Report Overview:
Total Clips (14)
Architecture (1)
Athletics (1)
College of Technology (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU Airport (2)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Trumbull (2)
KSU Museum (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
May 4 (1)
Student Wellness and Recreation Center (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Architecture (1)
5 ways for families to get close to birds 05/18/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...auctioned online Sept. 12-20, with proceeds benefitting AIA Cleveland and the garden's programs. Among the entries are four historical birdhouses by Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design students that represent styles ranging from "shingle/stick" to "prairie...


Athletics (1)
Kent State announces 2012-2013 football schedule (Nielsen) 05/19/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Technology (1)
School Notes: Learn about aviation careers at A.C.E. Academy this summer 05/18/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

...experience, which will expose them to a broad range of activities, trips and speakers. Students will also fly a plane with an instructor at the at the Kent State University airport. Each day during the week-long experience, students will tour an aviation-related worksite to talk to professionals...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
On the campus 05/18/2011 West Seneca Bee - Online Text Attachment Email

Simon Husted of West Seneca was awarded the William A. Fisher Scholarship from Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Husted, a junior, is majoring in newspaper journalism with a minor in electronic...


KSU Airport (2)
Another aircraft travels off runway at Kent State airport (Burford) 05/18/2011 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

Stow -- The Kent State University Airport has seen a third mishap on its runways in as many months. A 1998 Comp Air 6 rolled off the runway at the Kent...

Another aircraft travels off runway (Burford) 05/18/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

Stow -- The Kent State University Airport has seen a third mishap on its runways in as many months. A 1998 Comp Air 6 rolled off the runway at the Kent...


KSU at Stark (1)
Hundreds wait to apply for jobs in North Canton (Engelhardt) 05/18/2011 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

..."By the time that I pay for gas, I make about $150 to $200 a week," Dorothy Fulton said. Dr. Lucas Engelhardt, an associate professor of economics at Kent State University at Stark, said the overall trend of the economy in northeast Ohio is getting better. "Things are still worse than normal,...


KSU at Trumbull (2)
KENT TRUMBULL WINS AT EARTH DAY 05/18/2011 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Trumbull has placed third in a national competition initiated by the Earth Day Network. The organization's Earth Day...

POLICY IS Officials at Kent State Trumbull, Youngstown State 05/18/2011 21 News at 6 PM - WFMJ-TV Text Email

...34)EVERY FACULTY PUTS IN THEIR SYLLABUS A STATEMENT ON THE UNIVERSITY'S PLAGIARISM POLICY SO THAT STUDENTS ARE AWARE UP FRONT WHAT THE POLICY IS Officials at Kent State Trumbull, Youngstown State and Westminster College tell me while intentional plagiarism is rare, it does occur. (14:53:38 - : 47)WHETHER...


KSU Museum (1)
On With The Show 05/18/2011 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

Currently -- "Katherine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen," "Collectors and Collecting," "Recent Acquisitions to the Collection" and "Fiber and Fashion...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Scientific American 05/18/2011 Scientific American - Online Text Attachment Email

...promise. Consider: Advanced liquid crystal displays may soon improve the quality of life of anyone who uses laptop and hand-held computers. A team at Kent State University was touting a new kind of liquid crystal technology; it should lead to flat color display panels that have much better...


May 4 (1)
County Briefs - New KSU probe sought 05/18/2011 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

The sister of a student who died in the 1970 Kent State shootings has urged President Barack Obama's administration to look into the shootings. Laurel Krause, along with U.S. Rep. Dennis...


Student Wellness and Recreation Center (2)
Annual River Day presents a variety of activities, attractions 05/18/2011 Hudson Hub-Times Text Attachment Email

...house on River Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Stow-Munroe Falls High School Photography Club will offer a photo contest during the activities, and Kent State University Crooked River Adventures is providing canoes for the event this year. The Lake Erie Nature and Science Center will...

Annual River Day to present a variety of activities, attractions May 21 05/18/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

...open house on River Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Stow-Munroe Falls High School Photography Club will offer a photo contest during the activities and Kent State University Crooked River Adventures is providing canoes for the event this year. The Lake Erie Nature and Science Center will...


News Headline: 5 ways for families to get close to birds | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Martha Mueller Neff
News OCR Text: By Martha Mueller Neff, The Plain Dealer

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- While downy woodpeckers aren't exactly rare in Northeast Ohio, my family was nevertheless entranced when a large one alighted on our bird feeder recently to feast on sunflower seeds.

