Report Overview:
Total Clips (38)
Aeronautics (1)
Aeronautics; KSU Airport (1)
Athletics (2)
College of Business (COB) (1)
Dining Services (1)
Dining Services; Students (1)
Distinguished Scholar Awards (1)
Entrepreneurship (1)
Health Sciences (4)
KSU at Geauga (2)
KSU at Salem (3)
KSU at Stark (2)
Political Science (1)
Psychology (12)
Students (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Tuition (1)
University Press (1)
Wick Poetry Center (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics (1)
Learn about aviation careers at A.C.E. Academy this summer 04/17/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

...experience, which will expose them to a broad range of activities, trips and speakers. Students will also fly a plane with an instructor at the at the Kent State University airport. Each day during the week-long experience, students will tour an aviation-related worksite to talk to professionals...


Aeronautics; KSU Airport (1)
Airplane crashes during landing at KSU Airport (Palcho, Vincent) 04/17/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

Stow -- A single-engine plane crashed on the runway at Kent State University Airport when a student pilot attempted to land about 6:41 p.m. April 9, according to Stow Police Department and Kent...


Athletics (2)
KSU'S FAIRYTALE ENDS (Biggin) 04/18/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Haut officially returns to Kent (Haut, Senderoff, Hazell) 04/18/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Business (COB) (1)
CFA Society of Cleveland and Kent State University College of Business Present "The State of Capital" 04/17/2011 PR-Canada.net Text Attachment Email

The CFA Society of Cleveland (CFASC) and the Kent State University College of Business will host a discussion on career prospects and market opportunities...


Dining Services (1)
Earth Day Celebrations Start With Vegan Iron Chef Competition 04/18/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Dining Services; Students (1)
Chefs compete with vegan dishes at KSU 04/18/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Distinguished Scholar Awards (1)
Celebration news - April 17 04/18/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Entrepreneurship (1)
Priceline.com founder will speak at Kent State 04/17/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Jeff Hoffman, founder and CEO of Priceline.com, will be speaking at Kent State University at 7 p.m. Monday, in the Kiva, as part of the Michael D. Solomon Entrepreneurship Speaker Series. Hoffman will speak...


Health Sciences (4)
How salt intake raises BP (Glickman) 04/15/2011 AmsterdamNews.net Text Attachment Email

...the journal Hypertension Research reports. A team led by professors Robert P. Blankfield at Case Western Reserve University and Ellen L. Glickman at Kent State University tested whether these dual roles of the cardiovascular system might help explain how salt ingestion leads to salt-sensitive...

How salt intake raises BP (Glickman) 04/15/2011 BaltimoreNews.net Text Attachment Email

...the journal Hypertension Research reports. A team led by professors Robert P. Blankfield at Case Western Reserve University and Ellen L. Glickman at Kent State University tested whether these dual roles of the cardiovascular system might help explain how salt ingestion leads to salt-sensitive...

New study identifies possible cause of salt-induced hypertension 04/15/2011 RxPGNews.com Text Attachment Email

...arterioles that characterize individuals with essential hypertension. [RxPG] New research from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Kent State University shows that salt intake raises blood pressure because it makes it harder for the cardiovascular system to simultaneously...

Salt-related hypertension linked to temp 04/16/2011 UPI.com Text Attachment Email

...Blankfield, clinical professor of family medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and Ellen L. Glickman, professor of exercise science at Kent State University, examined the effect of salt and water consumption vs. just water on a group of 22 healthy men without high blood pressure....


KSU at Geauga (2)
KSU Geauga, ESC team for Literacy Day (Hricko) 04/16/2011 News-Herald Text Attachment Email

Several months of preparation culminated in a multi-school Literacy Day at Kent State University's Geauga campus Friday. Sixth-graders from Berkshire, Newbury and West Geauga schools spent this past semester reading...

Earth Day event set in Burton 04/17/2011 News-Herald Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Geauga Campus' Gaia Society is sponsoring an Earth Day celebration. From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at the campus,...


KSU at Salem (3)
KSU to offer insurance studies degree 04/18/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

KSU to offer insurance degree (Lefton) 04/18/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Salem will be the starting point for a new bachelor's degree of insurance studies in the fall of 2012. Insurance...

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY TO PURSUE BACHELOR'S IN INSURANCE STUDIES (Lefton) 04/15/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, April 15 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University is announcing its intent to bring a bachelor's...


KSU at Stark (2)
Kent Stark students learn life lesson patching pot hole 04/18/2011 Repository, The Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Conservationist Jerome Ringo Speaks at Kent State Stark 04/15/2011 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Ringo spoke to students and faculty at the Kent State University Stark Campus Thursday and encouraged them to educate others about nature and conservation. Click here to see video:...


Political Science (1)
KSU professor to publish book on political unrest in Middle East (Stacher) 04/17/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

Stow -- It was an emotional roller coaster when the uprisings in Egypt started back in January, according to assistant professor at Kent State University's Political Science Department. "It happened very fast," said Stow resident Joshua Stacher, an expert on the Middle...


Psychology (12)
Kent State University study links weight and memory (Gunstad) 04/18/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Video: Research Links Weight Loss and Memory Performance (Gunstad) 04/17/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Can losing weight make you smarter? One professor at Kent State University is working to answer that question. And so far, the answer appears to be "yes." John Gunstad, an associate professor...

Losing Weight Improves Memory: Study (Gunstad) 04/15/2011 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...memory. It makes sense that as the body becomes healthier, so does the brain, said study author John Gunstad, an associate professor of psychology at Kent State University, USA Today reported. The study was published online this week in the journal Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.

Could Weight Loss Improve Memory? (Gunstad) 04/15/2011 ABC News - Online Text Attachment Email

...for your heart. New research indicates it also can improve your memory. According to a study led by John Gunstad, assistant professor of psychology at Kent State University, weight loss may improve concentration and overall cognitive ability. "We've known for a long time that obesity is...

Weight Loss Improves Memory, Research Reveals (Gunstad) 04/15/2011 ABC News Radio - Online Text Attachment Email

...your heart. New research indicates it also can improve your memory. According to a study led by John Gunstad, assistant professor of psychology at Kent State University, weight loss may improve concentration and overall cognitive ability. "We've known for a long time that obesity is...

Digital Tutors Can Train Students to Seek Help With School Work (Rawson) 04/15/2011 Education Week - Online Text Attachment Email

...the extent to which the student can use a strategy depends on metacognitive skills,” said Katherine A. Rawson, an assistant professor of psychology at Kent State University, in Ohio. She studies the role of metacognition in study skills but was not part of the study on students' digital help-seeking...

A STUDY AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY 04/15/2011 San Diego 6 News at 5 AM - San Diego 6 The CW (XETV-TV) Text Email

TAKING OFF A FEW POUNDS APPARENTLY WILL IMPROVE YOUR MEMORY. RESEARCHERS HAVE FOUND ANOTHER BENEFIT TO WEIGHT LOSS. A STUDY AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FOUND THAT BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS SHOWED IMPROVED MEMORY FUNCTION 12-WEEKS AFTER THEIR OPERATIONS. THE FINDINGS WILL...

RESEARCH FROM KENT STATE UNIVERSITY 04/15/2011 Daybreak on the Deuce at 5 AM - KWGN-TV Text Email

JUST GOOD FOR THE BODY RESEARCH SHOWS IT'S GOOD FOR THE MIND AS WELL RESEARCH'S FROM KENT STATE UNIVERSITY TESTED THE FUNCTIONS OF OBESE VOLUNTEERS THEIR REPEATED THAT CONTRADICT AS 12 YEARS LATER AFTER PERCENTAGE OF THEM LOST...

RESEARCHERS AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY STUDIED 150 OVERWEIGHT PARTICIPANTS. 04/15/2011 World News - ABC News Network Text Email

...PENCIL? YES. HOW DID YOU DO? IF YOU HAD TROUBLE REMEMBERING AND HOPE TO SHARPEN YOUR SKILLS, CONSIDER LOSING SOME EIGHT. YES, EIGHT. RESEARCHERS AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY STUDIED 150 OVERWEIGHT PARTICIPANTS. THEY ALL TOOK A MEMORY TEST. A QUARTER OF THEM SHOWED SIGNS OF POOR MEMORY. AND...

Losing Weight Could Improve Memory, Research Suggests (Gunstad) 04/16/2011 Nurse.com Text Attachment Email

...know they lose a lot of weight in a short amount of time, so it was a good group to study, said lead researcher John Gunstad, an associate professor in Kent State Universitys Department of Psychology. This is the first evidence to show that by going through this surgery, individuals might improve...

A WEIGHT OFF YOUR MIND 04/16/2011 Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland) Text Email

...a health kick. If you're in need of motivation, here are 10 reasons why being slim is good for you: BRAIN POWER A new study by scientists at Kent State University in Ohio found that in mental tests, almost a quarter of their 150 overweight participants scored low enough to be considered...

Among Other Benefits Weight Loss Also Improves Memory (Gunstad) 04/18/2011 Medical News Today Text Attachment Email


Students (1)
2 KSU students indicted 04/16/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A Portage County grand jury has indicted two Kent State University students on charges they imported fake IDs from China in February with the alleged intent to distribute them on the Kent...


Theatre and Dance (1)
ALONG THE WAY: Erdmann-Zucherro tribute 04/16/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Totally elsewhere, Janet and I caught Karl Erdmanns nice Student Theater Festival at Kent State a week ago Friday that honored the memory of his late father, Lou Erdmann, and his colleague, the late Bill Zucherro, both so important...


Tuition (1)
Ohio public colleges try to work around tuition caps 04/15/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

...budgets are passed at the end of June. University of Akron officials had no comment on how they plan to allocate increases if trustees raise tuition. Kent State University has made no decision on fall tuition rates but would appreciate more flexibility, a spokesman said. Presidents of Ohio's...


University Press (1)
Authors focus on Jim Tully, Kent's forgotten literary light 04/17/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...for their book. Tully's story is interesting enough, they'd say, but they'd have trouble marketing it; nobody's ever heard of him. Will Underwood at Kent State University Press couldn't pass it up but recognized the same obstacle. “The hurdle for this book is answering the question: Who...


Wick Poetry Center (1)
Maplewood students win poetry prizes 04/17/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

In the annual Ohio high school student poetry competition sponsored by the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University, students at Maplewood Career Center in Ravenna nearly swept the honors this year, according to Maplewood instructor Scott...


News Headline: Learn about aviation careers at A.C.E. Academy this summer | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: High school students interested in exploring careers in aviation are invited to enroll in the tuition-based A.C.E., or Aviation Career Education Academy.

