Report Overview:
Total Clips (36)
Athletics (3)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
College of Technology (1)
Commencement (1)
Communication Studies (1)
Dining Services (1)
Fashion Design; Student Success (2)
Higher Education; Partnerships (1)
Hospitality Management (1)
KSU at Geauga; Regional Academic Center (3)
KSU at Geauga; Renovation at KSU (1)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU Museum (1)
May 4 (1)
Office of the Provost (1)
Physics (1)
Psychology (3)
Renovation at KSU (2)
Safety (1)
Student Media (3)
Student Wellness and Recreation Center (1)
Students (1)
Sustainability (1)
University Libraries (1)
Wick Poetry Center (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (3)
Finishing touch - KSU's Hahn wrapping up historic career in stellar fashion (Page) 04/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Uncertain state of NFL could have impact on future of KSU stars 04/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

GETTING TO KNOW HERB PAGE (Page) 04/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Yoga for Nurses (Pratt, Motter) 04/28/2011 Advance for Nurses - Online Text Attachment Email

Not often do you witness students doing a lotus pose, warrior II or downward-facing dog during a school day at Kent State University's College of Nursing in Ohio. But thanks to an innovative program developed by fashion designer Donna Karan, students...


College of Technology (1)
School News 04/28/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Commencement (1)
KSU commencement ceremonies set 04/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Communication Studies (1)
Social media have rewritten political rules (Haridakis) 04/26/2011 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

...that social networking sites are more effective in reaching and influencing voters, said Dr. Paul Haridakis, a professor of communications studies at Kent State University in Ohio. Haridakis studied the impact of social networking sites on the 2008 general election. President Barack Obama's...


Dining Services (1)
Bringing home the prize 04/27/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

When the Who's Your Mama Earth Day Festival in Kent recently held its Vegan Iron Chef competition at Kent State University, it was Akron's own Julie Wandling Costell, owner of Miss Julie's Kitchen, who proved victorious. Wandling Costell,...


Fashion Design; Student Success (2)
Kent State design students show us how they would dress Kate Middleton for the royal wedding 04/26/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...show us what they would design for the princess-to-be. And take a look at some iconic wedding garb in the past few decades. Holly Thompson Kent State University Hometown: Pittsburgh. Details: The dress is all crinoline, embellished with gold and ivory embroidery. The embroidery...

Kent State fashion design graduate; Katelyn Grummel 04/27/2011 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

...these years (it was written at the turn of the 20th century), managed to put a hold on Katelyn Grummel, an aspiring fashion designer soon to graduate from Kent State University. The creative can turn inspiration from all aspects of their lives, and this story, and ironically the yellow wallpaper,...


Higher Education; Partnerships (1)
University of Akron to offer classes in Lakewood 04/28/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


Hospitality Management (1)
Casino management courses getting renewed focus at Kent State 04/26/2011 BizJournals.com Text Attachment Email

A hospitality management course at Kent State University that focuses on the casino industry is getting a real-life edge as shovels hit the ground on Ohio's sites, the Akron Beacon...


KSU at Geauga; Regional Academic Center (3)
Twinsburg campus to break ground 04/28/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Earthmovers will be digging up the ground in a couple of weeks for the new Twinsburg campus of Kent State University, expected to open in the fall of 2012. The city's Planning Commission this week gave its final green light for the...

New Kent State Twinsburg Campus One Step Away From Groundbreaking 04/26/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University-Geauga is one step closer to moving dirt for its Twinsburg Regional Academic Center . The Twinsburg Planning Commission...

Twinsburg Regional Academic Center One Step Away From Digging In 04/26/2011 Twinsburg Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University-Geauga is one step closer to moving dirt for its Twinsburg Regional Academic Center . The city planning commission...


KSU at Geauga; Renovation at KSU (1)
Local KSU campus, JEDD award five students annual scholarships 04/28/2011 Twinsburg Bulletin Text Attachment Email


KSU at Salem (1)
Chorus concert to feature American theater music 04/27/2011 Hudson Hub-Times Text Attachment Email

...consists of volunteer singers from Hudson and nearby communities under the direction of a professional music director. Fucci serves on the faculty at Kent State University in the School of Music and the School of Theatre and Dance, and is a Music Mentor on the "Music!Words!Opera!" project...


KSU at Stark (1)
Kent Stark Celebrates End of Semester With Kentiki (Yerian) 04/26/2011 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

It's nearly May and the semester at Kent State University Stark Campus is coming to an end. Research papers, last-minute homework and final exams are the only things on the mind...


KSU Museum (1)
On View This Week 04/27/2011 Scene - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Museum: Beyond Fashion: Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevedo. Culled from 20 years of past collections, Quevedo's works...


May 4 (1)
KSU plans events to commemorate 41st anniversary of May 4 shootings 04/27/2011 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is hosting a series of events to reflect on its 41st anniversary of May 4, 1970. The May 4 Walking Tour documentary...


Office of the Provost (1)
School news 04/28/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Physics (1)
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY RESEARCHERS PLAY LEAD ROLE IN NEW SCIENCE DISCOVERY (Keane) 04/26/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, April 26 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University researchers are part of a team of international...


Psychology (3)
Health & Science | Gaining by losing: Study finds dropping excess weight may improve brain power (Gunstad) 04/26/2011 Daily Orange, The Text Attachment Email

...of shedding a few extra pounds is increased brain performance, according to an April 14 Time magazine article. John Gunstad, associate professor at Kent State University's Department of Psychology, headed a team of researchers who found losing excess weight might improve cognitive functions,...

Lose Weight And Boost Your Brain Power 04/26/2011 ThirdAge Text Attachment Email

...substantial number of pounds actually improves the health of the brain. Under the guidance of John Gunstad, an associate professor of psychology at Kent State University, along with a team of scientists from several research centers, tests taken by 150 people who weighed an average of 300...

VIDEO: Weight loss improves memory: research (Gunstad) 04/28/2011 Medical Express Text Attachment Email


Renovation at KSU (2)
VIDEO: Kent State Students Weigh in on new Student Fee Proposal 04/27/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

A $250 million plan to renovate the Kent State University main campus would rely on a new student fee to pay for $210 million of the cost. According to the university's proposal,...

School Notes: KSU makes another try at borrowing from state (Lefton) 04/27/2011 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is again trying to borrow $210 million for a campus renovation and construction project, and this time it will likely...


Safety (1)
Car Hits Bicyclist on Kent State Campus 04/27/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

A bicyclist was struck by a car on the Kent State University campus this afternoon. The accident happened at about 3 p.m. on Midway Drive near the Centennial A residence hall....


Student Media (3)
Three firms refuse to print Kent State's gay magazine 04/27/2011 Poynteronline Text Attachment Email

They were concerned about images and language in the spring issue of Fusion. A fourth printer finally agreed to do the job, but charged a $2,200 rush fee....

Three Printers Refuse To Publish Kent State LGBT Student Publication, Citing F-Word, Images Of Cross-Dressing 04/27/2011 Huffington Post, The Text Attachment Email

Three printing companies have refused to publish the spring edition of Fusion, a Campus Progress-sponsored LGBT magazine at Kent State University, citing concerns over its images and language. The controversy has cost Fusion, Campus Progress' 2010 awardee for Best...

Three Printers Refuse LGBT Student Publication, Citing F-Word, Images of Cross-Dressing 04/27/2011 CampusProgress.org Text Attachment Email

...not have been published. Three printing companies have refused to publish the spring edition of Fusion, a Campus Progress-sponsored LGBT magazine at Kent State University, citing concerns over its images and language. The controversy has cost Fusion, Campus Progress' 2010 awardee for Best...


Student Wellness and Recreation Center (1)
Moms Q&A: Summer Planning for Camps, Pools and Other Events 04/27/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...for camps or other summer-time gigs to keep the kids occupied? In addition to programs offered by the Kent Parks and Recreation Department and the Kent State University Recreation and Wellness Center , there are lots of options around Kent this summer for entertaining the children.


Students (1)
KSU student facing new theft charge 04/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Sustainability (1)
Portage residents doing a decent job of recycling several materials 04/27/2011 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...rural parts of the county, the district collected 161.7 tons of old tires from spring cleanups across the county last year. On the commercial side, Kent State University is probably the largest generator, Steiner said. "With 26,000 students on campus, it's like a city within a city," he...


University Libraries (1)
Cartoonist Tom Batiuk to Speak at Kent State Thursday 04/27/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University graduate, artist and author Tom Batiuk is giving a talk and book signing in the Read Room on the 10th floor of the Kent...


Wick Poetry Center (1)
"Giving Voice" Community Poetry Reading 04/27/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Location: Kent State University 500 E Main St, Kent, OH When: May 2, 2011 Time: 6:00pm Kent State University's Wick Poetry Center...


