Report Overview:
Total Clips (17)
Aeronautics (1)
Art (1)
Budget; Higher Education (1)
Geography (3)
Journalism and Mass Communications; KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Geauga (1)
Renovation at KSU (1)
Safety (1)
Student Media (6)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics (1)
My Town: Kent State Flight Team Awarded Prestigious Trophy 04/28/2011 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

The rarest and oldest collegiate aviation award has landed at Kent State University. KSU's Precision Flight Team earned the prestigious Loening Trophy for its performance at the National Intercollegiate...


Art (1)
Get Out: Pancake Breakfast at MAPS Air Museum and More 04/28/2011 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

...Springsteen Ohio cover band, get out and enjoy their electric live performance. Pricing: $5 4. REALITY BEYOND OUR REACH ART EXHIBIT Where/When: Kent State University Stark Campus , 6000 Frank Ave NW, North Canton; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday Why Go: Find some time to...


Budget; Higher Education (1)
Are more three-year college degrees the answer for rising tuition costs? (Robinson, Laux) 04/29/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email


Geography (3)
VIDEO: Tree takes out Kent home (Schmidlin) 04/28/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...widely scattered.This round of severe weather is expected to end this morning, followed by a cool few days and more rain next week, said Thomas Schmidlin, Kent State University professor and local weather buff.So far there have been 5.8 inches of rain this month compared with the area average of...

Thousands in Portage lose power: Strong winds cause outages, forcing some schools to close (Schmidlin) 04/29/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...power while Riverview school was closed because high voltage wires were down, creating a safety hazard. Thomas Schmidlin, a professor of geography at Kent State University and local weather expert, said the wind gusts of up to 50 mph the county saw late Wednesday and early Thursday were not...

Unusual collision of weather forces set stage for tornado outbreak (Schmidlin) 04/29/2011 Pocono Record - Online Text Attachment Email

...outbreaks of severe storms over the Southern states. "The pattern seems to persist for the next week," said research meteorologist Thomas Schmidlin at Kent State University in Ohio. Powering the storms is heat and moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, where sea-surface temperatures recently...


Journalism and Mass Communications; KSU at Stark (1)
Video: Kent Stark's Environmental Media Class Wraps Up With On-Campus Film Screening (McKenney) 04/29/2011 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Students in the Environmental Media course at Kent State University Stark Campus screened the films they've worked on all semester and showed off their knowledge of environmental issues...


KSU at Geauga (1)
TWINSBURG CAMPUS TO BREAK GROUND \ 04/28/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Earthmovers will be digging up the ground in a couple of weeks for the new Twinsburg campus of Kent State University, expected to open in the fall of 2012. The city's Planning Commission this week gave its final green light for the...


Renovation at KSU (1)
Rebuilding KSU campus 04/29/2011 Vindicator Text Attachment Email


Safety (1)
Update: No Car Involved in Bicyclist Wreck on Kent State Campus (Penn) 04/29/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Student Media (6)
Printers balk at content of KSU gay magazine: Three reject publication of Fusion because of language issues, controversial images 04/29/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

A gay and lesbian magazine at Kent State University will hit newsstands behind schedule because three printing companies balked at its controversial content. A fourth...

Three printers refuse Kent State gay community magazine 04/29/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

AUDIO Printers Turn Down KSU Gay Magazine 04/28/2011 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State's student media-produced Fusion magazine targets content to the gay community. For the spring 2011 issue, they've had trouble finding...

LGBT magazine refused publication 04/28/2011 Independent Collegian Text Attachment Email

Printers refuse to print the spring edition of Fusion, a Campus Progress-sponsored LGBT magazine at Kent State University due to profanity and imaging citations. The issue includes an eight-page spread featuring cross-dressing models with...

Three Printers Refuse LGBT Student Publication, Citing F-Word, Images of Cross-Dressing 04/28/2011 Nation - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...reposted with permission. Three printing companies have refused to publish the spring edition of Fusion, a Campus Progress–sponsored LGBT magazine at Kent State University, citing concerns over its images and language. The controversy has cost Fusion, Campus Progress's 2010 awardee for...

Three Printers Refuse LGBT Student Publication 04/28/2011 Printing Impressions - Online Text Attachment Email

...explain their decisions.) Three printing companies have refused to publish the spring edition of Fusion, a Campus Progress-sponsored LGBT magazine at Kent State University, citing concerns over its images and language. The three Ohio-based printing companies that rejected Fusion in its final...


University Press (1)
Batiuk discusses his comic journey at KSU 04/29/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Comics are supposed to be funny, you know. Tom Batiuk, a Kent State University alumnus and creator of the comic strip, "Funky Winkerbean," is well aware. Much of his "fan" mail begins with that reminder....


News Headline: My Town: Kent State Flight Team Awarded Prestigious Trophy | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Jacque Jovic Web Producer
News OCR Text: The rarest and oldest collegiate aviation award has landed at Kent State University. KSU's Precision Flight Team earned the prestigious Loening Trophy for its performance at the National Intercollegiate Flying Association's 2010 Safety and Flight Evaluation Conference (SAFECON). More than 450 students competed against each other in events including landing, navigation, planning and aircraft recognition.

