Report Overview:
Total Clips (14)
Alternative Spring Break (1)
Athletics (2)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Facilities Planning and Operations; Town-Gown (1)
Fashion Design (2)
Horticulture Technology (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU Museum; Women's Studies Program (1)
Psychology (1)
Public Relations (1)
Student (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alternative Spring Break (1)
Thank you offered to Kent volunteers 03/31/2011 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

...students making treks toward a popular southern destination. The words "Spring Break" aren't often associated with playgrounds. But that's how several Kent State students spent their break from classes - providing a facelift to the five city playgrounds scattered throughout East Liverpool....


Athletics (2)
ONE FOR THE AGES Champ Kilgore forever a part of KSU lore 03/31/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University student-atheletes will participate in the 9th annual Jock Jams Fundraiser (Seabeck) 03/31/2011 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Proceeds go to American Cancer Society and school Kent, OH - Kent State University will hold their ninth annual Jock Jams fundraiser at 7 p.m. on Monday, April 5th, in the Student Center Ballroom on the...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
NYT Dialogue on Shrinking Cities 03/30/2011 Environmental Law Professors Text Attachment Email

...about the way forward for post-industrial cities confronted with large-scale property abandonment. Jennifer Bradley (Brookings-MPP) and Terry Schwarz (Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative) each offer shrinking city visions that challenge the idea that all planning must be for demographic...


Facilities Planning and Operations; Town-Gown (1)
AUDIO State Releases Funding for KSU-Kent Walkway Project (Euclide) 03/30/2011 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

The long term blueprint to link Kent State University with downtown Kent took another step forward this week when the state controlling board released $390,000 for the project....


Fashion Design (2)
Coming Cleveland area style events 03/30/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...Cleveland. Wedding dresses are $20; other dresses, $10; and shoes and accessories, $5. Proceeds will benefit the task force. Call 216-621-0766, ext. 232. • Kent State University will grant an honorary doctorate in humane letters to Leonardo Ferragamo, who is affiliated with the Italian shoe and...

High tech inspires haute couture Kent State Fashion students employ digital textile technology to realize their visions 03/31/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email


Horticulture Technology (1)
Associate professor at Kent State Salem receives Award of Merit (Carlson, Jones) 03/31/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

SALEM-Chris Carlson, associate professor of biological sciences and horticulture technology at Kent State University at Salem, recently received the Award of Merit from the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA), an international...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHS TRAGEDY Experiencing Japan firsthand: Student's luck runs out when he reaches Tokyo (Harwood, LaBelle) 03/31/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


KSU Museum; Women's Studies Program (1)
Local news briefs - March 31 03/31/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Psychology (1)
Why obesity diminishes memory, by study (Gunstad) 03/30/2011 Nigeria Guardian Text Attachment Email

...well on cognitive tests as less hefty individuals do. To test whether weight alone — and not disease — might be partially responsible, John Gunstad of Kent State University in Ohio, United States of America, and his colleagues recruited 150 obese individuals for a series of cognitive tests....


Public Relations (1)
Kent State student 'winning' in race to become Charlie Sheen intern 03/31/2011 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email


Student (1)
Foundation for Enterprise Development Selects National Essay Contest Winners 03/30/2011 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...self-interested competition, increasing productivity and the effectiveness of the workforce." Alexandr Bolgari, BA Candidate, International Relations, Kent State University, Ohio 3rd place The Foundation for Enterprise Development (FED) was established in 1986 by Dr. J. Robert Beyster...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Kent Dance Ensemble celebrates 21 years 03/31/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Thank you offered to Kent volunteers | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When the words "Spring Break" are heard, they bring with them warm thoughts of sand and sun - and, of course, college students making treks toward a popular southern destination.

The words "Spring Break" aren't often associated with playgrounds.

But that's how several Kent State students spent their break from classes - providing a facelift to the five city playgrounds scattered throughout East Liverpool.

To that we say job well done.

It was part of the second annual Columbiana County Alternative Spring Break Program. Students from Kent State volunteered their services to repair, upgrade and install playground equipment for our area's youth.

"... we have a lot of pride knowing we helped a lot of kids have a clean, safe place to play," said Lexi Veri, a Kent student from Northfield, Ohio, who was the team leader at the Willie Cook Playground in the East End.

It can be a rare thing these days, finding anyone willing to volunteer. Not for a few hours or for the day, but for an entire week. This is especially true when you consider there are "Spring Break" alternatives out there to fill a week off from the grind of schoolwork.

These students ate and slept at Kent State-East Liverpool. That's after braving the elements daily to help others - the majority of whom they'll never come in direct contact with.

We applaud them for their service. We applaud those in charge of the program. And we thank those who believed our community and our children were worthy of this help.

