Report Overview:
Total Clips (33)
Athletics (2)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (2)
College of the Arts (CotA) (1)
Commencement (1)
Entrepreneurship (2)
Entrepreneurship; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Fashion Design (2)
Higher Education (1)
Hospitality Management; Student Success (1)
KSU Airport (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
KSU at Geauga (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
May 4 (3)
Student Accessibility Services (1)
Students (1)
Students; Sustainability (1)
Technology Transfer (2)
Town-Gown (1)
University Press (2)
WKSU-FM (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (2)
New Kent State football coach Darrell Hazell working to add long-lost shine to the Golden Flashes (Hazell, Neilsen) 05/16/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Kent State's pursuit of buyout money from former coach Geno Ford just part of the college basketball game: Terry Pluto 05/16/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


College of Education, Health and Human Services (2)
KSU, Hiram receive eTech grants 05/16/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University and Hiram College are among 11 recipients of $100,000 Teacher Planning Grants from eTech Ohio. Funds were awarded...

KSU ENCOURAGING TEACHERS TO INCORPORATE BURST OF ACTUAL EXERCISE INTO THEIR LESSONS 05/15/2011 Fox CT News at 10 PM - WTIC-TV Text Email

THE KENT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IS ENCOURAGING TEACHERS TO INCORPORATE BURST OF ACTUAL EXERCISE INTO THEIR LESSONS. CONCEPT IS PHYSICAL...


College of the Arts (CotA) (1)
Former Cleveland State president John Flower, 90, dies 05/14/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...Prior to serving as president he was vice president for academic affairs and the university's first provost. He came to Cleveland State in 1973 from Kent State University, where he served for seven years as dean of the College of Fine and Professional Arts and associate university provost....


Commencement (1)
Northeast Ohio colleges run into unexpected circumstances amid pomp of graduation ceremonies (Frank) 05/16/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


Entrepreneurship (2)
Entrepreneurship honor society opens a chapter at Kent State 05/16/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Sigma Nu Tau Entrepreneurship Honor Society has announced that Kent State University is the first in the country to be presented with a charter to operate a chapter of its honor society. The charter was...

City partners with Kent State for entrepreneur in residence program (Heisler, Messing) 05/16/2011 Hudson Hub-Times Text Attachment Email


Entrepreneurship; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Celebration news - May 15: School news 05/16/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design (2)
KSU fashion students win awards in spandex fabric design contest 05/15/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

RadiciSpandex recently revealed the winners of the Stretch to the Future design competition held with the junior class at the Kent State University School of Fashion and Design. Serving as the event's honoree designer judge was celebrated eveningwear designer Tadashi...

DESIGNS FROM KENT STATE DESIGN STUDENT 05/13/2011 Pittsburgh Today Live - KDKA-TV Text Email

...OF GREAT MODELS AND SOME PERFORMANCES TOO. WANT TO TALK ABOUT THE DESIGNERS MAYBE? SURE TROY BECK AND STELLA AND DOT, JEWELRY, ANNETTE, DESIGNS FROM KENT STATE DESIGN STUDENT AND THE ART INSTITUTE DESIGN STUDENTS. WE HAVE A COUPLE OF MODELS HERE WITH US TODAY FROM SOME OF THE FASHION FROM...


Higher Education (1)
Times Higher Education World University Rankings 05/14/2011 Daily Telegraph (UK) Text Email

...Cincinnati United States 46.9 193 Dalhousie University Canada 46.8 193 Royal Institute of Technology Sweden 46.8 195 University of Vienna Austria 46.7 196 Kent State University United States 46.5 197 Zhejiang University China 46.4 197 University of Illinois - Chicago United States 46.4 199 Simon...


Hospitality Management; Student Success (1)
College grads enter job market with new confidence 05/16/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


KSU Airport (1)
Another aircraft travels off runway (Burford, Friend) 05/16/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email


KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
East Liverpool hoping better fences make recycling business a better neighbor 05/14/2011 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

...submitted, one allowing semi trucks to be parked near the old Volino's car wash on State Street and the other for vacation of Union Street at the request of Kent State University, to make way for green space and parking.

East Liverpool hoping better fences make recycling business a better neighbor 05/14/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

...submitted, one allowing semi trucks to be parked near the old Volino's car wash on State Street and the other for vacation of Union Street at the request of Kent State University, to make way for green space and parking.


KSU at Geauga (1)
Educators aim to help students with disabilities transition to college (Morrison) 05/14/2011 News-Herald Text Attachment Email

...representatives of a college's accessibility services office, said Ben Morrison, coordinator of academic services and student accessibility services at Kent State University, Geauga Campus. Ideally, students also would sit in on at least one class session and talk to a professor about possible...


KSU at Stark (1)
Kent Stark Environmental Media Class Strengthens Ties Throughout Stark County (Bernstein, Williams, Smeltzer) 05/13/2011 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State Stark 's inaugural Environmental Media class — which pulled together 11 students with backgrounds in journalism to biology and video...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
KSU professor to head national library group 05/16/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

By Ben Wolford | Staff WriterA Kent State University professor will soon head the top organization for childrens library services in the world.Ive just always loved childrens...


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Former area resident wins Distinguished Alumni Award from University of Arkansas (Rumrill) 05/14/2011 Brattleboro Reformer Text Attachment Email

...Americans with disabilities. Dr. Rumrill is a Professor and Coordinator of Rehabilitation Counseling and Director of the Center for Disability Studies at Kent State University in Ohio. He has authored more than 150 professional journal articles, 40 book chapters, and nine books entitled "Employment...


May 4 (3)
Kucinich and Kent State 05/14/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...getting a little smarter he, throws me a curve. With the federal government almost broke and the economy in shambles, Kucinich wants to spend money on the Kent State University shootings. Has the congressman forgotten that unemployment is well over 8.5 percent, and higher in his hometown of...

Sister of May 4 victim appeals to Obama for probe of KSU shootings 05/16/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Video: May 4 Visitor's Center to Start Fundraising Campaign This Year (Davis) 05/15/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

The May 4 Visitor's Center at Kent State University needs your help. This year, the university will start a grassroots fundraising campaign to complete the visitor's...


Student Accessibility Services (1)
KSU ban on dogs fuels housing bias charge (Vincent) 05/14/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A recent Kent State University graduate says the university broke the law by not allowing her to live in an on-campus apartment with her support animal,...


Students (1)
Balloon artist finds new twist 05/15/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

...wiener dog,'' he said, laughing. When he's not twisting or doing magic acts for private or corporate functions, he's studying childhood education at Kent State University or entertaining at places like Donatos in Hudson or Doogan's in Aurora. He's also a regional trainer for Balloon Distractions,...


Students; Sustainability (1)
Second annual recycled garment fashion show contest 05/16/2011 First News at 5 AM - WKBN-TV Text Email

The Kent State Environmental club held it's second annual recycled garment fashion show contest yesterday. I had the honor of emceeing the event....


Technology Transfer (2)
Great jobs in Northeast Ohio? 05/13/2011 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...Computing Colleges and Universities: University of Akron, Cleveland State University, Case Western Reserve University, ITT Tech, Baldwin Wallace College, Kent State University, Youngstown State, Hiram College, Cuyahoga Community College "Flannel I.T. takes the boring out of career development,"...

Great jobs in Northeast Ohio? Absolutely--Just Watch! 05/13/2011 UPI.com Text Attachment Email

...Computing Colleges and Universities: University of Akron, Cleveland State University, Case Western Reserve University, ITT Tech, Baldwin Wallace College, Kent State University, Youngstown State, Hiram College, Cuyahoga Community College "Flannel I.T. takes the boring out of career development,"...


Town-Gown (1)
KENT STATE BUYING PROPERTY FOR WALKWAY FROM CAMPUS THROUGH KENT'S BUSINESS DISTRICT. 05/13/2011 19 Action News at 5 PM - WOIO-TV Text Email

EVERYWHERE. KENT. MORE MONEY FOR A NEW CAMPUS PROJECT. KENT STATE BUYING PROPERTY FOR WALKWAY FROM CAMPUS THROUGH KENT'S BUSINESS DISTRICT.


University Press (2)
Jim Tully: Rediscovering the life and works of Ohio's forgotten writer 05/16/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Book rediscovers Ohio writer Jim Tully 05/15/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...the studios. His first books included those autobiographical works he called his ''Underworld'' series, and four have been reproduced in facsimile by Kent State University Press. The second question doesn't arrive until almost 300 pages in: ''Why then has Tully's work been utterly forgotten?''...


WKSU-FM (2)
Downtown events are Celebrate Kent focus 05/16/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...grant funding just yet. Winners of Celebrate Kent Grants in 2010 included: Downtown Innovative Community Events, Kent Blues Fest, Kent Community Dinners, Kent State Folk Festival, Haymaker Farmers Market, Who"s Your Mama Earth Day Festival. The city provides matching dollar amounts that can be...

Be a Part of the Two Percent Solution 05/13/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...help to keep it strong and vital. There is an easy answer to WKSU's current budget crunch. It is not money from federal or state governments – or even Kent State University. With only a 2% increase in WKSU's member rolls, the station should be able to weather this financial storm. Donations...


News Headline: New Kent State football coach Darrell Hazell working to add long-lost shine to the Golden Flashes (Hazell, Neilsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Aside from a go-cart he patched together as a kid, Darrell Hazell hadn't built anything in his life.

But the summer before last, his son wanted a tree house, so Hazell dug in and got to work. There were no directions. All he had was a hammer and nails, a hand saw, an old circular saw and the self-induced pressure of not wanting the project to linger all summer.

He talked a forklift operator into loading the frame into his tree, then he and a neighbor finished the shingles in a thunderstorm.

The tree house was done in 16 days.

Now he's faced with another construction project -- again with no owner's manual, no lessons learned from having done it. In December, Hazell, 47, became head football coach at Kent State after nine stops as an assistant, most recently molding Ohio State's top pass-catchers into NFL wide receivers.

He left a program where four-loss seasons are volcanic to coach a program that hasn't won a conference title or played a bowl game in almost 40 years. There's much work to be done.

Like the tree house, he couldn't wait to get started.

In January, Ohio State returned to Columbus from its hair-thin Sugar Bowl victory over Arkansas at 5 a.m. After an hour-and-a-half catnap at home in Westerville, Hazell cleaned up, packed, told his family that he was leaving and hit the road for Kent, arriving shortly after noon for a staff meeting on his first day on the job.

Hazell is meticulous, almost militarily precise, whether in his vest and sweatshirt -- always tucked into long sweatpants -- or the pinstriped suit and tie, white shirt and cuff links he wears to the office. In late March, he was so keyed up for his first practice as a head coach he awoke way ahead of his usual 5:30 a.m. alarm. He told the media it was 4:09. Not 4 or 4:15, but 4:09.

His smile is effervescent -- and ever-present. Those who know him best describe a quiet confidence, a quality from being ultra-prepared.

Kent signed Hazell to a five-year deal for $300,000 per year, plus bonuses for reaching specific recruiting, attendance and other performance goals. If his team wins at least eight games in any of his last three seasons, for instance, his contract is extended two years.

Making a fast impression

Darrell Hazell and his coaching staff have been busy creating new ties to Ohio high schools unfamiliar with the Golden Flashes. During the KSU spring scrimmage, Hazell spent time with recuit Skevo Zembillas of Campbell Memorial.Hazell has been granted sufficient time to rebuild the program, not that you could tell at a recent spring practice.

"Let's go, let's go, lets go! Hurry, hurry, hurry!" he shouted above the mock crowd noise blaring throughout Kent's Field House.

About 100 high school coaches watched, some taking notes, pictures and video of the drills. Coaches from Grove City, Boardman and Ravenna, from Crestwood, Lake Catholic and Cleveland Heights, from Madison, Canfield and Hoban. They were invited for practice and a "Chalk Talk," where Kent's assistants drew up plays and formations on grease boards and answered questions in the football classrooms beneath the home stands of Dix Stadium.

When Hazell and Ohio State coach Jim Tressel had discussed Kent State's interest in him, Tressel urged him to recruit talent-rich Ohio. There's also an incentive for Hazell to do so. Each year in which at least 60 percent of his football scholarships go to players from Ohio is worth $5,000.

In the first five weeks, Hazell and his staff crammed in recruiting visits to coaches at 30 out-of-state schools and 177 high schools in Ohio, many of whom told them Kent State hadn't paid them a visit in years.

One was Orange football coach Adam Bechlem, who said hadn't heard from KSU while there, or at Garfield Heights, where he previously coached. "Within two weeks of taking over, coach Hazell was in [our] school," he said. "I thought they should be more visible. This was their back yard."

During halftime of the cold and wet spring football game at Dix Stadium, Hazell and his assistants schmoozed high school recruits on the sidelines. Some, like senior tailback Terrell Bates of state champion St. Edward and 6-4, 245-pound defensive end Nate Terhune of Orange, had already committed to Kent State. Others were high school juniors on their radar for next year. Many wore their school colors -- Cardinal Mooney, Campbell Memorial, Alliance.

"Hey," said offensive coordinator Brian Rock, striking up a conversation, "my wife was born in Alliance."

Hazell and his crew were setting a foundation.