Dr. Grover Loening, the first aeronautical engineer for the Wright Brothers, commissioned and first awarded the Loening Trophy in 1929. Charles Lindbergh, Amelia Earhart and Navy Commander John Towers judged the first SAFECON competition.

The Loening Trophy represents superb achievement in aeronautical skills and is awarded to outstanding collegiate aviation programs.

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News Headline: Get Out: Pancake Breakfast at MAPS Air Museum and More | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name: Morgan Day
News OCR Text: 1. JOHN STIPE AT THE BARREL ROOM
Where/When: The Barrel Room Wine & Beer Bar , 7901 Cleveland Ave NW, North Canton; 9 p.m.-midnight Friday
Why Go: Haven't been to the Barrel Room in awhile? You might find a new drink. One thing's certain, though: You'll find some great music and good company.
Pricing: No cover



2. OPENING DAY FOR NORTH CANTON LITTLE LEAGUE
Where/When: North Canton Little League Complex, 1455 Easton NE; 11 a.m. Saturday
Why Go: Did you hear Cleveland Indians' mascot Slider will be there?
Pricing: Free

3. JERSEY AT THE 356
Where/When: 356 Fighter Group Restaurant , 4919 Mount Pleasant St. NW, North Canton; 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Friday
Why Go: Enjoy the Bruce Springsteen Ohio cover band, get out and enjoy their electric live performance.
Pricing: $5

4. REALITY BEYOND OUR REACH ART EXHIBIT
Where/When: Kent State University Stark Campus , 6000 Frank Ave NW, North Canton; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday
Why Go: Find some time to walk around and enjoy the campus this weekend and check out some art by local artists in the Main Hall Gallery.
Pricing: Free

5. PANCAKE BREAKFAST AT MAPS AIR MUSEUM
Where/When: MAPS Air Museum , 2260 International Pkwy, North Canton; 9-11 a.m. Sunday
Why Go: MAPS is about to kick off its spring season of events and the pancake breakfast will be a smash! Join in for some pancakes, sausage and exciting history.
Pricing: $8 for meal and museum entry

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News Headline: Are more three-year college degrees the answer for rising tuition costs? (Robinson, Laux) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: by WKSU's AMANDA RABINOWITZ

Universities, students and parents react to Governor Kasich's three-year degree "pathway" plan

PHOTO (Courtesy of Cynthia Williams): Anna Jones is the type of student Gov. Kasich had in mind in his three-year degree plan. She earned 24 college credits before graduating high school.

Governor Kasich's higher education plans include cutting the time it takes to get through college. Kasich's two-year budget proposal calls for Ohio's public universities to develop more three-year degree options by next year. The idea is to save students money and get them into their careers faster. But some students, parents and professors say the fast-track comes with its own cost – and that may be too high. WKSU's Amanda Rabinowitz reports.

Anna Jones is a sophomore at Kent State University's Stark campus – but she graduated high school just last June. She's been on the fast-track to get her bachelor's degree in early education, earning 24 college credits while still in high school. She says a three-year college degree is doable.

Jones: "If you can put your mind to it and do it, you can get done without a problem in three years. Cuz I pay for college by myself and I know there are a lot of people in that same boat."

Jones is the type of student Governor John Kasich had in mind when he proposed his three-year degree plan. The proposal calls for the state's public universities to develop accelerated degree paths for 10-percent of their programs by next year – and 60-percent of programs by 2014. Holly Hollingsworth with the Ohio Board of Regents says students would complete the same 120-credit hour bachelor's degree by taking more credit hours each semester and by taking summer courses. And only for majors that can fit that mold.

Hollingsworth: "If you decide that you are the ambitious student that wants to try to accomplish this degree in three years, you are not just trying to figure that out by yourself, you've got a plan to go by."

There are already options for Ohio students who want to finish their college degrees early. They include the Seniors to Sophomores program and high-school advanced placement courses. Anna Jones took advantage of the post-secondary education program at Manchester High School. In such programs throughout the state, students split their time between high school and college classrooms. And for most, it's entirely free – even the cost of textbooks. But Jones says it's not for everyone.

Jones: "Junior year I actually had to take night classes so I was at school until 9:30, I was at high school and then I would leave and go to work, and then I would come here."

GlenOak High School senior Kavitha Bagavandoss is in her second year of the post-secondary program at Kent State University Stark. She has accumulated 19 credit hours in courses like math and English. But her goals are slightly different than Jones'.

Bagavandoss: "I mostly just wanted the experience of being in college; it's definitely an eye-opener when you come to college. I feel likenext year when I come to college I won't have that whole freshman crisis breakdown."

Even with their fast-tracked degree programs, both Jones and Bagavandoss do not plan to graduate in three years. Jones just learned about a study-abroad program in Italy that she's applying for next year. And Bagavandoss says the thought of completing her degree in economics and mathematics by the time she's 20 is overwhelming. Bagavandoss, who will attend Kent State's main campus next year, plans to slow down.