News Headline: Finishing touch - KSU's Hahn wrapping up historic career in stellar fashion (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WITH BRIGHT FUTURE AHEAD, FLASHES
STAR STAYS FOCUSED ON SENIOR YEAR

John Hahn hasn't been blinded by a
bright golfing future.
Instead of falling into the trap of becoming
distracted by agents, potential sponsorship
deals and planning out his post-college
schedule, the Kent State senior has stayed
focused on authoring a brilliant final chapter
to his Golden Flashes career.
“We had a talk early in the year and John
had so much on his mind,” said KSU golf
coach Herb Page. “We talked about putting
everything else aside and just enjoying the
last two or three months of college. Enjoy
the journey and don't worry about all of the
other stuff. All of those other things after
college will come soon enough.”
Hahn took the advice, and along with
simply having a ball in his last college season,
he has built a resume that ranks with
the best players in Kent State history and
with the current crop of top Division I players
on the national scene.
By finishing as co-champion at last week's
Robert Kepler Intercollegiate on Ohio State
University's Scarlet Course, Hahn became
the first player in the nation to win four
tournaments as an individual in 2010-11.
Only six other players in the nation have
three wins this season.
“I got so much more out the situation on
the 18th hole in the final round last week
than I did out of getting the win itself,”
said Hahn.
After Illinois' Luke Guthrie drained a 20-
footer on the last hole, Hahn needed to sink
a nine-foot putt to tie Guthrie for the individual
tie and give his team a share of the
overall tournament championship with the
Fighting Illini. He delivered.
“I love being in that kind of situation, to
see what I'm made of,” said Hahn. “I like to
thrive on that kind of pressure. Obviously it
was great to win (individually), but to get
the team win was really, really nice.”
Hahn has made a habit of coming through
in the clutch during his KSU career. He
opened the year with a two-round, 9-underpar
total to win at the Gopher Invitational in
September, then followed by winning three of
the six tournaments KSU entered this spring
— a four-shot victory (10-under) at the Louisiana
Classic and a two-shot win at the Fireline
Towson Invitational in March prior to
last week's shared title at Ohio State.
Add those four victories to wins at the
2010 and 2009 Mid-American Conference
championship and the 2009 Towson Invitational,
and Hahn has seven individual titles
in his career. The total matches the KSU record
set by Eric Frishette from 1991-94.
“You can bet he knows Eric Frishette's
record and he is going to try to break it,”
said Page.
A third consecutive medalist finish at the
MAC championship this weekend at TPC
River's Bend near Cincinnati would give
Hahn the record. He is guaranteed at least
one more opportunity May 19-21 when KSU
plays in an NCAA regional tournament at
either Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Indiana,
San Diego or Virginia Tech.
Should KSU advance to the NCAA Championship
at Karsten Creek Golf Club in Stillwater,
Okla., Hahn could find a chance
to eclipse another coveted KSU career
mark.
Ben Curtis owns the Flashes' all-time
scoring record at 72.27 from 1996-2000.
Hahn is at 72.33, but if he can average 71.3
over 10 rounds through the NCAA championship,
he would surpass Curtis.
Just as Tiger Woods has chased Jack
Nicklaus' records since joining the PGA
Tour, the KSU records of Curtis — the 2003
British Open champion — have provided
a target for Hahn ever since he arrived in
Kent in 2007. Hahn, who graduated from
nearby Hudson High School, ranked 22nd
nationally in his graduating class on the
National Junior Golf Scoreboard, making
him the highest-ranked signee in the history
of the KSU program.
While bettering Curtis would be a nice
accomplishment, Hahn's ultimate goal in
returning to the NCAA Tournament would
be a shot at leading KSU to its best ever national
finish. The Flashes placed sixth in the
nation in 2008, Hahn's freshman season.
“It seems like every year we have as good
a team as we've ever had, but this is definitely
the best team in my four years here,” said
Hahn. “As long as we have all the wheels turning,
we should have no problem getting to
Karsten Creek. And if we do, we can match
up with anybody there. There isn't a team in
the country that will intimidate us.”
According to page, “that kind of cockiness”
is one of the reasons John Hahn has thrived
at Kent State. It's also why he has a chance
at greatness beyond the college game.
“John is kind of a true student athlete
right now in that he is an academic All-
American for the second year in a row,” said
Page. “When he gets the chance to make golf
his only focus, I think he is going to be even
better. He has a lot of high goals, and the
biggest reason I think he can accomplish
those goals is he is absolutely fearless.”

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News Headline: Uncertain state of NFL could have impact on future of KSU stars | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WITHOUT NEW CBA,
TEAMS WILL BE UNABLE
TO SIGN UNDRAFTED FREE
AGENTS UNTIL LATER DATE

Kent State safety Brian Lainhart
and linebacker Cobrani Mixon
will be among the eligible
college players waiting with the
hopes of hearing their names
called during the final two days
of the 2011 NFL Draft.
Thanks to the league's ongoing
labor drama, this year's wait
will be a little different than past
seasons for those with the potential
to be selected in the draft's
later rounds.
Even with the lockout at least
temporarily lifted by the ruling of
a federal judge on Monday, NFL
teams don't expect to sign undrafted
rookie free agents after
the conclusion of Saturday's seventh
and final round.
That puts a roadblock in the
route to the NFL used by some
of the Golden Flashes' most successful
alumni.
Former KSU players like Joshua
Cribbs, James Harrison, Daniel
Muir and Antonio Gates all
signed free-agent deals within
hours of the conclusion of past
drafts. Despite going undrafted,
they all proved themselves in
camps and eventually worked
their way into starring roles with
NFL teams.
“Everybody is happy about the
lockout being lifted, at least for
now, but we'll still have to wait
and see what happens,” said
Lainhart. “If we don't hear our
names this week, free agency
is probably going to be a lot different
than it used to be.”
If a player goes undrafted,
he probably won't be able to
sign a free-agent contract until
a new collective-bargaining
agreement is in place. The opportunity
for first-year players to
prove themselves and catch the
eye of coaches in the minicamps
that usually follow the draft will
also be gone.
“It definitely makes it more
difficult on guys this year,” said
Lainhart. “There is no rookie minicamp,
so all the first-year guys
will probably end up eventually
reporting to camp with the veterans.
That will be a disadvantage,
but everyone will have to
do it, whether they get drafted
or not.”
The good news for Lainhart is
his draft stock appears to be on
the rise. A total of 16 teams have
contacted the KSU safety within
the last week.
“They all want to know my
draft-day cell number and what
airport I would fly out of if I get
drafted,” Lainhart said.
The Baltimore Ravens and the
hometown Cincinnati Bengals
are among the teams believed
to be interested in Lainhart, who
is a graduate of Cincinnati Colerain
High School. Mixon is also
a Colerain alum. Both players
worked out for the Bengals this
off-season.
Lainhart has also visited with
the Ravens. The New York Giants
are believed to be among
the other teams showing an interest
in Mixon.
“I'm excited. It would be great
to get drafted,” said Lainhart.
“But if I don't, I know I'll eventually
be a free agent, and I'll get
a chance. That's all I can ask for
is a chance. Hopefully I'll be able
to take it and run with it. I talked
to Cobrani and he said a couple
of teams have called him to ask
for his draft-day phone number. I
know he is excited too, and hopefully
things work out for him.”
Meanwhile, Kent State running
back Eugene Jarvis could find a
chance to play professionally in
the Canadian Football League.
According to a KSU source, the
Montreal Alouettes are pursuing
Jarvis.

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News Headline: GETTING TO KNOW HERB PAGE (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Team: Kent State men's golf.
Date of Birth: March 16, 1951.
Hometown: Markham, Ontario, Canada.
Family: Married to Dr. Paula Treckel.
Pets: None.
High School: Markham District High
School, Class of 1969.
College: Kent State University, Class
of 1974, Bachelor's degree in Health
Physical Education and Recreation;
Master's degree in Kinesiology in
1976.
Profession: Director of Golf at Kent
State University, men's golf coach,
PGA golf professional, Windmill
Lakes golf coach.
Why did you choose your profession:
I chose the profession because
I was too small to play pro hockey.
My father made that decision for
me when I was 12 years old. That's
when he got me interested in golf. I
guess I got pretty proficient at golf,
and found out I loved to play and
teach it.
Favorite school subject: In college,
I really enjoyed psychology and the
psychology of sport. I also enjoyed
statistics and my graduate classes
in, believe it or not, accounting.
Favorite teacher: I really liked Bob
Stadulis, who taught psychology of
sport and some statistics classes,
when I was an undergraduate
at Kent
State. He was the guy
who got me going on
more of the scientific
aspects of golf. He really
challenged me.
Favorite moment
as an athlete (Note:
Page played football,
ice hockey and golf
at Kent State): It was
awesome the moment
we beat Toledo
to win the MAC
championship my junior
year. I still get
goosebumps when I
think of it. Then personally,
I scored a
couple of goals in hockey at the Detroit
Olympia, and that meant a lot
to me because that's where Gordie
Howe played. That was cool. I also
remember when I won my first professional
golf tournament, birdying
the last hole at Firestone in 1977. I
won $200 and felt like I was a millionaire.
Favorite moment as a coach:
When we were in the hunt, competing
for a national championship.
Those were great moments. Your
gut is churning the whole time, but
hopefully my favorite moment is still
ahead of me.
What about coaching do you enjoy
the most: I think what I like is to
see young men improve, physically
and emotionally and start to play
to their potential. It' snot just about
technique, but when you see them
start to understand the science and
the art of golf. And then when you
can get a group. Golf is an individual
sport, but in college it becomes
a team sport and when you can get
a group of young men with high expectations,
you set a plan and you
see that plan move forward.
Favorite TV show: Dancing with the
Stars, because I have to watch that
with my wife. Other than that, I'm really
a sports junkie.
Last book read: The Big Short: Inside
the Doomsday Machine by Michael
Lewis. I also really enjoyed the
book Delivering Happiness:
A Path to Profits,
Passion and Purpose
by Tony Hsieh,
who is the CEO of
Zappos shoes. I read
both books over winter
break.
Favorite professional
sports team/athlete:
The Toronto Maple
Leafs. Growing
up, my favorite professional
athlete was
Jean Beliveau of the
Montreal Canadiens.
He was my idol. Now
my favorite pro athlete
is Ben Curtis.
Favorite college sports team: Kent
State Golden Flashes.
Favorite coach: Don James, my
football coach in college. No doubt
about it. It's hard to imagine the
greatness I was surrounded by in
that locker room, with James, Gary
Pinkel, Jack Lambert, Nick Saban. I
used to sit in the back of that locker
room as the kicker and soak it all in.
Who has been your biggest influence:
No doubt about it, my father,
Sid Page. He instilled a passion, persistence,
desire, that never-give-up
attitude to outwork people. I'm an
overachiever because of him.
Something interesting about
you most people wouldn't know:
When I was a kid, I grew up out in
the country and my hobby was racing
pigeons. It was a real sport, and I
had my little pigeon coupe.
Your tips to players looking to improve
during the off-season: Put
some balance into your life. It's not
all about golf all the time. Enjoy.
What actor
would play you
in your autobiography
movie:
Arte Johnson.
He was a comic
actor on Rowan
& Martin's
Laugh-in

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News Headline: Yoga for Nurses (Pratt, Motter) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Advance for Nurses - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Not often do you witness students doing a lotus pose, warrior II or downward-facing dog during a school day at Kent State University's College of Nursing in Ohio. But thanks to an innovative program developed by fashion designer Donna Karan, students have the opportunity to discover the healthy benefits of yoga.

