Report Overview:
Total Clips (32)
Aeronautics (1)
Center for Public Administration and Public Policy (1)
College of Arts and Sciences (AS) (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
Facilities Planning and Operations; Office of the University Architect (1)
Geography (4)
Health Sciences (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (3)
KSU at Geauga; Regional Academic Center (1)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
Library and Information Science (SLIS); Music (1)
May 4 (1)
Music (1)
Student Media (4)
Student Wellness and Recreation Center (2)
Students (2)
University Libraries; University Press (1)
University Press (1)
Wick Poetry Center (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics (1)
School Notes: Calling all Tiger Band alumni 05/01/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

...experience, which will expose them to a broad range of activities, trips and speakers. Students will also fly a plane with an instructor at the at the Kent State University airport. Each day during the week-long experience, students will tour an aviation-related worksite to talk to professionals...


Center for Public Administration and Public Policy (1)
Area fire districts on ladder of change (Hoornbeek) 05/01/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...stories and some very bad failures in that area. When you talk about that area I think you need to gather a lot of information.'' More study needed Kent State's Dr. John Hoornbeek is studying collaboration among government leaders as director of the school's Center for Public Administration...


College of Arts and Sciences (AS) (1)
OUR VIEW: Kent State and the legacy of Phillip Shriver 05/01/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

When Kent State Univer-sity was preparing to mark its 50th anniversary in 1960, President George Bowman encouraged the preparation of an official...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
Uncertain tuitions cause stress for families 05/02/2011 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email


Facilities Planning and Operations; Office of the University Architect (1)
Water conservation hurting Kent revenues (Euclide, Bush) 05/01/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...allowances on gallons per minute on water faucets and toilets. Old three-gallon-per-flush toilets are grandfathered in until you replace them. And Kent State University, the citys biggest water customer, has replaced them. Nearly all of them. The Kent campus used 30.4 million cubic feet...


Geography (4)
April Showers ... Close in on Record (Schmidlin) 04/30/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...this month, although it's not wet enough to match record rainfalls for this time of year. Meteorologist Thomas Schmidlin, a geography professor at Kent State University , has been recording precipitation levels from a weather station at his Brady Lake property for more than 25 years. From...

Weather Set Stage for Storm Outbreak (Schmidlin) 04/30/2011 KTTV-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...outbreaks of severe storms over the Southern states. "The pattern seems to persist for the next week," said research meteorologist Thomas Schmidlin at Kent State University in Ohio. Powering the storms is heat and moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, where sea-surface temperatures recently...

Weather Set Stage for Storm Outbreak (Schmidlin) 04/30/2011 WFLD-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...outbreaks of severe storms over the Southern states. "The pattern seems to persist for the next week," said research meteorologist Thomas Schmidlin at Kent State University in Ohio. Powering the storms is heat and moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, where sea-surface temperatures recently...

Weather Set Stage for Storm Outbreak (Schmidlin) 04/30/2011 WREG-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...outbreaks of severe storms over the Southern states. "The pattern seems to persist for the next week," said research meteorologist Thomas Schmidlin at Kent State University in Ohio. Powering the storms is heat and moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, where sea-surface temperatures recently...


Health Sciences (1)
New study identifies possible cause of salt-induced hypertension 05/02/2011 NewsRx.com Text Email

New research from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Kent State University shows that salt intake raises blood pressure because it makes it harder for the cardiovascular system to simultaneously...


KSU at E. Liverpool (3)
Downtown street parking discussed 05/01/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

... However, Estell said that if any change was to occur, he would prefer to make it a three-hour parking limit along a portion of Walnut Street to help Kent State students. In one other bit of discussion, Curtis and Estell said several residents along the downtown portion of Pennsylvania...

Downtown street parking discussed 04/30/2011 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

... However, Estell said that if any change was to occur, he would prefer to make it a three-hour parking limit along a portion of Walnut Street to help Kent State students. In one other bit of discussion, Curtis and Estell said several residents along the downtown portion of Pennsylvania...

Downtown street parking discussed 05/01/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

... However, Estell said that if any change was to occur, he would prefer to make it a three-hour parking limit along a portion of Walnut Street to help Kent State students. In one other bit of discussion, Curtis and Estell said several residents along the downtown portion of Pennsylvania...


KSU at Geauga; Regional Academic Center (1)
Kent State campus plan moving along in Twinsburg 05/02/2011 Hudson Hub-Times Text Attachment Email


KSU at Salem (1)
Kent State Salem holds annual awards banquet (Nolte) 05/02/2011 salem news (Salem, OH) Text Attachment Email


KSU at Stark (2)
Video: Kent Stark's Environmental Media Class Wraps Up With On-Campus Film Screening (McKenney) 05/02/2011 northcantonpatch.com Text Attachment Email

QuickBooks II Training Session 05/01/2011 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Location: Kent State University Stark Campus 6000 Frank Ave NW, North Canton, OH When: May 20, 2011 Time: 8:30am–4:30pm This is the second installment...


Library and Information Science (SLIS); Music (1)
OHIOANA BOOK FESTIVAL: Celebrating state's authors 05/02/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


May 4 (1)
Kent State forum will feature tape 05/02/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Music (1)
Service marks Dr. Walter Watson's retirement 05/01/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...during Watson's tenure are returning to sing with the choir. Alexandra May, a current student choir member from the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music at Kent State University, will sing three of Watson's "Prayers from the Ark." The Children's Choir, directed by Jennifer Culver and Guinevere Rhoads,...


Student Media (4)
Kent State U. Gay Student Mag Delayed, But Not Derailed 05/02/2011 Edge New York Text Attachment Email

Students at Kent State University stood up for the latest issue of their gay magazine, Fusion, which will reach newsagents later than originally intended...

Kent State U. Gay Student Mag Delayed, But Not Derailed 05/02/2011 Edge Gay Media Network Text Attachment Email

Students at Kent State University stood up for the latest issue of their gay magazine, Fusion, which will reach newsagents later than originally intended...

OH: Three Printers Refuse to Print Kent State Gay Magazine - April 29, 2011 04/30/2011 Gayopolis Text Attachment Email

A gay and lesbian magazine at Kent State University will hit newsstands behind schedule because three printing companies balked at its controversial content. A fourth...

Kent State U. Gay Student Mag Delayed, But Not Derailed 05/02/2011 Edgemiami.com Text Attachment Email

Students at Kent State University stood up for the latest issue of their gay magazine, Fusion, which will reach newsagents later than originally intended...


Student Wellness and Recreation Center (2)
Wilderness First Responder Course 04/30/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Location: Kent State University 500 E Main St, Kent, OH When: Daily Time: 5:00pm–7:00pm This class is vital, it will teach you the tools to make...

Introduction to Climbing Clinic 04/30/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Location: Kent State University 500 E Main St, Kent, OH When: May 1, 2011 / May 2, 2011 / May 3, 2011 Time: 6:00pm–8:00pm Participants will...


Students (2)
Bottles thrown at police end party in Kent: 13 arrested during College Fest for underage drinking, drugs; Total is down from 65 last year 05/02/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Hundreds party in Kent 05/02/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Libraries; University Press (1)
Cartoonist Tom Batiuk Talks About 'Lisa's Story' at Kent State 04/29/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...are carried in more than 700 news publications throughout the country, showed a more serious side during a discussion and book signing Thursday at the Kent State University Library. With an audience of 43 people in the Read Room, the 1969 Kent State alumnus detailed the origins...


University Press (1)
Author to discuss crime spree of notorious killer Stanley Hoss Read more: Author to discuss crime spree of notorious killer Stanley Hoss - Pittsburgh Tribune-Review http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/ae/books/s_734920.html#ixzz1LCex9dJW 05/02/2011 Pittsburgh Tribune-Review - Online Text Attachment Email


Wick Poetry Center (2)
BOOK BRIEFS 05/02/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Annual Jawbone Poetry & Pie Festival Fundraiser with Maj Ragain (Ragain) 05/02/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...available at www.standingrock.net WHEN: SAT, MAY 7, 11 AM-2PM -Other Jawbone event times available at www.standingrock.net Thanks to Maj Ragain, the Kent State University poetry professor who continues to be a creative driving force in our community! The gallery will be hosting the annual...


News Headline: School Notes: Calling all Tiger Band alumni | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Learn about aviation careers at A.C.E. Academy this summer

n High school students interested in exploring careers in aviation are invited to enroll in the tuition-based A.C.E., or Aviation Career Education Academy.

Incoming 10th-, 11th- and 12th-graders from the Six District Educational Compact schools are eligible for the experience, which will expose them to a broad range of activities, trips and speakers. Students will also fly a plane with an instructor at the at the Kent State University airport.

Each day during the week-long experience, students will tour an aviation-related worksite to talk to professionals and hear about careers in the airlines, government, military and airport management.

The unique opportunity is available thanks to a partnership between the Six District Educational Compact and Kent State University's College of Technology and the Division of Aeronautics.

Offered from June 13 to 17, students will meet from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at KSU's Van Deusen Hall. Cost is $185, which includes flying time, bus transportation, worksite visits and a T-shirt.

For more information, contact your high school guidance office or call the Compact office at 330-655-2247. Brochures are available.

The Six District Educational Compact provides College Tech Prep Initiatives, career programs, services and resources for Cuyahoga Falls, Hudson, Kent, Stow-Munroe Falls, Tallmadge and Woodridge school districts.

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News Headline: Area fire districts on ladder of change (Hoornbeek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: May 01,2011 07:00 AM GMT Dave Scott Beacon Journal Publishing Co. Consolidation a possibility to streamline, save costs, but department resistance eludes hopes in the region By Dave Scott Beacon Journal staff writer Published on Sunday, May 01, 2011

Does the Akron area need 111 fire chiefs?

Is it the best use of taxpayer money to have fire districts so small and inactive they report no fire losses for an entire year? That has happened 63 times in the five-county region over the last three years.