Bagavandoss: "I was actually thinking about taking some this summer, but then I thought about it and I was like, I don't know how far I want to get ahead, I don't think I'm ready to graduate in three years, it's scary. Three years, it seems like a long time but when you think about it, not really."

About two-dozen public and private universities nationwide offer a formal three-year option. So far, they're pretty sparingly used. At Upper Iowa University, only five students signed up for the program that's been in place for about five years, and none finished in three years. Many professors in Ohio say that's because the goal is unrealistic for most students. Kara Robinson is president of the Kent State University tenured-track faculty union. She says more students today have to work part- or even full-time jobs to cover the cost of college.

Robinson: "It might be easier for a student to complete a degree in three years if financial support for those students were increased to encourage them, to make it easier for them to not have to work and take time away from their degree."

Kent State English professor Tracey Laux says the Kasich administration should instead work to make college more affordable, rather than order universities to do something they're already doing.

Laux: "The blanket statement of 'we need more degrees completed in three years,' to me, shows a lack of understanding of higher education. We have ongoing projects of expediting things, of cutting out any additional requirements that might prolong the time it takes to get a degree."

However, the Kasich administration says universities wouldn't be required to reinvent the wheel. Board of Regents' Holly Hollingsworth says schools themselves would develop their own plans – which could include expanding current options.

Hollingsworth: "There's every chance that those existing programs, dual enrollment, post-secondary enrollment, advanced placement exams, these may be a part of the three-year degree plan that the university articulates for the student."

The University of Massachusetts-Amherst began what it calls a three-year “pathway” for about eight majors this past year, similar to Governor Kasich's proposal. UMass provost James Staros says it's aimed toward focused students who know what they want they want to do.

Staros: "We observed that a very small number of students were finding these pathways on their own. We polled departments and asked them would they be willing to cooperate on advising materials of their major in a shorter period of time."

But many professors in Ohio say student-demand for three-year degrees isn't high enough to make that a priority in higher education reform. Cleveland State University English professor Jeff Karem says many of his students attend college part-time while they work, and don't live on campus.

Karem: " I don't really see students themselves wanting to rush out of that experience. I've never had a single student propose this to me on their wish list and I've certainly in my advising years heard many wishes from students."

Even the state's private universities, not included in Kasich's plan, say three-year degrees are not ideal. Oberlin College was in the national spotlight in 2001 when then-president Fredrick Starr wrote an opinion piece for the New York Times pushing three-year degrees as way to ease rising tuition costs. Oberlin never took up his idea. Professor Marc Blecher says today's job market considers life experiences as important as completing a degree.

Blecher: "Increasingly, employers don't want somebody who's been locked up in a classroom for three years grinding out their credit hours to get out fast and save the governor's budget money. Increasingly they want student with real-world education – that's what they want to see."

Kent State University student Brandon Davis agrees. Davis is in his sixth year of college and will complete his bachelor's degree next year. He's had to support himself, sometimes with two or more jobs, while going to school. But he says all of his job experience, even if it's unrelated to his major, builds character.

Davis: "Some days I think I could almost have a doctorate in seven years. And that might be an important thing. If a boss interviews two people and one person says three years and one person says six, that boss might think, well this person might be a better employee."

Individual students face issues beyond economics and academics when it comes to how long they take – and should take – to get a degree. Beth Houseman of Akron got her own degree in three years, back in the early 80's. But she's not pushing that with any of her own children, a senior in High School and a senior in college.

Houseman: "Not all 18-year olds, and certainly mine, were in the position to understand what all the opportunities were in terms of courses of study and careers. If [my daughter] decided four years was the way she wanted to go, that that was fine with me and that I would actually prefer her to take that time. Everyone is different in what they need."

The three-year degree is just one part of Gov. Kasich's two-year budget proposal. He also wants to eliminate funding for some specialized academic programs, continue a cap on tuition and fees, and force universities to come up with more efficiencies through cooperation. The budget must be in place by July 1st.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Tree takes out Kent home (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Dave OBrien | Staff WriterHigh winds, on the leading edge of a storm passing eastward through Northeastern Ohio, buffeted eastern Portage County on Wedneday, sending trees, tree limbs and power lines crashing to the ground. No one was hurt Wednesday when a large tree fell on a house on East Oak Street on Kents south side at about 12:45 p.m.The tree, which homeowner Denise Jacobs-Woolf estimated at between 150 and 200 years old, fell across the driveway and crashed through the rear of the house at the southwest corner of East Oak and Vine streets, causing major damage. Jacobs-Woolf said she, her husband, Paul, her son and three dogs and a bird were unhurt. She said she would be going into the house to save what belongings she could, including her flatscreen TV. East School Street resident Sue Stabilla said a huge gust of wind came through the neighborhood just about the time the tree fell. It scared the pants off me, she said. The Kent Fire Department closed Vine Street at East Oak Street while city workers in a cherry picker used chainsaws to take limbs off the fallen tree. Thats 15 to 20 years of living, right there, Jacobs-Woolf said of her house as she watched workers cut the tree to pieces. South of Kent, Brimfield also was hit hard by the wind. Downed trees were reported throughout the township, according to the Brimfield Police Department. One tree was still reported down at Old Forge Road and Newton Street on the west side of the township as of 3 p.m. Police shut the road while awaiting the arrival of Portage County road crews to clean up the tree. Other trees and wires were reported down on Mogadore Road, Sandy Lake Road at Meloy Road and on Beal Drive in Brimfield. Residents were advised to stay away from downed power lines and report them to the Brimfield police or fire departments. A tree reported down across S.R. 44 north of S.R. 14 in Ravenna Township at about 2:15 p.m. was quickly cleaned up to allow traffic to pass.A spokeswoman for FirstEnergy was unsure how many in Portage County lost power during the height of the storm. But as of 9 p.m., only five customers were still without electricity. She said outages were widely scattered.This round of severe weather is expected to end this morning, followed by a cool few days and more rain next week, said Thomas Schmidlin, Kent State University professor and local weather buff.So far there have been 5.8 inches of rain this month compared with the area average of 3.9 inches.Its not the rainiest April in the 26 years Ive been doing this, but Aprils not over, he said.Record-Courier staff writers Mike Sever and Ben Wolford contributed to this story.