Kent State and Karan's Urban Zen Foundation have teamed on a program focused on nursing wellness and self-care with the goal to address issues facing nurses today, such as burnout and job-related stress. Karan established the foundation to advocate for combining Eastern and alternative healing therapies with Western medicine. In 2009, the foundation launched the Urban Zen Integrative Therapy Program (UZIT) to advance a more holistic approach to healthcare. The UZIT program includes training in yoga, essential oil therapy, Reiki, nutrition and contemplative caregiving.

Nursing Salary Statistics

2011 Nurse Pay: Moving Target

Regional results from nurses' reports of pay raises and other economic results.

Yoga Comes to Kent State

The collaboration started as a pilot project in September 2010. Approximately 30 students in the accelerated nursing program participated in the first 15-week "Care for the Caregiver" program. They met for an in-person class on a monthly basis, taught by a UZIT instructor. Students also participated in weekly webinars and tracked their progress through regular journaling. Thirty BSN students are participating this spring.

The program is embedded in the Introduction to Accelerated Nursing course. In the course, students are introduced to a variety of complementary modalities. The Urban Zen modalities of yoga and aroma therapy are practiced weekly in a 1-hour time block. A 3-hour introduction of Reiki is also part of the Urban Zen presentation.

"As a public institution, we take our public responsibility very seriously," explained David A. Pratt director of advancement, Kent State University College of Nursing. "At the College of Nursing, we feel we have a fundamental obligation to develop the talents of the nursing students who come through our doors to better prepare them for their future as healthcare providers. By providing them tools to better handle a stressful nursing education, we hope to plant the seeds of self-care they will carry with them throughout their nursing careers. In the end, the ultimate payoff would be for improved patient care/outcomes."

Combating Stress

Nursing professionals face extraordinary stresses and emotional and physical demands in the present healthcare environment. Many of these stresses have long been associated with the profession: extended work hours, giving intense emotional support to others in the face of patients' suffering, competing demands in personal and professional lives, and caring for patients and families coping with pain, loss and trauma. More recently, the problem of nursing shortages and the associated consequences have exacerbated the situation.

As a result of these demands, nurses are at high risk for chronic stress and burnout. Studies reveal the consequences of nurse burnout can be devastating; in addition to contributing to psychological and physical problems, burnout can also result in decreased patient, family and community satisfaction. For nurses, stress and burnout equate to lost time, less productive hours and a premature exit from the profession. Because nurses are identified as healthcare givers, much of their preparation has been focused on others, not on themselves. Mind/body self-care practices can offer an intervention that provides an opportunity for nurses to care for themselves.

"We believe it is important to teach nursing students how to care for themselves physically and mentally so they can have the capacity to care for others," said Tracey Motter , MSN, RN, senior undergraduate program director, Kent State University College of Nursing. "The Urban Zen modalities teach students to focus on ways to care for themselves, develop mindfulness, improve their ability to cope with stress and calm the chaos of the moment. Students can learn and practice these modalities while in school and as they begin to practice in the healthcare environment. Patients are also using and benefiting from these alternative modalities, and nurses need to be aware of the many practices that are helping patients heal and cope with illness."

Students Feel Stress Relief

Program participant Megan Janoch is a sophomore in the accelerated nursing program and has practiced yoga for the past 5 years. "Yoga keeps me in sync with my body. When there is discomfort, I find its location and breathe into it. I no longer fear pain. Yoga allows me to embrace it and control it."

Janoch believes in the benefits for her role as a nurse and for her patients as well. "Yoga has and continues to give me the patience to deal with stressful situations. It is easy to just react to stressors, but yoga emphasizes staying present in the moment, keeping the mind calm so you can critically think your way through problems. I have yet to master such mental peace, but I have noticed more patience within myself. Hospitals are founded on stressful situations of illness. Mindful awareness will help me navigate through the spurts of chaos and focus on what really matters - my patients."

Julie Friese is in her first semester of a 4 semester long accelerated/second degree BSN program.

She currently works as a nursing assistant on a busy ICU stepdown unit, so she has seen and experienced how hectic a nurse's schedule can be.

"I have always admired nurses who are able to seamlessly transition from one task to the next, despite the stressful environment. This ability may be difficult to achieve, so I believe it will be very important to have a technique I can use to find balance amidst the tension," Friese explained. "After learning of the mental and physical health benefits of yoga and meditation, it was obvious to me they would be vital to my success in nursing school and as a practicing nurse to find that balance.

She added the Urban Zen program has been wonderful. "The high level of stress and anxiety that I have is subdued when I tell my brain to solely focus on long, deep breaths. This is because my thoughts are redirected away from the stressful thoughts to the simple act of breathing. I have also used the meditative breathing technique before and during exams to calm myself down, and during class and clinicals to help maintain my concentration. Before a 12-hour clinical day, I make sure to take time to practice yoga in the morning when I'm getting ready for the day. This really helps me to calm my mind and prepare my body for the upcoming day."

Future for the Program

The university is conducting an evaluation of the program by measuring students perceived stress and ability to be mindful at the beginning, the midpoint and the final week of the course. "In my mind, success will be if students understand and appreciate the importance of caring for themselves physically and mentally and becoming open to alternate modalities," added Pratt. "Our goal is to open this program up to all students of the college."

Friese would absolutely recommend this program to other nursing students. "A nurse gives so much, and a lot is expected of him or her on an average day, which can quickly lead to feelings of stress and eventually burnout. We need to take care of ourselves first in order to be able to care for others. The simple techniques of yoga and meditation are easy to learn and provide a safe place to mentally return to when in a stressful environment."

Leslie Feldman is a contributor to ADVANCE.

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News Headline: School News | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State's College of Technology honored corporate partners, alumni and scholarship recipients at its Vision 21 induction ceremony in April. Parker Hannifin, Rockwell Automation and 3DP Technology were named to the college's new Corporate Hall of Fame. Alumni honored included Andrew Behary, Brunswick; Leanne Schumacher, Hudson; and Ashlee Steiner, Akron.

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News Headline: KSU commencement ceremonies set | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Spring 2011 Commencement
Ceremonies at Kent
State University are scheduled
for May 5 and May 7.
The May 5 ceremony for
those receiving doctoral degrees
will be held in the E.
Turner Stump Theatre in
the Music and Speech Center,
which is located on Theatre
Drive. T
he May 7 ceremonies for
those receiving master's and
baccalaureate degrees will
occur in the Memorial Athletic
and Convocation Center.
More than 4,000 students
will graduate universitywide
from Kent State this spring,
including 40 who will receive
doctoral degrees. Approximately
1,700 total students
will walk at Saturday's ceremonies.
The commencement
ceremonies may be viewed
live at www.kent.edu.
Dr. Timothy J.L. Chandler,
senior associate provost at
Kent State, will speak at the
ceremony for doctoral degree
recipients, which will be held
at 6 p.m. May 5.
Ceremonies will be held at
9 a.m. May 7 for graduates
of the College of Arts and
Sciences, College of Nursing
and College of Public
Health. Cathy D. Hemming,
co-founder of LevelFiveMedia,
a 1970 KSU alumna, will
speak.
Ceremonies will be held at
1 p.m. May 7 for graduates
of the College of Business,
College of Communication
and Information and College
of Technology. Patrick
S. Mullin, managing partner
for the Northeast Ohio
practice of Deloitte & Touche
LLP, a 1971 KSU alumnus,
will speak. Mullin is a
KSU trustee.
KSU commencement ceremonies set
Ceremonies will be held at
5:30 p.m. May 7 for graduates
of the College of Architecture
and Environmental Design,
College of the Arts, and College
of Education, Health
and Human Services.
Thomas L. Cole, chief administrative
officer of Macy's,
Inc., 1972 KSU alumnus,
will speak.
For more informatio, visit
the commencement website
at www.kent.edu/commencement

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News Headline: Social media have rewritten political rules (Haridakis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: [April 26, 2011]

Apr 24, 2011 (The Times Leader - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX) -- At age 67, Eugene Kelleher remembers the day when "friends" were people you hung around with and "likes" were, well, things you liked.

As recently as a year ago, the retired teacher had never heard the term "Facebook." He had a computer, but used it mostly for word processing and e-mail.

That changed this year, when Kelleher decided to run for the newly formed Luzerne County Council and began searching for ways to get his message out.

Kelleher, of Dallas Township, is among dozens of candidates seeking countywide political offices who have turned to Facebook, the popular social networking site on the Internet, to reach out to voters.

Each of the 16 judicial candidates and at least 23 of the 49 candidates for Luzerne County council has a page or group on Facebook, according to a scan of the site recently conducted by a reporter.

The amount of information on the sites varies greatly, with some candidates having numerous posts and videos, while others have personal information, but little to no information about their candidacy.

Electioneering tool Ed Mitchell, a local political consultant, said it would behoove those who are not actively using the sites to get on board.

Facebook and other similar sites, such as YouTube, which allows users to post videos, and Twitter, which allows users to send text messages to thousands of cell phones simultaneously, are changing the face of elections both nationally and locally, Mitchell said.

