Report Overview:
Total Clips (44)
Admissions (1)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Art (3)
Art; Theatre and Dance (1)
College of Business (COB) (3)
College of Business (COB); Institutional Advancement (1)
Community Service, Learning and Volunteerism; Hospitality Management (3)
Computer Science; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Fashion Design (2)
Foundation, Leadership and Administration (1)
Geography (1)
Geology (1)
Kent State and President Obama (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
KSU at Salem (3)
KSU at Stark (3)
KSU Museum (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
Office of the Provost (5)
Renovation at KSU (1)
Student Success (1)
Theatre and Dance (3)
University Archives and Special Collections (1)
WKSU-FM (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Admissions (1)
Streetsboro Academic Showcase set Thursday 02/26/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...“We've been trying to get that as a class for seven years.” There are also AP calculus and English classes, and students can also take college courses Kent State University, she said. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about the high school's unique programs and classes, including...


Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Shoshana Johnson to speak 02/27/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Johnson, the first African-American prisoner of war during the Iraq war, will talk about her experience at 7 p.m. Wednesday in the Kent Student Center at Kent State University. Johnson and five others, including Jessica Lynch, were taken prisoner March 23, 2003, after her convoy was ambushed...


Art (3)
Art 02/25/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

...216-298-9071 or go to williambustagallery.com The William Busta Gallery is offering a pair of exhibitions focusing on members of the art faculty at Kent State University. Darice Polo, a native of New York and an associate professor at KSU, is exhibiting paintings and drawings based on memories...

"The 11th annual National Juried Cup Show" 02/25/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Date: 03/02/11 Address: Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St. Kent, OH 44240 Description: Feature cups made by Kent State alumni from around the country...

Looking Back: 1971 Groundbreaking for School of Art 02/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Art; Theatre and Dance (1)
Grab & Go: Classical Music, Art Shows and More 02/28/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...section below. Artistic creations on display Where/When : Student Annual Juried Art Exhibition at the School of Art Gallery, located in the Kent State University Art Building on Terrace Drive. The exhibition will continue through March 16 during regular gallery hours of 11 a.m....


College of Business (COB) (3)
Business Calendar: "Spirit of Women in Business Conference" 02/26/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

SATURDAY, MARCH 5 "Spirit of Women in Business Conference": 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Kent State University, Kent Student Center; from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. a resource fair will be held in the second-floor rotunda of the Kent Student...

Women in Business session set 02/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Spirit of Women in Business Conference @ Kent State 02/27/2011 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email

Thu 3/10 @ 10AM Kent State University presents its inaugural Women in Business Conference on Thu 3/10. Women from all walks of life — college students, mid-level...


College of Business (COB); Institutional Advancement (1)
Business Notebook: PHILANTHROPY 02/26/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Walter Van Benthuysen, a 1961 advertising graduate of Kent State University and native of Canton, has made a $500,000 philanthropic grant to internships for students in the university's College...


Community Service, Learning and Volunteerism; Hospitality Management (3)
Campus Kitchen helps fight hunger 02/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State Opens Ohio's First Campus Kitchen to Help Feed the Hungry 02/28/2011 Suburbanite, The Text Attachment Email

KSU students repurpose excess food to serve families in need 02/25/2011 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...FILED UNDER Community & Event News The Campus Kitchen is part of a national food recovery effort to feed hungry families and eliminate waste. Kent State University is the first college in Ohio to take on the project. Another 28 schools across the country also participate. By recovering...


Computer Science; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Journalism joins computer science in new KSU class (Marino, Wang) 02/26/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

For the first time at Kent State University, student journalists and computer scientists will collaborate on real-world projects in a single course, Web Programming...


Fashion Design (2)
KSU fashion students head to China (Ohrn-Daniel) 02/25/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Ten students and faculty from Kent State University's School of Fashion Design and Merchandising will attend China's 2011 Fashion Week in Beijing at the end of March. ...

Young designers rock the runway at Kent State fashion school 02/28/2011 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email


Foundation, Leadership and Administration (1)
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY EDUCATION PROFESSOR'S DOCUMENTARY TO AIR FEB. 27 (Seeberg) 02/25/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Feb. 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Guanlan's Sisters: A Family Journal is a documentary about hope, strength and empowerment....


Geography (1)
Portage digs out from latest storm (Schmidlin) 02/26/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...are digging out from the latest event in what is the snowiest winter in local records. Local meteorologist Thomas Schmidlin, a geography professor at Kent State University, said 5.5 inches of the white stuff was measured at his weather station in Kent Friday. Add that to the 7.5 inches...


Geology (1)
IDAHO STATE UNIVERSITY'S FINNEY PARTICIPATES IN STUDY THAT DOCUMENTS DURATION OF DROUGHTS, WET PERIODS INCREASING IN PACIFIC NORTHWEST 02/25/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

...Pittsburgh; Nathan Stansell from Ohio State University; Pratigya Polissarass from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; Joseph Ortiz, from Kent State University; Finney; and Jon Riedel, a geologist at North Cascades National Park in Washington. For any query with respect to this...


Kent State and President Obama (1)
AUDIO Local Business Leaders Brainstorm With Obama 02/28/2011 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

...simply not interested in lending money to companies such as ours." Vadxx Energy CEO Jim Garrett was also asked to join the president today, along with Kent State University student Justin Pierce and KSU President Dr. Lester Lefton...


KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
Day set aside to acknowledge rare diseases 02/25/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...the U.S. who have had a lot of the same difficulties as I have in getting information and answers about this rare disease." Thankfully, a teacher at Kent State University-East Liverpool, was able to locate a pseudotumor cerebri specialist in Cleveland. Utt is currently enrolled in the...

Day set aside to acknowledge rare diseases 02/25/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

...the U.S. who have had a lot of the same difficulties as I have in getting information and answers about this rare disease." Thankfully, a teacher at Kent State University-East Liverpool, was able to locate a pseudotumor cerebri specialist in Cleveland. Utt is currently enrolled in the...


KSU at Salem (3)
Dissolution of YWCA is finalized 02/27/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

...FRC for 2011 Kin and Kids operating expenses; $6,000 went to the Sale Area Sustainable Opportunity Development Center for entrepreneurial workshops with Kent State University and the annual Salem-area women's recognition banquet. Jackson said the board decided to present United Way of Northern...

Dissolution of YWCA is finalized 02/28/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...FRC for 2011 Kin and Kids operating expenses; $6,000 went to the Sale Area Sustainable Opportunity Development Center for entrepreneurial workshops with Kent State University and the annual Salem-area women's recognition banquet. Jackson said the board decided to present United Way of Northern...

Dissolution of YWCA is finalized 02/28/2011 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

...FRC for 2011 Kin and Kids operating expenses; $6,000 went to the Sale Area Sustainable Opportunity Development Center for entrepreneurial workshops with Kent State University and the annual Salem-area women's recognition banquet. Jackson said the board decided to present United Way of Northern...


KSU at Stark (3)
Congregation moves in faith 02/26/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...world 28 years ago, when he married his wife, Shirley, who is deaf. In addition to pastoring the church, Smith works as a sign-language interpreter at Kent State University. The Rev. Kevin Smith, who serves as administrative pastor, and his wife, Jodi, are both deaf. The chemical engineer...

Arts festival to feature Kent Stark students, faculty 02/28/2011 Repository, The Text Attachment Email

KSU Stark to host county college fair 02/28/2011 Independent, The Text Attachment Email


KSU Museum (1)
Haute history: Fashion museums are well-suited for style mavens 02/27/2011 Louisville Courier-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Museum's eight galleries feature changing exhibitions of work by many of the world's artists and designers. (Dan Maxwell/Kent...


Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
Frost the glass in your windows with the flick of a switch 02/26/2011 Orange County Register - Online Text Attachment Email

...off, the liquid crystals return to their normal positions and turn the glass from clear to frosted. The dispersed liquid crystals were invented at Kent State University in 1983. But it wasn't until a joint venture was made between 3M and Viracon that the liquid-crystal film was actually...

Trends in glass 02/26/2011 Abilene Reporter-News - Online Text Attachment Email

...off, the liquid crystals return to their normal positions and turn the glass from clear to frosted. The dispersed liquid crystals were invented at Kent State University back in 1983. But it wasn't until a joint venture was made between 3M Company and Viracon that the liquid-crystal film...


Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
NorTech, Crain's Cleveland Business Announce 2011 Innovation Award Winners 02/25/2011 World Market Media Text Attachment Email

...CODONICS, INC; Flocel Inc.; NASA Glenn Research Center; R.W. Beckett Corp; Sunflower Solutions; Tipton Design and Engineering; and The University of Akron /Kent State University. For more information about the 2011 NorTech Innovation Award winners, please visit www.crainscleveland.com or www.nortechinnovationawards.org....


Office of the Provost (5)
KSU administrator gets provost's post in Georgia (Chandler) 02/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kennesaw State's new provost starts job in July 02/26/2011 Atlanta Journal-Constitution Text Email

...Kennesaw State University will begin in July, President Daniel Papp said Friday. Timothy Chandler, the senior associate provost for academic affairs at Kent State University, will serve as Kennesaw's vice president for academic affairs. While at Kent State Chandler developed programs...

Kennesaw State selects provost 02/25/2011 Atlanta Journal-Constitution - Online Text Attachment Email

...Kennesaw State University will begin in July, President Daniel Papp said Friday. Timothy Chandler, the senior associate provost for academic affairs at Kent State University, will serve as Kennesaw's vice president for academic affairs. While at Kent State Chandler developed programs...

Kennesaw State names Chandler provost 02/25/2011 Business Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...new provost and vice president for academic affairs. Chandler will start July 11. He is the current senior associate provost for academic affairs at Kent State University in Ohio, where he is credited with developing a comprehensive “Student Success Center” designed to increase student academic...

Kennesaw State Announces New Provost, Vice President for Academic Affairs (Chandler) 02/27/2011 Kennesaw Patch Text Attachment Email

...provost search committee comprised of faculty, staff, students and a member of the KSU Foundation board of trustees. Chandler joins KSU from Kent State University in Ohio, where he currently serves as senior associate provost for academic affairs. “Dr. Chandler is an accomplished...


Renovation at KSU (1)
Kent State and the Fingerhut Factor (Lefton) 02/25/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

The resignation of Ohio Chancellor Eric Fingerhut, announced this week, could pave the way for Kent State University to revive renovation plans for the Kent campus. Last year, university officials pitched the idea of spending $250...


Student Success (1)
Kent State student Justin Pierce was invited to participate in President Obama's Forum last Tuesday 02/28/2011 Suburbanite, The Text Attachment Email


Theatre and Dance (3)
Macedonia resident featured in KSU dance recital in new facility 02/27/2011 Hudson Hub-Times Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance presents junior and senior dance majors performing in Infinity ~ 3.14: BFA Senior Dance...

Macedonia resident featured in KSU dance recital in new facility 02/27/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

...Co. Macedonia native Katie Naso, far right, dances with, from left Jessica Mego, Sammi Weinmann, Sharon Kriz, Amanda Black, and Lindsay Chmielowiec Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance presents junior and senior dance majors performing in Infinity ~ 3.14: BFA Senior Dance...

Macedonia resident featured in KSU dance recital in new facility 02/28/2011 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...Co. Macedonia native Katie Naso, far right, dances with, from left Jessica Mego, Sammi Weinmann, Sharon Kriz, Amanda Black, and Lindsay Chmielowiec. Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance presents junior and senior dance majors performing in Infinity ~ 3.14: BFA Senior Dance...


University Archives and Special Collections (1)
Joint Historical, Civil War societies to meet 02/27/2011 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

Joint Historical, Civil War societies meeting planned for March 8 Kent State University Associate Professor and Archivist Stephen Paschen will present "History Begins at Home: Why Local History is Vital to...


WKSU-FM (1)
Public broadcasters in Northeast Ohio says loss of federal funding would be devastating 02/28/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Streetsboro Academic Showcase set Thursday | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Streetsboro — Part open house, part conferences and part eighth-grade orientation, Streetsboro High School's Academic Showcase is returning this year.

After a one-year hiatus, due to budget cuts, the event has been set for March 3 from 3:30-7:30 p.m. at Streetsboro High School, 1900 Annalane Drive, said Sherry Maruna, a social studies teacher at the school.