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News Headline: Thousands in Portage lose power: Strong winds cause outages, forcing some schools to close (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio Edison crews were fixing power lines on Waterloo Rd in Randolph Thursday morning.

Strong winds whipped through Portage County Thursday morning, knocking out power for several thousand customers, mostly in the Brimfield, Suffield area.

FirstEnergy's Web site showed that Aurora, Atwater, Kent and Brimfield each had more than 500 customers out of service Thursday morning. Scattered outages were reported in the rest of the county.

Field schools were closed Thursday because of a lack of power, after initially issuing a 2-hour delay.

Field Board of Education President Brian Olson said Field's main campus, which houses the high school and middle school, lost power around 4 a.m. Thursday.

“When the power goes out at that campus, it affects our septic and sewer and our well for water,” Olson said.

The Walmart store and Applebee's restaurant in The Cascades shopping center on Tallmadge Road were affected, according to the Brimfield Police Department.

Walmart was closed for a couple of hours when it lost power to part of the store. Employees used generators to get power up and reopened by early Thursday, according to a police department spokesman.

As of Thursday afternoon, many stores were still without power, said Chief David Blough.

“A lot of stores in that area have either no power or half power. We have sporadic outages throughout our area,” he said.

Altercare Post-Acute Rehabilitation Center off Tallmadge Road was on generators early Thursday.

Lights at most major intersections in Brimfield were affected, Blough said, but there were no reports of injury or property damage because of the winds.

A transformer at the corner of Beecher and Day streets in Ravenna reportedly blew up about 7:30 a.m. Thursday.

Trees and branches caused power outages in Randolph and elsewhere as well.

A portion of Darrow Road (S.R. 91) in Stow was closed while downed power lines were repaired after a tree fell on them near Adell Durbin Park.

Also in Stow, two elementary schools were closed Thursday. Indian Trail school was closed because there was no power while Riverview school was closed because high voltage wires were down, creating a safety hazard.

Thomas Schmidlin, a professor of geography at Kent State University and local weather expert, said the wind gusts of up to 50 mph the county saw late Wednesday and early Thursday were not abnormal for early spring in the region.

“We would expect that most springs,” Schmidlin said. “There were reports of winds up to 70 mph at Lorain Airport and Burke (Lakefront) Airport in Cleveland. That's unusual, but I didn't see any evidence of that in Portage County.”

FirstEnergy's website showed outages for more than 10,000 people in Cuyahoga, Lake and Lorain counties before noon Thursday.

Temperatures were supposed to drop to the low 40s Thursday night with a 50 percent chance of showers, according to the National Weather Service.

There is a chance of showers before noon today with skies turning partly sunny and warmer this afternoon.

Saturday is expected to be sunny with a high near 67, followed by a chance of showers and thunderstorms after midnight.

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News Headline: Unusual collision of weather forces set stage for tornado outbreak (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Pocono Record - Online
Contact Name: The Wall Street Journal
News OCR Text: MIAMI — An epidemic of deadly tornadoes that hit the southern US likely was spawned by the rare collision of hot, humid air from the Gulf of Mexico with frigid Arctic winds pushed down across five Southern states by global climate patterns, weather experts told The Wall Street Journal Thursday.

These forces have helped produce about 800 twisters so far this month, four times the average for April, meteorologists said. The National Weather Service reported 165 tornadoes on Wednesday alone. The last comparable spate of destructive storms occurred in April 1974, when 148 twisters touched down in 13 states over 16 hours.

"Hopefully, this is not a preview of coming events for May and June, which historically are the most active tornado months," said climatologist William Patzert at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Some meteorologists cautioned that they could not pinpoint the exact cause of so many powerful storms because the vast continental interplay of wind, temperature, humidity and barometric pressure is too intricate.

"It's as complicated as a living thing, even though it is only water vapor and air," said severe storm expert Hugh Willoughby at Florida International University's hurricane center in Miami.

"I don't see anything that really leaps out to say this is different from all other springs," he added.