Here are five ways area venues want to capture that fascination with our feathered friends.

1. "For the Birds: Architect-designed Birdhouses" at the (11030 East Boulevard in University Circle) June 10-Oct. 1. In collaboration with the Cleveland chapter of the American Institute of Architects, this exhibit enlists Cleveland's architectural talent pool to come up with fanciful renditions of birdhouses. Visitor hours are Tuesday through Saturday (10 a.m.-5 p.m.) and Sunday (noon-5 p.m). The birdhouse exhibit will be free with regular garden admission (adults: $8.50; children 3-12: $3; members and children under 3: free). The birdhouses will be nested among the garden's 10 acres of outdoor gardens, and will be auctioned online Sept. 12-20, with proceeds benefitting AIA Cleveland and the garden's programs.

Among the entries are four historical birdhouses by Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design students that represent styles ranging from "shingle/stick" to "prairie & beyond" to "modernism" to "post-war suburbia."

2. have been designated Important Bird Areas by for their role as breeding spots and places of rest and feeding during migration. Take a Saturday afternoon to check them out.

3. Follow the amazing birding blog of, a Plain Dealer reporter, where you'll find sightings and walks every week. McCarty's expertise will amaze you.

4. Beginning Sunday, June 19 (Father's Day!), , 9500 Sperry Road, Kirtland, will welcome 20 gnomes in the "Gnome and Garden" exhibit. You'll be able to walk the garden trail to discover the 20 gnomes in their garden settings, vote for your favorite gnome AND watch for the birds keeping the gnomes company. That Sunday, take part in the gnome celebration with children's crafts, a performance by Musical Mark, a visit from the Gnature Gnome and a gnome parade. and read all about theHolden is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Admission is free for members, $6 for adults, $5 for seniors, $3 for kids 6-12, and free for kids 5 and under. Call 440-946-4400.

5. You'll be just inches from a huge variety of birds at the in the Rocky River Reservation of Cleveland Metroparks. Giant windows are the only things separating you from the tufted titmouse, chickadee, goldfinches, sparrows, woodpeckers (maybe even a pileated woodpecker), white-breasted nuthatches and more. There are also swallows on the banks of the Rocky River, Canada geese, wood ducks, great blue herons, egrets, green herons, turkey vultures and more. "Last week, there were 17 different kinds of warblers spotted during the bird walks," a naturalist there said. Take a load off in the Amish rocking chairs, and just watch the wildlife. Kids will also love Hideaway Hollow, the giant oak tree with lots of things to discover.

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News Headline: Kent State announces 2012-2013 football schedule (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State Department
of Athletics announced Wednesday
its non-conference football
schedules for 2012-13. The slate
features a pair of home dates as
well as opponents from four of
the six BCS automatic qualifying
conferences.
“I'd like to commend Tom
Kleinlein for all his hard work in
putting together these schedules,”
says Kent State Director of
Athletics Joel Nielsen. “We had to
walk a fine line between competitiveness
and the ability to help
the department from a budgetary
standpoint, and that's not an
easy task. Obviously, we would
rather have more than one home
non-conference game in 2012
and 2013, but we inherited contracts
that limited our flexibility
in that area.”
In 2012, the Golden Flashes
will open at home on a Thursday
night with Football Championship
Subdivision foe Towson
and hit the road to face Kentucky,
Rutgers and Army. It will mark
the first meeting with Towson,
while Kent State has squared off
with the other three schools a total
of 10 times, including six previous
contests with Kentucky —
the last of which came in 2007.
The Flashes will play a similar
schedule in 2013, opening at home
against FCS opponent Liberty on
a Thursday night, before traveling
to take on Clemson, Penn State
and South Alabama. Kent State
hosted Liberty in 2004 and has
been to State College on three
different occasions, including this
past season. The game at South
Alabama will complete a homeand-
home series that will see the
Jaguars come to Dix Stadium this
fall, while the trip to Death Valley
will mark the first meeting with
Clemson.
Including the 2011 game at
Kansas State, the Golden Flashes
will play a member of every
BCS conference but the Pac-10
over the next three seasons. Under
the direction of first-year head
coach Darrell Hazell, Kent State
opens the 2011 campaign at Alabama
Sept. 3, before kicking off
its six-game home slate Sept. 10
against Louisiana. Call 330-672-
2244 or log on to www.kentstatesports.
com for season ticket information

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News Headline: School Notes: Learn about aviation careers at A.C.E. Academy this summer | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: High school students interested in exploring careers in aviation are invited to enroll in the tuition-based A.C.E., or Aviation Career Education Academy.