Lineage of developing talent

The Darrell Hazell file
Position: Kent State's new head football coach.
Age: 47
Experience: Joined Ohio State's staff in 2004, following three years at Rutgers; also coached at West Virginia, Army, Western Michigan, Pennsylvania, Eastern Illinois and twice at Oberlin. Was offered job to coach receivers for NFL's Jacksonville Jaguars, but turned it down to stay at OSU.
Noted Ohio State recruits: Cornerback Chimdi Chekwa, receivers DeVier Posey and Corey “Philly” Brown, New Orleans Saints defensive back Malcolm Jenkins.
Background: Native of Cinnaminson, N.J., a middle-class suburb of about 15,000 residents just over the bridge from north Philadelphia; was the youngest of eight. His mother, Bernice, drove a Head Start bus for 43 years and cleaned houses between bus routes; his late father, Daniel, worked as a custodian.
Playing days: Standout high school tailback; wore number 33 for his football idol, Hall of Fame running back Tony Dorsett. Became three-time all-conference wide receiver, senior captain and Division III All-American at Muskingum in New Concord, Ohio. Inducted into Muskingum Athletic Hall of Fame in 1993. Graduated with degree in speech communication and business.
If not a coach, I'd be a ... : Hostage negotiator. While on a recruiting trip for Western Michigan in 1995, a player's dad who was an FBI agent nearly recruited him.
A little trivia: Former Super Bowl linebacker Andre Collins is his cousin. Their mothers are sisters.
— Bill Lubinger

Related stories
Ohio ties began with improbable road trip
What they say about Darrell Hazell
Hazell replaced Doug Martin, who was 29-53 in seven years and announced late in the Golden Flashes' 5-7 season he wouldn't be back for another.

If not for the team pictures and their season records hung year by year on the walls of the MAC Center, Kent State's legacy of losing football would be almost unthinkable.

Since its lone bowl appearance, the losing has continued on and off through 11 coaching changes. It's continued despite a consistent run of NFL-caliber players, as a huge mural in the MAC Center lobby advertises to visitors: "Congrats to KSU 2008 NFL Pro Bowlers James Harrison, Josh Cribbs and Antonio Gates."

Hazell's name was among six to 10 that first-year athletic director Joel Nielsen kept on a ready list of head coaching candidates. Hazell's winning legacy, polished at Army, Rutgers, West Virginia and Ohio State, put him on Kent's radar. His OSU resume, where he coached future NFL receivers Santonio Holmes, Ted Ginn Jr., Anthony Gonzalez, Brian Hartline and the Browns' Brian Robiskie, spoke for itself. Tressel promoted him to assistant head coach within a year.

"People say, 'Well, he had all these [NFL] first-rounders,'" Gonzalez, a former St. Ignatius standout, said. "First of all, none of us were first-rounders when we got there. We were just kids."

Nielsen also heard how the OSU players felt about Hazell. Many still call Hazell's 10-year-old son, Kyle, on his birthday. In emotional good-byes after the Sugar Bowl, Ohio State receiver DeVier Posey was bawling.

"He was my father for three years," said Ginn, the former Glenville speedster who still talks to Hazell a few times a month. "He was on top of me in class, he was on top of me off the field."

"We had just as many conversations about how I was doing as we did about football," said Robiskie, the former Chagrin Falls standout. "And it was like that with all the guys."

During Kent's spring practices, Hazell left most of the yelling to his hand-picked assistants, one of whom is former Ohio State linebacker Marcus Freeman. The huge stack of resumes Hazell sifted through included coaching candidates he knew well and even learned from but didn't hire, because he thought they were too disrespectful to the players. He said that style of teaching turns his stomach.

Not that he's soft. When a KSU player continued to ignore warnings about blowing off required team study sessions, Hazell had his locker cleaned out. The player apologized and asked for another chance.

Coaches refer to such moments as "learning opportunities." This one was about commitment.

Program upgrade needed

From the moment he arrived to lead the program, Hazell has stressed developing pride and cohesiveness in the KSU locker room.
While Kent State's athletic administrators had a good idea about the commitment they would get from Hazell, he needed to find out kind of commitment he would get from Kent State -- namely, whether they were committed to winning.

Nielsen opened the books, revealing the financial realities of a Division I program that competes in the Mid-American Conference, not the wealthy Big Ten.

When Nielsen and associate AD Tom Kleinlein led Hazell on a tour of the football offices at the MAC Center, he was shocked. There were holes in the walls, discolored and missing ceiling tiles, '70s-style furniture and no place to watch game video.

Hazell thought to himself, "There's no way in the world I can bring recruits through here." He didn't have to say a thing.

"They said, 'I know, I know,'" he recalled.

Nielsen assured Hazell he would get whatever he needed to succeed. Hazell promised he wouldn't ask for anything that wasn't necessary.

On Hazell's second day on the job, a painter, carpet installer, electrician and architect were waiting outside his office. Three weeks later, the work was done.

For Hazell, the reconstruction was just beginning.

First, there must be pride

A sign on the front door where athletes train reads, "Attention: Staff and student-athletes. Please wear only Kent State apparel while in the weight room."

The reminder shouldn't be necessary, but the lack of pride -- shame even -- in a program accustomed to losing had permeated the football players themselves.

Around campus, the players rarely wore the dark blue and gold of Kent State, avoided eye contact in conversations with athletic staff and rarely hung around the football offices. Sophomore linebacker C.J. Steward said the team could feel the tension last season from coaches who were certain they were out if they didn't win.

When Hazell interviewed coaches from Martin's staff -- none of whom he retained -- he found so much separation between the offense and defense that the concept of "team" was almost nonexistent.

"And I'm not sure how long that went on," he said.

The question recruits want to know, Kleinlein said, is, "When's it going to change?"

Some players say the attitude already has, although that's typical after a coaching shuffle. Junior quarterback Spencer Keith said it feels like a fresh start. "There's a lot more sense of urgency," he said after a recent practice.

There'd better be. Hazell couldn't be walking into a more difficult debut, except for maybe facing his previous team at Ohio Stadium. (That comes in 2014, by the way.) When Alabama's opponent to open the 2011 season bailed, Nielsen jumped at the $1.2 million payday, even if KSU had to pay a $425,000 penalty to break a commitment to Purdue for the same date.

When Kent State takes the field in Tuscaloosa, the coach across the way might trigger a flashback for the program's loyal older fans. Alabama coach Nick Saban was a defensive back on the 1972 Kent State team that won the only Mid-American Conference championship in school history, earning a trip to the Tangerine Bowl.

As challenging as Alabama -- and a visit to Kansas State in week three -- will be, Hazell has a bigger concern: the team's traditional late-season collapse.

When researching the program before accepting the job, Hazell found that Kent State was 7-17 in November over the last seven years, and that the team had a bad habit of losing when games were on the line.

"You can't win championships and go to bowl games if you can't win in November," Hazell said.

When he brought up the November record at the first team meeting, the players had no idea. He also showed them a Kent State helmet that was shiny yellow instead of the traditional navy blue. He found it behind a bunch of boxes while rummaging through the equipment room the day after arriving at Kent. The dusty yellow helmet was a painting experiment from the past, but never used.

It now sits on the top shelf of a lighted curio cabinet Hazell picked out at Ikea in suburban Pittsburgh late one Friday night to have displayed in time for a weekend of on-campus recruiting visits.

The shelf below it has a ceramic Kent State football his son Kyle made for him; and nine rings, representing conference championships or bowl appearances Hazell earned at Ohio State and West Virginia. The helmet was purposely placed so recruits can see it as they approach his remodeled office from down the hall.

"That's our bowl helmet this year," Hazell said. "The equipment guy told me he can get them painted in four days."

Four days. One-fourth the time it takes to build a tree house.

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News Headline: Kent State's pursuit of buyout money from former coach Geno Ford just part of the college basketball game: Terry Pluto | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- I have no clue if Bradley University "intentionally induced [Geno] Ford to breach" his contract as basketball coach at Kent State. But that's what Kent State claims in its lawsuit against its former coach.

Or maybe Ford's statement is correct. The new Bradley coach insists: "During the process [of changing jobs], everything was handled professionally and appropriately."

So maybe Kent State just is unhappy with how its coach left and wants to make Ford sweat a bit.

But the bottom line is the contract. That means Ford owes Kent State $1.2 million. He had $300,000 annually left for four years. The contract has a clause stating that Kent State is to be paid what is left on the deal if Ford takes another job.

There's nothing new about how these deals work. I checked with former Kent State athletic director Laing Kennedy, who negotiated Ford's contract. He said it's the same protection clause that was in the contracts of previous coaches who left before their deals expired.

According to Kennedy, when Gary Waters went to Rutgers in 2001, Kent State received about $200,000. When Stan Heath departed after a single season for Arkansas in 2002, it was a $750,000 buyout. For Jim Christian to Texas Christian in 2008, it was about $350,000.

"It was never a problem being paid," said Kennedy. "We usually got the checks in a week or two."

Kent State used much of the buyout money to pay the salaries of their new coaches, according to Kennedy.

Ford was hired by Bradley on March 27, signing a multi-year contract worth an estimated $700,000 annually. Kent State filed its lawsuit on April 26, because the buyout had not been paid.

According to the contract, Ford is responsible for the buyout. But in most cases, it's the school that pays. Kent State was not happy with the way Ford handled his abrupt departure. The lawsuit claims Ford didn't have permission to talk to Bradley. Ford's statement refutes that. It asks $25,000 from Ford and Bradley in damages.

But the real issue is the buyout.

Perhaps Kent State would have been more patient or even willing to settle for something less than the full $1.2 million if things had been handled with less animosity. Eventually, this will be worked out. But it seems Bradley and Ford should not have allowed this to linger.

At Bradley, Ford replaces Jim Les. In 2006, he was the favorite son of Peoria when he coached Bradley to the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tournament. In 2007, his Braves went to the NIT. But there have been no NCAA or NIT appearances since. He was fired after a 12-20 season (4-14 in the Missouri Valley) despite being a former star player at the school.

His last salary was $420,000 with what was believed to be two years left on his contract. His record was 154-140, 74-88 in the Missouri Valley.

Les played one season at Cleveland State before transferring to Bradley. After being fired by his alma mater, Les was hired as coach at California-Davis.

Ford seemed like a very good guy in his time at Kent State. He was respected by the players and the administration. His Flashes won the last two Mid-American Conference regular-season titles and had a 68-37 record in three seasons. You can't fault coaches for wanting contract extensions. After all, they are fired -- and not always for good reason.

But if they do leave early, schools such as Kent State deserve to be paid what remains on the contract.

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News Headline: KSU, Hiram receive eTech grants | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University and Hiram College are among 11 recipients of $100,000 Teacher Planning Grants from eTech Ohio.

Funds were awarded to selected Ohio colleges of education for the purpose of expanding the use of technology in teacher preparation programs. The recipients will partner with local school districts to implement their proposed initiatives, which include programs designed to strengthen technology integration and coursework within colleges of education.

These collaborations will focus on the use of information and communication technologies with students.

KSU will partner with the Ravenna, Stow-Munroe Falls and Akron school districts. Hiram College will partner with the Crestwood, James A. Garfield and Woodridge school districts.

Plans submitted by participating colleges and universities prepare future teachers in the use of technology tools and curricula during their student teaching assignments.

The partnership with local districts ensures that current K-12 classroom teachers and students also benefit from increased access to tools and training.

Through activities supported by the grant, new teachers will be prepared to teach in a 21st century classroom, practicing teachers will remain abreast of new developments in technology.

Projects will undergo a final evaluation by a third party in June 2012.

Recipients will also document lessons learned and best practices, to be published at www.etech.ohio.gov in June 2012.

The University of Mount Union in Alliance and the Univrsity of Akron also received grants.

Project summaries and additional information can be found at: www.etech.ohio.gov/educators/teacher-planning-grant.

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News Headline: KSU ENCOURAGING TEACHERS TO INCORPORATE BURST OF ACTUAL EXERCISE INTO THEIR LESSONS | Email

News Date: 05/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Fox CT News at 10 PM - WTIC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: THE KENT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IS ENCOURAGING TEACHERS TO INCORPORATE BURST OF ACTUAL EXERCISE INTO THEIR LESSONS. CONCEPT IS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY CAN HELP STUDENTS STAY ENGAGED CONCENTRATE BETTER AND PERFORM BETTER ON TESTS.

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News Headline: Former Cleveland State president John Flower, 90, dies | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SERVED 7 YEARS AS KSU DEAN OF FINE AND PROFESSIONAL ARTS

Former Cleveland State University President John Flower died Thursday at his Shaker Heights home. He was 90.

Flower was Cleveland State's fourth president from 1988 to 1992. Prior to serving as president he was vice president for academic affairs and the university's first provost.

He came to Cleveland State in 1973 from Kent State University, where he served for seven years as dean of the College of Fine and Professional Arts and associate university provost. During his tenure at KSU, he was the founding dean of the Blossom Festival School, a joint program of Kent and the Cleveland Orchestra

As president of Cleveland State, Flower saw the completion of the the Convocation Center (now Wolstein Center) and the opening of the Music and Communication Building, featuring two concert halls.

