Report Overview:
Total Clips (37)
Alumni (1)
Athletics (6)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Dining Services (2)
Economic Impact; Town-Gown (1)
English (2)
Fashion Design (2)
KSU at E. Liverpool (4)
KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (3)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Trumbull (4)
KSU at Trumbull; Student Success (2)
KSU Museum (1)
KSU Museum; Women's Studies Program (1)
LGBT Studies (1)
Psychology (2)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Town-Gown (1)
University Communications and Marketing; Visual Communication Design (VCD); WKSU-FM (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
KSU grad documents history of the Gradall 03/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Athletics (6)
Kent State basketball coach Geno Ford leaving for Bradley (Nielsen) 03/28/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Basketball coach Geno Ford leaves Kent State for Bradley (Ford) 03/28/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

BRADLEY'S NEWEST BRAVE (Nielsen) 03/26/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

KSU coach Geno Ford weighing job offers (Ashby) 03/27/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Head Coach Geno Ford leaving KSU (Ford) 03/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State confirmed today that Geno Ford has been given permission to interview at another school. 03/27/2011 Daily Record, The Text Attachment Email

It was also confirmed that Ford was out of town on Friday and Saturday meeting with representatives of another school. While nobody would confirm the...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Health departments seek closer ties with Kent State University (Slenkovich, James) 03/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Dining Services (2)
Vegan Iron Chef III 03/25/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

WHO: Standing Rock Cultural Arts with cooperation of Kent State University Dining Services presents... WHAT: 3rd Annual Vegan Iron Chef Competition -In conjunction with The Annual "Who's...

Annual "Who's Your Mama?" Environmental Films & Presentations 03/26/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...Conservation 4. Multi-Media Environmental Education (Films, Music, Dance, etc.) Other events include the Vegan Iron Chef III, a competition held at the Kent State University Student Center in Dining Services and a block party on Main Street and The Home Savings Plaza. Full schedule can be found...


Economic Impact; Town-Gown (1)
Kent's 2010 Income Tax Revenue Hints at Recovery 03/25/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...of a culvert beneath Mogadore Road as part of the construction at Plum Creek Park . Still, the one stabilizing factor that can't be ignored is Kent State University . About 3,000 of the university's 5,000 employees work at the Kent campus. The contribution of Ohio's second-largest...


English (2)
April Gallery Open Poetry Reading hosted by Maj Ragain (Ragain) 03/25/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...until Fall 2011 ABOUT MAJ RAGAIN: Maj Ragain, one of the premiere poetic writers of our fair city of Kent and professor of English and writing at Kent State University hosts the monthly gallery Open Poetry Readings during the school year at The North Water Street Gallery. Dr. Major...

Annual Jawbone Poetry Festival with Maj Ragain (Ragain) 03/26/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...Summit Street -SAT, MAY 7, 8 PM - North Water Street Gallery -SUN, MAY 8, 2 PM - Poetry Potluck in Yard next to gallery Thanks to Maj Ragain, the Kent State University poetry professor who continues to be a creative driving force in our community! The gallery will be hosting the annual...


Fashion Design (2)
Kent State to Honor Ferragamo with Degree 03/28/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State to bestow honorary degree to fashion empire CEO, Leonardo Ferragamo 03/27/2011 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State University to Bestow Honorary Degree to Fashion Empire CEO, Leonardo Ferragamo Ceremony will also include Ferragamo's Induction...


KSU at E. Liverpool (4)
TIRE FUN 03/26/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

East End resident Gabrielle Dawson, 4, enjoyed the new playhouse at the Klondike Playground on Thursday. As a community service project, Kent State University students spent the week making playground upgrades and repairs. The effort will be featured in Sunday's Riverstyle. (Photo...

Students work so others can play (Maze) 03/26/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

EAST LIVERPOOL - About 45 Kent State University students have been sleeping in a classroom at the East Liverpool campus this week while volunteering to...

TIRE FUN 03/26/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

East End resident Gabrielle Dawson, 4, enjoyed the new playhouse at the Klondike Playground on Thursday. As a community service project, Kent State University students spent the week making playground upgrades and repairs. The effort will be featured in Sunday's Riverstyle. (Photo...

With a little help from our friends (Esterly) 03/27/2011 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

Kent State students help spruce up city's playgrounds EAST LIVERPOOL - The city's playgrounds got a much needed facelift this past week thanks...


KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (3)
$364K in US Appalachian funds asked for county work 03/25/2011 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

...behavioral medicine program. - County Airport Authority, seeking $43,555 as part of a $871,087 project to resurface and rehabilitate runways. - Kent State University, East Liverpool campus, seeking $51,005 as part of a $102,010 project to upgrade the nursing lab. - County Career Center,...

County eyes ARC funding 03/25/2011 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

...behavioral medicine program. - County Airport Authority, seeking $43,555 as part of a $871,087 project to resurface and rehabilitate runways. - Kent State University, East Liverpool campus, seeking $51,005 as part of a $102,010 project to upgrade the nursing lab. - County Career Center,...

$364K in US Appalachian funds asked for county work 03/25/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...behavioral medicine program. - County Airport Authority, seeking $43,555 as part of a $871,087 project to resurface and rehabilitate runways. - Kent State University, East Liverpool campus, seeking $51,005 as part of a $102,010 project to upgrade the nursing lab. - County Career Center,...


KSU at Stark (1)
Business calendar - Week of March 27, 2011 03/27/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Tuesday 2011 Stark County Entrepreneur Experience 7:30 to 9:30 a.m., Kent State University Stark University Center, 6000 Frank Ave. NW


KSU at Trumbull (4)
Kent State University Trumbull campus is helping 170 female high schoolers in Trumbull County with career choices. 03/25/2011 First News at 7 AM - WYFX-TV Text Email

Kent State University Trumbull campus is helping 170 female high schoolers in Trumbull County with career choices. The university is hosing...

Kent State University hosted a career conference today 03/25/2011 First News at 5 PM - WKBN-TV Text Email

Kent State University hosted a career conference today at their Trumbull branch and is was just for female high school sophomores. The girls...

State Senator Talks About House Vote For Senate Bill 5 (Golden) 03/27/2011 WYTV - Online Text Attachment Email

...right now with the financial crisis, and hopefully in better times we can not have to go through something like this, " said Shawn Golden, a professor at Kent State University's East Liverpool campus. "But right now I think everybody's affected. So wait and see what happens." Wilson said, the...

State Senator Talks About House Vote For Senate Bill 5 (Golden) 03/27/2011 WKBN-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...right now with the financial crisis, and hopefully in better times we can not have to go through something like this, " said Shawn Golden, a professor at Kent State University's East Liverpool campus. "But right now I think everybody's affected. So wait and see what happens." Wilson said, the...


KSU at Trumbull; Student Success (2)
KSU Encourages Non-Traditional Careers for Girls (Schneider) 03/25/2011 WKBN-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University hosted a career conference Friday at its Trumbull branch just for high school sophomore girls. The girls were encouraged...

KSU Encourages Non-Traditional Careers for Girls (Schneider) 03/25/2011 WYTV - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University hosted a career conference Friday at its Trumbull branch just for high school sophomore girls. The girls were encouraged...


KSU Museum (1)
Get Out: Beyond Fashion and Katharine Hepburn 03/25/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Beyond Fashion: Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevedo Where/When: Kent State University Museum , 515 Hilltop Dr., Kent, Higbee Gallery Daily 10 a.m. to 8:45 p.m. until 2012 Why Go: Quevedo is an award-winning...


KSU Museum; Women's Studies Program (1)
Kent State University Museum and KSU Women's Studies Program Partner via Katharine Hepburn Class (Holt, Druesedow) 03/26/2011 PRLog Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's fashion museum's original exhibit on Katharine Hepburn running thru Sept 4, 2011 is being complemented by a special...


LGBT Studies (1)
Film Festival for LGBTQ Benefit Event 03/28/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Psychology (2)
Obesity messes with the brain (Gunstad) 03/28/2011 Science News Text Attachment Email

New Research on Obesity and Brain Function (Gunstad) 03/27/2011 DAILY KOS Text Attachment Email

...difficult to determine how much of that impairment might be due to poor overall health rather than obesity alone. For the current study, John Gunstad of Kent State University in Ohio and his associates selected 150 obese (but otherwise healthy) individuals to voluntarily undergo a battery of...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Dance Ensemble Presents Annual Concert 03/28/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (1)
Kent's Acorn Alley II project springing up 03/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Communications and Marketing; Visual Communication Design (VCD); WKSU-FM (1)
KSU in Spotlight at State Ad Competitions 03/28/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


News Headline: KSU grad documents history of the Gradall | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State University
graduate and former heavy
equipment executive recently
penned a new book telling
the story of a piece of machinery
that helped shape
Ohio's roads.
“The Gradall: A Story of
American Ingenuity,” is a
comprehensive history of the
company that helped build
the Ravenna Arsenal and the
invention that made earthmoving
eaier.
Author James H. Grant,
a former executive at Gradall
Industries, published the
inch-thick volume about the
two brothers who invented
the Gradall, an excavator
with a massive, telescopic
boom.
“The Gradall is an Ohiobuilt
icon of construction
equipment industry and was
a tool in the construction of
the Ohio Turnpike and many
other major highway projects,”
Grant said.
The brothers, Ray and
Koop Ferwerda, were from
the Netherlands but moved
to Northeastern Ohio. Ray
Ferwerda lived for some time
with his family in Garrettsville.
In 1940, their construction
company went to Ravenna
to help with 55 miles of road
construction in support of
the new Ravenna Arsenal.
That construction project
held up plans to build
their most notable achievement,
the Gradall, which was
completed in its first form
in 1941.
“During the years prior to
Ray and his family moving to
Garrettsville, he and Koop
conceived an idea where
there was another way to finish
grade the slope of a roadway
with machinery,” Grant
wrote in the book.
Gradall Industries is now
headquartered in New Philadelphia.
Gradall models continue
to dominate the market,
accounting for 40 percent
of wheeled excavators sold to
government agencies.

