Report Overview:
Total Clips (9)
Athletics (1)
Athletics; Student Success (1)
College of Business (COB); Entrepreneurial and Business Innovation, Center of (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (2)
Health Services (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
Office of the President (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (1)
AUDIO: Legal battles dominate Ohio college sports 05/18/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email


Athletics; Student Success (1)
KSU's Bradley completes courageous golf comeback (Morrow) 05/18/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Business (COB); Entrepreneurial and Business Innovation, Center of (1)
City partners with Kent State for entrepreneur in residence program (Heisler, Messing) 05/17/2011 Hudson Hub-Times Text Attachment Email

Hudson -- The city will partner with Kent State University for an entrepreneur in residence program that would help college and high school students who want to start new businesses....


College of Public Health (COPH) (2)
KSU names dean for College of Public Health (Frank, Alemagno) 05/18/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University named Sonia Alemagno Tuesday the new dean of its College of Public Health, which saw its first graduating class earlier this month....

Kent State Health College Dean Steps Down (Frank) 05/18/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Health Services (1)
Hypertension Watch 05/17/2011 Pharmacy Times Text Attachment Email

...Research, a team of researchers led by Robert P. Blankfield, MD, MS, of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and Ellen L. Glickman, PhD, of Kent State University, set out to test whether the dual roles of the cardiovascular system in maintaining normal blood pressure and helping...


KSU at Stark (1)
North Canton Mayor: Monday Job Fair Positive Sign For City (Engelhardt) 05/17/2011 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

...also included clips from the job fair in a video . That video also included comments from Lucas Engelhardt, an associate professor of economics at the Kent State University Stark Campus . Engelhardt said in the video that the economy in Northeast Ohio has improved since a year ago, although...


Office of the President (1)
AUDIO UPDATE NEOMED Research Facility Groundbreaking 05/17/2011 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

...President, Dr. Jay Gershen, says the new private-public partnership also strengthens ties with feeder universities such as the University of Akron and Kent State University. He predicts improvements in both medical and economic health. Congressman Tim Ryan, who was also present for the groundbreaking,...


University Press (1)
Long Dead Kent Writer Gets Fresh Spotlight 05/17/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Press will release this month a new book about a former Kent resident in the early 1900s who lived a dramatic, poetic...


News Headline: AUDIO: Legal battles dominate Ohio college sports | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State sues former coach; OSU coach Tressel hires pricey lawyer; what MLB team is hot on Cleveland's trail?

Kent State is suing former men's basketball coach Geno Ford for $1.2 million for leaving for Bradley University without paying what's owed on his contract. And Ohio State football coach Jim Tressel is beefing up his defense in his NCAA violations case.

WKSU commentator Terry Pluto talks to Amanda Rabinowitz on the latest in both cases and talks about just how many games he thinks the Indians can win this season.