“We're trying to showcase some of the work we do at the high school so the community knows what we're doing here, as well as the parents,” she said.

Interim Superintendent Bob Wolf said the event should be a good opportunity for parents coming in for conferences to learn more about the education their students are receiving.

“It will also be an opportunity to wander through the gym and see what's going on there,” he said, adding it will be the first community event in the gym since renovations were completed in February.

During the event, parents of high schoolers can drop in for conferences with teachers in gym or request a more private conference ahead of time in a teacher's classroom.

The event also is geared toward eighth-graders who are coming to the high school as freshmen in the fall, said Maruna.

“We want them to be aware that we are a full-service high school,” she said.

Eighth-graders need to learn about all the classes and activities the high school offers, including unusual ones like psychology, sociology, songwriting and an assortment of advanced placement classes, said Maruna.

Incoming freshmen need to realize the classes they take and the grades they get during their first year of high school have implications when it comes time to apply to college, she said.

According to Streetsboro High School English Teacher Greg Ceilec, eighth-graders can meet all the ninth-grade teachers in the lecture hall at 6:30 p.m.

Other special events during the showcase include: An information session on AP courses at 6:30 p.m.; a session on local scholarships at 7 p.m. in the lecture hall; and concert by the jazz band at 7 p.m. in the gym, according to Ceilec.

“You can come and meet the high school's teachers, coaches, and administrators; take a tour of the radio and TV stations; and check out various student clubs and projects,” he said.

A new AP government class is among the courses attendees can learn about, said Maruna.

“We were so excited to offer it to our students and make them more competitive in post secondary applications,” she said. “We've been trying to get that as a class for seven years.”

There are also AP calculus and English classes, and students can also take college courses Kent State University, she said.

Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about the high school's unique programs and classes, including the radio and TV stations.

“We've had quite a few students go on to careers [in those fields],” she said. “We're one of a few schools in Ohio that have both of those classes.”

After a turbulent 18 months that included budget reductions and the June 2010 fire at the school, Maruna said teachers haven't lost focus on their goals of helping students improve their ACT scores and increase their options after graduation.

“We had the fire; we had budget cuts, but so what?” she said. “We're going forward. With the Academic Showcase, we want to focus on what we do for students and the community.”

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News Headline: Shoshana Johnson to speak | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Shoshana Johnson, the first African-American prisoner of war during the Iraq war, will talk about her experience at 7 p.m. Wednesday in the Kent Student Center at Kent State University.

Johnson and five others, including Jessica Lynch, were taken prisoner March 23, 2003, after her convoy was ambushed in Nasiriyah. Marines later rescued Johnson, Lynch and the others.

Johnson is retired from the Army with a temporary disability honorable discharge and is the author of the book I'm Still Standing: From Captive U.S. Soldier to Free Citizen � My Journey Home. The lecture is free and open to the public.

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News Headline: Art | Email

News Date: 02/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Litt, Steven
News OCR Text: "Darice Polo: Through a Glass Darkly," and "Lorri Ott: Something Quiet" (recent drawings)

When: Ott through Saturday, March 12; Polo through Saturday, March 26.

Where: William Busta Gallery, 2731 Prospect Ave., Cleveland.

Admission: Free. Call 216-298-9071 or go to williambustagallery.com

The William Busta Gallery is offering a pair of exhibitions focusing on members of the art faculty at Kent State University. Darice Polo, a native of New York and an associate professor at KSU, is exhibiting paintings and drawings based on memories of a family outing to the Statue of Liberty in 1958. Polo will speak in the gallery from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday. Lorri Ott, an adjunct at KSU, is exhibiting examples of recent drawings made of poured resin, which complement the artist's current exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland.

Art "Darice Polo: Through a Glass Darkly," and "Lorri Ott: Something Quiet" (recent drawings). When: Ott through Saturday, March 12; Polo through Saturday, March 26. Where: William Busta Gallery, 2731 Prospect Ave., Cleveland. Admission: Free. Call 216-298-9071 or go to williambustagallery.com

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: "The 11th annual National Juried Cup Show" | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Date: 03/02/11

Address: Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St.

Kent, OH 44240

Description: Feature cups made by Kent State alumni from around the country.

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News Headline: Looking Back: 1971 Groundbreaking for School of Art | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sending the first ceremonial shovelful of earth skyward,
Elmer Novotny, director of the Kent State
University School of Art, breaks ground for the
new art building in 1971. Lending enthusiastic applause
is John Flower, dean of the College of Fine and Professional
Arts, while other campus dignitaries watched
from the groundbreaking ceremony platform on the
KSU Commons. The School of Art Building, a $2.3 million
project, was hailed for its innovative design when it
opened in 1972. Novotny, who chaired the School of Art
from 1947 until 1974, served on the art faculty for nearly
40 years. He died in 1997. Henry Halem of Kent, who was
beginning his tenure on the School of Art faculty when
the groundbreaking took place, took this photo, which
he shared with the Record-Courier.

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News Headline: Grab & Go: Classical Music, Art Shows and More | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Kasha Legeza
News OCR Text: It may be winter in Northeast Ohio, but the calendar is still chock full of fun activities – both indoors and out – for children and families. And most of them are free!


Cultural entertainment is plentiful this week in Kent, with venues offering exposure to art, astronomy, theater and classical music.


Every week, check back with Kent Patch for a roundup of ideas for getting out of the house with the kids. Have suggestions for activities and venues that should be on the list? Just add them in the comments section below.

Artistic creations on display

Where/When : Student Annual Juried Art Exhibition at the School of Art Gallery, located in the Kent State University Art Building on Terrace Drive. The exhibition will continue through March 16 during regular gallery hours of 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays.


Why Go: Distinguished artist/critic Dan Tranberg has selected works for the public exhibition from among those submitted by undergraduate and graduate students currently enrolled in the Kent State School of Art.


Pricing: Free. For more information call 330-672-7853.

Get into 'Grease' on campus

Where/When : E. Turner Stump Theatre, located in the Music and Speech Center, 1325 Theatre Drive on the Kent State University campus. Performances are at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday.


Why Go: The Kent State School of Theatre and Dance presents the all-American favorite “Grease,” a musical about high schoolers set in California in 1959. The production is rated PG-13 due to mature language and situations.


Pricing: Tickets are $16 for adults, $12 for senior citizens and $8 for ages 18 and under. Call 330-672-2497 for ticket availability.

Music Together

Where/When : The Story Time Room at Kent Free Library , 312 E. Main St. The program will be presented at 7 p.m. Monday and 10:30 and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday.


Why Go: Children of all ages, accompanied by an adult, are invited for a 30-minute session of music and songs with Mr. Jim.


Pricing: Free. Space is limited, so attendees need to pick up Boarding Passes at the Children's Room Desk 30 minutes before each program to ensure a spot.

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News Headline: Business Calendar: "Spirit of Women in Business Conference" | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SATURDAY, MARCH 5

"Spirit of Women in Business Conference": 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Kent State University, Kent Student Center; from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. a resource fair will be held in the second-floor rotunda of the Kent Student Center. Local businesses and organizations will showcase their services and products to conference attendees. $30, or $12 for students, if registered by March 4; $40, or $15 for students, for on-site registration. Go to www.kent.edu/business/wib to register. Tables for the fair will be available on a first-come, first-served basis, and the registration deadline for tables is March 4.

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News Headline: Women in Business session set | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's
College of Business is hosting
its first Spirit of Women in
Business Conference from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. March 10 in the
Kent Student Center.
The day will be divided
into three 60-minute breakout
sessions. Participants
can choose one of three different
presentation options
for each session. The sessions
will include a wide range of
topics, including social media,
entrepreneurship and
work-life balance.
Lisa Clarke, president of
Rally Marketing Group, an integrated
marketing and promotions
agency in Seattle,
will be the keynote speaker.
Pre-registration must be
done by March 4 or on-site
registration may be done the
day of the conference. General
pre-registration is $30; student
pre-registration is $12.
On-site registration will be
$40 for general; $15 for students.

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News Headline: Spirit of Women in Business Conference @ Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name: sarahvalek
News OCR Text: Thu 3/10 @ 10AM

Kent State University presents its inaugural Women in Business Conference on Thu 3/10. Women from all walks of life — college students, mid-level professionals and seasoned veterans — are encouraged to attend and participate. The day includes a keynote lunch featuring Lisa Clarke, MBA '94, President and CEO of Rally Marketing Group, a networking reception, resource fair and plenty of interesting sessions to attend. Have at it, ladies.

Kent State University

http://Kent.edu/business/wib/

[Click here to return to the current issue of Cool Cleveland]
Facebook Twitter DiggIt Del.icio.us

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News Headline: Business Notebook: PHILANTHROPY | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Walter Van Benthuysen, a 1961 advertising graduate of Kent State University and native of Canton, has made a $500,000 philanthropic grant to internships for students in the university's College of Business Administration.

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News Headline: Campus Kitchen helps fight hunger | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Campus Kitchen at
Kent State University, part
of a national food recovery
effort to feed hungry families,
will celebrate its grand
opening recently.
The kitchen operates from
the cafeteria of Beall Hall, a
residence hall.
The Campus Kitchens
Project is a national network
of college campuses that recovers
food items from cafeterias
and events and prepares
hot meals to feed the
needy in local communities.
There are approximately
30 Campus Kitchen sites
in the United States. KSU
is the only college in Ohio
chosen to participate in the
project.
The Campus Kitchen at
Kent State will recover food
from cafeterias and community
donations and engage
Campus
Kitchen
helps fight
hunger
students as volunteers to
prepare and deliver meals to
local feeding programs.
The kitchens are entirely
student-run with students
planning menus, collecting
food, running cooking shifts
and organizing meal delivery.
Volunteers are trained in
food recovery, safe food handling
and learn basic cooking
techniques.
The Campus Kitchen
at Kent State will receive
$15,000 from the national
Campus Kitchens Project,
which will help the kitchen
open and begin operations.
In addition, members of
the campus community who
host large events where food
is served are encouraged to
become part of the Campus
Kitchens effort by contacting
The Campus Kitchen at
Kent State to recover food
after an event concludes.
Since 2001, Campus Kitchens
has engaged more than
25,000 student volunteers
in recovering more than 1
million pounds of donated
food and delivered 1 million
meals to their communities.

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News Headline: Kent State Opens Ohio's First Campus Kitchen to Help Feed the Hungry | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent, Ohio — The Campus Kitchen at Kent State University, part of a national food recovery effort to feed hungry families, celebrated its grand opening with a public event Feb. 23. The event featured foods representative of those that will be prepared in The Campus Kitchen at Kent State.

The Campus Kitchens Project is a national network of college campuses that recovers food items from cafeterias and events and prepares hot meals to feed the needy in local communities. There are approximately 30 Campus Kitchen sites in the United States; Kent State is the only college in Ohio chosen to participate in the project.

The Campus Kitchen at Kent State will recover food from cafeterias and community donations and engage students as volunteers to prepare and deliver meals to local feeding programs. The kitchens are entirely student run with students planning menus, collecting food, running cooking shifts and organizing meal delivery. Volunteers are trained in food recovery, safe food handling and learn basic cooking techniques.

The Campus Kitchen at Kent State will receive $15,000 from the national Campus Kitchens Project, which will help the kitchen open and begin operations.

In addition, members of the campus community who host large events where food is served are encouraged to become part of the Campus Kitchens effort by contacting The Campus Kitchen at Kent State to recover food after an event concludes.

Since 2001, Campus Kitchens has engaged more than 25,000 student volunteers in recovering more than one million pounds of donated food and delivered one million meals to their communities. The national effort is supported by the Walmart Foundation, Sodexo, General Mills and the Corporation for National and Community Service. More information on the Campus Kitchens Project is available at www.campuskitchens.org.

Visit and “like” The Campus Kitchen at Kent State on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pages/The-Campus-Kitchen-at-Kent-State-University/155651411139256 .

To watch a video about the project, go to www.kent.edu/news/video/campuskitchen.cfm .

For additional information about the grand opening event or to volunteer for The Campus Kitchen at Kent State University project, contact Ann Gosky at agosky@kent.edu.

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News Headline: KSU students repurpose excess food to serve families in need | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: Jennifer Lindgren
News OCR Text: 12:05 AM, Feb 24, 2011 |

FILED UNDER

Community & Event News

The Campus Kitchen is part of a national food recovery effort to feed hungry families and eliminate waste.