After stepping down from Cleveland State, he later served eight years as executive director of the Northeast Ohio Council on Higher Education.

A world-renowned pianist and music teacher for more than 50 years, Flower earned two master of music degrees in piano and music theory, as well as a Ph.D. in musicology from the University of Michigan. He also studied at the Conservatoire Americain in Fontainebleau, France, and performed concerts worldwide.

Survivors include his son, John Jr. of Frankfurt, Germany, and daughter, Jill of Shoreview, Minn. His wives, Lanette (Sheaffer) and Maxeen (Stone), died previously.

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News Headline: Northeast Ohio colleges run into unexpected circumstances amid pomp of graduation ceremonies (Frank) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: One of the most important factors when planning a party is knowing how many guests to expect.

Especially when it's a milestone like a college graduation ceremony.

But chagrined Kent State University officials were caught off-guard when more graduating students than expected showed up for one of the three commencement ceremonies last weekend. As a result, some of those graduating wound up watching most of the event from a nearby student center.

The University of Akron also had an unusually high number of graduating students attend one of its ceremonies. However, officials there had enough notice to find seats for all of them.

Why the graduation ceremonies drew more interest this year is a mystery to planners, but the gaffe has KSU re-evaluating the way it estimates how many people are likely to show up.

Area college officials spend months calculating the number of eligible students who will choose to "walk" at graduation. They monitor cap and gown purchases, issue tickets for guests or require those graduating to register.

KSU, which relies solely on student registration, had accommodated graduating students and their guests for years in 6,000 seats at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center, said Provost Robert Frank.

While the university found spots on bleachers for more than 100 unexpected graduating students on Saturday, 73 had to watch the ceremony in the nearby student center, along with 425 guests.

"Graduation is very emotional time for people and they don't have much charity in their hearts if it does not work out as they imagine," Frank said on Tuesday. "We understand that. We are disappointed too. We work hard to make it a good day."

About 600 graduating students were expected at the Saturday evening event, but about 800 showed up, he said.

"We never had a problem like this and the genesis of the problem was that more showed up than had RSVP'd," he said. "It is sort of like people coming to your house for a cocktail party without an RSVP."

Frank said he did not know why so many graduating students decided to attend that ceremony for several academic colleges, including the school of nursing. Overall, more than 1,900 of the 4,000 eligible KSU students attended a graduation ceremony.

Those who spent most of Saturday's ceremony in another building did walk across the stage and were recognized. But many and their families were irate. Frank posted an apology on the university website and said the 73 would receive a free graduation picture and DVD of the ceremony.

"We will do a systematic review of every step of the process," he said. "We will change the system to assure confidence that there will be seats for everyone. We could go to tickets or not let students walk if they did not RSVP. We haven't settled on any one solution."

Cleveland State University, which will hold graduation ceremonies this weekend, tracks its eligible graduates from the moment they buy a cap and gown at the bookstore, said Barbara Smith, manager of special events in the president's office, who has organized the event for 14 years.

When they buy their caps and gowns, students receive up to six tickets and must fill out and submit an information card.

About 1,200 of the 2,000 eligible are expected to attend graduation on Saturday during two ceremonies held at the Wolstein Center, she said. Students can request more tickets since the center seats 13,000.

Smith recalls only one ceremony that graduating students and guests clamored to attend -- when comedian Drew Carey was presented an honorary degree in 2000.

"Tickets were being Xeroxed," she said. "Everybody wanted to be here. We were able to fit them all in."

The University of Akron held four ceremonies over three days last weekend because the number of graduating students has increased and the E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Center only holds 3,600, said Charles Fey, vice president for student engagement and success.

Eligible students register at the registrar's office and receive up to five tickets, he said. When they buy their cap and gown, the bookstore sends the information to the registrar, he said.

Fey said each year about 40 to 50 students who register and buy a cap and gown don't attend their ceremony, while up to 10 may show up at the last minute and want to participate. Extra caps and gowns are available at the hall, he said.

This year officials realized more students than expected had registered to attend one ceremony, he said.

"Engineering usually has a 45 percent rate of participating, but this year it exceeded 88 percent," Fey said. So the university planned for the overflow, placing chairs and a video screen in the lobby and readying a nearby auditorium. About 40 guests sat in the lobby, he said.

All graduating students were inside where the ceremony was taking place.

Referring to the problems KSU had in seating, Fey said, "I'm sure they were just dying up there."

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News Headline: Entrepreneurship honor society opens a chapter at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sigma Nu Tau Entrepreneurship Honor Society has announced that Kent State University is the first in the country to be presented with a charter to operate a chapter of its honor society. The charter was presented in April by Dr. Nancy J. Church, president and executive director of Sigma Nu Tau, to KSU's Julie Messing and Karla Mendoza, who were installed as faculty adviser and faculty secretary, respectively, of the KSU chapter.

Seven student members, five faculty members and three entrepreneur members also were inducted as founding charter members of the Kent State Sigma Nu Tau Chapter.

The students inducted were all from Ohio: Collin Bensinger of Kent, Darla Craiglow of Lancaster, Shannon Gallagher of Mantua, Kyle Hughes of Cuyahoga Falls, Christopher Lintner of North Canton, Richard Pine of Brecksville and Nathan Rango of Hudson.

The charter and induction ceremony was followed by the Michael D. Solomon Entrepreneurship Speaker Series, which featured Jeff Hoffman, founder of Priceline.com.

Sigma Nu Tau Entrepreneurship Honor Society was established with the mission "to promote, recognize, honor and reward academic excellence in entrepreneurship and to encourage and recognize the practice of principled entrepreneurship."

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News Headline: City partners with Kent State for entrepreneur in residence program (Heisler, Messing) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hudson -- The city will partner with Kent State University for an entrepreneur in residence program that would help college and high school students who want to start new businesses.

City officials will work with KSU officials to hire someone for the program after Council members voiced support for the program at the May 10 workshop, said Communications Manager Jody Roberts.

The city and university will invest $5,000 each to hire a business person to mentor budding entrepreneurs and help arrange internships with local businesses, according to Yank Heisler, dean of the KSU College of Business Administration.

Heisler and Julie Messing, program director of the Center for Entrepreneurship and Business Innovation, spoke to Council May 10 about the program.

The entrepreneur in residence would help students at Kent State at least one day per week and spend one to more days a week in the community helping high school students or creating partnerships with local businesses, Messing said.

"Students are not being hired by big businesses," Heisler said. "They're hired by small businesses. The entrepreneur in residence is the bridge between small businesses and students."

The entrepreneur in residence is typically an older, former business owner who has time to give back to the community, Heisler said.

The university reevaluates entrepreneurs in residence annually and all of them have returned, Heisler said.

Kent State University has six other communities with an entrepreneur in residence and 950 students in the entrepreneur program.

"There is a lot of interest," Heisler said.

Four students are grouped in the entrepreneur program at Kent State University and launch a business, Messing said.

"We get seasoned entrepreneurs to help the students hit a home run," she said.

Council members were supportive of the proposal. They said it would complement existing entrepreneur programs offered at Hudson High School, Western Reserve Academy, the Hudson Library and Historical Society, the Burton D. Morgan Foundation and the TECHudson business incubator.

Economic Development Director Chuck Wiedie said he would be involved in the Hudson program.

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News Headline: Celebration news - May 15: School news | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State is the first university nationwide to receive a charter to operate a chapter of the Sigma Nu Tau Entrepreneurship Honor Society. Akron-Canton students inducted into the inaugural class were Collin Bensinger of Kent, Shannon Gallagher of Mantua, Kyle Hughes of Cuyahoga Falls, Christopher Lintner of North Canton and Nathan Rango of Hudson. The honor society was established at the State University of New York two years ago.

• Three Akron-area students were honored at Kent State's scholarship and awards ceremony for journalism and mass communication majors. Stacy Hargreaves, a junior studying advertising and marketing from Copley, received the Paul Ashby Lewis Award for advertising majors; Amanda Morrow, an Akron resident studying broadcast journalism, the Frances B. Murphey Scholarship for news majors; and Kaitlin Krister, a graduate student in public relations from Kent, the John Fowler Award for public relations majors.

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News Headline: KSU fashion students win awards in spandex fabric design contest | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: RadiciSpandex recently revealed the winners of the Stretch to the Future design competition held with the junior class at the Kent State University School of Fashion and Design.

Serving as the event's honoree designer judge was celebrated eveningwear designer Tadashi Shoji, who accepted the Stretch to the Future Award from RadiciSpandex marketing manager Kim Hall during the judging session held at the Fashion School's New York City design studio. The competition, now in its 11th year, has been held at the Fashion School for five years.

Tadashi led a diverse judging panel of apparel industry experts, including members of the charitable organization The Underfashion Club, which sponsored the contest's lingerie award, and Kristy Chen, the competition's grand-prize winner in 2005, who is now an assistant designer at the contemporary label Doo.Ri.

Scholarship winners were selected in the categories of eveningwear, activewear, swimwear, lingerie and a grand prize overall.

Sarah Ineson, a 20-year-old native of West Hartford, Conn., emerged as the grand-prize and eveningwear winner for her one-shouldered gown created in black stretch fabric donated by Darlington Fabrics.

Amanda Heslinga of Stow won the activewear prize with her two-piece design featuring a black bandeau top embellished with pink bands and matching pant made of fabrics from Darlington and Guilford Performance Textiles.

Alexandria Petrus of Hartville took the honors in lingerie for a bra-and-panty set made of fabrics from Darlington, McMurray, Hornwood and Ames Textiles.

Madelyn Winfield, a native of Zelienople, Pa., earned the swimwear prize for a one-piece suit made of fabrics donated by Darlington and Sextet Fabrics and a cover-up constructed in Polartec fabric.

This year's winners were selected from a field of 53 students who competed with garments designed in stretch fabrics containing RadiciSpandex RadElast spandex donated by Ames Textiles, Cyberknit Fabrics, Darlington Fabrics, Eagle Fabrics, Guilford Performance Textiles, Markbilt Technical Fabrics, McMurray Fabrics, Polartec, Prescott Finishing, Rentex, Royal Lace, Sextet Fabrics, Swisstex, TDB Tecidos and Tweave LLC.

In addition to Tadashi and Chen, the judging panel included Kim Hall, RadiciSpandex Corp. marketing manager; Camille Block, intimate apparel specialist; Virginia Borland, New York correspondent, Textile World; Linda Corby, sales representative, Darlington Fabrics; Jacky Clyman, executive vice president, Cockpit U.S.A.; Marie Dekens, account manager, Sourcing Solutions; Angela Farina, women's apparel designer, Under Armour; Ruth Finley, publisher, Fashion Calendar; Britt Meadows, specialty products sales representative, Guilford Performance Textiles; and Norman Szychter, director of fabric development and compliance, Aeropostale, Inc.

Created in 1999, the "Stretch to the Future" design scholarship competition inspires the creative development of design students while educating them about the technical aspects of garment construction using fashion fabrics containing a highly technical fiber such as RadElast by RadiciSpandex.

Each year, RadiciSpandex invites a well-known designer to head up the Stretch to the Future judging panel of apparel industry experts. Previous recipients of this honor include Betsey Johnson, Dana Buchman, Nicole Miller, Nanette Lepore, Carmen Marc Valvo and Marc Bouwer, among others.

(photos)

Grand-prize winner Sarah Ineson, center, with her winning garment, along with RadiciSpandex marketing manager Kim Hall and honoree designer judge Tadashi Shoji.

Madelyn Winfield earned the swimwear prize for a one-piece suit made of fabrics donated by Darlington and Sextet Fabrics and a cover-up constructed of Polartec fabric, being modeled by KSU student Emily Marie Lambrix.

Amanda Heslinga won the activewear prize with her two-piece design featuring a black bandeau top embellished with pink bands and matching pant made of fabrics from Darlington and Guilford Performance Textiles, modeled by KSU student Rachel Knepley.

Alexandria Petrus took the honors in lingerie for a bra-and-panty set made of fabrics from Darlington, McMurray, Hornwood and Ames Textiles, modeled by KSU student Michaela Neu.