Several other research meteorologists, however, said spring storm systems have been strengthened and pinned in place longer than usual this year by shifts in climate patterns over the Arctic and the Pacific oceans.

The rise and fall of atmospheric pressure over the Arctic -- a long-term climate pattern called the Arctic Oscillation -- and the lingering effects of a cooling La Nina current in the Pacific Ocean can alter the path of prevailing winds across North America by altering the balance of energy in the atmosphere. That combination may have propelled repeated outbreaks of severe storms over the Southern states.

"The pattern seems to persist for the next week," said research meteorologist Thomas Schmidlin at Kent State University in Ohio.

Powering the storms is heat and moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, where sea-surface temperatures recently have been running about two degrees Fahrenheit above average. Researchers, however, discounted any link to long-term global climate change.

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News Headline: Video: Kent Stark's Environmental Media Class Wraps Up With On-Campus Film Screening (McKenney) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name: Morgan Day
News OCR Text: Students in the Environmental Media course at Kent State University Stark Campus screened the films they've worked on all semester and showed off their knowledge of environmental issues Thursday.


A handful of students participated in the course, which brought together journalism, communications, biology and other majors and teamed them up to produce short films on the problems facing the Nimishillen Creek Watershed.


The students' topics ranged from septic tanks to general ways to be more environmentally conscious and a topic discussed at a recent city council meeting: fracking, or hydraulic fracturing .


The students who created the fracking video had logged 2,000 miles in four weeks as they traveled to Pennsylvania, New York and other areas to interview and gather information for their film. They even have a campus group to show for their efforts: Take Action, Spread Knowledge and a successful Facebook page .


"Fracking was sort of a wild card," said Mitch McKenney, assistant professor of journalism and mass communication. "Because it's current, because it does have an impact potentially on the watershed, they came up with that topic and said, 'Can we do this?' and we said 'Sure.'"


"With the fracking group, they've started a student group, they have their Facebook site, they have plans for more film showings and more activity. So they've really run with this."


The class came about through a grant relationship between the campus and Herbert W. Hoover Foundation, which funds projects related to the community, education and environment.

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News Headline: TWINSBURG CAMPUS TO BREAK GROUND \ | Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Schleis, Paula
News OCR Text: Earthmovers will be digging up the ground in a couple of weeks for the new Twinsburg campus of Kent State University, expected to open in the fall of 2012.

The city's Planning Commission this week gave its final green light for the $24 million project. The 43,000-square-foot building will be located on Creekside Drive near Interstate 480.
Currently, some 900 students attend KSU classes in a former high school building that was built in the 1930s. The city owns that property, at state Routes 91 and 82.
KSU owns the new property, and the planned campus will accommodate 1,500 students. With nearly double the space, there will also be room for a wider variety of classes.
''They will offer some upper-level programs and a full nursing and nursing assistant program and maybe a graduate course or two,'' Planning Director Larry Finch said.
The 15-acre property is expected to host a second building in the future, he added.
Finch said Planning Commission approval was needed because the property is in an area that was subjected to a ''business area plan'' and originally targeted for retail.
''Over the years, the market has changed, so the intended retail strip plaza there never materialized,'' Finch said.
City Council must still approve plans for a dedicated roadway; Finch expects that to happen at the May 10 meeting.
Finch said having college classes available in the city has been a boon to local residents. The KSU campus opened in the late 1990s, first to provide classes to union employees at Chrysler, then opening to the community in general.
''It's a local and low-cost option and helps get students to college when they may have not gone otherwise,'' Finch said.

Copyright © 2011 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Rebuilding KSU campus | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent-Ravenna Record-Courier: Kent State University has renewed its bid for state approval of a plan that would enable a comprehensive renewal of the campus to go forward.

The proposal, which involves borrowing $210 million, offers a positive vision for the future. We hope Kent State receives the green light from Columbus.

If fully realized, the plan would affect more than 30 buildings on the campus, with an emphasis on facilities for architecture, science, technology, engineering and health. Renovation of existing buildings is planned along with construction of new academic facilities for areas such as architecture and art.

The proposal submitted to the Ohio Board of Regents, which must approve a bond issue to underwrite the cost, resurrects one submitted to Columbus last year that was killed by Eric Fingerhut, then-chancellor of the Regents.

Fingerhut, an appointee of Gov. Ted Strickland, objected to a key provision of the proposal: Increasing student fees to pay off the bonds.

Jim Petro, the new Regents chancellor appointed by Gov. John Kasich following Fingerhut's decision to leave his post a year early, apparently is more inclined to view the plan favorably.

University officials are estimating the projects they envision could create about 7,500 construction jobs, providing an economic stimulus for the greater Kent area for the next four or five years. Undertaking an effort of this magnitude would be less expensive now because interest rates are relatively low and the market for new construction is competitive.

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News Headline: Update: No Car Involved in Bicyclist Wreck on Kent State Campus (Penn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Matt Fredmonsky | Email the author | April 27, 2011
Victim transported to Robinson Memorial Hospital with minor injuries after crash

No car was involved when a bicyclist on the Kent State University campus crashed and was injured Wednesday afternoon.