Incoming 10th-, 11th- and 12th-graders from the Six District Educational Compact schools are eligible for the experience, which will expose them to a broad range of activities, trips and speakers. Students will also fly a plane with an instructor at the at the Kent State University airport.

Each day during the week-long experience, students will tour an aviation-related worksite to talk to professionals and hear about careers in the airlines, government, military and airport management.

The unique opportunity is available thanks to a partnership between the Six District Educational Compact and Kent State University's College of Technology and the Division of Aeronautics.

Offered from June 13 to 17, students will meet from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at KSU's Van Deusen Hall. Cost is $185, which includes flying time, bus transportation, worksite visits and a T-shirt.

For more information, contact your high school guidance office or call the Compact office at 330-655-2247. Brochures are available.

The Six District Educational Compact provides College Tech Prep Initiatives, career programs, services and resources for Cuyahoga Falls, Hudson, Kent, Stow-Munroe Falls, Tallmadge and Woodridge school districts.

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News Headline: Airplane crashes during landing at KSU Airport (Palcho, Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name: Mariana Silva
News OCR Text: Stow -- A single-engine plane crashed on the runway at Kent State University Airport when a student pilot attempted to land about 6:41 p.m. April 9, according to Stow Police Department and Kent State University Police.

The pilot, an aeronautics major at Kent State performing her first solo flight, was not injured.

The pilot told KSU police she was landing and lost control of the airplane, causing its nose to hit the runway. The plane is a 1984 single-engine Cessna 152 owned by Kent State University. The airport remained closed after the accident and reopened about 9:30 p.m. when the runway was cleared.

Stow Police were the first to arrive at the airport. According to their report, upon arrival they found the pilot "extremely upset" and outside of the airplane. Officers reported the airplane appeared to have front-end damage to the propeller and front wheel.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol and the Cleveland Flight Standards District Office, the local branch of the Federal Aviation Administration, are investigating.

A Cleveland FSDO officer said no further information on the accident could be released until investigations are complete. The officer was at the airport April 11 to inspect the plane.

Emily Vincent, Kent State's spokesperson, said the university will leave it to investigators to determine what went wrong. She confirmed the front end of the aircraft was damaged and that the university doesn't know how much the damage will cost to repair.

Timothy Palcho, chief instructor and lecturer at the Kent State Aeronautics program, said the student's instructor was there when the planed crashed. Palcho said the student had flown with her instructor for about one hour that day and made successful landings. He said she flew for about 20 minutes on her own and completed one successful full stop landing before experiencing a problem during the second one.

Palcho also said the student satisfied all the procedures included in the Code of Federal Regulations to be eligible for a student pilot certificate and did all the preparation required for a solo flight.

On March 15, a twin-engine Cessna 152 slid off the airport's runway. The plane was a commercial aircraft. The pilot and five other people were aboard and no one was injured. This accident is also under investigation.

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News Headline: KSU'S FAIRYTALE ENDS (Biggin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Program's best season ever comes to close at NCAA finals

CLEVELAND — No
Kent State team has ever
done what the 2011 edition
of the Golden Flashes
have.
There was disappointment
following the team's
exit from the NCAA
Championships on Friday,
but at the same time,
there was reason to celebrate,
too.
The Golden Flashes
failed to advance to the
Super Six, which would
have allowed them the
opportunity to continue
their quest for a first-ever
national championship.
However, the team completed
the season with its
highest ranking in program
history at No. 12 after
totaling a team score
of 195.000 on Friday at
the national finals, which
were held at Cleveland's
Wolstein Center.
No other Kent State
gymnastics team has ever
qualified for the national
championships. This
year's team advanced after
placing second overall
at the Ann Arbor Regional
and entered Friday's
opening day of competition
as the No. 12 seed
out of 12 teams.
“It's hard to describe
how gratifying this season
has been,” said Kent
State head coach Brice
Biggin, who completed
his 20th year as the
program's head coach.
“To see all of the hard
work the girls put in pay
off with a trip to the national
championships,
I think it is safe to say
the future is very bright
for Kent State gymnastics.
I'm very proud of
our team.”
Senior co-captain
Christina Lenny just
missed finishing out her
storied career with All-
America honors, placing
17th in the overall allaround
with a score of
39.125, which was good
for 10th in the second
semifinal.
Lenny tied senior cocaptain
Christine Abou-
Mitri for ninth on the
floor exercise with a
9.850. Lenny also tied
for 21st on the vault with
a 9.825 and tied for 24th
on the uneven bars with
a 9.800.
Freshman Marie Case,
who was named the Mid-
American Conference's
Freshman of the Year,
closed out her strong
rookie campaign by tying
for 22nd in the combined
all-around and
tying for 13th in the
second semifinal with
a 39.025.
She tied for 24th on the
vault, along with freshman
Nikki Moore and
sophomore Rachel Guida
with a 9.800.
Case also tied for 25th
on the floor exercise with
a 9.800 and tied sophomore
Lindsay Runyan, who took
home MAC Specialist of the
Year honors this season, for
30th on the uneven bars with
a 9.750.
Sophomore Lauren Wozniak
finished her season by
tying for 33rd on the vault
with a 9.775.
UCLA grabbed the last
qualifying spot in Friday's
preliminary round of the
NCAA women's, keeping
alive its quest for a second
straight national title.
Oklahoma (196.775) and
Michigan (196.7) were in the
top two positions following
the morning session, and
UCLA (196.5) was third.
Alabama (197.05), Nebraska
(196.85) and Utah
(196.2) led the night qualifying
round and also will compete
in Saturday's finals at
Cleveland State's Wolstein
Center.
Michigan senior Kylee
Botterman (39.525) won the
NCAA all-around championship.
Alabama senior Kayla
Hoffman (39.5) was second,
while Crimson Tide junior
Geralen Stack-Eaton and
Georgia senior Cassidy Mc-
Comb tied for third at 39.4.

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News Headline: Haut officially returns to Kent (Haut, Senderoff, Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Eric Haut has returned
to his alma mater to join Rob
Senderoff first men's basketball
coaching staff at Kent State.
The former Golden Flashes
shooting guard and assistant
coach arrived in Kent on
Tuesday, interviewed
for the only opening on the KSU staff
on Wednesday, was on the
job by Thursday and the official
announcement of his
hire came on Friday.
Kent State has always
been a special place for
me, and I am thrilled to be
back with the opportunity
to continue the championship
success of the storied
program,” said Haut,
who is a 2004 KSU grad
that spent the last three
season at Texas Christian
on the staff of former KSU
head coach Jim Christian.
“This is where my heart
and loyality is, so I am both
thankful and appreciative
to coach Senderoff and the
Kent State administration
for allowing me to return
and be able to build upon
the strong roots of the Kent
State basketball family.”
Haut knows what it takes
to win at KSU. As a player,
he was a key performer
off the bench in the Flashes'
2002 Elite Eight run.
The Lansing, Mich. native
hit 200 3-pointers in his career,
ranking second in the
Flashes' record books behind
only Trevor Huffman.
During his four years in a
KSU uniform, the Flashes
posted a 98-34 overall record
with four consecutive
MAC East Division crowns.
Haut also made it to the
NCAA Tournament as a
coach, serving as an assistant
on the 2008 Mid-
American Conference
championship team that
earned a No. 8 seed — the
highest seed in program
history. Two years earlier,
he was director of operations
on another MAC
title team and tourney
qualifier.
That record for success
is a big reason Senderoff
asked Haut if he would
consider returning to
Kent. He wanted another
coach who alreadly understands
the blueprint
the Flashes have used to
become one of the top
mid-major programs in
the country over the last
decade.
“I could not be more excited
to welcome coach
Haut back to Kent State,”
said Senderoff. “He has
been an integral part of
our tradition since his
playing days and time as
an assitant coach, and he
knows what it takes to
win at Kent State and in
the Mid-American Conference.
“Having already been
part of the Kent State
family for seven years, the
experience coach Haut
has with our program is
invaluable. As a coach,
he is a great teacher of
the game and does all the
work needed to recruit
the best student-athletes
that will enable the
continued success of our
team.”
BLUE-AND-GOLD GAME
TONIGHT
KSU's spring football
game kicks off at 6 p.m.
at Dix Stadium, with the
Jacquise Terry and Dri
Archer-led Gold team
taking on the Spencer
Keith and Roosevelt Nixled
Blue team.
The game signals the
end of the Flashes' first
spring practice season
under first-year head
coach Darrell Hazell.
“It will be exciting,” said
Hazell. “It's been a good
spring for us.”
The plan is to play four
12-minute quarters. The
game could be played
with a running clock, depending
on the weather.
Rain is expected most of
the day.
WHAT TO WATCH, PART 1
KSU fans will want to
keep an eye on the play of
the Flashes' quarterbacks
during tonight's spring
game.
Incumbent starter
Spencer Keith and redshirt
freshman Cedric Mc-
Cloud split reps with the
first team in last weekend's
jersey scrimmage.
Keith will start tonight for
the Blue team, while Mc-
Cloud is expected to get
most of the work with the
Gold.
Hazell has liked what
he has seen out of both
quarterbacks, and while
Keith is the favorite to return
as the starter in his
junior season, his battle
with McCloud could be
one of the most intriguing
of preseason camp.
“You've seen a lot of
growth in Spencer and
Cedric,” said Hazell. “I really
like the direction they
are heading. They have to
keep getting better and
learning the system, but I
think they have a chance
to be really good.”
WHAT TO WATCH, PART 2
With Terry and Archer
on the same side following
Wednesday's springgame
draft, the Gold
team should have the
most dangerous running
team. Terry and Archer
are the only backs with
experience on the Flashes'
roster.
Watch for signs of Archer's
continued growth.
After a somewhat disappointing
sophomore season
in 2010, Archer has
been electrifying at times
this spring. With several
long runs, he was the
star of last week's jersey
scrimmage.

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News Headline: CFA Society of Cleveland and Kent State University College of Business Present "The State of Capital" | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: PR-Canada.net
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The CFA Society of Cleveland (CFASC) and the Kent State University College of Business will host a discussion on career prospects and market opportunities two years after the financial crisis. The event -- which will take place on Wednesday, April 20, at Kent State University's Student Center Ballroom in Kent, Ohio -- will feature Margaret E. Franklin, CFA, chair of the Board of Governors of CFA Institute and president and CEO of Kinsale Private Wealth, Inc. Also lending their insights and expertise will be Denise Farkas, CFA, chair of the Investment Committee at Sigma Investment Counselors, and Bruce McCain, Ph.D., CFA, chief investment strategist for Key Private Bank.