Incoming 10th-, 11th- and 12th-graders from the Six District Educational Compact schools are eligible for the experience, which will expose them to a broad range of activities, trips and speakers. Students will also fly a plane with an instructor at the at the Kent State University airport. Each day during the week-long experience, students will tour an aviation-related worksite to talk to professionals and hear about careers in the airlines, government, military and airport management. The unique opportunity is available thanks to a partnership between the Six District Educational Compact and Kent State University's College of Technology and the Division of Aeronautics.

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News Headline: On the campus | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: West Seneca Bee - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Simon Husted of West Seneca was awarded the William A. Fisher Scholarship from Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Husted, a junior, is majoring in newspaper journalism with a minor in electronic media.

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News Headline: Another aircraft travels off runway at Kent State airport (Burford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name: Mariana Silva
News OCR Text: Stow -- The Kent State University Airport has seen a third mishap on its runways in as many months.

A 1998 Comp Air 6 rolled off the runway at the Kent State Airport and into a ditch at about 1:10 p.m. May 8, according to the Canton Post of the Ohio Highway Patrol and Stow Police Department. No one was injured, but the plane's left wing was damaged.

Bob Burford, media relations coordinator for Kent State, said the three incidents are unrelated, caused by operator errors and not because of conditions of the runway.

Thomas Friend, operations coordinator for the airport, said the average number of incidents in the airport is two in a year, so the number of incidents this year has been above average.

Burford said the university does not believe the incidents require a response from Kent State University in terms of doing something differently in the airport or runway. He added Kent State is confident in the airport's operations.

Brad A. Leeman, the pilot, and Naomi Leeman, the only passenger, were not injured in the May 8 incident, according to the OSHP. The couple had left from the Galion Municipal Airport that morning with a destination to the KSU Airport.

Sgt. David Garber of the Canton Post of the OSHP said when he arrived on the scene, he observed skid marks in the land strip and the airplane stuck in mud. The plane sustained some minor damage to the left wing when it hit the ground. The airport does not have a dollar amount for the damages yet.

According to reports from the OSHP and Stow Police, Leeman overcorrected after he landed. Leeman told Stow Police he waited too long to do a go-around and ended up skidding off the right side of the runway.

Garber confirmed the accident occurred due to pilot error. He said the OSHP's investigation is complete and that the post is waiting for the Federal Aviation Administration to conclude its investigation.

After FAA completes its investigation, the post should be informed whether there is a need for follow-ups. If not, information on the final conclusions about the accident should be released.

On March 15, a private twin-engine Cessna T303 slid off the runway stopping in a ditch before crossing onto N. River Road. On April 9, a student-pilot was landing when she lost control of a single-engine Cessna 152, owned by the university, and hit the runway.

No one was injured in either incident. Both cases are being investigated by the Ravenna Post of the OSHP and the FAA.

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News Headline: Another aircraft travels off runway (Burford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name: Mariana Silva
News OCR Text: Stow -- The Kent State University Airport has seen a third mishap on its runways in as many months.

A 1998 Comp Air 6 rolled off the runway at the Kent State Airport and into a ditch at about 1:10 p.m. May 8, according to the Canton Post of the Ohio Highway Patrol and Stow Police Department. No one was injured, but the plane's left wing was damaged.

Bob Burford, media relations coordinator for Kent State, said the three incidents are unrelated, caused by operator errors and not because of conditions of the runway.

Thomas Friend, operations coordinator for the airport, said the average number of incidents in the airport is two in a year, so the number of incidents this year has been above average.

Burford said the university does not believe the incidents require a response from Kent State University in terms of doing something differently in the airport or runway. He added Kent State is confident in the airport's operations.

Brad A. Leeman, the pilot, and Naomi Leeman, the only passenger, were not injured in the May 8 incident, according to the OSHP. The couple had left from the Galion Municipal Airport that morning with a destination to the KSU Airport.

Sgt. David Garber of the Canton Post of the OSHP said when he arrived on the scene, he observed skid marks in the land strip and the airplane stuck in mud. The plane sustained some minor damage to the left wing when it hit the ground. The airport does not have a dollar amount for the damages yet.

According to reports from the OSHP and Stow Police, Leeman overcorrected after he landed. Leeman told Stow Police he waited too long to do a go-around and ended up skidding off the right side of the runway.

Garber confirmed the accident occurred due to pilot error. He said the OSHP's investigation is complete and that the post is waiting for the Federal Aviation Administration to conclude its investigation.