A look at state fire marshal statistics for the area shows scores of tiny fire departments, some with origins more than 100 years ago but now facing an era when every dollar of government spending is scrutinized.

Fire marshal information can be criticized as incomplete because there are no national reporting standards, it doesn't show ambulance runs and smaller departments might not have the time or expertise to do it right. But the basic thrust of the information shows rural areas are dominated by largely idle districts that have been immune to attempts to streamline operations.

Boston Heights in northern Summit County is one of nine area departments with no fire losses in the last three years. The department covers 6.9 square miles with 17 part-time firefighters who race from their work places and homes to the station when an alarm sounds and then go out in their trucks.

The village contracts with Macedonia for ambulance service.

Boston Heights looked at merging in 2007, joining Sagamore Hills, Northfield Center, Northfield Village and Macedonia in sharing the $38,000 cost of a study.

It didn't work out, at least not in its original form.

Like many proposals for collaboration among fire departments, the easiest, most politically safe path was followed.

Sagamore Hills, which had been paying Northfield Center to provide its fire service for years, joined the township to form a new fire district, complete with taxing authority.

The other three communities bowed out.

Northfield Center-Sagamore Hills Fire Chief Dave Enzman said he dreamed of forming a fire district long before it was politically possible.

''We'd been waiting for the right group to get together,'' he said of the political climate.

Now he's in charge of a department that winks at the political realities by having ''Northfield Center-Sagamore Hills'' on one side of the trucks, ''Sagamore Hills-Northfield Center'' on the other.

Northfield Center Trustee Richard Reville also saw the need for collaboration years ago, but knew the time was not right.

''When you get the different personalities and they are totally against something that you are going for, you cannot bring it to the eyes of the public and those you are trying to serve in a way that is fair, because they will see the negativism in it and it might have turned the firefighters against it too,'' he said.

With pumper trucks costing $300,000 to $400,000, Enzman says he relishes the economy of scale a larger district would offer. He said a larger district would allow smarter decisions with station staffing and possible cost savings in buying large equipment.

But he began by emphasizing the possible.

''This group here didn't want to swallow the elephant,'' he said. ''They were trying to start small and then grow from here.''

He still holds out hope the district will grow, maybe even including combined dispatch for the northern part of the county, now a hodge-podge of local districts and coverage from the sheriff's office.

Boston Heights Mayor Bill Goncy said a merger probably will come incrementally with a combined dispatch coming first.

A major factor the previous consolidation attempt failed was that the departments operated on different radio bands, and making them all conform would have been too costly, he said.

''I'm all for consolidation,'' Goncy said. ''We are a small department. We are all volunteers.''

Murmurs to the west

Consolidation also has been talked about in western Summit County, but progress is slow.

To some degree, mutual aid agreements that allow firefighters to leave their district to help a neighbor satisfy immediate needs and work against proposals for larger collaboration.

Fairlawn has worked with neighbors Copley and Bath townships to erect a radio tower, and it makes its ''tower'' truck available for fires in neighboring districts at no cost.

''I think we collaborate quite a bit right now with the other departments so it's working very well,'' Fairlawn Fire Chief Glenn Goodrich said.

Fairlawn Mayor Bill Roth says he's a proponent of governments sharing, but says his voters have come to expect a high level of service and want it maintained.

The city, with a $2.4 million annual budget (including paramedic service), had five structure fires last year and three in each of the two preceding years, according to the fire marshal data.

In 2010, Fairlawn reported only $3,250 in fire losses. Goodrich acknowledged those figures but said the department has had almost $400,000 in fire damage in the last four weeks and said the department does many other things: ambulance service, fire prevention and calls for things like downed lines and trees.

''I think we do have a very high level of service and that is an issue,'' he said. ''So residents, if they hear about things like a merger or things like that, well first thing [they ask:] 'What's going to happen? How am I going to be affected.' ''

Despite his doubts about its public support, Roth says he's all for collaboration.

''I first became mayor 16 years ago and there was no talk of regionalism,'' he said. ''Now every meeting we attend there's different projects we're looking at. . . . I think people realize it's an option. . . . I think the trend is toward consolidation. I think that's a trend. How quick that is, I don't know.''

As for the idea of merging with other districts, Goodrich said: ''I don't know, the jury is out on that. I've heard some success stories and some very bad failures in that area. When you talk about that area I think you need to gather a lot of information.''

More study needed

Kent State's Dr. John Hoornbeek is studying collaboration among government leaders as director of the school's Center for Public Administration & Public Policy. He says he can appreciate why politicians might resist collaboration, especially mergers.

''When you become a mayor of a city you commit to the protection of that entity and its citizenry,'' he said.

He said communities might find it hard to change familiar old institutions like fire departments.

''Identity really does play a role in some of these collaborative efforts if communities feel that their fire department is a key piece of how their community is represented,'' he said.

He also sees some confusion about just how to begin needed reforms and is hoping his study can provide some answers.

''What we are seeing now is a new set of incentives that are requiring local governments to be more effective and to address problems they are not well suited to address on their own and as that occurs, I think we are seeing a fair amount of activity,'' he said.

Data incomplete

Copley Township reported no fire damage to the fire marshal in 2008, but Chief Mike Benson said that raises a sore point with him.

He said there are no national reporting standards and sometimes damage categories are left blank because of legal technicalities in arson cases.

''The other thing with the state fire marshal data is the stuff that you sent out [to the fire marshal] was just fires, it doesn't include the other 90-plus percent of what most fire agencies do,'' he said.

That would include dealing with emergency medical runs, hazardous materials, service calls, and rescues.

He also said reporting data can be a challenge for some departments.

''You may find that some agencies don't ever put down losses in their data because they do not feel they are adequately trained or have enough knowledge in construction to make an adequate loss estimate,'' he said.

Benson went back to look at 2008 and found three fires with $57,000 in total damage that were not recorded.

Playing politics

Mogadore fire chief Don Adams has a one-word answer for why more mergers don't get done:

''Politics.''

He said when negotiations start ''everybody needs to gain and it's hard to make that happen. Everyone wants to know what's in it for me. I've been saying for 18 years we need a county department.''

But what if a merger meant he no longer would be chief?

''I don't have to be the chief,'' he said. ''I could always be a captain or something.''

Dave Scott can be reached at 330-996-3577 or davescott@thebeaconjournal.com. For more stories on tax dollars at work, go to http://govsavings.ohio.com/. Follow Scott on Twitter @davescottofakro

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News Headline: OUR VIEW: Kent State and the legacy of Phillip Shriver | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When Kent State Univer-sity was preparing to mark its 50th anniversary in 1960, President George Bowman encouraged the preparation of an official history as part of the "semi-centennial" celebration.

The task of chronicling Kent State's first half-century became a labor of love for Phillip R. Shriver, who had joined the history faculty in 1947.

Kent State couldn't have been blessed with a better historian. "The Years of Youth," Shriver's history of the university's formative years, is a meticulously accurate yet highly readable account of the institution that came into being in 1910 as Kent State Normal School. The passing of 50 years has not diminished it as the authoritative document of Kent State's history.

Dr. Shriver, who died April 23 at the age of 88, went on to serve as dean of the College of Arts & Sciences at Kent State and then became president of Miami University in Oxford in 1965. He held the position for 16 years, serving that institution of higher learning with distinction. An affable man, he was better known to generations of Miamians as "Uncle Phil."

"Phil" Shriver retained a special place in his heart for Kent State University and the people of Kent, partly because of family ties but also because he found a home in the community and on the campus.

His final words in "The Years of Youth" are characteristic of a historian who never lost his humility: "For (this book's) shortcomings, I alone am accountable." He needn't have worried; his impeccable account has no shortcomings. It is a fine legacy for a historian who loved Kent State and Kent.

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News Headline: Uncertain tuitions cause stress for families | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Deadline today for most to declare choice of college

With the deadline to declare his college choice closing in fast, Dylan Blaschak found himself mired in the pros and cons of five campuses in three states.

The usual angst over where the Fox Chapel Area High School senior should spend the next four years was complicated by another source of unease: His family had no way of knowing the exact cost this fall of four of the schools that offered him admission.

The only school willing to lock in a firm price for tuition and fees was Bethany College in West Virginia, the only private campus in the mix.

The others, all public universities in this state and Ohio, could give at best only estimated totals, given unresolved state budget debates, including Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett's controversial proposal to slash public higher education funding from the state in half.

"It's like saying, 'Hey, you like this house? After you buy it, we'll tell you what it's going to cost,' " said Dylan's mother, Diane Blaschak.

Even in the best case, family worries had not been allayed as May 1 -- the traditional deadline for students to declare where they will enroll -- drew near.

But for families like the Blaschaks, who live in Indiana Township, the agonizing over one of the biggest investments in their life goes beyond the usual considerations of public versus private, in-state versus out-of-state and grants versus loans.

They also worry that the estimated cost that drives their decision in May won't be the price they end up paying in the fall.

"You're going to accept admission for your kid to enroll, pay the housing fee and do all of that, and you still don't know what it's going to cost," Ms. Blaschak said.

Public campus leaders insist they do not intend to ask students to shoulder most of the cuts through higher fees, and financial aid representatives say they take great pains to help families estimate the cost based on increases in past years. They say the advice is usually enough to allay fears.

Still, some families say a swing of a few thousand dollars matters as they weigh attributes of each campus against the price.

That was true for Dylan Blaschak, 17, whose interests include communications, sports management and journalism.

His short list of schools initially included Bethany, Kent State University, the University of Akron, Indiana University of Pennsylvania and Edinboro University.

The public campuses sent aid offers with disclaimers, such as the letter from IUP that said "these unprecedented times" make it hard to share the most accurate information on price, financial aid and out-of-pocket expenses.

"Your financial aid package has been created based upon estimated costs," it read. "Your final costs may vary from these estimates depending on the final state funding level that is provided by the commonwealth."

In winnowing the five schools, the family scoured campus websites and spoke with admissions staff, at one point even drawing on an alumni connection to secure a better guesstimate of out-of-state tuition at one Ohio school.

