 1965 to 1997, amassing vast wealth for himself. Stricken with cancer, he was eventually overthrown in the First Congo War by Laurent-Desire Kabila. He fled to Togo, before settling in Morocco

He died in 1997 10. Charles Taylor Liberia - Nigeria Taylor ruled Liberia, in western Africa, from 1997 until international pressure against his regime forced him to flee to exile in Nigeria in 2003. He is in prison in The Hague, in The Netherlands, where he is on trial for alleged war crimes during the civil war in neighbouring Sierra Leone 11. Jean-Claude Duvalier Haiti - France Nicknamed Baby Doc, Duvalier replaced his father as president of Haiti in 1971. Thousands of Haitians were killed or tortured. He was overthrown in 1986 and fled to France

He returned to Haiti last month, vowing to help in recovery from last year's earthquake. He was arrested 12. Alfredo Stroessner Paraguay - Brazil Stroessner seized power in the South American nation in a coup in 1954, ruling for 35 years until he was ousted in 1989 amid fears in the military his son would succeed him. Stroessner, whose rule was marked by prosperity but human rights abuses, lived in exile in Brazil until his death in 2006 at 93

Copyright © 2011 News Limited Australia. All rights reserved.

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News Headline: 'One-third of Egypt's economy under army control' (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Daily News South Africa
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Egyptian military played a crucial role in the ousting of President Hosni Mubarak and has promised to steer the nation towards democracy. What's little known outside Egypt is that the army plays a crucial role in the economy as well. That raises the question: Will the military back reformers if they threaten to dismantle its business interests?

The armed forces have a substantial stake in Egypt's civilian economy through a host of government-owned service and manufacturing companies, at least 14 of them under the auspices of the Military Production Ministry. Military-run companies are in such businesses as janitorial services, household appliances, pest control and catering.

El Nasr for Services and Maintenance, for instance, has 7 750 employees in such sectors as child care, automobile repair and hotel administration, according to its website. Other military companies produce small arms, tank shells, and explosives – as well as exercise equipment and fire engines.

These companies add up to “a very large, unaccountable, nontransparent military”, says Robert Springborg, a professor in the department of national security affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, and author of Mubarak's Egypt: Fragmentation of the Political Order. The generals “will try to massage the new order so that it does not seek to impose civilian control on the armed forces”, he says.

“It's not just a question of preserving the institution of the army. It's a question of preserving the financial base of its members.”

As much as one-third of Egypt's economy is under military control, says Joshua Stacher, an Egyptian-military expert and assistant professor at Kent State University in Ohio. Revenues from military companies are a state secret, along with the armed forces budget, he says.

It isn't uncommon for governments and militaries to own or run their own defence-related industries and arms makers. In Singapore and Israel, for example, nationalised production of fighting hardware is seen as a way to protect national security by avoiding dependence on foreign arms contractors.

What sets apart the Egyptian military, the Arab world's largest, is that its companies also offer an array of products or services in the domestic consumer economy – and without any civilian oversight.

The latest assessment of defence production and military companies in Egypt from defence information firm IHS Jane's in London, and a 1998 report produced by the US Embassy's commercial affairs section in Cairo, list three military-owned businesses that sell to both the armed forces and the public.

One of these is El Nasr, which operates under the brand Queen Service. It has at least 18 service businesses, according to its website.

General Ahmed El-Banna, general manager of El Nasr, says the military owns 75 percent of the company while the rest is held by retired officers. Two other consumer companies were named by the reports: El Nasr for Intermediate Chemicals, whose website says it produces chemicals, fertilisers, industrial and medical gases, and household pesticides; and Arab International Optronics, a maker of lenses and advanced optical equipment.

The Ministry for Military Production lists on its website more than a dozen “military production companies”, including Abu Zaabal for Engineering Industries, Benha for Electronic Industries, and Maadi for Engineering Industries.

Abu Zaabal was established to secure the armed forces' artillery needs, according to the website. It also produces water and fuel tanks.

Maadi makes parts for medical and agricultural equipment as well as home appliances, radiators, and exercise equipment. Benha owns factories and produces telecommunication equipment, microwaves, and personal computers. The Egyptian Tank Plant makes red firefighting vehicles.

