Report Overview:
Total Clips (10)
Campus Environment and Operations (2)
Fashion Design (1)
Hospitality Management (2)
KSU at Geauga; Regional Academic Center (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Physics (1)
University Libraries; University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Campus Environment and Operations (2)
HAPPENINGS: KSU again named Tree Campus USA 04/27/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

KSU to celebrate Tree Campus on Thursday 04/27/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design (1)
Kent State, Virginia Marti design students show us how they would dress Kate Middleton for the royal wedding 04/27/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


Hospitality Management (2)
KSU COURSE SEEKS JACKPOT (Heiman) 04/27/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Casino management courses getting renewed focus at Kent State (Heiman) 04/27/2011 Business First of Columbus Text Attachment Email


KSU at Geauga; Regional Academic Center (1)
New Kent State Twinsburg Campus One Step Away From Groundbreaking 04/27/2011 kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


KSU at Stark (1)
Kent Stark Celebrates End of Semester With Kentiki (Yerian) 04/27/2011 northcantonpatch.com Text Attachment Email


KSU Museum (1)
Hepburn film to be screened at KSU Museum 04/27/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Physics (1)
KSU research team shares in nuclear discovery (Keane) 04/27/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Libraries; University Press (1)
Cartoonist Tom Batiuk to Speak at Kent State Thursday 04/27/2011 kentpatch.com Text Attachment Email


News Headline: HAPPENINGS: KSU again named Tree Campus USA | Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: From The Plain Dealer, April 27, 2011:

Kent State University will celebrate being designated Tree Campus USA at a ceremony at 2 p.m. Thursday in front of Engleman Hall on the main campus. The ceremony marks the third consecutive year that KSU has received the Tree Campus USA award, which is given by the Arbor Day Foundation. Residents of Engleman Hall will plant a tree to commemorate the occasion.

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News Headline: KSU to celebrate Tree Campus on Thursday | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A ceremony to celebrate Kent
State University's designation as
a Tree Campus USA for the third
consecutive year will take place
at 2 p.m. Thursday in front on Engleman
Hall as the university also
celebrates Arbor Day.
The Tree Campus USA award,
which is given by the Arbor Day
Foundation, will be presented to
Gregg Floyd, Kent State vice president
for finance and administration.
Following the presentation,
residents of Engleman Hall will
plant a tree to commemorate the
occasion. Engleman Hall was the
winner of Kent State's 2011 Recyclemania
competition.
Tree Campus USA, a national
program launched in 2008 by the
Arbor Day Foundation, honors colleges
and universities and the leaders
of the campus and surrounding
communities for promoting healthy
urban forest management and engaging
the campus community in
environmental stewardship. During
the first year of the program,
KSU was one of 29 schools to receive
the initial designation.

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News Headline: Kent State, Virginia Marti design students show us how they would dress Kate Middleton for the royal wedding | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The details of Kate Middleton's wedding dress are a tightly kept secret, but that hasn't stopped anyone -- including us -- from speculating.

In honor of the royal wedding Friday (the ceremony starts at 6 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time), we asked four fashion students to show us what they would design for the princess-to-be.

And take a look at some iconic wedding garb in the past few decades.

Holly Thompson

Kent State University

Hometown: Pittsburgh.

Details: The dress is all crinoline, embellished with gold and ivory embroidery. The embroidery consists of lilies (Middleton's favorite flower), daffodils (official flower of Wales) and roses (to represent Kenya, where Prince William proposed). Embroidery is scattered across a sheer back and three-quarter-length sleeves. The neckline is rather conservative to balance the sheerness of the back. The entire dress is covered in crystal and pearl beading. The veil is very dramatic with pickups tacked with rose appliques and crystals. The "royal train" length would be 9 feet from the waistline.

Career plans: After graduation, I plan to move to Pittsburgh and work at Anne Gregory for the Bride doing custom bridal work and working on my first private sample bridal collection.

Liz Opaczewski

Kent State University

Hometown: Toledo.

Details: The dress is made out of silk satin with a silk-chiffon insert of layers in the front. The dress contains beading on the front bust and at the top of the waist insert. There are also embroidered flowers and more beading on the bottom of the cathedral-length train, which is 7 feet from the natural waist. My inspiration came from the Baroque era, and I added a modern details.