Click here for Audio: http://www.wksu.org/news/story/28386

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News Headline: KSU's Bradley completes courageous golf comeback (Morrow) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: There was a time
in Sarah Bradley's
life when she considered
herself a
golfer before anything
else.
The sport, and
her place in it, was
how she defined
her entire life.
“I used to have
only one vision
for myself,” Bradley
says when she
thinks back to her
life before Jan. 5,
2008.
It was on that
day, though, that
Bradley's life would
change forever.
Consequently, so
would her vision of
herself.
Bradley, who was
a sophomore on the
Oklahoma State
women's golf team at
the time, was on winter break from
school and back in her home country
of New Zealand for a holiday visit
with family.
It was scheduled to be her last
night in her hometown of Cambridge,
which is a city that sits in the
Waikato region of the north island of
New Zealand.
Bradley was in the car with her father
as the two drove home from a
day on the golf course.
Showing signs of fatigue from the
day, Bradley's father recommended
that she recline her passenger seat
and try to get some rest.
“He knew I had a long day ahead
of me the next day,” said Bradley, referencing
her return flight to Oklahoma.
It wasn't long after that, though,
that Bradley's father lost control of
the car and slid into oncoming traffic
at 65 miles per hour. Before he could
regain control of the car, an oncoming
vehicle violently crashed into the
passenger side door and Bradley.
What happened from there became
a mystery to Bradley.
“I woke up and was in the hospital,”
Bradley said. “I couldn't remember
what happened. Everything
felt like a movie to me from that
point forward. I had to keep a diary,
because I could not remember anything.”
Family, friends and doctors began
to inform Bradley of everything.
That she had been unconscious for
15 minutes after the accident. That
she had suffered a traumatic head
injury with bleeding in the brain.
That she had dislocated her left
shoulder.
That she was lucky to be alive.
In fact, doctors indicated that had
she been sitting upright, she likely
would have died.
Within moments, Bradley was
forced to consider a life that would
not include golf.
She would spend the next 12 days
in the hospital under constant evaluation
by doctors.
“Even then, I was in such a hurry
to get back to golf,” Bradley said.
“I was in denial. I was trying to fool
people into thinking I was OK and
was ready to get on with my life the
way it was. I was worried about losing
my spot on the Oklahoma State
team.”
She may have done her best to
trick everyone, but the doctors knew
better.
Three months after the accident,
tests indicated that Bradley's brain
was operating at only 35 percent.
The diagnosis left doctors to estimate
full recovery at six to eight
years.
The news was devastating for
Bradley.
Doctors offered their best recommendation,
which was sleep.
And that is exactly what Bradley
did. She was determined to shrink
her recovery time.
“I would sleep for what felt like entire
days,” Bradley said.
“In reality, the accident and what
I needed to do to recover properly
happened at the best time in my
life,” an optimistic Bradley said. “I
did not have a career or children to
consider. I had the time to sleep so
that is what I was going to do.”
When it was time for
Bradley's return visit to
her neurological doctor,
surprise quickly filled the
room.
Similar testing had
shown such drastic improvement
that her doctor
could almost not understand
it.
“The doctor was
amazed,” Bradley recalls.
“I remember him looking
at me and asking, ‘What
have you been doing so
that you could show this
kind of improvement so
quickly?' I told him that
I had done exactly what
he had told me to do ...
sleep.”
Bradley, despite still
experiencing short-term
memory loss and fatigue,
appeared to have
regained control of her
own life.
But would that life be
one that still included
golf?
It was Kent State
women's golf coach Mike
Morrow that had the answer
to that question.
Having never seen
Bradley swing a golf club
in person, the coach
reached out to Bradley
and offered her a spot
on the Golden Flashes'
team.
“We had limited information
on Sarah,
but thought Kent State
would be a good option
for her,” Morrow said.
“We did our research, but
sometimes you just have
to go with your gut feeling.”
That feeling for Morrow
was that Kent State
was the right school at
the right time for Bradley.
“She came for an official
visit, and I had a
nice talk with her, along
with (KSU men's golf
coach) Herb Page,” Morrow
said. “We thought
that she could make a
comeback in golf, and we
wanted to be a part of
that.”
It has been three years,
but it is an opportunity
that Bradley still can't
believe was real.
“I was going to go back
home to New Zealand
and give up golf,” Bradley
said. “It was hard to
accept, but I was happy
to be alive and was just
going to move on with
my life.
“My dream had always
been to live in the states
and play golf,” Bradley
said. “All of a sudden
coach Morrow stepped
in and let me live my
dream again.”
There were still a long
list of unknowns for
Bradley and her health.
Morrow knew that, but
invested trust in the golfer
he had yet to fully get
to know.
“Coach had so much
faith in me without ever
seeing me play,” Bradley
said. “He basically retaught
me the game. He
was patient and broke
down the game to its
simplest form. He helped
me find my passion for
the game again.”
Bradley transferred to
Kent State in January
2009, but would not participate
with the team
until September. The
timetable perfectly allowed
Bradley to bring
herself back at her own
speed without any pressures.
The memory loss was
still there. The fatigue
was still there. And soon,
frustration would be
there, too.
She had not played
golf in six months and
judging the course, its
distances, how wind
would affect the ball and
gauging what club to use
were suddenly far from
the instinctive responses
that they once were.
“My energy level was
so low and it really became
quite emotional for
me,” Bradley said. “Golf
is a difficult sport that
requires a lot of attention.
I would find myself
worried about how tired
I was and not about the
game.
“There were times I
could barely make it
through nine holes,”
Bradley said. “I would
end up back in the
team van so I could
sleep.”
Bradley soon found a
way to balance her condition
to allow for successful
golf, starting with
her very first event with
KSU when she placed
eighth overall at the
LPGA Invitational.
She eventually became
one of the team's top
performers, earning All-
MAC honors and helping
guide the Flashes to
a pair of Mid-American
Conference championships
and NCAA Championship
berths.
It was all part of Bradley
refocusing her life,
but she could not have
done it without Kent
State.
“I've never been on a
team like the one I was
on at Kent State,” Bradley
said. “It was a true
family and everyone genuinely
cares about each
other. When my parents
came to Kent for my
graduation, they could
not believe just how
close we were. They were
amazed.”
Bradley's graduation
last week came
with a degree in communications,
alongside
a 3.68 grade-point average.
The GPA is impressive
in its own right, but
when you factor in that
it was achieved with
someone challenged
with memory loss and
you begin to understand
the determination
Bradley, who offers
direct credit to KSU
learning specialist Deborah
Keith for her success,
had to succeed in
the classroom.
Success for Bradley,
though, did not come
without the gift of optimism.
“Sarah is one of the
most positive people I
know,” said Morrow, who
said he ranks Bradley's
comeback as one of his
favorite memories of his
coaching career.
Kent had a profound
impact on Bradley as
well.
“Kent will always be
such a special place to
me,” she says. “I love my
teammates and all my
coaches. Mike Morrow
is such an amazing man.
He gave me a chance,
and I know somewhere
in my future I am going
to do the same for someone
else.
“Coach really cares
about me. He was not
as worried about golf
results and winning. He
was more concerned
with me as a person
first and making sure
I was healthy,” Bradley
said.
With her health leading
the way, Bradley can
now leave everything related
to her near-fatal
crash behind her in exchange
for such a bright
future that is in front of
her.
“It's an awesome feeling,”
said Bradley, whose
life is now so much more
than just golf.
“My whole perspective
has changed. I look at
each day that I am alive
as a gift, and I want to
take full advantage of my
opportunities. I love golf,
but now know that there
are so many other great
things out there.”