The armed forces' business interests would be at risk if demands for opening up the economy ran too deep, said Samer Shehata, an assistant professor at the Edmund A Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University in Washington, before Mubarak stepped down.

“If the military was completely removed from politics, then there is no question that these interests would be put in jeopardy.”

Military companies also play a significant role in consumer food production, says Springborg, the Naval Postgraduate School professor. The military runs “chicken farms, dairy farms, horticultural operations. And it of course has its own bakeries,” he says.

The military's “business interests are very large”, says Bassma Kodmani, executive director of the Paris-based Arab Reform Initiative and a senior adviser at the French National Research Council.

Those businesses, though, help build the nation and keep capital within its borders. “The army is not seen as corrupt,” she told a group of reporters in Paris last week. “It might seem strange to people in the West, but in Egypt it's not considered shocking that the army builds highways or new housing projects.”

The bottom line: The Egyptian military, which runs a large network of businesses, will defend those interests if they are threatened by reformers. – Bloomberg

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News Headline: Military's business interests run wide, deep (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Buenos Aires Herald - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LONDON - The Egyptian military, which promises to steer the nation to a new democratic future after the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, has its own economic interests to protect as well.

The armed forces have a substantial stake in the civilian economy through a host of government-owned service and manufacturing companies, at least 14 of them under the auspices of the Ministry of Military Production. Their websites list product lines that include civilian goods.

Military-run companies are in such businesses as janitorial services, household appliances, pest control and catering. El Nasr Company for Services and Maintenance, for instance, has 7,750 employees in such sectors as child care, automobile repair and hotel administration, according to its website. Other military companies produce small arms, tank shells and explosives — as well as exercise equipment and fire engines.

These companies add up to "a very large, unaccountable, non-transparent 'Military Inc.,'" said Robert Springborg, a professor in the department of national security affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., and author of Mubarak's Egypt: Fragmentation of the Political Order.

The generals "will try to massage the new order so that it does not seek to impose civilian control on the armed forces," he said. "It's not just a question of preserving the institution of the Army. It's a question of preserving the financial base of its members."

As much as one-third of Egypt's economy is under military control, said Joshua Stacher, an Egyptian-military expert and assistant professor at Kent State University in Ohio whose work has been published in five academic journals. Revenues from military companies are a state secret, along with the armed- forces budget, he said.

It isn't uncommon for governments and militaries to own or run their own defence-related industries and arms makers. In Singapore and Israel, for example, nationalized production of fighting hardware has been seen as a way to protect national security by avoiding dependence on foreign producers.

What sets apart the Egyptian military, the Arab world's largest, is that its companies also offer an array of products or services in the domestic consumer economy — and without civilian oversight.

The latest assessment of defence production and military companies in Egypt from defence-information firm IHS Jane's in London, and a 1998 report produced by the US embassy's commercial affairs section in Cairo, list three military-owned firms that sell to both armed forces and the public.

One is El Nasr Company for Services and Maintenance, which operates under the brand "Queen Service." It has at least 18 service businesses, including child care centres, according to its website.

General Ahmed El-Banna, general manager of El Nasr, said in a telephone interview that the military owns 75 percent of the company while the rest is held by a group of shareholders made up of retired officers. Families of retired officers can inherit shares after the principals die, El-Banna said.

Military companies play a significant role in consumer food production, said Springborg, the Naval Postgraduate School professor.

Because the Egyptian military wanted to be self-sufficient in meeting the dietary needs of personnel, it runs "chicken farms, dairy farms, horticultural operations. And it of course has its own bakeries," he said.

The military's "business interests are very large," said Bassma Kodmani, executive director of the Paris-based Arab Reform Initiative and a senior adviser at the French National Research Council. Those businesses, though, help build the nation and help keep capital within its borders.

"The army is not seen as corrupt," she told a group of reporters in Paris last week. "It might seem strange to people in the west, but in Egypt it's not considered shocking that the army builds highways or new housing projects."

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News Headline: Mayor Believes Twinsburg Moving In Right Direction | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Patch
Contact Name: Mitch Cooper
News OCR Text: Mayor Katherine Procop spoke before a crowd of city business owners with a message of confidence and optimism in her State of the City address Thursday afternoon.

The event, hosted by the Twinsburg Chamber of Commerce , gave the mayor the opportunity to share insight on the previous year in the city as well as opportunities for the future.