Registrants are invited to check in between 3:45 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. For those who are interested, the CFASC will offer a presentation on the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) program beginning at 4:15 p.m. The CFA program is a globally recognized standard for measuring the competence and integrity of financial analysts administered by the CFA Institute. The curriculum covers investment analysis, portfolio management, financial statement analysis, corporate finance, economics, performance measurement, and professional ethics. After the CFA program, there will be a short break with the panel discussion featuring Franklin, Farkas and McCain commencing at 5:30 p.m. The CFASC will host a networking session, complete with drinks and appetizers, from 6:45-8 p.m.

Attendance is free of charge to CFASC members as well as one guest per member, CFA candidates, students, and faculty; otherwise, a cost of $20 will apply. To register, visit http://ksu.eventbrite.com or contact CFASC administrator, Katie Khoury, at 216-696-8066 or via email at cfa@cleveland.cfasociety.orgThis e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it . Registration will remain open until 5 p.m. on Monday, April 18, or until capacity is met (250 attendees). Khoury can also provide information about sponsorship opportunities.

Margaret E. Franklin, CFA

Margaret E. Franklin, CFA, is president and CEO of Kinsale Private Wealth, Inc. Previously, she was a partner at K.J. Harrison & Partners for eight years. Before transitioning to the private client side of the business, Franklin spent more than a decade in institutional asset management. She was managing director of institutional asset management at Altamira Management, overseeing all activities related to the institutional business. Franklin was responsible for the firm's largest institutional clients, including pension plans, government agencies, corporate entities, endowments, and foundations. Her activities included setting portfolio strategy and ensuring implementation of and compliance with portfolio mandates. Franklin has also worked with Barclays Global Investors Canada, Mercer Investment Consulting, and State Street Global Advisors. She was elected to the CFA Institute Board of Governors in 2004 and currently serves as chair. Franklin formerly chaired the Audit and Risk Committee, External Relations and Volunteer Involvement Committee, and Planning Committee. She graduated from McMaster University with a B.A. in Economics.

Denise M. Farkas, CFA

Denise M. Farkas, CFA, joined Sigma Investment Counselors in 2007 bringing more than 25 years of investment related experience to the firm. Prior to joining Sigma, she was director of research at a Cleveland-based investment advisory firm. Farkas holds a business degree from Emory University and an MBA from the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University. She received the CFA designation in 1991. Farkas is chair of Sigma's Investment Committee and oversees the investment research process. She also serves as a relationship officer and portfolio manager on client accounts. Farkas currently serves as a member and immediate past chair of the Capital Markets Policy Committee of CFA Institute's Center for Financial Market Integrity. She is also a member of CFA Institute's Curriculum Executive Advisory Board, and was a member of the Board of Governors of CFA Institute from 1999 to 2005.

Bruce McCain, Ph.D., CFA

Bruce McCain, Ph.D., CFA, is the chief investment strategist for Key Private Bank and directs the research efforts which support that team's work. He is the past director of investment research. He serves as the investment manager on portfolios for both individuals and charitable endowments. Prior to working at Key, McCain taught courses and conducted research in organizational behavior at the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. He received a B.A. in Accounting and a B.S. in Psychology from Boise State University and received his Ph.D. in Business Administration from the University of California, Berkeley. McCain holds the CFA designation and belongs to the CFA Institute and the CFA Society of Cleveland.

About The CFA Society of Cleveland

The CFA Society of Cleveland (www.cfacleveland.org), formerly The Cleveland Society of Security Analysts, was founded in 1950 and provides investment-related programs and services to its Northeast Ohio-based membership. The CFASC has approximately 450 members, and is a member society of CFA Institute, formerly the Association for Investment Management and Research (AIMR). AIMR was formed in January 1990 as a combination of the Financial Analysts Federation, founded in 1947, and the Institute of Chartered Financial Analysts, and was renamed CFA Institute in 2004. CFA Institute currently represents more than 100,000 members, who include the world's 90,000 CFA charterholders, in 135 countries and territories.

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News Headline: Earth Day Celebrations Start With Vegan Iron Chef Competition | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Standing Rock Cultural Arts, in cooperation with The VegiTerranean Restaurant, The University of Akron, and Kent State University Dining Services, hosted the 3rd Annual Vegan Iron Chef competition at the Kent State University Student Center Sunday.

The cooking competition is the first of several events planned by Standing Rock to celebrate Earth Day this week.

The events culminate with the Who's Your Mama? Earth Day Festival Friday at the Kent Stage.

For more information on the festival, visit Standing Rock's website.

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News Headline: Chefs compete with vegan dishes at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 4TH ANNUAL KSU EVENT PART OF ‘WHO'S YOUR MAMA' FEST

It was sweet; it was spicy.
“Usually it's sweet and sour,”
said Pete Yachanin, a Kent State
University senior, as he deftly prepared
the sauce for his vegetarian
egg roll.
“This is sweet and hot. It's got
that sweet flavor at first, but
then it's got a little bit of a kick,”
he said.
The hospitality management
major was one of a dozen college
students competing in the fourth
annual Vegan Iron Chef Competition,
put on by Standing Rock
Cultural Arts in Kent.
Student and professional
teams cooked up their animalless,
organic and mostly locallygrown
food on Sunday. They offered
samples to the judges and
to the more than 100 visitors who
wandered around the second
floor of the KSU student center
examining the chefs' artistry.
The event was one of the centerpieces
of Standing Rock's
Who's Your Mama? Earth Day
Festival.
“The objective is to provide an
outlet for local and organic food
to be displayed to the public,”
said Jeff Ingram, executive director
of Standing Rock Cultural
Arts. The VegiTerranean Restaurant
in Akron, the University
of Akron and KSU Dining Services
were also sponsors.
“It's to display the benefits to
personal health as well as
the health to planet earth
of a vegan diet and eating
lower on the food chain,”
Ingram said.
There was a watermelon
sculpting competition featuring
hospitality management
students from the
University of Akron, and
musicians provided background
music.
Yachanin had his egg roll
recipe planned and was
even prepared to substitute
tofu for the chicken
gardein (a meat-flavored
vegetable substance) he
hoped to have. He was in
luck; they had chicken gardein.
But the mystery ingredient
— a surprise to competing
iron chefs — was
turnips. These particular
ones were supplied by a
farm in Hiram.
“It wasn't really the taste
that I expected for this,”
Yachanin said.
The Who's Your Mama?
festival continues this week
with film showings and poetry
readings. Check www.
standingrock.net for details

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News Headline: Celebration news - April 17 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Three Kent State faculty members received Distinguished Scholar Awards from the university. Music professor Theodore Albrecht teaches musicology and music history and is best known as a Beethoven specialist and for his work in classical and romantic music, early 20th-century music and American music. His latest book, Beethoven and the Orchestral Musicians of Vienna, will be published in 2013 by Indiana University Press. Accounting professor Ran Barniv focuses his research on financial and international accounting and has published 11 articles in the top 10 accounting journals, including seven in the last five years. Physics professor Declan Keane was part of a research group that made headlines last year for discovering the heaviest antimatter nucleus and whose findings were published in the journal Science.

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News Headline: Priceline.com founder will speak at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jeff Hoffman, founder and CEO of Priceline.com, will be speaking at Kent State University at 7 p.m. Monday, in the Kiva, as part of the Michael D. Solomon Entrepreneurship Speaker Series.

Hoffman will speak about his college years as an entrepreneur as well as his experience founding and leading Priceline.com.

As an accomplished entrepreneur in the fields of the Internet, e-commerce, and entertainment, Hoffman previously served as CEO of Enable Holdings which operates sites such as Ubid.com and RedTag.com.

He is currently a founder and partner in ColorJar, a venture accelerator firm that helps entrepreneurs and small business owners launch and grow new business ventures.

After Priceline, Jeff also served as a CEO and Founder of Black Sky Entertainment whose firm successfully produced the successful independent film, "Cabin Fever."

which grossed over $100 million worldwide.

The Michael D. Solomon Entrepreneurship Speaker Series brings experienced entrepreneurs on campus each semester to share their insight with students. This endowed program is supported by Kent State Alumnus Michael D. Solomon.

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News Headline: How salt intake raises BP (Glickman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: AmsterdamNews.net
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Scientists have figured out how salt intake contributes to raising one's blood pressure (BP).

They found that salt intake makes it harder for the body to juggle BP regulation and its temperature simultaneously.

For decades, the inability of scientists to explain why salt raises BP in some but not others has hampered the development of a comprehensive theory about high BP, the journal Hypertension Research reports.

A team led by professors Robert P. Blankfield at Case Western Reserve University and Ellen L. Glickman at Kent State University tested whether these dual roles of the cardiovascular system might help explain how salt ingestion leads to salt-sensitive hypertension.

They found that salt and water ingestion lowered body temperature more than the ingestion of water by itself. Besides, body temperature decreased more in individuals who are salt resistant than in individuals who are salt sensitive, according to a Case Western statement.

'It appears that salt sensitive individuals maintain core body temperature equilibrium more effectively than salt resistant individuals, but experience increased blood pressure in the process,' Blankfield says.

'Conversely, salt resistant individuals maintain blood pressure equilibrium more effectively than salt sensitive individuals following salt and water intake, but experience a greater temperature reduction in the process.'

The cardiovascular system is responsible for maintaining normal BP and also helps control body temperature by conducting heat from the muscles and internal organs to the skin's surface.

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News Headline: How salt intake raises BP (Glickman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: BaltimoreNews.net
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Scientists have figured out how salt intake contributes to raising one's blood pressure (BP).

They found that salt intake makes it harder for the body to juggle BP regulation and its temperature simultaneously.

For decades, the inability of scientists to explain why salt raises BP in some but not others has hampered the development of a comprehensive theory about high BP, the journal Hypertension Research reports.

A team led by professors Robert P. Blankfield at Case Western Reserve University and Ellen L. Glickman at Kent State University tested whether these dual roles of the cardiovascular system might help explain how salt ingestion leads to salt-sensitive hypertension.

They found that salt and water ingestion lowered body temperature more than the ingestion of water by itself. Besides, body temperature decreased more in individuals who are salt resistant than in individuals who are salt sensitive, according to a Case Western statement.

'It appears that salt sensitive individuals maintain core body temperature equilibrium more effectively than salt resistant individuals, but experience increased blood pressure in the process,' Blankfield says.

'Conversely, salt resistant individuals maintain blood pressure equilibrium more effectively than salt sensitive individuals following salt and water intake, but experience a greater temperature reduction in the process.'