Bethany, one of Dylan's two top picks, quoted a 2011-12 sticker price of $34,810 for tuition, fees and room and board, more than what the public campuses were likely to charge. But once a $9,500 scholarship from Bethany was factored in, the actual price -- $25,310 -- closed to within a few thousand dollars of Dylan's other top choice, Kent State.

Kent hasn't set its price for tuition, fees and room and board for 2011-12 but estimates the out-of-state rate will be $26,136. It offered a university award of $3,980 that would lower the overall estimated price to $22,156.

A Bethany graduate herself, Ms. Blaschak said when the gap between campuses "starts getting down to a couple thousand dollars" other factors might tip the decision.

She said either school seemed a good academic match for her son.

On one hand, Kent is a larger, vibrant campus, a definite plus for Dylan. But he said he also liked the intimate learning environment of Bethany's 1,000-student campus and the potential to be a walk-on player for the school soccer team.

The clincher was a tour of Bethany late last month. "I got a chance to look at it. I sat in on one off the classes, and I got a feeling for what it was going to be like there," Dylan said. "It was kind of warm and friendly."

He said that good impression combined with lingering uncertainty about Kent's price was enough for him to decide in favor of Bethany.

James Boyle, a McLean, Va.-based parent advocate and former president of College Parents of America, has heard parents vent over the years about having to decide based on estimated costs.

A clear disconnect exists, he said, between the admissions and financial aid processes. He said families generally must apply to campuses before Dec. 31, yet they can't fill out a Free Application for Federal Student Aid form (FAFSA) -- used to determine eligibility for college financial aid -- until the next month.

"You've got to apply to college before you can even start to apply for aid," he said.

Private campuses, mindful of family sensitivity to higher sticker prices, have grown more deft at giving firm price and aid award information by April.

But Mr. Boyle said some public universities "seem to get later and later every year," especially in states where budget woes delay approval of campus appropriations that influence tuition rates.

That delay is hard on families "who want to have the best information possible in making a very important decision," said Dan Hurley, director of state relations and policy analysis for the Washington, D.C.-based American Association of State Colleges and Universities.

But a public university that sets tuition without a state budget in place could get a lower-than-expected appropriation that forces a midyear tuition increase, just as unpopular with students and parents.

In Pennsylvania, tuition at public campuses including the University of Pittsburgh, Penn State University and the 14 state-owned universities belonging to the State System of Higher Education aren't typically set until July, weeks before the fall semester begins, a pattern encouraged by the state's tendency to miss its June 30 state budget deadline.

Noting that 30 percent of the State System's operations are funded from the state budget, State System spokesman Kenn Marshall said it's unrealistic to think the system can set prices until its appropriation is settled.

He and other public campus representatives say that if estimated prices are truly an impediment, it's not apparent from the growth in both applications and enrollment.

The day after Mr. Corbett unveiled his planned college cuts, Penn State President Graham Spanier expressed worry at a news conference that students would assume incorrectly that the burden would be laid entirely on them, noting the damage to the school if they are scared away.

But last week, Penn State said that while families do want to know fall rates, there are relatively few state budget questions.

Still, there are signs of unease. At Edinboro, where a rolling admission policy lets families decide later than May 1, applications are up this year by 1 percent, but deposits are 7 percent behind last year, something campus spokeswoman Amy Neil said suggests that families may be holding off on their decision.

Debbie Uselman, another Indiana Township parent with a college-bound high school senior, understands that unease.

Her son Jeffrey, 18, who has medical school ambitions, considers Pitt his top choice to study chemistry. But with firm price and aid offers already on the table from Washington & Jefferson College and Otterbein University in Ohio, both private schools, she'd like the same from Pitt.

She said she doesn't want the decision to be solely about price, but also fears a wallet-busting tuition increase if the state budget cuts stick. So her family is deciding whether to make a quick decision or spread around deposit money, even if it's non-refundable.

"In the grand scheme of things, if you're talking about tens of thousands of dollars, if you have to hold a spot in two places to talk about it more, maybe it's worth it," she said.

Still, others argue that families shouldn't be put in such a position.

Pitt graduate student Tony Gorga wonders why the state can't settle at least the university part of the state budget early so prices can be set. "If students have to decide by May 1 what school they are going to, why shouldn't there be a tuition price deadline at the same time?"

on the web

To view a slide show of Dylan Blaschak's visit to Bethany College, visit post-gazette.com.

Bill Schackner: bschackner@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1977

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News Headline: Water conservation hurting Kent revenues (Euclide, Bush) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Ben Wolford | Staff Writer

Kent has more water customers, but theyre using less water. Thats good for the environment and bad for the city of Kent. The service department and City Council are considering another rate increase if Kent cant entice a big industrial water guzzler to move in and perk up revenues. Were as lean as we can be, said Gene Roberts, Kent public service director.

Kent sold 1.2 billion gallons of water in 1998. By 2010, consumption fell by a quarter to 900 million. That comes in spite of 16 percent more users (now about 6,600) over the same period.

Consequently, the water treatment and water reclamation departments are running on empty. In 2009, sewer service fell almost $400,000 short of its $3.9 million operating cost, and water treatment revenues fell $579,002 shy of $3.3 million.

They city covered those differences with its reserve fund. The fund could go into a deficit this year, Roberts said. We need a bump now, he said. The next presentation to council will be we need to increase our rates. Part of the problem is an increase in the cost to treat the water. We are a lime soda processing plant, and let me tell you the cost of our chemicals has really gone up in the last 10 years, said Steve Hardesty, water plant manager.

The total cost of chemicals lime, soda ash, chlorine, fluoride and carbon dioxide was $220,195 in 2010, up 5 percent from the year before. Those chemicals were less than $100,000 in 2003, according to water treatment plant reports. But whats really killing the service department is efforts at conservation. Its sort of a catch-22, said Bob Brown, manager of the water reclamation division. You want people to conserve water, but when they do, you lose revenue. Browns division has the capacity to handle 5 million gallons of sewage a day. The most it has ever treated was 3.5 million gallons in a day, and last year a typical day saw 2.5 million. In effect, that wasted capacity is wasting money.

Conservation efforts at the state level sliced maximum allowances on gallons per minute on water faucets and toilets. Old three-gallon-per-flush toilets are grandfathered in until you replace them.

And Kent State University, the citys biggest water customer, has replaced them. Nearly all of them.

The Kent campus used 30.4 million cubic feet of water in fiscal year 2001-02. By fiscal year 2009-10, theyd cut it by 30 percent. Theyve installed metered faucets that stop when you take your hand away and even metered sprinklers that stop when the lawn is wet enough. Weve replaced large-flow shower heads with low-flow heads and toilets, said Thomas Euclide, the universitys architect. He said theyve added several new residence halls and remodeled all the old ones.

Keith Bush is a mechanical engineer with the university, but hes also the president of the Cleveland chapter of the American Society of Plumbing Engineers. He said 1.6-gallon flushes are the new national standard. Save water, he said. Its going to be one of the next big resources that were dealing with. The water rate in the city went up 3 percent at the beginning of 2010 to the current rate of $24.74 per 1,000 cubic feet. New rates would take effect as soon as the service department decides on and city council passes another increase.

Unless ... If we could get a 300,000-gallon-per-day user, that would be equivalent to a 14-percent rate increase to the sanitary sewer and about an 11 percent increase to our water treatment, Roberts said. To that end, officials put out bait. Council passed revisions to the municipal ordinances that substantially brought down the cost for big water users to connect to the citys water lines. It has been a few days and no bites. We dont have that user on the horizon right now, Roberts said.

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News Headline: April Showers ... Close in on Record (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Tess Wolfe
News OCR Text: April has been among the wettest in Kent in more than two decades, with nearly half a foot of rain so far this month, although it's not wet enough to match record rainfalls for this time of year.

Meteorologist Thomas Schmidlin, a geography professor at Kent State University , has been recording precipitation levels from a weather station at his Brady Lake property for more than 25 years. From his observations, the average, total April rainfall is 3.93 inches. At last count, 5.9 inches of rain had fallen this month, he said.

"This is the fourth rainiest April so far, but I think we'll probably exceed that before the end of the month," Schmidlin said.

Since 1987, the April record for total rainfall measured was in 1998, at 7.2 inches, with Aprils in 1994 and 1996 also wetter than this year, he said.

"It all depends, long run, on what May and June are like. The pattern doesn't seem to be changing yet," he said.

In regard to city services, the rain has had little effect. The Kent Police Department has responded to weather-related incidents more as a result of high winds than rain this month, according to the department.

"It's slowed us down a little bit, on some of our pothole repairs, but otherwise, not too much," Jack Hogue, central maintenance manager for the city, said.

Carl Battaglia, owner of Battaglia's T & B Garden Center Wholesale, located at 4980 S. R. 43, said some area residents have had to delay seasonal preparations for mulching, gardening and other spring home-care activities as a result of the rain.

"People can't get into their yards to cut the grass, let alone planting," Battaglia said.

A break in the weather and a few breezy, sunny days would quickly dry the ground enough to get things going for this year's gardening and yard-care season, he said.

"It's just the idea of Mother nature cooperating a little bit," Battaglia said.

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News Headline: Weather Set Stage for Storm Outbreak (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: KTTV-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published : Thursday, 28 Apr 2011, 4:58 PM PDT

(NewsCore) - MIAMI -- An epidemic of deadly tornadoes that hit the southern US likely was spawned by the rare collision of hot, humid air from the Gulf of Mexico with frigid Arctic winds pushed down across five Southern states by global climate patterns, weather experts told The Wall Street Journal Thursday.

These forces have helped produce about 800 twisters so far this month, four times the average for April, meteorologists said. The National Weather Service reported 165 tornadoes on Wednesday alone. The last comparable spate of destructive storms occurred in April 1974, when 148 twisters touched down in 13 states over 16 hours.