"Social media is probably going to be, by the next election in 2012, the equivalent to direct mail, and almost as important as television in communicating with voters," said Mitchell, who represents judicial candidate Michael Vough. "It's a burgeoning field of communication and people who do it well will reap great benefits." Facebook, which allows people worldwide to instantly communicate and share photos and videos, has been particularly beneficial for politicians because it lets them quickly communicate with a limitless base of voters.

"It gives you the opportunity to reach out to a lot of voters you might otherwise not be able to meet personally," said judicial candidate Molly Hanlon Mirabito. "It really complements the personal contact you have and gives people the opportunity to learn more about you." Christian Wenzel of Old Forge, an Internet advertising consultant, likened Facebook posts to putting a sign in your yard announcing your support for a particular candidate -- except it's seen by hundreds or thousands of people, not just those driving by your house.

"Facebook is all about word of mouth. It's a place you can go to communicate with friends and see what interests they have with you," he said. "They will look at that and say 'What does my friend see in that candidate?' Maybe I should check them out." Wenzel has been hired by several candidates, including judicial candidate Lesa Gelb, to manage their Facebook pages. He's continually updating Gelb's page, posting messages about meet-and-greets as well as photos and videos of events she's attended.

'Friends' redefined Users of Facebook connect with each other by becoming "friends." They express approval about posts each other make by hitting a "like" tab.

That's key information for political candidates because it lets them know if their constituents approve of their message.

"What we're trying to do is turn 'likes' into votes," said Joe Florencio, a computer/Internet consultant and friend of Kelleher's who is helping to update his page.

Kelleher has been getting a crash course in "Facebookology" from Florencio and several teenagers from his church, including 15-year-old Taylor Hodle, who boasts of having 1,039 Facebook friends.

On Friday afternoon, Hodle was showing Kelleher, who just recently started his page, how quickly his number of friends, then a paltry 78, could compound exponentially in a short time.

"There are a lot of people at our church on Facebook," Hodle said.

"That's great. If I hit 40 people, and they go to 10 people, then they go to 10 people, we could get thousands," he said.

Like many of the other candidates, Kelleher also has a separate website that details his views. That's important, but research has shown that social networking sites are more effective in reaching and influencing voters, said Dr. Paul Haridakis, a professor of communications studies at Kent State University in Ohio.

Haridakis studied the impact of social networking sites on the 2008 general election. President Barack Obama's astute use of the sites is credited with helping him win the election, he said.

Haridakis said the sites are crucial to candidates because research has also shown that voters are most influenced by opinions of people within their social circles.

"The average person is not going to go out of their way to visit a candidate's website, but they will discuss politics on a social media site and may be influenced that way," Haridakis said.

Free exposure The sites also have one other major benefit: They're free.

That's been a campaign saver for judicial candidate Vito DeLuca, who said his campaign is being financed mostly by himself and his family.

"It's really important for me to use some of the most inexpensive ways to get my message out," he said.

DeLuca said Facebook has been effective for him. He noted he had more than 150 people at his announcement. Nearly all of them were contacted via Facebook or e-mail.

Judicial candidate Dick Hughes said he can also attest to the draw of social networking.

Hughes ran for judge in 2009. He said he's seen a dramatic increase in the number of hits on his website and "friends" on his Facebook page compared to the last election.

"It's becoming more important every year," Hughes said.

He and the other candidates stress they're not forgoing other traditional forms of campaigning, however.

"Getting out into the community and going door to door is certainly the key," said Susan Kolesar of Artemis Media Group, who is working for Gelb's campaign. "What makes it work is the synergy of using multiple media forms. It's a combination of all that." To see more of The Times Leader, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.timesleader.com. Copyright (c) 2011, The Times Leader, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. For more information about the content services offered by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services (MCT), visit www.mctinfoservices.com.

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News Headline: Bringing home the prize | Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Abraham, Lisa
News OCR Text: When the Who's Your Mama Earth Day Festival in Kent recently held its Vegan Iron Chef competition at Kent State University, it was Akron's own Julie Wandling Costell, owner of Miss Julie's Kitchen, who proved victorious.

Wandling Costell, who operates her vegan cafe at 1809 S. Main St., won both the judges' votes and the people's choice award.

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News Headline: Kent State design students show us how they would dress Kate Middleton for the royal wedding | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Emily Hamlin, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: The details of Kate Middleton's wedding dress are a tightly kept secret, but that hasn't stopped anyone -- including us -- from speculating.

In honor of the royal wedding Friday (the ceremony starts at 6 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time), we asked four fashion students to show us what they would design for the princess-to-be.

And take a look at some iconic wedding garb in the past few decades.


Holly Thompson

Kent State University

Hometown: Pittsburgh.

Details: The dress is all crinoline, embellished with gold and ivory embroidery. The embroidery consists of lilies (Middleton's favorite flower), daffodils (official flower of Wales) and roses (to represent Kenya, where Prince William proposed). Embroidery is scattered across a sheer back and three-quarter-length sleeves. The neckline is rather conservative to balance the sheerness of the back. The entire dress is covered in crystal and pearl beading. The veil is very dramatic with pickups tacked with rose appliques and crystals. The "royal train" length would be 9 feet from the waistline.

Career plans: After graduation, I plan to move to Pittsburgh and work at Anne Gregory for the Bride doing custom bridal work and working on my first private sample bridal collection.


Liz Opaczewski

Kent State University

Hometown: Toledo.

Details: The dress is made out of silk satin with a silk-chiffon insert of layers in the front. The dress contains beading on the front bust and at the top of the waist insert. There are also embroidered flowers and more beading on the bottom of the cathedral-length train, which is 7 feet from the natural waist. My inspiration came from the Baroque era, and I added a modern details.

Career plans: I plan to work in technical design to further enhance my skills and experience in garment fitting.

Kristen Woodruff

Virginia Marti College of Art and Design

Hometown: Toledo.

The dress: I chose this design over a few others I drew because I feel it fits her personality, body type and royal appeal. Sleeves were a must, but I did not want overly used, and simply hideous, leg-of-mutton sleeves, so I opted for the more modern see-through lace. A train is important for a royal wedding, and I chose a round, lacey approach. The mermaid-style silhouette will show off her curves without being revealing.

Career plans: Right now I'm just deciding exactly where I fit in the fashion world. But I lean more toward menswear and costuming.


Joy Kobzowicz

Virginia Marti College of Art and Design

Hometown: Medina.

Details: The entire dress is made of silk organza. It is a halter style and has pale, cold-stone gray coloring. The ruched bodice features crystals and gems sewn into the material. Completing the look is an organza-tulle veil with hand-sewn crystals and a beaded headdress. I did a lot of designs for her, and I chose this one because it is dramatic, yet not over the top. The silk organza was the inspiration. It was light and feminine, and it reminded me of a spring fabric.

Career plans: I'm headed to the West Coast after graduation to continue my education. I would love to work in the entertainment industry, maybe costumes.

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News Headline: Kent State fashion design graduate; Katelyn Grummel | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Stacey Thomas
News OCR Text: The Yellow Wallpaper is a short story by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. The story depicts a woman, whose wallpaper begins to consume her thoughts, finally encroaching upon her and entrapping her mind. Hauntingly beautiful, the tale is extremely powerful, and even after all these years (it was written at the turn of the 20th century), managed to put a hold on Katelyn Grummel, an aspiring fashion designer soon to graduate from Kent State University.

The creative can turn inspiration from all aspects of their lives, and this story, and ironically the yellow wallpaper, was what stuck in Katelyn's mind as she began her senior collection. Wishing to portray the insanity inside the woman, and the impending doom and constraint of her thoughts, Katelyn used upholstery inspired floral print knit as the base fabric and pattern for her collection. Katelyn sculpted her garments to emulate the chaos and craziness of the inspiration, but also to represent an unrefined beauty. Her garments came to life in tones of yellows, grays, and blacks, all derived from Gilman's description in the story.

She describes her target customer as a woman living in an up and coming area, who enjoys collecting unique pieces of clothing that contain different details and interesting fabrics. Her ideal customer does follow runway trends, but shops at a bridge price point. Grummel aimed to satisfy her customer's niche by using a yellow wool knit, twill fabrics, black challis wool on the bias and silk jerseys in her garments.

Originally from Mount Prospect, Illinois, Katelyn has been extremely involved throughout her college career, participating in activities such as the Honor's College, Relay for Life, Mock Trial Captain, Kent Artist Collective, and the Beaux Arts Ball. Her most inspirational experience at Kent State took place at the New York City Studio, and describes the learning benefits from studying abroad as ‘unbelievable'. Conquering subway maps, intense schedules, internships, and more, Katelyn adds, “All of this is worth living here one hundred times over, because when you're sitting in Central Park, eating a frozen yogurt, looking at a beautiful skyline (with) diverse people walking past, everything is perfect.” Studying in New York City made her a stronger and more independent student, and she enjoyed the city to its utmost potential.

In addition to her educational experiences, Katelyn has also interned with Juicy Couture and Abercrombie & Fitch. Working in a variety of different garment categories, Katelyn was put to the test creating and updating tech packs and technical photos. By internships end, she was taking pictures at fit sessions and eventually running them herself. After graduation, Katelyn plans to pursue a design career in Chicago or New York, and like many May grads, she is frantically filling out job applications. If you'd like to get in touch with Katelyn, feel free to email her at kgrummel@kent.edu.

Cleveland Women's Fashion Examiner is looking for graduating fashion design or merchandising students from local universities who would like to be featured here! to be included.

Do you have a local fashion event or announcement that you would like to advertise? for inclusion in a future post!

Are you a local boutique owner, store manager, or entrepreneur? Do you have a business or website that you think the readers of Cleveland Women's Fashion Examiner would be interested in?

Stacey Kay is a freelance fashion blogger residing in Cleveland, Ohio. She holds a BA in Fashion Merchandising from Kent State University, and has...