The cardiovascular system is responsible for maintaining normal BP and also helps control body temperature by conducting heat from the muscles and internal organs to the skin's surface.

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News Headline: New study identifies possible cause of salt-induced hypertension | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: RxPGNews.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Matthew D. Muller, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow at the Penn State College of Medicine, and the paper's first author explains, If our results are generalizable, it would be possible to account for the role of salt in the development of salt-sensitive hypertension: salt and water loading raises blood pressure in salt sensitive individuals, and the elevated blood pressure persists for a finite period of time during and after the salt and water intake. These transient blood pressure elevations, whether brief or prolonged, might initiate the complex changes within the walls of the arteries and arterioles that characterize individuals with essential hypertension.

[RxPG] New research from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Kent State University shows that salt intake raises blood pressure because it makes it harder for the cardiovascular system to simultaneously juggle the regulation of blood pressure and body temperature.

For decades, medical researchers have sought to understand how salt causes salt-induced high blood pressure to no avail. Some individuals, described as salt sensitive, experience an increase in blood pressure following the ingestion of salt, whereas others, termed salt resistant, do not. Until now, scientists have been unable to explain why some individuals are salt sensitive and others are salt resistant. This inability to explain why salt raises blood pressure in some individuals but not others has hampered the development of a comprehensive theory as to what causes most cases of high blood pressure.

Since the cardiovascular system is responsible for maintaining normal blood pressure and also helps control body temperature by conducting heat from the muscles and internal organs to the skin's surface, a team of researchers led by Robert P. Blankfield, MD, MS, clinical professor of family medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and a member of the Department of Family Medicine at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Ellen L. Glickman, PhD, professor of exercise science at Kent State University, tested whether these dual roles of the cardiovascular system might help explain how salt ingestion leads to salt-sensitive hypertension.

The researchers examined the effect of salt and water consumption versus just water upon a group of 22 healthy men without high blood pressure. The study participants' blood pressure, rectal temperature, cardiac index (the volume of blood pumped by the heart per minute), and urine output were monitored at one, two, and three hours after the men ingested either salt and water or water alone. Changes in rectal temperature were compared between the men identified as salt sensitive versus those who were salt resistant.

The study found that the ingestion of salt and water lowered body temperature more than the ingestion of water by itself. In addition, body temperature decreased more in individuals who are salt resistant than in individuals who are salt sensitive.

It appears that salt sensitive individuals maintain core body temperature equilibrium more effectively than salt resistant individuals, but experience increased blood pressure in the process, Dr. Blankfield says. Conversely, salt resistant individuals maintain blood pressure equilibrium more effectively than salt sensitive individuals following salt and water intake, but experience a greater temperature reduction in the process.

Matthew D. Muller, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow at the Penn State College of Medicine, and the paper's first author explains, If our results are generalizable, it would be possible to account for the role of salt in the development of salt-sensitive hypertension: salt and water loading raises blood pressure in salt sensitive individuals, and the elevated blood pressure persists for a finite period of time during and after the salt and water intake. These transient blood pressure elevations, whether brief or prolonged, might initiate the complex changes within the walls of the arteries and arterioles that characterize individuals with essential hypertension.

Dr. Muller adds, Nowadays, physicians tell their patients that no one knows what causes high blood pressure. Since we can now explain why salt-sensitive hypertension develops, a theory that will explain all hypertension may be possible. Thus, physicians may one day be able to tell their patients that the cause of high blood pressure is understood, and physicians may also be able to explain to their patients what must be done to avoid developing this chronic medical condition. Dr. Muller conducted this research as a doctoral student at Kent State University.

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News Headline: Salt-related hypertension linked to temp | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: UPI.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, April 16 (UPI) -- Salt raises blood pressure because it makes it harder for the cardiovascular system to juggle blood pressure and body temperature, U.S. researchers say.

Dr. Robert P. Blankfield, clinical professor of family medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and Ellen L. Glickman, professor of exercise science at Kent State University, examined the effect of salt and water consumption vs. just water on a group of 22 healthy men without high blood pressure.

The study participants' blood pressure, rectal temperature, cardiac index -- the volume of blood pumped by the heart per minute -- and urine output were monitored at 1, 2, and 3 hours after the men ingested either salt and water or water alone.

Changes in rectal temperature were compared between the men identified as salt sensitive vs. those who were salt resistant.

The study, published in the journal Hypertension Research, found that the ingestion of salt and water lowered body temperature more than the ingestion of water by itself.

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News Headline: KSU Geauga, ESC team for Literacy Day (Hricko) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Several months of preparation culminated in a multi-school Literacy Day at Kent State University's Geauga campus Friday.

Sixth-graders from Berkshire, Newbury and West Geauga schools spent this past semester reading three books — “When You Reach Me” by Rebecca Stead; “Surviving the Applewhites” by Stephanie Tolan; and “A Long Way From Chicago” by Richard Peck. They also wrote essays from the books, said Debra Barrickman, the gifted program coordinator at Geauga Educational Service Center.

On Friday, the students worked on a range of multimedia projects illustrating themes from the books. Sessions were developed by KSU students pursuing teaching degrees.

They got their first field experience during the event.

Projects ranged from creating high-tech Prezi presentations to simpler, hand-drawn images. Prezi is a brand name for a computerized presentation program; students used the tool to highlight key points in “A Long Way From Chicago.”

“You can twist and turn things. It's basically a big canvas … unlike PowerPoint, which is more linear,” said Jamie Lee, a KSU junior who was helping lead the session.

The goal was for students to get an introduction to the technology as well as to review the reading materials and have fun in the process, Lee said. Each group was asked to consider certain factors, such as a theme, visualization or cause and effect.

In other sessions, students created displayable, paper-based presentations, such as collages, or wrote poems.

The “When You Reach Me” session asked students to draw their idea of the “laughing man” character as well as their idea of a hero, said Sherry Obradovich, a fourth-year Kent student. Continued...

“I want them to make connections that heroes aren't always who you expect them to be,” she said.

“Heroes can be anyone.”

Students were paired with peers from other schools as a way to share new perspectives, Barrickman said.

Brent Gardner, a Berkshire teacher, said his district was one of the pilot schools for the 2010 Literacy Day and there was “no question” the district would participate again this year. He said the event is a quality project that provides students an opportunity for socialization as well as multiple ways for self-expression.

“I think one of the strengths of it is the students get to work with other students of similar abilities,” Gardner said.

KSU, which recently added a four-year middle education program, partnered with the Geauga ESC to organize the day.

For Assistant Dean Mary Hricko, the event is a way to foster community service and good citizenship as well as celebrating literacy and helping the various schools to work together. She hopes the campus will begin offering science fairs and events in other disciplines in the near future.

“Our role in the community (is) to promote education, not just college. We have an obligation to the community as well,” Hricko said.

Click to hear audio:
http://news-herald.com/articles/2011/04/16/news/nh3892263.txt?viewmode=default
http://news-herald.com/articles/2011/04/16/news/nh3892263.txt?viewmode=2
http://news-herald.com/articles/2011/04/16/news/nh3892263.txt?viewmode=3

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News Headline: Earth Day event set in Burton | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Geauga Campus' Gaia Society is sponsoring an Earth Day celebration.

From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at the campus, 14111 Claridon-Troy Road in Burton, there will be a variety of tables and displays from local organizations and KSUG students, music, food and demonstrations for kids of all ages. Gaia Society is also collecting old (working or not) cell phones to donate.

Contact Sue Clement for more details sclement@kent.edu.

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News Headline: KSU to offer insurance studies degree | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University
wants to become the only
public university in the state
to offer a degree in insurance
studies, housed at the Salem
campus. They're anticipating
a growing number of
jobs in Ohio's insurance industry
coupled with growth
in job openings as the workforce
retires.
The Independent Insurance
Agents of Ohio gave
a $20,000 startup donation,
calling it “an investment in
our future.”

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News Headline: KSU to offer insurance degree (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Salem will be the starting point for a new bachelor's degree of insurance studies in the fall of 2012.

Insurance is a huge industry in Ohio. The Westfield Group Inc. and Progressive Insurance are based here, and the state has 245 insurance companies, making it the seventh-largest state in insurance-industry employment.

KSU President Lester A. Lefton said in a news release that by 2016, Ohio's insurance industry is going to grow by 7.1 percent. About 238,000 people work now in the industry in the state, and about 50 percent of those workers will be retiring by then.

Many people now in the industry have a bachelor's degree. The new degree will be the insurance degree.

David B. Hazen of Salem, who is vice president of Commercial Lines of Hunting Insurance, was instrumental in formulating the plans for the degree.

“We need a work force with a solid understanding of insurance, especially as this industry continues to grow and expand,” he said.

The program initially will be funded by a $20,000 donation from the Independent Insurance Agents of Ohio.

Hazen said the program is a “win-win” situation for everyone.

As the older workers retire, a new group of educated people will be ready to take their places, he said.

For example, a customer-service representative can make $600 a week; a risk manager can make more than $2,000 a week.

Hazen added that everyone got behind the project, including Gov. John Kasich.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY TO PURSUE BACHELOR'S IN INSURANCE STUDIES (Lefton) | Email

News Date: 04/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, April 15 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University is announcing its intent to bring a bachelor's degree in insurance studies to Ohio. By engaging corporations and private individuals in an ongoing relationship, the university is looking to implement an insurance program in 2012. The degree will initially be housed at Kent State University at Salem.

Currently, Kent State is the only private or public university in Ohio committed to growing a bachelor's degree in insurance studies. By 2016, Ohio's insurance industry workforce is projected to grow by 7.1 percent. Additional employment opportunities also will become available as an estimated 50 percent of the industry workforce reaches retirement age by 2016. The diversity of potential employers and market demands of the workforce creates an ideal environment for partnerships between Kent State's regional campuses and the insurance industry.

Kent State President Lester A. Lefton said implementing this degree would give students a dedicated path to a rich and diverse career.

"Reflecting national trends, more Kent State University students are interested in academic programs that will provide long-term career opportunities in recession-proof industries; the insurance industry provides a viable option," Lefton said. "National leaders in the insurance industry, including the Westfield Group and Progressive Insurance, have corporate headquarters located in areas served by Kent State's regional campuses. Combined with independent agency companies, specialized insurance companies and independent agents, more than 238,000 individuals are employed by the insurance industry in Ohio."

David B. Hazen, vice president of commercial lines of Huntington Insurance, was instrumental in working with Kent State to formulate plans for the degree.