Kent State University is the first college in Ohio to take on the project. Another 28 schools across the country also participate.

By recovering excess food from school meal programs, local restaurants and food distributors, students are saving nutritious meals from ending up in the trash.

For example, unused frozen chicken breasts may become a topping for salad. In the Beall Hall kitchen, student volunteers create new meals out of the food items.

They'll cook on Wednesday nights and deliver to Kent Social Services on Thursday.

Christie Anderson from Kent Social Services says the need has increased by about 20 percent in the last year.

"I think in our area, we're still seeing people losing jobs, losing homes and a lot of economic stability, so [Campus Kitchen] is significant," Anderson said.

Social Services has two meal programs: one that provides emergency groceries and another where families can walk in and have a home-cooked meal.

"I thought, this is such a warm thing to do for people. It makes you feel good, knowing you dedicated your time to doing something for somebody else," said senior Christine Sweeney.

Organizers hope, with enough involvement, the Campus Kitchen can operate seven days a week.

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News Headline: Journalism joins computer science in new KSU class (Marino, Wang) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For the first time at Kent State University, student journalists and computer scientists will collaborate on real-world projects in a single course, Web Programming for Multimedia Journalism.

Student media outlets KentWired and The Burr magazine, as well as professional media, including Cleveland Magazine and Akron's the330.com, have expressed interest in publishing projects the class produces.

Offered jointly this spring by the university's department of computer science and the school of journalism and mass communication, the new course has 22 enrolled students.

There are 10 computer-science majors and 12 student reporters and photojournalists.

“We're not trying to turn journalists into computer scientists or computer scientists into journalists,” said Jacqueline Marino, assistant professor in Kent State's School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

“We want each student to excel in his or her chosen area of expertise in a collaborative way. I often hear ‘Wow, that's cool' when I show some whiz-bang news application in class. This is the course where journalism students stop admiring from afar. They're finally going to be with people who can help them make their own whiz-bang news app.”

Those skilled in programming have developed online tools to keep track of campaign promises (The Obameter), personalize searches of public data (EveryBlock), inform people of local crimes (Tampa Bay Mug Shots) and create innovative storytelling integrating user-generated content (A Moment in Time).

As the news becomes more personal and interactive, journalists know they need to collaborate with those who best understand the emerging technologies that will help media organizations inform, engage and inspire their audiences in the future.

“When the faculty from the Department of Computer Science and JMC get together to create and teach this interdisciplinary course, students from both departments benefit, and the university benefits,” said Paul Wang, professor in Kent State's Department of Computer Science said. “The class will certainly make students strong candidates for a growing area of employment.”

Wang and Marino, along with Sue Zake (who advises KentWired and will be the class multimedia coach), want to increase literacy among student journalists and computer scientists, who will be tomorrow's media partners.

Journalism students will learn basic programming skills, including HTML and CSS.

Computer science students will learn journalism basics, such as news values, common practices and ethics.

By the end of the semester, the students will create their own news-related websites or interactive features that will include original journalistic content to be published on existing Web sites.

The course was devel-oped with the help of a Summer Teaching Development Grant from the Kent State University Teaching Council.

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News Headline: KSU fashion students head to China (Ohrn-Daniel) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ten students and faculty from Kent State University's School of Fashion Design and Merchandising will attend China's 2011 Fashion Week in Beijing at the end of March.

The invitation, extended by the China Central Academy of Fine Arts, will provide all-expense paid trips for seven students and three faculty members, compliments of the Beijing Municipal Government which, each year, sponsors an international partner for CAFA China Fashion Week. The seven KSU fashion design students will show four pieces each from their senior collections.

The offer was extended to J.R. Campbell, director of Kent State's Fashion School, while he was in Seoul, Korea, in November for the 2010 International Fashion Art Biennale. Campbell was there representing KSU as one of only four Americans invited to speak.

Additionally, Campbell and Vincent Quevedo, KSU associate professor of fashion design, had submitted a piece titled “DMZ” and were collaboratively awarded the “International Artist of the Year” award for their innovative design.

Open to all 49 senior design students at KSU, the judging process began less than one month after returning from winter break. All 49 designers were required to have two pieces from their collection completed and ready to present to the committee. The students were critiqued by Campbell and fellow fashion faculty Linda Ohrn-McDaniel, Noel Palomo-Lovinski, Sherry Schofield-Tomschin and Paula Dancie. Finalists were chosen based on the quality and aesthetic of their designs.

“The seven students are now feverishly finishing their four-piece collections in time for our trip,” said Ohrn-McDaniel. “This truly is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for them. This event could catapult their careers overnight.”

The seven finalists are Bethany Clark, Abigail Drake, Zachary Hoh, Vanecia Kirkland, Staci Moening, Caitlin Nugent and Samantha Woodard. Campbell, along with faculty members Ohrn-McDaniel and Schofield-Tomschin, will accompany the students to Beijing where they will stay for seven days. The runway event is tentatively scheduled for March 29.

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News Headline: Young designers rock the runway at Kent State fashion school | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Rockwell Auditorium was near capacity for the Little Black Dress Sophomore Walk Off at Kent State University. Fellow students, reporters, parents and even the fashion school's director, J.R. Campbell, attended the event, with over 34 sophomore level design students showing their work.

Student models appeared from behind a translucent sheet, their statuesque poses appearing moments before they took the stage. One by one the designs were revealed. Major trends present included lacy fabrics, racerback detailing, and exposed zippers. All the dresses were adorned with swarovski key necklaces designed by Katie O'Neill.

Skirt lengths and silhouettes varied by designer, with both mini and full skirt lengths present. The finale dress was a sheer maxi dress, reminiscent of popular 70's styling, with lace detailing.

The show was organized by the Kent State Fashion Productions Team, with Senior Co-Producers Brittany Mizelle and Laura Toomey introducing the show and giving background information on the significance of the little black dress. All proceeds from the event go to sponsor Kent State Fashion School's Annual Fashion Show, the culmination of the year's student work, that will take place this year on April 16th.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY EDUCATION PROFESSOR'S DOCUMENTARY TO AIR FEB. 27 (Seeberg) | Email

News Date: 02/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb. 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Guanlan's Sisters: A Family Journal is a documentary about hope, strength and empowerment. It is about the passion of a woman who believes in the power of education. It is about a family's journey to incite change in one of China's poorest regions. The documentary airs Sunday, Feb. 27, at 2:30 p.m. on WVIZ/PBS.

Eleven years ago, Dr. Vilma Seeberg, associate professor of education at Kent State University, traveled to China to speak at a university about education and girls in the 21st century. It was during that trip that Seeberg started a scholarship foundation to help Chinese girls in the rural, poverty-stricken mountain areas of the country.

"I donated the honorarium from my speech to start the scholarship," Seeberg said. "Since then, it has continued to grow. The girls write regularly, and we can keep track of how it's impacting their lives."

Named after her adopted daughter, the Guanlan Scholarship Foundation has provided the funds to educate more than 70 girls who otherwise would not have had the opportunity to attend school.

Seeberg has always been interested in cross-cultural research on girls' education and has been a scholar of Chinese education for nearly 37 years. In 1998, she and her husband adopted a baby girl from the country. Her research brought her to the mountains of China, where she experienced the abject poverty of the region.

"Many people live on less than one dollar a day," Seeberg said. "There's no heat, no running water, no transportation. The kids walk to school, even in the winter. It's hard to imagine."

Still, Seeberg felt that she could help the girls living in the villages.

"I have always felt that if we do research anywhere, we should give back," she said. "I was able to adopt a Chinese girl. I wanted to help more girls improve their status."

Last summer, a concrete road to the village was finally finished, and Seeberg and her family were able to visit the homes and families that were helped by the scholarship. Their journey is documented in Guanlan's Sisters: A Family Journal.

"Being able to watch these girls develop into young women and make something of their lives has been really rewarding," Seeberg said. "It has been more rewarding than the long-term results of any research."

The scholarships give the girls enough foundational education so that they are able to get training to support a family and lift themselves out of poverty. Some of the girls have gone on to attend junior colleges.

"They want to learn and are willing to sacrifice a lot to learn," Seeberg said. "Some of these girls are very creative in getting the resources needed to further their education, like bank loans to pay for college."

Seeberg has also watched her 13-year-old daughter, , begin to understand her role in the project.

"She came from here, and she is learning that she can give back," Seeberg said. "For her to be involved in this takes it to a much higher level."

In total, more than 70 girls have received an education because of the Guanlan Scholarship Foundation. Seeberg hopes that the documentary will increase Americans' understanding of China and its people, and also send the message to the Chinese that the education of girls is important to the development of the rural areas, where boys are still preferred. She has seen firsthand the change in the villages because of the girls.

"It's like the whole village is having some hope for a future they can't predict yet," Seeberg said. "There is more pride, more hope. They know things are changing, and that their daughters are changing them."

To learn more about the Guanlan Scholarship Foundation or for information on how to donate to the scholarship fund, visit www.guanlanscholarshipfoundation.org. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Portage digs out from latest storm (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Portage County residents are digging out from the latest event in what is the snowiest winter in local records.

Local meteorologist Thomas Schmidlin, a geography professor at Kent State University, said 5.5 inches of the white stuff was measured at his weather station in Kent Friday.

Add that to the 7.5 inches that fell Monday and Tuesday, and all the snow from other storms this season, and thats a whopping 109.5 inches this season, Schmidlin said. Its by far the snowiest season in the 25 years Ive been keeping records, he said. Aside from this weeks events, he said, the most snow came in December, with multiple snowfalls that left more than 20 inches each on the area. This years winter has also become one of the most expensive for snow and ice removal by county crews. We have eclipsed our past benchmarks, said Portage County Engineer Michael Marozzi. Our total cost has gone over $859,000 for materials and labor. Thats about 37 percent higher than an average winter, and that doesnt include the cost from (Fridays) event, Marozzi said. So far, county crews have spread more than 10,000 tons of salt at $49 per ton.

Marozzi said he could be looking at a million-dollar winter before its all over. Were not done yet. We always get one good snowstorm in March. We could easily spend another $100,000, Marozzi said. Money spent on plowing means less money for road and bridge projects this spring.

Marozzi said he had planned three bridge replacement projects this year, but were probably going to have to defer the third one a year. Portage County weathered the worst of the snowstorm around 11 a.m. Friday, and by the afternoon the precipitation was tapering off, said Mark Adams, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Cleveland. Theres a chance for some light snow (today), he said. In Portage County itll be an inch here, an inch there. Schmidlin said the weather should be warmer by Monday, when rainfall is expected. Because the ground is already wet, there is the possibility that the rain could spark flooding if its a heavy storm, he said.

The main campus of Kent State University was closed Friday, with only grounds crews, residence hall, dining and library employees reporting for work. Hiram College, Fortis College and the Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy in Rootstown also were closed.

Every public school district in the county was closed. As the Ohio legislature considers legislation that would restore Ohio students to five calamity days without having to make them up, most districts have reached or exceeded the five-day mark on Friday.

Ravenna Superintendent Tim Calfee said it was the fifth calamity day for his district, and he is aware of other districts that have had more calamity days this year.

Record-Courier reporters Mike Sever, Diane Smith and Ben Wolford contributed to this story.

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News Headline: IDAHO STATE UNIVERSITY'S FINNEY PARTICIPATES IN STUDY THAT DOCUMENTS DURATION OF DROUGHTS, WET PERIODS INCREASING IN PACIFIC NORTHWEST | Email

News Date: 02/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: POCATELLO, Idaho, Feb. 25 -- Idaho State University issued the following news release:

The Pacific Northwest could be entering a period of generally drier climate where the duration of cycles between wetter versus drier conditions last 60 to 100 years, is an implication of a new study that has analyzed the region's weather patterns from the last 6,000 years.

According to a study published this week in Proceeding of the Natural Academy of Sciences, during most of the 20th century the region was in a relatively wet period compared to the last 6,000 years, and if weather patterns continue, the region is due for a prolonged dry period.

"Over the last 6,000 years droughts and wet periods have tended to come in cycles and the period of those cycles has not been constant over time," said Idaho State University biological and geosciences professor Bruce Finney. "Early in the record the duration of one wet-dry cycle was roughly every 30 to 60 years, but they have become less frequent, particularly in the last 1,000 years, occurring 60 to 100 years apart."