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News Headline: Kent State basketball coach Geno Ford leaving for Bradley (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Geno Ford, who coached Kent State to consecutive regular-season Mid-American Conference titles, has been named the next head coach at Bradley University according to the Bradley University website.

This ends a three-year run for Ford that also saw him lead the Golden Flashes to two postseason tournament trips to the NIT, where Kent was a combined 3-2 over the past two seasons.

Kent finished its season last Tuesday with an 81-74 NIT loss at top-seeded Colorado that ended Kent's season at 25-12. The Flashes were 12-4 in MAC play.

Ford was named the conference's Coach of the Year for the second straight season and leaves Kent after three years with a combined 68-37 record.

Neither Ford nor KSU Athletic Director Joel Neilsen returned phone calls Sunday night. Yet, on the Bradley site, Ford is quoted as saying: "I am ecstatic to work at such a great institution with such a rich basketball history."

The Braves, coached by former Cleveland State guard Jim Les, finished last season at 12-20 overall and 4-14 in the Missouri Valley Conference.

Bradley is in Peoria, Ill.

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News Headline: Basketball coach Geno Ford leaves Kent State for Bradley (Ford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Less than a week after leading the Kent State men's basketball team to the quarterfinals of the National Invitation Tournament, third-year coach Geno Ford wrapped up a whirlwind weekend of entertaining other coaching offers by accepting an invitation Sunday night to become the 13th head coach at Bradley University.

Although rumors floated over the weekend and intensified Sunday that the two-time Mid-American Conference Coach of the Year was serious about looking elsewhere, it was surprising how quickly the Bradley deal was done. The school announced the hiring on its website about 9:30 p.m. Sunday, noting Ford would be formally introduced at a noon press conference Monday at the school's Renaissance Coliseum arena.

Although attempts to reach Ford for comment were unsuccessful, Bradley's website quoted the 36-year-old coach as saying, ''I am ecstatic to work at such a great institution with such a rich basketball history. . . .I am excited about the support for our program and the resources we have to achieve at the highest levels.''

Bradley, which is in Peoria, Ill., and competes in the Missouri Valley Conference, went 12-20 last season, with a 4-14 league mark.

In three seasons at the helm of the Kent State program, Ford was 68-37 with a .648 winning percentage. The last two seasons he led the Golden Flashes to back-to-back MAC regular-season titles. In this postseason, the No. 7 seed Flashes knocked off two higher-seeded opponents on the road before falling in the final two minutes to host Colorado Tuesday in the NIT.

In addition to his MAC Coach of the Year awards, Ford was the 2009 NABC District 14 Coach of the Year. Including previous head coaching stints at NAIA Shawnee State (22-10 in 2001-02) and NCAA Division III Muskingum (29-22 in 2005-07), Ford takes a six-year career record of 119-69 (.633) to Bradley.

''Geno Ford met every quality that I was seeking in the head coach of Bradley basketball,'' said Braves Director of Athletics Dr. Michael Cross. ''He has tremendous values, high basketball IQ, is a gifted and charismatic communicator, appreciates the educational quality of Bradley and has demonstrated he is a proven winner time and time again.''

A message for comment left with a KSU athletic spokesman was not returned.

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News Headline: BRADLEY'S NEWEST BRAVE (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WITH FORD OUT THE
DOOR, KSU'S PLAYERS
HOPE FOR SENDEROFF

The meeting to tell Kent
State's stunned men's basketball
players their head
coach had bolted for Bradley
University was scheduled for
10:15 p.m. on Sunday
Those players already
knew.
The news broke on the
Bradley University website
soon after 9:30 p.m., and
word spread like a wildfire
through the roster of the
two-time defending Mid-
American Conference regular-
season champions.
By the time they rolled into
the M.A.C. Center parking lot
just after 10 p.m., the players
were already trying to move
past the feeling that they
were betrayed by now-former
head coach Geno Ford, and
had already started thinking
of the future.
“All I know is I want to play
for only one guy, and that's
Rob Senderoff and the staff
we have here at Kent State,”
said MAC player of the year
Justin Greene. “It's important
to all of us that everything
stays the same. This
team has a chance to be too
good to be broken up.”
While the star center took
on the role of team spokesman,
every player on the roster
echoed the sentiment
“If this staff comes back,
we are going to be very good,”
said Rutgers transfer Pat
Jackson, who will play his
first season with the Flashes
next season. “If coach Senderoff
isn't the head coach,
who knows if some of this
team breaks up.”
Senderoff has been an assistant
at Kent State for
three years under both Ford
and previous head coach Jim
Christian, including three as
associate head coach.
Five of those seasons saw
the Flashes win the regular-
season MAC title, and in
all seven they qualified for a
postseason tournament.
Ford and Christian were,
of course, promoted from
within. The Flashes players
hope first-year athletic director
Joel Nielsen follows
the same blueprint that has
been successful at KSU for
more than a decade.
“If it isn't broken, don't
fix it,” said Greene, who will
be back for his fourth season
next season. “Why not
keep it going? We've won
the last two (regular-season
championships) and probably
60-percent of that was
Geno Ford, and 40-percent
of that was coach Senderoff.
Coach Senderoff has already
been like a head coach
on the court. He is the only
one who can keep this all together.”
The announcement of
Ford's hire caught everyone
at Kent State by surprise.
There were rumors
that a deal could be a few
days away, but nobody expected
to see Ford's face
palstered on the front page
of the Bradley University
website.
At 6:30 p.m. on Sunday,
Ford confirmed to the Record-
Courier he was about
to board a flight to Peoria,
Ill, where the Bradley University
campus is located.
At the time, he said he did
not have a contract offer. By
6:58, a private Cessna Citation
jet left Akron Fulton Airport.
It landed an hour later
in Peoria. Within two hours,
the news of Ford's hire had
been announced.
“I found out about it on
Twitter,” said Greene.
A press conference has
been called for noon today
at the M.A.C. Center where
Nielsen will discuss the future
of the KSU program.
Bradley is expecting 500
attendees at its press conference
today at noon in Peoria

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News Headline: KSU coach Geno Ford weighing job offers (Ashby) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The wooing
of Kent
State Univ
e r s i t y
men's bask
e t b a l l
coach Geno
Ford is under
way.
A KSU
spokesman confirmed on
Saturday the university
granted permission for
Ford to interview at another
school.
According to several
sources, Ford is on the
radar of at least two programs
with coaching vacancies
— Bradley University
of the Missouri Valley
Conference and Fresno
State University of the
Western Athletic Conference.
Another school that
could have an opening in
the not-too-distant future
— the University of Dayton
of the Atlantic 10 — is also
believed to have Ford on its
early list of candidates.
Ford's salary at KSU is
worth $300,000 annually
and expires after the 2014-
15 season. If Ford were to
leave for another program,
he could potentially double
his current salary.
Ford was out of town
Friday and Saturday for
a meeting with a representative
of another program.
While KSU would not
confirm the name of that
school, athletic department
spokesman Alan
Ashby said the university
would never hinder a
coach's ability to look at
another opportunity. As
has been its policy when
schools have asked to
meet with one of its coaches,
KSU granted permission
for Ford to interview.
Fresno State could have
a tough time covering a
buyout in Ford's contract.
Former coach Steve Cleveland
stepped down as head
coach two weeks ago after
a 14-17 campaign.
Fresno State's athletic
director, Tom Boeh, spent
10 years at Ohio University
from 1995 to 2005. Ford
played at Ohio from 1993-
97 and served as an assistant
under Larry Hunter
at the school from 1998-
2001.
The positions at Dayton
and Bradley would allow
Ford to recruit in the
same footprint as KSU if
he were to become head
coach at either school.
However, the Dayton
position is not open yet.
According to published reports
on Saturday, Georgia
Tech has made an offer
to Dayton Flyers coach
Brian Gregory. As of Saturday
night there had
been no announcement of
a hire. Other reports had
Richmond coach Chris
Mooney interviewing for
the Georgia Tech position
this weekend.
Of the three schools,
Dayton offers the best opportunity
to win right away.
The Flyers were 22-14 last
season under Gregory.
Bradley has been looking
for a new head coach
since March 6 when it
fired Jim Les after a nineyear
run at his alma mater.
That included a Sweet
16 appearance in the 2006
NCAA Tournament.
Les was 154-140 at Bradley,
including a 12-20 mark
last season. The Braves attendance
at Carver Arena
also dropped to an average
of 8,447 per game last
year, its lowest mark since
1992-93.
Bradley appears to be
ready to make a serious
commitment to a new
coach who can rebuild the
Braves' program. While
Les reportedly made almost
$420,000 in salary
and benefits during
his final season, Bradley
could be prepared to pay
a new coach more than
$600,000.
Oral Roberts coach
Scott Sutton turned down
an offer believed to be
worth more than $600,000
last week.
If word of the offer is
true, Ford would more
than double his base salary
of $300,000 per year at
KSU, whose enrollment
hovers around 30,000,
while Bradley's fluctuates
between 5,000 and 6,000.
Ford is 68-36 in three
seasons at KSU, including
Mid-American Conference
regular-season championships
in the last two
years. After both seasons,
he was named the league's
Coach of the Year.