The accident happened at about 3 p.m. on Midway Drive near the Centennial A residence hall. Initial reports indicated a car struck the cyclist.

But Michquel Penn, community resource officer for Kent State University Police, said in an e-mail today that there was no vehicle involved in the crash.

"Apparently, there was one riding by at the same time, which caused some confusion originally," Penn said.

The Kent Fire Department transported the male bicyclist to Robinson Memorial Hospital in Ravenna with minor injuries.

Kent Fire Lt. Dave Moore said he was in stable condition when transported. His name and condition was unavailable.

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News Headline: Printers balk at content of KSU gay magazine: Three reject publication of Fusion because of language issues, controversial images | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A gay and lesbian magazine at Kent State University will hit newsstands behind schedule because three printing companies balked at its controversial content.

A fourth printer, Printing Concepts, based in Stow, agreed to print Fusion, a student-run, semesterly magazine that addresses lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues.

“I think we did the right thing by standing up for the First Amendment,” said Raytevia Evans, the spring editor of Fusion.

She said she didn't believe the content was more offensive than images in other media.

Freeport Press, which had printed issues of Fusion before, declined to print this issue because it included the F-word in a headline and an image of “graphic material, which involved some pictures of genitalia,” said David Pilcher, vice president of sales and marketing, talking with Campus Progress, an activist group.

Pilcher did not return a call to his office Thursday.

The content in question was the fashion spread in the middle of the magazine which showed one man in a form-fitting leotard. No nude genitals were exposed.

The piece was apparently a statement about the difference between sex and gender, proclaiming, “Gender is dead.” The magazine is available at Fusion's website, www.thatgaymaga

zine.com.

It was the language that threw “red flags” for a second company, Hess Print Solutions in Brimfield, said Chief Financial Officer Fred Cooper. In another article, the headline contained words some consider slurs for homosexuals.

“Generally those are harmful words,” Cooper said. “We don't generally do profanity.”

With the end of the semester looming — when students and readers would leave campus for the summer — Evans and the Fusion staff tried a third company, Davis Graphic Communication Solutions in Barberton.

The company's decision not to print the magazine was one of necessity, not content objections. Whenever potentially offensive material runs off their presses, employees have the opportunity not to participate in the job, President Bob Ellis said. Giving that opportunity would take time.

“Davis GCS also could not produce the project within the time constraints requested by Kent State University due production capacity issues,” Ellis wrote in a statement.

Evans was up front with Printing Concepts, she said, telling them about the other printers, their tight deadline and the language and images.

“They actually got right back to us when we contacted them,” Evans said.

Ron Taggart, the president of the company, put out a press release saying, “Printing Concepts advocates freedom of speech and the extension of that right to all persons or organizations. They accepted the Fusion magazine project based on this constitutional right.

“As a business philosophy, Printing Concepts maintains that they do not judge the artistic, literary or political content of their clients' work, unless that content advocates violence or harm to others.”

As a first-time editor of Fusion, Evans, a KSU graduate student in communications, said she was surprised by the reaction of the printers and by the amount of coverage the issue has received. The Huffington Post and journalism commentator Jim Romenesko posted blogs about it.

“We think this shows what we really stand for,” she said.

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News Headline: Three printers refuse Kent State gay community magazine | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fusion magazine's explicit language and photos are cited as reasons
Story by Alison Ritchie

Kent State University's gay community magazine has found a new printer after three others refused to publish the student publication.

Freeport Press has printed Fusion for several years. But last week, it asked the magazine to remove explicit language and a photo. Although fully clothed, the photo emphasized male genitalia. Editors refused to make the changes, and Freeport refused to print the magazine.

Fusion's editor Raytevia Evans says the photo essay that raised concern is intended to depict why gender no longer matters.

Fusion then approached Hess Print Solutions in Brimfield. But its Chief Financial Officer Fred Cooper says he had similar concerns.

Other options:

Fusion was refused by a third printer, before finding one that agreed to print the content. Evans says the change in printers cost the magazine more than two-thousand dollars, because publication had to be expedited.

The issue has drawn national attention, including from The Huffington Post. Its vice president told Campus Progress it was uncomfortable with the content. But Freeport Press is refusing to elaborate saying it wants to move on.

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News Headline: AUDIO Printers Turn Down KSU Gay Magazine | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State's student media-produced Fusion magazine targets content to the gay community. For the spring 2011 issue, they've had trouble finding a printer who was willing to put ink to paper.

Editors note: some of the links in this story may contain graphics or language which some readers may find objectionable.

Fusion Editor in chief, Raytevia Evans, says Fusion is known for being edgy. It's also been recognized as a consistent award-winning student media publication.

"In no way were we intentionally trying to be offensive to anybody. We do believe that our target audience, which is the gay community, would understand and enjoy the way that we portrayed that specific spread."

Fusion is listed as a publication supported by Campus Progress, affiliated with the Center for American Progress. Campus Progress defines itself as a "national organization that works with and for young people to promote progressive solutions to key political and social challenges."

Three local printing companies told the magazine's editors their objections involved a certain body part, other highly sexual images and wide use of the "f" word. That included the title of an eight-page photo feature titled "Gender F---" as the headine.