Finney was part of a team of researchers led by University of Pittsburgh's Daniel Nelson and Mark Abbott that produced the study "Drought variability in the Pacific Northwest from a 6,000-yr lake sediment record" by analyzing the sediment core samples from Castor Lake in Washington.

The study's results have been discussed in a variety of media outlets including:

* NPR: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=133947103

* Science Daily: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110222122725.htm

* University of Pittsburgh: http://www.news.pitt.edu/news/Abbott-wet-dry-cycles-American-West

As the duration of drought and wet periods has increased, their impacts have been amplified over the last 6,000 years in the Pacific Northwest. The effects of climate change could create even more extreme periods of both types of weather patterns in the region. The change in Pacific Northwest's drought patterns in the last 1,000 years is linked to weather patterns in the Pacific Ocean, namely the El-Nino Southern Oscillation. El-Nino weather patterns are the result of cyclic warming and cooling of the surface of the central and eastern parts of the Pacific Ocean, creating disruptions in weather patterns over a large scale. El-Nino patterns have intensified over the last 1,000 years, and that intensification could continue.

"The experts on El Nino have a hard time predicting what is gong to happen to this weather pattern as human influence on climate grows stronger," Finney said. "But what our research shows is that you really need to know what El Nino is going to do to predict the future of our climate here."

The impact of global warming on the El Nino Southern Oscillation "will be intimately tied" to changes in the Pacific Northwest's climate and hydrology in upcoming years, the study authors conclude.

The study's authors included lead author Nelson, Abbott, Michael Rosenmeier and Byron Steinman from the University of Pittsburgh; Nathan Stansell from Ohio State University; Pratigya Polissarass from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; Joseph Ortiz, from Kent State University; Finney; and Jon Riedel, a geologist at North Cascades National Park in Washington. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: AUDIO Local Business Leaders Brainstorm With Obama | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Some area small business officials will meet with President Obama today in Cleveland to talk about ways to help small business.

It's billed as a brainstorming session at Cleveland State University intended to find ways to foster small business growth, particularly as it relates to the president's objectives of sparking more entrepreneurship, increasing exports and clean energy technology.

Among the 100 or so small business leaders invited to attend the forum are Akron Polymer Systems President & CEO Dr. Frank Harris and Kent Displays CEO Dr. Albert Green.

Harris says that while the Obama administration has helped small businesses that are still growing and making large investments with changes in the tax code, he thinks the president is coming to the right place to seek input.

"Ohio, I think, sort of leads the way in helping small businesses," said Harris. "I'd certainly like to have the federal government look at what Ohio has done and follow suit."

Harris specifically mentioned Ohio's Third Frontier program for helping companies like Akron Polymer Systems.

Green wants the president to do something that would loosen capital for companies like his to make further investments.

"We are dramatically increasing our revenues," said Green. "We're moving towards being profitable. We're a technology company, a start-up, if you will. Banks are simply not interested in lending money to companies such as ours."

Vadxx Energy CEO Jim Garrett was also asked to join the president today, along with Kent State University student Justin Pierce and KSU President Dr. Lester Lefton.

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News Headline: Day set aside to acknowledge rare diseases | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name: KATIE SCHWENDEMAN
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Last spring, East Liverpool resident Lisa Utt sat in her car in the parking lot of a local doctor's office crying so hard she couldn't drive home.

A visit to a local eye doctor confirmed she had one of two health problems-one that could result in complete loss of vision, or one that could result in death.

The doctor advised Utt her symptoms indicated the presence of either pseudotumor cerebri, or a brain tumor. The diagnosis came after visits to neurologists in East Liverpool and Beaver, Pa.

Utt, 23, said she initially went to the neurologists because she was having frequent headaches, and neck and shoulder pain, which implicated a brain tumor.

She also visited a local hospital, where doctors in the emergency room advised her the problem was due to a pulled muscle or stress, she said.

A chiropractor believed the symptoms were for that of a pinched nerve, she added.

Utt remembers waking up after sleep and not being able to see. Until last year, she never struggled with vision problems-she didn't even need glasses or contact lenses.

"It would take 20 seconds before I could even see anything," she said. "My vision was what I was most concerned about."

She was officially diagnosed with pseudotumor cerebri in March of last year. The diagnosis only escalated her fears of vision loss.

Pseudotumor cerebri is a rare disease that literally means "false brain tumor." It is also known as intracranial hypertension (IH), and is caused by the buildup or poor absorption of cerebrospinal fluid in the skull. Symptoms of IH closely mimic symptoms of a large brain tumor but, no tumor is actually present.

Emmanuel Tanne, MD, and president of the Vancouver-based Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation, said spinal pressure inside the skull typically affects the optic nerve, resulting in papilledema, and that if left untreated, can lead to progressive loss of vision.

Papilledema is a swelling of the optic disc caused by increased intracranial pressure.

Tanne said an eye examination is "very important" for someone with the same symptoms as Utt, since a swollen optic nerve is a tell-tale sign of the disease.

Utt said it was her visit to the optometrist that proved the most beneficial.

Little more than two weeks after that day in the parking lot, she had her first spinal tap.

The experience was scary and painful, although it did relieve her symptoms temporarily, she said.

According to Tanne, a spinal tap is the "gold standard" for measuring intracranial pressure.

Another spinal tap was later needed, and multiple CAT scans and MRI's were ordered to monitor her vision, she said.

She was also prescribed medication typically used for the treatment of glaucoma.

She explained that her frustration with finding the proper diagnosis was only compounded by the frustration of learning she had a disease that few medical experts knew much about.

"My biggest struggle with this disease has been the frustration of the unknown," she said. "I have been in touch with many people all over the U.S. who have had a lot of the same difficulties as I have in getting information and answers about this rare disease."

Thankfully, a teacher at Kent State University-East Liverpool, was able to locate a pseudotumor cerebri specialist in Cleveland.

Utt is currently enrolled in the physical therapy assisting program at the college.

The teacher, Lynn Davis, knew she was struggling with a health problem because she was having trouble reading the required textbooks due to her vision problem, Utt said.

She visited the specialist at the Cleveland Clinic recently and said her health has improved.

Although she is now required to wear contacts, she is not suffering from severe headaches and neck and shoulder pain.

Symptoms of the disease can return, however, and medical research has yet to discover how the condition develops and why, she said.

She is concerned about individuals across the world struggling with other rare diseases.

"Nearly 30 million (about 1 in 10) have rare diseases. All of us know someone with a rare disease," she said.

Utt would like for everyone to observe World Rare Disease Day, which is Feb. 28. She learned about Rare Disease Day through the Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation.

"We felt an obligation to go ahead and try to stimulate awareness of the disorder, as well as research," Tanne said. "The treatment has lagged for many years because nobody has ever developed a drug specifically to control the problem. It's a disorder that has been around for a long time, and has basically fallen through the cracks in terms of medical research and funding for the research."

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News Headline: Day set aside to acknowledge rare diseases | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name: KATIE SCHWENDEMAN
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Last spring, East Liverpool resident Lisa Utt sat in her car in the parking lot of a local doctor's office crying so hard she couldn't drive home.

A visit to a local eye doctor confirmed she had one of two health problems-one that could result in complete loss of vision, or one that could result in death.

The doctor advised Utt her symptoms indicated the presence of either pseudotumor cerebri, or a brain tumor. The diagnosis came after visits to neurologists in East Liverpool and Beaver, Pa.

Utt, 23, said she initially went to the neurologists because she was having frequent headaches, and neck and shoulder pain, which implicated a brain tumor.

She also visited a local hospital, where doctors in the emergency room advised her the problem was due to a pulled muscle or stress, she said.

A chiropractor believed the symptoms were for that of a pinched nerve, she added.

Utt remembers waking up after sleep and not being able to see. Until last year, she never struggled with vision problems-she didn't even need glasses or contact lenses.

"It would take 20 seconds before I could even see anything," she said. "My vision was what I was most concerned about."

She was officially diagnosed with pseudotumor cerebri in March of last year. The diagnosis only escalated her fears of vision loss.

Pseudotumor cerebri is a rare disease that literally means "false brain tumor." It is also known as intracranial hypertension (IH), and is caused by the buildup or poor absorption of cerebrospinal fluid in the skull. Symptoms of IH closely mimic symptoms of a large brain tumor but, no tumor is actually present.

Emmanuel Tanne, MD, and president of the Vancouver-based Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation, said spinal pressure inside the skull typically affects the optic nerve, resulting in papilledema, and that if left untreated, can lead to progressive loss of vision.

Papilledema is a swelling of the optic disc caused by increased intracranial pressure.

Tanne said an eye examination is "very important" for someone with the same symptoms as Utt, since a swollen optic nerve is a tell-tale sign of the disease.

Utt said it was her visit to the optometrist that proved the most beneficial.

Little more than two weeks after that day in the parking lot, she had her first spinal tap.

The experience was scary and painful, although it did relieve her symptoms temporarily, she said.

According to Tanne, a spinal tap is the "gold standard" for measuring intracranial pressure.

Another spinal tap was later needed, and multiple CAT scans and MRI's were ordered to monitor her vision, she said.

She was also prescribed medication typically used for the treatment of glaucoma.

She explained that her frustration with finding the proper diagnosis was only compounded by the frustration of learning she had a disease that few medical experts knew much about.

"My biggest struggle with this disease has been the frustration of the unknown," she said. "I have been in touch with many people all over the U.S. who have had a lot of the same difficulties as I have in getting information and answers about this rare disease."

Thankfully, a teacher at Kent State University-East Liverpool, was able to locate a pseudotumor cerebri specialist in Cleveland.

Utt is currently enrolled in the physical therapy assisting program at the college.

The teacher, Lynn Davis, knew she was struggling with a health problem because she was having trouble reading the required textbooks due to her vision problem, Utt said.

She visited the specialist at the Cleveland Clinic recently and said her health has improved.

Although she is now required to wear contacts, she is not suffering from severe headaches and neck and shoulder pain.

Symptoms of the disease can return, however, and medical research has yet to discover how the condition develops and why, she said.

She is concerned about individuals across the world struggling with other rare diseases.

"Nearly 30 million (about 1 in 10) have rare diseases. All of us know someone with a rare disease," she said.

Utt would like for everyone to observe World Rare Disease Day, which is Feb. 28. She learned about Rare Disease Day through the Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation.

"We felt an obligation to go ahead and try to stimulate awareness of the disorder, as well as research," Tanne said. "The treatment has lagged for many years because nobody has ever developed a drug specifically to control the problem. It's a disorder that has been around for a long time, and has basically fallen through the cracks in terms of medical research and funding for the research."

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News Headline: Dissolution of YWCA is finalized | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name: LARRY SHIELDS
News OCR Text: SALEM - The YWCA of Salem held its final annual meeting on Tuesday, finalizing the official dissolution process.

The board dissolved the organization in November 2009, and its last day was Dec. 31, 2010.

But the national organization requires local YWCAs to make two votes at annual meetings in order for the dissolution process to be recognized and final in May.

Amanda Jackson, board president, said the dissolution was due to economic reasons.

"Since the closing of its building in 2001, the YWCA has operated at a deficit year to year," Jackson said, adding the board felt the

"most financially responsible decision at this time was to cease operations and preserve what funds remained."

That amounts to approximately $125,000 that was raised by members of the community over the past 55 years.

Jackson said the board made a decision early on to keep this money in the community to benefit the people here.

She said the breakdown will be $100,000 in principal funds will remain in the YWCA's endowment fund with the Salem Community Foundation.

The annual income earned in 2011 will be distributed to the Family Recovery Center in 2012 for Kin and Kids program which provides support to grandparents and relatives in Columbiana County who are raising minor children.

In Salem, the programs were developed under the direction of former executive director, Susan Hays and Mary Caye Bixler, the current director, and taken over by the FRC in January of 2010.

Income earned in 2012 and afterward will be available to any non-profit organization providing services to individuals in Columbiana County that meets the requirements.

The Salem Community Foundation will handle applications for the money.

Of the remaining $25,000 that was distributed, $5,000 was given the FRC for 2011 Kin and Kids operating expenses; $6,000 went to the Sale Area Sustainable Opportunity Development Center for entrepreneurial workshops with Kent State University and the annual Salem-area women's recognition banquet.

Jackson said the board decided to present United Way of Northern Columbiana County with the remaining $15,000 for the creation of an endowment fund.