"We need a workforce with a solid understanding of insurance, especially as this industry continues to grow and expand," Hazen said. "We are intent on engaging young people in careers with us. Kent State Salem is a natural fit for this degree seeing as they already offer a bachelor's in business management. Plus, the campus has a proven track record of partnering with industry to bring needed degrees to the area, such as horticulture, nursing and radiology."

Kent State Salem Dean Dr. Jeffrey Nolte said the campus is excited to offer more options to its students. "We are always looking to increase our degrees, partner with industry and provide more opportunities for our students," Nolte said. "I'm proud we're able to pursue the bachelor's degree in insurance."

The program will be initially supported by a $20,000 donation from the Independent Insurance Agents of Ohio. This is the group's first charitable donation to a higher education institution.

"This gift is an investment in our future," said Hazen, who is the group's past president. "We believe in the notion of giving back, and feel this is a direct way to make an impact on the future of the insurance industry."

As highlighted in Kent State Magazine, Kent State provides more than $1.96 billion in added income to the Northeast Ohio economy each year. Regional campuses are a key catalyst to economic development for the 12 counties that compose the region. For more than 40 years, Kent State Salem has developed new educational programs and facilities in response to the changing needs of employers.

Founded in 1897, the Independent Insurance Agents of Ohio has more than 10,000 members. The group is committed to providing its membership with unparalleled legal, legislative and regulatory representation before Congress, the Ohio General Assembly, the judicial system and regulatory agencies. It is one of the most respected lobbying organizations in Ohio and Washington, D.C.

Independent agents rely on the organization for products and services which help them compete and succeed in the marketplace. Services range from insurance products to continuing education programs to a host of administrative, informational and marketing services.

Between Kent State University at East Liverpool and Kent State University at Salem, students can earn a bachelor's degree in 14 different disciplines or an associate's degree in 14 different areas. Kent State East Liverpool and Salem are home to more than 3,300 students. For more information, please visit www.col.kent.edu or call 1-877-KENT-EDU. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Kent Stark students learn life lesson patching pot hole | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CANTON — A pothole on the city's northeast side was fixed Friday afternoon, courtesy of some students at the Kent State University Stark campus.

A single $14 bag of patch proved to be enough to fill the hole on Fifth Street NE near Rowland Avenue.

Kent Stark students Jennifer Zachary, Jarod Mobley and Jordan Miller emptied the bag, then used it to protect their shoes as they tried to smooth the mix in the hole.

“I think we did a pretty good job,” Zachary said looking over the filled hole. Her cohorts agreed.

Filling the hole was part of an assignment the trio worked on for a human communications class. Students were split into groups of four and told to select an issue that affected the community.

Zachary, Mobley, Miller and their fourth team member, who asked to remain anonymous, decided to attack the issue of potholes. Why?

“It's a problem for everybody,” Miller said.

“I'm sure there's nobody who hasn't been affected by it, whether they ride a bus of they walk,” Zachary quickly added.

Once the students selected their topic, they had to look for a way to address and solve the issue.

Communicating and dividing up work was the key lesson behind the project, the students said. Each participant had a different task and had to pull their own weight. An explanation of the project will be presented next week.

When it is, the students will be able to show how that they did something on their own and filled a pothole. “We wanted to get out into the community and do something,” Zachary said.

Copyright 2011 CantonRep.com. Some rights reserved

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News Headline: VIDEO: Conservationist Jerome Ringo Speaks at Kent State Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name: Nick Rock
News OCR Text: Ringo spoke to students and faculty at the Kent State University Stark Campus Thursday and encouraged them to educate others about nature and conservation.

Click here to see video: http://northcanton.patch.com/articles/video-conservationist-jerome-ringo-speaks-at-kent-state-stark#video-5661453

World-renowned conservationist Jerome Ringo stopped by Kent State Stark Thursday evening. Ringo, former head of the World Wildlife Federation, spoke not only about the current state of the environment but about the future of green energy jobs.

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News Headline: KSU professor to publish book on political unrest in Middle East (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name: Mariana Silva
News OCR Text: Stow -- It was an emotional roller coaster when the uprisings in Egypt started back in January, according to assistant professor at Kent State University's Political Science Department.

"It happened very fast," said Stow resident Joshua Stacher, an expert on the Middle East. "The hard part was having lived there for so long, and being here when everything was going on. I didn't sleep much when the revolution was going on. I was in constant contact with people over there."

Although he knew everyone he met was safe during his nine years living abroad, mainly in Cairo, much of his life was impacted by the changes going on in Egypt.

Stacher, a specialist in Egypt and Middle East, went to Cairo during spring break to observe what was happening in Egypt. When he came back to Kent, his students in his Middle East class were very interested in learning more about that country. He also knew he had some updating to do for his book, "Adapting Authoritarianism in Egypt and Syria."

"Nobody could predict that this all was going to take hold, although there are rows of books with people detailing in very meticulous notes just how rotten these regimes are, and how crummy the regime was," Stacher said. "The question was always, why was it able to hang on for so long?"

While in Egypt, Stacher said he saw how politics became a much decentralized topic with people talking about it in the streets and even starting political parties.

"And even then, we have to be really careful with the revolutionary fervor that is in the air because while these regimes have been able to kind of get rid off the heads of the states, whether it is Hosni Mubarak or [Zine El Abidine] Ben Ali, their regimes haven't changed that much," Stacher said.

"Many of the same people that were running the things in Mubarak's Egypt are still running things there," he said. "So it is a case that we have to be cautiously optimistic about the amount of change that we are seeing."

While there, Stacher learned his book was in the right track. The book will go over debates on what holds authoritarian regimes up and what implicates on their ability to stay durable.

It will talk about historical aspects and moments that make the regimes what they are and explain what makes them last. He also said the book will speak to the discipline and to those interested in the technical aspects of governments in the Middle East.

"The longer the situation plays out on the ground, the longer I think that the book will be OK," Stacher said. "Originally, I was very concerned about what was going on, but what this also is doing is generating more interest and more of a market for a potential readership of a book like this," said Stacher, referring to the media attention he received.

During the uprisings in Egypt, Stacher was cited as a source by the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Guardian, Cairo Times and others news organizations. He was also invited to the White House and to a United Nations closed room briefing for the UN's political department along with other specialists.

"Unfortunately, while it was fantastic to be sort of a spotlight commentator on the events in Egypt, it was for entirely regrettable reasons," Stacher said.

"People had to suffer for 30 years under the Mubarak presidency," he said, "and people were being tortured and humiliated on a daily basis, and it didn't matter that I had been saying this for years. It had to take until there was a volcanic explosion for people to care."

Stacher will go back to Egypt this summer with a grant provided by the Research and Sponsored Programs at Kent State.

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News Headline: Kent State University study links weight and memory (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Obesity and mental functioning
are related, according
to findings from a Kent
State University researcher.
John Gunstad, associate
professor of psychology
at KSU, discovered that
as one goes up, the other
goes down. Those who lose
weight are more able to concentrate,
according to the
research.
“We found that in general,
as weight would go up,
inhibited memory and concentration
problem solving
also went up,” said Gunstad,
who led a team of scientists
from around the country.
That result was from a primary
study. It prompted another
one.
“After confirming that excess
weight was associated
with these adverse problems
in everday life, the next
step was to determine if excess
weight was causing the
problem and whether losing
weight would actually
resolve some of that,” Gunstad
said.
Turns out, it did.
Gunstad studied 150 people
— 109 of them bariatric
surgery patients and 41
control subjects who were
obese. Before the surgery,
many of them had problems
with tasks like connecting
dots and solving
word games on a touchscreen
test monitor (“think
of it as a very large iPad”).
Twelve weeks after their
surgeries, the patients had
moved from “a mildly impared
range” to a normal
range.
“Clinically, for us, that's a
big change to go from the
point where there's something
wrong to saying this
person is essentially normal,”
Gunstad said.
These findings will be
published in the next issue
of Surgery for Obesity and
Related Diseases, operated
by the American Society
for Metabolic and Bariatric
Surgery.
It's the first study that
showed memory and concentration
improvements
for weight-loss surgery patients,
and it's perhaps the
most definitive project examining
the relationship of
weight and mental functioning,
Gunstad said.
Next he wants to study connections
between weight and
afflictions such as Alzheimer's
disease. He also wants
to see if he gets the same results
out of subjects who lose
weight without surgery.
Regardless of those results,
Gunstad doesn't recommend
either method over
the other.
“If people are concerned
about their weight, talking
with their primary care doctor
is probably the best place
to start,” Gunstad said.

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News Headline: Video: Research Links Weight Loss and Memory Performance (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Can losing weight make you smarter?


One professor at Kent State University is working to answer that question. And so far, the answer appears to be "yes."


John Gunstad, an associate professor of psychology at Kent State, is working to publish the first round of research in a study linking weight loss to improved brain fuction.


Gunstad worked with a team of researchers for the past four years collecting data from 150 patients in New York and North Dakota. Their research showed patients who had undergone bariatric weight loss surgery demonstrated improved memory and concentration as they lost weight.


One particular test showed patients who lost weight could both learn more words and retain them more effectively.


"Seeing that weight loss improves both of those steps is very encouraging," Gunstad said. "Now we just have to figure out how it all happens."


Gunstad's research team is following study participants for two years. Each patient was tested before the bariatric surgery and 12 weeks after. The participants were tested again one year after surgery and will undergo more testing at the two-year mark.


The $1.5 million study, funded by a grant from the National Institute of Health, will culminate with the findings published in an upcoming issue of Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, the Official Journal of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery.


Gunstad, a neuropsychologist, said weight loss has more far-reaching effects on brain function than just improving memory and concentration.


"It's broader than just memory," he said. "So it seems to be that obesity effects the brain in lots of ways. And we're just really I think at the tip of the iceburg."


Their next line of research will study whether patients who lose weight through more natural steps — dieting and exercise — also show improved brain function as opposed to only surgical patients.


"We're cautiously optimistic that it will happen," he said. "Exercising more, eating a healthier diet, all those things lead to better cognition."

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News Headline: Losing Weight Improves Memory: Study (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Losing weight helps overweight and obese people improve their memories and concentration, according to a new study.

Researchers tested the cognitive abilities of 150 people who weighed an average of 300 pounds and repeated the tests 12 weeks after 109 of the participants underwent weight loss surgery and lost an average of 50 pounds, USA Today reported.

The follow-up tests revealed that those who had the weight loss surgery showed improvement in memory and other cognitive abilities, such as organizational skills. The participants who didn't lose weight showed a small decrease in memory.