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News Headline: Head Coach Geno Ford leaving KSU (Ford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Takes job leading basketball team at Bradley University in Illinois; twice earned MAC honors

Geno Ford, head basketball coach at Kent State University, will become the 13th head coach at Bradley University, a private institution in Peoria, Ill., that university announced Sunday.
Ford, the Mid-American Conference Coach of the Year the past two seasons, will be formally introduced to the public during a press conference at noon today in Bradley's Renaissance Coliseum arena.
“I am ecstatic to work at such a great institution with such a rich basketball history,” Ford said. “The passionate Bradley fan base, academic excellence and exceptional facilities will give us an opportunity to compete at the highest levels of the Missouri Valley Conference.”
In his third season at the helm of the Kent State program, Ford, 36, became the first men's basketball coach to lead his team to consecutive, outright MAC regular-season titles in 48 years. After winning the 2009-10 title with a 13-3 league record, Ford welcomed back only three returning players for the title defense, but successfully navigated the season with 10 newcomers to earn the repeat MAC championship in 2010-11 with a 12-4 conference mark. Denied a trip to the NCAA Tournament after losing in the MAC Tournament championship game, Kent State won NIT contests on both coasts – at Saint Mary's (Calif.) and Fairfield — before dropping an 81-74 decision at No. 1 seed Colorado in the quarterfinals to finish the season with a 25-12 overall record.
Ford produced a 68-37 (.648) record in his three seasons at Kent State, including a 35-13 (.729) ledger in the Mid-American Conference. In addition to his two MAC Coach-of-the-Year Awards, Ford was the 2009 NABC District 14 Coach of the Year.
“Geno Ford met every quality that I was seeking in the head coach of Bradley basketball,” said Dr. Michael Cross, director of athletics. “He has tremendous values, high basketball IQ, is a gifted and charismatic communicator, appreciates the educational quality of Bradley and has demonstrated he is a proven winner time and time again.”

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News Headline: Kent State confirmed today that Geno Ford has been given permission to interview at another school. | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Daily Record, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: It was also confirmed that Ford was out of town on Friday and Saturday meeting with representatives of another school.

While nobody would confirm the school, some sources have confirmed that Ford is on the radar of Fresno State and Bradley. Both schools currently have coaching vacancies. Dayton is also believed to have an early interest in Ford, and that's very early considering the Flyers may not even have an opening yet.

Here's the link to the story that will be in tomorrow's Record-Courier:

http://www.recordpub.com/news/sports_article/5006094

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News Headline: Health departments seek closer ties with Kent State University (Slenkovich, James) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: While Kent, Ravenna and
Portage County's health departments
are just beginning
to study the possibility
of consolidation, officials at
all three agree on one point:
They want to work more
closely with Kent State University.
And officials at KSU's College
of Public Health are on
board.
for health departments to
consult with experts who
work at the college.
“Let's say there's a food
(illness) outbreak in the
city of Kent and a bunch
of residents get sick,” Slenkovich
said. “The local
health department could
come to us, where we have
folks that are trained in epidemiology.
Then our faculty
who have some expertise
can try to pinpoint where
(the outbreak started).”
Mark James, dean of
the college, said he also
hopes to eventually set up
internship programs for
students at local health
departments.
“There are some basic
needs of these health departments,
like formulating
budgets or doing a
needs assessment, that our
students are learning how
to do here,” James said.
“That's a good example of
how our college could help
the health districts.”
Although its not a requirement,
Slenkovich said
Academic Health Departments
often involve health
departments moving onto
a university's campus. He
said sharing office space
with staff members from
local health departments
within the year is more feasible,
for the time being.
“Ideally, it would be
nice if we were all in the
same building,” Slenkovich
said.
Ravenna Mayor Joseph
Bica said he was also interested
in the possibility of
partnering with KSU.
“To me it's a win-win,”
Bica said. “We can (potentially)
save costs and add
additional services. That
makes a significant difference.”
Kent Board of Health
member Christopher
Woolverton, who is also a
professor at the College
of Public Health, said his
“utopian” plan for Kent's
department going forward
would be eventually sharing
a location on or near
KSU's campus.
“Whether it's three health
departments or one, we can
still function with them as
an Academic Health Department
and still provide
assistance and services to
all of them and even some
office space,” said Ken Slenkovich,
assistant dean of the
College of Public Health.
According to the Association
of Schools of Public
Health, an Academic Health
Department is broadly defined
as a “partnership between
schools of public
health and health departments
... which effectively
pools assets of both institutions.”
Proposed benefits of system
include: Internships for
students, additional training
for health department employees
and increased communication
between schools
and departments.
DuWayne Porter, Portage
County health commissioner,
said the county is interested
in the concept of the
Academic Health Department
whether or not consolidation
occurs.
“As long as we go into it
looking to remain independent,
there are financial advantages
and academic advantages,”
Porter said.
Porter and Slenkovich
both noted that under state
law, KSU could have no say
in the governance of the departments.
“Maybe Academic Health
Department sounds a bit
scary, like the university
runs things,” Slenkovich
said. “I (want) to make it
clear we're not going to take
over anything.”
Slenkovich said one of the
most important benefits of
an Academic Health Department
is the possibility

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News Headline: Vegan Iron Chef III | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WHO: Standing Rock Cultural Arts with cooperation of Kent State University Dining Services presents...

WHAT: 3rd Annual Vegan Iron Chef Competition
-In conjunction with The Annual "Who's Your Mama?" Earth Day & Environmental Film Festival
-FREE!
-Silent Auction will also take place to benefit Kent Social Services Hot Meals Program
-More details coming soon!

WHEN: Sunday, April 17, 2011 ~ 2pm-5pm

WHERE: Kent State University Student Center off Risman Drive, Kent (Patch location address is not accurate but is auto-generated by Patch - Please see www.kent.edu for driving directions)
-2nd floor Dining Services
-FREE parking in Campus Center Visitor's Lot in front of Student Center

MORE ABOUT "WHO'S YOUR MAMA?"

The Annual “Who's Your Mama?” Earth Day and Environmental Film Festival is produced by Standing Rock Cultural Arts. This annual event is held in Portage County and was developed to celebrate Earth Day and bring a greater awareness to the idea of sustainable, ecological activities to a large number of people in our region. A wind-powered website is found at our sister site www.whosyourmama.org . There are four main ideas presented at the event:

1. Alternative Energy
2. Sustainable Agriculture
3. Conservation
4. Multi-Media Environmental Education (Films, Music, Dance, etc.)

--
Standing Rock Cultural Arts is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Thank you to our current sponsors: The Ohio Arts Council, The City of Kent, The Henry V. and Frances W. Christenson Foundation, The Home Savings Bank, The Hall-Green Insurance Agency, Woodsy's Music, Kent Parks and Recreation, City Bank Antiques, Wild Goats Cafe, Taco Tantos, Rays Place, 91.3 The Summit Radio, Jim Burris of The Universe, and Edwin George, Cherokee. Thank you also to our current members! Donations and memberships are tax-deductible and greatly appreciated!

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News Headline: Annual "Who's Your Mama?" Environmental Films & Presentations | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Location: Standing Rock Cultural Arts
257 N Water St, Kent, OH When:
April 22, 2011
Time: 8:00pm
Greetings!


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:


CONTACT


Standing Rock Cultural Arts
257 N Water St
Kent OH 44240
330.673.4970
info@standingrock.net for inquiries
www.standingrock.net / www.whosyourmama.org for updates
Also www.facebook.com/SRCAKent , www.facebook.com/WhosYourMama , and www.twitter.com/Kent_SRCA


SAVE THE DATE!

WHO: Standing Rock Cultural Arts presents...


WHAT: Annual "Who's Your Mama?" Environmental Films & Presentations
-Powered by natural alternative power instead of electricity
-Films pertinent to sustainability and the environment
-More info coming soon!


WHEN: Friday, April 22, 2011 - 8pm
-Schedule coming soon!


WHERE: The Kent Stage, 175 E Main St, downtown Kent


COST: Info coming soon! Many films & presentations are free of charge!


MORE ABOUT "WHO'S YOUR MAMA?"


The Annual “Who's Your Mama?” Earth Day and Environmental Film Festival is produced by Standing Rock Cultural Arts. This annual event is held in Portage County and was developed to celebrate Earth Day and bring a greater awareness to the idea of sustainable, ecological activities to a large number of people in our region. A wind-powered website is found at our sister site www.whosyourmama.org . There are four main ideas presented at the event:


1. Alternative Energy
2. Sustainable Agriculture
3. Conservation
4. Multi-Media Environmental Education (Films, Music, Dance, etc.)


Other events include the Vegan Iron Chef III, a competition held at the Kent State University Student Center in Dining Services and a block party on Main Street and The Home Savings Plaza. Full schedule can be found at www.whosyourmama.org as details become available.


--


Standing Rock Cultural Arts is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.


Thank you to our current sponsors: The Ohio Arts Council, The City of Kent, The Henry V. and Frances W. Christenson Foundation, The Home Savings Bank, The Hall-Green Insurance Agency, Woodsy's Music, Kent Parks and Recreation, City Bank Antiques, Wild Goats Cafe, Taco Tantos, Rays Place, 91.3 The Summit Radio, Jim Burris of The Universe, and Edwin George, Cherokee. Thank you also to our current members! Donations and memberships are always tax deductible and greatly appreciated.