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News Headline: City partners with Kent State for entrepreneur in residence program (Heisler, Messing) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times
Contact Name: Laura Freeman
News OCR Text: Hudson -- The city will partner with Kent State University for an entrepreneur in residence program that would help college and high school students who want to start new businesses.

City officials will work with KSU officials to hire someone for the program after Council members voiced support for the program at the May 10 workshop, said Communications Manager Jody Roberts.

The city and university will invest $5,000 each to hire a business person to mentor budding entrepreneurs and help arrange internships with local businesses, according to Yank Heisler, dean of the KSU College of Business Administration.

Heisler and Julie Messing, program director of the Center for Entrepreneurship and Business Innovation, spoke to Council May 10 about the program.

The entrepreneur in residence would help students at Kent State at least one day per week and spend one to more days a week in the community helping high school students or creating partnerships with local businesses, Messing said.

"Students are not being hired by big businesses," Heisler said. "They're hired by small businesses. The entrepreneur in residence is the bridge between small businesses and students."

The entrepreneur in residence is typically an older, former business owner who has time to give back to the community, Heisler said.

The university reevaluates entrepreneurs in residence annually and all of them have returned, Heisler said.

Kent State University has six other communities with an entrepreneur in residence and 950 students in the entrepreneur program.

"There is a lot of interest," Heisler said.

Four students are grouped in the entrepreneur program at Kent State University and launch a business, Messing said.

"We get seasoned entrepreneurs to help the students hit a home run," she said.

Council members were supportive of the proposal. They said it would complement existing entrepreneur programs offered at Hudson High School, Western Reserve Academy, the Hudson Library and Historical Society, the Burton D. Morgan Foundation and the TECHudson business incubator.

Economic Development Director Chuck Wiedie said he would be involved in the Hudson program.
Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3150

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News Headline: KSU names dean for College of Public Health (Frank, Alemagno) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University named Sonia Alemagno Tuesday the new dean of its College of Public Health, which saw its first graduating class earlier this month.

Alemagno, who came to KSU as a special adviser to the provost in 2009, served as the universitys interim vice president for research last year, but said she welcomes a chance to focus on public health again. Before arriving at KSU she served in a variety of roles at the University of Akron, including director of the universitys Institute for Health and Social Policy. I was recruited to Kent State to help develop the college, Alemagno said. KSU Provost Robert Frank said though a lot of Alemagnos work with the college so far has been behind the scenes, shes been integral to the success of the school. Shes incredibly energetic, he said. Shes indefatigable. She takes on everything and gets it done with great energy. The College of Public Healths current dean, Mark James, will stay on at the college as a professor teaching graduate-level courses and serving as director of global health programs for KSU.

Frank said there are no set parameters for James new position yet, but they will involve creating or expanding relationships between the College of Public Health and universities in South America and Asia.

Alemagno is scheduled to officially take over as dean on July 1.

Although the college already offers a bachelors degree, five masters degrees and a doctoral degree, the incoming dean sees expansion as the biggest priority.

If the College of Public Health begins offering two more doctoral degrees, it can be accredited as a school of public health by the Council on Education for Public Health. The main goal for me is to set the college up for accreditation as soon as possible, Alemagno said. Dr. James has done a good job of getting us on that road. Alemagno said she also wants to start building up the research infrastructure at the college now that staffing and curriculum are settled at college which was founded in 2009.