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News Headline: DESIGNS FROM KENT STATE DESIGN STUDENT | Email

News Date: 05/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: Pittsburgh Today Live - KDKA-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WHAT IS GLITZBURG? HOW MANY YEARS? GLITZBURG STARTED LAST YEAR IN 2010. IT IS A CHARITY FASHION SHOW, ALL STUDENT RAN. ALL NET PROCEEDS GO TO CHILDREN'S. GOT YOU. HOW DID IT DO LAST YEAR? REALLY WELL, ACTUALLY. WE RAISED $14,000. IT KIND OF BLEW US OUT OF THE WATER. THIS YEAR WE ARE SET UP A LITTLE BIT BETTER NOW. WE ARE PRETTY MUCH AT OUR $14,000 MARK BEFORE THE EVENT ITSELF. SO THE AMOUNT OF SUPPORT WE ARE GET ASKING UNBELIEVABLE. YOU HAD THAT COMMITTED TO THE EVENT ITSELF. YOU ARE BOUND TO BREAK LAST YEAR'S TOTAL. WHERE IS THE EVENT HELD NOW? IT IS IN STATION SQUARE, IN PITTSBURGH. WHAT TIME? THE DOORS OPEN AT 6:00 P. TOMORROW NIGHT. NEXT SUNDAY, THE 22nd. MAY 22nd, MY FAULT. TELL US WHAT PEOPLE WILL SEE WHEN THEY COME AND ATTEND. THERE ARE GOING TO BE A COUPLE OF SURPRISES. THAT WE ARE NOT GOING TO GIVE AWAY JUST YET. OKAY. BUT YOU'LL SEE BASICALLY SOME PITTSBURGH CELEBRITIES, ATHLETES, MODELS. JAMES HARRISON IS WALKING FROM THE PITTSBURGH STEELERS. MIKE WASHINGTON. AUDREY, AND THEN WE HAVE KELLY MAYS AND BRIAN HUMPHRIES, WE HAVE A WHOLE SLEW OF GREAT MODELS AND SOME PERFORMANCES TOO. WANT TO TALK ABOUT THE DESIGNERS MAYBE? SURE TROY BECK AND STELLA AND DOT, JEWELRY, ANNETTE, DESIGNS FROM KENT STATE DESIGN STUDENT AND THE ART INSTITUTE DESIGN STUDENTS. WE HAVE A COUPLE OF MODELS HERE WITH US TODAY FROM SOME OF THE FASHION FROM THAT WEEKEND, THE 22nd OF MAY. DESCRIBE WHAT WE ARE SEEING. RIGHT KNEE MEADE CLOTH AND JEWELRY FROM STYLISH CHRIS COCHRAN IN CRANBERRY. LET'S SEE ANOTHER MODEL PLEASE. THAT WAS NICE. NEXT WE HAVE BRIAN HUMPHRIES, THEY ARE PLAYING GLITZBURG AS WELL. HE IS WEARING A HOODIE, A T-SHIRT FROM TROY BECK. WHAT DOES THE T-SHIRT SAY? BRIAN YOU WANT TO OPEN IT UP JUST A LITTLE BIT. THE HAIR AND SNOW ON BACK AND THE BIG KNACK AND DROP KICK AND THE TAYLOR GANG AND THE BEARD'S STEEL CURTAIN. IF YOU ZOOM IN ON THE BELT BUCKLE THERE, YOU CAN SEE THE PITTSBURGH. JEWELRY SHE HAND CRAFTS ALL HER OWN BELT BUCKLES, KEY CHAINS, THINGS LIKE THAT. NICE. NICE. WE HAVE ONE MORE MODEL I THINK. YES, NEXT. OH, LOOK AT THAT. YOU HAVE TO LOVE THAT OUTFIT. NEXT UP IS ANNA, SHE DESIGNED THIS ON HER OWN. SHE HAS EIGHT PITTSBURGH INSPIRED LOOKS ON THE RUNWAY THIS YEAR. SHE IS ALSO WEARING JEWELRY FROM STELLA AND DOT, AND INDEPENDENT STILL LIST CHRIS COCHRAN FROM CRANBERRY. WHAT IS HER NAME? ANNA. IS ANNA A LOCAL DESIGNER? DID YOU SAY? SHE IS AND SHE GOES TO POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. VERY COOL. YOU MENTIONED SHE HAS EIGHT DIFFERENT DESIGNS OF HER OWN. ARE THEY ALL STEELER THEMED? PITTSBURGH THEMED. LITTLE BIT OF THE PIRATES AND THE PENGUINS AND THE STEELERS. VERY COOL. RACHAEL, HOW DID YOU GET INVOLVED? COM WAS HOOKED UP WITH IT A YEAR AGO. YOU HELPED FOUND IT RIGHT? ACTUALLY RACHAEL HELPED. ANNA WAS DOING LOOKS. WE WERE WATCHING THE VICTORIA'S SECRET FASHION SHOW, THOUGHT IT WOULD BE AGREE TO RAISE MONEY FOR A CHARITY WHILE DOING THAT. WE MET THROUGH MUTUAL FRIENDS, BROUGHT HIM ON. HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN IN THE PLANNING STAGES FOR THIS EVENT THIS YEAR? ABOUT SIX MONTHS. SO WE ARE VERY EXCITED. LIKE WE SAID BEFORE IT HAS GROWN LEAPS AND BOUNDS. WE HAVE GREAT GREAT MAKEUP TEAM. PATTY BELL, JULIE FROM PITTSBURGH MAKEUP. PEOPLE COME OUT OF THE WOODWORK TO HELP. NO WONDER. YOU HAVE A GREAT IDEA, GREAT THEME.

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News Headline: Times Higher Education World University Rankings | Email

News Date: 05/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Daily Telegraph (UK)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Your choice of university, whether at home or abroad, will depend on a variety of factors, from the courses on offer to affordability and location. But among the consideration criteria, quality of teaching is always a priority and the Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2010–2011 offer the clearest picture of global educational excellence in the top 200 institutions.

190 Drexel University United States 46.9 190 University of Cincinnati United States 46.9 193 Dalhousie University Canada 46.8 193 Royal Institute of Technology Sweden 46.8 195 University of Vienna Austria 46.7 196 Kent State University United States 46.5 197 Zhejiang University China 46.4 197 University of Illinois - Chicago United States 46.4 199 Simon Fraser University Canada 46.2 199 Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Sweden 46.2 League table reproduced by kind permission of Times Higher Education © 2010 TSL Education Ltd. See www.timeshighereducation.co.uk for information on methodology and for further tables and analysis.

Copyright © 2011 The Telegraph Group Limited, London

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News Headline: College grads enter job market with new confidence | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Anna Marie Ruckgaber graduated Saturday from Cleveland State University with a degree in biology, and she's already landed one job offer and interviews at three other companies.

And while she turned down the offer for a commission-only position that had no benefits, Ruckgaber is confident she'll soon find another job in the medical industry or a related field.

"I'm very optimistic," said the 23-year-old, who hopes her volunteering efforts as a CSU student ambassador will help in her job search. "The three words that I use to describe myself in interviews are industrious, articulate and sharp."

Industry experts say the job outlook is better for 2011 college seniors like Ruckgarber and Kent State University graduate Jaaron Oliver than it was for last year's seniors entering the job market.

In fact, employers plan to hire 19.3 percent more undergraduates and graduate students this year than they did in 2010, the National Association of Colleges and Employers said in its latest study. The Pennsylvania-based group surveys employers twice a year about their hiring plans.

Progressive Insurance Co. projects it will hire 60 percent more college graduates this year than last year. Those hires will be for positions in claims, accounting, analysis and information technology, company spokeswoman Leah Knapp said.

Jamie Cahoon, branch manager for the Beachwood recruitment firm Robert Half International, is seeing more companies move past the just-trying-to-get-through-bad-times mode after seeing a dramatic improvement in the job market. And because resources at those companies aren't as thin as before, more of them are willing to train and groom workers, she said.

"We're getting requests from companies saying specifically 'We'd like to see your best college graduates,' or 'We're interested in hiring college graduates,' " she said. Those requests are especially coming from manufacturers seeking entry-level accountant positions, along with those in the credit and collection industry and information technology, Cahoon said.

Despite the uptick in job offers for this year's seniors, the National Association of Colleges and Employers admits that just 24 percent of those grads will actually have a job to go to following graduation -- the same percentage as this time last year. But Marilyn Mackes, the association's executive director, said that number is somewhat misleading.

"We're seeing many more seniors applying for jobs this year, and we're also seeing more turning down job offers," Mackes said in a statement.

The picture gets less rosy, though, because this year's graduates are competing with those who entered the job market during the recession and in the early stages of recovery. And they face a weak labor market that has seen more than two years of unemployment at well over 8 percent. That has especially been tough on young people entering the work force.

"The economy has been growing relatively strongly for the last three months, so we could be getting to the point where it is better than last year," said Heidi Shierholz, a researcher at the Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit Economic Policy Institute, which focuses on the economic conditions of America's families. "But the issue is if it is better, we're still talking about small gradations of really crappy."

The unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds averaged 18.4 percent last year, compared with 9.6 percent overall for U.S. workers, according to institute data based on statistics from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Census Bureau.

Jaaron Oliver isn't taking any chances.

Oliver, 23, wary of the job market, started his employment search long before he graduated a week ago from Kent State with a hospitality management degree. By January, he had snagged an internship at the Marriott Resort in Hilton Head, where he is heading this summer to a job that involves planning recreation activities for guests.

"It's pretty much my audition for a full-time job," he said. "That's the hope."

Danielle S. McDonald, career communications coordinator at John Carroll University's Center for Career Services, said early indicators give her optimism for this year's graduates. She said that at the school's most recent job fair, there were more interview times available than there were students interested in positions at local and national companies including Sherwin-Williams and Target.

Career counselors at several Northeast Ohio colleges and universities say finance, technology, business and engineering majors are among those that typically get recruited, as well as occupational-therapy majors, which they attribute to baby boomer demands.

According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, salary offers to accounting majors on average increased 2.2 percent to $49,022; electrical engineers' offers are up 4.4 percent to $61,690.

Still, counselors said graduates in some other majors are concerned about the job market, particularly those in education, which is facing budget cutbacks and school district layoffs.

Ashley Lorko, a special-education major at CSU, graduated Saturday with a master's degree. Even with a 3.96 grade-point average, an undergraduate degree in English and Spanish, and student-teaching experience in the United States and abroad, Lorko, 26, said she will be working as a waitress until she lands a job working with at-risk youths.

"It's been upsetting because I really want to work in the public schools," she said. "But after the most recent layoff announcement with the Cleveland School District, I started applying out of state and with charter schools."

Rob Johnson, an audit partner at Ernst & Young, said internships are critical in a tough and competitive job market. His division reports a 40 percent growth in 2011 hiring from the previous year, thanks to an increase in mergers, acquisitions and increasing regulations for public companies.

An internship at an accounting firm helped recent grad Cory Hanawalt, who just completed a five-year accounting program at Baldwin-Wallace College. He received a job offer last October as an auditor at Ernst & Young in downtown Cleveland.

Philip Noftsinger, business unit president for the Independence-based accounting and business services company CBIZ, said his best tip for new graduates is "to be more tactical. Look for industries where you can apply the skill you were trained in. In a tight labor market, you don't want to take a job outside of what you want to do and get trapped."

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News Headline: Another aircraft travels off runway (Burford, Friend) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Stow -- The Kent State University Airport has seen a third mishap on its runways in as many months.

A 1998 Comp Air 6 rolled off the runway at the Kent State Airport and into a ditch at about 1:10 p.m. May 8, according to the Canton Post of the Ohio Highway Patrol and Stow Police Department. No one was injured, but the plane's left wing was damaged.

Bob Burford, media relations coordinator for Kent State, said the three incidents are unrelated, caused by operator errors and not because of conditions of the runway.

Thomas Friend, operations coordinator for the airport, said the average number of incidents in the airport is two in a year, so the number of incidents this year has been above average.

Burford said the university does not believe the incidents require a response from Kent State University in terms of doing something differently in the airport or runway. He added Kent State is confident in the airport's operations.

Brad A. Leeman, the pilot, and Naomi Leeman, the only passenger, were not injured in the May 8 incident, according to the OSHP. The couple had left from the Galion Municipal Airport that morning with a destination to the KSU Airport.

Sgt. David Garber of the Canton Post of the OSHP said when he arrived on the scene, he observed skid marks in the land strip and the airplane stuck in mud. The plane sustained some minor damage to the left wing when it hit the ground. The airport does not have a dollar amount for the damages yet.

According to reports from the OSHP and Stow Police, Leeman overcorrected after he landed. Leeman told Stow Police he waited too long to do a go-around and ended up skidding off the right side of the runway.

Garber confirmed the accident occurred due to pilot error. He said the OSHP's investigation is complete and that the post is waiting for the Federal Aviation Administration to conclude its investigation.

After FAA completes its investigation, the post should be informed whether there is a need for follow-ups. If not, information on the final conclusions about the accident should be released.

On March 15, a private twin-engine Cessna T303 slid off the runway stopping in a ditch before crossing onto N. River Road. On April 9, a student-pilot was landing when she lost control of a single-engine Cessna 152, owned by the university, and hit the runway.

No was injured in either incidents. Both cases are being investigated by the Ravenna Post of the OSHP and the FAA.

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News Headline: East Liverpool hoping better fences make recycling business a better neighbor | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - City Council will be asked at its next meeting to uphold a request for a zoning change by Six Recycling in the East End of the city, provided the company makes some modifications to its fencing.

Council's planning and expansion committee met Thursday to discuss the company's request to change its zoning classification from R-3, high residential, to M-3, or general industrial, which had already been recommended by the city Planning Commission.

At its May 3 meeting, council held a public hearing on the issue but took no action, with Councilman Ryan Stovall scheduling the committee meeting for further discussion.

During Thursday's meeting, Ray Six spoke on behalf of the company while Kent Street resident Bruce Cowart spoke on behalf of residents concerned about the company's activities.

Six Recycling is requesting the zoning change because it owns nine lots it wants to incorporate into the business.

Ray Six told the committee Thursday he had gone over everything at the public hearing and had nothing further to add except that he had, meanwhile, spoken to a fencing company about repairing or replacing fence around the company.