Halloween as a kid was all about indulgences: dressing up...

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News Headline: University of Akron to offer classes in Lakewood | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LAKEWOOD, Ohio -- The University of Akron will open a satellite facility in Lakewood this fall.
University trustees on Wednesday agreed to lease about 11,000 square feet on the first floor of Bailey Building at Warren Road and Detroit Avenue. Initially, education and nursing courses will be offered, with Lakewood Hospital serving as a teaching hospital, said Holly Harris Bane, UA's associate vice president for strategic initiatives and engagement.

She said city and UA officials first discussed establishing a presence for the university in Lakewood in 2004, but determined the climate was not right. Discussions resumed about a year ago.

City officials aggressively worked to attract the university, said Dru Siley, assistant director of planning and development for Lakewood.

"It will be in the heart of downtown Lakewood and have great access and visibility," he said.

Bane said the university's move into Cuyahoga County is not to compete with other universities and community colleges but to collaborate, as it has elsewhere.

"We will look at the community and see what is needed and the university won't have all those programs so we will partner with other universities," she said. "We look forward to working with them."

In recent years, UA, Cleveland State University and Kent State University, have expanded well beyond their main campuses, either opening academic centers or affiliating with community colleges.

For example, CSU will offer two master's degree programs this fall at Cuyahoga Community College's new academic building in Brunswick, in Medina County. UA and Lorain County Community College offer classes on Pearl Road in Brunswick and UA operates the Medina County University Center, south of Medina. KSU has an academic center in Twinsburg, in Summit County.

CSU, KSU and the UA are among nine four-year colleges that recently announced they will offer bachelor's and graduate degrees at Lakeland Community College's new center across from the entrance to its Kirtland campus in Lake County.

Tri-C recently opened a Westshore Campus in Westlake. LCCC plans to build a three-story center in North Ridgeville.

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News Headline: Casino management courses getting renewed focus at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: BizJournals.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A hospitality management course at Kent State University that focuses on the casino industry is getting a real-life edge as shovels hit the ground on Ohio's sites, the Akron Beacon Journal reports.

The school in recent years has offered a course dubbed Casino Management and Gaming Operations, created by professor Rob Heiman as he saw sites popping up in states around Ohio. One key to the course's popularity: A trip to Las Vegas every year to give students a behind-the-scenes look, the paper reported.

Heiman said he's looking to add related courses at Kent State as sites in Columbus, Cincinnati, Cleveland and Toledo move closer to completion. The Ohio casinos, he said, are leading students to take the courses more seriously and no longer see the trade as “some fantasy land out in Las Vegas or Atlantic City.”

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News Headline: Twinsburg campus to break ground | Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Schleis, Paula
News OCR Text: Earthmovers will be digging up the ground in a couple of weeks for the new Twinsburg campus of Kent State University, expected to open in the fall of 2012.

The city's Planning Commission this week gave its final green light for the $24 million project. The 43,000-square-foot building will be located on Creekside Drive near Interstate 480.

Currently, some 900 students attend KSU classes in a former high school building that was built in the 1930s. The city owns that property, at state Routes 91 and 82.

KSU owns the new property, and the planned campus will accommodate 1,500 students. With nearly double the space, there will also be room for a wider variety of classes.

"They will offer some upper-level programs and a full nursing and nursing assistant program and maybe a graduate course or two," Planning Director Larry Finch said.

The 15-acre property is expected to host a second building in the future, he added.

Finch said Planning Commission approval was needed because the property is in an area that was subjected to a "business area plan" and originally targeted for retail.

"Over the years, the market has changed, so the intended retail strip plaza there never materialized," Finch said.

City Council must still approve plans for a dedicated roadway; Finch expects that to happen at the May 10 meeting.

Finch said having college classes available in the city has been a boon to local residents. The KSU campus opened in the late 1990s, first to provide classes to union employees at Chrysler, then opening to the community in general.

"It's a local and low-cost option and helps get students to college when they may have not gone otherwise," Finch said.

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News Headline: New Kent State Twinsburg Campus One Step Away From Groundbreaking | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Mitch Cooper
News OCR Text: Kent State University-Geauga is one step closer to moving dirt for its Twinsburg Regional Academic Center .

The Twinsburg Planning Commission approved the final site plan and recommended the dedication plat and final Business Area Plan (BAP) Monday night.

Spencer Pisczak, who represents the firm that will build the new facility, Premier Development Partners , said they are still working out some minor details but want to begin soon.

“Many of the pieces and parts are being evaluated to make sure the project comes in on budget,” Pisczak said. “That's critical in terms of timing right now because we're at a fork in the road where they need to break ground, in a perfect world, sometime in May.”

The dedication plat, which extends Creekside Drive and allows the property next to the university to be served in the future, and the final BAP, will go to Twinsburg City Council for final consideration in the next few weeks.

Kent State will abide by all the codes of the BAP, but the university was given an exception on parking restrictions because of the large number of spaces it would require.

Only two conditions need to be met for the final site plan, including a finalized landscape plan with plant species and an approved lighting plan. Both aspects will be completed soon, Pisczak said.

The $24 million, 45,000-square-foot project on Creekside Drive is still expected to be complete for the fall semester of 2012.

“I wish you the best of luck on the project,” Twinsburg Mayor Katherine Procop said. “We're very excited about it and it's a really great community project.”

Twinsburg Ward 5 representative Chris Feldman mirrored her thoughts and said the university has done well at meeting all the requirements.

“It's great to have them in that area,” Feldman said. "That area has been idle for many years, so for them to place it there, right along a major thoroughfare, will be good for Kent State and us.”

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News Headline: Twinsburg Regional Academic Center One Step Away From Digging In | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Patch
Contact Name: Mitch Cooper
News OCR Text: Kent State University-Geauga is one step closer to moving dirt for its Twinsburg Regional Academic Center .

The city planning commission gave approval to the final site plan and recommended the dedication plat and final Business Area Plan (BAP) Monday night.

Spencer Pisczak, who represents the firm Premier Development Partners , said they are still working out some minor details, but want to begin soon.

“Many of the pieces and parts are being evaluated to make sure the project comes in on budget,” Pisczak said. “That's critical in terms of timing right now because we're at a fork in the road where they need to break ground, in a perfect world, sometime in May.”

The dedication plat, which extends Creekside Drive and allows the property next to the university to be served in the future, and the final BAP, will go to City Council for final consideration in the next few weeks.

KSU will abide by all the codes of the BAP, but were given an exception on parking restrictions because of the large number of spaces it would require.

Only two conditions need to be met for the final site plan, including a finalized landscape plan with plant species and an approved lighting plan. Both aspects will be completed soon, Pisczak said.

The $24 million, 45,000-square-foot project on Creekside Drive is still expected to be complete for the fall semester of 2012.

“I wish you the best of luck on the project,” Mayor Katherine Procop said. “We're very excited about it and it's a really great community project.”

Ward 5 representative Chris Feldman mirrored those thoughts, saying the university has done well at meeting all the requirements.

“It's great to have them in that area,” Feldman said. That area has been idle for many years, so for them to place it there, right along a major thoroughfare, will be good for Kent State and us.”

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News Headline: Local KSU campus, JEDD award five students annual scholarships | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: IN CONJUNCTION WITH KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S REGIONAL ACADEMIC CENTER IN TWINSBURG, THE JOINT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT SHARED BY TWINSBURG TOWNSHIP AND THE VILLAGE OF REMINDERVILLE RECENTLY AWARDED SCHOLARSHIPS TO FIVE AREA STUDENTS.

Senior Angela Green of Twinsburg (technology); and sophomores Stephanie Berry of Twinsburg (human development family studies), Nicolle Estevez of Bedford (justice studies), Nicole Meyers of Streetsboro (nursing), and Rocco Pignatiello of Twinsburg (accounting) have each been awarded $500 scholarships to continue their studies at the local Kent State University campus.

The JEDD scholarship was established in 2008 by an endowment provided by the JEDD.

Each year, up to five Kent State University Geauga Campus/Regional Academic Center students can be awarded scholarships.

First priority for a scholarship is given to applicants who are an employee, spouse, or child/stepchild of an employee of a business located in the JEDD.

Next priority is given to any resident of Twinsburg Township or the village of Reminderville, and then to a resident of the city of Twinsburg.

In addition, students must be enrolled in at least one course at KSU's Regional Academic Center with credit earned toward an associate's or bachelor's degree; and maintain satisfactory academic progress.

The KSU Regional Academic Center is an extension of Kent State University's Geauga Campus and located at the intersection of routes 82 and 91. Plans are under way for a new Regional Academic Center in Twinsburg, to be completed in the summer of 2012.

The new location will be at Creekside Drive, adjacent to I-480 and Route 91.

For more information about the new building or a complete list of degrees and academic offerings available, visit www.geauga.kent.edu or call 330-487-0574.

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News Headline: Chorus concert to feature American theater music | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Hudson Community Chorus will present its 23rd annual Spring Concert on May 1 at 4 p.m. at the First Congregational Church, 47 Aurora St.

Director Melissa Fucci says she has planned a unique and exciting program, featuring some of the best from American musical theater.

Admission is $10, or $5 children for 12 and younger. Tickets may be purchased from the Learned Owl Book Shop, 204 N. Main St.; the Acme Fresh Market, 116 W. Streetsboro St.; Epiphany, 105 First St.; Laurel Lake, 200 Laurel Lake Drive, from any chorus member, or at the door on the day of the concert. The audience is invited to join the chorus for light refreshments in the church Fellowship Hall following the concert.

The Hudson Community Chorus consists of volunteer singers from Hudson and nearby communities under the direction of a professional music director. Fucci serves on the faculty at Kent State University in the School of Music and the School of Theatre and Dance, and is a Music Mentor on the "Music!Words!Opera!" project with Opera Cleveland. She has served as music director for many theater productions at Porthouse Theatre and Kent State University, and has been involved with shows at other venues including Cain Park, The Halle Theatre, The Great Lakes Theatre Festival, and Weathervane Playhouse.