"Over the past 52 years, numerous members of this community served as board members, general managers and volunteers of the YWCA of Salem," Jackson said.

"Our remaining funds were raises and donated by these dedicated individuals and friends of the YWCA from the community."

The Salem YWCA maintained a building that was the center for health and fitness at the corner of E. 3rd St. and N. Lincoln Ave. until 2002 when it was sold, torn down and replaced.

The YWCA continued with offices in the Salem Community Center and the Kent State University City Center until 2009.

The YWCA advocated for the rights of individuals and families in Columbiana County and strove to provide opportunities for education, networking, leadership and family enrichment, Jackson said.

The board hopes that non-profit organizations receiving money will continue to provide these services and the legacy of the YWCA in Salem.

Larry Shields can be reached at lshields@salemnews.net

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News Headline: Dissolution of YWCA is finalized | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name: LARRY SHIELDS
News OCR Text: SALEM - The YWCA of Salem held its final annual meeting on Tuesday, finalizing the official dissolution process.

The board dissolved the organization in November 2009, and its last day was Dec. 31, 2010.

But the national organization requires local YWCAs to make two votes at annual meetings in order for the dissolution process to be recognized and final in May.

Amanda Jackson, board president, said the dissolution was due to economic reasons.

"Since the closing of its building in 2001, the YWCA has operated at a deficit year to year," Jackson said, adding the board felt the

"most financially responsible decision at this time was to cease operations and preserve what funds remained."

That amounts to approximately $125,000 that was raised by members of the community over the past 55 years.

Jackson said the board made a decision early on to keep this money in the community to benefit the people here.

She said the breakdown will be $100,000 in principal funds will remain in the YWCA's endowment fund with the Salem Community Foundation.

The annual income earned in 2011 will be distributed to the Family Recovery Center in 2012 for Kin and Kids program which provides support to grandparents and relatives in Columbiana County who are raising minor children.

In Salem, the programs were developed under the direction of former executive director, Susan Hays and Mary Caye Bixler, the current director, and taken over by the FRC in January of 2010.

Income earned in 2012 and afterward will be available to any non-profit organization providing services to individuals in Columbiana County that meets the requirements.

The Salem Community Foundation will handle applications for the money.

Of the remaining $25,000 that was distributed, $5,000 was given the FRC for 2011 Kin and Kids operating expenses; $6,000 went to the Sale Area Sustainable Opportunity Development Center for entrepreneurial workshops with Kent State University and the annual Salem-area women's recognition banquet.

Jackson said the board decided to present United Way of Northern Columbiana County with the remaining $15,000 for the creation of an endowment fund.

"Over the past 52 years, numerous members of this community served as board members, general managers and volunteers of the YWCA of Salem," Jackson said.

"Our remaining funds were raises and donated by these dedicated individuals and friends of the YWCA from the community."

The Salem YWCA maintained a building that was the center for health and fitness at the corner of E. 3rd St. and N. Lincoln Ave. until 2002 when it was sold, torn down and replaced.

The YWCA continued with offices in the Salem Community Center and the Kent State University City Center until 2009.

The YWCA advocated for the rights of individuals and families in Columbiana County and strove to provide opportunities for education, networking, leadership and family enrichment, Jackson said.

The board hopes that non-profit organizations receiving money will continue to provide these services and the legacy of the YWCA in Salem.

Larry Shields can be reached at lshields@salemnews.net

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News Headline: Dissolution of YWCA is finalized | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name: LARRY SHIELDS
News OCR Text: SALEM - The YWCA of Salem held its final annual meeting on Tuesday, finalizing the official dissolution process.

The board dissolved the organization in November 2009, and its last day was Dec. 31, 2010.

But the national organization requires local YWCAs to make two votes at annual meetings in order for the dissolution process to be recognized and final in May.

Amanda Jackson, board president, said the dissolution was due to economic reasons.

"Since the closing of its building in 2001, the YWCA has operated at a deficit year to year," Jackson said, adding the board felt the

"most financially responsible decision at this time was to cease operations and preserve what funds remained."

That amounts to approximately $125,000 that was raised by members of the community over the past 55 years.

Jackson said the board made a decision early on to keep this money in the community to benefit the people here.

She said the breakdown will be $100,000 in principal funds will remain in the YWCA's endowment fund with the Salem Community Foundation.

The annual income earned in 2011 will be distributed to the Family Recovery Center in 2012 for Kin and Kids program which provides support to grandparents and relatives in Columbiana County who are raising minor children.

In Salem, the programs were developed under the direction of former executive director, Susan Hays and Mary Caye Bixler, the current director, and taken over by the FRC in January of 2010.

Income earned in 2012 and afterward will be available to any non-profit organization providing services to individuals in Columbiana County that meets the requirements.

The Salem Community Foundation will handle applications for the money.

Of the remaining $25,000 that was distributed, $5,000 was given the FRC for 2011 Kin and Kids operating expenses; $6,000 went to the Sale Area Sustainable Opportunity Development Center for entrepreneurial workshops with Kent State University and the annual Salem-area women's recognition banquet.

Jackson said the board decided to present United Way of Northern Columbiana County with the remaining $15,000 for the creation of an endowment fund.

"Over the past 52 years, numerous members of this community served as board members, general managers and volunteers of the YWCA of Salem," Jackson said.

"Our remaining funds were raises and donated by these dedicated individuals and friends of the YWCA from the community."

The Salem YWCA maintained a building that was the center for health and fitness at the corner of E. 3rd St. and N. Lincoln Ave. until 2002 when it was sold, torn down and replaced.

The YWCA continued with offices in the Salem Community Center and the Kent State University City Center until 2009.

The YWCA advocated for the rights of individuals and families in Columbiana County and strove to provide opportunities for education, networking, leadership and family enrichment, Jackson said.

The board hopes that non-profit organizations receiving money will continue to provide these services and the legacy of the YWCA in Salem.

Larry Shields can be reached at lshields@salemnews.net

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News Headline: Congregation moves in faith | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: February 26,2011 07:30 AM GMT Colette M. Jenkins Beacon Journal Publishing Co. Green church reduces barriers to fellowship

By Colette M. Jenkins Beacon Journal religion writer Published on Saturday, Feb 26, 2011

GREEN: T

There's a lot more bass in the music. The praise team sings with its hands. And clapping involves raising your hands and shaking them.

The portable sign out front signals the change: Deaf Outreach Church. The 140-member congregation, which has about 20 hearing members, moved into the former Green Baptist Church building at the beginning of the month.

The move has been a welcome change to parishioners such as Tom and Suzanne McMullen. The McMullens joined the Deaf Outreach Church about three years ago, after the Calvary Church of the Deaf in Akron closed. The couple had been members of the Akron Church for more than 10 years.

''It's really amazing that this is a deaf-owned church. It shows that deaf people can help lead other people to Christ to be saved,'' said Tom McMullen, who owns a local dental lab. ''Our doors are open to everyone. We love hearing people too.''

The Deaf Outreach Church started as a ministry at Akron Baptist Temple. In September 2004, the leaders of that ministry the Rev. Darwin Smith and the Rev. Kevin Smith (who are not related) felt God calling them to establish an independent nondenominational church.

Its initial 22 members met in the family center at Parkside Church, then Harvest Bible Church, on South Arlington Road. In October, the congregation dedicated the last Sunday for a special collection to raise the $30,000 needed for the down payment on its new church at 2200 Greensburg Road.

''Some people said it would be impossible. Some said we would only get a little money,'' said the Rev. Darwin Smith, senior pastor. ''But God moved in a mighty way, and we collected $36,000. This building is a big blessing from the Lord, and it has shown us that with God nothing is impossible.''

Calling to serve

Smith, who is hearing, began his journey into ministry with the deaf 18 years ago when he was hired for the outreach ministry at Akron Baptist Temple. He made a conscious decision to live in a deaf world 28 years ago, when he married his wife, Shirley, who is deaf.

In addition to pastoring the church, Smith works as a sign-language interpreter at Kent State University.

The Rev. Kevin Smith, who serves as administrative pastor, and his wife, Jodi, are both deaf. The chemical engineer typically delivers a sermon in American Sign Language once a month. A voice interpreter communicates his message to the hearing.

The Rev. Darwin Smith delivers sermons using voice and sign language. He said in addition to focusing on spiritual growth, the church is meant to be a place of empowerment for the deaf and hearing impaired.

''There's only one thing a deaf person can't do and that's hear. Our goal here is to enable the deaf community to get involved in serving the Lord,'' Smith said. ''In America, there are more than 3 million deaf people, and we estimate that there are 12,000 to 15,000 deaf and hard-to-hear people in the Akron-Canton area. That's a huge mission field.''

Suzanne McMullen, who works as an American Sign Language instructor at the University of Akron and Malone University, agrees that the church gives deaf people opportunities to serve in leadership roles and helps inspire them.

''The Deaf Outreach Church is a wonderful place where the deaf can worship God and fellowship with other deaf people with no barriers,'' Suzanne McMullen said. ''We accept anyone, regardless of their religious background.''

The nondenominational church offers a 10 a.m. Sunday worship service and a Wednesday Bible study at 6:30 p.m. Future plans for the church include a Deaf Outreach Center that will provide counseling, youth outreach, seniors programs, interpreting services, a food pantry and other services.

''We have a great vision of impacting the deaf community for Christ,'' Smith said. ''The Lord showed us a miracle when he made a way for us to purchase this building, and we plan to reach as many people as we can, both deaf and hearing, with the Gospel of Christ.''

For more information about the Deaf Outreach Church, go to http://www.deafoutreach.com.

Colette Jenkins can be reached at 330-996-3731 or cjenkins@thebeaconjournal.com.

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News Headline: Arts festival to feature Kent Stark students, faculty | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. — Kent State University Stark Campus' Interfaith Campus Ministry will present a Festival of the Arts featuring the talents of students and faculty from the fine arts programs from 5 to 8 p.m. March 19 in the Kent State Stark Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township.

The event will include a wide display of student artwork and an opportunity for younger attendees to work with clay art in the studio. Creative writing students will be accompanied by the jazz ensemble for a combined musical and verbal arts performance and music technology students will give hands-on demonstrations on the lab equipment. Refreshments will be available during the evening.

Tickets are free with current ID for KSU Stark and Stark State College students and children 8 years and younger. For all others, tickets are $10 each. For tickets and information, visit www.stark.kent.edu/FestivalOfTheArts. Proceeds from the event will benefit scholarships for students in fine arts programs.

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News Headline: KSU Stark to host county college fair | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Independent, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. — Kent State University at Stark will host the 2011 Stark County Spring College Fair from 6 to 7:30 p.m March 8 in The University Center, 6000 Frank Ave. NW in Jackson Township.

The event is free and open to the public. No reservations are required.

With more than 50 colleges and universities represented, the college fair is an ideal event for high school students who are interested in pre-college programs or attending a college after high school, as well as prospective non-traditional students looking for degree options and information.

In addition to speaking to college and university representatives, guests can learn more about securing financial assistance during a free lecture “Funding Your Education” which begins at 6:15 p.m. Students and parents can learn more about pre-college program opportunities including post-secondary enrollment options during a special discussion that begins at 6:45 p.m.

For more information about the event or either special session, contact William Casterlow at 330-244-3250 or wcasterl@kent.edu or visit www.stark.kent.edu/collegefair.

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News Headline: Haute history: Fashion museums are well-suited for style mavens | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Louisville Courier-Journal - Online
Contact Name: Beth J. Harpaz
News OCR Text: Kent State University Museum's eight galleries feature changing exhibitions of work by many of the world's artists and designers. (Dan Maxwell/Kent State University Museum)

An Alexander McQueen design at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Chris Moore/Catwalking.com) / /

For an appreciation of modern fashion, visit HerScene.com

Boohoo, so you didn't get a front-row seat for New York Fashion Week!

Fortunately, for fashionistas who love couture but can't afford to buy it, there are many museums in the United States and abroad where you can get your fashion fix without having to present credentials at the door.

Fashion museums and costume institutes offer close-up looks at contemporary designers and cutting-edge trends, as well as classic styles and fashion history. These collections of clothing, accessories and textiles can be found not only in style capitals like New York, Los Angeles and Paris, but also in unexpected places like Indianapolis and Antwerp, Belgium.