Freeport Press Inc., of Freeport, Ohio, is a privately held, family owned business in operation since 1880 and is one of the three companies to reject printing the edition despite printing prior editions of Fusion and other campus-based magazines. Evans says the company has printed "riskier" material in the past. Company officials did not immediately return our phone calls. The other companies who reportedly refused to print the magazine were Hess Print Solutions of Brimfield and Davis Graphic Communication Solutions in Barberton, according to a report on HuffPost/AOL.com.

Company representatives for Hess and Davis told other online sites reporting on the story they asked for editorial revisions, mainly over the use of language. One compared the use of the "f" word to racially-sensitive language they would also find objectionable and refuse to print.

A fourth company, Printing Concepts of Stow, reportedly did agree to print the material but at an additional $2,200.00 cost. Copies are expected to be out early next week.

The story was largely distributed through social media, such as postings by Kent State students and faculty on Facebook. It was picked up for national distribution by the website , in a posting Wednesday afternoon. Some of the comments on the website were supportive of the decision by the local printing companies to decline the work, saying it was their business decision.

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News Headline: LGBT magazine refused publication | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Independent Collegian
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Printers refuse to print the spring edition of Fusion, a Campus Progress-sponsored LGBT magazine at Kent State University due to profanity and imaging citations.

The issue includes an eight-page spread featuring cross-dressing models with the headline “Gender Fuck” written in large print above.

Freeport Press Inc., Hess Print Solutions, and Davis Graphic Communication Solutions refused to publish this edition of Fusion.

David Pilcher, vice president of sales and marketing at Freeport Press said, “We actually asked them to adjust the content of Fusion based on the f-word and on what we're calling some graphic material, which involved some pictures of genitalia, and we're just not comfortable producing that type of content.”

Fred Cooper, Hess' chief financial officer said the images in the magazine were acceptable, but the use of several explicative words that “refer to alternative sexuality” were not.

“That's offensive to folks,” Cooper says. “If you're running the press and you happen to be of that persuasion, you may feel offended.”

Bob Ellis, president of Davis Graphic Communication Solutions, said the decision was purely business-related.

Printing Concepts finally agreed to print the issue, but is charging Fusion $2,200 in delivery fees.

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News Headline: Three Printers Refuse LGBT Student Publication, Citing F-Word, Images of Cross-Dressing | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Nation - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This post was originally published by Campus Progress and is being reposted with permission.

Three printing companies have refused to publish the spring edition of Fusion, a Campus Progress–sponsored LGBT magazine at Kent State University, citing concerns over its images and language.

The controversy has cost Fusion, Campus Progress's 2010 awardee for Best Overall Publication, more than $2,000, its editor says, as well as substantial effort as students try to release the issue before the school year ends next week.

One company after another turned Fusion down before a fourth printer agreed to take the issue to press.

“We are very surprised that it happened more than once,” says Raytevia Evans, the editor of Fusion and a first-year journalism and mass communications graduate student at Kent State.

The controversial magazine issue includes an eight-page spread featuring cross-dressing models, with the headline “Gender Fuck” written in large print above. Because the issue has not yet been released, Fusion requested that Campus Progress withhold posting the controversial content.

A six-page spread in last year's spring issue of Fusion featured “Boys in Bottoms.” The issue's publisher, Freeport Press Inc., said it published the images in error.

The three Ohio-based printing companies that rejected Fusion in its final form—Freeport Press Inc. in Freeport, Hess Print Solutions in Brimfield and Davis Graphic Communication Solutions in Bamberton—cited similar reasons for refusing to publish the magazine.

“We actually asked them to adjust the content of Fusion based on the f-word and on what we're calling some graphic material, which involved some pictures of genitalia, and we're just not comfortable producing that type of content,” says David Pilcher, vice president of sales and marketing at Freeport Press, the first company that refused to print the issue without editorial changes. “It's not that we are trying to perform any censorship here.”

The photo in question depicts a man wearing a leotard. A bulge is noticeable around his genitals.

Freeport has been Fusion's publisher for several years, even as the magazine published a spread in its spring 2010 issue depicting underwear-clad men kissing intimately. Freeport also published the word “fuck” at least three times in two previous issues of Fusion, released fall 2009 and winter 2011.

Evan Bailey, a former student media specialist at Kent State who worked with Freeport for five years, says that other student publications, including poetry magazine Luna Negra, were printed by Freeport and also included the word.

Freeport should not have printed those issues without editing, Pilcher says, but the problem “wasn't highlighted to anyone” before publishing completed.

Bailey spoke with Freeport after the underwear spread's release. He says the publishing company expressed concerns that were tinged with homophobia.

“You'd start to hear stuff like, ‘What if the owners' kids are walking through the press room?' ” Bailey says. “You heard the stereotypes and the very flimsy arguments that were just not very well-constructed.”

“They were looking at me like I needed to advise students not to do this,” he says.

A representative of Hess, the second company that declined to print Fusion, says it was a mischaracterization that his company refused to print the magazine, since it was only asking for editorial changes.

“What we do is we go back and say, ‘Is there a way we can change the language, make the language not so offensive?' ” says Fred Cooper, Hess' chief financial officer.