Career plans: I plan to work in technical design to further enhance my skills and experience in garment fitting.

Kristen Woodruff

Virginia Marti College of Art and Design

Hometown: Toledo.

The dress: I chose this design over a few others I drew because I feel it fits her personality, body type and royal appeal. Sleeves were a must, but I did not want overly used, and simply hideous, leg-of-mutton sleeves, so I opted for the more modern see-through lace. A train is important for a royal wedding, and I chose a round, lacey approach. The mermaid-style silhouette will show off her curves without being revealing.

Career plans: Right now I'm just deciding exactly where I fit in the fashion world. But I lean more toward menswear and costuming.

Joy Kobzowicz

Virginia Marti College of Art and Design

Hometown: Medina.

Details: The entire dress is made of silk organza. It is a halter style and has pale, cold-stone gray coloring. The ruched bodice features crystals and gems sewn into the material. Completing the look is an organza-tulle veil with hand-sewn crystals and a beaded headdress. I did a lot of designs for her, and I chose this one because it is dramatic, yet not over the top. The silk organza was the inspiration. It was light and feminine, and it reminded me of a spring fabric.

Career plans: I'm headed to the West Coast after graduation to continue my education. I would love to work in the entertainment industry, maybe costumes.

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News Headline: KSU COURSE SEEKS JACKPOT (Heiman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students study casino industry, take trip to Vegas

Kent State University students
learned first-hand what happens
in Las Vegas when you cheat.
You get caught.
That's one of the lessons 30
hospitality management students
picked up in KSU's unique
course, Casino Management and
Gaming Operations. The biggest
perk of the class: A four-day trip
to Vegas, which the students pay
for themselves.
“We'd love to be one of the feeders
to this emerging industry in
Ohio,” said hospitality management
professor Rob Heiman,
who conceived of the course and
teaches it with colleague Nicholas
Bellino.
“Casino has not been a part
of the Ohio language,” Heiman
said.
Anticipating that it could be,
Heiman began teaching the
course four years ago. It's designed
as an introductory survey
of a massive industry. Commercial
gaming has several major
markets and employed 375,000
people in 2008, according to the
American Gaming Association.
Ohio has no casinos yet. But
amendments to the state constitution
have cleared the way
for construction to begin in Columbus,
Cleveland, Toledo and
Cincinnati. The developer of a
Columbus casino broke ground
Monday.
Despite expansion in Ohio and
other states, the biggest market
by far is still the Las Vegas Strip,
with annual earnings topping $5
billion.
That's why Heiman takes his
students there.
“We had private tours of the
MGM Grand, Excalibur and Bellagio,”
said Kaylee Rinella, a senior
hospitality management major.
She traveled with the class to
Las Vegas in early March. “We got
to go in the high-roller suites.”
Most people will never see
those suites. Most people will
never see the kitchens or the offices,
either. The KSU delegation
saw it all. They filed reports
based on interviews with front
desk managers: How they work,
how they're organized, how they
keep a hotel running.
They even saw how the Bellagio
keeps its casino floor secure
and roots out cheaters.
Turns out, it's just like in the
movies. They were surrounded by
dozens of closed circuit monitors
in the heart of Bellagio security
as employees with joysticks
zoomed in on people's
faces and people's hands.
“One person they suspected
we saw, they actually had
a database face match,” Heiman
said. “He was counting
cards.”
The course isn't about how
to gamble (a slang term for
the industry-preferred “to
game”), but it does cover
odds and how to play some
games. Heiman teaches the
social issues, too.
“Las Vegas was not built
on winners,” he says. “This
is a form of entertainment. It
will never be a way to make
money.”
For Rinella, this spring,
it was.
She forked over $20 on a
blackjack table. That became
$60, and she walked.
Then at the end of the
trip, she played a dollar in a
five-cent Wheel of Fortune
game.
Lights and sirens. She won
$100.