It was mentioned during the hearing that replacing fencing around the business would cost upwards of $100,000, while installing fence along one area would cost about $42,000.

Committee member Brian Kerr said there had been many promises made by the company which have not been upheld, noting, "It's hard to take your word on something," and although he conceded the company has been making some improvements to its fencing, asked, "If we pass (this change) now, how do we know you'll continue?"

Six said that, while "everyone thinks we didn't do anything when asked the first time," the company was growing at such a rapid pace, its owners had to "take a step back" and determine whether the current location was going to remain there long-term.

"We didn't want to make a considerable investment if it was not going to be a long-term location," Six said.

He said a "majority of the eyesores" at the recycling center now cannot be seen due to installation of new fence in 2004 but agreed that the fence had not held up as well as hoped and repairs are being considered.

Although not a committee member, Councilwoman Sherrie Curtis said, "I feel betrayed because none of your promises were fulfilled," although she said some residential properties in the area also have an adverse impact on the neighborhood due to their appearance.

"Unless I see the changes promised, you won't get a vote from me," Curtis said, noting that, in addition to fencing the company was to have put a large portion of its operation under roof, which has not happened.

"I thought that was pie in the sky then," Curtis said, adding that she normally votes for business issues.

Six said he did not recall ever making such promises but that it may have been something the company wanted to do.

"This, in my mind, was a promise," Curtis insisted.

Cowart reiterated his concerns that the recycling center and scrapyard are in a residential area and it "goes beyond the fence itself."

He said, "Accountability is what we're looking for."

Kerr pointed out that even some of the homes in that area owned by Cowart had no doors, with junk lying about, but Cowart said those issues had been resolved but reminded Kerr, "I'm not coming before council and asking for an M-3 designation."

Ultimately, the committee - with Ray Perorazio absent - agreed to send the recommendation to council for approval, providing fences are replaced and/or repaired.

Members emphasized this legislation will not be passed under suspension of rules as an emergency but will be given three separate readings.

In other matters, the committee scheduled a public hearing at 6 p.m. June 20 on two zoning change petitions that have been submitted, one allowing semi trucks to be parked near the old Volino's car wash on State Street and the other for vacation of Union Street at the request of Kent State University, to make way for green space and parking.

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News Headline: East Liverpool hoping better fences make recycling business a better neighbor | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - City Council will be asked at its next meeting to uphold a request for a zoning change by Six Recycling in the East End of the city, provided the company makes some modifications to its fencing.

Council's planning and expansion committee met Thursday to discuss the company's request to change its zoning classification from R-3, high residential, to M-3, or general industrial, which had already been recommended by the city Planning Commission.

At its May 3 meeting, council held a public hearing on the issue but took no action, with Councilman Ryan Stovall scheduling the committee meeting for further discussion.

During Thursday's meeting, Ray Six spoke on behalf of the company while Kent Street resident Bruce Cowart spoke on behalf of residents concerned about the company's activities.

Six Recycling is requesting the zoning change because it owns nine lots it wants to incorporate into the business.

Ray Six told the committee Thursday he had gone over everything at the public hearing and had nothing further to add except that he had, meanwhile, spoken to a fencing company about repairing or replacing fence around the company.

It was mentioned during the hearing that replacing fencing around the business would cost upwards of $100,000, while installing fence along one area would cost about $42,000.

Committee member Brian Kerr said there had been many promises made by the company which have not been upheld, noting, "It's hard to take your word on something," and although he conceded the company has been making some improvements to its fencing, asked, "If we pass (this change) now, how do we know you'll continue?"

Six said that, while "everyone thinks we didn't do anything when asked the first time," the company was growing at such a rapid pace, its owners had to "take a step back" and determine whether the current location was going to remain there long-term.

"We didn't want to make a considerable investment if it was not going to be a long-term location," Six said.

He said a "majority of the eyesores" at the recycling center now cannot be seen due to installation of new fence in 2004 but agreed that the fence had not held up as well as hoped and repairs are being considered.

Although not a committee member, Councilwoman Sherrie Curtis said, "I feel betrayed because none of your promises were fulfilled," although she said some residential properties in the area also have an adverse impact on the neighborhood due to their appearance.

"Unless I see the changes promised, you won't get a vote from me," Curtis said, noting that, in addition to fencing the company was to have put a large portion of its operation under roof, which has not happened.

"I thought that was pie in the sky then," Curtis said, adding that she normally votes for business issues.

Six said he did not recall ever making such promises but that it may have been something the company wanted to do.

"This, in my mind, was a promise," Curtis insisted.

Cowart reiterated his concerns that the recycling center and scrapyard are in a residential area and it "goes beyond the fence itself."

He said, "Accountability is what we're looking for."

Kerr pointed out that even some of the homes in that area owned by Cowart had no doors, with junk lying about, but Cowart said those issues had been resolved but reminded Kerr, "I'm not coming before council and asking for an M-3 designation."

Ultimately, the committee - with Ray Perorazio absent - agreed to send the recommendation to council for approval, providing fences are replaced and/or repaired.

Members emphasized this legislation will not be passed under suspension of rules as an emergency but will be given three separate readings.

In other matters, the committee scheduled a public hearing at 6 p.m. June 20 on two zoning change petitions that have been submitted, one allowing semi trucks to be parked near the old Volino's car wash on State Street and the other for vacation of Union Street at the request of Kent State University, to make way for green space and parking.

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News Headline: Educators aim to help students with disabilities transition to college (Morrison) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: High school students with disabilities should not assume accommodations will be made for them at college, area educators caution.

While in high school, Ohio students with disabilities are protected by Individualized Education Programs, which require schools and families to be proactive in establishing supportive settings for students.

Once those students head off to college, however, IEPs give way to Americans with Disabilities Act protections, said Julie O'Neil, director of special education for Lake County Educational Services. That means students must learn to advocate for their own needs, rather than follow the guidance of their IEP team, she said.

"As soon as you're under the Americans with Disabilities Act, the premise of that law is that you have to advocate for yourself and ask for assistance, seek out assistance," O'Neil said. "... It's the nature of teenagers to think they can do it all on their own, and you layer a disability on top of that, they're selling themselves short."

To prepare for that shift, IEP teams typically start preparing students as young as 14 for their post-secondary plans, even though students on an IEP are allowed to remain in school through age 22, O'Neil said.

By 16, Ohio requires students to have goals and a rough plan addressing post-secondary training, employment and potential independent living arrangements, she said.

"What it's doing is it's requiring IEP teams, which include staff from the schools, hopefully — at this age — the students, and the families to think to the future and then think backward," to create the steps needed to achieve students' stated goals, O'Neil said.

That plan should include researching what accommodations are available at a student's selected college, as well as meeting with representatives of a college's accessibility services office, said Ben Morrison, coordinator of academic services and student accessibility services at Kent State University, Geauga Campus. Ideally, students also would sit in on at least one class session and talk to a professor about possible accommodations, he said.

Too often, students apply to a college and simply assume accommodations and can and will be made, Morrison said.

"Every college has a student disabilities services office and it would be a good first step that they visit that office to see what the program can provide, but they should meet with an academic adviser to see if their school has something that fits within their career goals," he said. Continued...

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"It's critical (to ask) the two departments, do they all interact together to make sure that students can be eased into the college setting?"

Families often expect services to be the same at college as in high school, but are surprised to learn about the range of technological assistance tools available, such as "smart pens" capable of voice-recording lectures, Morrison said.

This past week he held the first educational session for families and guidance counselors regarding the tools needed to smooth the transition from high school to college for students with disabilities.

About 25 people visited the "Bridging the Transition Gap for Students with Disabilities" seminar, Morrison said, adding he hopes to make it an annual event.

"When they come to college, there's that expectation that they think the IEP will carry over, but it does not, and there's also an expectation that they will get the same kind of accommodation, the same kind of team resources, and they don't get that," he said.

"The students have to realize that they have to know what combinations (of tools) they need to be successful on their own and they also need to know how to advocate for themselves."

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View reader comments (0) » Comment on this story »

Reader Comments »

View reader comments (0) » Comment on this story »

Reader Comments »

View reader comments (0) » Comment on this story »

High school students with disabilities should not assume accommodations will be made for them at college, area educators caution.

While in high school, Ohio students with disabilities are protected by Individualized Education Programs, which require schools and families to be proactive in establishing supportive settings for students.

Once those students head off to college, however, IEPs give way to Americans with Disabilities Act protections, said Julie O'Neil, director of special education for Lake County Educational Services. That means students must learn to advocate for their own needs, rather than follow the guidance of their IEP team, she said.

"As soon as you're under the Americans with Disabilities Act, the premise of that law is that you have to advocate for yourself and ask for assistance, seek out assistance," O'Neil said. "... It's the nature of teenagers to think they can do it all on their own, and you layer a disability on top of that, they're selling themselves short."

To prepare for that shift, IEP teams typically start preparing students as young as 14 for their post-secondary plans, even though students on an IEP are allowed to remain in school through age 22, O'Neil said.

By 16, Ohio requires students to have goals and a rough plan addressing post-secondary training, employment and potential independent living arrangements, she said.

"What it's doing is it's requiring IEP teams, which include staff from the schools, hopefully — at this age — the students, and the families to think to the future and then think backward," to create the steps needed to achieve students' stated goals, O'Neil said.

That plan should include researching what accommodations are available at a student's selected college, as well as meeting with representatives of a college's accessibility services office, said Ben Morrison, coordinator of academic services and student accessibility services at Kent State University, Geauga Campus. Ideally, students also would sit in on at least one class session and talk to a professor about possible accommodations, he said.

Too often, students apply to a college and simply assume accommodations and can and will be made, Morrison said.

"Every college has a student disabilities services office and it would be a good first step that they visit that office to see what the program can provide, but they should meet with an academic adviser to see if their school has something that fits within their career goals," he said.

"It's critical (to ask) the two departments, do they all interact together to make sure that students can be eased into the college setting?"

Families often expect services to be the same at college as in high school, but are surprised to learn about the range of technological assistance tools available, such as "smart pens" capable of voice-recording lectures, Morrison said.

This past week he held the first educational session for families and guidance counselors regarding the tools needed to smooth the transition from high school to college for students with disabilities.

About 25 people visited the "Bridging the Transition Gap for Students with Disabilities" seminar, Morrison said, adding he hopes to make it an annual event.

"When they come to college, there's that expectation that they think the IEP will carry over, but it does not, and there's also an expectation that they will get the same kind of accommodation, the same kind of team resources, and they don't get that," he said.

"The students have to realize that they have to know what combinations (of tools) they need to be successful on their own and they also need to know how to advocate for themselves."

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News Headline: Kent Stark Environmental Media Class Strengthens Ties Throughout Stark County (Bernstein, Williams, Smeltzer) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name: Morgan Day
News OCR Text: Kent State Stark 's inaugural Environmental Media class — which pulled together 11 students with backgrounds in journalism to biology and video production and tasked them with producing short videos about environmental issues facing the Nimishillen Creek Watershed — was anything but a flop.

The class, geared toward junior- and senior-level students, will take place again next spring. And why wouldn't it? In addition to the students giving it a thumbs up, the class spawned several collaborations with Kent Stark and the other colleges and universities throughout Stark County, said Penny Bernstein, associate professor of biological sciences.

Bernstein spoke before about 80 people inside the Joseph Saxton Gallery in Canton Thursday evening at the Herbert W. Hoover Foundation reception. (The class came about through a grant relationship between the campus and foundation, which funds projects related to the community, education and environment.)

One student group focused their video on fracking — or horizontal hydraulic fracturing to obtain natural gas that received attention locally because of safety concerns — and Bernstein said more could come from that in the form of internships.

“Several (campuses) could collaborate on a grant to Herbert W. Hoover to monitor fracking areas to see what's going on there now and be able to say why they shouldn't go to that area (to drill),” she said.

Everyone got a chance to see the student-made films that day as they walked around the gallery. Four student groups showed their films on large TVs and talked with those in attendance, which included Kent State Stark officials and other community stakeholders.

(You can watch the students' films, too, through the Our Water Webs website .)

Cynthia Williams, public relations coordinator at Kent State Stark, said next year's class also will take place in the spring semester and maintain the same number of students — about a dozen.

“(The class) is quite innovative,” Williams said. “Plus, it's something that brings exposure and awareness to issues in our environment, and it lets people know how they can help.”

Derek Wholihan, a sophomore public communication major from Canton, said that's what he and his group tried to portray in their video — simple ways the everyday citizen could help. Their video took a personal approach, with Wholihan talking directly to the camera as a concerned citizen.

“None of the other videos were focused on what you're doing as a citizen,” he said. “But ours was ‘what are we doing as people that cause these problems and the small steps we can take to fix it.'”

Josh Quiros, a freshman electronic video production major from Green, thought about what he might tell other students who are interested in taking the class next year.

“I don't want to sound cliche and say ‘Expect the unexpected,' but that's pretty much it,” he said.

Quiros said his class partner was better at the communication side of the class, whereas he had a better handle on the video production. He suggested students who take the class next try to also know their roles as well as their partners' roles the best they can.