Thank you for supporting the Arts!


For information: http://www.standingrock.net/ , www.whosyourmama.org


Contact: info@standingrock.net
Phone: 330-673-4970


# # #
Website: http://www.whosyourmama.org Phone: 330.673.4970 Email: info@standingrock.net Price: varies, some films are free, see website for details

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News Headline: Kent's 2010 Income Tax Revenue Hints at Recovery | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Is the economic recovery starting? It could be in Kent.


The city's total income tax receipts — local government's primary income source and a general marker of the status of the economy — were down again in 2010 compared to the previous year.


But the drop from 2009 to 2010 of 0.2 percent is marginal compared with the 2.1 percent decrease Kent saw between 2008 and 2009.


Kent Budget and Finance Director Dave Coffee said that stabilization in Kent's income tax revenue is a signal of the "invisible recovery."


"To a large extent it's generally acknowledged that the recovery actually began earlier than what it seemed like, what it felt like," Coffee said. "2008 and 2009 was the obvious, the big dip, so to speak. Fortunately we didn't see so much erosion between 2009 and 2010."


In December 2010, Kent actually saw an increase in total income tax receipts on a monthly basis compared with December 2009. The increase of $52,676 compares with a drop of $52,957 between December 2009 and December 2008.


Coffee attributed that increase in part to the number of large capital projects underway last year, including construction of the Fairchild Avenue Bridge and the reconstruction of a culvert beneath Mogadore Road as part of the construction at Plum Creek Park .


Still, the one stabilizing factor that can't be ignored is Kent State University . About 3,000 of the university's 5,000 employees work at the Kent campus.


The contribution of Ohio's second-largest public university to the city of Kent's tax rolls gradually increased month-by-month last year, though that increase has leveled off with a hiring freeze that began on campus in December. Collections on income tax from Kent State are actually down about 1 percent through February of this year compared with last year.


"(Kent State) was undoubtedly the huge stabilizing influence for us," Coffee said. "The very nature of higher education is it tends to be somewhat counter-cyclical to the economy. As the economy declines, typically enrollment in higher education increases. With that came higher funding, payroll for KSU."


For 2011, Coffee said the city is projecting an absolute flat revenue stream. He doesn't expect that the start of construction for several downtown redevelopment projects will bolster the city's tax rolls much this year despite the jobs.


"In all honesty, I don't see a huge impact on them for 2011," he said. "Those payrolls tend to lag a little bit, so my best guess at this point is we really won't begin to see any palpable impact on those until maybe fourth quarter this year at most. The majority of that would probbally be a 2012 impact."

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News Headline: April Gallery Open Poetry Reading hosted by Maj Ragain (Ragain) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WHO: Standing Rock Cultural Arts and Maj Ragain present...

WHAT:
-Read in the round (no list, no mics)

WHEN: Fri, Apr 15, 2010
-starts 8 PM
-come and leave quietly whenever you wish while it's going or during the usual break (time varies)

WHERE: North Water Street Gallery, 257 N Water St, Kent OH

REMAINING DATES FOR THIS SEASON:

Fri-Sun, May 6-8: Annual Jawbone Poetry with Maj Ragain
-Readings will go on hiatus following Jawbone until Fall 2011

ABOUT MAJ RAGAIN:

Maj Ragain, one of the premiere poetic writers of our fair city of Kent and professor of English and writing at Kent State University hosts the monthly gallery Open Poetry Readings during the school year at The North Water Street Gallery.

Dr. Major D. Ragain, a Professor of English at Kent State since 1981, teaches courses such as Creative Writing (introductory and advanced poetry writing workshops), Survey of American Literature 1800 to Present and Survey of American Literature, among others. He previously taught in Illinois at Frontier College, Olney Community College and Southern Illinois University and in North Carolina at Winston-Salem State College. He earned his Ph.D. at Kent State in 1990, his master's at the University of Illinois in 1963 and his bachelor's from Eastern Illinois University in 1962. Today, Ragain is a successful poet with both written and audio publications.

Ragain has received much praise from his peers and students. One student wrote, “Maj is active in the local and regional poetry scene, and his genuine love of the use of language is unprecedented. The energy of genuine love and respect between poet, faculty and students was a once in a lifetime thrill I am honored to have witnessed.” Another student said, “Maj is a selfless professor, and KSU is indeed fortunate to have the dedicated Major Ragain on faculty. I have seen Maj's positive impact upon students; their self-esteem rockets with astonishing work by semester's end. He draws the very best out of each and every student. I have the deepest respect for this man.”

One of Ragain's colleagues said, “A devotion to poetry and its unique power to heal, to unite people around a single purpose, and to create the fire of creative energy in groups of people is characteristic of all of Maj Ragain's work as writer, teacher and reader. … His classroom is rigorous in its demand that students push the work beyond where they thought they could go with it. He makes innovative assignments, requires a lot of writing and reading of poems, and teaches, by precept and example, the ways in which a life can be grounded in the life of the imagination. …I learn from Maj Ragain every day, and I carry his gifts
to my own students and into my own poems.”

In Ragain's teaching statement he said, “Before I ever taught a class, I came across this sentence in Louis Sullivan's Kindergarten Chats, a singular book about organic principles in architecture and the forms in which spirit resides. I can still see my hand writing it down in an old notebook, ‘To teach is to touch the heart and impel it to action.' In 33 years of teaching, that has remained a guiding principle. …I believe that, as a teacher, I am also an apprentice, a learner and in the poet Gary Snyder's wonderful phrase, ‘a fellow worker in the Buddha fields.' I often write with my students. Of all the ‘strategies,' that seems the most fruitful. It brings certitude to the classroom a sense that the teaching is being translated into action, that the work is shared. I am teaching myself to listen."
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Standing Rock Cultural Arts is a 501(c)(3) organization. We always welcome donors and sponsors. We now also have reasonably-priced memberships to our Organization. Donations and memberships are tax deductible.

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News Headline: Annual Jawbone Poetry Festival with Maj Ragain (Ragain) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WHO: Standing Rock Cultural Arts and Maj Ragain present

WHAT: Jawbone Poetry Festival
-open poetry with Maj Ragain

WHERE:
-North Water Street Gallery, 257 N. Water St. Downtown Kent
-Tannery Park, Summit St by the river
-See scheduled days/times below

WHEN: Full Schedule For Jawbone Poetry.
-FRI, MAY 6, 8 PM - North Water Street Gallery
-SAT, MAY 7, 11 AM-2PM - Pie & Poetry, N Water St Gallery
-SAT, MAY 7, 2 PM - Tannery Park, Summit Street
-SAT, MAY 7, 8 PM - North Water Street Gallery
-SUN, MAY 8, 2 PM - Poetry Potluck in Yard next to gallery

Thanks to Maj Ragain, the Kent State University poetry professor who continues to be a creative driving force in our community! The gallery will be hosting the annual Jawbone Reading on Friday, May 6th, 8pm, Saturday, May 7th, 8pm, and Sunday, May 8th, 2pm as well as the Poetry & Pie Festival on Saturday, May 7th, 11 AM-2PM. Hope you can make it!

ABOUT MAJ RAGAIN

Maj Ragain, one of the premiere poetic writers of our fair city of Kent and professor of English and writing at Kent State University, will host the many wondrous voices of people from all over the country this week-end at The 24th Annual Jawbone Poetry Reading.

He is a Creative Writing Professor at Kent State University and hosts monthly Poetry Readings during the school year at The North Water Street Gallery.

Dr. Major D. Ragain, an instructor of English at Kent State since 1981, teaches courses such as Creative Writing (introductory and advanced poetry writing workshops), Survey of American Literature 1800 to Present and Survey of American Literature, and Introduction to Poetry, among others. He previously taught in Illinois at Frontier College, Olney Community College and Southern Illinois University and in North Carolina at Winston-Salem State College. He earned his Ph.D. at Kent State in 1990, his master's at the University of Illinois in 1963 and his bachelor's from Eastern Illinois University in 1962. Today, Ragain is a successful poet with both written and audio publications.

Ragain received much praise from his peers and students. One student wrote, “Maj is active in the local and regional poetry scene, and his genuine love of the use of language is unprecedented. The energy of genuine love and respect between poet, faculty and students was a once in a lifetime thrill I am honored to have witnessed.” Another student said, “Maj is a selfless professor, and KSU is indeed fortunate to have the dedicated Major Ragain on faculty. I have seen Maj's positive impact upon students; their self-esteem rockets with astonishing work by semester's end. He draws the very best out of each and every student. I have the deepest respect for this man.”

One of Ragain's colleagues said, “A devotion to poetry and its unique power to heal, to unite people around a single purpose, and to create the fire of creative energy in groups of people is characteristic of all of Maj Ragain's work as writer, teacher and reader. … His classroom is rigorous in its demand that students push the work beyond where they thought they could go with it. He makes innovative assignments, requires a lot of writing and reading of poems, and teaches, by precept and example, the ways in which a life can be grounded in the life of the imagination. …I learn from Maj Ragain every day, and I carry his gifts to my own students and into my own poems.”