It makes sense that as the body becomes healthier, so does the brain, said study author John Gunstad, an associate professor of psychology at Kent State University, USA Today reported.

The study was published online this week in the journal Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.

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News Headline: Could Weight Loss Improve Memory? (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: ABC News - Online
Contact Name: BEN FORER
News OCR Text: Subjects Who Underwent Gastric Bypass Surgery Saw Significant Memory Improvement Losing weight may be more than just good for your heart. New research indicates it also can improve your memory. According to a study led by John Gunstad, assistant professor of psychology at Kent State University, weight loss may improve concentration and overall cognitive ability.

"We've known for a long time that obesity is a risk factor for things like Alzheimer's disease and stroke, and more recent work really shows that obesity is a link to memory problems and concentration problems before that even begins," said Gunstad. "If excess weight causes these problems, can losing weight help reverse them? That's what we wanted to research."

Gunstad tested the memory and attention of 150 overweight people. Then, some of the participants underwent gastric bypass surgery while others did not. "What we found is that by individuals who went through the weight loss surgery showed improvements in memory about 12 weeks after surgery," said Gunstad. "They were able to show improvements moving from the kind of mildly impaired range into the normal range, which clinically is a pretty good, is a pretty meaningful change."

Prior to surgery, 23.9 percent of all the participants showed impaired learning and 22.9 percent had poor recognition memory.

Twelve weeks after surgery, the average performance for those that went under the knife was within average range or above average on all cognitive tests, improvements that were not seen in the group of people that decided to not have gastric bypass surgery.

3 Unanswered Questions

There still are three major questions that need to be answered, Gunstad said:

1. What from obesity is causing the brain damage?

2. What causes the brain to improve after surgery?

3. Can behavioral weight loss produce the same changes in the brain as surgery?

"If we're able to identify what causes these memory problems in the first place and then changes after surgery to make the memory better, that's the key," said Gunstad. "Once we can find that, that might be an answer to what better understands how obesity's linked to Alzheimer's disease, stroke or even just memory decline that happens in older adults."

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News Headline: Weight Loss Improves Memory, Research Reveals (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: ABC News Radio - Online
Contact Name: Carmen Cox
News OCR Text: (KENT, Ohio) -- Losing weight may be more than just good for your heart. New research indicates it also can improve your memory.

According to a study led by John Gunstad, assistant professor of psychology at Kent State University, weight loss may improve concentration and overall cognitive ability.

"We've known for a long time that obesity is a risk factor for things like Alzheimer's disease and stroke, and more recent work really shows that obesity is a link to memory problems and concentration problems before that even begins," said Gunstad. "If excess weight causes these problems, can losing weight help reverse them? That's what we wanted to research."

Gunstad tested the memory and attention of 150 overweight people. Then, some of the participants underwent gastric bypass surgery while others did not.

"What we found is that by individuals who went through the weight loss surgery showed improvements in memory about 12 weeks after surgery," said Gunstad. "They were able to show improvements moving from the kind of mildly impaired range into the normal range, which clinically is a pretty good, is a pretty meaningful change."

Prior to surgery, 23.9 percent of all the participants showed impaired learning and 22.9 percent had poor recognition memory.

Twelve weeks after surgery, the average performance for those that went under the knife was within average range or above average on all cognitive tests, improvements that were not seen in the group of people that decided to not have gastric bypass surgery.

There still are three major questions that need to be answered, Gunstad said:

1. What from obesity is causing the brain damage?

2. What causes the brain to improve after surgery?

3. Can behavioral weight loss produce the same changes in the brain as surgery?

"If we're able to identify what causes these memory problems in the first place and then changes after surgery to make the memory better, that's the key," said Gunstad. "Once we can find that, that might be an answer to what better understands how obesity's linked to Alzheimer's disease, stroke or even just memory decline that happens in older adults."

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News Headline: Digital Tutors Can Train Students to Seek Help With School Work (Rawson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Education Week - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Computer Tutors Prod Students to Ask for Help

Ask a friend to meet you at a restaurant in a city he or she has never visited, and it's entirely possible the friend will get lost along the way. You might expect the friend to pull out a map, turn on the car's navigation system, or even ask a gas station attendant for directions. You wouldn't expect your lost friend to wander around town, knocking on random restaurant doors until eventually giving up and hopping in a taxi.

Yet research suggests this random searching and reluctance to seek basic help is exactly how high school students often approach problem-solving.

“Students often misuse help,” said Ido Roll, a postdoctoral researcher at the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia and a member of the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center. “Either they don't ask for help at all, or they ask for all the help there is.”

In a series of studies presented at the American Educational Research Association's annual meeting, held here April 8-12, researchers from the Vancouver-based university and Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh found that students typically will go to extreme lengths to avoid asking for help when working on computer-based tutoring programs. Yet if they learn to think about when and how to ask for help, they are more likely to avoid simply cheating to get answers.

In the classroom, it can be difficult to determine why a student does or doesn't ask for help. Yet when students use an online program, the computer can record how fast and how often a student tries to solve a problem, uses a dictionary, or asks for help. In several studies since 2006, Mr. Roll and his research partners at Carnegie Mellon's Human-Computer Interaction Institute—assistant professor Vincent Aleven, senior systems scientist Bruce M. McLaren, and professor Kenneth R. Koedinger—mined data from math-tutoring programs to gauge how 10th and 11th grade students used a help button, which offers progressively more in-depth hints and eventually gives the answer to the question.

“If you get one error, 25 percent of students will ask for help; 75 percent of them will try again. And the pattern persists after any consecutive number of errors; after five, six attempts, I am still more likely to try again than to ask for help,” Mr. Roll said.

“Across hundreds of thousands of actions in multiple studies, we never get more than 30 percent of students who ask for help; they always try to do it again themselves,” he said. “When we asked students [why they didn't ask for help], they said their parents told them [essentially] ‘real men don't ask for help.' ”

By the time students finally did ask for help, the data showed they had given up trying to solve the problem and were aiming to cheat; Mr. Roll said 82 percent of students who used the hint tool did not stop to read it, but instead clicked through multiple hints to get to the answer.

Thinking About Help

In a 2008 study in the same series of studies, Mr. Roll and other researchers found students often “gamed the system” through guessing and looking for the answer when they felt frustrated or disliked the subject.

Research on metacognition—the study of how students think about what they know or learn—suggests that encouraging students to reflect on how they are learning can lead them to use better strategies, such as asking for appropriate help or studying more effectively.

“Simply giving students the tools may not be enough if the extent to which the student can use a strategy depends on metacognitive skills,” said Katherine A. Rawson, an assistant professor of psychology at Kent State University, in Ohio. She studies the role of metacognition in study skills but was not part of the study on students' digital help-seeking behaviors.

With that in mind, in Mr. Roll's most recent experiments, the researchers changed an adaptive, computer-based geometry tutor so that the help tool would encourage students to reflect on their problem-solving strategies.

For example, if a student had answered incorrectly several times in quick succession, which would suggest he or she was guessing, a help window could pop up noting that the student seemed to be struggling and point out the glossary and hint buttons. Or if the student hit the hint button repeatedly without enough time to read the hints, suggesting he or she had given up and was just looking for the answer, a help window would encourage the student to slow down and think about the hint.

The help tutor based its responses on how quickly and correctly a student answered problems, as well as how often he or she made “help mistakes,” such as not asking for help when it was needed or asking for help just to get to the answer.

“For unskilled students, just a few errors is enough to trigger a warning; for skilled students, we let them grapple with it a bit more,” Mr. Roll said.

He tested the new system first with 58 10th and 11th graders in two urban classes with high concentrations of students from minority groups and two suburban, low-minority classes, and then in a second experiment with 67 students in a rural high school. In each trial, half the students used the updated tutoring program, while the other two classes used the standard program.

In the first, three-week trial, students who used the hint tool prompting students to be more reflective about solving a problem used hints inappropriately 10 percent less often than those who did not receive feedback. In the control group, 70 percent of the time that students clicked on the help button, it was to “game the system” by clicking straight through to the final answer; by contrast, only 48 percent of the students given the help tutor did so.

The second, four-month trial had similar findings: Students in the control group used the hint button to cut straight to the final answer 60 percent of the time, while students who received feedback from the help tutor tried to game the system only 45 percent of the time. The students using the adaptive help tutor also sought help more productively in other ways: They took more time considering one hint before requesting additional hints and solved the problem with lower-level hints than students using the standard program did.

The researchers will seek to replicate these initial findings with more students.

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News Headline: A STUDY AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY | Email

News Date: 04/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: San Diego 6 News at 5 AM - San Diego 6 The CW (XETV-TV)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TAKING OFF A FEW POUNDS APPARENTLY WILL IMPROVE YOUR MEMORY. RESEARCHERS HAVE FOUND ANOTHER BENEFIT TO WEIGHT LOSS. A STUDY AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FOUND THAT BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS SHOWED IMPROVED MEMORY FUNCTION 12-WEEKS AFTER THEIR OPERATIONS. THE FINDINGS WILL BE PUBLISHED IN THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC AND BARIATRIC SURGERY.

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News Headline: RESEARCH FROM KENT STATE UNIVERSITY | Email

News Date: 04/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Daybreak on the Deuce at 5 AM - KWGN-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JUST GOOD FOR THE BODY RESEARCH SHOWS IT'S GOOD FOR THE MIND AS WELL RESEARCH'S FROM KENT STATE UNIVERSITY TESTED THE FUNCTIONS OF OBESE VOLUNTEERS THEIR REPEATED THAT CONTRADICT AS 12 YEARS LATER AFTER PERCENTAGE OF THEM LOST 50 POUNDS THE FOLLOW-UP TESTS REVEALED THOSE WHO LOST WEIGHT SHOWED IMPROVED MEMORY AND COGNITIVE ABILITIES THE PARTICIPANTS WHO DIDN'T LOSE ANYTHING SHOWED A SMALL DECREASE IN MEMORY THE STUDY APPEARS IN SCIENCE NEWS. ED IT!