The Hudson Community Chorus is a non-profit organization and relies heavily on community support. Contributions are fully tax deductible and may be sent to: Hudson Community Chorus, PO Box 468, Hudson, OH 44236. For more information, call 330-342-4099.

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News Headline: Kent Stark Celebrates End of Semester With Kentiki (Yerian) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name: Aaron Fowler
News OCR Text: It's nearly May and the semester at Kent State University Stark Campus is coming to an end. Research papers, last-minute homework and final exams are the only things on the mind of most students.


Kristi Yerian, the Student Life Coordinator at the campus, is trying to give students a chance to escape all that with the Kentiki, an event that runs Wednesday and Thursday in front of the Campus Center (or inside depending on the weather).

“Students are starting to get stressed out because of finals approaching, so they can take some time to lay on a beach towel, listen to some music and not have to worry," she said.

Kentiki is a time for students to relax a bit during two days of festivities, including live music, an obstacle course, spin-art Frisbees, a movie on the lawn and a whole lot more. One of the more popular activities is the faculty dunk tank, where students can pay a few bucks and have a chance to sink their favorite professor.

“We get a lot of faculty to come out of their offices and help do small things like run the cookout, be a greeter or collect money at the dunk tank table,” she said.

Though the event is primarily geared toward students, anyone can come out and have some fun. A cookout and free cotton candy will be provided with a watermelon-eating contest even on the agenda. Yerian said the film screening on the lawn Thursday evening usually draws the largest crowd. This year the selected film will be "Due Date," the comedy blockbuster starring Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Galifianakis.

Collaborating with the students to make this possible each and every year, however, is what Yerian enjoys the most.


"I love working with the students all semester long, talking about their ideas and seeing what interesting twists we can put on it,” she said. “The students do everything from design T-shirts to help with publicity by making posters to put around campus.”

All proceeds collected during Kentiki will be donated to the Stark County Hunger Task Force, which will also be on hand during the two-day event.

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News Headline: On View This Week | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Scene - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Museum: Beyond Fashion: Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevedo. Culled from 20 years of past collections, Quevedo's works range from sculptural clothing to quilted wall art. Through February 2012 at 515 Hilltop Dr. on the K.S.U. campus; call 330-672-3450.

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News Headline: KSU plans events to commemorate 41st anniversary of May 4 shootings | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is hosting a series of events to reflect on its 41st anniversary of May 4, 1970.

The May 4 Walking Tour documentary and the May 4 film for the First-Year Experience course are new to this year's commemoration.

Individuals also will have the opportunity to experience the Symposium on Democracy and the May 4 Commemoration Ceremony, where they can pay their respects and remember the events of May 4, 1970, from noon to 2 p.m. For more information, visit http://www.kent.edu/einside/briefs.cfm?issueweek=2011-04-25%2015:51:44.

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News Headline: School news | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Provost Robert G. Frank was appointed to the Defense Health Board, a federal advisory committee to the secretary of the Department of Defense. The board provides independent scientific recommendations on programs for the armed services.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY RESEARCHERS PLAY LEAD ROLE IN NEW SCIENCE DISCOVERY (Keane) | Email

News Date: 04/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, April 26 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University researchers are part of a team of international scientists who have discovered antihelium-4, the most massive antinucleus known to date. This new discovery is the antimatter partner of the helium-4 nucleus, also called the alpha particle. Helium-4 is the normal form of helium, the second most abundant element in the universe after hydrogen.

The international team of scientists studies high-energy collisions of gold nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a 2.4 mile-circumference particle accelerator at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, N.Y. The new antinucleus was discovered at RHIC's STAR detector, and the same group set the previous world record for the heaviest known antinucleus just last year.

Kent State physics professors Declan Keane and Spiros Margetis are the principal investigators of the project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, of which a major goal was the pursuit of this research. The peer-reviewed findings were published online April 24 by the journal Nature, the world's most highly-cited interdisciplinary science journal.

The author contact on behalf of the full international team is Brookhaven scientist Aihong Tang, who received his doctoral degree from Kent State in 2002. The findings were presented outside the STAR collaboration for the first time in a colloquium by Tang at Brookhaven on April 19. The first scheduled presentation at a conference will be by Keane at a meeting sponsored by the American Physical Society in Anaheim, Calif., on April 27.

The new antihelium-4 is a negatively charged state of antimatter containing two antiprotons and two antineutrons. Unlike the antinucleus discovered in 2010, this one does not undergo radioactive decay.

"The last stable antinucleus discovery was at a Russian accelerator in 1971. To break the new record established by the present discovery, a future experiment would need to find an antinucleus containing six antiparticles, and if this were produced by the same mechanism, it would be rarer by a factor of 2.6 million," Keane said. "This huge factor puts that milestone out of reach of any accelerator-based experiment for the foreseeable future."

Collisions at RHIC fleetingly produce conditions that existed a few microseconds after the Big Bang, which gave birth to the universe some 13.7 billion years ago. "Our understanding is that matter and antimatter were initially created with equal abundance immediately following the Big Bang," Tang said. "The predominance of matter in the visible universe today remains a major unsolved scientific mystery."

Several other members of the Kent State physics department are co-authors of the new paper by virtue of their vital contributions to constructing and operating the various interlocking subsystems of the STAR detector, including emeritus professor Bryon Anderson, postdoctoral researchers Jonathan Bouchet and Lokesh Kumar, Senior Research Fellow Wei-Ming Zhang, and graduate students Jeremy Alford, Jaiby Joseph, Yadav Pandit, Amilkar Quintero and Joe Vanfossen.

The STAR collaboration is composed of 54 institutions from 12 countries. Research at RHIC is funded primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and by various governmental agencies of the countries of the collaborating institutions.

One of 10 national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences, as well as in energy technologies and national security. Brookhaven Lab also builds and operates major scientific facilities available to university, industry and government researchers.

For more information about the Department of Physics at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/cas/physics. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Health & Science | Gaining by losing: Study finds dropping excess weight may improve brain power (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Daily Orange, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Among the health benefits of shedding a few extra pounds is increased brain performance, according to an April 14 Time magazine article.

John Gunstad, associate professor at Kent State University's Department of Psychology, headed a team of researchers who found losing excess weight might improve cognitive functions, such as attention and memory.

In the study, the researchers examined memory and attention in a group of 150 overweight participants. Some of the participants underwent weight-loss surgery and others did not, according to the article.

"We decided to originally focus on weight-loss surgery patients, as they lose a very large amount of weight in a relatively short period of time," Gunstad said in a phone interview. "We thought that if there might be an effect, a benefit for the brain from weight loss, that we're most likely going to see it here first."

When the overweight volunteers were tested on their mental skills at the beginning of the study, about 24 percent of the patients showed impaired learning, and 23 percent showed signs of poor memory recall, according to the article.

The 109 patients who underwent surgery shed an average of 17 percent of their initial body weight and boosted their scores to the average or above-average level for memory performance by 12 weeks of follow-up, according to the study, published in the journal Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases in October 2010.

"We were cautiously optimistic going in that we would see a positive effect from the weight loss, but it was still great to see it," Gunstad said in the Time article.

Among the 41 obese control participants who did not undergo weight-loss surgery, scores for cognitive functions plummeted even further than at baseline assessments, according to the study.

Gunstad is optimistic about the results of the study because they suggest that more traditional weight-loss methods can have a positive relationship with cognitive functions, according to an April 12 Kent State news release.

"One of the things about obesity, relative to other medical conditions, is that something can be done to fix it," Gunstad said in the release. "Our thought was, if some of these effects are reversible, then we're really on to something — that it might be an opportunity for individuals who have memory or concentration problems to make those things better in a short amount of time. And that's what we found."

These findings relate to the eating and exercise habits of young adults in college — even if they have a healthy body weight, Gunstad said in the interview.

"For young healthy adults who decide to exercise on a regular basis, who become more cardiovascular fit, abilities to concentrate and solve problems actually all get better," Gunstad said. "Even if they're not overweight, the process of becoming more fit seems to enhance brain function."

The research cost approximately $1.5 million and was funded by a grant from the National Institute of Health. The team's next project will analyze whether behavioral weight loss has the same effect on cognitive functions as surgical weight loss does, Gunstad said. He said he anticipates similar results.

"The goal at this point is, really, to better understand how weight loss more broadly might influence brain function," Gunstad said. "We want to be able to look at people who are losing weight for behavioral needs — so people who eat healthier and exercise — if you could get the same results."

chlevin@syr.edu

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News Headline: Lose Weight And Boost Your Brain Power | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: ThirdAge
Contact Name: Robin Westen
News OCR Text: Fitting into your favorite dress or jeans, having more energy, increasing your heart health and liking what you see in the mirror, are all good reasons to lose weight. Well, now you can add another: boosting your brain power. Although medical experts have known for a while that overweight and obese people are at a greater risk for memory loss, a new study shows that dropping a substantial number of pounds actually improves the health of the brain.

Under the guidance of John Gunstad, an associate professor of psychology at Kent State University, along with a team of scientists from several research centers, tests taken by 150 people who weighed an average of 300 pounds were analyzed. Not surprisingly, many of the subjects had several other health problems including high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea.

Of that group, 109 of them had bariatric surgery — mostly gastric bypass surgery. This type of surgery creates a smaller stomach and bypasses part of the small intestine. Those who have the surgery can only consume a significantly reduced amount of calories at each meal. The other 41 obese patients did not have surgery.

