Report Overview:
Total Clips (32)
Alumni (3)
Athletics (2)
College of Public Health (COPH) (2)
Higher Education (1)
Interior Design (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (3)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (2)
Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
Psychology (1)
Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) (1)
Safety (2)
Student Wellness and Recreation Center (3)
Students (3)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (3)
East Liverpool grad pens another book 05/20/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

EAST LIVERPOOL - Brigid O'Farrell followed in her elder brothers' footsteps and attended Kent State University in Kent after graduating from East Liverpool...

East Liverpool grad pens another book 05/20/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

EAST LIVERPOOL - Brigid O'Farrell followed in her elder brothers' footsteps and attended Kent State University in Kent after graduating from East Liverpool...

EL Class of 2011 takes next step 05/23/2011 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

...lost his Potter Pride. Poynter earned both a master's and a doctorate in education at Texas A&M after earning his bachelor's degree in education from Kent State University. He told graduates that as he sat listening to the high school commencement address 23 years ago, he was "hoping and praying"...


Athletics (2)
Depleted finances force KSU to chase football paydays 05/23/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Quality means qualify for KSU (Page) 05/23/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Public Health (COPH) (2)
Data from Kent State University Advance Knowledge in Cardiology (Zullo) 05/23/2011 Cardiovascular Week Text Email

...of CR programs do not assess patients for metabolic syndrome or have written guidelines for the metabolic syndrome," wrote M.D. Zullo and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "Opportunities exist for better management of metabolic syndrome in CR." Zullo and colleagues...

Data from Kent State University Advance Knowledge in Cardiology (Zullo) 05/23/2011 Respiratory Therapeutics Week Text Email

...of CR programs do not assess patients for metabolic syndrome or have written guidelines for the metabolic syndrome," wrote M.D. Zullo and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "Opportunities exist for better management of metabolic syndrome in CR." Zullo and colleagues...


Higher Education (1)
Viewpoint: Colleges should not judge students on basis of ACT or SAT scores 05/20/2011 MLive.com Text Attachment Email

...off of true facts instead of a test score. Some colleges have already started to eliminate the ACT or SAT when judging applicants. Schools such as Kent State University, Seton Hall University, Oakland University, and New England College no longer make it a requirement. These colleges have...


Interior Design (1)
KSU recognizes interior designer 05/21/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

HONORED Kent State University honored Nancy Kwallek with a Lifetime Achievement Award for her career of interior design teaching, research and service....


KSU at E. Liverpool (3)
Concert for a Cure 05/20/2011 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

EAST LIVERPOOL — Concert for a Cure sponsored by Kent State featuring Awake the Dawn and Rumors Bands will be held at 5 p.m. Saturday at LaCroft Elementary. The concert benefits Relay for Life...

Relay for Life fundraiser set for Saturday 05/21/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

EAST LIVERPOOL - Music will fill the air for a good cause Saturday. The Kent State University - East Liverpool student government is sponsoring a concert to benefit Relay for Life. The event, which is open to...

Relay for Life fundraiser set for Saturday 05/21/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

EAST LIVERPOOL - Music will fill the air for a good cause Saturday. The Kent State University - East Liverpool student government is sponsoring a concert to benefit Relay for Life. The event, which is open to...


KSU at Stark (1)
KSU Stark to offer degree in biology 05/22/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...in biological science, but also want the flexibility to study in one or more other fields, soon will be able to earn a four-year degree in biology from Kent State University in Stark. Beginning in the fall 2011 semester, the bachelor of arts in biology will be added as the 16th baccalaureate...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Orchids and Onions 05/21/2011 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

ORCHID: To Kent State University Trumbull as it is predicting a more than 45 percent increase in enrollment compared to 2010. Initial summer 2011 numbers...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Celebrities will spell to promote literacy 05/20/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Celebrity spellers have agreed to take the stage Tuesday night at Kent State Tuscarawas and test their skills publicly in a competition to raise awareness and funding for literacy. The Tuscarawas County...

Arts Center has even bigger plans for second season (Morelli, Andrews) 05/21/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is planning on at least 11 more shows for its second season than during its just-completed inaugural one, said general...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (2)
School news 05/22/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Carolyn Brodie, a Kent State professor of library and information science, was elected vice president of the Association for Library Service to Children, a division...