She started out by mentioning changes in leadership and legislation in Ohio could have a direct impact locally.

“I have no doubt that decisions at the state level will also impact our own municipal budgets,” Procop said.

The possible reduction in the local government fund and estate tax could mean loss of nearly $1 million annually for the city.

“The message is loud and clear: It is time for local jurisdictions to assess and use all of their available resources,” Procop said.

Another economic blow has been the loss of the Chrysler plant in 2010, costing the city jobs and revenue. But even in tough times, opportunities present themselves, she said. The key to finding them is planning and hard work, and the positive response of a community.

“Although challenged, the city's diverse economic base and community character have met the test,” Procop said.

She mentioned several key industries that will energize the city such as the addition of a 24 hour emergency unit at University Hospitals, the opening of the Cleveland Clinic Family Health and Surgery Center , Kent State's Twinsburg Regional Academic Center and additions and innovations with the General Electric plant.

“These industries are accelerating the city's recovery in ways that other Northeast Ohio communities are unable to match,” Procop said.

The mayor also mentioned some highlights from last year for the city and some departments.


Twinsburg received more than $4 million in American Recovery Reinvestment Act funding. It used the federal grants for capital projects like repairing roads and investing in green initiatives that have saved city almost $100,000 on energy consumption.


The city was eight percent under budget for 2010 and received more than $1 million in extra revenue because of the late closing of Chrysler.
The Twinsburg Police Department was given $128,000 from the Office of Criminal Justice Services for two new cruisers and new digital video systems.
Parks and Recreation began the successful Rock the Park last year and is planning six concerts this year starting in June.
The Twinsburg Fitness Center had its highest membership and lowest subsidy ever .


Procop also acknowledged the work of city council and their great desire for the benefit of the community.

“We could never have accomplished what we have without their support,” Procop said. “This is one of the best years I think that we have had since I have been mayor in 1999.”

Procop ended her talk fittingly, reminding the room that Twinsburg was rated the top suburb in Northeast Ohio by Cleveland Magazine .

“We believe it's a clear choice,” Procop said. “Twinsburg truly is number one and we are really proud of it.”

Procop hopes that residents and businesses know despite setbacks, there is reason to be optimistic and potential for growth.

“Despite some of the setbacks the city of Twinsburg has had, such as the closing of Chrysler, we are moving forward and we have great projects and initiatives going on,” she said afterwards.

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News Headline: KSU to begin scholarship match (Garcia, Lefton) | Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Feb. 20--Kent State has unveiled a scholarship program that could provide up to $1,000 for some freshmen.

The Kent Scholarship Match Program will match anynonuniversity scholarship of up to $1,000 from churches, professional organizations, clubs, companies and the like.

David Garcia, KSU associate vice president of enrollment management and student affairs, said he didn't know of similar programs at other Ohio universities.

The award aims to "minimize the financial burden on students," KSU President Lester Lefton said in a news release Thursday. That's a nod to the possibility that tuition might rise this fall if the state reduces its subsidies to tax-supported universities, including Kent State, as it scrabbles to close an $8 billion budget gap.

Garcia said the program

aims to "stretch our institutional dollars more" by bringing in a fresh influx of revenue from outside sources.

"It's a call to action for students to apply for any and all scholarships," he said. "I started thinking about this in November and December. We need to think outside the box and see how we can be proactive."

Current undergraduate tuition at Kent State is about $9,000 for in-state students.

The new award comes with some restrictions. Incoming freshmen must be enrolled for at least 12 credit hours at the Kent campus and must be eligible for the federal Pell Grant, the need-based financial aid program that provides up to $5,550 this year.

The KSU award will be split between the fall and spring semesters, even if the outside award is for only the fall term. The KSU award is not renewable, even if the outside award is. Students must be from Ohio.

For details, e-mail Kent State's financial aid office at

finaid@kent.edu.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: KSU to start matching scholarship (Vincent, Garcia, Evans) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Starting this fall, Kent State University will match non-university scholarships for incoming freshmen up to $1,000.

Students who receive scholarships from organizations such as churches or businesses — even multiple ones — can have an extra $500 added to their accounts each semester of their first year at KSU.

“We're trying to get students to look for those outside scholarships that go untapped,” spokeswoman Emily Vincent said.