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News Headline: ONE FOR THE AGES Champ Kilgore forever a part of KSU lore | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By TOM HARDESTY | ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
DUSTIN KILGORE IS NO
different than the thousands
of students that make their
way across campus at Kent State
University every day.
“I've got classes to go to and tests
to take,” said the criminal justice
major.
But while Kilgore may seem like
any other KSU undergrad trudging
from one building to the next,
he's not just lugging books with
him anymore.
He's carrying history.
Earlier this month, Kilgore became
the first Kent State studentathlete
since 1973 — and the firstever
in the storied history of the
Golden Flashes' wrestling program
— to capture a national title when
he won the 197-pound crown at the
NCAA Division I Championships in
Philadelphia.
Kilgore, a redshirt junior, pinned
Oklahoma State's Clayton Foster
with just four seconds left in the
second period after trailing 5-1 to
secure Kent State's first national title
in any sport since Jacques Accambray
won the hammer throw
at the 1973 NCAA Track & Field
Championships.
And despite Kent State's rich
tradition in wrestling, no Golden
Flash had ever made it to the top
of the podium at the NCAA Championships
until Kilgore put Foster's
shoulder blades to the mat in Philadelphia's
Wells Fargo Center on the
night of March 19.
In fact, the KSU wrestling team
had not even had an NCAA finalist
since Walter Porowski in 1942.
“It means so much to me because
we've never had a national
champion before,” said Kilgore,
who finished 38-2 on the year — setting
a school record for victories in
a season — and captured his third
consecutive Mid-American Conference
title en route to being named
the MAC Wrestler of the Year. “Not
too many people get a pin in the finals,
so getting a pin to win the national
championship just added to
everything.”
While Kilgore says “things are
starting to settle down now” following
the myriad congratulations he received
in the aftermath of his history-
making victory, Kent State coach
Jim Andrassy said that Kilgore's accomplishment
resonates as much
now as it did the moment his star
wrestler leapt triumphantly into his
arms that night in Philadelphia.
“As a coach, it's something that
still gives me goose bumps when I
think about it,” said Andrassy, who
credited assistant coaches Matt
Hill, Josh Moore and Drew Lashaway
for their invaluable contributions.
“We have such a historical
wrestling program at Kent State,
and to finally have a national champion
... this might never happen in
our lives again.”
Kilgore's road to Kent State history
actually began when he was a
senior at Berea High School.
That season, he was defeated
in the state championship
match after winning
the title the year before as
a junior, and the devastating
loss motivated Kilgore
to reach for the stars at the
next level.
“I never wanted to have
that feeling again,” said
Kilgore, the disappointment
evident in his voice. “When I
decided to go to Kent State,
I knew about their wrestling
tradition and knew they never
had a national champion,
and I really thought I could
be the first. Coming to Kent
after that loss, I really wanted
to turn things around
and do something big.”
It was obvious right away
that Kilgore could be something
special.
After redshirting his first
season at KSU, Kilgore was
named MAC Freshman of
the Year the next season as
a redshirt freshman, winning
the conference's 184-
pound title in the process.
As a sophomore, Kilgore
again won a MAC title and
earned All-American status
after placing seventh at the
NCAA Championships at
184 pounds.
It was then that Andrassy
realized his wrestler had
what it took to go all the
way. Kilgore lost an 8-5 decision
in the national quarterfinals
to eventual national
champion Maxwell Askren
of Missouri, establishing
that he was as good as any
wrestler in the country.
“Dustin was winning that
match with about 25 seconds
left, and he ended up
getting reversed and the
guy also got riding time at
the end,” said Andrassy.
“At that point, we said to
Dustin, ‘Listen, next year
anything but a championship
is unacceptable.' We
knew last year that he was
right there.”
Kilgore moved up to 197
this season, but that was
the only thing that changed
as he won the MAC for a
third time and entered the
NCAAs as the fourth seed
in the 197 bracket.
On the first day of nationals,
Kilgore scored back-toback
13-4 major decisions
over Brent Haynes of Missouri
in the opening round
and Jay Hahn of Bucknell in
the round of 16. In the win
over Hahn, Kilgore broke
former teammate Danny
Mitcheff's school record for
career victories with 132.
On day two, Kilgore
scored a 10-3 decision over
Luke Lofthouse of Iowa
in the quarterfinals, then
edged No. 1-ranked Cam
Simaz of Cornell 10-9 in the
semifinals.
Kilgore trailed three different
times against Simaz
before earning the onepoint
win, setting up his
day-three championship
match against Foster, who
entered the title bout with
a perfect 26-0 record.
However, despite Foster's
lofty record, Andrassy had
spotted some chinks in his
otherwise perfect armor.
“We knew Dustin's conditioning
was our biggest asset
going into that match,”
said the eighth-year KSU
coach. “Watching him earlier,
we knew Foster was very
good with his technique, but
Dustin pushes very hard —
he's very strong and physical
and he forces his will on
his opponents.”
However, it was Foster
who dictated the early going,
scoring two takedowns
to lead 4-1 after one period
and eventually building a 5-1
lead in the second period.
“It did surprise me — I
didn't expect to get taken
down twice so quickly,” said
Kilgore. “I thought, ‘I have
to get going here and kick it
into gear.' ”
But even though he was
trailing by four points, and
the second period — and a
national title — was ticking
away, Kilgore sensed his
opponent was beginning to
weaken.
“I noticed he was getting
pretty tired,” said Kilgore.
Andrassy, too, saw Foster's
fatigue.
“I was concerned after the
first period, but as the second
period went on, that kid
was visibly tired,” said Andrassy.
“He was changing
how he was wrestling because
of how tired he was.”
Then, with 25 seconds
left in the second period,
Kilgore shot in on Foster's
right leg and latched on,
sending Foster to the mat
in a seated position.
At that moment, Foster
made a fatal mistake.
“When I got into that
shot, he hooked his leg
around my leg, and that's
kind of my sweet spot,” said
Kilgore. “He hung onto my
left leg, and I just tilted him
back and exposed his back
to the mat. And instead of
just giving up the two (takedown
points) and going to
the third period up 5-3, he
tried to fight it. That actually
worked to my advantage.”
At one point Foster
reached up for Kilgore's
head in an attempt to turn
him, but in the process lost
leverage and was quickly
wrapped up by Kilgore, Foster's
shoulder blades hovering
just above the mat as the
final seconds ticked away.
As the final sequence unfolded,
neither Kilgore nor
Andrassy were aware of the
clock situation. But those
watching ESPN's live national
telecast were keenly
aware of the dwindling time
that was displayed on the
screen, and surely wondered
if Foster literally would be
saved by the bell.
“I was trying not to look
at the clock,” said Kilgore.
“That might have changed
the match a little bit. If I
would have known how
much time was left, I might
not have gone after him so
aggressively.”
Said Andrassy: “To be
honest, I totally lost track of
the time. I was just watching
what was happening on
the mat. I knew that even
if he didn't get the pin, the
takedown and back points
would put Dustin up 6-5 going
to the third period.”
That wasn't necessary.
Like a spider enveloping
its hapless prey, Kilgore finished
off the writhing Foster,
getting his right arm under
Foster's head and pinning
him to the mat with a mere
four seconds remaining for
his school-record 135th career
victory.
Moments later, Kilgore
ran over to Andrassy and
jumped into the arms of his
jubilant coach.
At long last, Kent State
wrestling had its national
champion.
“I consider myself a pretty
young coach still,” said Andrassy,
“and for this to happen
at this point in my career
is pretty amazing.”
So now, with the echoes of
the roaring crowd in Philadelphia
just a memory, it's
back to classes and exams
for Kilgore — and, of course,
quality time in the training
room.
After all, Kilgore does
have one more season of
college wrestling left, and
he'll enter 2012 with a huge
target on his back.
The defending national
champion always does.