“It gets a little complicated," he said. "It gets a little messy, but I think we pulled it together pretty well."

David Smeltzer, assistant professor of journalism and mass communication, also screened what he called the “shell” of a video he hopes to show at a Canton film festival and later on public television.

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News Headline: KSU professor to head national library group | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Ben Wolford | Staff WriterA Kent State University professor will soon head the top organization for childrens library services in the world.Ive just always loved childrens books, and I love the connection they make to children, said Carolyn Brodie, who was named president of the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association.Once the chair of the highly visible Newbery Committee, Brodie has built a standing among childrens library professionals. She was elected to lead the ALSC for a year term between 2012 and 2013.In 2000, Brodie led the Newbery Committee, which gives the most prestigious award in childrens literature, the Newbery Medal. Shes currently serving her second term on the ALSC board of directors.The ALSC administers services relating to childrens literature awards, library programming and other issues for practitioners, such as intellectual freedom.At KSU, Brodie teaches three courses on librarianship: childrens, young adult and school.Ill have some more responsibilities and sort of shift around some of the things I do now, she said. Shell continue teaching her classes.

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News Headline: Former area resident wins Distinguished Alumni Award from University of Arkansas (Rumrill) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Brattleboro Reformer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Saturday May 14, 2011

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. -- Dr. Phillip D. Rumrill, Jr., formerly of Westminster, Vt., received the 2011 Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of Arkansas College of Education and Health Professions at the university's May commencement ceremony. Dr. Rumrill was recognized for his work as a rehabilitation counselor educator, researcher in the fields of rehabilitation and disability studies, and advocate for Americans with disabilities.

Dr. Rumrill is a Professor and Coordinator of Rehabilitation Counseling and Director of the Center for Disability Studies at Kent State University in Ohio. He has authored more than 150 professional journal articles, 40 book chapters, and nine books entitled "Employment Issues and Multiple Sclerosis" (two editions), "Occupational Neurology, Multiple Sclerosis: A Guide for Rehabilitation and Health Care Professionals," "Emerging Issues in Rehabilitation Counseling," "Research in Rehabilitation Counseling" (two editions), and "Research in Special Education" (two editions).

Dr. Rumrill is also a frequent speaker at national and international conferences in the fields of education, health care, and disability studies, including the 2008 World Congress on Education and Workforce Development in Paris, France; the 2008 and 2011 Conferences of the International Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers in Montreal, Canada; the 2011 Hawaii International Conference on Education in Honolulu; and the

2004-2010 World Conferences on Higher Education and Disability in Innsbruck, Austria.

Dr. Rumrill has held Distinguished Visiting Scholar and Lecturer appointments at the University of Leeds Medical School in England, the Arla Institute of Finland, the University of Hawaii, and Ohio State University. In 2005, Dr. Rumrill was named Rehabilitation Researcher of the Year by the National Council on Rehabilitation Education. In 2007, he was selected as a delegate to the By the People Convocation sponsored by the Jim Lehrer Foundation in Williamsburgh, Va. This forum brought together 47 national leaders from various disciplines to deliberate and discuss the rights and responsibilities that citizens have as participants in the American Democracy, and it resulted in a documentary film hosted by Jim Lehrer that aired nationally on PBS in 2008. In 2010, Dr. Rumrill received the Kent State University Distinguished Scholar Award.

A 1985 graduate of Bellows Falls Union High School, Dr. Rumrill received his bachelor's and master's degrees from Keene State College in 1989 and 1991, respectively. He completed his Ph.D. in Rehabilitation at the University of Arkansas in 1993. He is the son of Shirley and Phillip Rumrill, Sr. of Charlestown, N.H. Dr. Rumrill resides in Munroe Falls, Ohio, with his wife, Amy, and their six children.

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News Headline: Kucinich and Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Tim Heinrich Lakewood
News OCR Text: Just when I thought Dennis Kucinich was turning the corner and getting a little smarter he, throws me a curve. With the federal government almost broke and the economy in shambles, Kucinich wants to spend money on the Kent State University shootings.

Has the congressman forgotten that unemployment is well over 8.5 percent, and higher in his hometown of Cleveland? Does the congressman remember that the war in Afghanistan is still in full swing with no end in sight?

The shooting at Kent State in 1970 was a national tragedy. It was also 40 years ago, and the relevance of an investigation in a world in constant turmoil is a job that should be left to historians and funded by the universities, not the taxpayers.

Kucinich needs to try to work for an end to the war in Afghanistan and to create jobs in America. He needs to get his priorities in order and not waste the taxpayers' time and money.

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News Headline: Sister of May 4 victim appeals to Obama for probe of KSU shootings | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Arthur Krause leaned
against 1970s wallpaper in a
photo taken at a press conference
for May 4 victims.
Most of the others were
sitting, including a young,
wheelchair-bound Dean
Kahler, a student paralyzed
from the barrage of bullets.
But Krause was standing.
Shoulders straight, cigarette
poised, a grimace on
his face.
His daughter, Allison, had
been killed nine years earlier.
He had crusaded for truth
and justice. What he got —
what they all got — was a
settlement.
“We don't want the damn
money,” he said at the time.
“We want the truth.”
Now, more than 30 years
after the official case was
effectively closed, Allison
Krause's sister, Laurel, is
pushing for a new investigation.
Laurel Krause addressed
a letter on May 6 to
President Barack Obama
urging his administration
to take action.
Laurel Krause and others,
including U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich,
say new audio evidence is enough to
launch an inquiry into the
campus shooting that killed
four and wounded nine.
At the request of The Plain
Dealer, Stuart Allen, a forensic
audio expert in New
Jersey, has been analyzing
a reel-to-reel recording that
was created by a student
on May 4, 1970. In October,
he said he heard an order
to fire.
Wednesday, Allen told the
Record-Courier he's even
more sure.
“This is the most significant
development in 41
years,” said Alan Canfora,
who was among the wounded
by Ohio National Guardsmen.
In November, Canfora
met with a U.S. Justice Department
official who heads
the civil rights division to
present the new evidence.
The official, Assistant Attorney
General Thomas Perez,
“promised that he would
consider a new investigation,”
Canfora said.
So far, despite their hopes,
nothing has happened.
William Gordon, author of
“Four Dead in Ohio,” recently
filed a public records request
with the Justice Department
seeking any documentation
related to an investigation.
There was none.
“When they did the original
investigation (in the 1970s),
we knew they were talking
to people and following certain
lines of inquiry,” Gordon
said. “With this, there's a big
nothing.”
That hasn't dampened
the hopes of activists. They
think the new evidence is
too good.
On May 4, 1970, a student
named Terry Strubbe put
a microphone out his dorm
room window and recorded
the protests, the 13 seconds
of gunfire and the aftermath.
For years, the tape sat in
a Yale University archive —
until Canfora dug it out and
Allen analyzed it.
He's still analyzing it. He
recently put in 50 hours of
pro bono work on the Strubbe
tape, even as other commissions
stack up. (“I'm
trying to solve a double homicide
in the UK,” he said.)
“The more I explore this
tape, the more I'm finding,”
Allen said. “I even have an
echo off a building 1,618 feet
away.”
With world-class equipment,
Allen can match tones
and pinpoint locations.
He knows four pistol shots
were fired from a spot consistent
with accounts of a student
named Terry Norman,
an elusive figure known to
have been working for the
FBI and carrying a handgun
on May 4.
Allen knows someone said,
“Fir—,” before the guardsmen
all fired at once. “I got
two syllables out of it now,”
he said.
Now, he even knows .45-
caliber pistol fire preceded
the rifle fire of the guardsmen.
Canfora presented to the
Justice Department last year.
He said if there's no federal
investigation, he's willing to
go to court.
“We're hoping that we
don't have to go back into
the court room, but if we
have to, if we must, we're prepared
to go back into court
to obtain justice and truth,”
he said.
Though much is known
about May 4, the actions of
Norman and his connection
to the FBI are still unknown.
A new investigation would
force the modern Justice Department
to scrutinize the
Justice Department of 1970,
Canfora said.
Allen said he isn't an activist.
He's a forensic scientist
who can manipulate recorded
sound waves.
But on the phone Wednesday
night from New Jersey,
Allen said he's hoping something
comes of the revived
effort.
“I don't know if (Canfora
and Krause) have it right,
but I'm convinced I have it
right,” he said. “I think we
need to put this thing to rest
finally.”
“Maybe ‘I'm sorry' might
do the trick,” Allen said.

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News Headline: Video: May 4 Visitor's Center to Start Fundraising Campaign This Year (Davis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: The May 4 Visitor's Center at Kent State University needs your help.


This year, the university will start a grassroots fundraising campaign to complete the visitor's center project inside Taylor Hall and create a permanent museum for people to remember and reflect on the events of May 4, 1970.


Laura Davis, faculty coordinator for May 4 initiatives, said they plan to reach out to people all over the country through mailing requests asking for modest donations to support the project.


Look for updates on the campaign and the visitor's center here on Kent Patch.

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News Headline: KSU ban on dogs fuels housing bias charge (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A recent Kent State University graduate says the university broke the law by not allowing her to live in an on-campus apartment with her support animal, according to a complaint she filed recently with a federal housing agency.

Jackie Luke, 26, of Seven Hills, said university officials told her in February 2010 she had two days either to comply with KSU's “no pet” policy and get rid of her dog or move out.

On Feb. 14, 2010, Luke said, she moved out.

Now Luke and the Fair Housing Advocates Association in Akron have each filed complaints with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, a HUD spokeswoman in Chicago confirmed.

The complaint alleges that by not accommodating her dog, KSU was in violation of the Fair Housing Act. Luke's doctor acknowledged the dog helped in alleviating stress related to an emotional disability, she said.

“We're aware that a complaint has been filed, and we are following the process that HUD requires us to follow,” KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent said in an email. She and two officials named in the complaint did not comment further.

The wording of the Fair Housing Act is vague in order to be case specific, HUD spokeswoman Laura Feldman said. Landlords must provide accommodation for disabilities “depending on the nature of the disability and the burden on the housing provider,” she said.

Specifically, the Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to refuse to provide accommodations that would give a person with disabilities “equal opportunity to use and enjoy a dwelling.”

The law relating to service animals — which help individuals perform important tasks, such as walking or seeing — is clearer than the law relating to support animals, which provide therapy for those with emotional disabilities.

Landlords are entitled to request documentation of disabilities that aren't apparent, and the tenant should establish that the support animal is necessary to “use and enjoy” the housing. Medical experts have recognized benefits of animal therapy in lessening symptoms of emotional disabilities, such as depression or anxiety.

Because HUD is investigating the complaint against KSU, Feldman couldn't comment on its validity.

Luke said she had been living in Allerton Apartments on campus since August 2008. By November 2009, her doctor, a KSU psychiatrist, recommended a small mixed dog and signed a note advising the university should allow the animal to live with Luke and her husband in the apartment.

Then in December, Amy Quillin, of Student Accessibility Services, and Brian Hellwig, the manager of the apartment, informed Luke that she could not keep the dog. Luke said they told her a neighbor had complained.

“They sent me an email, and then we ended up getting a letter,” Luke said. “I spoke with both of them a couple times.”

According to the complaint filed by the Fair Housing Advocates Association, Quillin wrote to Luke there was “no ruling from the court that would, at this time, provide for pet therapy animals as an accommodation.”

The head of the Fair Housing Advocates Association, a nonprofit that files complaints on behalf of clients, said he has never taken action against a university.

“What's stunning about this case is we're not talking about a mom and pop organization,” Executive Director Vincent Curry said.

In a 2009 case against an Illinois university, the U.S. Justice Department charged Millikin University alleging it discriminated against a student who was blind and epileptic and required a service dog.

If there's no settlement and a HUD investigation determines KSU has discriminated against Luke, the Justice Department could take legal action.

“They gave us two days to get rid of the dog or get out, and since I can't get rid of her, we had two days to move,” said Luke, who graduated May 7 with a degree in geography.

“That was rough. I missed a ton of classes that semester.”

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News Headline: Balloon artist finds new twist | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Hone-McMahan, Kim
News OCR Text: Family entertainer challenges himself to create unusual, inflatable designs I ''Oh, my gosh, that's lovely,'' said Laura Conn, grinning. ''It's actually classy.''

Not the kind of comments one might expect about a dress made of balloons. To complete the white and gray ensemble, Rodau, of Hudson, slipped on a pair of sparkling high heels. She strutted out the door into a room filled with women who had gathered for a style show, sponsored by the Hudson Newcomers Club to raise money for the school district's special education program.

At first blush, it took a moment for the audience to realize what the dress was made of.

''It's balloons,'' a surprised onlooker declared. ''And it's absolutely darling.''

Rodau went around the room to peddle raffle tickets. Later, she removed the dress, which took more than 150 balloons and five hours to make, so she could model other fashions � the kind that don't deflate.

The dress was just one example of the seemingly endless creativity of Buchanan, a balloon twister who pushes himself to create everything from the simplest balloon animal to caricatures.

His rise to balloon stardom began with a trip to the Tallmadge Branch Library when he was just 9 years old. To learn more about balloon twisting, he checked out a book on the craft. What he didn't realize was that he had selected the fourth volume in a series of do-it-yourself balloon art.