Before the surgery, all of the participants had undergone a battery of cognitive tests designed to test the three brain functions, including concentration, organization skills and memory. In repeating the same style of tests after 12 weeks, all of the surgery patients--who, though heavy, were still down from their presurgical weight--saw statistically significant improvement on the tests. Those who had not lost weight not only showed no improvement but - somewhat alarmingly - showed a mild decline in memory function.

Researchers concluded that in the same way diet and exercise improves brain function -- as the body becomes healthier in general -- the brain also gets healthier. It makes sense. After all, our brains are part of our bodies.

The scientists said that more research is needed to see if mildly overweight people experience similar improvements with weight loss through exercise or diet. The study was published online in the journal Surgery for Obesity and Related Disease.

Robin Westen is ThirdAge's medical reporter. Check for her daily updates.

See what others have to say about this story or leave a comment of your own.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Weight loss improves memory: research (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Medical Express
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: John Gunstad, an associate professor in Kent State University's Department of Psychology, and a team of researchers have discovered a link between weight loss and improved memory and concentration. The study shows that bariatric surgery patients exhibited improved memory function 12 weeks after their operations. Credit: Kent State University

John Gunstad, an associate professor in Kent State University's Department of Psychology, and a team of researchers have discovered a link between weight loss and improved memory and concentration. The study shows that bariatric surgery patients exhibited improved memory function 12 weeks after their operations.

The findings will be published in an upcoming issue of Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, the Official Journal of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. The research report is also available online at www.soard.org/article/S1550-7289(10)00688-X/abstract.

"The initial idea came from our clinical work," Gunstad said. "I was working at Brown Medical School in Rhode Island at the time and had the chance to work with a large number of people who were looking to lose weight through either behavioral means or weight loss surgery."

TO VIEW VIDEO CLICK HERE: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2011-04-weight-loss-memory.html

Gunstad said he kept noticing that these patients would make similar mistakes. "As a neuropsychologist who is focused on how the brain functions, I look for these little mental errors all the time," Gunstad explained.

The research team studied 150 participants (109 bariatric surgery patients and 41 obese control subjects) at Cornell Medical College and Weill Columbia University Medical Center, both in New York City, and the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo, N.D. Many bariatric surgery patients exhibited impaired performance on cognitive testing, according to the study's report.

The researchers discovered that bariatric surgery patients demonstrated improved memory and concentration 12 weeks after surgery, improving from the slightly impaired range to the normal range.

"The primary motivation for looking at surgery patients is that we know they lose a lot of weight in a short amount of time, so it was a good group to study," Gunstad said. "This is the first evidence to show that by going through this surgery, individuals might improve their memory, concentration and problem solving."

Gunstad thinks the study is reason for optimism. "One of the things about obesity, relative to other medical conditions, is that something can be done to fix it," Gunstad said. "Our thought was, if some of these effects are reversible, then we're really on to something - that it might be an opportunity for individuals who have memory or concentration problems to make those things better in a short amount of time. And that's what we found."

The team is following study participants for two years. They tested subjects before surgery, 12 weeks after surgery and one year after surgery, and will also test at the two-year mark.

Gunstad was the principal investigator for the team, which included Gladys Strain, Ph.D., of Cornell Medical College in New York City; Michael Devlin, M.D., of Weill Columbia University Medical Center in New York City; Rena Wing, Ph.D., and Ronald Cohen, Ph.D., of the Warren Albert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, R.I.; Robert Paul, Ph.D., of the University of Missouri-St. Louis in St. Louis, Miss.; and Ross Crosby, Ph.D., and James Mitchell, M.D., of the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo, N.D.

Gunstad wasn't surprised by the study's findings. "A lot of the factors that come with obesity – things such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea - that might damage the brain are somewhat reversible," Gunstad said. "As those problems go away, memory function gets better."

The team's next project will examine whether people who experience behavioral weight loss see the same effects as those who have had bariatric surgery. Gunstad said he expects to see similar results.

"One of the things we know is that as individuals become more cardiovascular fit and their heart health gets better, their brain health also improves," Gunstad added. "Even if we take young adults and put them through an exercise program, their memory and their concentration get better by the end of the program."

Provided by Kent State University

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News Headline: VIDEO: Kent State Students Weigh in on new Student Fee Proposal | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: A $250 million plan to renovate the Kent State University main campus would rely on a new student fee to pay for $210 million of the cost.

According to the university's proposal, the fee will be charged at a rate of $24 per credit hour for in-state students and $28 for out-of-state students. The average course load for Kent State students is 13.5 credits, which would equal a fee of $324 per semester or $648 annually for the average in-state student. The fee would be $360 per semester and $720 annually for a student taking 15 credit hours.

The fee will be phased in over a period of five years, according to the proposal. The fee will be applied at $7 per credit hour in fiscal year 2013, $12 per credit hour in fiscal year 2014, $16 per credit hour in fiscal year 2015, and $20 per credit hour in fiscal year 2016.

For this week's You Said It, we asked Kent State students for their thoughts on the idea — particularly paying a new student fee for academic renovations.

TO VIEW VIDEO, CLICK HERE: http://kent.patch.com/articles/video-kent-state-students-weigh-in-on-new-student-fee-proposal#video-5797736

Look for the next video Thursday here on Kent Patch.

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News Headline: School Notes: KSU makes another try at borrowing from state (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is again trying to borrow $210 million for a campus renovation and construction project, and this time it will likely succeed.

The pitch is basically the same as the one the state balked at last year. The difference is the new chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents -- Jim Petro.

"The new chancellor recognizes that Kent State wants to make an investment in the future of its students and its facilities," KSU President Lester Lefton said. "He recognizes that the impact of this bond will be to create hundreds, if not thousands, of jobs in Northeast Ohio."

Former Chancellor Eric Fingerhut killed the proposal in 2010. He said the student fees that would pay off the bonds undermined an effort to keep college affordable. He also called the fees unfair to students who he said wouldn't reap the benefits of the project.

University officials argued against those claims in September, and they made the same case last week after announcing Lefton submitted the resurrected proposal to Petro on April 13.

Regents' approval of the bond issuance would pave the way for $250 million worth of changes on campus, which would affect more than 30 buildings with an emphasis on science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine.

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News Headline: Car Hits Bicyclist on Kent State Campus | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: A bicyclist was struck by a car on the Kent State University campus this afternoon.

The accident happened at about 3 p.m. on Midway Drive near the Centennial A residence hall.

The Kent Fire Department transported the male on the bicycle to Robinson Memorial Hospital in Ravenna with minor injuries.

Kent Fire Lt. Dave Moore said he was in stable condition when transported. His condition was unavailable.

The names of the driver and the cyclist were not available this afternoon.

Michquel Penn, community resource officer for Kent State University Police, said it's unclear at this point what caused the accident.

"It's not clear at this point whether or not the bike caused the accident or the vehicle caused the accident," Penn said.

Check Kent Patch for updates on this story.

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News Headline: Three firms refuse to print Kent State's gay magazine | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Poynteronline
Contact Name: Jim Romenesko
News OCR Text: They were concerned about images and language in the spring issue of Fusion. A fourth printer finally agreed to do the job, but charged a $2,200 rush fee.

THE PRINTERS' PROBLEM WITH FUSION

Freeport Press
“We actually asked them to adjust the content of Fusion based on the f-word and on what we're calling some graphic material, which involved some pictures of genitalia, and we're just not comfortable producing that type of content.” The “graphic” photo depicts a man wearing a leotard and showing a bulge.

Hess Print Solutions
“What we [did was] go back and say, ‘Is there a way we can change the language, make the language not so offensive?'” says CFO Fred Cooper. He also objected to words that “refer to alternative sexuality,” including queers, fags, and steers.

Davis Graphic Communication Solutions
The printer didn't like the f-word (the one with the u.) “It's incumbent upon production facilities that we protect other people who are offended by that. Church groups wouldn't be comfortable having that exposed. It is not our policy to print pornography or profanity.”

Printing Concepts ended up accepting the job.

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News Headline: Three Printers Refuse To Publish Kent State LGBT Student Publication, Citing F-Word, Images Of Cross-Dressing | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Huffington Post, The
Contact Name: The Huffington Post News Editors
News OCR Text: Three printing companies have refused to publish the spring edition of Fusion, a Campus Progress-sponsored LGBT magazine at Kent State University, citing concerns over its images and language.

The controversy has cost Fusion, Campus Progress' 2010 awardee for Best Overall Publication, more than $2,000, its editor says, as well as substantial effort as students try to release the issue before the school year ends next week.

One company after another turned Fusion down before a fourth printer agreed to take the issue to press.

"We are very surprised that it happened more than once," says Raytevia Evans, the editor of Fusion and a first-year journalism and mass communications graduate student at Kent State.

The controversial magazine issue includes an eight-page spread featuring cross-dressing models, with the headline "Gender Fuck" written in large print above. Because the issue has not yet been released, Fusion requested that Campus Progress withhold posting the controversial content.

The three Ohio-based printing companies that rejected Fusion in its final form--Freeport Press Inc. in Freeport, Hess Print Solutions in Brimfield, and Davis Graphic Communication Solutions in Bamberton--cited similar reasons for refusing to publish the magazine.

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News Headline: Three Printers Refuse LGBT Student Publication, Citing F-Word, Images of Cross-Dressing | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: CampusProgress.org
Contact Name: David Spett
News OCR Text: The spring 2010 issue of Fusion, published a year ago, depicted partial male nudity on its back cover and in a six-page spread inside. The publisher of the issue, Freeport Press Inc., said the "questionable content wasn't highlighted" and that it should not have been published.

Three printing companies have refused to publish the spring edition of Fusion, a Campus Progress-sponsored LGBT magazine at Kent State University, citing concerns over its images and language.

The controversy has cost Fusion, Campus Progress' 2010 awardee for Best Overall Publication, more than $2,000, its editor says, as well as substantial effort as students try to release the issue before the school year ends next week.