In Ragain's teaching statement he said, “Before I ever taught a class, I came across this sentence in Louis Sullivan's Kindergarten Chats, a singular book about organic principles in architecture and the forms in which spirit resides. I can still see my hand writing it down in an old notebook, ‘To teach is to touch the heart and impel it to action.' In 33 years of teaching, that has remained a guiding principle. …I believe that, as a teacher, I am also an apprentice, a learner and in the poet Gary Snyder's wonderful phrase, ‘a fellow worker in the Buddha fields.' I often write with my students. Of all the ‘strategies,' that seems the most fruitful. It brings certitude to the classroom a sense that the teaching is being translated into action, that the work is shared. I am teaching myself to listen."
-------------------------------
Standing Rock Cultural Arts is a 501(c)(3) organization. Thank you to our current sponsors and members! Donations and memberships are always tax deductible and greatly appreciated.

info@standingrock.net
330.673.4970
Website: http://www.standingrock.net

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News Headline: Kent State to Honor Ferragamo with Degree | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University on Thursday, April 7, will bestow the honorary degree Doctor of Humane Letters on Leonardo Ferragamo, chief executive officer of Palazzo Feroni Finanziaria S.p.A., a holding company of the shoe and luxury goods dynasty Salvatore Ferragamo of Florence, Italy.
Ferragamo also will be inducted into the university's Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising Hall of Fame for his internationally recognized expertise in the global merchandising of the Salvatore Ferragamo brand of women's footwear, handbags, scarves as well as the men's shoes and clothing line.
The special ceremony, which is free and open to the public, will take place at 5 p.m. in the Kent Student Center Kiva, 1075 Risman Drive, Kent, Ohio. Free parking is available. For more information or to reserve a seat, call 330-672-2760 or e-mail collegeofthearts@kent.edu. Reservations are encouraged.

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News Headline: Kent State to bestow honorary degree to fashion empire CEO, Leonardo Ferragamo | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Stacey Thomas
News OCR Text: Kent State University to Bestow Honorary Degree to Fashion Empire CEO, Leonardo Ferragamo

Ceremony will also include Ferragamo's Induction into the Fashion School Hall of Fame

Kent, OH – Kent State University will bestow the honorary degree Doctor of Humane Letters to Leonardo Ferragamo, Chief Executive Officer of Palazzo Feroni Finanziaria SpA, a holding company of the shoe and luxury goods dynasty Salvatore Ferragamo of Florence, Italy. The special ceremony will take place on Thursday, April 7, 2011 at 5 pm in the Kent State University Student Center Kiva Auditorium. During the same ceremony, Ferragamo will also be inducted into the Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising Hall of Fame for his internationally- recognized expertise in the global merchandising of the Salvatore Ferragamo brand of women's footwear, handbags, scarves as well as the men's shoes and clothing line. The event is free and open to the public. Kiva Auditorium is located in the Student Center at 1075 Risman Drive. Free parking will be available in the visitor parking lot. For more information or to reserve a seat, call 330-672-2760 or email collegeofthearts@kent.edu. Reservations are not required but are encouraged.

Ferragamo was nominated for an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters by the College of the Arts and the College of Communication and Information, with direct input from the Fashion School, which has a Florence program. In addition to Ferragamo's driving force in organizing and supporting fashion trade in Florence, it was his clear leadership and vision in preserving Florentine culture and arts in Florence which attracted Dean John R. Crawford, College of the Arts and Dean Stanley Wearden, College of Communication and Information, along with Fashion School Director, J.R. Campbell to forward his nomination. His direct support to KSU's Florence campus, Palazzo dei Cerchi, has afforded many enriching, internationally-based opportunities for both fashion and communication majors studying a semester in Florence.

The process for awarding the degree begins with nominations from Kent State colleges and academic departments to the institution's Citation and Recognition Committee. Nominees who receive the approval from the committee are then recommended to the Kent State Board of Trustees and University President Dr. Lester Lefton for approval.

Mr. Ferragamo is Chief Executive Officer for Palazzo Feroni Finanziara SpA and entered the family company of Salvatore Ferragamo Italia in 1975, as assistant to the Technical Director of Production. Since 1919, the Ferragamo Company has been world renowned for its unparalleled design and production of women's footwear, handbags, scarves and accessories and most of the stars of Hollywood, stage and screen appeared in designs by Ferragamo. In 1970, the Ferragamo Company began producing men's shoes and clothing, which was driven by Leonardo Ferragamo in the 1980s.

Leonardo Ferragamo went on to create and extend the men's wear division, beginning with footwear, then with accessories and clothing and remained Head of the sector until 1987, when he became Director of the Commercial Activity and therefore of Europe, Asia, and subsequently South America markets. He devoted himself mainly to the development and commercialization of the Ferragamo product over those areas, after which he took on the role of Chief Executive Officer of the Europe Asia Division.

Since the beginning of 2000, as CEO of Palazzo Feroni Finanziaria, Leonardo Ferragamo guides the diversified investments of the Ferragamo Group among which he chairs the Lungarno Hotels. Mr. Ferragamo is the Honorary Chairman of Altagamma (the luxury goods companies association that he has chaired for nine years from 2000-2009), of the Palazzo Strozzi Partners Association whose objective is to support Florence as an important center of international art and culture, and advisor of Salvatore Ferragamo Italia and of Ferragamo Finanziaria, the financial holding of the group. In May 2008 Leonardo Ferragamo received the title of Honorary Member of the Academy of Fine Arts of Florence. Kent State University's honorary degree will be the first American honorary degree received by Ferragamo.

The induction of Leonardo Ferragamo into the Fashion School ‘s Hall of Fame was based on his continued pursuance of his family's legacy in designing and producing luxury market footwear, clothing, accessories, handbags, eyewear and timepieces worldwide. Moreover, Ferragamo has contributed greatly to the development of arts and culture in Florence, Italy and has sponsored some of the key fashion exhibitions there, including Pitti Immagine.

The Fashion School “Hall of Fame,” includes other significant individuals such as Oscar de la Renta, Anna Sui, Estee Lauder, Judith Leiber, Cynthia Rowley, Michael Weiss, Ralph Rucci and KSU alumna Linda Allard.

Cleveland Women's Fashion Examiner is looking for local style and fashion bloggers who would like to be featured here! to be included.

Do you have a local fashion event or announcement that you would like to advertise? for inclusion in a future post!

Are you a local boutique owner, store manager, or entrepeneur? Do you have a business or website that you think the readers of Cleveland Women's Fashion Examiner would be interested in?

Stacey Kay Thomas is a recent college graduate with a Bachelor's degree in Fashion Merchandising from the Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman...

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News Headline: TIRE FUN | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: East End resident Gabrielle Dawson, 4, enjoyed the new playhouse at the Klondike Playground on Thursday. As a community service project, Kent State University students spent the week making playground upgrades and repairs. The effort will be featured in Sunday's Riverstyle. (Photo by Michael D. McElwain

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News Headline: Students work so others can play (Maze) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - About 45 Kent State University students have been sleeping in a classroom at the East Liverpool campus this week while volunteering to make improvements to city playground.

Councilwoman Sherrie Curtis said Friday the improvements are being paid for with $5,000 obtained by city Planning Director Bill Cowan from the CIC through Marshall Bleckman and Associates.

All five city playgrounds received some attention during the week, with new wood-and-tire playhouses built at the Willie Cook Playground on Saint George Street and the Klondyke Playground.

At the Bank Street facility, a new pavilion was erected and a new picnic table was built by Councilman Russell Dray and Jim Davis. Dray chairs City Council's recreation committee, of which Curtis is also a member.

The sliding board was repaired at the Bank Street playground, and at Fulmer Park, new basketball hoops were provided by Local 24 of the Firefighters Association and Lions Club, Curtis said.

Repairs will be made to various equipment and fencing, and the group - which also included some teachers and high school students - painted existing equipment at the playgrounds.

On Friday, students were putting the finishing touches on the new playhouse at the Willie Cook playground, assisted by KSU maintenance workers Ralph Maze and Jack Lott.

Maze commended the students for their work ethic, saying, "They spend the nights on the floor of a classroom then work like a dog all day."

Other groups have spent their time in the county doing similar painting and repairs at the Scenic Vista Park in Lisbon and for the Humane Society of Columbiana County.

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News Headline: TIRE FUN | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: East End resident Gabrielle Dawson, 4, enjoyed the new playhouse at the Klondike Playground on Thursday. As a community service project, Kent State University students spent the week making playground upgrades and repairs. The effort will be featured in Sunday's Riverstyle. (Photo by Michael D. McElwain

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News Headline: With a little help from our friends (Esterly) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name: MICHAEL D. McELWAIN
News OCR Text: Kent State students help spruce up city's playgrounds

EAST LIVERPOOL - The city's playgrounds got a much needed facelift this past week thanks to some Kent State University students.

"I'm very proud of these kids and what they've accomplished," Rachael Esterly, program coordinator with Kent State University, said. "They all did a fantastic job, stayed focused and learned a lot by working in the community."

It was the second annual Columbiana County Alternative Spring Break program that brought in the volunteers.

The week-long activity involves Kent State University students volunteering their time to participate in community-service projects and activities throughout the county.

This year, students spent the majority of their time repairing playgrounds in the East Liverpool area. Many others also assisted the Columbiana County Humane Society.

On the opening day, the students had dinner at the campus' Blair Memorial Library followed by a tour at the Museum of Ceramics.

"I am excited to continue this program in our county for a second year," Esterly said. "Our initiative focuses on needs in East Liverpool and surrounding communities, specifically area playgrounds."

Student volunteers ate and slept at Kent State-East Liverpool during the week.

Esterly said there were many touching moments.