But there are restrictions on who qualifies.

The matching scholarship money will only go to Ohio residents, admitted to the Kent campus for fall 2011 as full-time students. They must be in a bachelor's degree program, and they must be eligible for the federal Pell Grant.

The award is non-renewable and can only cover tuition costs.

Still, this award program may help to keep students enrolling in classes as cuts to Ohio's financial aid offerings appear likely.

The reason for the introduction of KSU's new program was “concern for the reduction of state and federal aid coupled with the anticipated increase with tuition,” said David Garcia, associate vice president for enrollment management, in an e-mail.

“This new award may bring closer the gap of financial aid support and the cost of attendance,” he said. “In some cases, it may mean taking out a reduced student loan.”

KSU's financial aid office hadn't heard of any other scholarships like it in Ohio. At one point Bowling Green State University and Miami University were matching Ohio College Opportunity Grants but aren't any more.

Mark Evans, director of Student Financial Aid at KSU, said the university made the program possible by “re-allocating existing scholarship resources” and aren't spending any extra money on it.

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News Headline: New scholarships at Kent St defray costs | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - Kent State University announced a new scholarship program Thursday in anticipation of cuts in state and federal aid in the next school year.

The Kent State Scholarship Match Program matches any non-university scholarship that an incoming freshman receives for the fall semester. Examples of acceptable matches include scholarships from high schools, clubs and organizations, churches, businesses and agencies. The match awards are capped at $1,000.

To be eligible for the Kent State Scholarship Match Program, a student must meet the following criteria:

- Be an Ohio resident

- Be admitted to the Kent Campus as a new incoming freshman for the Fall 2011 Semester

- Enroll in a bachelor's degree program

- Register each semester for a minimum of 12 credit hours that are designated as Kent Campus courses

- Complete the 2011-2012 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and have results sent to Kent State

- Be eligible for the federal Pell Grant (as determined by the FAFSA results)

The award will be split between fall and spring semesters, even if the outside scholarship award is only for the fall semester. The student's account will be credited, and the award will be applied only to tuition charges. The award is nonrenewable.

To be considered for the Kent State Scholarship Match Program, complete the application form available at www.kent.edu/financialaid/scholarshipmatch . For more information or to contact Kent State's Student Financial Aid Office, e-mail finaid@kent.edu .

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News Headline: Ravenna business strategy targeted (Carrington-Matthews) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Several leaders in Ravenna's business community came together Friday with one goal in mind — to tell the city how it could help them.

City officials, along with the Portage County Regional Planning Commission, invited business community members to discuss their concerns.

Other focus groups are planned in the weeks ahead with non-profit businesses, educators, employees and members of the retail community.

Mayor Joseph Bica said the group is part of his initiative to have a strategic plan for the city. As part of that, the city partnered with the Regional Planning Commission to start an “asset mapping” process.

Todd Peetz, director of the regional planning commission, said there is already a map with 700 non-residential parcels in the city. The map, he said, might help business owners find a place to expand in the years ahead.

“If I'm a business owner looking for 20,000 square feet of office space, we can help them find that sweet spot,” he said.

City Economic Development Director Kerry Macomber said several business owners filled out surveys ranking various concerns.

About a dozen members of the business community broke down into two groups, led by Peetz and Macomber, coming back with similar concerns. Many expressed concern about not being able to find qualified applicants with the right skills or work ethic, applicants not being able to pass a drug screening, and about the need to find one another so they can do business and buy supplies locally.

Dan Brown of Cleveland Punch and Dye said the need for skills in technology has grown, but the skills of the workforce has not kept pace at the same level.

“The schools are doing the best they can” he said. “It's just that we require more technology. The workforce we have here is wonderful. We've been a company that's willing to train for years.”

Lisa Zavara, human resources director at Portage Precision Polymers, said her company, which is expanding, sometimes finds it difficult to find qualified applicants who want to work.

“I think it's good that the city is doing,” she said.

Other business owners asked if the city would be able to provide assistance if they were to expand, including cutting through red tape.

Gavin Carrington-Matthews, director of the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University, said his agency provides free business consulting to new and existing businesses.