INSET:
REWRITING THE
RECORD BOOKS
Kent State junior Dustin
Kilgore collected a bevy of
honors and firsts on his way
to the NCAA Division I national
championship at 197
pounds. Some of the more
notable are as follows:
Kent State's first national
champion in wrestling.
■ The Mid-American Conference's
first national champion
in wrestling since Central
Michigan's Casey Cunningham
in 1999.
Kent State's first NCAA finalist
in wrestling since Walter
Porowski in 1942.
Kent State's first national
champion in any sport since
hammer thrower Jacques Accambray
in 1973.
Kent State's second twotime
All-American in wrestling,
following Don Horning
in 1986.
■ Established school record
for victories in a season (38).
■ Established school record
for victories in a career (135).
■ Won third consecutive MAC
title.
■ Named MAC
Wrestler of
the Year.

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News Headline: The Kent State University student-atheletes will participate in the 9th annual Jock Jams Fundraiser (Seabeck) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Proceeds go to American Cancer Society and school

Kent, OH - Kent State University will hold their ninth annual Jock Jams fundraiser at 7 p.m. on Monday, April 5th, in the Student Center Ballroom on the Kent State main campus.

Jock Jams consists of the 16 varsity athletic teams at Kent State performing a choreographed lip sync and dance routine. Each team will compete against each other in front of the public and a panel of judges. The teams will be judged on most creative and original performances. The winning team will receive the annual Jock Jams trophy.