In Manhattan, a gem that deserves to be better known — especially among tourists with an interest in fashion — is The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, at 27th Street and Seventh Avenue in the trendy Chelsea neighborhood.

The Museum at FIT has special exhibits as well as a rotating themed show selected from its permanent collection of 50,000 objects dating to the 1700s. Through May 10, the museum's first-floor Fashion and Textile History Gallery presents “His and Hers,” a look at 100 items exploring the relationship between gender and fashion.

The exhibit ranges from side-by-side displays of men's and women's outfits from the 1700s and 1800s to business suits from the 1980s. The women's power suit on display from that era, by Yves Saint Laurent, has the requisite blouse with pussycat bow, matching skirt and blazer. Other highlights include a Don Johnson outfit from the “Miami Vice” era and a 1945 zoot suit.

Through April 2 at The Museum at FIT, the “Japan Fashion Now” exhibit looks at contemporary Japanese fashion, from Lolita fashions — sugary-pink little-girl styles for young women that also have a black Gothic Lolita iteration — to the gauzy, flowing Forest Girl look.

Elsewhere in Manhattan, The Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fifth Avenue and 82nd Street, is gearing up for a major exhibition, “Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty,” May 4-July 31. The show will look at the late designer's career, from his first collection in 1992, when he was in his early 20s, to designs that made their debut on the runway after his suicide last year. His work ranged from romantic to audaciously edgy.

In Los Angeles, the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising, 919 S. Grand Ave., has an “Annual Art of Motion Picture Costume Design” show during Oscars season. Costumes from more than 20 movies from 2010 are on display through April 30.

At L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art, “Rodarte: States of Matter” looks at more than 20 pieces from fashion and costume designers Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte, a brand known for unusual and elaborate use of textiles. The show includes original ballet costumes designed by Rodarte for the movie “Black Swan.”

Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, is home to a school of fashion design and merchandising, and the focus of the university's museum is on fashion and textiles, though the collection also includes decorative arts. Exhibits often feature works by renowned designers. A show of costumes worn by the late actress Katharine Hepburn is on display through Sept. 4.

The Indianapolis Museum of Art, 4000 Michigan Road, has a dedicated fashion and textile arts exhibition space that usually highlights the museum's collection of 7,000 fabric and fashion-arts items, which range from couture to antique silks and lace. “Material World,” which opens April 22, examines how extravagant ornamentation of textiles and personal adornment relate to wealth, status and power. The show will include a Buddhist bone apron, Dior and Chanel designs, and items made from luxurious materials including fur and semiprecious stones.

In Florence, Italy, the Salvatore Ferragamo Museum, located in Palazzo Spini Ferroni, looks at the history of the famous footwear company and its founder.

Paris is home to two fashion museums, though the Musee Galliera is closed for renovation until next year. The other, Les Arts Decoratifs, at 107 rue de Rivoli, is a branch of the Louvre that also houses other design-related items like furniture. Through May 8 is a show on the fashion of the 1990s.

In Antwerp, the Mode Museum (MoMu) at Nationalestraat 28 has “Unravel: Knitwear in Fashion,” March 16-Aug. 14. The exhibit looks at knit garments from classic Schiaparelli and Chanel items to knits in avant-garde, everyday and contemporary designs.

Toronto is home to the Bata Shoe Museum, at 327 Bloor St. West. The building is designed to resemble a lid resting on an open box. Exhibits range from contemporary footwear to historic artifacts, from ancient Egyptian sandals to moon boots.

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News Headline: Frost the glass in your windows with the flick of a switch | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Orange County Register - Online
Contact Name: ROSEMARY SADEZ FRIEDMANN
News OCR Text: Often in this space I've talked about how to cover windows with draperies, shutters, blinds or other privacy/sun-blocking devices. But never have I talked about electric privacy glass. Well, I did mention it many years ago when the product was new, but a deeper explanation is now required since this electric glass is gaining popularity.

What is it, anyway? Well, first of all, it is glass, just like the glass windows in your house. You can see out and those who are outside can see in.

What makes it different is that with the flip of a switch, the glass changes from clear to frosted, offering privacy while still allowing the light in.

How does it work? The secret is in the layers.

First, there is an outer layer of glass or polycarbonate, then an adhesive interlayer followed by liquid-crystal film. Then there is another adhesive interlayer and, finally, another outer layer of glass or polycarbonate.

Sounds complicated, so let's delve into this a little more. It is the liquid-crystal film that affords the transition between clear and frosted.

This same technology has been used in digital watches and computer screens for years. Liquid crystals are sandwiched between two layers of transparent conductive film to make the privacy film.

That film is laminated between the two pieces of glass by the glass manufacturer. When electricity is applied to the film at the flick of a switch, the liquid crystals line up and the window is clear. When the power is turned off, the liquid crystals return to their normal positions and turn the glass from clear to frosted.

The dispersed liquid crystals were invented at Kent State University in 1983. But it wasn't until a joint venture was made between 3M and Viracon that the liquid-crystal film was actually put together between two panes of glass to become a usable form now called privacy glass. It is also known as smart glass.

So where would you use this privacy/smart glass? Just about anywhere. Consider these possibilities: The shower, the front door, any or all windows in your house, skylights (to calm the noon sun), your office's conference room. You name it – privacy glass can fit the bill.

There are many websites that will provide you with visuals on privacy glass, and some sites even allow for price quotes without any obligation, if you are interested in pursuing this. Simply type in “privacy glass” or “smart glass” in a search engine and get ready to be inundated with information.

Often in this space I've talked about how to cover windows with draperies, shutters, blinds or other privacy/sun-blocking devices. But never have I talked about electric privacy glass. Well, I did mention it many years ago when the product was new, but a deeper explanation is now required since this electric glass is gaining popularity.

What is it, anyway? Well, first of all, it is glass, just like the glass windows in your house. You can see out and those who are outside can see in.

What makes it different is that with the flip of a switch, the glass changes from clear to frosted, offering privacy while still allowing the light in.

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News Headline: Trends in glass | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Abilene Reporter-News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Posted February 25, 2011 at 10:30 p.m.

Often in this space I've talked about how to cover windows with draperies, shutters, blinds or other privacy/sun-blocking devices. But never have I talked about electric privacy glass. Well, I did mention it many years ago when the product was pretty new, but a deeper explanation is now required since this electric glass is gaining popularity.

What is it, anyway? Well, first of all, it is glass, just like the glass windows in your house. You can see out and those who are outside can see in. What makes it different is that with the flip of a switch, the glass changes from clear to translucent, offering privacy while still allowing the light in.

How does it work? The secret is in the layers.

First, there is an outer layer of glass or polycarbonate, then an adhesive interlayer followed by liquid-crystal film. Then there is another adhesive interlayer and, finally, another outer layer of glass or polycarbonate.

Sounds complicated, so let's delve into this a little more. It is the liquid-crystal film that affords the transition between clear and translucent. This same technology has been used in digital watches and computer screens for years. Liquid crystals are sandwiched between two layers of transparent conductive film to make the privacy film.

That film is laminated between the two pieces of glass by the glass manufacturer. When electricity is applied to the film at the flick of a switch, the liquid crystals line up and the window is clear. When the power is turned off, the liquid crystals return to their normal positions and turn the glass from clear to frosted.

The dispersed liquid crystals were invented at Kent State University back in 1983. But it wasn't until a joint venture was made between 3M Company and Viracon that the liquid-crystal film was actually put together between two panes of glass to become a usable form now called privacy glass. It is also known as smart glass.

So where would you use this privacy/smart glass? Just about anywhere. Consider these possibilities: The shower, the front door, any or all windows in your house, skylights (to calm the noon sun), your office's conference room. You name it — privacy glass can fit the bill.

There are many websites that will provide you with visuals on privacy glass, and some sites even allow for price quotes without any obligation, if you are interested in pursuing this. Simply type in "privacy glass" or "smart glass" in a search engine and get ready to be inundated with information.

Rosemary Sadez Friedmann, an interior designer in Naples, Fla., is author of "Mystery of Color." For design inquiries, write to Rosemary at DsgnQuest@aol.com.

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News Headline: NorTech, Crain's Cleveland Business Announce 2011 Innovation Award Winners | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: World Market Media
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Feb. 25, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- NorTech, in partnership with Crain's Cleveland Business, is pleased to announce the winners of its annual Innovation Awards program which honors the achievements of Northeast Ohio's most innovative organizations and leaders.

This year, nine winners have been selected to receive awards, representing innovations from a broad range of technology industries including advanced energy; advanced materials; biosciences; flexible electronics; and instrumentation, controls and electronics.

A panel of distinguished judges from across Northeast Ohio, representing academia, venture capital, private industry and economic development, selected this year's winners. Judges include: Martin Abraham, Founding Dean, College of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, Youngstown State University; Dianne Anderson, Executive Director, Great Lakes Energy Institute, Case Western Reserve University; Dave Baldwin, President, Aquarian Technology Systems, LTD; Stephen Cheng, Dean, College of Polymer Science and Polymer Engineering, University of Akron; Dennis Cocco, Co-Director, GLIDE (The Great Lakes Innovation and Development Enterprise); John Dearborn, President, JumpStart Inc.; Walter E. Horton, Jr., Ph.D.; Vice President for Research and Dean, College of Graduate Studies, NEOUCOM; Max Lewis, Vice President – Global Innovation (Corporate Division), Sherwin-Williams Company; and Kathy Needham, Deputy Chief of the Business Development and Partnership Office, NASA Glenn Research Center.

"NorTech is pleased to recognize some of the most exciting innovations being developed and commercialized in Northeast Ohio," said Rebecca O. Bagley, President and CEO of NorTech. "Many of these success stories were also highlighted earlier this week during President Obama's Small Business Forum in Cleveland. The excitement and civic pride generated from the Forum and NorTech Innovation Awards continues the momentum to revitalize Northeast Ohio's economy."Â

Award winners were recognized last night during an evening ceremony at LaCentre Conference and Banquet Facility in Westlake, Ohio. Â Hiroyuki Fujita, Ph.D., Founder, President & CEO of Quality Electrodynamics (QED), a medical-imaging startup that manufactures and sells state-of-the-art MRI coils worldwide, was the keynote speaker for the evening. Â Dr. Fujita was also the recipient of the 2011 Regional Impact Award, which recognizes a previous NorTech Innovation Award winner who has successfully grown their technology business and received regional and national recognition for their work.

Below is a list of 2011 NorTech Innovation Award winners and descriptions of their innovation.

Aeroclay, Inc.

AeroClay®

AeroClay® composites offer significant value to its customers by providing extremely light weight materials that possess improved and sought after mechanical properties, demonstrating opportunities for energy efficiencies and temperature tolerance, and allowing for variability in form including the ability to be molded into custom shapes. AeroClay®, a platform technology, is made using sustainable, eco-friendly polymers. www.aeroclayinc.com

AllTech Medical Systems America, Inc.

High-Performance Low-Cost Total MRI System

AllTech has created a revolutionary MRI system that improves the capability of existing systems while reducing cost by 30%, thereby increasing global access to this extremely expensive but needed medical technology. Â The company has leveraged the highly skilled biomedical engineering base found in Northeast Ohio with the low cost manufacturing capabilities in China to develop its initial product and is on its way to a successful market entry. www.alltechmedusa.com Â

Ashlawn Energy, LLC

Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries for Energy Storage Solutions

Ashlawn Energy provides energy storage solutions utilizing vanadium redox fuel cell energy storage technology. The vanadium redox energy storage system is a flow battery capable of storing energy in multi-megawatt ranges for durations of hours or days from any available input source such as the grid, or renewable resources, such as wind or solar. The stored energy can be returned to the grid/customer as it is needed. www.ashlawnenergy.com

Echogen Power Systems, Inc.

Advanced Energy Recycling Using a CO2 Based Power Cycle

Echogen has developed a proprietary thermal engine to convert industrial waste heat into electricity, reducing the demand that large power consumers currently place on the grid. Target customers face high energy demands and must satisfy this need cost-effectively while complying with ever-tightening greenhouse emission standards. Echogen's technology allows customers to repurpose their waste heat into electricity reducing fuel cost up to 30%. www.echogen.com

Kent Displays, Inc.