After FAA completes its investigation, the post should be informed whether there is a need for follow-ups. If not, information on the final conclusions about the accident should be released.

On March 15, a private twin-engine Cessna T303 slid off the runway stopping in a ditch before crossing onto N. River Road. On April 9, a student-pilot was landing when she lost control of a single-engine Cessna 152, owned by the university, and hit the runway.

No was injured in either incidents. Both cases are being investigated by the Ravenna Post of the OSHP and the FAA.

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News Headline: Hundreds wait to apply for jobs in North Canton (Engelhardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name: Bob Jones
News OCR Text: NORTH CANTON, Ohio - About 1,000 people waited in a cold drizzle in North Canton to apply for 100 new manufacturing jobs at Suarez Corporation Industries.

The jobs-- general labor and warehouse positions-- will pay between $7.50 and $14 per hour.

Suarez needs workers to build portable heaters. The products were manufactured in China, but the company recently decided to give the jobs to local people and build the heaters at home.

"It's really clear that this is a good thing, bringing these jobs back, especially into North Canton because there are so many people that need work," said Lauren Capo, a spokesperson for Suarez.

Matthew Fulton and his wife, Dorthy, were among the people who waited in the long line to fill out an application.

Matthew has been out of work in the construction field since last October. Dorothy works two days a week cleaning homes. The couple has five children and is on Welfare.

"I've always been able to pick up jobs pretty easy, but it's not so easy," Matthew Fulton said.

"By the time that I pay for gas, I make about $150 to $200 a week," Dorothy Fulton said.

Dr. Lucas Engelhardt, an associate professor of economics at Kent State University at Stark, said the overall trend of the economy in northeast Ohio is getting better.

"Things are still worse than normal, but not as bad as they were a year ago," Dr. Engelhardt said.

He also said unemployment numbers are down-- in Stark County from 13 percent to 10 percent-- and that interest rates are low, giving businesses a reason to expand.

"The problem is interest rates won't stay low forever, so the question in my mind is whether businesses are accounting for this or not," Dr. Engelhardt said.

Suarez officials said the company could hire several hundred more people in the coming months or years.

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News Headline: KENT TRUMBULL WINS AT EARTH DAY | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Trumbull has placed third in a national competition initiated by the Earth Day Network. The organization's Earth Day University Challenge, was part of its "A Billion Acts of Green" theme for Earth Day 2011. Kent State Trumbull students, faculty and staff committed 990 "Acts of Green."

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News Headline: POLICY IS Officials at Kent State Trumbull, Youngstown State | Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: 21 News at 6 PM - WFMJ-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Officials from the North Carolina Central University Law School say they are disappointed that one of their students engaged in plagiarism. A commencement speech given by Class President Preston Mitchum of Youngstown included excerpts of a speech delivered at another university last year. Mitchum says he obtained permission from the author of the speech, but failed to give the author credit during the address. Most colleges and universities have strict policies on plagiarism. And as Sally Phillips tells us, some instructors have software to detect copycat submissions from students. When students enter college, they're quickly informed that plagiarizing another person's work will NOT be tolerated. (15:02:24- : 34)EVERY FACULTY PUTS IN THEIR SYLLABUS A STATEMENT ON THE UNIVERSITY'S PLAGIARISM POLICY SO THAT STUDENTS ARE AWARE UP FRONT WHAT THE POLICY IS Officials at Kent State Trumbull, Youngstown State and Westminster College tell me while intentional plagiarism is rare, it does occur. (14:53:38 - : 47)WHETHER IT'S ACCIDENTAL OR NOT, THAT'S STILL PLAGIARISM. BUT WE TRY TO GET HEM TO UNDERSTAND THAT EARLY ON SO THEY DON'T MAKE THE MISTAKE. Punishment for plagiarism typically ranges from just repeating the assignment all the way to sanctions like failing the course. (14:56:03 - : 12)IF THEY DO A SENIOR PROJECT IN THEIR SENIOR COURSE AND ARE PLAGIARIZING THERE, THEY COULD NOT GET THEIR DEGREE. Professors say plagiarism is usually apparent. (14:56:54 YOU SEE SOMETHING THAT'S VERY PROFESSIONALLY POLISHED WRITING, JUMPING OUT OF THAT STUDENT AND YOUR RADAR GOES OFF. From there, some professors can just Google passages in a student's work to determine if it belongs to someone else. Kent State Trumbull subscribes to a service called "Turn It In dot com. "(15:05:11- : 25)ESSENTIALLY THE STUDENT SUBMITS THE PAPER TO THEM AND IT CHECKS IT AGAINST ITS DATABASE WHICH INCLUDES NOT ONLY WHAT YOU'D FIND ON GOOGLE BUT ALSO A LOT OF SCHOLARLY RESOURCES AS WELL AS OTHER STUDENT PAPERS. The website returns a report of similar writings and lets the professor decide. With so much technology out there, plagiarism is becoming even easier to detect.