The proceeds from Jock Jams will be donated to the American Cancer Society and Walls Elementary School. Since Jock Jams began in 2003 the student athletes have raised over $25,000 to help fight against cancer.

The donations going to Walls Elementary School in Kent will go toward the purchase of new playground equipment.

The student-athletes have been spending time with students from the elementary school during their recess time. The program is called “Fridays with Flashes.” Since the program has gone so well and grown, the student-athletes wanted to give back to the elementary school.

“Those who haven't seen a previous Jock Jams event are in for quite a surprise,” said director of student-athlete development Angie Seabeck. “A lot of these kids are amazingly talented dancers and choreographers. Some of them even sing rather than lip-sync. Their costumes are always entertaining as well – the crowd just loves seeing them perform like this.”

The funds are raised through the $3.00 admission fee, t-shirt sales and general donations. The annual fundraising event sponsored by Kent State Athletics, is organized by the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC). For directions or further information about the 9th annual Jock Jams, contact Angie Seabeck at 330-672-4733 or visit www.kentstatesports.com.

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News Headline: NYT Dialogue on Shrinking Cities | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Environmental Law Professors
Contact Name: landuseprof
News OCR Text: The latest census figures from Detroit (Chad's hometown blogged about here and here) have inspired the New York Times to solicit opinions from several urban planning experts about the way forward for post-industrial cities confronted with large-scale property abandonment. Jennifer Bradley (Brookings-MPP) and Terry Schwarz (Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative) each offer shrinking city visions that challenge the idea that all planning must be for demographic expansion and economic growth. Their greening strategies, including attention to urban agriculture and ecosystems, contemplate a 'new normal' for cities that may, in some ways, be better than historical peak periods. Richarda Florida (Toronto-Business) and Sam Staley urge a focused (and apparently unsubsidized) effort to retain and attract residents in a mobile society. Still others, such as Toni Griffin (Harvard-Planning) see Detroit and similar cities as merely the most egregiously wounded casualties of unsustainable sprawl-promoting policies that must be changed throughout the U.S. Both the articles and even the comment board are worth checking out. (Hat Tip to Nicole Garnett (Notre Dame) and her student, Sean Ashburn)



I would also encourage those interested in working with the land use challenges faced by undercrowded, post-industrial cities to check out The Center for Community Progress (f/k/a National Vacant Properties Campaign). Over the years, I have had the chance to participate in conferences and technical assistance efforts that have brought urban development practitioners together with experts like Jennifer Bradley, Terry Schwarz, Kermit Lind (Cleveland State), Joe Schilling (Va. Tech-Metropolitan Inst.) and CCP's co-founder, Frank Alexander (Emory).



Jim K.

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News Headline: AUDIO State Releases Funding for KSU-Kent Walkway Project (Euclide) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The long term blueprint to link Kent State University with downtown Kent took another step forward this week when the state controlling board released $390,000 for the project.

The money will be used to purchase three key pieces of property needed to complete a campus walkway project

Kent State's Associate Vice President for Facilities Planning and Operations Tom Euclide tells AkronNewsNow " These are key pieces of property that will allow us to extend the university Esplanade )Es-plah-nod), the wide walkway that runs through the center of campus, all the way down to the business district in Kent."

Euclide says the plan is to provide a well lit and safe walkway for students to have access to downtown Kent , and for Kent residents to have easier access to the University's resources. "

Euclide says the walkway is also vital for downtown Kent's redevelopment plans, which include a hotel conference center. He says the walkway should help new businesses thrive in the downtown area in the years ahead.

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News Headline: Coming Cleveland area style events | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: • Saks Fifth Avenue at Beachwood Place, 26100 Cedar Road, will present a men's and women's contemporary fashion show at 7 p.m. Thursday on the second floor. Refreshments and light bites will be offered. You can shop from 7 to 9 p.m. and win an ensemble from the runway. Call 216-292-5500, ext. 205.

• The Little White Cottage gift shop in Aurora will host a trunk show of the spring collection of Bosom Buddy handbags Thursday through Saturday. Hours are 1-7 p.m. Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. The gift shop is inside Margaret's Fine Tailoring, 1013 N. Aurora Road. Those attending have a chance to win a clutch handbag. Call 330-562-0881.

• The Cleveland Craft Coalition will have an April Showers craft show featuring 30 artists and crafters from 2 to 8 p.m. Saturday at Sachsenheim Hall, 7001 Denison Ave., Cleveland. Call 216-965-5729.

• The AIDS Taskforce of Greater Cleveland will have a sale of recycled formalwear from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at its offices, 3210 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. Wedding dresses are $20; other dresses, $10; and shoes and accessories, $5. Proceeds will benefit the task force. Call 216-621-0766, ext. 232.