Friends of Library award scholarships 05/22/2011 Hudson Hub-Times Text Attachment Email

...librarianship. Gao, a Hudson resident, has been employed at the Hudson library since 2007. Gao earned a bachelor of arts degree in China and is enrolled at Kent State University working toward her master's degree in library science. Thompson plans to graduate with a master's degree in library...


Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
KSU on cutting edge of 3-D technology (Lavrentovich) 05/21/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

High-definition, 70-inch, 3-D televisions that dont require special glasses will exist by 2015, a Samsung executive said Friday at Kent State University. The KSU physicists in the room seemed impressed and skeptical. How could you engage both eyes without filtering the...

Global Technology Leader to Visit Kent State to Discuss Liquid Crystal Research (Lavrentovich, Yokoyama) 05/20/2011 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State University issued the following news release: Samsung Electronics Corporation is a leader in the global market of high-tech electronics...


Psychology (1)
KSU associate professor receives humanitarian award (Neal-Barnett) 05/23/2011 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

KSU associate professor receives humanitarian award Angela Neal-Barnett, an associate professor in Kent State University's Department of Psychology, was awarded the 2011 Harold K. Stubbs Humanitarian Award recognizing her important work in...


Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) (1)
Former de Blasio aide now steering ship at chamber 05/20/2011 Woodlands Villager - Online Text Attachment Email

West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933 Thomas Gray, who became executive director of the...


Safety (2)
Guilty plea entered in KSU robbery 05/21/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A University of Akron student charged with robbing two Kent State University students at gunpoint in February in a Kent campus parking lot has pleaded guilty to a felony robbery charge. His co-defendants...

When parties get wild (Neumann) 05/22/2011 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

...more problems with unruly parties than there used to be -- just that different schools have problems in different years. Many campus officials agreed. Kent State University had to deal with a "near riot" at the off-campus College Fest two years ago, but it hasn't had to deal with any problems...


Student Wellness and Recreation Center (3)
Kent kids celebrate water, wildlife 05/21/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...lakes, animals and plants while assembling bracelets. The students learned not only how to take care of the river, but also how to have fun on it. Kent State Universitys Crooked River Adventures canoe livery brought kayaks and gear for dry-land testing. Karen Underwood, fourth-grade...

A 'beautiful' day to celebrate Cuyahoga in Kent (Herpy) 05/21/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Akron they tell you not to touch the water. Here we tell you to get in the water.” KEC brought in other groups including Kent Parks and Recreation, Kent State University's Crooked River Adventures livery and the Portage County Historical Society to give presentations. “We can't use the...

River Day activities set for Saturday in Munroe Falls 05/20/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

...open house on River Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Stow-Munroe Falls High School Photography Club will offer a photo contest during the activities and Kent State University Crooked River Adventures is providing canoes for the event this year. The Lake Erie Nature and Science Center will...


Students (3)
Do's and don'ts for LaDue: Bring skill, leave your big outboard motor at home 05/21/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

...stern electric motors. We were competing in a small KSU LaDO bass tournament last Saturday, a friendly tournament trail Franks operates with members of Kent State University's bass fishing team. "It takes some planning to be successful," he said. "You know you won't be able to cover the whole...

Battery-powered boats make for a peaceful day of bass fishing on LaDue Reservoir 05/20/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...stern electric motors. We were competing in a small KSU LaDO bass tournament on Saturday, a friendly tournament trail Franks operates with members of Kent State University's bass fishing team. "It takes some planning to be successful," he said. "You know you won't be able to cover the whole...

Balloon artist finds new twist with unusual, inflatable designs 05/20/2011 Cape Cod Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...wiener dog,” he said, laughing. When he's not twisting or doing magic acts for private or corporate functions, he's studying childhood education at Kent State University or entertaining at places like Donatos in Hudson or Doogan's in Aurora, Ohio. He's also a regional trainer for Balloon...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Kilgour Dowdy tells artful stories 05/21/2011 Trinidad Guardian Text Attachment Email

T&T born US-based writer and Kent State University professor, Dr Joanne Kilgour Dowdy, is due to release yet another book. Artful Stories: The Teacher, the Student, and...