''So here I was trying to figure out how to make a monkey climbing a tree and crazy hats before learning the simple stuff � like a wiener dog,'' he said, laughing.

When he's not twisting or doing magic acts for private or corporate functions, he's studying childhood education at Kent State University or entertaining at places like Donatos in Hudson or Doogan's in Aurora.

He's also a regional trainer for Balloon Distractions, teaching college students the basics of balloon twisting. He instructs them on proper etiquette when they are performing at restaurants. While they work for tips, Buchanan notes they generally make about $15 a hour.

''That's good for a college kid and they get to learn a fun, pointless skill,'' he joked.

He's a former manager for Star Gaming in Tallmadge, and he opened a store, Freaks and Geeks Comics in Cuyahoga Falls, which has since closed.

''Growing up, I was always told that I had to work a job I didn't like now so that I could do what I wanted later. I always thought that was stupid,'' Buchanan lamented. ''I would much rather work a job I had fun at when I was young and still continue to have fun later.''

Thus the balloon twisting, magic acts and his ownership of a gaming and hobby store. To treat himself, and others, to a daily dose of fun, he challenged himself to design a new balloon creation every day for a year. On his blog, visitors can see some of those designs, including a walrus, a goldfish in a fish bowl, a saxophone, a rocking chair and a leprechaun with a pot of gold.

''I've always been the 'king of the dorks.' I played collectible card games in the convention circuit and other things. Of course, that was when I was younger and didn't have responsibilities.''

The Springfield Township resident explained that his wife, Kathy, whom he had a crush on in high school, credits herself for making him a better person by keeping his dorkiness to a minimum.

''Her memory of me in science class was the guy who harassed her and argued with the teachers,'' he said, adding that he wasn't particularly fond of school.

So why the desire to be an educator? He explains it's because of his bad experiences in school and a desire to make lessons fun and interesting.

And if things get a bit too boring in class, he can always whip up a few cows, elephants, hats or cocktail dresses.

Kim Hone-McMahan can be reached at 330-996-3742 or kmcmahan@thebeaconjournal.com.

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News Headline: Second annual recycled garment fashion show contest | Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: First News at 5 AM - WKBN-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State Environmental club held it's second annual recycled garment fashion show contest yesterday. I had the honor of emceeing the event. Cash prizes were awarded to the top three designs, which were all made of recyclable materials. Lukas Rhoades and Josiah hull won the top prize of 250 dollars for their dress made out of an old graduation gown.

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News Headline: Great jobs in Northeast Ohio? | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New web TV series delivers the dirt on careers in NEO

CLEVELAND, May 13, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- What do you get when you combine the popular style of TV's hit show "The Office", a budding Katie Couric and a Drew Carey wanna-be? You get the Web TV show, Flannel I.T. sponsored by OEConnection. This is the first career show to launch on The Flannel Channel delivering laughs, awkward moments and solid information about jobs and careers right here in Northeast Ohio.

The Flannel Channel (get it? flannel, the ultimate feel-good fabric) is located on the newly launched UNCOMN.TV Network – the source for news and entertainment about college, career and community. This site is where fun and substance go to tango. Flannel I.T. is the first of many industry-cluster shows on Northeast Ohio career opportunities.

The Flannel I.T. show is proudly sponsored by the forward-thinking Northeast Ohio Company, OEConnection, an online technology solutions company providing information and systems to assist automotive parts and service departments across the country. (www.oeconnection.com)

"There is a great need for I.T. talent in Northeast Ohio. We need to get the word out that there are employers looking for qualified I.T. professionals. There are jobs for those who are trained and internships for those looking to get trained," informed Chuck Rotuno, President & CEO of OEConnection.

This is the first career show to launch on The Flannel Channel and stars, Hilary – "the excited interview host", Flannel Man - "master of the game show answers" ...and lots of great information about I.T. career development in Northeast Ohio.

"Our shows take aim at the brain-gain 18-35 year old – college students through young professionals," noted Barbara Oney, President of UNCOMN.TV Network. "We know the only way to hit this target is for 'The Flannel Channel' to make the idea of career development something that you should feel good about – and maybe even have fun with."

Located at www.uncomn.tv, the Flannel I.T. show includes 8-episodes released over 8 weeks. Each episode averages 7-10 minutes. Of course the beauty of Web TV is the show will then be available on-demand via some new-fangled thing called the internet.

Flannel I.T. showcases a sampling of Northeast Ohio companies that employ information technology professionals, regional educational institutions that train them and organizations that help in getting jobs. Twenty-seven Northeast Ohio Companies, Universities and Organizations are featured in the series including:

Cleveland: TOA Technology (awarded Weatherhead 100's fastest growing company in NEO), OneCommunity, Rosetta, DXY Solutions, Thunder::tech, PerceptIS, Quicken Loans Arena, DimpleDough, Cleveland Professional 20/30 Club, NOCHE (Northeast Ohio Council on Higher Education)

Akron: OEConnection, Time Warner Cable, InfoCision

Youngstown: Via680, Turning Technologies, Visual Impact Imaging, Steel Valley Computers, DRS Cloud Computing

Colleges and Universities: University of Akron, Cleveland State University, Case Western Reserve University, ITT Tech, Baldwin Wallace College, Kent State University, Youngstown State, Hiram College, Cuyahoga Community College

"Flannel I.T. takes the boring out of career development," says series producer Luke Frazier. "We even give away prizes each week. What could be better?"

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News Headline: Great jobs in Northeast Ohio? Absolutely--Just Watch! | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: UPI.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New web TV series delivers the dirt on careers in NEO

CLEVELAND, May 13, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- What do you get when you combine the popular style of TV's hit show "The Office", a budding Katie Couric and a Drew Carey wanna-be? You get the Web TV show, Flannel I.T. sponsored by OEConnection. This is the first career show to launch on The Flannel Channel delivering laughs, awkward moments and solid information about jobs and careers right here in Northeast Ohio.

The Flannel Channel (get it? flannel, the ultimate feel-good fabric) is located on the newly launched UNCOMN.TV Network – the source for news and entertainment about college, career and community. This site is where fun and substance go to tango. Flannel I.T. is the first of many industry-cluster shows on Northeast Ohio career opportunities.

The Flannel I.T. show is proudly sponsored by the forward-thinking Northeast Ohio Company, OEConnection, an online technology solutions company providing information and systems to assist automotive parts and service departments across the country. (www.oeconnection.com)

"There is a great need for I.T. talent in Northeast Ohio. We need to get the word out that there are employers looking for qualified I.T. professionals. There are jobs for those who are trained and internships for those looking to get trained," informed Chuck Rotuno, President & CEO of OEConnection.

This is the first career show to launch on The Flannel Channel and stars, Hilary – "the excited interview host", Flannel Man - "master of the game show answers" ...and lots of great information about I.T. career development in Northeast Ohio.

"Our shows take aim at the brain-gain 18-35 year old – college students through young professionals," noted Barbara Oney, President of UNCOMN.TV Network. "We know the only way to hit this target is for 'The Flannel Channel' to make the idea of career development something that you should feel good about – and maybe even have fun with."

Located at www.uncomn.tv, the Flannel I.T. show includes 8-episodes released over 8 weeks. Each episode averages 7-10 minutes. Of course the beauty of Web TV is the show will then be available on-demand via some new-fangled thing called the internet.

Flannel I.T. showcases a sampling of Northeast Ohio companies that employ information technology professionals, regional educational institutions that train them and organizations that help in getting jobs. Twenty-seven Northeast Ohio Companies, Universities and Organizations are featured in the series including:

Cleveland: TOA Technology (awarded Weatherhead 100's fastest growing company in NEO), OneCommunity, Rosetta, DXY Solutions, Thunder::tech, PerceptIS, Quicken Loans Arena, DimpleDough, Cleveland Professional 20/30 Club, NOCHE (Northeast Ohio Council on Higher Education)

Akron: OEConnection, Time Warner Cable, InfoCision

Youngstown: Via680, Turning Technologies, Visual Impact Imaging, Steel Valley Computers, DRS Cloud Computing

Colleges and Universities: University of Akron, Cleveland State University, Case Western Reserve University, ITT Tech, Baldwin Wallace College, Kent State University, Youngstown State, Hiram College, Cuyahoga Community College

"Flannel I.T. takes the boring out of career development," says series producer Luke Frazier. "We even give away prizes each week. What could be better?"

About UNCOMN.TV Network LLC

UNCOMN.TV NETWORK is the online news and entertainment source for college, career and community. The award-winning Got*City GAME! Cleveland was the first network show, attracting viewers from over 1,065 cities in 66 countries globally. The company has been awarded "Champion" status by the Civic Innovation Lab; "Hero to the Region" by ERC (Employers Resource Council) for talent attraction and retention and most recently the coveted Third-Frontier funded GLIDE Innovation Fund Grant for early-stage Northeast Ohio companies.

About OEConnection LLC

OEConnection is the leading Online Parts & Service Exchange (OPSX) in the automotive industry and beyond, serving over 20,000 dealership and repair customers. Customers use OEConnection products over 5 million times each month to market, manage and move original equipment parts, facilitating an estimated $12 billion in annual replacement parts trade. The company is headquartered in the greater Cleveland area at 4205 Highlander Parkway, Richfield, Ohio, 44286. Additional information is available at www.oeconnection.com or by emailing Marilyn Thaxton at Marilyn.Thaxton@OEConnection.com.

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News Headline: KENT STATE BUYING PROPERTY FOR WALKWAY FROM CAMPUS THROUGH KENT'S BUSINESS DISTRICT. | Email

News Date: 05/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: 19 Action News at 5 PM - WOIO-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EVERYWHERE. KENT. MORE MONEY FOR A NEW CAMPUS PROJECT. KENT STATE BUYING PROPERTY FOR WALKWAY FROM CAMPUS THROUGH KENT'S BUSINESS DISTRICT.

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News Headline: Jim Tully: Rediscovering the life and works of Ohio's forgotten writer | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Newspaper columnists take a lot of abuse these days -- angry emails, sputtering voice mails and mean-spirited online comments follow almost every column.

It isn't pleasant, but don't pity them. Pity the columnists of a hundred years ago. Readers tormented them with something even worse. Much, much worse.

Bad poetry.

As Ted Robinson wrote in his Plain Dealer column on June 27, 1911: "A great many people send us a great deal of poor poetry. It is only once in a blue moon that anyone sends a real poem."

With that introduction, the columnist offered his readers one of the rare good ones to come his way: "On Keats' Grave," a short, lyrical ode to both the Romantic poet and the "long dream" of death, by one James Alexander Tully.

Readers, and perhaps even Robinson, didn't know it, but even more surprising than the receipt of a good poem was that it came from that particular poet.

Jim Tully hardly fit the portrait of the poet as a young man, at least the one of popular imagination. He came out of St. Marys, Ohio, the son of poor, alcohol-bedeviled Irish immigrants -- "shanty Irish," he called his family.

After his mother died young, he spent six brutal years in a Cincinnati orphanage and another year in virtual bondage to a cruel farmer. At 14, he ran away to spend six years riding the rails as a "road kid," a sort of junior hobo.

He then went on the small-town boxing circuit as a featherweight, survived the hot furnaces of chain-making factories in Columbus and Kent, and worked as a traveling tree surgeon, even tending the trees of future U.S. senator and president, Warren G. Harding.

Tully was 25 when The Plain Dealer became his first publisher by printing that poem, and he was not sure he would ever make it as a writer. By 1925, he was one of the most popular writers in the country. His hard-boiled, realistic books about the outcasts and vagabonds of America -- the hobos and boxers, Irish ditch diggers and prostitutes, circus carnies and prisoners -- earned rave reviews in national publications and were celebrated by the likes of H.L. Mencken and George Jean Nathan.

When Tully died in 1947 at age 61, he had published 14 books, along with countless magazine articles about Hollywood's biggest stars. Two of his books were made into movies. Critics compared him to Ernest Hemingway and said he had fathered the hard-boiled school of writing.

Yet today, Tully is all but forgotten.

That may change with the publication this month of "Jim Tully: American Writer, Irish Rover, Hollywood Brawler" by Mark Dawidziak (The Plain Dealer's television critic) and Paul Bauer. The publisher, Kent State University Press, also has reprinted four of Tully's books, so readers whose appetites have been whetted by the biography can check out Tully for themselves.

The quest to restore Tully to his place in American letters began when a client asked Bauer, a rare-book dealer in Kent, for Tully's "The Bruiser." Bauer had never heard of the book or the writer.

"I was a little embarrassed that I didn't know him," Bauer said. He asked friends, including Dawidziak, if they knew of Tully. No one did.

A little digging turned up some intriguing nuggets: Tully was from Ohio and had even lived in Kent for a period. What's more, Dawidziak, who was working for the Akron Beacon Journal at the time, discovered that the paper had a file on Tully, labeled "former Beacon Journal reporter."

So began Bauer and Dawidziak's 19-year project to rediscover the important American writer and reintroduce him to readers.

Early on, they found most of his books and read as much about Tully as they could find. The problem was, they didn't find much. Then the Kent State library led them to a collection at the University of California, Los Angeles.