Kent State University will grant an honorary doctorate in humane letters to Leonardo Ferragamo, who is affiliated with the Italian shoe and luxury goods company Salvatore Ferragamo, and induct him into the Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design Hall of Fame at a ceremony at 5 p.m. Thursday, April 7. It will take place in the Kent State Student Center's kiva, 1075 Risman Drive. For reservations, email collegeofthearts@kent.edu or call 330-672-2760.

Fax Style news items to John Gruner at 216-515-2033 or e-mail to jgruner@plaind.com. For events, include the time, date, place (full address, including city), cost and phone number. Submissions must be received at least 10 days before the publication date. Notices will be printed as space permits and/or published online.

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News Headline: High tech inspires haute couture Kent State Fashion students employ digital textile technology to realize their visions | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: by WKSU's VIVIAN GOODMAN

Kent State's Fashion School was recently ranked third in the nation and 13th in the world. A key factor in the school's success has been advanced technology. Seven graduating seniors showed how they use it this week in Beijing at the invitation of the Chinese government.

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News Headline: Associate professor at Kent State Salem receives Award of Merit (Carlson, Jones) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM-Chris Carlson, associate professor of biological sciences and horticulture technology at Kent State University at Salem, recently received the Award of Merit from the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA), an international organization comprised of 22,000 certified arborists from 47 countries.

The once in a lifetime honor is given for outstanding and meritorious service in advancing the principles, ideals, and practices of professional tree care and arboriculture and contributing materially to the promotion of the ISA.

A certified arborist since 1991, Carlson joined the ISA in 1985. During his tenure he has published more than 65 articles on professional tree care, arboriculture and urban forestry, taught 12 different university courses in horticulture technology, and been responsible for helping develop and administer the ISA's Certified Arborist Exam recognized by 47 countries around the world as the most prestigious exam of its kind in arboriculture and urban forestry.

"The recognition of my efforts was one of the highlights in my career," Carlson said. "It truly was an honor for me to accept this award."

The Ohio chapter of the ISA presented Carlson with the award recently in a meeting in Columbus.

At Kent State Salem, Carlson teaches seven courses including urban forestry and arboriculture, which is one of three concentration areas within the university's horticulture program. Students studying horticulture can earn either an associate's or a bachelor's degree and focus their studies in professional tree care and arboriculture, turfgrass management or landscape management and design.

Prior to coming to Kent State Salem, Carlson was the head of the forestry and urban forestry department at North Dakota State University where he taught a variety of classes in arboriculture and urban forestry. Before this post, Carlson was a research forester with the Timberlands Division of Champion International Corporation in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Carlson earned bachelor's degrees in both plant biology and natural resource management from The University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point. Following graduation he held several positions as a state and county forester for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the United States Forest Service. In 1981, he earned his Master of Science degree from Michigan State University in East Lansing in forest management and silviculture, the section of forestry that focuses on the development and care of forests. Most recently Carlson served as an ISA board of director for the national ISA certification exam committee.

"Chris Carlson's ISA award reflects his years of commitment in supporting arboriculture education and his more than 20 years as a member of the ISA," said Stan Jones, director of the horticulture program at Kent State Salem. "The award attests to his expertise in the field of arboriculture and greatly helps support the professional ideals we promote within the horticulture department here at Kent State Salem."

Jones said the award helps recognize the specific fields of study offered at Kent State Salem and the university's commitment in keeping attuned to new technologies via industry memberships.

"We are very proud of his achievement and applaud Chris in receiving such a prestigious award," Jones said.

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News Headline: KSU STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHS TRAGEDY Experiencing Japan firsthand: Student's luck runs out when he reaches Tokyo (Harwood, LaBelle) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Carol Biliczky
Beacon Journal staff writer

Published on Thursday, Mar 31, 2011

KENT: When Thomas Song heard about the earthquake and tsunami in Japan, he started checking flights. Why not go over and snap a few photos?

A week later, the enterprising Kent State sophomore was en route to Southeast Asia to practice his burgeoning skills in photography.

''The opportunity was there. I didn't want to miss it,'' said Song, 28. ''If I'm going to do photojournalism, I want to experience it.''

The Stow native only got into photography when he took an introductory class the year before. His interest has morphed so much that he is thinking of changing his major from graphic design to photography. He has

talent, said KSU lecturer Gary Harwood, who had him as a student in a class.

''He was always very well prepared for class, actually doing more than I asked for,'' Harwood said. ''He has a real love of photography.''

Song also had something many students don't have — experience. He'd been all over the world as a specialist in Farsi with the Navy, including Japan about a decade ago. He had fond memories of the friendliness of the Japanese people. He knew what he was getting into.