Town-Gown (1)
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS 05/21/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...real estate companies, as recorded by the county auditor and county assessor. PORTAGE COUNTY KENT CITY 429 College, Heintel Georgelle C to Kent State University Board Of Trustees, (1) 329 Erie, Lavelle-Pahl Cynthia D Trustee to Kent State University Board Of Trustees,...


News Headline: East Liverpool grad pens another book | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Brigid O'Farrell followed in her elder brothers' footsteps and attended Kent State University in Kent after graduating from East Liverpool High School in 1963.

She considered majoring in journalism, but decided politics was more her niche.

After graduating with a bachelors degree in political science she traveled to Washington D.C. to work as an intern for Ohio congressman Wayne L. Hays, who served from 1949 to 1976.

"I was kind of hooked," she said of the political realm.

She also worked for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which further ignited her passion for equity in labor relations.

"I learned a lot about discrimination and employment for women and minorities. I decided that I really didn't want to continue in a legal government regulation approach, I wanted to help companies and unions and women solve the problems," she said.

The more she learned, the more she wanted to know.

A later job at a consulting company in Massachusetts that focused on social policy changes led her to consider attending Harvard University, where she later graduated with a masters degree.

"Harvard had the best social policy program around; I was fortunate to be able to be a part of it," she said.

She recently authored "She Was One of Us: Eleanor Roosevelt and the American Worker," which depicts the former first lady's involvement in the labor movement.

It was a book O'Farrell co-authored in 1965 entitled "Rocking the Boat," that prompted her to consider Roosevelt, she said.

"(That book) was based on oral histories of union women from 1950 to 1975. They were getting older and passing away and their stories hadn't been written down because they weren't women who kept diaries," she said.

The oral histories also included stories about Eleanor Roosevelt.

The former first lady wrote a column six days a week for 26 years called "My Day," that focused on unions and workers and their issues, O'Farrell said.

"That really formed the core of my being able to follow her development and her interest in how she cared about it and the actions she took," she said.

Roosevelt was carrying her union member card in her wallet when she died at the age of 78 in 1962, she added.

"Eleanor Roosevelt struggled with public sector unions. She wanted to make sure that children and sick people would be protected. She came down strongly on the need for workers to have a voice....I think she would be quite dismayed at what is happening right now," she said.

Although she moved to California in 2001, she remains informed about Ohio's politics and its effect on her hometown.

"It's a very special and important area to me, and if the message of (my recent book) can be of any help, or people would find it interesting, I would go out of my way to come back and speak," she said.

She has already conducted speaking engagements in Washington D.C.; Denver, Co.; Hyde Park, Ny.; New Orleans, La.; and several locations in California.

She has also appeared on C-SPAN and nearly 40 radio stations across the country, and is affiliated with the Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project, George Washington University.

Her articles have also appeared in several academic journals.

She currently teaches sociology at Mills College in Oakland, Ca. and lives in the San Francisco Bay area with her husband, T.J. Glauthier. They have four sons and three grandsons.

More information about O'Farrell and her work can be found at www.bofarrell.net.

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News Headline: East Liverpool grad pens another book | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Brigid O'Farrell followed in her elder brothers' footsteps and attended Kent State University in Kent after graduating from East Liverpool High School in 1963.

She considered majoring in journalism, but decided politics was more her niche.

After graduating with a bachelors degree in political science she traveled to Washington D.C. to work as an intern for Ohio congressman Wayne L. Hays, who served from 1949 to 1976.

"I was kind of hooked," she said of the political realm.

She also worked for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which further ignited her passion for equity in labor relations.

"I learned a lot about discrimination and employment for women and minorities. I decided that I really didn't want to continue in a legal government regulation approach, I wanted to help companies and unions and women solve the problems," she said.

The more she learned, the more she wanted to know.

A later job at a consulting company in Massachusetts that focused on social policy changes led her to consider attending Harvard University, where she later graduated with a masters degree.

"Harvard had the best social policy program around; I was fortunate to be able to be a part of it," she said.

She recently authored "She Was One of Us: Eleanor Roosevelt and the American Worker," which depicts the former first lady's involvement in the labor movement.