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News Headline: Casino management courses getting renewed focus at Kent State (Heiman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Business First of Columbus
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A hospitality management course at Kent State University that focuses on the casino industry is getting a real-life edge as shovels hit the ground on Ohio's sites, the Akron Beacon Journal reports.

The school in recent years has offered a course dubbed Casino Management and Gaming Operations, created by professor Rob Heiman as he saw sites popping up in states around Ohio. One key to the course's popularity: A trip to Las Vegas every year to give students a behind-the-scenes look, the paper reported.

Heiman said he's looking to add related courses at Kent State as sites in Columbus, Cincinnati, Cleveland and Toledo move closer to completion. The Ohio casinos, he said, are leading students to take the courses more seriously and no longer see the trade as “some fantasy land out in Las Vegas or Atlantic City.”

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News Headline: New Kent State Twinsburg Campus One Step Away From Groundbreaking | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Twinsburg Planning Commission approved final site plan for Kent State Geauga campus

Kent State University-Geauga is one step closer to moving dirt for its Twinsburg Regional Academic Center.

The Twinsburg Planning Commission approved the final site plan and recommended the dedication plat and final Business Area Plan (BAP) Monday night.

Spencer Pisczak, who represents the firm that will build the new facility, Premier Development Partners, said they are still working out some minor details but want to begin soon.

“Many of the pieces and parts are being evaluated to make sure the project comes in on budget,” Pisczak said. “That's critical in terms of timing right now because we're at a fork in the road where they need to break ground, in a perfect world, sometime in May.”

The dedication plat, which extends Creekside Drive and allows the property next to the university to be served in the future, and the final BAP, will go to Twinsburg City Council for final consideration in the next few weeks.

Kent State will abide by all the codes of the BAP, but the university was given an exception on parking restrictions because of the large number of spaces it would require.

Only two conditions need to be met for the final site plan, including a finalized landscape plan with plant species and an approved lighting plan. Both aspects will be completed soon, Pisczak said.

The $24 million, 45,000-square-foot project on Creekside Drive is still expected to be complete for the fall semester of 2012.

“I wish you the best of luck on the project,” Twinsburg Mayor Katherine Procop said. “We're very excited about it and it's a really great community project.”

Twinsburg Ward 5 representative Chris Feldman mirrored her thoughts and said the university has done well at meeting all the requirements.

“It's great to have them in that area,” Feldman said. "That area has been idle for many years, so for them to place it there, right along a major thoroughfare, will be good for Kent State and us.”

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News Headline: Kent Stark Celebrates End of Semester With Kentiki (Yerian) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: northcantonpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Stark campus offers students a stress-free conclusion to the semester with the two-day Kentiki event

It's nearly May and the semester at Kent State University Stark Campus is coming to an end. Research papers, last-minute homework and final exams are the only things on the mind of most students.

Kristi Yerian, the Student Life Coordinator at the campus, is trying to give students a chance to escape all that with the Kentiki, an event that runs Wednesday and Thursday in front of the Campus Center (or inside depending on the weather).

“Students are starting to get stressed out because of finals approaching, so they can take some time to lay on a beach towel, listen to some music and not have to worry," she said.

Kentiki is a time for students to relax a bit during two days of festivities, including live music, an obstacle course, spin-art Frisbees, a movie on the lawn and a whole lot more. One of the more popular activities is the faculty dunk tank, where students can pay a few bucks and have a chance to sink their favorite professor.

“We get a lot of faculty to come out of their offices and help do small things like run the cookout, be a greeter or collect money at the dunk tank table,” she said.

Though the event is primarily geared toward students, anyone can come out and have some fun. A cookout and free cotton candy will be provided with a watermelon-eating contest even on the agenda. Yerian said the film screening on the lawn Thursday evening usually draws the largest crowd. This year the selected film will be Due Date, the comedy blockbuster starring Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Galifianakis.

Collaborating with the students to make this possible each and every year, however, is what Yerian enjoys the most.

"I love working with the students all semester long, talking about their ideas and seeing what interesting twists we can put on it,” she said. “The students do everything from design T-shirts to help with publicity by making posters to put around campus.”

All proceeds collected during Kentiki will be donated to the Stark County Hunger Task Force, which will also be on hand during the two-day event.