But when he tested his idea with KSU faculty, they weren't all on board, recalls Dave LaBelle, the lecturer who directs the university's photo sequence.

Many of them ''didn't think he could do it,'' LaBelle said. ''They were afraid of him getting hurt. People tend to respond from the safe spot, but if you're going to excel you've got to move beyond that.''

Song overlooked the naysayers, leaving for Japan as KSU was starting its spring break. He had the $2,000 he needed for the trip, including a $1,200 flight, socked away thanks to a student loan he'd taken out for emergencies a ways back.

And he connected with friends of friends of friends in Japan via Facebook, so he had some contacts when he got there.

But his luck ran out when he reached Tokyo. He had trouble getting a seat on a bus for the six-hour trip north to Sendai, the biggest city near the heart of the disaster. When he finally got on a bus on Thursday, he couldn't find a hotel room in Sendai. An Internet contact saved the day and let him stay at his apartment.

Finally, Song had the chance to do what he'd come so far to do. But that wasn't ideal either.

By this time, he only had one hour of sunlight, in a cab, with a driver who didn't speak English, and he was only allowed to get out of the vehicle one time for a few minutes.

''It all boiled down to a $100 cab ride and one hour of daylight,'' Song said.

Still, he had time to shoot some gripping photos of the devastated storm scene. He said he was amazed at how quickly the Japanese were moving to set the disaster straight, even organizing debris into recyclable categories.

Where just days before there had had been debris and the remains of houses, he found soggy fields swept clean of timber and cars and the like.

The next day he was back on the bus to get to Tokyo in time for his flight on Saturday. His regular schedule in Kent awaited him — classes, his freelance work as a photographer for weddings and senior portraits and his job covering the campus for the student-run Daily Kent Stater.

If he could change anything, what would it be?

''Maybe next time, I'd push the taxi driver to get out more often,'' he said.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

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News Headline: Local news briefs - March 31 | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PORTAGE COUNTY

Class on Hepburn
KENT: Kent State is offering a special course this spring and also this summer on film star Katharine Hepburn.

The class pairs with an exhibition at the Kent State University Museum that showcases her attire on stage and screen.

The inaugural class on Hepburn in progress now examines her role as an American personality, a feminist and cultural influence. It is sponsored by the university's Women's Studies Program.

In addition, the KSU Museum will present two classic romantic comedies starring Spencer Tracy and Hepburn: Woman of the Year (1942) and Pat and Mike (1952). The movies are open to the public as well as students and are free with admittance to the museum.

Woman of the Year will be shown at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. today. Members of the Women's Studies class will lead a discussion after the 6 p.m. screening.

Pat and Mike will be shown at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. April 28. Patricia Campbell Warner, author of When the Girls Came Out to Play: The Birth of American Sportswear will discuss Hepburn's fashion influence after the 6 p.m. screening.

For details on the museum, call 330-672-3450. To register for the summer Hepburn course, call 330-672-8042 or send an email to slholt@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Why obesity diminishes memory, by study (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Nigeria Guardian
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OBESITY subtly diminishes memory and other features of thinking and reasoning even among seemingly healthy people, an international team of scientists reports. At least some of these impairments appear reversible through weight loss. Researchers also report one likely mechanism for those cognitive deficits: damage to the wiring that links the brain's information-processing regions.

A number of studies in recent years have shown that individuals with diseases linked to obesity, including cardiovascular disease, hypertension and type 2 diabetes, don't score as well on cognitive tests as less hefty individuals do. To test whether weight alone — and not disease — might be partially responsible, John Gunstad of Kent State University in Ohio, United States of America, and his colleagues recruited 150 obese individuals for a series of cognitive tests. These people weighed on average just under 300 pounds, although some were substantially heavier. Two-thirds would shortly undergo weight-loss surgery.

Scores on the tests were assessed against those of people in the Brain Resource International Database, a large multicenter project with data on very healthy people. Obese individuals in the new study initially performed on the low end of the normal range for healthy individuals from the database on average, Gunstad says, although nearly one-quarter of the obese participants' scores on memory and learning actually fell within what researchers consider the impaired range.

Tested again 12 weeks after bariatric surgery — when most had shed some 50 pounds — the lighter but still heavy patients scored substantially better. Most now performed “within the average or greater-than-average range for all cognitive tests,” the researchers report online in Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.

Study participants who didn't have surgery — or lose weight — performed worse on the second test. “That was a bit surprising,” Gunstad says.

Neurologist Stefan Knecht of the University of Münster in Germany, who is not involved in the new research, says he is not surprised that the untreated participants experienced rapid, continuing drops in cognitive performance. Among the morbidly obese, he says, “You can actually watch them getting worse from one three-month period to the next if you have sufficiently sensitive measures, which [Gunstad's group] did.”