It was a book O'Farrell co-authored in 1965 entitled "Rocking the Boat," that prompted her to consider Roosevelt, she said.

"(That book) was based on oral histories of union women from 1950 to 1975. They were getting older and passing away and their stories hadn't been written down because they weren't women who kept diaries," she said.

The oral histories also included stories about Eleanor Roosevelt.

The former first lady wrote a column six days a week for 26 years called "My Day," that focused on unions and workers and their issues, O'Farrell said.

"That really formed the core of my being able to follow her development and her interest in how she cared about it and the actions she took," she said.

Roosevelt was carrying her union member card in her wallet when she died at the age of 78 in 1962, she added.

"Eleanor Roosevelt struggled with public sector unions. She wanted to make sure that children and sick people would be protected. She came down strongly on the need for workers to have a voice....I think she would be quite dismayed at what is happening right now," she said.

Although she moved to California in 2001, she remains informed about Ohio's politics and its effect on her hometown.

"It's a very special and important area to me, and if the message of (my recent book) can be of any help, or people would find it interesting, I would go out of my way to come back and speak," she said.

She has already conducted speaking engagements in Washington D.C.; Denver, Co.; Hyde Park, Ny.; New Orleans, La.; and several locations in California.

She has also appeared on C-SPAN and nearly 40 radio stations across the country, and is affiliated with the Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project, George Washington University.

Her articles have also appeared in several academic journals.

She currently teaches sociology at Mills College in Oakland, Ca. and lives in the San Francisco Bay area with her husband, T.J. Glauthier. They have four sons and three grandsons.

More information about O'Farrell and her work can be found at www.bofarrell.net.

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News Headline: EL Class of 2011 takes next step | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name: NANCY TULLIS
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - "Carpe diem, graduates. 'Seize the day,'" Jordan Crawford told fellow members of the East Liverpool High School Class of 2011.

Crawford, senior class president, and one of five co-valedictorians, delivered the Graduates' Creed during the 137th commencement Sunday at the Potter Fieldhouse.

"We will be responsible for our actions, because there are no free rides in society," Crawford said. "We are determining what we will become. Our future is our responsibility."

Crawford said he wanted to quote a wise, but anonymous philosopher, who once said, "The tassel is worth the hassle."

Other co-valedictorians are Caitlyn Burt, Jacob Cunningham, Courtney Dawson and Jenna Francis. Ashley Milano is class salutatorian.

Valedictorians each read a portion of Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken." Graduate William Hogue III sang "The Lord's Prayer."

Following the ceremony, the newest members of the mighty East Liverpool High School Alumni Association assembled in front of the high school and tossed their graduation caps into the air.

One of those members delivered the commencement address. Dr. John Poynter of the Class of 1988 has been a teacher and coach, worked in student services and is an adjunct professor of educational administration at Concord University in Austin, Texas.

He has made a home in Texas and is raising a family there, but he still considers East Liverpool home. He comes home once a year to visit family, and has never lost his Potter Pride.

Poynter earned both a master's and a doctorate in education at Texas A&M after earning his bachelor's degree in education from Kent State University. He told graduates that as he sat listening to the high school commencement address 23 years ago, he was "hoping and praying" to make it through four years at Kent State University.

"I was not in the honor society. I did not make the top ten," he said. "I became a teacher because of the teachers I had here. Some are still teaching, and are here today."

Poynter told the graduates, "Your first step into adulthood begins today." He said they should remember that there are three things in life you can never get back: opportunity, words and time.

Choose words carefully, because once said, they can never be taken back, he told the graduates. He told them to enjoy the moment, to celebrate today, because "we always seem to be looking back or forward" and miss opportunities in the present.

"Enjoy the moment now," he said.

"I can't tell you how humbling it is to come home," Poynter said. He told the graduates to hold tight to their Potter Pride. "Take with you your uniqueness, your work ethic and history."

Poynter said in all his travels he has had contact with many colleges and high schools, and has never found any other place where the school mascot is a potter.

"Being a Potter is not something anyone else can understand," he said. "You will be asked where you went to school. You will say East Liverpool. Then you will be asked what is your high school mascot. You will say the Potters. The response will be, 'I'm sorry - the what?' And you will have to explain it. So grab hold of that Potter Pride. Take ownership of it."