Boogie Boardâ„¢ LCD Writing Tablet

In 2010, Kent Displays introduced its first consumer product utilizing their patented Reflexâ„¢ LCD technology. The Boogie Boardâ„¢ is an electronic writing tablet that only uses power when clearing an image. The Boogie Boardâ„¢ was introduced in early 2010 and soon became a commercial success. The Boogie Boardâ„¢ is available through retail stores such as Brookstoneâ„¢ and Amazonâ„¢ as well as European and Asian outlets. www.kentdisplays.com

MAR Systems Inc.

Sorbsterâ„¢

MAR Systems has developed patented, proprietary processes that remove mercury, arsenic and other heavy metals from industrial water streams through its Sorbsterâ„¢ media. The Sorbsterâ„¢ media works by chemisorbing the contaminants, creating a non-hazardous disposal option, and has demonstrated success that is 20,000 times faster than current technologies. MAR Systems' process establishes a new standard in effectiveness, cost and simplicity. www.marsystemsinc.com

RTI International Metals, Inc.

Continuous Casting Method for Making Titanium Ingots

This innovation allows Titanium ingots to be produced by a continuous casting method – a development that increases productivity by 150% over conventional ingot making processes.  The benefits include a 67% reduction in energy consumption, an 80% cut in processing time and a 30% reduction in total production costs. www.rtiintl.com

The University of Akron

Ultrasonic Rubber Devulcanization Extruder and Technology

The University of Akron has developed a technology that saves the energy typically used to make new rubber by instead creating materials and products through a patented extrusion process that re-processes shoe soles, gaskets, seals, roofing membranes and tires. Â This devulcanized rubber becomes soft, reprocessable and curable. The process does not require the use of any chemicals. www.uakron.edu

VasoStar Inc.

Vibrational Guidewire System for Crossing Chronic Lesions

Chronic total occlusions (or CTOs) are a prevalent vascular disease that remain the 'last frontier' in interventional cardiology. VasoStar has developed an electromagnetic vibrating technology and device that allows clinicians to penetrate CTOs with a single piece of equipment – bypassing invasive surgeries and reducing hospital costs by 50%.

2011 NorTech Innovation finalists include: Aesir Metals, LLC; Altronic, LLC; Biopolymers International, Inc; CleveMed; CODONICS, INC; Flocel Inc.; NASA Glenn Research Center; R.W. Beckett Corp; Sunflower Solutions; Tipton Design and Engineering; and The University of Akron /Kent State University.

For more information about the 2011 NorTech Innovation Award winners, please visit www.crainscleveland.com or www.nortechinnovationawards.org. NorTech is a regional nonprofit technology-based economic development organization serving 21 counties in Northeast Ohio. Â As a catalyst for growing Northeast Ohio's emerging technology industries, NorTech is leading efforts to develop regional innovation clusters that create jobs, attract capital and have a long term, positive economic impact. www.nortech.org

Kelly South

Sr. Director, Communications

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News Headline: KSU administrator gets provost's post in Georgia (Chandler) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A top administrator at
Kent State University will
be a top administrator at a
university in Georgia by the
end of 2011.
Timothy Chandler, senior
associate provost for academic
affairs, will take over
as provost at Kennesaw
State University, 30 miles
northwest of Atlanta, starting
July 11.
At 22,500 students, Kennesaw
State is a little smaller
than Kent State and has
70 degree programs, with intent
to gain more.
“It's a terrific opportunity,”
Chandler said. “It's a growing
place, a lively place.”
Chandler earned $183,750
in 2010 as senior associate
provost at Kent State. Officials
at Kennesaw State said
Chandler will earn $228,000.
Chandler will be leaving
Kent State significantly different
than when he joined
it in 2004 as dean of the College
of the Arts.
In 2009, he became senior
associate provost, a job
that made him a main voice
in some of the academic and
financial reforms of the last
few years. Kent State moved
to a new financial model that
puts colleges in charge of balancing
their own budgets,
and it could soon be easier
for students to switch majors
since administrators began
changing the way students
enroll in core classes.
Chandler, a native of England,
has lived in Kent with
his wife, who's from Canada,
and their two children for the
last 20 years.
“We've made some great
friends not only at the university
but in the community,”
he said. “It's just great people.
They've been very welcoming
to a strange Brit.”
Chandler was among more
than 100 candidates seeking
the Georgia post.

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News Headline: Kennesaw State's new provost starts job in July | Email

News Date: 02/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Contact Name: Diamond, Laura
News OCR Text: The new provost for Kennesaw State University will begin in July, President Daniel Papp said Friday.

Timothy Chandler, the senior associate provost for academic affairs at Kent State University, will serve as Kennesaw's vice president for academic affairs. While at Kent State Chandler developed programs to improve retention and graduation rates and was responsible for a complete revision of the liberal education requirements. Chandler will fill the vacancy created last year when former provost, Lendley Black, stepped down to become chancellor of the University of Minnesota-Duluth. LAURA DIAMOND

Copyright © 2011 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

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News Headline: Kennesaw State selects provost | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Atlanta Journal-Constitution - Online
Contact Name: Laura Diamond
News OCR Text: The new provost for Kennesaw State University will begin in July, President Daniel Papp said Friday.

Timothy Chandler, the senior associate provost for academic affairs at Kent State University, will serve as Kennesaw's vice president for academic affairs.

While at Kent State Chandler developed programs to improve retention and graduation rates and was responsible for a complete revision of the liberal education requirements.

Chandler will fill the vacancy created last year when former provost, Lendley Black, stepped down to become chancellor of the University of Minnesota-Duluth.

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News Headline: Kennesaw State names Chandler provost | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Business Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kennesaw State University named Timothy J. L. Chandler as the institution's new provost and vice president for academic affairs.

Chandler will start July 11. He is the current senior associate provost for academic affairs at Kent State University in Ohio, where he is credited with developing a comprehensive “Student Success Center” designed to increase student academic success and to improve retention and graduation rates. Kennesaw State said. He also was responsible for the complete revision of the university's liberal education requirements.

Prior to becoming senior associate provost in January 2009, Chandler was dean in the College of the Arts at Kent State.

“Dr. Chandler is an accomplished professor, researcher and administrator – a true leader who engages students and works collaboratively with faculty and staff,” Kennesaw State President Daniel S. Papp said in a statement. “He will be a strong asset to KSU as the university continues to increase its national visibility, and we are pleased to appoint him to this critical role.”

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News Headline: Kennesaw State Announces New Provost, Vice President for Academic Affairs (Chandler) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kennesaw Patch
Contact Name: Gaetana Pipia
News OCR Text: Kennesaw State University President Daniel Papp announced Friday the selection of Timothy Chandler as KSU's new provost and vice president for academic affairs, effective July 11 of this year.


A nationwide search for the new provost began in August 2010 following the departure of former provost, Lendley Black, who stepped down in July after being named chancellor of the University of Minnesota-Duluth. Candidates were reviewed by a 20-member provost search committee comprised of faculty, staff, students and a member of the KSU Foundation board of trustees.


Chandler joins KSU from Kent State University in Ohio, where he currently serves as senior associate provost for academic affairs.


“Dr. Chandler is an accomplished professor, researcher and administrator – a true leader who engages students and works collaboratively with faculty and staff,” said Papp. “He will be a strong asset to KSU as the university continues to increase its national visibility, and we are pleased to appoint him to this critical role.”


At Kent State, Chandler is credited with developing a Student Success Center designed to increase academic success and improve retention and graduation rates. He was also responsible for the revision of Kent's liberal education requirements.


As the chief academic officer of the university, Chandler will report directly to the president. The provost also serves as a senior member of the president's leadership team, chairs the university's Deans' Council and leads faculty in strengthening academic programs.


“It is a privilege for me to be joining Kennesaw State,” said Chandler. “The excitement and energy across the campus from the faculty, staff and students is palpable, and I am excited that I have the opportunity to help shape the future for what I see as a truly remarkable institution.”

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News Headline: Kent State and the Fingerhut Factor (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: The resignation of Ohio Chancellor Eric Fingerhut, announced this week, could pave the way for Kent State University to revive renovation plans for the Kent campus.


Last year, university officials pitched the idea of spending $250 million to renovate and upgrade elements of the Kent campus . They proposed paying for those improvements by creating a new student fee that, when fully implemented, would have cost a student taking 12 credit hours per semester $576 each year.


Fingerhut adamantly opposed the fee. He argued the fee did not meet the chief guideline spelled out in his  10-year Strategic Plan for Higher Education  — affordability and access to higher education.


In his resignation letter to Gov. John Kasich, Fingerhut reiterated that priority.


"Our challenge these past four years has not been to build new institutions, though we have built facilities and altered institutional mandates where needed," Fingerhut wrote. "Rather, our challenge has been to focus our extraordinary higher education infrastructure on helping Ohioans meet the challenges and opportunities of today's global, knowledge based economy."


But Fingerhut's departure could lead to the appointment of a new Ohio chancellor much more accepting of Kent State's fee-based renovation plan.


Kent State University President Lester Lefton said in a December interview the renovation plans are on hold until the state releases its budget in March and the university learns how much state support it will lose for 2011.


Still, Lefton also said they are considering other options for renovating the campus — including making the same improvements at a much slower pace — and that he remains committed to "fixing" the Kent campus.


"We have needed renovations that have to take place," Lefton said. "It's just a matter of when, not if."


Fingerhut served as chancellor for four years. In wishing Fingerhut well, Ohio Board of Regents Chairman James M. Tuschman pointed to the outgoing chancellor's accomplishments in a statement released this week.


Tops on Tuschman's list: cost-cutting efforts. In his first two points, Tuschman credited Fingerhut with "creating operational efficiencies and low-cost options for students to make college more affordable," and for "championing a two-year tuition freeze on all public community college and university campuses during his first two years as chancellor, and then limiting tuition increases to no more than 3.5 percent over the next two years."


Whether or not the departure of Fingerhut — who was appointed by former governor Ted Strickland — revives talk of a student-fee to renovate the Kent campus remains to be seen. One element to watch for is whether Kasich's appointment to the chancellor's office is a budget hawk or a big spender.


Columbus Business First reported this morning that Kasich has tapped former Ohio Attorney General Jim Petro as chancellor.


It's unclear how Petro will manage serving as the head of higher education for the state's public universities. His career has revolved mostly around his expertise as an attorney, but he has held public office before in Cuyahoga County as a commissioner. He ran unsuccessfully for governor in 2006.

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News Headline: Kent State student Justin Pierce was invited to participate in President Obama's Forum last Tuesday | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent, Ohio — Kent State University student Justin Pierce was invited to participate in President Barack Obama's “Winning the Future Forum on Small Business” on Feb. 22, in Cleveland at the Wolstein Center. Pierce was one of a few students on a panel discussing youth issues.

“I woke up on Thursday morning last week, and within 15 minutes, I was on the phone with the White House, giving my information for a background check,” Pierce said. “I was completely shocked, and the excitement didn't set in for a while after. Hundreds of things race through my mind when I think of what I'm going to say as I shake the president's hand.”

The university was also represented by Kent State President Lester A. Lefton, who received a White House invitation.

According to a White House press release, the “Winning the Future Forum on Small Business” was an opportunity for President Obama and his economic team to hear directly from small business owners and leaders about their ideas for how America can continue to grow the economy, put Americans back to work and win the future.

Pierce serves as executive director of Kent State's Undergraduate Student Government. The senior finance major introduced Lefton before the university president delivered his fourth annual State of the University address last September.

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News Headline: Macedonia resident featured in KSU dance recital in new facility | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance presents junior and senior dance majors performing in Infinity ~ 3.14: BFA Senior Dance Concert and Student Dance Festival Concert.

The concert takes place on March 11 and 12 at 8 p.m., and March 12 and 13 at 2 p.m. in EZ Theatre in the Roe Green Center for the School of Theatre and Dance at 1325 Theatre Drive in Kent.

This collaborative concert will offer audience members the opportunity to see works with seventeen different and exciting artistic visions in dance, music and choreographic explorations in the new, state-of-the-art Louis O. Erdmann and William H. Zucchero Theatre (EZ Theatre).

Tickets are $16 adults, $12 seniors, and $8 students with valid ID. The box office is located in the lobby of the Roe Green Center at 1325 Theatre Drive. Hours are noon to 5 p.m. weekdays, and one hour prior to curtain on show days. Visa, MasterCard, Discover, personal checks and cash are accepted. Contact the box office at 330-672-2497 or online at www.dance.kent.edu.