"At one playground site, a homeless man brought by pop and paper cups for the students because he was so excited and touched by what was going on," Esterly said. "The kids were really touched, and they realized they were making a big difference in the community."

People honked horns, waved and shouted words of encouragement and thanks during the week. Some neighborhood children helped in the cause and others waited anxiously to use the new playhouse or teeter totter.

"The weather was a little tough one day, but we made it through fine," volunteer Lexi Veri, from Northfield, Ohio, said.

Veri was the team leader at the Willie Cook Playground in the East End.

"This was an excellent program by Kent State, and we have a lot of pride knowing we helped a lot of kids have a clean, safe place to play," Veri said.

Despite a few blisters and a lot of bruises, she said the effort was worthwhile.

Esterly agreed. "I think we now have some lifelong volunteers," she said.

A whole host of organizations and individuals teamed up to make the project a success.

Russell Dray and Sherrie Curtis, with the city council Playground Committee, helped organize some of the effort.

"The kids did a wonderful job, and everyone should be proud," Curtis said.

Dray helped gather material and made a list of priorities. Several playgrounds got new playhouses and all got needed repairs, upgrades and fresh paint.

Ribbon cutting ceremonies were held at the Bank Street, Ohio Avenue, Mulberry, Orchard Grove and Moore Street playgrounds.

"It means a lot to see it come together like this," Veri said. "The community benefits and so do the volunteers."

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News Headline: $364K in US Appalachian funds asked for county work | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name: TOM GIAMBRONI
News OCR Text: LISBON - Approximately $364,806 in federal dollars for Appalachian counties are being sought this year to fund nearly $1.68 million in local projects, according to Columbiana County Commissioner Penny Traina.

Traina reported on the projects at this week's meeting after noting she was recently re-elected president of OMEGA, an organization of 10 Ohio counties that are part of the federally designated Appalachian region. As such, these counties and communities within them are eligible to seek federal Appalachian funds, with OMEGA recommending which projects to fund.

According to Traina, the following local projects are being recommended for Appalachian funding this year:

- Salem Community Hospital, seeking $74,246 as part of a $559,227 project to purchase equipment for a behavioral medicine program.

- County Airport Authority, seeking $43,555 as part of a $871,087 project to resurface and rehabilitate runways.

- Kent State University, East Liverpool campus, seeking $51,005 as part of a $102,010 project to upgrade the nursing lab.

- County Career Center, seeking $196,000 as part of a $515,000 project to make the school more energy efficient.

As a back-up project, should the other ones fail to get funded, the Salem campus of Kent State University is seeking $57,225 as part of $114,450 to purchase radiology and imaging science lab equipment.

Traina said this is just an example of the type of projects that have been funded over the years because of their active involvement in OMEGA. In the past three years alone the county has obtained $ 1 million in Appalachian funds to undertake $13 million in projects, such as at the county Port Authority's industrial park in Wellsville, the Glenmoor/LaCroft sewer project, the Bradshaw Avenue project in East Liverpool, and the Wellsville sewage treatment plant.

She said Appalachian funding is often the key to the applicant being able to access other government funding for a project, with the county airport being an example. The airport is eligible to receive a $827,532 grant from the Federal Aviation Administration to fund runway improvements, commissioners needed to put up $43,555 in matching funds.

"That's huge, because otherwise county commissioners would have to come up with that match," Traina said.

She reported the two major sources of Appalachian funding - the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) and Governor's Office on Appalachian (GOA) - are expected to be cut. Gov. John Kasich has proposed cutting GOA funding by 17.9 percent, while ARC funding is expected to be reduced by 10 percent or $76 million.

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News Headline: County eyes ARC funding | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name: TOM GIAMBRONI
News OCR Text: LISBON - Approximately $364,806 in federal dollars for Appalachian counties is being sought this year to fund nearly $1.68 million in local projects, according to Columbiana County Commissioner Penny Traina.

Traina reported on the projects at this week's meeting after noting she was recently re-elected president of OMEGA, an organization of 10 Ohio counties that are part of the federally designated Appalachian region. As such, these counties and communities within them are eligible to seek federal Appalachian funds, with OMEGA recommending which projects to fund.

According to Traina, the following local projects are being recommended for Appalachian funding this year:

- Salem Community Hospital, seeking $74,246 as part of a $559,227 project to purchase equipment for a behavioral medicine program.

- County Airport Authority, seeking $43,555 as part of a $871,087 project to resurface and rehabilitate runways.

- Kent State University, East Liverpool campus, seeking $51,005 as part of a $102,010 project to upgrade the nursing lab.

- County Career Center, seeking $196,000 as part of a $515,000 project to make the school more energy efficient.

As a back-up project, should the other ones fail to get funded, the Salem campus of Kent State University is seeking $57,225 as part of $114,450 to purchase radiology and imaging science lab equipment.

Traina said this is just an example of the type of projects that have been funded over the years because of their active involvement in OMEGA. In the past three years alone the county has obtained $ 1 million in Appalachian funds to undertake $13 million in projects, such as at the county Port Authority's industrial park in Wellsville, the Glenmoor/LaCroft sewer project, the Bradshaw Avenue project in East Liverpool, and the Wellsville sewage treatment plant.

She said Appalachian funding is often the key to the applicant being able to access other government funding for a project, with the county airport being an example. The airport is eligible to receive a $827,532 grant from the Federal Aviation Administration to fund runway improvements, commissioners needed to put up $43,555 in matching funds.

"That's huge, because otherwise county commissioners would have to come up with that match," Traina said.

She reported the two major sources of Appalachian funding - the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) and Governor's Office on Appalachian (GOA) - are expected to be cut. Gov. John Kasich has proposed cutting GOA funding by 17.9 percent, while ARC funding is expected to be reduced by 10 percent or $76 million.

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News Headline: $364K in US Appalachian funds asked for county work | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name: TOM GIAMBRONI
News OCR Text: LISBON - Approximately $364,806 in federal dollars for Appalachian counties are being sought this year to fund nearly $1.68 million in local projects, according to Columbiana County Commissioner Penny Traina.

Traina reported on the projects at this week's meeting after noting she was recently re-elected president of OMEGA, an organization of 10 Ohio counties that are part of the federally designated Appalachian region. As such, these counties and communities within them are eligible to seek federal Appalachian funds, with OMEGA recommending which projects to fund.

According to Traina, the following local projects are being recommended for Appalachian funding this year:

- Salem Community Hospital, seeking $74,246 as part of a $559,227 project to purchase equipment for a behavioral medicine program.

- County Airport Authority, seeking $43,555 as part of a $871,087 project to resurface and rehabilitate runways.

- Kent State University, East Liverpool campus, seeking $51,005 as part of a $102,010 project to upgrade the nursing lab.

- County Career Center, seeking $196,000 as part of a $515,000 project to make the school more energy efficient.

As a back-up project, should the other ones fail to get funded, the Salem campus of Kent State University is seeking $57,225 as part of $114,450 to purchase radiology and imaging science lab equipment.

Traina said this is just an example of the type of projects that have been funded over the years because of their active involvement in OMEGA. In the past three years alone the county has obtained $ 1 million in Appalachian funds to undertake $13 million in projects, such as at the county Port Authority's industrial park in Wellsville, the Glenmoor/LaCroft sewer project, the Bradshaw Avenue project in East Liverpool, and the Wellsville sewage treatment plant.

She said Appalachian funding is often the key to the applicant being able to access other government funding for a project, with the county airport being an example. The airport is eligible to receive a $827,532 grant from the Federal Aviation Administration to fund runway improvements, commissioners needed to put up $43,555 in matching funds.

"That's huge, because otherwise county commissioners would have to come up with that match," Traina said.

She reported the two major sources of Appalachian funding - the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) and Governor's Office on Appalachian (GOA) - are expected to be cut. Gov. John Kasich has proposed cutting GOA funding by 17.9 percent, while ARC funding is expected to be reduced by 10 percent or $76 million.

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News Headline: Business calendar - Week of March 27, 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tuesday

2011 Stark County Entrepreneur Experience
7:30 to 9:30 a.m., Kent State University Stark University Center,
6000 Frank Ave. NW

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News Headline: Kent State University Trumbull campus is helping 170 female high schoolers in Trumbull County with career choices. | Email

News Date: 03/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: First News at 7 AM - WYFX-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Trumbull campus is helping 170 female high schoolers in Trumbull County with career choices. The university is hosing a career exploration program, focusing on non-traditional careers in math, science and technology. The event runs from 8:30 this morning until 2. That does it for 27 First News this morning,

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News Headline: Kent State University hosted a career conference today | Email

News Date: 03/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: First News at 5 PM - WKBN-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University hosted a career conference today at their Trumbull branch and is was just for female high school sophomores. The girls were encourage to explore non traditional jobs, especially those in math, science and technology. After the students heard from several speakers, they got to break into smaller groups where local professional women offered hands-on activities in their chosen field.

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News Headline: State Senator Talks About House Vote For Senate Bill 5 (Golden) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: WYTV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: There's been a lot of rallying and protesting since the creation of Senate Bill 5-- legislation that would reduce collective bargaining rights for public employees in the state. The Bill passed in the Ohio Senate by a 17 to 16 vote, and is expected to be voted on and passed in the House this week. Ohio Senator Jason Wilson said he's convinced the Bill is bad for Ohio.

"Number one, I don't see any direct savings in dollars, that's the first thing," said Wilson. "Secondley is that, when we talk about people's right to collectively bargain, I think that's something that's been earned over many years, many generations of workers, and each of us stance on those who proceeded us in work."