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News Headline: Kent Stage serves up 'Music on Main Street' | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A near capacity audience, the price of entree being $10 a seat, previewed selections from two upcoming musicals and raised nearly $3,000 for charitable purposes at "Music on Main Street" at the Kent Stage Feb. 11.

The musical charity, now in its seventh year, is staged annually by the Kent Rotary Club. This year, it brought in enough money to supply every third-grader in the Kent Schools with a dictionary and also to make a donation to an effort to supply a village in Ecuador with fresh water.

Members of the Theodore Roosevelt High School cast of "Brigadoon," which will be staged at the high school in Kent the weekend of Feb. 25 to 27, performed songs from the Lerner and Lowe musical of the late 1940s.

Jon Lilly enriched the mysterious atmosphere of the story, a myth set in Scotland, by performing bagpipes at the conclusion of the songs.

Faculty member Donna Crews directed, accompanied by Becky Thomas utilizing an electronic keyboard. Sarah Kaplan is director of the cast.

Following "Brigadoon," theater-goers found themselves revved up by a peppy performance of songs from "Grease," the 1971 musical by Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey that set records on Broadway for its 3,888-performance run.

The musical opened at Kent State University Friday and performances continue today and then Feb. 23 through 27.

Students in the Kent State School of Theater and Dance, accompanied by faculty member Mel Fucci on the piano, had toes a-tapping with songs that called up the 1950s so-called "greaser" era, touching on stark reality issues but also on the age-old themes of teenage love, friendship and rebellion.

Because the KSU student cast of "Grease" was in rehearsal, John Swoboda, musical director of the School of Theater and Dance, had to round up students, who had tried out for the parts, a kind of backup cast. Those students easily proved themselves up to their assignment, an indicator of the depth of talent the School of Theater and Dance is attracting.

According to Kent Schools Superintendent Joe Giancola, who set up the evening on Rotary's behalf, about $2,700 was raised after expenses.

ROBERT J. LUCAS/RECORD-COURIER PHOTOS

Adam Ruyten, Ed Caruso and Mary Ruyten

Jim and Pat Gless

Miriam and Gerald Ridinger

Jon Lilly plays the Scottish bagpipes.

Robbie Eberhart and his mother, Vicki Eberhart.

Gayle Wall, whose son is in "Brigadoon," and Ralph Kletzien.

Jerri Ann and Dale Smith

Sangmi Heo, Euijin Kim, 21 months, and Yeonmin Kim

Susan and Randy Smith

Richele Charlton and her son, Devlin Charlton, work at the counter.

Holly Kostenski and Trinidy Rose

Janell Ryan and Rosalee Hodge

"Brigadoon" preview by the Theodore Roosevelt High School Drama and Music departments.

"Grease" preview by the Kent State School of Theatre and Dance.

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: Eye on upscale housing in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Would the Kent market be able to fill a new development
of homes starting at $200,000 and going
up?
Carol Foote of Cutler Realty thinks it would
help keep Kent State faculty members and administrators,
who, when they accept employment
at the university, from skipping Kent and
instead buying homes in communities such as
Stow and Hudson.
The university continues to grow. As it adds
employees, the city needs to serve their housing
needs. Although the community has added numerous
homes in the $200,000 and above category
over the last 20 years it might be able to fill
more of them.

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News Headline: "Farm boy' never lost his love of nature (Underwood) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Long-time botanist Tom Cooperrider is sharing his love of nature in a new book, a collection of essays on plant life that make Kent unique.

Most of the essays have been published before, but the 83-year-old retired Kent State University professor infused a literary quality and removed tricky botanical jargon for his compilation, “Botanical Essays from Kent.”

He says it's something like a “culmination” for him.

Cooperrider was studying plant life in Kent before most people knew it had plant life worth studying. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources acknowledged that when in 1995 they named part of the Kent Bog in his honor.

“It's a nice mix of good, solid botanical information, and it's intended for a lay audience,” said Will Underwood, director of the Kent State University Press, which published the book.

He said Cooperrider came to him with the idea for the book three years ago, and he helped him clip away botanical jargon for non-expert readers.

“I'm a farm boy,” Cooperrider said as he explained the genesis of his botany career.

His parents worked a farm in Licking County, east of Columbus. Living there, he learned to identify the plants around him.

“We had a woods, and we had a flower garden, and my mother had a vegetable garden,” he said. “And, of course, we had crops.”