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News Headline: RESEARCHERS AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY STUDIED 150 OVERWEIGHT PARTICIPANTS. | Email

News Date: 04/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: World News - ABC News Network
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: THERE IS A STUDY TONIGHT OUT ABOUT MEMORY AND WEIGHT LOSS. IT'S DOCUMENTED THAT PEOPLE WHO LOSE A LOT OF WEIGHT CAN IMPROVE THEIR HEALTH. BUT LOSING WEIGHT CAN SHARPEN YOUR MIND. HERE IS SHARON AL PHONECY. Reporter: TAKE A LOOK AT THIS LIST AND TRY TO REMEMBER WHAT IS ON IT. DESK, CAR, PENCIL, SHIRT, PHONE, CUP. GOT IT? OKAY, WAS THE WORLD PHONE ON THE LIST? YES. WHAT ABOUT PLATE? NO. PENCIL? YES. HOW DID YOU DO? IF YOU HAD TROUBLE REMEMBERING AND HOPE TO SHARPEN YOUR SKILLS, CONSIDER LOSING SOME EIGHT. YES, EIGHT. RESEARCHERS AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY STUDIED 150 OVERWEIGHT PARTICIPANTS. THEY ALL TOOK A MEMORY TEST. A QUARTER OF THEM SHOWED SIGNS OF POOR MEMORY. AND SO OF THE VOLUME TEENS UNDER WENT GASTIC BY PASS. THOSE WHO DIDN'T LOSE WEIGHT, THEIR MEMORIES STAYED THE SAME AND CASES GOT WORSE. WHY COULD YOUR WEIGHT AFFECT YOUR MEMORY? THAT. THAT IS A $1 MILLION QUESTION. WHY OBESITY CAN HURT THE BRAIN. WE CAN LOOK TO WAYS TO UNDO THEM OR PREVENT THEM IN THE FIRST PLACE. Reporter: OBESITY IS KNOWN TO CAUSE HYPER TENSION, DIABETES, SLEEP APNEA. IF YOU LOSE WEIGHT, IMPROVE YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE, YOU MIGHT IMPROVE THE FLOW OF BLOOD TO YOUR BRAIN. IT'S POSS THABL FITNESS OR BEING TIVE MIGHT IMPROVE YOUR ABILITIES. Reporter: THE PEOPLE IN THE STUDY LOST A LOT OF WEIGHT, 50 POUNDS EACH. RESEARCHERS DON'T KNOW IF LOSING A FEW POUNDS WILL HAVE BENEFITS. WHETHER THAT WHAT IS GOOD FOR THE BODY IS GOOD FOR YOUR BRAIN. IF I BOMBED ON THE QUIZ, I START TONIGHT.

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News Headline: Losing Weight Could Improve Memory, Research Suggests (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Nurse.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Researchers have discovered a link between weight loss and improved memory and concentration, specifically in bariatric surgery patients 12 weeks after their operation.

The study will appear in an upcoming issue of Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, the official journal of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and is available at http://bit.ly/hBtRzB.

The research team studied 150 participants 109 bariatric surgery patients and 41 obese control subjects at Cornell Medical College and Weill Columbia University Medical Center, both in New York City, and the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo, N.D. Many bariatric surgery patients exhibited impaired performance on cognitive testing, according to the report.

The researchers discovered that bariatric surgery patients demonstrated improved memory and concentration 12 weeks after surgery, improving from the slightly impaired range to the normal range.

The primary motivation for looking at surgery patients is that we know they lose a lot of weight in a short amount of time, so it was a good group to study, said lead researcher John Gunstad, an associate professor in Kent State Universitys Department of Psychology. This is the first evidence to show that by going through this surgery, individuals might improve their memory, concentration and problem solving.

Gunstad was not surprised by the studys findings: A lot of the factors that come with obesity things such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea that might damage the brain are somewhat reversible,he said. As those problems go away, memory function gets better.

To comment, e-mail editorNTL@gannetthg.com or post a comment below.

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News Headline: A WEIGHT OFF YOUR MIND | Email

News Date: 04/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland)
Contact Name: McQueen, Craig
News OCR Text: WE'RE used to being told why keeping our weight in check is a good idea.

Now there's another reason - with the news that shedding a few pounds can be as good for the mind as it is for the body.

Spring is now upon us, so there's no better time to start a health kick.

If you're in need of motivation, here are 10 reasons why being slim is good for you:

BRAIN POWER

A new study by scientists at Kent State University in Ohio found that in mental tests, almost a quarter of their 150 overweight participants scored low enough to be considered "learning disabled".

Two-thirds of the volunteers then had gastric bypass surgery and lost weight. When they were tested again 12 weeks later, those who had shifted the pounds improved their scores significantly - especially in tests involving memory.

The third who didn't lose weight scored worse second time around.

PAY

A survey of 24,000 American and German workers by the University of Florida found that women who were slim earned pounds 12,000 a year MORE than women of average weight.

The study also found that women who were overweight earned pounds 10,000 a year LESS than their average counterparts, creating a total difference of pounds 22,000.

FERTILITY

A recent study by the European Science Foundation discovered that the rising level of obesity was one of the most important factors in falling sperm counts across Europe.

This is because men with higher levels of fat seem to produce less testosterone - the hormone whose levels influence many aspects of masculinity, including sperm production.

CANCER

If you want to reduce your risk of the disease, keeping your weight in check will help.

A study by the World Cancer Research Fund recently provided further evidence of the link between obesity levels and many forms of the disease.

The survey concluded that women should keep their waist smaller than 31.5in while men were advised to stay below 37in.

The WCRF said that body fat raises the danger of all cancers - but is strongly linked to those of the pancreas, bowel and breast.

HEADACHES

When we've got a sore head, we reach for the paracetamol for relief. But maintaining a healthy weight could be a better long-term option, according to a study carried out by US scientists in Atlanta, Georgia.

They studied the relationship between body mass index and headaches, and found that being overweight raises your risk of a sore head by 20 to 40 per cent.

SLEEP

If you're active in your day-to-day life, the chances are you'll enjoy healthier sleep patterns.

But keeping your weight in check is also good for your sleep as it means you're less at risk from sleep apnoea - a condition that occurs when tissues in the upper airways come too close to each other, temporarily blocking breathing.

It can lead to memory difficulties, low energy, shortness of breath, leg swelling and high blood pressure.

ARTHRITIS

Being overweight is the single biggest cause of osteoarthritis in joints, with an obese person 14 times more likely to develop knee arthritis.

The additional pressure wears away cartilage - the natural layer of shock absorbers in our joints - leaving bone to grind against bone.

For every pound you are overweight, the momentum of running or jumping increases the pressure on the joint by as much as 10 times.

DIABETES

The less you weigh, the less likely you are to become a diabetic - because the body uses insulin to deliver glucose to cells.

When a person is overweight, the cells in the body become less sensitive to the insulin that is released from the pancreas.

If the insulin becomes less effective, the glucose will remain circulating in the blood instead of being taken into the cells.

JOBS

Losing weight doesn't only improve your health, it also makes you better at your job.

A recent survey by an occupational health firm showed that employees who are obese are less productive than those of an average weight - and that overweight people take nearly twice as much sick leave.

In another study, 30 per cent of HR bosses said they thought obesity was a valid medical reason for not employing someone.

LIFE EXPECTANCY

A recent investigation using data from nearly 900,000 people found that moderate obesity shortens lives by three years, while people who are severely obese will die 10 years earlier than they should.

Copyright © 2011 MGN Ltd.

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News Headline: Among Other Benefits Weight Loss Also Improves Memory (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Medical News Today
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: John Gunstad, an associate professor in Kent State University's Department of Psychology, and a team of researchers have discovered a link between weight loss and improved memory and concentration. The study shows that bariatric surgery patients exhibited improved memory function 12 weeks after their operations.

The findings will be published in an upcoming issue of Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, the Official Journal of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. The research report is also available online here.

"The initial idea came from our clinical work," Gunstad said. "I was working at Brown Medical School in Rhode Island at the time and had the chance to work with a large number of people who were looking to lose weight through either behavioral means or weight loss surgery."

Gunstad said he kept noticing that these patients would make similar mistakes. "As a neuropsychologist who is focused on how the brain functions, I look for these little mental errors all the time," Gunstad explained.

The research team studied 150 participants (109 bariatric surgery patients and 41 obese control subjects) at Cornell Medical College and Weill Columbia University Medical Center, both in New York City, and the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo, N.D. Many bariatric surgery patients exhibited impaired performance on cognitive testing, according to the study's report.

The researchers discovered that bariatric surgery patients demonstrated improved memory and concentration 12 weeks after surgery, improving from the slightly impaired range to the normal range.

"The primary motivation for looking at surgery patients is that we know they lose a lot of weight in a short amount of time, so it was a good group to study," Gunstad said. "This is the first evidence to show that by going through this surgery, individuals might improve their memory, concentration and problem solving."

Gunstad thinks the study is reason for optimism. "One of the things about obesity, relative to other medical conditions, is that something can be done to fix it," Gunstad said. "Our thought was, if some of these effects are reversible, then we're really on to something - that it might be an opportunity for individuals who have memory or concentration problems to make those things better in a short amount of time. And that's what we found."

The team is following study participants for two years. They tested subjects before surgery, 12 weeks after surgery and one year after surgery, and will also test at the two-year mark.

Gunstad was the principal investigator for the team, which included Gladys Strain, Ph.D., of Cornell Medical College in New York City; Michael Devlin, M.D., of Weill Columbia University Medical Center in New York City; Rena Wing, Ph.D., and Ronald Cohen, Ph.D., of the Warren Albert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, R.I.; Robert Paul, Ph.D., of the University of Missouri-St. Louis in St. Louis, Miss.; and Ross Crosby, Ph.D., and James Mitchell, M.D., of the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo, N.D.

Gunstad wasn't surprised by the study's findings. "A lot of the factors that come with obesity - things such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea - that might damage the brain are somewhat reversible," Gunstad said. "As those problems go away, memory function gets better."

The team's next project will examine whether people who experience behavioral weight loss see the same effects as those who have had bariatric surgery. Gunstad said he expects to see similar results.

"One of the things we know is that as individuals become more cardiovascular fit and their heart health gets better, their brain health also improves," Gunstad added. "Even if we take young adults and put them through an exercise program, their memory and their concentration get better by the end of the program."

The cost for the research project was approximately $1.5 million, and was funded by a grant from the National Institute of Health.

Source: Kent State University

Copyright: Medical News Today

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News Headline: 2 KSU students indicted | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Portage County grand jury has indicted two Kent State University students on charges they imported fake IDs from China in February with the alleged intent to distribute them on the Kent campus.

Antonino G. Bucca, 20, of Broadview Heights, and Drew H. Patenaude, 21, with a local address of 122 S. Lincoln St., Kent are free on bond pending trial in Portage County Common Pleas Court.

Bucca was indicted April 7, and Patenaude on April 11, on three fifth-degree felonies apiece -- one count each of fraud, identity fraud and telecommunications fraud. Each charge carries a potential sentence of anything from probation up to a year in prison.