"Hopefully, this is not a preview of coming events for May and June, which historically are the most active tornado months," said climatologist William Patzert at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Some meteorologists cautioned that they could not pinpoint the exact cause of so many powerful storms because the vast continental interplay of wind, temperature, humidity and barometric pressure is too intricate.

"It's as complicated as a living thing, even though it is only water vapor and air," said severe storm expert Hugh Willoughby at Florida International University's hurricane center in Miami.

"I don't see anything that really leaps out to say this is different from all other springs," he added.

Several other research meteorologists, however, said spring storm systems have been strengthened and pinned in place longer than usual this year by shifts in climate patterns over the Arctic and the Pacific oceans.

The rise and fall of atmospheric pressure over the Arctic -- a long-term climate pattern called the Arctic Oscillation -- and the lingering effects of a cooling La Nina current in the Pacific Ocean can alter the path of prevailing winds across North America by altering the balance of energy in the atmosphere. That combination may have propelled repeated outbreaks of severe storms over the Southern states.

"The pattern seems to persist for the next week," said research meteorologist Thomas Schmidlin at Kent State University in Ohio.

Powering the storms is heat and moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, where sea-surface temperatures recently have been running about two degrees Fahrenheit above average. Researchers, however, discounted any link to long-term global climate change.

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News Headline: Weather Set Stage for Storm Outbreak (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: WFLD-TV - Online
Contact Name: Wall Street Journal
News OCR Text: Published : Thursday, 28 Apr 2011, 6:58 PM CDT

(NewsCore) - MIAMI -- An epidemic of deadly tornadoes that hit the southern US likely was spawned by the rare collision of hot, humid air from the Gulf of Mexico with frigid Arctic winds pushed down across five Southern states by global climate patterns, weather experts told The Wall Street Journal Thursday.

These forces have helped produce about 800 twisters so far this month, four times the average for April, meteorologists said. The National Weather Service reported 165 tornadoes on Wednesday alone. The last comparable spate of destructive storms occurred in April 1974, when 148 twisters touched down in 13 states over 16 hours.

"Hopefully, this is not a preview of coming events for May and June, which historically are the most active tornado months," said climatologist William Patzert at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Some meteorologists cautioned that they could not pinpoint the exact cause of so many powerful storms because the vast continental interplay of wind, temperature, humidity and barometric pressure is too intricate.

"It's as complicated as a living thing, even though it is only water vapor and air," said severe storm expert Hugh Willoughby at Florida International University's hurricane center in Miami.

"I don't see anything that really leaps out to say this is different from all other springs," he added.

Several other research meteorologists, however, said spring storm systems have been strengthened and pinned in place longer than usual this year by shifts in climate patterns over the Arctic and the Pacific oceans.

The rise and fall of atmospheric pressure over the Arctic -- a long-term climate pattern called the Arctic Oscillation -- and the lingering effects of a cooling La Nina current in the Pacific Ocean can alter the path of prevailing winds across North America by altering the balance of energy in the atmosphere. That combination may have propelled repeated outbreaks of severe storms over the Southern states.

"The pattern seems to persist for the next week," said research meteorologist Thomas Schmidlin at Kent State University in Ohio.

Powering the storms is heat and moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, where sea-surface temperatures recently have been running about two degrees Fahrenheit above average. Researchers, however, discounted any link to long-term global climate change.

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News Headline: Weather Set Stage for Storm Outbreak (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: WREG-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published : Thursday, 28 Apr 2011, 6:58 PM CDT

(NewsCore) - MIAMI -- An epidemic of deadly tornadoes that hit the southern US likely was spawned by the rare collision of hot, humid air from the Gulf of Mexico with frigid Arctic winds pushed down across five Southern states by global climate patterns, weather experts told The Wall Street Journal Thursday.

These forces have helped produce about 800 twisters so far this month, four times the average for April, meteorologists said. The National Weather Service reported 165 tornadoes on Wednesday alone. The last comparable spate of destructive storms occurred in April 1974, when 148 twisters touched down in 13 states over 16 hours.

"Hopefully, this is not a preview of coming events for May and June, which historically are the most active tornado months," said climatologist William Patzert at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Some meteorologists cautioned that they could not pinpoint the exact cause of so many powerful storms because the vast continental interplay of wind, temperature, humidity and barometric pressure is too intricate.

"It's as complicated as a living thing, even though it is only water vapor and air," said severe storm expert Hugh Willoughby at Florida International University's hurricane center in Miami.

"I don't see anything that really leaps out to say this is different from all other springs," he added.

Several other research meteorologists, however, said spring storm systems have been strengthened and pinned in place longer than usual this year by shifts in climate patterns over the Arctic and the Pacific oceans.

The rise and fall of atmospheric pressure over the Arctic -- a long-term climate pattern called the Arctic Oscillation -- and the lingering effects of a cooling La Nina current in the Pacific Ocean can alter the path of prevailing winds across North America by altering the balance of energy in the atmosphere. That combination may have propelled repeated outbreaks of severe storms over the Southern states.

"The pattern seems to persist for the next week," said research meteorologist Thomas Schmidlin at Kent State University in Ohio.

Powering the storms is heat and moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, where sea-surface temperatures recently have been running about two degrees Fahrenheit above average. Researchers, however, discounted any link to long-term global climate change.

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News Headline: New study identifies possible cause of salt-induced hypertension | Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New research from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Kent State University shows that salt intake raises blood pressure because it makes it harder for the cardiovascular system to simultaneously juggle the regulation of blood pressure and body temperature.

For decades, medical researchers have sought to understand how salt causes salt-induced high blood pressure to no avail. Some individuals, described as "salt sensitive," experience an increase in blood pressure following the ingestion of salt, whereas others, termed "salt resistant," do not. Until now, scientists have been unable to explain why some individuals are salt sensitive and others are salt resistant. This inability to explain why salt raises blood pressure in some individuals but not others has hampered the development of a comprehensive theory as to what causes most cases of high blood pressure (see also ).

Since the cardiovascular system is responsible for maintaining normal blood pressure and also helps control body temperature by conducting heat from the muscles and internal organs to the skin's surface, a team of researchers led by Robert P. Blankfield, MD, MS, clinical professor of family medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and a member of the Department of Family Medicine at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Ellen L. Glickman, PhD, professor of exercise science at Kent State University, tested whether these dual roles of the cardiovascular system might help explain how salt ingestion leads to salt-sensitive hypertension.

The researchers examined the effect of salt and water consumption versus just water upon a group of 22 healthy men without high blood pressure. The study participants' blood pressure, rectal temperature, cardiac index (the volume of blood pumped by the heart per minute), and urine output were monitored at one, two, and three hours after the men ingested either salt and water or water alone. Changes in rectal temperature were compared between the men identified as salt sensitive versus those who were salt resistant.

The study found that the ingestion of salt and water lowered body temperature more than the ingestion of water by itself. In addition, body temperature decreased more in individuals who are salt resistant than in individuals who are salt sensitive.

"It appears that salt sensitive individuals maintain core body temperature equilibrium more effectively than salt resistant individuals, but experience increased blood pressure in the process," Dr. Blankfield says. "Conversely, salt resistant individuals maintain blood pressure equilibrium more effectively than salt sensitive individuals following salt and water intake, but experience a greater temperature reduction in the process."

Matthew D. Muller, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow at the Penn State College of Medicine, and the paper's first author explains, "If our results are generalizable, it would be possible to account for the role of salt in the development of salt-sensitive hypertension: salt and water loading raises blood pressure in salt sensitive individuals, and the elevated blood pressure persists for a finite period of time during and after the salt and water intake. These transient blood pressure elevations, whether brief or prolonged, might initiate the complex changes within the walls of the arteries and arterioles that characterize individuals with essential hypertension."

Dr. Muller adds, "Nowadays, physicians tell their patients that no one knows what causes high blood pressure. Since we can now explain why salt-sensitive hypertension develops, a theory that will explain all hypertension may be possible. Thus, physicians may one day be able to tell their patients that the cause of high blood pressure is understood, and physicians may also be able to explain to their patients what must be done to avoid developing this chronic medical condition." Dr. Muller conducted this research as a doctoral student at Kent State University.

Copyright © 2011 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Downtown street parking discussed | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Members of the city council's Streets Committee discussed several items Friday morning that may impact parking in some downtown areas.

Sherrie Curtis, head of the committee, led the discussion which included fellow committee members Russell Dray and Ryan Stovall along with Service-Safety Director Ryan Estell and Law Director Charles Payne.

The group is considering la change to the parking situation along one section of Market Street.

According to Curtis, a Market Street business owner asked that the parking ticketing zone be expanded to include an area of Market Street between Third and Fourth streets.

"It would take an ordinance to extend the parking authority to that area," Estell noted.

If ultimately approved, the parking in that area would be for a two-hour limit, and the city would also offer parking passes for the associated city-owned lots in that vicinity.

The cost of a parking pass would be $10, and that would make it more attractive for nearby business employees who could park at the lot without a time limit.

Curtis said there was some interest in changing the current on-street parking situation along a portion of Walnut Street.

The committee discussed the matter, and Estell noted that most downtown parking areas went from a three-hour to a two-hour time limit.

However, Estell said that if any change was to occur, he would prefer to make it a three-hour parking limit along a portion of Walnut Street to help Kent State students.

In one other bit of discussion, Curtis and Estell said several residents along the downtown portion of Pennsylvania Avenue expressed a desire to have on-street parking switched to the other side of the roadway.

Estell said he will study the matter further, but the change, if made, would not impact the width of roadway travel but simply move the parked vehicles from one side to the other.

The committee also heard from Estell about a piece of pothole patching equipment that some city council members want to purchase.

Estell said he's heard mixed reviews about one particular brand, and Lisbon officials now have second thoughts about a similar purchase.

Estell said he will visit Steubenville to see a similar piece of equipment in operation and also speak with township officials about their experiences. He encouraged committee members to do so as well.

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News Headline: Downtown street parking discussed | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name: MICHAEL D. McELWAIN
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Members of the city council's Streets Committee discussed several items Friday morning that may impact parking in some downtown areas.