Alemagno graduated with a maser of arts degree in sociology from KSU in 1984 and earned her doctorate in medical sociology from Case Western Reserve University in 1991.

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News Headline: Kent State Health College Dean Steps Down (Frank) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's young College of Public Health will see its second dean in as many years of existence for the school.

The university announced this morning Mark James will step down as the health college dean after just one year in the position.

Sonia Alemagno, a professor of health policy and management and associate dean of the college, will take over for James on July 1 — one year after he took the job as the inaugural dean.

The university said in a statement James chose to return to his "first love" of teaching and relinquished his deanship.

The change in leadership comes just after the school celebrated its first graduates with bachelor's degrees in public health this month and as the school looks forward to relocating on the Kent campus as part of a proposed $250 million campus renovation.

Kent State Provost Robert Frank said Alemagno makes perfect sense to lead the new college.

"Sonia has been an integral part of establishing our new College of Public Health and then getting it up and running," Frank said in prepared remarks. "The college has been growing rapidly with more than 250 students in its undergraduate and graduate programs. This growth can be attributed to Sonia's hard work and ongoing dedication to the college. Sonia is a strong academic and intellectual leader who will work with us to take the College of Public Health to the next level."

Alemagno, a Kent State graduate, joined the university faculty in 2009 to help develop the new health college. She was named interim vice president for research in July 2010. She previously served as chair of the Department of Public Administration and Urban Studies and as director of the Institute for Health and Social Policy at the University of Akron.

James was announced as dean in February 2010. James came from Tulane University, where he spent 21 years of his academic career before moving to Ohio. He will serve as executive director of global health programs at Kent State.

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News Headline: Hypertension Watch | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Pharmacy Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published Online: Monday, May 16th, 2011

For Kids, Watching Too Much TV Now Can Lead to High BP Later

The argument to limit the number of hours children spend watching TV just got stronger.

According to a study published in the May issue of Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, children who logged the most screen time had narrower arteries, which is a possible indicator for cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. Researchers determined that more sedentary behavior—which included watching television, using a computer, or playing video games—was associated with an average narrowing of 2.3 microns in the retinal arteriolar caliber.

In the study, children aged 6 to 7 years who regularly participated in outdoor physical activity had 2.2 microns wider average retinal arteriolar compared with those children with the lowest level of activity. The magnitude of the narrowing associated with each hour of screen time was similar to that associated with a 10 mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure in children, according to lead author Bamini Gopinath, PhD, senior research fellow at the Center for Vision Research at the University of Sydney.

“We found that children with a high level of physical activity had a more beneficial microvascular profile compared to those with the lowest levels of physical activity,” said Dr.Gopinath. “This suggests that unhealthy lifestyle factors may influence microcirculation early in life and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension later in life.” PT

Study Identifies Possible Cause of Salt-Induced Hypertension

A new study sheds light on an issue that has baffled researchers for decades: the mechanism behind salt-induced hypertension.

The inability to explain why salt raises blood pressure in some individuals but not others has hindered understanding of what causes most cases of hypertension. In a study published in the April issue of Hypertension Research, a team of researchers led by Robert P. Blankfield, MD, MS, of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and Ellen L. Glickman, PhD, of Kent State University, set out to test whether the dual roles of the cardiovascular system in maintaining normal blood pressure and helping to regulate body temperature might help explain how salt ingestion leads to salt-sensitive hypertension.

The authors examined the effect of salt and water consumption versus water alone in a group of 22 healthy men without hypertension. Subjects' blood pressure, rectal temperature, cardiac index, and urine output were monitored at 1, 2, and 3 hours after they ingested either salt and water or water alone, and changes in rectal temperature were compared between those who were identified as salt sensitive versus those who were salt resistant.

They found that the ingestion of salt and water lowered body temperature more than the ingestion of water alone. In addition, body temperature decreased more in individuals who are salt resistant than in those who are salt sensitive.

“It appears that salt sensitive individuals maintain core body temperature equilibrium more effectively than salt resistant individuals, but experience increased blood pressure in the process,” Dr. Blankfield said. “Conversely, salt resistant individuals maintain blood pressure equilibrium more effectively than salt sensitive individuals following salt and water intake, but experience a greater temperature reduction in the process.”

Shielding Boys from Secondhand Smoke May Lower Risk of Hypertension

Exposure to secondhand smoke, even at extremely low levels, is associated with elevated blood pressure in boys, which increases the risk of developing hypertension in adulthood, according to research presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies' annual meeting in May.