The second new study by Gunstad's group used a form of magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, to probe the wiring that connects nerve cells to move information throughout the brain. The bundled fibers are sheathed in a protective layer of white insulation, giving rise to the tissue's name: white matter.

In obese individuals — but not normal-weight or overweight people — this sheathing shows signs of damage.

“It's not as though a cable has been cut,” Gunstad says. “It's just that its integrity is diminished,” jeopardizing the strength or clarity of signals that must traverse these cognitive highways. His group's findings appear in the March 2011 Obesity.

This white matter study “is interesting, and the methodology looks sensible,” says brain-imaging expert Mark Bastin of the University of Edinburgh Western General Hospital, who is also studying white matter integrity. But he argues it must be viewed as preliminary owing to “the very small numbers of subjects” — just 17 obese individuals among the 103 people studied.

Using the same Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique last year, Knecht's team linked C-reactive protein — a blood marker of systemic inflammation — with white matter integrity in a group of 447 older adults. Both type 2 diabetes and obesity can chronically elevate CRP levels in the blood.

As CRP levels in blood increased, Knecht and his colleagues found, so did the likelihood that white matter's insulation would be impaired. This suggests “that low-grade inflammation, which is strongly correlated with obesity, could be an important mediator,” Knecht says.

In that study, the researchers reported in the March 30, 2010 Neurology, higher levels of CRP also correlated with “with worse performance in executive function, including tests of psychomotor speed and attention.”

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News Headline: Kent State student 'winning' in race to become Charlie Sheen intern | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Posted: 9:15 PM
Last Updated: 12 hours and 15 minutes ago

By: Jen Steer

KENT, Ohio - A Kent State student must have some “tiger blood” because she is still in the running to become Charlie Sheen's intern.

A few weeks ago, 21-year-old Kelsey Cullen was looking for a job when she noticed a friend had retweeted Charlie Sheen : “I'm looking to hire a #winning INTERN with #TigerBlood.” Cullen click the link just out of curiousity, but, to her, the offer sounded awesome.

The full-time position is a paid summer internship with the former “Two and a Half Men” star.

“I've very interesting in the power of social media, and the job description sounds amazing to me,” Cullen said. “Being Charlie Sheen's intern would be the learning experience of a lifetime and it would undoubtedly jump-start my career.”

The Sandusky native is in her junior year of college, and is double majoring in public relations and advertising, with a minor in marketing.

In 75 characters or less, which is less than a Twitter post, Cullen had to explain why she would be good for the job. She wrote “I'm a tigress, social media guru, and educated in PR/AD/MKTG.”

And that was just the first round of the application process. Next, Cullen had to submit a formal resume. For round three, applicants had to answer a question in a 2-minute video. Watch her video here: http://bit.ly/fFS09x

Cullen said she heard the search has been narrowed down to 250 contestants and more than 82,000 people applied.

Sheen became an instant star on Twitter, after a series of bizarre interviews that popularized his now-signature phrases like “tiger blood,” “Adonis DNA” and, of course, “winning.”

Copyright 2011 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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News Headline: Foundation for Enterprise Development Selects National Essay Contest Winners | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SOURCE Foundation for Enterprise Development

Creating Wealth by Sharing Wealth

SAN DIEGO, /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Foundation for Enterprise Development (FED) today announced judges have selected winners for its national essay contest – Creating Wealth by Sharing Wealth™. The FED sponsored the first-ever multi-university essay contest to catalyze college students' thinking on business principles and strategies required for future economic success.

More than 430 graduate and undergraduate students participated from across the country. Students were asked to describe their strategies for increasing employee motivation, creating innovative and productive firms, and establishing more sustainable economies in the 21st century through broad-based employee ownership and profit sharing within the corporation.

Mary Ann Beyster, president of the FED, states, "Students will lead the way in establishing new cooperative and innovative models of the modern corporation based on more people winning, rather than a few."

Complete essays from the four national winners and a listing of students are available at: www.fed.org/education-essay-contest.

Essays convey insights on effective corporate leadership:

"The difference will not be in the quality or novelty of the product I sell, or the service my company offers, but in the commitment, motivation, and empowerment of the people who do not work 'for' but who work 'with' me."

Terry Williamson, MBA Candidate, University of California, San Diego, Calif.

1st place

"People want to be a part of something great. Great ideas come from people with the incentive and freedom to explore; and in that respect business is no different than any other discipline."

Scotty McWilliams, BBA Candidate, Finance and Economics, LaMar University, Texas

4th place

They articulate their assessments of corporate shortcomings:

"In the midst of our own Great Recession, what idea could be more powerful than a country in which we all own the future?...Employees are not commodities to be fired when the business does poorly and provided with disproportionally low compensation when the business does well, but are vested stakeholders who have a legitimate right to share power and responsibility."