Sherrie Curtis, head of the committee, led the discussion which included fellow committee members Russell Dray and Ryan Stovall along with Service-Safety Director Ryan Estell and Law Director Charles Payne.

The group is considering la change to the parking situation along one section of Market Street.

According to Curtis, a Market Street business owner asked that the parking ticketing zone be expanded to include an area of Market Street between Third and Fourth streets.

"It would take an ordinance to extend the parking authority to that area," Estell noted.

If ultimately approved, the parking in that area would be for a two-hour limit, and the city would also offer parking passes for the associated city-owned lots in that vicinity.

The cost of a parking pass would be $10, and that would make it more attractive for nearby business employees who could park at the lot without a time limit.

Curtis said there was some interest in changing the current on-street parking situation along a portion of Walnut Street.

The committee discussed the matter, and Estell noted that most downtown parking areas went from a three-hour to a two-hour time limit.

However, Estell said that if any change was to occur, he would prefer to make it a three-hour parking limit along a portion of Walnut Street to help Kent State students.

In one other bit of discussion, Curtis and Estell said several residents along the downtown portion of Pennsylvania Avenue expressed a desire to have on-street parking switched to the other side of the roadway.

Estell said he will study the matter further, but the change, if made, would not impact the width of roadway travel but simply move the parked vehicles from one side to the other.

The committee also heard from Estell about a piece of pothole patching equipment that some city council members want to purchase.

Estell said he's heard mixed reviews about one particular brand, and Lisbon officials now have second thoughts about a similar purchase.

Estell said he will visit Steubenville to see a similar piece of equipment in operation and also speak with township officials about their experiences. He encouraged committee members to do so as well.

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News Headline: Downtown street parking discussed | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Members of the city council's Streets Committee discussed several items Friday morning that may impact parking in some downtown areas.

Sherrie Curtis, head of the committee, led the discussion which included fellow committee members Russell Dray and Ryan Stovall along with Service-Safety Director Ryan Estell and Law Director Charles Payne.

The group is considering la change to the parking situation along one section of Market Street.

According to Curtis, a Market Street business owner asked that the parking ticketing zone be expanded to include an area of Market Street between Third and Fourth streets.

"It would take an ordinance to extend the parking authority to that area," Estell noted.

If ultimately approved, the parking in that area would be for a two-hour limit, and the city would also offer parking passes for the associated city-owned lots in that vicinity.

The cost of a parking pass would be $10, and that would make it more attractive for nearby business employees who could park at the lot without a time limit.

Curtis said there was some interest in changing the current on-street parking situation along a portion of Walnut Street.

The committee discussed the matter, and Estell noted that most downtown parking areas went from a three-hour to a two-hour time limit.

However, Estell said that if any change was to occur, he would prefer to make it a three-hour parking limit along a portion of Walnut Street to help Kent State students.

In one other bit of discussion, Curtis and Estell said several residents along the downtown portion of Pennsylvania Avenue expressed a desire to have on-street parking switched to the other side of the roadway.

Estell said he will study the matter further, but the change, if made, would not impact the width of roadway travel but simply move the parked vehicles from one side to the other.

The committee also heard from Estell about a piece of pothole patching equipment that some city council members want to purchase.

Estell said he's heard mixed reviews about one particular brand, and Lisbon officials now have second thoughts about a similar purchase.

Estell said he will visit Steubenville to see a similar piece of equipment in operation and also speak with township officials about their experiences. He encouraged committee members to do so as well.

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News Headline: Kent State campus plan moving along in Twinsburg | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: by Emily Canning-Dean | Reporter

Twinsburg -- City planners brought the proposed Kent State Geauga Twinsburg campus one step closer to a reality April 25, as they approved the final site plan for the new, 45,000-square-foot campus.

Spencer Pisczak, who represents Premier Development Partners, said he expects the facility to be complete by the fall 2012 semester. University and city officials conducted a groundbreaking ceremony last November, though actual work on the site is expected to begin in May.

The $24 million facility will be located on 15 acres on Creekside Drive, off Darrow Road and just north of Interstate 480.

The Twinsburg campus is currently housed in a 90-year-old, 29,000-square-foot building at routes 91 and 82, known as the Old School.

Kent State officials have said the new campus will serve up to 1,500 students. In 2004, the campus had 200 students enrolled. Today enrollment is at about 900, which the current building can accommodate. However, university officials expect enrollment to grow to 1,200 students in the next five years.

The planning commission ruled that Kent State must submit a final landscaping plan that includes the species of trees to be used on the grounds, and the project's lighting plan must be approved by the building department.

The site plan does not need Council's approval, but Council must approve a dedication plat on the site.

Community Development and Planning Director Larry Finch said the dedication plat is a 150-stretch of land on the property that will be donated to the city to become a dedicated roadway. Finch said the roadway will be an extension of Creekside Drive. Planning Commission recommended 4-0 that Council approve the plat. Council is expected to vote on the dedication plat in the next few weeks.

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News Headline: Kent State Salem holds annual awards banquet (Nolte) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: salem news (Salem, OH)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sedzmak honored as Friend of the Campus recipient

SALEM - Kent State University at Salem held its annual awards banquet April 21 at the Salem Golf Club.

More than 100 students were honored for their academic excellence and scholastic achievements.

Top students in business management technology, computer technology, mathematics, early childhood education, human services, psychology, nursing, radiology and undergraduate research received awards.

Several scholarships including the Kent State Salem Advisory Board Scholarship, Donna J. Sedzmak Scholarship, James Cooney Scholarship, John Roncone Scholarship, Home Savings and Loan Scholarship and the Professional Promise Scholarship were awarded.

Those earning academic scholarships through the campus' honors program were also named.

Student worker Michelle Ludwig won the student campus service award and senior Jo Broffman received the community service award.

In addition to celebrating the achievements of its student body, Dean Jeffrey Nolte presented the campus' highest honor, its Friend of the Campus Award.

The award celebrates members of the community who have worked to better the campus through their time and talents over the years. Joe Sedzmak was this year's award winner.

Nolte said that Sedzmak has volunteered for Kent State Salem for more than 20 years and currently serves as the campus advisory board chairperson.

He also helped guide the campus' philanthropy committee, which has led to the construction of Kent State Salem's New Health and Sciences Wing.

Notle thanked Sedzmak for perpetuating the memory of his late wife, Donna J. Sedzmak, through the Donna J. Sedzmak Scholarship, which is available annually for a student attending Kent State Salem.

"The creation of this scholarship is another example of his commitment to the welfare of students," Nolte said. "Joe is a mentor, advocate, and confidant for Kent State Salem. He is without question one of the most humble people I know, but is also one of the best role models for each of us to aspire."

Nolte also highlighted how Joe has also impacted the entire community through organizations including the Youngstown Diocese, Eastern Seals, and United Way of Northern Columbiana County, the Salem Community Foundation and Rotary International. "Each of these organizations have benefited greatly from his leadership and involvement," he said.

Numerous friends and family attended the event in support and appreciation of Sedzmak.

At the Kent State Columbiana County campuses, students can earn a bachelor's degree in 14 different disciplines or an associate's degree in 14 different areas. The Kent State Columbiana County campuses, which include Kent State East Liverpool and Kent State Salem, are home to more than 3,300 students.

This year, Kent State Columbiana County again saw an increase in students. For more information please visit www.col.kent.edu or call 330-332-0361 for the Salem Campus or 330-385-3805 for the East Liverpool Campus.

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News Headline: Video: Kent Stark's Environmental Media Class Wraps Up With On-Campus Film Screening (McKenney) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: northcantonpatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students in Kent Stark's Environmental Media course — the first ever at Kent State University — showed off their films in the Main Hall Auditorium Thursday afternoon

Students in the Environmental Media course at Kent State University Stark Campus screened the films they've worked on all semester and showed off their knowledge of environmental issues Thursday.

A handful of students participated in the course, which brought together journalism, communications, biology and other majors and teamed them up to produce short films on the problems facing the Nimishillen Creek Watershed.

The students' topics ranged from septic tanks to general ways to be more environmentally conscious and a topic discussed at a recent city council meeting: fracking, or hydraulic fracturing.

The students who created the fracking video had logged 2,000 miles in four weeks as they traveled to Pennsylvania, New York and other areas to conduct interviews and gather information for their film. They even have a campus group to show for their efforts: Take Action, Spread Knowledge – and a successful Facebook page.

"Fracking was sort of a wild card," said Mitch McKenney, assistant professor of journalism and mass communication. "Because it's current, because it does have an impact potentially on the watershed, they came up with that topic and said, 'Can we do this?' and we said 'Sure.'"

"With the fracking group, they've started a student group, they have their Facebook site, they have plans for more film showings and more activity. So they've really run with this."

The class came about through a grant relationship between the campus and Herbert W. Hoover Foundation, which funds projects related to the community, education and environment.

What do you think about the campus' and students' efforts to raise awareness about watershed issues? Tell us in the comments.

Click on link to view video:
http://northcanton.patch.com/articles/video-kent-starks-environmental-media-class-wraps-up-with-on-campus-film-screening#video-5831277

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News Headline: QuickBooks II Training Session | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Location: Kent State University Stark Campus
6000 Frank Ave NW, North Canton, OH When:
May 20, 2011
Time: 8:30am–4:30pm
This is the second installment of QuickBooks Training. Customize your books, track inventory and learn about the payroll feature. This course is for industry professionals.

Fee includes the training, continental breakfast, morning and afternoon break service and lunch.

Registration & payment must be made online at www.CantonSBDC.org.