After serving in the army after World War II, Cooperrider studied at Denison University and then at the University of Iowa where he earned his doctorate. At 31, he moved to Kent and became a professor of biology at Kent State University.

“One of the reasons for writing the book was that I had a story to tell,” Cooperrider said. “I lived through some exciting times.”

He means the 1960s, ‘70s and ‘80s. And he's not talking about rock ‘n' roll.

“It was during that time that Kent Bog was acquired and made into a nature preserve, dedicated in 1987,” he said. “Maybe it's hard to understand how unique this is — hardly any nature preserves are located within city limits.”

Most bogs nearby are in the suburbs or in the rural areas around Kent.

The Tom S. Cooperrider-Kent Bog State Nature Preserve (you'll never hear him call it by his own name) is on the edge of town, south of S.R. 261 and east of S.R 43. It serves as the centerpiece of “Botanical Essays.”

What makes the bog so special, Cooperrider said, are its tamarack trees. They're deciduous conifers, meaning they have pine cones and needles but shed them each year. That's somewhat unique.

But what's most interesting about the tamarack trees in Kent is how they got here. The trees are native to northern Canada but were pushed south in the last glacial descent 10,000 years ago.

Most didn't last. Kent's did.

“This is the largest stand of tamarack trees in Ohio,” Cooperrider said. “In only a few places, including the Kent Bog, the tamarack tree was able to hang on.”

“Botanical Essays from Kent” is on sale at their website, upress.kent.edu, for $16.95.

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News Headline: Akron schools among grant winners | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The GAR Foundation has granted $100,000 to Akron Public Schools for a program aimed at increasing student achievement by training principals and future school staff leaders.

The grant is part of $530,000 awarded to organizations this quarter.

The Akron school grant will go for the Great Leaders Principal Development Program that, among other things, is aimed at expanding the pool of qualified candidates for aspiring principals.

The foundation also gave $25,000 to Haven of Rest Ministries to provide food, clothing and shelter to homeless people in the area.

Other grants went to:

• Alchemy Inc., $5,000 for the Myths, Muses and Scribes program.

• Apollo's Fire, $17,500 for Summit County performances in the 2011-12 season.

• Asian Services in Action Inc., $40,000 for its International Community Empowerment Project.

• Barberton City Schools, $45,000 for the Assessing Students Toward Success program.

• Case Western Reserve University, $25,000 for its Science and Entrepreneurship program.

• Christ Child Society, $30,000 for the Clothing Center.

• Cuyahoga Community College, $35,000 for scholarships for Summit County students.

• Conservancy for Cuyahoga Valley National Park, $52,000 for its summer youth outreach programs.

• East Akron Neighborhood Development Corp., $20,000 for its Emergency Home Repair program.

Kent State University Foundation, $20,000 for WKSU's 2011 fund drive and $70,000 for its Partnership for the Minority Business Accelerator.

• Specialized Alternatives for Families and Youth of Ohio Inc., $5,000 for foster parent recruitment and training in Summit County.

• Tri-County Jobs for Ohio's Graduates, $40,000 for operations.

The foundation, with assets of $147 million, was established in 1967 by Roadway Express co-founder, chief executive and major shareholder Galen J. Roush and his wife, Ruth, who designated half of their estate to the trust.

Since its founding, it has distributed $195 million to nonprofit organizations.

For information, go to http://www.garfoundation.org, or e-mail Julie Rittenhouse atjrittenhouse@garfdn.org or call 330-576-2913.

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News Headline: Radio host deals at WSDP record show | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plymouth Observer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Matt Watroba (right, with Robert Jones) will be dealing at the WSDP record show Saturday, Feb. 26. / Bill Bresler | staff photographer

Filed Under

Matt Watroba will participate as a dealer at the 88.1FM Record/CD/Music Memorabilia Show on Saturday, Feb. 26, at Salem High School. The show runs 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Salem High School Cafeteria.

Watroba will be selling much of his large collection of music. He was a long time public radio host in the Detroit area on WDET and WEMU. His collection spans many genres including folk, country, American, bluegrass and blues.

He currently hosts the Sing Out Radio Magazine, Wednesdays at 11 a.m. on WSDP 88.1-FM. The syndicated show is also heard on stations across the country. He also is a folk music artist and he serves as an announcer and producer for Folkalley.com and WKSU at Kent State University.