This concert marks the first student-choreography production in the EZ Theatre in the Roe Green Center for the School of Theatre and Dance. This new performing venue for the School of Theatre and Dance will showcase the choreography of dance major and minors, as well as dance education majors.

Guest choreographer Richard Brandon Hall, along with student lighting designers from the Theatre Division, will help in presenting this collaborative concert. Graduating majors in dance performance and choreography Amanda Black, Tamara Landry, and Macedonia native Katie Naso present works which explore individual and diverse meanings with a focus on modern dance. Black's work, inspired by the quote, "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain," is about making personal choices that others try to undermine. Landry's piece explores seven different phases of her life as a dance artist. This piece focuses on her exploration of various techniques, her struggles, and, ultimately, the celebration of dance. Naso's work concentrates on the extremely difficult situation a couple faces when they come to the realization that their life's paths have become divergent.

The graduating seniors will also perform a new dance choreographed and directed by Dance Division guest choreographer Richard Brandon Hall, providing them with an opportunity to perform together for a final time. In this new work, entitled The Encounter with Angels, Hall explores his relationship with his deceased great-grandmother and the impact she had on his life. Incorporating personal experiences from the dancers, Hall will pay homage to those who have come before and now watch over life's continuing journey.

Along with the three BFA senior choreographers and guest artist Richard Brandon Hall, 13 junior choreographers, comprised of dance performance and choreography majors and dance education majors, will premiere works representing various styles and artistic visions.

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News Headline: Macedonia resident featured in KSU dance recital in new facility | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Photos special to Record Publishing Co. Macedonia native Katie Naso, far right, dances with, from left Jessica Mego, Sammi Weinmann, Sharon Kriz, Amanda Black, and Lindsay Chmielowiec

Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance presents junior and senior dance majors performing in Infinity ~ 3.14: BFA Senior Dance Concert and Student Dance Festival Concert.

The concert takes place on March 11 and 12 at 8 p.m., and March 12 and 13 at 2 p.m. in EZ Theatre in the Roe Green Center for the School of Theatre and Dance at 1325 Theatre Drive in Kent.

This collaborative concert will offer audience members the opportunity to see works with seventeen different and exciting artistic visions in dance, music and choreographic explorations in the new, state-of-the-art Louis O. Erdmann and William H. Zucchero Theatre (EZ Theatre).

Tickets are $16 adults, $12 seniors, and $8 students with valid ID. The box office is located in the lobby of the Roe Green Center at 1325 Theatre Drive. Hours are noon to 5 p.m. weekdays, and one hour prior to curtain on show days. Visa, MasterCard, Discover, personal checks and cash are accepted. Contact the box office at 330-672-2497 or online at www.dance.kent.edu.

This concert marks the first student-choreography production in the EZ Theatre in the Roe Green Center for the School of Theatre and Dance. This new performing venue for the School of Theatre and Dance will showcase the choreography of dance major and minors, as well as dance education majors.

Guest choreographer Richard Brandon Hall, along with student lighting designers from the Theatre Division, will help in presenting this collaborative concert. Graduating majors in dance performance and choreography Amanda Black, Tamara Landry, and Macedonia native Katie Naso present works which explore individual and diverse meanings with a focus on modern dance. Black's work, inspired by the quote, "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain," is about making personal choices that others try to undermine. Landry's piece explores seven different phases of her life as a dance artist. This piece focuses on her exploration of various techniques, her struggles, and, ultimately, the celebration of dance. Naso's work concentrates on the extremely difficult situation a couple faces when they come to the realization that their life's paths have become divergent.

The graduating seniors will also perform a new dance choreographed and directed by Dance Division guest choreographer Richard Brandon Hall, providing them with an opportunity to perform together for a final time. In this new work, entitled The Encounter with Angels, Hall explores his relationship with his deceased great-grandmother and the impact she had on his life. Incorporating personal experiences from the dancers, Hall will pay homage to those who have come before and now watch over life's continuing journey.

Along with the three BFA senior choreographers and guest artist Richard Brandon Hall, 13 junior choreographers, comprised of dance performance and choreography majors and dance education majors, will premiere works representing various styles and artistic visions.

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News Headline: Macedonia resident featured in KSU dance recital in new facility | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Photos special to Record Publishing Co. Macedonia native Katie Naso, far right, dances with, from left Jessica Mego, Sammi Weinmann, Sharon Kriz, Amanda Black, and Lindsay Chmielowiec.

Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance presents junior and senior dance majors performing in Infinity ~ 3.14: BFA Senior Dance Concert and Student Dance Festival Concert.

The concert takes place on March 11 and 12 at 8 p.m., and March 12 and 13 at 2 p.m. in EZ Theatre in the Roe Green Center for the School of Theatre and Dance at 1325 Theatre Drive in Kent.

This collaborative concert will offer audience members the opportunity to see works with seventeen different and exciting artistic visions in dance, music and choreographic explorations in the new, state-of-the-art Louis O. Erdmann and William H. Zucchero Theatre (EZ Theatre).

Tickets are $16 adults, $12 seniors, and $8 students with valid ID. The box office is located in the lobby of the Roe Green Center at 1325 Theatre Drive. Hours are noon to 5 p.m. weekdays, and one hour prior to curtain on show days. Visa, MasterCard, Discover, personal checks and cash are accepted. Contact the box office at 330-672-2497 or online at www.dance.kent.edu.

This concert marks the first student-choreography production in the EZ Theatre in the Roe Green Center for the School of Theatre and Dance. This new performing venue for the School of Theatre and Dance will showcase the choreography of dance major and minors, as well as dance education majors.

Guest choreographer Richard Brandon Hall, along with student lighting designers from the Theatre Division, will help in presenting this collaborative concert. Graduating majors in dance performance and choreography Amanda Black, Tamara Landry, and Macedonia native Katie Naso present works which explore individual and diverse meanings with a focus on modern dance. Black's work, inspired by the quote, "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain," is about making personal choices that others try to undermine. Landry's piece explores seven different phases of her life as a dance artist. This piece focuses on her exploration of various techniques, her struggles, and, ultimately, the celebration of dance. Naso's work concentrates on the extremely difficult situation a couple faces when they come to the realization that their life's paths have become divergent.

The graduating seniors will also perform a new dance choreographed and directed by Dance Division guest choreographer Richard Brandon Hall, providing them with an opportunity to perform together for a final time. In this new work, entitled The Encounter with Angels, Hall explores his relationship with his deceased great-grandmother and the impact she had on his life. Incorporating personal experiences from the dancers, Hall will pay homage to those who have come before and now watch over life's continuing journey.

Along with the three BFA senior choreographers and guest artist Richard Brandon Hall, 13 junior choreographers, comprised of dance performance and choreography majors and dance education majors, will premiere works representing various styles and artistic visions.

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News Headline: Joint Historical, Civil War societies to meet | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Joint Historical, Civil War societies

meeting planned for March 8

Kent State University Associate Professor and Archivist Stephen Paschen will present "History Begins at Home: Why Local History is Vital to our National History" at a joint meeting with the Civil War Society March 8 at 7:30 p.m. at Old Town Hall. Paschen is a member of the Ohio Historical Society Board and a longtime curator and executive director of the Summit County Historical Society.

Refreshments will be served. Guests are asked to park at Key Bank where an auxiliary police officer will assist in escorting them across the Circle.

Upcoming meetings:

* April 5 -- Board meeting, 7:30 p.m. All officers, executive board and appointees to attend. The Nominating Committee report will be presented.

* April 30 -- Annual dinner meeting at The Rose at Erie Station Grille, which will include the election of officers.

Open houses are scheduled for March 27 and May 1 from 2 to 4 p.m. at Old Town Hall, the Museum and the Historic Church on Tallmadge Circle. On May 30 from 2 to 4 p.m., The Schenkenberger House, 35 Southwest Ave., which has undergone restoration, will be open as well. All buildings will be open from 2 to 4 p.m. June 26.

As always, there is no charge for admission at any of these events.

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News Headline: Public broadcasters in Northeast Ohio says loss of federal funding would be devastating | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: These are nervous times at the area's public broadcasting stations. The budget bill passed this month by the U.S. House of Representatives would cut $61 billion in federal spending, including the $430 million allocated to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

About 70 percent of that CPB money is channeled to the nation's public radio and television stations. And Northeast Ohio's public broadcasters say the loss of that funding would have a devastating effect.

"We're obviously very concerned," said Jerry Wareham, the president and chief executive officer of Ideastream, the corporate umbrella over Cleveland's WVIZ Channel 25 and WCPN FM/90.3.

"In this environment, every program should and must undergo some degree of review and scrutiny. There's nothing wrong with that. But this funding is so integral to how the system works, its loss would fundamentally change the character of the system."

Backers of the cuts cite a number of issues, ranging from deficit reduction and alleged liberal bias in some programming to a belief that broadcasting should be subject to market conditions. Supporters of public broadcasting have an equally diverse array of arguments in favor, and say the system produces education-based programming unavailable anywhere else.

Ideastream receives a little more than $2 million a year from the CPB -- $1.7 million for Channel 25 and $370,000 for WCPN. That represents about 10 percent of its $19.75 million annual unrestricted operating budget. The rest of the money for public stations comes from membership drives, corporate and foundation grants and state funds, sources that also tend to shrink in a bad economy.

"People ask me, 'Why do you care so much? It's only 10 percent of your budget,' " Wareham said. "My answer is that I'm about 5-foot-10-inches tall, and if I were 10 percent shorter, I would be about 5-foot-3. You would notice that.

"It doesn't mean I would disappear, but I would be diminished. I would be less noticeable."

The concerns among area public broadcasting executives range from the system being seriously diminished to being endangered.

Nationally, CPB funds represent 15 percent of public stations' annual operating budgets. At stations in large cities or with substantial endowments, that figure can be as low as 7 percent. At stations in small cities and rural areas, it can be as high as 40 percent.

Kent-based Western Reserve Public Media (WNEO Channel 45/WEAO Channel 49) receives $900,000 a year from the CPB. That represents 18 percent of its $5 million annual operating budget.

Trina Cutter
"We pay $1.2 million a year to PBS for programming, so if we don't get that $900,000, we're short," said Trina Cutter, Western Reserve's president and chief executive officer. "Try sawing off one of the legs of your table. If you saw off one of those legs, you wouldn't be able to carry anything of weight on it. It would fall. And that's what I'm afraid is going to happen."

Cutter isn't afraid of just individual stations falling without CPB funds. She's worried about the whole public broadcasting system going down.

"The falling-domino effect will be devastating," Cutter said. "If we don't get the CPB money, we don't pay the PBS bill. We don't pay the PBS bill, we don't get PBS programming. And if we don't get PBS programming, it's not as if there are discretionary funds to get programming from somewhere else."

There would be more falling dominoes out there.

"The ongoing regular operating support is 10 percent, but that doesn't begin to tell the whole story," Wareham said. "CPB grants pay for all kinds of individual initiatives. They help fund national programs like 'Nova,' 'Sesame Street' and 'Masterpiece.' They pay for the interconnection that ties the entire system together and allows us to exchange programs.

"The funding is seminal, not only because it's often the basis and the stimulus for additional funding, but because it's the glue that holds the system together."

The loss of CPB funding would create a double-edge sword, undercutting public broadcasting in two directions. If more public stations can't pay for national programming, the cost of that programming will go up for others. And without CPB support of that programming, the cost again must increase.

Mark Urycki
"If they raise the prices for the shows, fewer stations will able to afford them," said Mark Urycki, program director at Kent public radio station WKSU FM/89.7. "And then they'll need to raise the prices even more, just to produce the show. Then the downward spiral is deadly."

WKSU receives $354,000 a year from the CPB, about 9 percent of its $4 million budget.

The elimination of CPB funding is far from certain. The budget battle moves to the Senate this week, and the White House version of the budget includes funding for public broadcasting. But if the cuts go through, the outlook will be bleak for many, if not all, public stations.

"We are such a lean operation, we just don't have a lot of waste here," Urycki said. "It would be a killer to overcome, because there's not another revenue stream out there right now. Our listeners have been very generous, but our corporate underwriting support has shrunk dramatically over the last two years."

That's the problem for many public stations -- no realistic financial options.

"We don't have an endowment," Cutter said. "We're restricted from taking advertising dollars by the FCC. The underwriting money has dried up. I'm trying to look at what our options are, and it's a scary place to be."

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