One company after another turned Fusion down before a fourth printer agreed to take the issue to press.

“We are very surprised that it happened more than once,” says Raytevia Evans, the editor of Fusion and a first-year journalism and mass communications graduate student at Kent State.

The controversial magazine issue includes an eight-page spread featuring cross-dressing models, with the headline “Gender Fuck” written in large print above. Because the issue has not yet been released, Fusion requested that Campus Progress withhold posting the controversial content.

A six-page spread in last year's spring issue of Fusion featured "Boys in Bottoms." The issue's publisher, Freeport Press Inc., said it published the images in error.

The three Ohio-based printing companies that rejected Fusion in its final form—Freeport Press Inc. in Freeport, Hess Print Solutions in Brimfield, and Davis Graphic Communication Solutions in Bamberton—cited similar reasons for refusing to publish the magazine.

“We actually asked them to adjust the content of Fusion based on the f-word and on what we're calling some graphic material, which involved some pictures of genitalia, and we're just not comfortable producing that type of content,” says David Pilcher, vice president of sales and marketing at Freeport Press, the first company that refused to print the issue without editorial changes. “It's not that we are trying to perform any censorship here.”

The photo in question depicts a man wearing a leotard. A bulge is noticeable around his genitals.

Freeport has been Fusion's publisher for several years, even as the magazine published a spread in its spring 2010 issue depicting underwear-clad men kissing intimately. Freeport also published the word “fuck” at least three times in two previous issues of Fusion, released fall 2009 and winter 2011.

Evan Bailey, a former student media specialist at Kent State who worked with Freeport for five years, says that other student publications, including poetry magazine Luna Negra, were printed by Freeport and also included the word.

Freeport should not have printed those issues without editing, Pilcher says, but the problem “wasn't highlighted to anyone” before publishing completed.

Bailey spoke with Freeport after the underwear spread's release. He says the publishing company expressed concerns that were tinged with homophobia.

“You'd start to hear stuff like, ‘What if the owners' kids are walking through the press room?'” Bailey says. “You heard the stereotypes and the very flimsy arguments that were just not very well-constructed.”

“They were looking at me like I needed to advise students not to do this,” he says.

A representative of Hess, the second company that declined to print Fusion, says it was a mischaracterization that his company refused to print the magazine since it was only asking for editorial changes.

“What we do is we go back and say, ‘Is there a way we can change the language, make the language not so offensive?'” says Fred Cooper, Hess' chief financial officer.

Cooper says the images in the magazine were acceptable, but the use of fuck and several words that “refer to alternative sexuality,” including queers, fags, and steers, were not.

The magazine uses those words in the headline of a story about the etymology of common words used to describe the LGBT community.

“That's offensive to folks,” Cooper says. “If you're running the press and you happen to be of that persuasion, you may feel offended.”

“I'm black and if ‘nigger' came across, even if the NAACP was saying it, we wouldn't print it,” he adds.

Bob Ellis, president of Davis Graphic Communication Solutions, the third company that would not print Fusion, says the decision was purely business-related and that the only problem was the magazine's use of the word “fuck.”

“It's incumbent upon production facilities that we protect other people who are offended by that. Church groups wouldn't be comfortable having that exposed,” Ellis says. “It is not our policy to print pornography or profanity.”

He says that policy was moot, however, since his company was unable to produce the magazine by Fusion's deadline. If he could find employees in his company who were not offended by the magazine, he says, he could have them publish it late next week.

“We have to go through that step as a service and protection to our employees,” he says.

Zack Ford, an LGBT blogger who works at Think Progress, a sibling organization of Campus Progress, says the term “gender fuck” was perfectly appropriate and that the printing companies' actions unquestionably amounted to censorship.

“It's intentionally used by people to question the gender binary, to be proud of the ambiguity,” Ford says. “‘Gender fuck' is very much a part of the culture and political movement for queer liberation.”

On Tuesday afternoon, after substantial effort by editors and Kent State's student media office over the previous week, a fourth company agreed to produce the issue by Friday. But that company, Printing Concepts, in Stow, Ohio, is charging Fusion $2,200 in rush and delivery fees, which Freeport would not have charged.

Evans, the editor of Fusion, says the whole controversy was upsetting and frustrating and that “it felt like stepping back in time.”

“No one would really know that they're even the printers that we use, because there's nowhere in the magazine that it says that,” she says.

Frank LoMonte, executive director of the Student Press Law Center, says it was “unbelievable” that so many companies refused to publish the issue on profanity grounds.

Printers “are allowed to have any policies or standards they want to have, but that would be a very anomalous policy in the publishing business,” LoMonte says. “Many great works of literature have profanity in them.”

David Spett is the Journalism Network Associate at Campus Progress.

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News Headline: Moms Q&A: Summer Planning for Camps, Pools and Other Events | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Summer is fast approaching, and with the end of school that means children all over Kent will be looking for fun, safe things to do on break.

Now's the time for Kent parents to start planning by booking memberships at lakes, parks and summer camps.

Have you made your summer plans yet for your children? Got any tips or suggestions for camps or other summer-time gigs to keep the kids occupied?

In addition to programs offered by the Kent Parks and Recreation Department and the Kent State University Recreation and Wellness Center , there are lots of options around Kent this summer for entertaining the children.

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News Headline: KSU student facing new theft charge | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State University
student already facing felony
vandalism charges for a
March graffiti incident faces
an additional charge of
theft after allegedly stealing
a campus video surveillance
camera.
Benjamin H. McKenzie,
18, of 326 Verder Hall, was arrested
Monday and charged
with one count of theft, a
misdemeanor. According to
a criminal complaint filed in
Portage County Municipal
Court, McKenzie allegedly
stole a video surveillance
camera on April 22.
McKenzie, an Indianapolis,
Ind. resident and freshman
crafts major, was arraigned
this week in Portage County
Municipal Court in Kent.
McKenzie and two fellow
students, Edwin J. Knesek
Jr., 19, and Michael Kelleher,
20, were arrested earlier
this month and charged
with fifth-degree felony vandalism
for allegedly spray painting
graffiti on several
downtown Kent businesses
on March 31. The trio also allegedly
damaged KSU property
in Verder Hall.

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News Headline: Portage residents doing a decent job of recycling several materials | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name: MIKE SEVER
News OCR Text: Portage County recycles, and a lot of what it recycles is residentially generated waste such as aluminum cans, cardboard, newspaper and plastics.

Last year the Portage County Solid Waste Management District recycled more than 24,000 tons of materials -- from aluminum cans to wooden pallets.

Household materials are collected two ways -- weekly on curbside routes run by the district, and at a series of dropoff sites operated by the district and the townships.

All the materials are sorted at the district's facility on Mogadore Road in Brimfield. Usable recyclables are sold to commodity brokers and revenues are used to operate the district.

"The markets have actually rebounded quite nicely," said Bill Steiner, district director. "The one that really holds its value quite nicely is office paper," which is getting $255 a ton right now.

"It's just a sign the economy is getting better and there's demand out there" for recyclable material, he added.

Steiner said there is a slight premium for newsprint now, which is fetching $162 a ton. "There's not a lot in the marketplace right now," he said, adding corrugated cardboard is fetching $157 a ton.

In addition to recyclables collected through curbside routes and from drop off centers around the rural parts of the county, the district collected 161.7 tons of old tires from spring cleanups across the county last year.

On the commercial side, Kent State University is probably the largest generator, Steiner said. "With 26,000 students on campus, it's like a city within a city," he said.

In addition to paper and other recyclables that are collected twice a week, the district supplies 100 95-gallon containers for the spring "Throw and Go" where students can deposit usuable furniture, small appliances and household goods before they leave campus.

Before Throw and Go was instituted a few years ago, perfectly usable items were going into landfills. Now the items go to the County Clothing Center and its household goods area for redistribution.

Steiner said the single event usually generates about 100,000 pounds of material that is now kept out of landfills for reuse.

E-mail: msever@recordpub.com

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News Headline: Cartoonist Tom Batiuk to Speak at Kent State Thursday | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Kent Patch
News OCR Text: Kent State University graduate, artist and author Tom Batiuk is giving a talk and book signing in the Read Room on the 10th floor of the Kent State University Library on Thursday, April 28, at 3 p.m. The event, which is free and open to the public, is part of the University Libraries' "Kent Reads" program.

Batiuk will be discussing his book Lisa's Story: The Other Shoe , based on the life of Lisa Moore, a character in his comic strip, Funky Winkerbean . The book tells the story of Lisa and her family's struggles with breast cancer. The event is co-hosted by Kent State University Libraries and the Kent State University Press. Books will be available for purchase and signing by the author.

Batiuk's Funky Winkerbean and Crankshaft comic strips are carried in more than 700 newspapers throughout the United States. Batiuk was honored in 2006 by the American Cancer Society and presented its Cancer Care Hall of Fame Award for his sympathetic work in highlighting the experiences of those with cancer. He is responsible for the establishment of University Hospitals' Lisa's Legacy Fund.

For more information on Lisa's Story: The Other Shoe , click on this link: http://www.kentstateuniversitypress.com/2010/lisas-story/

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News Headline: "Giving Voice" Community Poetry Reading | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Location: Kent State University
500 E Main St, Kent, OH When:
May 2, 2011
Time: 6:00pm
Kent State University's Wick Poetry Center will present its tenth annual “Giving Voice” performance in the KSU Student Center Ballroom on Monday, May 2 at 6:00 p.m. The performance will feature schoolchildren from Walls Elementary, Holden Elementary, and Stanton Middle School. Also featured will be senior citizens from Judson Manor, local veterans, medical care providers, and patients. All participants will read their original poetry created in the Wick outreach program. Kent musician Hal Walker will accompany them.
Website: http://www.kent.edu/wick Phone: 330-673-1772 Email: wickpoet@kent.edu Price: Free

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