Cooper says the images in the magazine were acceptable, but the use of fuck and several words that “refer to alternative sexuality,” including queers, fags and steers, were not.

The magazine uses those words in the headline of a story about the etymology of common words used to describe the LGBT community.

“That's offensive to folks,” Cooper says. “If you're running the press and you happen to be of that persuasion, you may feel offended.”

“I'm black and if ‘nigger' came across, even if the NAACP was saying it, we wouldn't print it,” he adds.

Bob Ellis, president of Davis Graphic Communication Solutions, the third company that would not print Fusion, says the decision was purely business-related and that the only problem was the magazine's use of the word “fuck.”

“It's incumbent upon production facilities that we protect other people who are offended by that. Church groups wouldn't be comfortable having that exposed,” Ellis says. “It is not our policy to print pornography or profanity.”

He says that policy was moot, however, since his company was unable to produce the magazine by Fusion's deadline. If he could find employees in his company who were not offended by the magazine, he says, he could have them publish it late next week.

“We have to go through that step as a service and protection to our employees,” he says.

Zack Ford, an LGBT blogger who works at Think Progress, a sibling organization of Campus Progress, says the term “gender fuck” was perfectly appropriate and that the printing companies' actions unquestionably amounted to censorship.

“It's intentionally used by people to question the gender binary, to be proud of the ambiguity,” Ford says. “ ‘Gender fuck' is very much a part of the culture and political movement for queer liberation.”

On Tuesday afternoon, after substantial effort by editors and Kent State's student media office over the previous week, a fourth company agreed to produce the issue by Friday. But that company, Printing Concepts, in Stow, Ohio, is charging Fusion $2,200 in rush and delivery fees, which Freeport would not have charged.

Evans, the editor of Fusion, says the whole controversy was upsetting and frustrating and that “it felt like stepping back in time.”

“No one would really know that they're even the printers that we use, because there's nowhere in the magazine that it says that,” she says.

Frank LoMonte, executive director of the Student Press Law Center, says it was “unbelievable” that so many companies refused to publish the issue on profanity grounds.

Printers “are allowed to have any policies or standards they want to have, but that would be a very anomalous policy in the publishing business,” LoMonte says. “Many great works of literature have profanity in them.”

More Activism

Three Printers Refuse LGBT Student Publication, Citing F-Word, Images of Cross-Dressing (Gay and Lesbian Issues and Organizing, Media, Higher Education)

Governor Snyder's Emergency Manager Crushes Student Protest (Activism, Economy)

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News Headline: Three Printers Refuse LGBT Student Publication | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Printing Impressions - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (Editor's note: The full story includes the language and images that the printers reportedly found objectionable and gives them the opportunity to explain their decisions.)

Three printing companies have refused to publish the spring edition of Fusion, a Campus Progress-sponsored LGBT magazine at Kent State University, citing concerns over its images and language. The three Ohio-based printing companies that rejected Fusion in its final form—Freeport Press Inc. in Freeport, Hess Print Solutions in Brimfield, and Davis Graphic Communication Solutions in Bamberton—cited similar reasons for refusing to publish the magazine.

...a fourth company agreed to produce the issue by Friday. But that company, Printing Concepts, in Stow, OH, is charging Fusion $2,200 in rush and delivery fees, which Freeport would not have charged.

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News Headline: Batiuk discusses his comic journey at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Comics are supposed to be funny, you know.

Tom Batiuk, a Kent State University alumnus and creator of the comic strip, "Funky Winkerbean," is well aware. Much of his "fan" mail begins with that reminder.

But Batiuk stretched the definition. He's made a living for more than a decade drawing comics that deal with the most unfunny of topics: cancer, war, divorce. In his 2007 book, "Lisa's Story: The Other Shoe," published by the Kent State University Press, he tells the story of Lisa Moore, his character who died from breast cancer.

"It was a summer night, and I was on my porch," he told an audience at the KSU library Thursday.

On that night, he said he had an epiphany: that a comic strip can "carry the weight of substantial ideas." He put them into Funky Winkerbean.

"It meant my words could be a means of self-expression rather than a means of amusing strangers," he said.

Lisa was one of his most powerful means of self-expression. After she discovered she had cancer in 1999, Batiuk took her through the daily struggles of living with the disease.

Having been diagnosed with cancer himself, research was simpler. It was first person. "There's a huge void between empathy and personal experience," he said.

Lisa underwent chemotherapy, lost her hair, recovered, regressed and then finally decided she was ready to die, saying, "I'd like to get on with living, thank you very much." Batiuk's book covers all of this.

The decision to take Lisa, and his readers, through such a powerful ordeal was somewhat controversial. Jeff Stahler, cartoonist for The Columbus Dispatch, depicted death with his sickle laughing at the news of Lisa's death.

"You're always going to have your detractors," Batiuk said.

And even Batiuk knew he couldn't make every strip a heart-wrenching account of cancer's toll.

"Readers just won't take that, and I've got the emails on my computer to prove it," he said. But he added the readers "showed him a lot of faith" in remaining readers.

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