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News Headline: On With The Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Currently -- "Katherine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen," "Collectors and Collecting," "Recent Acquisitions to the Collection" and "Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevido," KSU Museum, the front campus of KSU.

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News Headline: Scientific American | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Scientific American - Online
Contact Name: W. Wayt Gibbs
News OCR Text: Features | Technology

Smart Materials

They will soon be in everything from computers to concrete bridges

Forget dumb old bricks and mortar: engineers are designing future devices from exotic materials that incorporate chemical switches or mechanical sensors to improve their performance. These "smart materials" are just starting to emerge from the laboratory, but soon you can expect to find them in everything from laptop computers to concrete bridges.

At a recent conference in San Diego, attendees were allowed a glimpse of a smart future still under construction. A hodgepodge group of physicists, chemists, computer scientists, civil engineers and even washing machine makers gathered to compare notes and to demonstrate for one another a host of inventions that stretch, twist, measure or respond in novel ways (the diversity is readily apparent from a quick glance at the conference program). Meanwhile, the conference's keynote speakers--most notably James S. Sirkis of the University of Maryland--wrangled over just how to define this new cross-discipline.

Unifying the field, the doyens concluded, is a shared goal to enhance ordinary objects or to create extraordinary ones by embedding sensors, processors or actuators into larger things. An alternative explanation, however, might be that the all-embracing label of smart materials provides an excuse for playful engineers to do cool things with polymers, fiber

optics and microprocessors.

Certainly there was no lack of creativity in San Diego. Applications for smart materials covered a broad gamut. Jeff M. Melzak's group at Case Western Reserve University is embedding silicon pressure sensors into Goodyear tires to improve fuel economy and reduce wear. Army researchers are placing piezoelectric crystals inside helicopter rotor blades; the crystals produce a feedback response intended to reduce the vibration and noise inside the cockpit.

Philip R. Troyk of the Illinois Institute of Technology has constructed wireless sensors no larger than a Rice Krispie. Implanted in a patient's muscle, the devices could relay information on local nerve activity via radio to an external computer. The devices could also receive power through magnetic induction and send out mild shocks that stimulate the muscle into action.

A few inventions demonstrated at the conference appear to offer considerable promise. Consider:

Advanced liquid crystal displays may soon improve the quality of life of anyone who uses laptop and hand-held computers. A team at Kent State University was touting a new kind of liquid crystal technology; it should lead to flat color display panels that have much better resolution and lower cost than current state-of-the-art LCDs. The smart-crystal displays will also consume far less battery power, allowing portables to come closer to living up to their name.

Artificial muscles that expand and contract in a controllable way could find numerous applications in robotics, medical implants, even virtual reality. At the smart materials conference, researchers at the University of New Mexico showed off an artificial muscle substance that is twice as strong as human muscles and contracts nearly as fast.

Embedded sensors offer a way to monitor the health of structures that undergo a lot of wear and tear--concrete bridges and icebreaker propellers, to name just two examples. Engineers hope to save both money and lives with smart structures that warn their operators when the load becomes more than they can bear. These projects may seem to have little in common with one another. But new areas of technology always emerge through chaos and confusion over their mission. Smart material researchers can at least take heart in the rapid changes in their field; it will probably take only years, rather than decades, before their work starts yielding useful products.

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News Headline: County Briefs - New KSU probe sought | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The sister of a student who died in the 1970 Kent State shootings has urged President Barack Obama's administration to look into the shootings.

Laurel Krause, along with U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich, say new audio evidence is enough to launch an inquiry into the campus shootings that killed four and wounded nine.

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News Headline: Annual River Day presents a variety of activities, attractions | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times
Contact Name: MARIANA SILVA
News OCR Text: Munroe Falls -- Along with a day of sunshine, more than 30 different attractions and activities are expected for the annual Munroe Falls River Day, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 21 at Brust Park on state Route 91. The event is free and put together by the city and Friends of the Munroe Falls Parks.