For additional information, call 330-244-3290.
Phone: 330-244-3290 Price: $119

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News Headline: OHIOANA BOOK FESTIVAL: Celebrating state's authors | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BOOKS WITH A LOCAL CONNECTION

The fifth
annual Ohioana
Book Festival
will take
place from 10
a.m. to 4:30
p.m. on May
7 at the Fort
Hayes Metropolitan
Education
Center,
546 Jack
Gibbs Blvd.,
Columbus.
The event is
free and open
to the public.
No tickets or
advance registration are required.
The festival's theme is “Celebrating
Ohio's Authors.”
Activities will include panels,
roundtables, author readings
and discussions, a book fair,
entertainment, and a special
area for children's programming.
More than 100 nationally
recognized authors, all Ohioans
by birth or residence with
books that have published in
the past year, will participate,
according to Linda R.
Hengst, Ohioana's executive
director.
“They represent every major
literary field and genre —
fiction (mystery, romance,
fantasy, science fiction, and
literary fiction), nonfiction
(memoirs, history, and essays),
poetry, and books for
children and young adults,”
she said.
Among the 100 authors will
be Paul J. Bauer of Kent, coauthor
of Frazier Robinson's
autobiography, “Catching
Dreams: My Life in the Negro
Baseball Leagues”; Kiki
Howell of Portage County,
author of “Torn Asunder”;
Denise A. Seachrist, associate
professor of music and director
of Kent State University's
Hugh A. Glauser School
of Music and author of “The
Musical World of Halim El-
Dabh” and “Snow Hill: In
the Shadows of the Ephrata
Cloister”; Amanda Flower
of Akron, author of the
mystery “Maid of Murder”;
Mary Ellis of Medina, who
grew up in Geauga County
and writes fiction about
the Amish community; Carrie
Bebris, the author of six
Mr. and Mrs. Darcy Mysteries,
including “Pride and Prescience,”
which employs the
characters from Jane Austen's
novels; Lisa Black, the
author of five crime thrillers,
including the Theresa MacLean
series and two featuring
Elizabeth Becka, all set in
her hometown of Cleveland;
Tim Bowers, who has illustrated
more than 30 popular
children's books including
“First Dog” and “First Dog's
White House Christmas”;
Robert Greer, author of the
C.J. Floyd mystery series, two
medical thrillers, and more;
Ted Gup, who wrote “A Secret
Gift: How One Man's
Kindness — And a Trove of
Letters — Revealed the Hidden
Story of the Great Depression,”
which tells the
story of his grandfather and
the people of his hometown
of Canton during the 1930s;
J. Patrick Lewis, who has authored
more than 40 books of
poems, riddles,
and
stories for
young people;
Sandy
Plunkett, a
self-taught
illustrator
and comic
book artist
who began
his career
at age 18
with Marvel
Comics;
Andrea
Cheng, aut
h o r o f
17 books for children and
young adults; Bev Shaffer,
director of the Mustard Seed
Market and Café Cooking
Schools in Akron and author
of four popular cookbooks;
and Maggie Smith, author of
three volumes of poetry.
The festival will include
22 workshops, panel discussions,
and readings and conversations.
Some of the programs
include “Mentors &
Muses: Literary Influences”
with J. Patrick Lewis and
Lisa Black, “The Power of
Words” with Carrie Bebris
and Bev Shaffer, “Real People,
Real Stories” with Andrea
Cheng and Ted Gup,
and “How We Write, What We
Write” with Tim Bowers and
Robert Greer. The Aldus Society
will do a workshop on
“Book Collecting” as well as
book appraisals.
Kent State University Library
and Information Science
students and faculty
along with local librarians
will provide activities for
youngsters, including meeting
costumed book characters,
story times, and bookrelated
arts and crafts.
More information about
the festival and the day's
program can be found online
at www.OhioanaBook
Festival.org.

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News Headline: Kent State forum will feature tape | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Man who analyzed 1970 recording to speak

Beacon Journal staff report
KENT: The 41st annual observance of the 1970 Kent State riots and shootings next week will feature the lone tape recording that preserves the 13 seconds of gunfire, military commands to fire and more.

Stuart Allen, of International Media Services in New Jersey, who last year used modern forensic technology to analyze the tape, will be part of an educational forum from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday in the KSU Kiva.

A new U.S. Justice Department investigation is being sought because of Allen's analysis. The forum is free and open to the public.

Other events will include the annual candlelight march and vigil at 11 p.m. Tuesday at the Victory Bell on the KSU commons.

The anniversary observance from noon to 2 p.m. Wednesday will include talks by Allen; Randy Gardner, an eyewitness to the May 4, 1970, shooting who was struck by gunfire in the January shooting in Tucson; and Mary Vecchio, a May 4, 1970, eyewitness and high school runaway who was photographed screaming above a fallen student.

The annual observance is coordinated by KSU students on the May 4 Task Force.

For details, contact task force co-chairperson Krista Knapp at 440-319-6958 or Task Force faculty adviser Idris Syed at 330-289-8887.

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News Headline: Service marks Dr. Walter Watson's retirement | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Doris Larson | Record-Courier correspondent

May 8 will be a celebration for the members and friends of the Kent United Church of Christ as they mark the retirement of Dr. Walter Watson, the director of music at the church from 1992 to 2011. Watson served as director of the Chancel Choir, organist and pianist and supervised the maintenance of all church-owned musical instruments.

"Music has long been a central part of worship at Kent United Church of Christ and I feel blessed to have been selected to succeed the many excellent musicians who instilled the love of music in this congregation," said Watson. An early influence on Watson's decision to serve as a church musician was his 10 years as a member of the Men and Boys Choir of St. Paul Episcopal Church in Canton.

Sunday's 10:30 a.m. service will include music to mark the occasion. Organist David Fisher will open the service with a prelude composed by Watson. The Chancel Choir, conducted by Kerry Glann, will perform three anthems, including two composed by Watson: "God Made Man Music" and "The Lord Bless You and Keep You." A number of former student scholarship members of the choir during Watson's tenure are returning to sing with the choir.

Alexandra May, a current student choir member from the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music at Kent State University, will sing three of Watson's "Prayers from the Ark." The Children's Choir, directed by Jennifer Culver and Guinevere Rhoads, and the Handbell Choir, directed by Leslie Madden, will also participate in the service.

The inclusion of the KSU Jazz Ensemble in the Sunday's service will recognize Watson's role in developing the jazz program at the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music. Watson established the Jazz Ensemble in 1968 and served as faulty director for several years. He also introduced a popular course, Jazz History, as a credit course in 1968 and continued teaching it until 1979.

Watson came to KSU as assistant professor of music in 1966, rising to professor. He taught a range of courses including music theory, music composition and jazz history. He also accompanied numerous faculty and student recitals. He was appointed director of the School of Music in 1980 and continued to served in that position until his retirement from the university in 1996.

Composition has been an integral part of Watson's life since he composed a musical while a student at Canton Lehman High School. Since starting composition degree studies in 1952, he has composed for almost every medium: band, orchestra, choir and ensembles. His compositions have been performed in some of the country's most important musical venues, including the Washington National Cathedral, Carnegie Hall, Severance Hall, Blossom Music Center, John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and Aspen Music Festival.

Watson credits the teachers who have guided him in his composition career, including Martin P. Alexander, Karl Ahrendt, Darius Milhaud and Samuel Adler for ongoing performances of his works. He also took Master Classes from Ernest von Dohnanyi and Aaron Copland.

The celebration of Watson's retirement will continue after the 10:30 a.m. service in Van Meter Hall with more musical offerings and refreshments.

The worship service and reception to honor this Kent resident's musical life in the community are open to the public.

(photo)

A musical service set for 10:30 a.m. May 8 at the Kent United Church of Christ will mark the retirement of Dr. Walter Watson, the director of music at the church from 1992 to 2011.

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News Headline: Kent State U. Gay Student Mag Delayed, But Not Derailed | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Edge New York
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students at Kent State University stood up for the latest issue of their gay magazine, Fusion, which will reach newsagents later than originally intended because it took the magazine's staff four tries to find a printer who would take the project on, Recordpub.com on April 29.

A printer finally agreed to produce the paper version of the magazine, but not before the new issue had been turned down by three other firms. The refusals were due to the magazine containing the headline "Gender Fuck'd." The headline belonged to a provocative photo essay, according to comments made to a school organization, Campus Progress, by the magazine's vice president of sales and marketing, David Pilcher. The reported that the photo essay featured cross-dressing models.

The online version of the magazine did not contain any full frontal male nudity, the Recordpub.com article said, though one model appeared in a skintight leotard.

It was that photo, along with the F-bomb, that triggered the magazine's usual printer, Freeport Press, to reject the issue. The printer asked for changes, including the deletion of the photo.

The magazine's producers wouldn't hear of it, reported college radio station WKSU. The Recordpub.com article indicated that standing by the magazine was a matter of principle.

"I think we did the right thing by standing up for the First Amendment," said the editor of the Spring issue, Raytevia Evans. The magazine is published once per semester.

But one company that turned the magazine away indicated that the magazine's use of words that are used as anti-gay slurs made it unacceptable to them for printing.

"Generally those are harmful words," Fred Cooper of Hess Print Solutions told Recordpub.com. "We don't generally do profanity."

Still another printing concern would have been willing to undertake the job--if there had been time to vet the magazine's content with the company's workers. That's the policy followed by Davis Graphic Communication Solutions, the third company the magazine's publishers approached.

"Davis GCS also could not produce the project within the time constraints requested by Kent State University due production capacity issues," said the firm's head, Bob Ellis.

The fourth time was a charm, the article reported. The new edition of Fusion finally was accepted by Printing Concepts, whose president, Ron Taggart, issued a statement framing the job as an exercise in first amendment rights, the article said.

"Printing Concepts advocates freedom of speech and the extension of that right to all persons or organizations," Taggart's statement said. "They accepted the Fusion magazine project based on this constitutional right."

The magazine's website proved student publishers knew the game as well as the adults. "After being denied by three printers, Fusion magazine has finally gone to print," text at the site read. "To get an early taste of the content that has been causing so much controversy, check out our latest issue before picking up your own personal copy."

One article visible in the table of contents was titled "Fags, Dykes & Queers." Another was called "It's a Fag Hag's World." The photo essay was not available for viewing online.