Previous studies of nonsmoking adults have uncovered links between both secondhand smoke and outdoor air pollution with increased blood pressure, but until recently, no research had examined the relationship in children.

A team of investigators led by Jill Baumgartner, PhD, of the University of Minnesota, assessed exposure to secondhand smoke among 6421 youths as determined through their own reports of whether they lived with a smoker, and through levels of cotinine, a substance produced when the body breaks down nicotine. Analysis demonstrated that boys aged 8 to 17 years who were exposed to secondhand smoke had significantly higher systolic blood pressure than those who were not exposed.

“While the increases in blood pressure observed among boys in our study may not be clinically meaningful for an individual child, they have large implications for populations,” said Dr. Baumgartner.

The research also showed that girls who were exposed to secondhand smoke had lower blood pressure levels than girls who were not exposed to tobacco smoke.

“These findings support several previous studies suggesting that something about female gender may provide protection from harmful vascular changes due to secondhand smoke exposure. An important next step is to understand why,” Dr. Baumgartner added.

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News Headline: North Canton Mayor: Monday Job Fair Positive Sign For City (Engelhardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name: Morgan Day
News OCR Text: About 1,000 people waited in line at the Hoover building Monday to apply for 100 jobs through Suarez Corp. Industries, the newest tenant inside the Hoover building.

North Canton Mayor David Held talked about the job fair with optimism at Monday night's City Council meeting.

“I think it really represents a couple things,” Held said. “No. 1, that there are still a lot of people out there struggling to find employment … and at the same time, it's nice we have at least 100 jobs to offer.”

Suarez Corp. Industries' move into the building actually will bring about 250 jobs to the city immediately, but 150 of those are relocating, while 100 are being created.

The company makes the portable EdenPURE heaters, among other household appliances.

Held said reporters and photographers from the Washington Post arrived Monday to document the job fair for inclusion in a story about the Rust Belt recovery.

WEWS NewsNet5.com also included clips from the job fair in a video . That video also included comments from Lucas Engelhardt, an associate professor of economics at the Kent State University Stark Campus .

Engelhardt said in the video that the economy in Northeast Ohio has improved since a year ago, although the job seekers in NewsNet5.com 's video didn't agree.

City Council also discussed the occupancy grant tax credit the city has offered Suarez Corp. Industries. It would give the company a credit of one-half of the city income tax paid by new employees after the company signs a five-year lease.

The company, which announced its intentions to move into the Hoover District last Tuesday , will be in the 200,000-square-foot building at 334 Orchard St. It will receive an annual tax credit against its net profit tax. If the credit is more than the tax owed by the company, the city would refund the difference up to the maximum credit.

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News Headline: AUDIO UPDATE NEOMED Research Facility Groundbreaking | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ground was broken Monday for the Research and Graduate Education building in Rootstown.

The new four story, 80,000 square foot facility will be used not only for medical research but also to expand other offerings at the Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) including dual degree programs.

NEOMED's President, Dr. Jay Gershen, says the new private-public partnership also strengthens ties with feeder universities such as the University of Akron and Kent State University. He predicts improvements in both medical and economic health.

Congressman Tim Ryan, who was also present for the groundbreaking, says the only way to compete with the billions of competitors in China and India is to do it regionally.

"You do the research, you get the jobs," said Ryan.

NEOMED Vice President for Research Dr. Walter Horton said the facility will create jobs and have an impact on the economy, not just in Rootstown, but in the region.

Regionalism is nothing new at NEOMED but the new facility is expected to attract not only top medical research but start up companies that will operationalize the results and ultimately create jobs.

Following the groundbreaking, NEOMED hosted a Research!America forum intended to demonstrate the importance of research investment to create jobs in Ohio. Seven Ohio university presidents were in attendance including Dr. Lester Lefton of Kent State University and Dr. Luis Proenza of the University of Akron. Members of the Ohio congressional delegation, state leadership, researchers and other stakeholders were also in attendance.

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News Headline: Long Dead Kent Writer Gets Fresh Spotlight | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Press will release this month a new book about a former Kent resident in the early 1900s who lived a dramatic, poetic life on the road.

Jim Tully: American Writer, Irish Rover, Hollywood Brawler , examines the life story of Tully as told by authors Paul Bauer and Mark Dawidziak.

News of the book netted new press for Tully as Bauer and Dawidziak prepare to travel the country promoting the tale.

Kent Patch broke the news of the book first in January , but other news outlets have since covered the story. Take a look at the latest.

Plain Dealer: Jim Tully, rediscovering the life and works of Ohio's forgotten writer

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