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News Headline: Hepburn film to be screened at KSU Museum | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fashion historian Patricia
Campbell Warner will join
Kent State University Museum
director Jean Druesedow
in a conversation on Katharine
Hepburn's influence on
women, fashion, sports, and
popular culture Thursday at
the museum.
The discussionwill take
place in Murphy Auditorium
immediately after the 6
p.m. screening of the romantic
sports comedy “Pat and
Mike,” starring Hepburn and
Spencer Tracy.

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News Headline: KSU research team shares in nuclear discovery (Keane) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University researchers are part of a team of international scientists who have discovered antihelium-4, the most massive antinucleus known to date.

This new discovery is the antimatter partner of the helium-4 nucleus, also called the alpha particle. Helium-4 is the normal form of helium, the second most abundant element in the universe after hydrogen.

The international team of scientists studies high-energy collisions of gold nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, a 2.4 mile-circumference particle accelerator at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, N.Y. The new antinucleus was discovered at RHIC's STAR detector, and the same group set the previous world record for the heaviest known antinucleus just last year.

KSU physics professors Declan Keane and Spiros Margetis are the principal investigators of the project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The peer-reviewed findings were published online April 24 by the journal Nature, the world's most highly-cited interdisciplinary science journal.

The author contact on behalf of the full international team is Brookhaven scientist Aihong Tang, who received his doctoral degree from Kent State in 2002.

The new antihelium-4 is a negatively charged state of antimatter containing two antiprotons and two antineutrons. Unlike the antinucleus discovered in 2010, this one does not undergo radioactive decay.

"The last stable antinucleus discovery was at a Russian accelerator in 1971. To break the new record established by the present discovery, a future experiment would need to find an antinucleus containing six antiparticles, and if this were produced by the same mechanism, it would be rarer by a factor of 2.6 million," Keane said.

Collisions at RHIC fleetingly produce conditions that existed a few microseconds after the Big Bang, which gave birth to the universe some 13.7 billion years ago. "Our understanding is that matter and antimatter were initially created with equal abundance immediately following the Big Bang," Tang said. "The predominance of matter in the visible universe today remains a major unsolved scientific mystery."

Several other members of the Kent State physics department are co-authors of the new paper by virtue of their vital contributions to constructing and operating the various interlocking subsystems of the STAR detector, including emeritus professor Bryon Anderson, postdoctoral researchers Jonathan Bouchet and Lokesh Kumar, Senior Research Fellow Wei-Ming Zhang, and graduate students Jeremy Alford, Jaiby Joseph, Yadav Pandit, Amilkar Quintero and Joe Vanfossen.

The STAR collaboration is composed of 54 institutions from 12 countries. Research at RHIC is funded primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and by various governmental agencies of the countries of the collaborating institutions.

One of 10 national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences, as well as in energy technologies and national security. Brookhaven Lab also builds and operates major scientific facilities available to university, industry and government researchers.

For more information about the Department of Physics at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/cas/physics.

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News Headline: Cartoonist Tom Batiuk to Speak at Kent State Thursday | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: kentpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University graduate, artist and author Tom Batiuk is giving a talk and book signing in the Read Room on the 10th floor of the Kent State University Library on Thursday, April 28, at 3 p.m. The event, which is free and open to the public, is part of the University Libraries' "Kent Reads" program.

Batiuk will be discussing his book Lisa's Story: The Other Shoe, based on the life of Lisa Moore, a character in his comic strip, Funky Winkerbean. The book tells the story of Lisa and her family's struggles with breast cancer. The event is co-hosted by Kent State University Libraries and the Kent State University Press. Books will be available for purchase and signing by the author.

Batiuk's Funky Winkerbean and Crankshaft comic strips are carried in more than 700 newspapers throughout the United States. Batiuk was honored in 2006 by the American Cancer Society and presented its Cancer Care Hall of Fame Award for his sympathetic work in highlighting the experiences of those with cancer. He is responsible for the establishment of University Hospitals' Lisa's Legacy Fund.

For more information on Lisa's Story: The Other Shoe, click on this link: http://www.kentstateuniversitypress.com/2010/lisas-story/

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