Tejdev Sandhu, MS Candidate, Accounting and Information Systems, Virginia Tech

Best in class

They argue for government economic policies and programs consistent with America's constitution:

"For the proponents of greater social equality it [employee ownership] enables the workers to own the enterprise and means of production, and for the adherents of Adam Smith's principles of economics, it operates within the boundaries of the free market under the premise of self-interested competition, increasing productivity and the effectiveness of the workforce."

Alexandr Bolgari, BA Candidate, International Relations, Kent State University, Ohio

3rd place

The Foundation for Enterprise Development (FED) was established in 1986 by Dr. J. Robert Beyster to promote the concept of broad-based, participative employee ownership and entrepreneurism. The FED funds inter-disciplinary research and curriculum development at business, engineering, and liberal arts schools. The FED also creates and engages in research and training programs that inspire innovation and entrepreneurship for solving problems of national and global importance. For more information, visit www.fed.org

Contact:

Bianca Lipshitz

blipshitz@fed.org

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News Headline: Kent Dance Ensemble celebrates 21 years | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent Dance Ensemble will perform its 21st main stage concert at
8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2 p.m. Sunday. For tickets or more information,
call 330-672-2497.

Kent State University's
School of Theatre and Dance
will present the Kent Dance
Ensemble's 21st annual main
stage concert, titled “Coming
of Age.” Performances are at
8 p.m. Friday and Saturday,
and 2 p.m. Sunday in the E.
Turner Stump Theatre, Music
and Speech Center, 1325
Theatre Drive in Kent.
The pre-professional student
dance company boasts
13 dancers from both the
performance/choreography
and dance education programs
who will be performing
new and revitalized works
by KSU dance faculty members
and guest artists from
Washington, D.C. and Eugene,
Oregon.
The concert opens with the
entire Ensemble in Dance
Director Andrea Shearer's
Rainbow Concerto, inspired
by and performed to music
by Antonio Vivaldi. Following
is Artistic Director Kimberly
Karpanty's new trio
iron hand in a velvet glove,
inspired by a recent trip to
her grandfather's birthplace
in Northern Italy. The title
is a phrase listed under the
definition of her family's Italian
name “Pugno,” which
means “to fight.” Accompanied
by an aria by Italian
composer Giuseppe Verdi
and projections of doors
from Rome, Florence, Tuscany
and Asti, the three dancers
portray immigrant sisters
reminiscing about their
homeland while hoping for a
better future in this country.
Closing the first half is the
mysterious Ashplay, choreographed
by guest artist and
former dance faculty member
Melanie George. Images
of France, Morocco, Audrey
Hepburn, Leslie Caron, Beatniks,
and Andy Warhol's Factory
contribute to this new
quartet where jazz, smoking
and secrets combine.
Assistant Professor Joan
Meggitt restages her 2007 the
sky beneath our feet on the
Ensemble, this season to live
music. Lou Harrison's music
for violin, piano and percussion
will be played by Dance
Music Director Bill Sallak,
Assistant Professor of Theatre
Jonathan Swoboda and
School of Music student Nicolette
Kocsardy. This reflective
quintet explores the
seemingly polarized sensibilities
of form and flow. Ludwig
van Beethoven's iconic
“Moonlight Sonata” is score
for a new duet by Barbara
Allegra Verlezza about the
shades and complexities of
relationships. “Man is a knot
into which relationships are
tied,” a quote by Antoine de
Saint-Exupéry also inspired
this examination.
The evening closes with
guest artist Brad Garner's
athletic and dramatically
layered dance for ten, Pages
Missing. Originally created
in 2005, the work is a
reflection on a time in Garner's
life when much of what
he believed suddenly made
no sense. It is a celebration
of persistence in the face of
disorder. The sound score is
comprised of a re-edited version
of John Cheever's short
story “The Enormous Radio”
read by Meryl Streep, a modernized
cover of Beethoven's
“Triple Concerto” by William
Orbit, and Radiohead's “The
Gloaming.” What are the
connections between the
parts? Exactly.
Contact Artistic Director
Kimberly Karpanty at
330-672-0127 for more information
and on more of the
Ensemble's upcoming performances
and educational
outreach programs.
To reserve tickets, call
the School of Theatre and
Dance Box Office at 330-672-
2497 between noon and 5 today
or Friday, or visit www.
dance.kent.edu to order online.
General adult admission
is $16; $12 for seniors,
KSU faculty, staff and alumni;
$8 for students with a valid
ID. A free reception will
take place on Saturday, April
2 following the performance
to honor KDE alumni.

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