"It will be very similar to last year and hopefully the weather holds up. We had probably 500 people last year and we expect the same this year," said Mayor Frank Larson. "There will be a lot of activities down at the river."

To kick off the day, the Munroe Falls Fire and Rescue Association will host a free pancake breakfast from 7 to 11 a.m. at Station 1 at 43 Munroe Falls Ave., and a cleanup will begin at 9 a.m. at Brust Park. Three Girl Scout Northeast Ohio troops will help with the cleanup.

"We start thinking about [River Day] as soon as the other one is over," said Joy Mazurowski, president of the Park Board. "There is so many little details involved that you don't think of."

Representatives of a variety of local and state organizations, including Munroe Falls Police and Fire departments, Historical Society and Garden Club, will have tables to give out information and answer public's questions.

Mazurowski said the board and Friends of the Parks considered every age group when planning the activities for River Day.

The auxiliary police will offer parents fingerprinting for their children's Kids Safety Passport, and the Munroe Falls Garden Club will have its annual open house, bake sale and perennial sale starting at 9 a.m. at the Historical Society Museum, at 83 Munroe Falls Ave. The museum is also having an open house on River Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The Stow-Munroe Falls High School Photography Club will offer a photo contest during the activities, and Kent State University Crooked River Adventures is providing canoes for the event this year.

The Lake Erie Nature and Science Center will bring live animals, including an owl and a falcon, and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency will provide fish shocking demonstrations.

Other organizations participating in the event include the Ohio Division of Watercraft, Summit County Metro Parks, Summit County Soil and Water, Native Plant Society of Northeast Ohio, Conservancy for Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Relay for Life, Buckeye Perennial, Hale Farm and Village, and The Canal Society.

Food and refreshments will be sold by Crooked River Grill and the profits donated to the Friends of the Munroe Falls Parks.

After the commemorations, Folknet, a nonprofit educational organization for folk music and traditional arts, will play at the Guise Park' lodge from 7 to 10 p.m.

"It looks like it will be a good time," Larson said.

For more information call the city of Munroe Falls at 330-688-7491.

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News Headline: Annual River Day to present a variety of activities, attractions May 21 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name: Mariana Silva
News OCR Text: Munroe Falls -- Along with a day of sunshine, more than 30 different attractions and activities are expected for the annual Munroe Falls River Day, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 21 at Brust Park on state Route 91. The event is free, and put together by the city and Friends of the Munroe Falls Parks.

"It will be very similar to last year and hopefully the weather holds up. We had probably 500 people last year and we expect the same this year," said Mayor Frank Larson. "There will be a lot of activities down at the river."

To kick off the day, the Munroe Falls Fire and Rescue Association will host a free pancake breakfast from 7 to 11 a.m. at Station 1 at 43 Munroe Falls Ave., and a cleanup will begin at 9 a.m. at Brust Park. Three Girl Scout Northeast Ohio troops will help with the cleanup.

"We start thinking about [River Day] as soon as the other one is over," said Joy Mazurowski, president of the Park Board. "There are so many little details involved that you don't think of."

Representatives of a variety of local and state organizations, including Munroe Falls Police and Fire departments, Historical Society and Garden Club, will have tables to give out information and answer public's questions.

Mazurowski said the board and Friends of the Parks considered every age group when planning the activities for River Day.

The auxiliary police will offer parents fingerprinting for their children's Kids Safety Passport, and the Munroe Falls Garden Club will have its annual open house, bake sale and perennial sale starting at 9 a.m. at the Historical Society Museum, at 83 Munroe Falls Ave. The museum is also having an open house on River Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The Stow-Munroe Falls High School Photography Club will offer a photo contest during the activities and Kent State University Crooked River Adventures is providing canoes for the event this year.

The Lake Erie Nature and Science Center will bring live animals, including an owl and a falcon, and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency will provide fish shocking demonstrations.

Other organizations participating in the event include the Ohio Division of Watercraft, Summit County Metro Parks, Summit County Soil and Water, Native Plant Society of Northeast Ohio, Conservancy for Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Relay for Life, Buckeye Perennial, Hale Farm and Village, and The Canal Society.

Food and refreshments will be sold by Crooked River Grill and the profits donated to the Friends of the Munroe Falls Parks.

After the commemorations, Folknet, a nonprofit educational organization for folk music and traditional arts, will play at the Guise Park' lodge from 7 to 10 p.m.

"It looks like it will be a good time," Larson said.

For more information contact the city at 330-688-7491.

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