But some public employees who will be affected by the bill said they understand why some cuts have to be made.

So several people biting the bullet right now with the financial crisis, and hopefully in better times we can not have to go through something like this, " said Shawn Golden, a professor at Kent State University's East Liverpool campus. "But right now I think everybody's affected. So wait and see what happens."

Wilson said, the good news is that he's heard some changes will be made to the House version of the Bill.

"I was told the leadership in the Ohio House wanted to make some changes," said Wilson. "They saw some things that they thought were problematic that now they can change."

And even if the Bill is signed into law, voters will have the opportunity to put the bill on the ballot in November, to give people a chance to vote on whether they want it or not.

"If that's done, there will be a requirement for a number of signatures, a number of petitions, and then it will be placed on the ballot for the entire state to decide at that point," said Wilson.

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News Headline: State Senator Talks About House Vote For Senate Bill 5 (Golden) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKBN-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: There's been a lot of rallying and protesting since the creation of Senate Bill 5-- legislation that would reduce collective bargaining rights for public employees in the state. The Bill passed in the Ohio Senate by a 17 to 16 vote, and is expected to be voted on and passed in the House this week. Ohio Senator Jason Wilson said he's convinced the Bill is bad for Ohio.

"Number one, I don't see any direct savings in dollars, that's the first thing," said Wilson. "Secondly is that, when we talk about people's right to collectively bargain, I think that's something that's been earned over many years, many generations of workers, and each of us stance on those who proceeded us in work."

But some public employees who will be affected by the bill said they understand why some cuts have to be made.

So several people biting the bullet right now with the financial crisis, and hopefully in better times we can not have to go through something like this, " said Shawn Golden, a professor at Kent State University's East Liverpool campus. "But right now I think everybody's affected. So wait and see what happens."

Wilson said, the good news is that he's heard some changes will be made to the House version of the Bill.

"I was told the leadership in the Ohio House wanted to make some changes," said Wilson. "They saw some things that they thought were problematic that now they can change."

And even if the Bill is signed into law, voters will have the opportunity to put the bill on the ballot in November, to give people a chance to vote on whether they want it or not.

"If that's done, there will be a requirement for a number of signatures, a number of petitions, and then it will be placed on the ballot for the entire state to decide at that point," said Wilson.

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News Headline: KSU Encourages Non-Traditional Careers for Girls (Schneider) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKBN-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University hosted a career conference Friday at its Trumbull branch just for high school sophomore girls.

The girls were encouraged to explore non-traditional jobs, especially those in math, science and technology. After the students heard from several speakers, they got to break into smaller groups where local professional women offered hands-on activities in their chosen field.

The conference was called "The Road Not Taken" and the keynote speaker was Dr. Randi Schneider, associate director of Student Success Programs at Kent State University. Approximately 170 sophomore girls from Trumbull County participated. The conference was co-hosted by the Trumbull Career and Technical Center.

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News Headline: KSU Encourages Non-Traditional Careers for Girls (Schneider) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: WYTV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University hosted a career conference Friday at its Trumbull branch just for high school sophomore girls.

The girls were encouraged to explore non-traditional jobs, especially those in math, science and technology. After the students heard from several speakers, they got to break into smaller groups where local professional women offered hands-on activities in their chosen field.

The conference was called "The Road Not Taken" and the keynote speaker was Dr. Randi Schneider, associate director of Student Success Programs at Kent State University. Approximately 170 sophomore girls from Trumbull County participated. The conference was co-hosted by the Trumbull Career and Technical Center.

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News Headline: Get Out: Beyond Fashion and Katharine Hepburn | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Vincent R. Komenda
News OCR Text: Beyond Fashion: Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevedo
Where/When: Kent State University Museum , 515 Hilltop Dr., Kent,
Higbee Gallery
Daily 10 a.m. to 8:45 p.m. until 2012
Why Go: Quevedo is an award-winning fiber artist and designer. He is displaying sculptural clothing and quilted works from collections formed over 20 years. " An important ingredient in my work is the relationship between the body and the material while exploring the space between the two ," said Quevedo on the museum website. He is currently an associate professor at Kent State University's School of Fashion Design and Merchandising. Pricing: $5

Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen
Fashion exhibit and classic movie showing of Woman Of The Year
Where/When: Kent State University Museum , 515 Hilltop Dr., Kent,
Exhibit: Broadbent Gallery, daily 10 a.m. to 8:45 p.m. until Sept. 2011.
Movie Date with Kate: Woman Of The Year , Thursday March 31, 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. in museum's Murphy Auditorium
Why Go: See stage and screen costumes from this iconic Hollywood actress as well as selected publicity outfits. She won four Academy Awards over a career spanning 6 decades.

In conjunction with the exhibit, the museum will be showing classic Hepburn films on certain dates during the year. The first presentation is the 1942 movie, Woman Of The Year , featuring her favorite co-star Spencer Tracy. The movie wraps up the celebration of Women's History Month. Pricing: $5 - Movie free with museum admission.

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News Headline: Kent State University Museum and KSU Women's Studies Program Partner via Katharine Hepburn Class (Holt, Druesedow) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: PRLog
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's fashion museum's original exhibit on Katharine Hepburn running thru Sept 4, 2011 is being complemented by a special course at KSU on the star and her films as well as 2 Tracy-Hepburn classic comedies on TH, 3-31 & TH, 4-28.

Woman of the Year_Tracy and Hepburn

PRLog (Press Release) – Mar 25, 2011 – In cooperation with Kent State University Museum's nationally recognized exhibition “Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen,” the Kent State University's Women's Studies Program (WMST) is offering a special course during this spring semester on the life and work of the great film star.

WMST offers undergraduates an interdisciplinary minor which engages in relevant scholarly inquiry and timely discussion on women-centered issues and subjects. WMST also conducts its own colloquium, creates a wide range of special topics courses, and works collaboratively with other departments on their women-centered programming and classes.

The Women's Studies course now being offered, “Katharine Hepburn: A Rarity,” examines Hepburn as a distinct American personality, a feminist, and a cultural influence. Winner of four Best Actress Academy Awards, Katharine Hepburn is listed by the American Film Institute as the number one female screen legend in the world, and she is still recognized as a role model for generations of women.

“Our spring course ‘sold out the house' -- a record enrollment, in fact, for Women's Studies,” said WMST director Suzanne Holt, who is also teaching the course. “Because of its tremendous appeal and engaging subject matter, we will do an encore of 'Katharine Hepburn/A Rarity' this summer.”

For those who don't want to wait until summer, WMST and the KSU Museum are co-presenting two classic Spencer Tracy-Katharine Hepburn romantic comedies -- "Woman of the Year" (1942, dir George Stevens) and "Pat and Mike" (1952, dir George Cukor). Open to the public as well as students, both movies are free upon admittance to the museum.

"Woman of the Year" is being shown at 3 pm and 6 pm on Thursday, March 31. A discussion to be led by members of the Women's Studies class is planned after the 6 pm screening.

"Woman of the Year" was Tracy and Hepburn's first movie together and won an Oscar for Original Screenplay. It's listed among America's 100 top love stories and 100 top comedies, and her portrayal of political columnist Tess Harding garnered Hepburn her fourth of 12 Best Actress Oscar nominations.

“We think 'Woman of the Year' is a great movie to wrap up Women's History Month,” said Jean Druesedow, director of the museum and curator of the exhibit. “Hepburn's competence, style, beauty, intelligence and determination really appealed to upcoming professional American women. It still does.”

"Pat and Mike," scheduled for Thursday, April 28 (again at 3 pm and 6 pm) was Tracy and Hepburn's seventh film and Hepburn's favorite. In it, Hepburn plays a woman athlete, a first for a major Hollywood picture, though not for her: she actually was an excellent golfer, a terrific tennis player, and a natural athlete who did her own stunts.

The popular comedy helped generate a wider acceptance of women's informal dress and sportswear as suitable public attire, and Patricia Campbell Warner, author of "When the Girls Came Out to Play: The Birth of American Sportswear" (University of Massachusetts Press, 2006), will make a special visit to Kent to talk about Hepburn's fashion influence in conjunction with the 6 pm screening. Her talk is also being co-sponsored by the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and the College of Arts and Sciences.

For more about the museum, call 330.672.3450, friend http://www.facebook.com/ksumuseum or visit http://www.kent.edu/museum. For summer session registration for WMST's Hepburn course, call 330.672.8042 or email slholt@kent.edu.

[NOTE TO MEDIA: High res and low-res images relating to the exhibit, "Woman of the Year" and "Pat and Mike" are available upon request.]

H/L is a Marketing, Strategic Consulting and Public Relations firm headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio. We serve a wide variety of clients, Our guideline is "Going Beyond Cliches." For more information,, go to our website at www.hlcommunications,com.

Contact Email: ***@hlcommunications.com

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Kent State University Museum and KSU Women's Studies Program Partner via Katharine Hepburn Class

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News Headline: Film Festival for LGBTQ Benefit Event | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Where: Kent State University, 500 E Main St, Kent, OH 44242
Date: April 2, 2011
Time: 7:00pm–9:00pm
Come to the Kent State University as they host a film screening and reception in conjunction with the 35th Cleveland International Film Festival to benefit the university's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Student Emergency Scholarship Fund.
It is a two-hour reception in the Cleveland Ballroom of the Ritz-Carlton, followed by the 9:20 p.m. screening of “A Marine Story” at the adjacent Tower City Cinemas.
Features: Benefit, Open to All
Website: http://KentSt.pr-optout.com/Url.aspx?520382x186345x-202536
Phone: 330-672-0315
Email: mmerryma@kent.edu
Price: $75

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News Headline: Obesity messes with the brain (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Science News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Obesity subtly diminishes memory and other features of thinking and reasoning even among seemingly healthy people, an international team of scientists reports. At least some of these impairments appear reversible through weight loss. Researchers also report one likely mechanism for those cognitive deficits: damage to the wiring that links the brain's information-processing regions.