According to U.S. Customs and Border Patrol, an X-ray of the package destined for Kent revealed 90 fake IDs stashed inside an electronic device. Customs agents contacted Kent police, who started their investigation on Feb. 26.

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: Erdmann-Zucherro tribute | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Totally elsewhere, Janet and I caught Karl Erdmanns nice Student Theater Festival at Kent State a week ago Friday that honored the memory of his late father, Lou Erdmann, and his colleague, the late Bill Zucherro, both so important to the development of the highly respected Roe Green School of Theater and Dance that has grown up on campus.

Faculty members from the 1950s until the late 1980s, the two men saw enrollment go from approximately 40 students to 250 during their tenure, the excitement and professionalism they brought to the program a big draw for those aspiring to work in theater and dance. Jeff Richmond, producer of 30 Rock , and Tony award winning actress Alice Ripley went through the program during the Erdmann-Zucherro era.

How appropriate to name the new EZ Black Box theater in their honor. The two men were also co-founders of Porthouse Theater at Blossom Music Center. The School of Theater and Dance continues to grow. Its enrollment has topped the 300 mark, its current director, Cynthia Stillings, reports.

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News Headline: Ohio public colleges try to work around tuition caps | Email

News Date: 04/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Farkas, Karen
News OCR Text: Students at Ohio's public universities could face tuition increases of more than 3.5 percent next year, above the annual cap proposed by Gov. John Kasich.

The governor's budget calls for limiting tuition increases to 3.5 percent in each of the next two years. But universities, facing an average 13 percent drop in state aid, are asking for the flexibility to implement more of the allowable total increase in the first year.

Cleveland State University, for example, is considering a 1.5 percent tuition increase this fall for undergraduate and graduate students, a 3.5 percent increase in spring 2012 and a 2 percent increase for the 2012-13 school year.

By imposing most of the increase in the first year, CSU would collect about $2 million more than what would be raised by 3.5 percent increases each year.

"It gives you more flexibility as long as you're a faithful to the top of the cap," President Ronald Berkman said Thursday after a presentation to trustees about how CSU could deal with budget cuts.

He said altering the tuition caps spelled out by the governor would require a legislative amendment to the budget proposal and Kasich's approval.

CSU trustees, like those at other colleges, are just beginning the budget process, with many possibilities under discussion until budgets are passed at the end of June.

University of Akron officials had no comment on how they plan to allocate increases if trustees raise tuition. Kent State University has made no decision on fall tuition rates but would appreciate more flexibility, a spokesman said.

Presidents of Ohio's four-year universities discussed on Tuesday ways of altering Kasich's tuition proposal, Berkman told trustees. He said the university leaders have gotten some support for their plan.

Rob Nichols, Kasich's spokesman, said the governor's policy staff was aware of the universities' proposal. According to Nichols, Kasich said he will leave the issue up to legislators.

Tuition increases also were capped at 3.5 percent a year in the current two-year budget, but CSU did not impose an increase in fall 2009 because it is difficult for students to budget for increases when given only a few months, Berkman said.

CSU's law school students could face a 7 percent tuition increase this fall and in fall 2012, since their tuition is not capped.

An $8 per credit hour fee increase for all students also is proposed. That will generate $2.2 million a year.

The board approved the fee increase last year to help fund the new $44 million student center, but it was not imposed, Berkman said.

If trustees decide to go ahead with the two tuition increases and general fee increase for the upcoming school year, an undergraduate credit hour – including tuition and all fees – would rise from the current $352 to $378 by spring, 2012, said chief financial officer Stephanie McHenry. A full-time student taking 15 credit hours would pay an additional $390.

Trustees said they do not want to price students out of Cleveland State. Berkman and Provost Geoffrey Mearns said the university is taking many other steps to cover an expected $17 million shortfall in the budget, which includes the loss of one-time federal stimulus funds.

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: kfarkas@plaind.com , 216-999-5079

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: Authors focus on Jim Tully, Kent's forgotten literary light | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: If you don't know who Jim Tully is, keep reading.

He was an early 20th Century hobo, nationally known author, confidant to Charlie Chaplin, circus hand, journalist, chain maker and professional boxer.

Oh, and Tully once lived in Kent, where he worked for Davey Tree Expert Co. and wanted to marry a Kent librarian.

So why is it that most people don't know about Jim Tully?

That's what Kent used and rare book dealer Paul Bauer and Plain Dealer film critic Mark Dawidziak wanted to find out 19 years ago when they first learned of him. All these years later, their pioneering Tully biography, “Jim Tully: American Writer, Irish Rover, Hollywood Brawler,” went on sale last week.

“Have you ever heard of Jim Tully?” Bauer asked Dawidziak one day in the summer of 1992.

A customer was asking for a copy of “The Bruiser,” a book about boxing, Tully's 12th publication out of 14. None of that rang a bell for Bauer. Dawidziak neither.

For a rare book dealer, “to be this stumped really rankled (Bauer),” Dawidziak said.

Tully was born in St. Marys, a small city in western Ohio. His mother died and his father didn't want to care for him, so Tully lived in a Cincinnati orphanage until 1898. Then he skipped town, catching a train to become a hobo. He was 12.

Tully lived on the road, working dinky circuses and hanging around libraries, gaining experience for future writings.

He drifted for six years. Then he stopped, settled down (for a little while) and got a job making chains in Kent, where Seneca Chain Co. was located.

“Kent was one of the first towns with chainworks,” Dawidziak said. “He also launches his boxing career in Kent.”

When the chainworks burned down in 1909, Tully landed a job at Davey Tree as a tree surgeon. He traveled around the country and sent reports back to headquarters. The reports were so good, Davey Tree published them in their newsletter — Tully's first published work.

His first professionally published work was a poem in The Plain Dealer. It was called “On Keats' Grave” and June 27, 1911.

He also fell in love in Kent. He also was smitten with Nellie Dingley, the well-dressed Ashtabula native who ran the Kent Free Library. Tully proposed to her there, but she said no.

Tully married Kentite Florence Bushnell instead.

“I think it's fair to say that for the rest of his life, he held more of a connection with Kent than he did with St. Marys,” Dawidziak said.

It wasn't long before Tully divorced Bushnell, moved to California, wrote PR for Charlie Chaplin and became famous for his book, “Beggars of Life,” which was turned into a film.

In one larger-than-life but entirely true anecdote, Tully knocked out heartthrob film actor John Gilbert with one punch. Critics, including the Baltimore Sun's H.L. Mencken, were comparing him to Sinclair Lewis and Theadore Dreiser.

“How does somebody be that big and disappear?” Dawidziak said.

As he and Bauer found, there were a few reasons: He got sick and World War II distracted the public from literature. Tully died in 1947.

“Once you get into the ‘60s, Tully is pretty much gone,” Dawidziak said.

The two biographers even had trouble finding a publisher for their book. Tully's story is interesting enough, they'd say, but they'd have trouble marketing it; nobody's ever heard of him.

Will Underwood at Kent State University Press couldn't pass it up but recognized the same obstacle.

“The hurdle for this book is answering the question: Who the hell is Jim Tully?” Underwood said.

They hope the publication of the biography and the KSU Press reprints of four Tully books will re-energize interest. Bauer says their 19 years of off-and-on research into his life already has.

“There are a lot of people after him now,” Bauer said. “Dealers like to look for the next old, big thing, and I think Tully might be it.”

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News Headline: Maplewood students win poetry prizes | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
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News OCR Text: In the annual Ohio high school student poetry competition sponsored by the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University, students at Maplewood Career Center in Ravenna nearly swept the honors this year, according to Maplewood instructor Scott Parsons. Maplewood students took first place, third place and first honorable mention.

Jennifer Walker won first place and received a $4,000 scholarship, renewable for four years. Jamie Viall, the third-place winner, received a $1,500 scholarship renewable for four years. Both are students at Ravenna High School. Olivia Melert of Mogadore High School earned an honorable mention.

All three will have their work published by the KSU Wick Poetry Center in a broadside in the fall and will participate in the center's "Celebrating Our Own" poetry reading in the fall, which features the high school and KSU undergraduate scholarship winners.

"As usual, these students displayed a rare and admirable work ethic in writing and doing nearly endless revision," said Parsons. He pointed out that the students won "an impressive $22,000 this year," for an eight-year total for Maplewood poets of about $115,000.

"Watching these poems begin as a few scribbled lines and then take shape over a sequence of weeks (or months) into their final form is absolutely my favorite part of my job here," said Parsons.

"We begin simply with a deep immersion in poetic language that, I hope, begins to shape an appreciation for well-tuned lines, concrete images, and begins to give each student a sense of her own aesthetic preferences," he said. "When a student finally hits on the right line or a killer ending or just a perfect turn of phrase, it really is like magic. Jennifer worked a long time on one of her poem's final lines, put in a lot of time, didn't get anywhere for days, and then finally ripped off three ending lines that about knocked me over."

Putting into words how she feels about poetry, Jennifer said, "I like describing things around me in ways that no one else really notices. Once they read the poem, they look at the subject in a completely new light." She added, "Writers can reach into a person's chest and yank their heartstrings with a few lines and I find that almost illegal." Here's an excerpt from one of her winning poems, "Lost Love": " 'Call me pitiful,' she cries, 'or replaceable,/ say that respectable men banished me,/ say I've grown rough around the edges,/ but remember,/ I was in love once.' "

One of Jamie's poems is titled "Somewhere," and here's an excerpt: "If you breathe snow, I will too./ The heart deepens with each touch and when it is open you have the power/ to travel countries, eyes who understand the deeper voice./ You imagine each intense breath,/ the fingers that can open any rose."

Olivia said, "Poems mean the world to me and I love to write them just to make myself feel better. It's like the words of the poem just twist off my tongue and play on my lips. It's beautiful and comforting." Here's a line from one of her poems, "The Pond, Mogadore Ohio": "I don't even have to look at the water to see the sadness my face would be reflecting."

"I am very grateful that my students have this venue through the Wick Center to enter their work," said Parsons. "I don't know of any similar opportunity anywhere. One of the goals of the center is to 'encourage new voices,' and they've certainly done that."

Parsons added, "Even had they not won these honors, they (the students) displayed a work ethic that will serve them very well throughout their lives. Several other students submitted work, and I admire their efforts also."

For information on the poetry program at Maplewood Career Center, call 330-296-2892.

(photo)

Student poets of Maplewood Career Center in Ravenna who recently won accolades are, from left, Jennifer Walker and Jamie Viall, both of Ravenna High School, and Olivia Melert of Mogadore High School.

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