“We're excited to have Matt participating in our show,” said Bill Keith, Station Manager of WSDP. “He is a wonderful addition to our great line up of dealers. I can't wait to see the music he has for sale.”

Collectors who attend the 88.1-FM Record Show will find thousands of vinyl records, CDs, import only releases, 45s, T-shirts, posters, and other collectibles. The music will span many genres including rock, jazz, pop, country, r b and folk. The show will also feature special giveaways and door prizes.

Tickets are $3, $5 for early admission between 9 and 10 a.m., and free for Canton, Plymouth and Salem students. Ticket proceeds will benefit WSDP, and will help the station to continue serving the community with unique programming and broadcast training for students.

Dealer tables are also still available for $30 for an eight-foot table. Interested dealers can contact the station at (734) 416-7732 or by e-mail at bill.keith@pccsmail.net

Salem High School is located at 46181 Joy Rd., at the corner of Joy and Canton Center in Canton, Michigan.

WSDP is staffed by students at Canton, Plymouth and Salem High Schools. The station has been serving the community since Feb. 14, 1972. More about the station can be found at www.881TheEscape.com.

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News Headline: Metro Detroit: Newsmakers Feb. 18, 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Michiguide.com
Contact Name: Mike Austerman
News OCR Text: Three of Detroit's Citadel owned-radio stations have been sold as part of a huge Citadel deal with Cumulus, according to a report posted Thursday on the Web site of industry trade publication Radio Ink. The three Detroit stations that would be affected by the deal are WJR-AM (760), WDVD-FM (96.3) and WDRQ-FM (93.1). Radio Ink reported that news of the transaction -- valued at $2.4 billion and $1.5 billion in market equity -- was leaked internally. Radio insiders have known about the possible deal for weeks. WJR's Paul W. Smith explored the subject on his show Thursday... 3 Detroit radio stations sold (Fri, 2/18)

Local radio host to participate in 88.1FM Record Show

Matt Watroba will participate as a dealer at the 88.1FM Record/CD/Music Memorabilia Show on Saturday Feb. 26, at Salem High School. The show is from 10am to 4pm at the Salem High School Cafeteria.

Watroba will be selling much of his large collection of music that spans many genres including folk, country, American, bluegrass and blues. He was a long time public radio host in the Detroit area on WDET and WEMU and currently hosts the Sing Out Radio Magazine, Wednesday at 11am on WSDP, 88.1FM and via syndication on other stations across the country. Watroba also is a folk music artist and serves as an announcer and producer for Folkalley.com and WKSU at Kent State University.

"We're excited to have Matt participating in our show," said Bill Keith, WSDP station manager. "He is a wonderful addition to our great line up of dealers. I can't wait to see the music he has for sale."

Collectors that attend the 88.1FM Record Show will find thousands of vinyl records, CD's, import only releases, 45's, t-shirts, posters, and other collectibles. The music will span many genres including rock, jazz, pop, country, R&B and folk. The show will also feature special giveaways and door prizes.

Tickets are $3, $5 for early admission between 9 and 10am, and free for Canton, Plymouth and Salem students. Ticket proceeds will benefit WSDP, and will help the station to continue serving the community with unique programming and broadcast training for students.

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Mike Austerman published on February 18, 2011 9:40 AM.

A look at what a combination of Citadel and Cumulus could look like in lower Michigan was the previous entry in this blog.

Public broadcasters ask for help in preserving federal funding is the next entry in this blog.

Metro Detroit: Newsmakers Feb. 18, 2011

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News Headline: YWCA will host student career fair | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The YWCA of Warren, in partnership with 4-H and Goodwill GoodGuides, will be hosting a career fair for students in grades seven through 12 from 6 to 9 p.m. March 4. This free event is open to the public.

On hand will be representatives from local universities, colleges and trade or technical schools to talk with students about the programs they offer. Included are Kent State University Trumbull Campus, National College, ITT Technical Institute, The Academy of Dental Assisting & Smile Design, Staff Right Services and Randstadt Work Solutions.

Students will be able to speak with representatives from a variety of careers and be able to participate in mock interviews with potential employers. Career-building activities will also take place.

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