A number of studies in recent years have shown that individuals with diseases linked to obesity, including cardiovascular disease, hypertension and type 2 diabetes, don't score as well on cognitive tests as less hefty individuals do. To test whether weight alone — and not disease — might be partially responsible, John Gunstad of Kent State University in Ohio and his colleagues recruited 150 obese individuals for a series of cognitive tests. These people weighed on average just under 300 pounds, although some were substantially heavier. Two-thirds would shortly undergo weight-loss surgery.

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News Headline: New Research on Obesity and Brain Function (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: DAILY KOS
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Author's Note: My report of the following findings should not lead anyone to believe that I think obese people are “stupid,” or that I am in any way “targeting” them.” I am not making an argument that thin people are smarter than overweight people. My mother is obese, and she is a brilliant and highly educated woman. However, I do think obesity is a health risk and believe in proper fitness and nutrition, though I am no “health nut.” I think the research that has been done over the past few years on obesity and the brain is very interesting, and I believe it's something we should all take a closer look at, regardless of our size.

ADDITIONAL Author's Note: Yes, the sample sizes in these studies are small. No, correlation does not have to imply causation. Yes, there could be all sorts of other factors contributing to test results. I am posting some findings I find interesting. Pretty simple, pretty benign. Chill, people.

It has already been documented that obesity is linked with brain atrophy (PDF), though the findings have proven controversial. A review, for those who may not have read it, of a previous study from 2009:

A new brain-imaging study by researchers at UCLA and the University of Pittsburgh finds that the brains of overweight and obese subjects were on average 4% and 8% smaller, respectively, than the brains of those who were at a healthy weight--evidence, according to UCLA neurology professor and study author Paul Thompson, of "severe brain degeneration."

For the obese--those with a BMI over 30--the news is particularly bad: the areas of significant observed shrinkage were the frontal temporal lobes, the seat of higher-order reasoning and judgment; the anterior cingulate gyrus, key to attention and decision-making as well; the hippocampus, where long-term memories are processed, and the basal ganglia, from which smooth movement is initiated.

Overweight people--those with a BMI over 25--also had shrinkage in the basal ganglia, as well as in the parietal lobe, where we integrate sensory input and position ourselves in space, and in the brain's white matter, which helps speed messages among regions of the brain that must work together for us to function properly.

After virtually weighing and measuring the brains of 94 subjects over age 70, the study authors concluded that the brains of the overweight appeared, on average, eight years older than those of subjects at healthy weight. Brains of the obese appeared 16 years older. While the subjects scanned in the study showed no outward signs of cognitive impairment at the time of the study, the study's authors predicted the premature aging and loss of brain volume they observed would put heavier subjects at greater risk of Alzheimer's disease and other degenerative brain diseases.

Some images from that study, which is available free online (PDF):

Further research is emerging that sheds additional light on the ways in which the brain appears to be damaged. A new study suggests that the reason memory and other aspects of thought may be impaired in some obese individuals has to do with damage to the wiring linking the brain's information-processing regions. Historically, when cognitive deficits in overweight people were discovered in medical research, it has been difficult to determine how much of that impairment might be due to poor overall health rather than obesity alone. For the current study, John Gunstad of Kent State University in Ohio and his associates selected 150 obese (but otherwise healthy) individuals to voluntarily undergo a battery of cognitive tests. Most participants weighed near 300 pounds, although some were significantly more overweight. The most “useful” factor about this group: Two thirds were scheduled to have weight loss surgery shortly thereafter.

The results:

Scores on the tests were assessed against those of people in the Brain Resource International Database, a large multicenter project with data on very healthy people. Obese individuals in the new study initially performed on the low end of the normal range for healthy individuals from the database on average, Gunstad says, although nearly one-quarter of the obese participants' scores on memory and learning actually fell within what researchers consider the impaired range.

Tested again 12 weeks after bariatric surgery — when most had shed some 50 pounds — the lighter but still heavy patients scored substantially better. Most now performed “within the average or greater-than-average range for all cognitive tests,” the researchers report online in Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.

Study participants who didn't have surgery — or lose weight — performed worse on the second test. “That was a bit surprising,” Gunstad says.

Neurologist Stefan Knecht of the University of Münster in Germany, who is not involved in the new research, says he is not surprised that the untreated participants experienced rapid, continuing drops in cognitive performance. Among the morbidly obese, he says, “You can actually watch them getting worse from one three-month period to the next if you have sufficiently sensitive measures, which [Gunstad's group] did.”

Another study used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine the wiring connecting nerve cells which allow signals and information to travel through the brain. In some obese individuals (BMI 30+), the white matter that protects this wiring appears damaged, as compared with normal-weight and overweight individuals. It should be noted that the damage being described is to the protective sheath, not to the nerve fibers themselves.

Both studies were done with a relatively low number of subjects, particularly the second. Further research into the mechanisms behind the possible link between brain deterioration and obesity is still needed.

Originally posted to sricki on Sun Mar 27, 2011 at 04:01 AM EDT.

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News Headline: Dance Ensemble Presents Annual Concert | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent Dance Ensemble of Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will present its 21st annual main stage concert, “Coming of Age,” April 1-3. The pre-professional student dance company boasts 13 dancers from both the performance/choreography and dance education programs who will be performing new and revitalized works by KSU dance faculty members and guest artists from Washington, D.C. and Eugene, Oregon.
The Ensemble's performances are April 1 and 2 at 8 p.m. and April 3 at 2 p.m. in the E. Turner Stump Theatre, Music and Speech Center, 1325 Theatre Drive in Kent. To reserve tickets call the School of Theatre and Dance box office at 330-672-2497 between noon and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, or visit www.dance.kent.edu to order online.
General adult admission is $16; $12 for seniors, KSU faculty, staff and alumni; $8 for students with a valid I.D. A free reception to honor KDE alumni will take place on Saturday, April 2, following the performance.

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News Headline: Kent's Acorn Alley II project springing up | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As the weather improves,
two projects that will change
the face of downtown Kent
are starting to move forward.
Construction workers
are putting up the walls for
Acorn Alley II, the expansion
of the East Main Street
retail complex, which will
extend south of Erie Street
and west of South DePeyster
Street.
Developer Ron Burbick
said at a groundbreaking
in mid-December that the
goal was to open Acorn Alley
II in July, weather permitting.
A record amount of snowfall
in Kent slowed the project
down, but Burbick is
hopeful that original goal
won't be missed completely.
“The weather's put us
back a little bit,” he said.
“We hope to have a couple
stores open in July. Everything
should be open by August.”
Tree City Coffee and Pastry,
Wild Earth Outfitters
and Zoupwerks-Kent, a
soup and sandwich shop,
have been announced as
the businesses that will intially
occupy the new development.
Burbick said he has several
more businesses in place,
but is waiting to make an
announcement until all of
the details are worked out.
He said the names of those
busineses should be released
by the end of April.
“Even with the weather,
we're still not very far off
schedule,” Burbick said.
“We're very happy. The pace
is going to be increasing
quickly.”
Burbick said construction
workers should begin steel
work on the project next
week.
Gary Locke, Kent's Community
Development director,
said he's not surprised
at the speed Burbick has
pushed the development
along. He said he thought
construction workers
could hit Burbick's targets.
“I think it's possible,” he
said. “They're really going
to have to hustle, but I
don't doubt they can.”
In other downtown
development news, the
Portage Area Regional
Transportation Authority
plans to break ground on
April 4 on a major downtown
project after a few
delays while buying property.
PARTA acquired 12
properties to begin construction
on a $26 million
transit center, buying
the final property on
Feb. 16.
That site, at 115 S. De-
Peyster, was the longtime
location of Commercial
Press and most recently
housed a Car Parts
Warehouse. It currently
is boarded-up and ready
for demolition.
Locke also said the city
could see plans for a $16
million hotel and conference
center, proposed
by Pizzuti Solutions and
the Kent State University
Foundation, as soon as
next week.
“I think we're starting
to see some of the things
we've been talking about
for a long while starting to
occur,” he said.

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News Headline: KSU in Spotlight at State Ad Competitions | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University was well represented in recent advertising award competitions statewide. In Cleveland, the firm Marcus Thomas took home 17 ADDY Awards for a poster campaign and other collateral pieces created for the 44th Kent State Folk Festival while in Akron student graphic designers at Glyphix, a design agency housed within Kent State's School of Visual Communication Design, collected three gold ADDYs for their design for the Healing Stanzas poetry and art poster series currently on Akron METRO buses, Kent PARTA buses and the RTA system in Cleveland. The posters are also in Kent Starbucks.
At the Columbus ADDY Awards, advertising and public relations firm Fahlgren was honored with a gold ADDY for the agency's work on a series of television ads produced for the university's “Experience for Life” admissions marketing campaign.
The ADDY events are the first round in a three-tiered national competition with winning entries in the local competitions automatically forwarded to the appropriate regional level, competing in a field of 10 districts. District awards will be held in April.

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