College magazines containing adult content are nothing new. Boston University students produce a publication called Boink. In 2004, even Harvard University students got into the act, starting a publication called H Bomb that featured articles about sexuality and photos of nude models, exciting the international press in the process. Some condemned the inaugural edition of the magazine as "pornography," though others hailed it as an example of free expression.

Kilian Melloy reviews media, conducts interviews, and writes commentary for EDGEBoston, where he also serves as Assistant Arts Editor.

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News Headline: Kent State U. Gay Student Mag Delayed, But Not Derailed | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Edge Gay Media Network
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students at Kent State University stood up for the latest issue of their gay magazine, Fusion, which will reach newsagents later than originally intended because it took the magazine's staff four tries to find a printer who would take the project on, Recordpub.com on April 29.

A printer finally agreed to produce the paper version of the magazine, but not before the new issue had been turned down by three other firms. The refusals were due to the magazine containing the headline "Gender Fuck'd." The headline belonged to a provocative photo essay, according to comments made to a school organization, Campus Progress, by the magazine's vice president of sales and marketing, David Pilcher. The reported that the photo essay featured cross-dressing models.

The online version of the magazine did not contain any full frontal male nudity, the Recordpub.com article said, though one model appeared in a skintight leotard.

It was that photo, along with the F-bomb, that triggered the magazine's usual printer, Freeport Press, to reject the issue. The printer asked for changes, including the deletion of the photo.

The magazine's producers wouldn't hear of it, reported college radio station WKSU. The Recordpub.com article indicated that standing by the magazine was a matter of principle.

"I think we did the right thing by standing up for the First Amendment," said the editor of the Spring issue, Raytevia Evans. The magazine is published once per semester.

But one company that turned the magazine away indicated that the magazine's use of words that are used as anti-gay slurs made it unacceptable to them for printing.

"Generally those are harmful words," Fred Cooper of Hess Print Solutions told Recordpub.com. "We don't generally do profanity."

Still another printing concern would have been willing to undertake the job--if there had been time to vet the magazine's content with the company's workers. That's the policy followed by Davis Graphic Communication Solutions, the third company the magazine's publishers approached.

"Davis GCS also could not produce the project within the time constraints requested by Kent State University due production capacity issues," said the firm's head, Bob Ellis.

The fourth time was a charm, the article reported. The new edition of Fusion finally was accepted by Printing Concepts, whose president, Ron Taggart, issued a statement framing the job as an exercise in first amendment rights, the article said.

"Printing Concepts advocates freedom of speech and the extension of that right to all persons or organizations," Taggart's statement said. "They accepted the Fusion magazine project based on this constitutional right."

The magazine's website proved student publishers knew the game as well as the adults. "After being denied by three printers, Fusion magazine has finally gone to print," text at the site read. "To get an early taste of the content that has been causing so much controversy, check out our latest issue before picking up your own personal copy."

One article visible in the table of contents was titled "Fags, Dykes & Queers." Another was called "It's a Fag Hag's World." The photo essay was not available for viewing online.

College magazines containing adult content are nothing new. Boston University students produce a publication called Boink. In 2004, even Harvard University students got into the act, starting a publication called H Bomb that featured articles about sexuality and photos of nude models, exciting the international press in the process. Some condemned the inaugural edition of the magazine as "pornography," though others hailed it as an example of free expression.

Kilian Melloy reviews media, conducts interviews, and writes commentary for EDGEBoston, where he also serves as Assistant Arts Editor.

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News Headline: OH: Three Printers Refuse to Print Kent State Gay Magazine - April 29, 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Gayopolis
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A gay and lesbian magazine at Kent State University will hit newsstands behind schedule because three printing companies balked at its controversial content.

A fourth printer, Printing Concepts, based in Stow, agreed to print Fusion, a student-run, semesterly magazine that addresses lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues.

"I think we did the right thing by standing up for the First Amendment," said Raytevia Evans, the spring editor of Fusion.

Full Story From RecordPub.com

Published on: April 29, 2011

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News Headline: Kent State U. Gay Student Mag Delayed, But Not Derailed | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Edgemiami.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students at Kent State University stood up for the latest issue of their gay magazine, Fusion, which will reach newsagents later than originally intended because it took the magazine's staff four tries to find a printer who would take the project on, Recordpub.com on April 29.

A printer finally agreed to produce the paper version of the magazine, but not before the new issue had been turned down by three other firms. The refusals were due to the magazine containing the headline "Gender Fuck'd." The headline belonged to a provocative photo essay, according to comments made to a school organization, Campus Progress, by the magazine's vice president of sales and marketing, David Pilcher. The reported that the photo essay featured cross-dressing models.

The online version of the magazine did not contain any full frontal male nudity, the Recordpub.com article said, though one model appeared in a skintight leotard.

It was that photo, along with the F-bomb, that triggered the magazine's usual printer, Freeport Press, to reject the issue. The printer asked for changes, including the deletion of the photo.

The magazine's producers wouldn't hear of it, reported college radio station WKSU. The Recordpub.com article indicated that standing by the magazine was a matter of principle.

"I think we did the right thing by standing up for the First Amendment," said the editor of the Spring issue, Raytevia Evans. The magazine is published once per semester.

But one company that turned the magazine away indicated that the magazine's use of words that are used as anti-gay slurs made it unacceptable to them for printing.

"Generally those are harmful words," Fred Cooper of Hess Print Solutions told Recordpub.com. "We don't generally do profanity."

Still another printing concern would have been willing to undertake the job--if there had been time to vet the magazine's content with the company's workers. That's the policy followed by Davis Graphic Communication Solutions, the third company the magazine's publishers approached.

"Davis GCS also could not produce the project within the time constraints requested by Kent State University due production capacity issues," said the firm's head, Bob Ellis.

The fourth time was a charm, the article reported. The new edition of Fusion finally was accepted by Printing Concepts, whose president, Ron Taggart, issued a statement framing the job as an exercise in first amendment rights, the article said.

"Printing Concepts advocates freedom of speech and the extension of that right to all persons or organizations," Taggart's statement said. "They accepted the Fusion magazine project based on this constitutional right."

The magazine's website proved student publishers knew the game as well as the adults. "After being denied by three printers, Fusion magazine has finally gone to print," text at the site read. "To get an early taste of the content that has been causing so much controversy, check out our latest issue before picking up your own personal copy."

One article visible in the table of contents was titled "Fags, Dykes & Queers." Another was called "It's a Fag Hag's World." The photo essay was not available for viewing online.

College magazines containing adult content are nothing new. Boston University students produce a publication called Boink. In 2004, even Harvard University students got into the act, starting a publication called H Bomb that featured articles about sexuality and photos of nude models, exciting the international press in the process. Some condemned the inaugural edition of the magazine as "pornography," though others hailed it as an example of free expression.

Kilian Melloy reviews media, conducts interviews, and writes commentary for EDGEBoston, where he also serves as Assistant Arts Editor.

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News Headline: Wilderness First Responder Course | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Location: Kent State University
500 E Main St, Kent, OH When:
Daily
Time: 5:00pm–7:00pm
This class is vital, it will teach you the tools to make important medical and evacuations decisions while in remote locations. The program includes the course materials as well.
Phone: Dave Herpy 330-672-7820 Email: dherpy@kent.edu

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News Headline: Introduction to Climbing Clinic | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Location: Kent State University
500 E Main St, Kent, OH When:
May 1, 2011 / May 2, 2011 / May 3, 2011
Time: 6:00pm–8:00pm
Participants will learn the basic skills. Learn how to perform basic knot-tying, learn knot-tying, belaying techniques, rope management skills, technical equipment use and climbing commands.

Phone: Dave Herpy 330-672-2830 Email: dherpy@kent.edu

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News Headline: Bottles thrown at police end party in Kent: 13 arrested during College Fest for underage drinking, drugs; Total is down from 65 last year | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Diane Smith | staff writer
A late-night incident in which participants in Kent's College Fest threw bottles at police officers ended the party early, but Kent police said fewer people were arrested at the event this year.
Sgt. Michael Lewis said there were 13 arrests directly related to College Fest on Saturday. Charges included alcohol prohibition, disorderly conduct, littering, possession of drugs and resisting arrest.
“We were disgruntled that some people at College Fest threw bottles at us to try to evoke a response,” he said on Sunday. “They threw beer bottles and beer cans at us, which eventually led to us shutting down the party.”
The incident occurred at about 11:30 p.m., he said.
Kent police were assisted by officers from the Portage County Sheriff's Office, Brimfield, Kent State University and Stow police and Metro SWAT.
The number of arrests was a fraction of the number arrested in previous years, Lewis acknowledged. Last year, 65 people were arrested.
“Our aim was just to maintain control and try not to do anything that would provoke a violent response from students,” he said.
Lewis said he was told that there was a lot of clean-up taking place Sunday.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Hundreds party in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: About 1,500 people danced on porches and roofs as huge crowds gathered at College Fest, but police on the scene said the event was mostly calm.

A few fights were broken up at the event, but police from Kent, Kent State University and surrounding departments found little illegal activity as they patrolled East College Avenue Saturday.

Officers maintained a watchful eye on partiers, who gathered in large crowds in yards along the street. Numerous broken bottles and discarded beer cans littered the street and sidewalk.

A concession stand was doing business near the dead end of College Avenue near DePeyester Street, and impromptu games of Frisbee and corn hole broke out.

Loud music blared from several houses, as revelers danced to the music, standing on porch railings or gathering on roofs.

Many wore t-shirts with their house numbers on them, commemorating the event. “If you can't beat them, join them,” one shirt read.

One student said the event had been a peaceful one.

“There's fights,” he said. “When they happen, everybody runs over to watch it. I'm not one to go watch a fight.”

As of 11 p.m., Kentwired.com was reporting that police in riot gear were moving in groups and that police visors were pulled down afer a beer was thrown at officers.