"The motherlode," Dawidziak said. At UCLA, they found 117 boxes filled with Tully's papers, letters, unpublished works, magazine articles and more, donated in 1952 by Tully's third (and last) wife.

Even better: The boxes had never been opened.

What they found inside -- and report in their fascinating biography -- was both the record of one man's extraordinary, almost unbelievable life and of America at a time when it was changing as rapidly and awkwardly as any other adolescent.

Tully was something of a literary Zelig: Once you begin looking for him, he seems to pop up everywhere in the 1920s and '30s, when he was most popular.

COLLECTION OF PAUL BAUER AND MARK DAWIDZIAK Jim Tully was part of the inner circle of Hollywood and gathered to watch Lita Grey sign her contract for "The Gold Rush" on March 2, 1924. From left: Eddie Manson, Lillian McMurray, Chuck Reisner, Charlie Chaplin, Tully, Grey, Henry Bergman, Eddie Sutherland and Al Reeves.
He worked as a writer and publicist for Charlie Chaplin when the Little Tramp was making "The Gold Rush." He wrote for Mencken's legendary magazine, The American Mercury, from its start and for Smart Set before that.

Living in Hollywood at the time the movies were coming of age, he wrote movie-star profiles for both Vanity Fair and for lower-life-form fan magazines such as Photoplay.

He was friends with Lon Chaney, Boris Karloff, Tom Mix and Erich von Stroheim, and hated by just about everybody else, mostly for refusing to fawn over them in his profiles.

Louise Brooks, who was in the movie version of Tully's 1924 memoir, "Beggars of Life," despised him. Matinee idol John Gilbert, stung by something Tully wrote, made the mistake of starting a fistfight with him at the Brown Derby. Perhaps he didn't know that Tully was once a boxer. Tully knocked him out.

He hung out with writers, too. He spent an evening with a very drunk Jack London in a hotel room and had a long-running dispute with Upton Sinclair over Sinclair's contribution -- or lack thereof -- to Tully's first book, the 1922 novel "Emmett Lawler."

F. Scott Fitzgerald tried to trick Hemingway into a boxing match with Tully, but Hemingway declined.

A hard start in life

It was all heady company for Tully, who came from a family of Irish ditch diggers and from the muddy farmland of western Ohio.

His grandfather, Hugh, who had a starring role in Tully's 1928 memoir, "Shanty Irish," came to America in 1854, fleeing the poverty that followed the great potato famine.

Tully's father, also named Jim, was a man worthy of a starring role in Frank McCourt's memoir "Angela's Ashes." He was an alcoholic and itinerant ditch digger who regularly left his wife and six children to fend for themselves.

Tully was 6 when his mother, Biddy, died, and his father sent him and two brothers to St. Joseph Orphan Asylum in Cincinnati. For the rest of his life, his older sister was a larger presence than his father.

At 14, he ran away and became a road kid, crisscrossing the country on (and worse, under) freight cars, hanging out with hobos and the occasional criminal. He stopped after six years, trading that life for more travels as a featherweight boxer, fighting in such towns as Lima, Kent and Cleveland.

Everywhere he went, he always found a library, though. (In Kent, he also found a librarian; he fell in love and proposed to her, but she declined.)

The depth and breadth of his reading -- from Mark Twain to Fyodor Dostoevsky -- propelled him toward a life of writing. So did his older sister, who told him over and over again that he should be a writer. In his early 20s, he decided to throw himself into it.

"I would never be happy at anything else," Bauer and Dawidziak quote Tully saying. He declared he would "write or starve."

He had two children and was married to the first of his three wives at the time, so his declaration carried with it some bravado: The authors show that he always supported his family. (He continued that support even through the deeply disturbing saga of his son, Alton, who was accused of and sometimes convicted and imprisoned for a series of rapes and brutal assaults on women.)

The original cover for "The Bruiser," published in 1936.
Tully followed the age-old advice to writers, "Write what you know," with books about his family and St. Marys ("Shanty Irish" and "Emmett Lawler"), his time as a road kid ("Beggars of Life"), his days as a boxer ("The Bruiser"), his time working in traveling circuses ("Circus Parade") and Hollywood ("Jarnegan").

Dawidziak argues that Tully's experiences as a boxer informed his writing, not only as a subject but his style as well.

"He writes like the boxer that he was," Dawidziak said. "The most important punch in boxing is the jab, and that's the hard-boiled realism of Tully. So he jab-jab-jabs you with that, and the payoff is this Irish lyricism he has, that comes out of nowhere and knocks you flat."

Writing with integrity and conviction'

Whether that style was any good or not is a matter of opinion.

Richard Schrader, a professor emeritus of English at Boston College, knows Tully's work through his association with Mencken, whose work is one of Schrader's areas of expertise.

"The reason Mencken liked him is because he told the truth," Schrader said. "He writes with integrity and conviction, and that makes up for, in Mencken's terms, his lesser style."

As for his place in American literature, Schrader hesitated.

"I don't want to run him down, because I do want people to read the biography, which is excellent," he said. "I would say he's in the second or third rank of American writers."

Schrader said that puts him somewhere between Theodore Dreiser, who wrote in a similarly realistic style about downtrodden subjects but is "an absolute chore to read," and Fitzgerald, "who was a poet."

John Sayles, the writer and filmmaker, wrote in his foreword to the reprint of "Shanty Irish": "Jim Tully wrote like a man surprised to still be breathing, thinking, feeling."

Film director and producer Tony Bill ("My Bodyguard") has all of Tully's books in his collection of 20th-century American literature -- and has an order in for the biography, he said.

"I came across him and became kind of fascinated with him. I knew he had languished undiscovered by most people, but I think he deserves to be cast in the same light as a lot of those tough-guy writers, as they're called."

And Ken Burns, in the foreword to the new biography, seems to echo Mencken: "Tully is a diamond in the rough, untrained as he is both structurally and narratively. But it doesn't matter. His gifts so far outweigh his limitations, there are no doubts that the reader is encountering an American original."

Burns adds: "Here is a writer who not only deserves to be rediscovered, he needs to be rediscovered."

This raises the question: Why was he forgotten in the first place, then?

Bauer and Dawidziak tackle that one in the book. They note that professors in university English departments "dismissed Tully as a primitive" and rarely taught his work.

Schrader seconded that. "The test of literary reputation is, does this person get taught in colleges?" he said. Tully doesn't, "and that's a shame, because he should be remembered. He's not as good a writer as [John] Steinbeck, but he's writing about the same period and he had intimate knowledge about the same people, the lower depths of America."

Bauer and Dawidziak also note that "tough guy" writing is a young man's game, and after the Depression, Tully was eclipsed by the likes of Hemingway and Norman Mailer.

Perhaps the biography and reprints will correct the vicissitudes of history and popular taste. The authors obviously hope so.

"This is the great stray dog of American literature," Bauer said. "I hope he finds a home with readers."

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News Headline: Book rediscovers Ohio writer Jim Tully | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: _ Paul J. Bauer and Mark Dawidziak answer two big questions in Jim Tully: American Writer, Irish Rover, Hollywood Brawler, more than a decade in the making. To answer the first question, they have produced a sterling biography of the Ohio writer, born in 1886 into desperate poverty in the Auglaize County town of St. Marys.

Who was Jim Tully? He is unrecognized today, but he was a big success in the 1920s and '30s. He was sent to an orphanage at the age of 6 after his mother died, and after six years there became a ''road-kid,'' a term he preferred to ''hobo'' when his book Beggars of Life was published in 1924; he considered the publisher's subtitle of A Hobo Autobiography ''inaccurate and misleading.''

Tully spent six more years on the road and landed in Kent, where he worked in a chain factory, for the Davey Tree Expert Company, as a boxer and, very briefly, for the Beacon Journal and its rival, the Akron Press.

Though Tully had only the education he received in the orphanage, he was fiercely intelligent and dedicated to books (including those he stole from libraries � in Beggars of Life, his character ''Red'' steals only one volume of Crime and Punishment and laments ''I was terribly mortified, and was forced to go back for the other volume.'')

Yet another career opened in Hollywood when Tully began working for the mercurial Charlie Chaplin and writing magazine profiles about celebrities, some of them not as flattering as those generated by the studios. His first books included those autobiographical works he called his ''Underworld'' series, and four have been reproduced in facsimile by Kent State University Press.

The second question doesn't arrive until almost 300 pages in: ''Why then has Tully's work been utterly forgotten?'' As documentarian Ken Burns declares in his foreword, ''Here is a writer who not only deserves to be rediscovered, he needs to be rediscovered.''

So why has he been forgotten? Some of it is bad timing, some bad luck. The eminent critic George Jean Nathan regarded Tully as the equal of Sinclair Lewis and Eugene O'Neill, but many were offended by Tully's realism, which was often sordid; when he-man writers like Ernest Hemingway came along, ''Hemingway portrayed men as they wished to be seen . . . Tully portrayed men as they are.''

Jim Tully (376 pages, hardcover) costs $39.95 from Kent State University Press. Dawidziak, who lives in Cuyahoga Falls, is the television writer for the Plain Dealer and formerly for the Beacon Journal; Bauer is a book dealer in Kent.

Dawidziak and Bauer will give a talk about Tully and his writing at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Cleveland Public Library, 325 Superior Ave. NE. Footnotes In last week's column, the name of the author of Benson Tales, the book of photographs of a dressed-up English setter, was incorrectly listed: Vicki Lynn Thomas should get the credit. I'm sorry about the error. Events Hudson Library & Historical Society (96 Library St.) � Regina Brett signs God Never Blinks: 50 Lessons for Life's Little Detours, at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Tickets are required but free, and available at the library's reference desk and the Learned Owl Book Shop, 204 N. Main St., Hudson.

Stark County District Library (715 Market Ave. N., Canton) � Jim McGarrity of Doylestown, author of Check Point One-Four: A Vietnam Veteran's Chronicle of Survivor Guilt, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Mending the Invisible Wound, appears from 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, and North Canton author Mike Johnson, with historical fiction including Warrior Priest and God's Perfect Scar, follows from 1 to 2:30 p.m., as part of an Armed Forces Day program. � Barbara McIntyre Special to the Beacon Journal Send information about books of local interest to Lynne Sherwin, Features Department, Akron Beacon Journal, P.O. Box 640, Akron, OH 44309 or lsherwin@thebeaconjournal.com. Event notices should be sent at least two weeks in advance.

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News Headline: Downtown events are Celebrate Kent focus | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The city of Kent is seeking out organizations with ideas for events that could attract large groups of people downtown for its annual Celebrate Kent grant program.The idea is to provide quality of life community events that bring people into our downtown and reinforce the positive business climate, Smith said.Proposals for the grant program must be made by Kent-based businesses or groups and must focus on drawing people into the downtown area. Smith said the program is growing. last year $15,000 was available for the grants, and businesses and non-profits requested $40,000 in funding, while in 2009 $23,000 was requested with $10,000 available. Kent City Council has budgeted $30,000 for community support programs this year, though Smith said hes not sure how much of that will go into Celebrate Kent grant funding just yet. Winners of Celebrate Kent Grants in 2010 included: Downtown Innovative Community Events, Kent Blues Fest, Kent Community Dinners, Kent State Folk Festival, Haymaker Farmers Market, Who"s Your Mama Earth Day Festival. The city provides matching dollar amounts that can be used for advertising, clean-up and other hard costs for the events. The grants cannot be used to pay staff. Smith said the grants are competitive, with groups who agree to spend more having a better shot at winning matching funding. The city does not pay out the funds directly, but instead reimburses the business or group after the event. Obviously there is an economic component to this (program), Smith said. Were truly trying to make local sales happen in and around the central business district.The city of Kent's deadline for proposals in May 20. The Economic Development Department will review grant proposals to determine if they meet the qualifications, then forward them to Kent City Council for further consideration.

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News Headline: Be a Part of the Two Percent Solution | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Northeast Ohio is your community. WKSU is your station. Be part of the 2% Solution!

If you're a member of WKSU, thank you! You are part of an exclusive group that has recognized the important role WKSU plays in your day-to-day life and you have chosen to support it with a financial donation.

A few years back, Ira Glass conducted some funny interviews to prove a point about the importance of community support to public radio. He said that only 10% of listeners actually make that annual membership call. But that was then. Now, that number has drifted down to 7%. In a time when more and more people are discovering quality news, music and entertainment on WKSU, listeners who use the station's service are being asked for help to keep it strong and vital.

There is an easy answer to WKSU's current budget crunch. It is not money from federal or state governments – or even Kent State University. With only a 2% increase in WKSU's member rolls, the station should be able to weather this financial storm.

Donations from listeners are used for WKSU's operating funds covering everything from tower maintenance and the massive amounts of electricity it takes to broadcast to 22 counties to staff salaries and programming costs. Not only does WKSU not get operating funds from NPR, APM or PRI, the station must pay annual membership fees to each network along with purchasing specific shows. And, as a non-profit organization, all money that comes to WKSU from listeners and other community sources goes to pay for the quality public radio on which you have come to rely.

Please, step up and say, “This is my community and WKSU is my station!” Be part of the 2% Solution!

Copyright © 2011 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

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