Click on link to view video:
http://www.recordpub.com/news/slideshow/5027126

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News Headline: Cartoonist Tom Batiuk Talks About 'Lisa's Story' at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Tess Wolfe
News OCR Text: Cartoonist Tom Batiuk, whose long-running comic strips Funky Winkerbean and Crankshaft are carried in more than 700 news publications throughout the country, showed a more serious side during a discussion and book signing Thursday at the Kent State University Library.

With an audience of 43 people in the Read Room, the 1969 Kent State alumnus detailed the origins and inspiration for his book, Lisa's Story: The Other Shoe , published by the Kent State University Press .

Batiuk sought to draw attention to the realities of those who experience breast cancer through the character of Lisa in his Funky Winkerbean comic strip. The series pertaining to those story lines have been compiled in the book, the proceeds from which go toward Lisa's Legacy Fund for cancer research at University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center .

Batiuk said he received advice in a vision that inspired him to launch his 1999 creation of the comic-strip story lines that deal with cancer. He said an angel told him, "In the end, your faith simply has to be greater than your fear."

Controversial at the time, the Funky Winkerbean Lisa series dealt with the gritty and painful elements of stages of cancer, from diagnosis to death.

"You can't do that on a daily basis. Readers won't take that, and I've got the emails to prove it," Batiuk said.

Batiuk said "everything changed," including the tone, coloring and sentiment of the Funky Winkerbean story lines, when he later was diagnosed with cancer.

"I was diagnosed, and I realized there is a huge void between empathy and personal experience. This time, when I went into that internal landscape, it was more emotionally charged," he said.

When Batiuk opened the discussion to questions from audience members, he was asked what direction the characters in his Funky Winkerbean comic strip, which in March will have been published for 40 years, would take in the future.

"I've already got my up-and-comers started for next year, but it's hard to say where it's going to go," Batiuk said.

Co-sponsored by the Kent State University Press and Kent State University Libraries, the discussion and book signing was part of the Libraries' "Kent Reads" program.

For more information on Batiuk's Funky Winkerbean comic strip, click here .

For more information about Lisa's Story: The Other Shoe , click here .

For more information about Lisa's Legacy Fund at the University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, click here .

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News Headline: Author to discuss crime spree of notorious killer Stanley Hoss Read more: Author to discuss crime spree of notorious killer Stanley Hoss - Pittsburgh Tribune-Review http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/ae/books/s_734920.html#ixzz1LCex9dJW | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When he started to work at the Western Penitentiary in Pittsburgh, Jim Hollock barely could go to a barbershop without someone asking, "Did you know Stanley Hoss?"

The public's fascination with the man who killed a Verona police officer in 1969 and was suspected of killing a young Maryland woman and her child led Hollock to pen "Born to Lose: Stanley B. Hoss and the Crime Spree that Gripped the Nation."

Hollock will discuss his new book, published by Kent State University Press, at the Alle-Kiski Valley Heritage Museum at 7 p.m. Thursday.

Joining Hollock for the presentation will be Robert Fescemyer, the mayor of Oakmont and a former police officer who was a friend of Joe Zanella, the officer that Hoss gunned down in 1969.

"Hoss was the forerunner to exceptional cruelty," Hollock says.

"Each of his victims were so removed from him. When you have a drug dealer kill a robber these days, we say 'no big deal.' But it's something different when you have an over-average killer take the life of a beautiful man — a cop in Verona — and grab young women from neighborhood streets to kidnap and rape them."

Hollock, a resident of Pittsburgh's North Side and a retired prison counselor from the penitentiary, spent more than five years researching the book, talking with prison staff, Hoss' relatives, girlfriends and others.

Although Hollock never met Hoss, who was transferred out of the penitentiary about a year before Hollock started working there, he had access to people who knew and were counselors to Hoss.

One of Hollock's sources for the book is the late Valley News Dispatch reporter Tony Klimko. When Hoss was in prison, he wrote to Klimko. "Tony was almost like The Washington Post reporter Carl Bernstein, known for the Watergate stories. Klimko was on it right away."

According to Hollock, Hoss admitted to counselors and others that he killed Zanella and abducted Linda Peugeot and her 2-year-old daughter, then murdered them both.

Hoss was sentenced to death for the killing of Zanella, but the sentence was overturned by the state Supreme Court. Hoss was found hanged in 1978 in his prison cell in Philadelphia.

"He was a sociopath," Hollock says. "His conscious feelings for others were absent."

Hollock describes Hoss as a loner who, nonetheless, liked people to be around him.

"He liked adulation from women. He wanted them to be obedient. I'm not sure if he cared for anybody, but if they wanted to leave, he would fly into a violent rage."

Even in jail, Hoss was a dangerous man: He and two other inmates beat and slashed to death prison guard Capt. Walter Peterson.

Found guilty of second-degree murder, Hoss was sentenced to 10 years to 20 years on top of his life sentence for killing Zanella.

"There's no question he would kill again given opportunity," Hollock says.

Hollock's program on Hoss is a joint effort by the Community Library of Allegheny Valley, the Alle-Kiski Historical Society, the Tarentum History and Landmarks Foundation and Tarentum Borough.

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News Headline: BOOK BRIEFS | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 10th annual poetry
reading Monday at KSU

Kent State University's Wick Poet-
ry Center will present “Giving Voice”
at 6 p.m. Monday in the Ballroom of
the Kent State Student Center.
The 10th annual performance of
“Giving Voice” will feature area students
in grades three to 12, senior
citizens, veterans, medical care providers,
and patients from local hospitals
performing original poetry with
guest musician Hal Walker.
All material is created in workshops
led by KSU undergraduate
students enrolled in the servicelearning
course “Teaching Poetry
in the Schools” and from additional
Wick outreach programs.
The event is free and open to
the public.
For more information, visit www.
kent.edu/wick or call the Wick Poetry
Center at 330-672-2027.

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News Headline: Annual Jawbone Poetry & Pie Festival Fundraiser with Maj Ragain (Ragain) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WHO: Standing Rock Cultural Arts and Maj Ragain present

WHAT: Jawbone Poetry & Pie Festival Fundraiser with Maj Ragain
-Full Jawbone schedule available at www.standingrock.net

-Call Jeff at 330.673.4970 to place an order. Pies by the slice or whole made from local and organic ingredients in a variety of flavors to please every palate! Funds benefit the arts programming of Standing Rock Cultural Arts, which includes recurring open poetry readings led by local poet and emeriti professor, Maj Ragain.

WHERE:
-North Water Street Gallery, 257 N. Water St. Downtown Kent
-Other Jawbone locations available at www.standingrock.net

WHEN: SAT, MAY 7, 11 AM-2PM
-Other Jawbone event times available at www.standingrock.net

Thanks to Maj Ragain, the Kent State University poetry professor who continues to be a creative driving force in our community! The gallery will be hosting the annual Jawbone Reading on Friday, May 6th, 8pm, Saturday, May 7th, 8pm, and Sunday, May 8th, 2pm as well as the Poetry & Pie Festival on Saturday, May 7th, 11 AM-2PM. Hope you can make it!

ABOUT MAJ RAGAIN

Maj Ragain, one of the premiere poetic writers of our fair city of Kent and professor of English and writing at Kent State University, will host the many wondrous voices of people from all over the country this week-end at The 24th Annual Jawbone Poetry Reading.

He is a Creative Writing Professor at Kent State University and hosts monthly Poetry Readings during the school year at The North Water Street Gallery.

Dr. Major D. Ragain, an instructor of English at Kent State since 1981, teaches courses such as Creative Writing (introductory and advanced poetry writing workshops), Survey of American Literature 1800 to Present and Survey of American Literature, and Introduction to Poetry, among others. He previously taught in Illinois at Frontier College, Olney Community College and Southern Illinois University and in North Carolina at Winston-Salem State College. He earned his Ph.D. at Kent State in 1990, his master's at the University of Illinois in 1963 and his bachelor's from Eastern Illinois University in 1962. Today, Ragain is a successful poet with both written and audio publications.

Ragain received much praise from his peers and students. One student wrote, “Maj is active in the local and regional poetry scene, and his genuine love of the use of language is unprecedented. The energy of genuine love and respect between poet, faculty and students was a once in a lifetime thrill I am honored to have witnessed.” Another student said, “Maj is a selfless professor, and KSU is indeed fortunate to have the dedicated Major Ragain on faculty. I have seen Maj's positive impact upon students; their self-esteem rockets with astonishing work by semester's end. He draws the very best out of each and every student. I have the deepest respect for this man.”

One of Ragain's colleagues said, “A devotion to poetry and its unique power to heal, to unite people around a single purpose, and to create the fire of creative energy in groups of people is characteristic of all of Maj Ragain's work as writer, teacher and reader. … His classroom is rigorous in its demand that students push the work beyond where they thought they could go with it. He makes innovative assignments, requires a lot of writing and reading of poems, and teaches, by precept and example, the ways in which a life can be grounded in the life of the imagination. …I learn from Maj Ragain every day, and I carry his gifts to my own students and into my own poems.”

In Ragain's teaching statement he said, “Before I ever taught a class, I came across this sentence in Louis Sullivan's Kindergarten Chats, a singular book about organic principles in architecture and the forms in which spirit resides. I can still see my hand writing it down in an old notebook, ‘To teach is to touch the heart and impel it to action.' In 33 years of teaching, that has remained a guiding principle. …I believe that, as a teacher, I am also an apprentice, a learner and in the poet Gary Snyder's wonderful phrase, ‘a fellow worker in the Buddha fields.' I often write with my students. Of all the ‘strategies,' that seems the most fruitful. It brings certitude to the classroom a sense that the teaching is being translated into action, that the work is shared. I am teaching myself to listen."
-------------------------------
Standing Rock Cultural Arts is a 501(c)(3) organization. Thank you to our current sponsors and members! Donations and memberships are always tax deductible and great appreciated.

Thank you for supporting the Arts!

www.standingrock.net
info@standingrock.net
330.673.4970

Website: http://www.standingrock.net Phone: 330.673.4970 Email: info@standingrock.net Price: $3 slice of pie, $15 whole pie

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