According to school officials, the Class of 2011 has already done much to raise the banner of Potter Pride.

"This is a terrific group," said Supt. Ken Halbert Jr. "This class has earned our respect" and "should be held in awe."

The class has earned 254 college semester credits through Kent State University, received $570,000 in college scholarships, and $94,000 from the East Liverpool Foundation. Three graduates are headed to the military, 76 to a four-year college and 32 to a trade or technical school.

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News Headline: Depleted finances force KSU to chase football paydays | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent
State's
cashstrapped
athletic
department
is doing
a nice
job of adding
to its
coffers with
its out-ofconference
football
scheduling.
Last
October,
athletic director Joel
Nielsen guaranteed a net of
$950,000 from the Golden
Flashes' 2011 schedule by
dropping a season-opening
trip to Purdue in favor of a
$1.2 million payday at Alabama.
On Wednesday, KSU announced
its non-conference
schedules for 2012
and 2013, and those eight
games will net the department
a combined total of
more than $2 million.
In both years, the Flashes
will play just one of their
four non-Mid-American
Conference games at Dix
Stadium. But by playing
at Kentucky, Rutgers and
Army in 2012, the department
will make another
$950,000.
The addition of games at
Clemson and Penn State
to a 2013 schedule that includes
a trade-off game at
South Alabama (a home
opponent in the upcoming
2011 season), will mean
$1.35 million in that year.
KSU is expecting another
number north of six figures
in 2014 when it plays at
Ohio State. Nielsen is also
believed to be close to adding
another game with an
Atlantic Coast Conference
school in that season.
Sacrificing competitiveness
in the non-conference
season for the revenue
of larger paydays
with BCS opponents can
help KSU offset the expense
of Division I football.
In 2010, the department
spent more than $4
million on football, while
they netted just $350,000
from a out-of-conference
schedule that included
games at Boston College
and Penn State.
In signing to play Alabama
for $1.2 million
back in October, KSU
broke a contract with
Purdue that would have
paid $425,000. The contract
with Purdue had
been signed in 2008, almost
two years before
Nielsen was hired in
Kent.
The Boilermakers were
not happy with KSU's
decision to back out of
the deal. Instead of playing
the Flashes, Purdue
will open its season
at home against Middle
Tennessee State of the
Sun Belt Conference.
HAZELL IN SPOTLIGHT
Two games with teams
from Alabama in 2011
meant KSU head coach
Darrell Hazell found a little
extra attention from
the media this past weekend
when he attended
the GoDaddy.com Bowl's
dinner and golf outing in
Mobile, Ala.
Hazell was interviewed
on WKRG TV-5, Mobile's
CBS affiliate. He was also
a guest on WNSP Sports
Radio 105.5 FM with
Lee Shirvanian, who is
the play-by-play voice of
South Alabama football.
KSU hosts South Alabama
on Sept. 24. The
Flashes open the season
at Alabama on Sept. 3.
IT WAS A VERY GOOD YEAR
Kent State's football
team may have fallen
short of its goals on
the field during the 2010
football season. They excelled
in the classroom,
however, during the 2010-
11 school year.
In 2011, the Flashes'
roster will welcome
back 29 returning players
who earned at least a 3.0
grade-point average.
Three of those players
— quarterback Spencer
Keith, Punter Matt Rinehart
and defensive back
Brian Hummer — finished
with 4.0 GPAs.
AND THE CARAVAN IS ON ITS
WAY
The first of the Kent
State Athletics Community
Caravans is set for
today from 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. at the Giant Eagle in
Stow Towne Center (1700
Norton Road).
Fans can meet KSU's
first-year coaches — Hazell
and men's basketball
coach Rob Senderoff
— while picking up a hot
dog and a Coke for just
$1, along with a free KSU
cookie. All proceeds will
benefit the Akron Children's
Hospital.
The event will also feature
interactive games.
The idea borrows from
the traditional off-season
“caravans” held by Major
League Baseball teams
over the years.
Future KSU caravans
will be held at the Giant
Eagles at Tanglewood
Square in Bainbridge on
June 4 (Senderoff only),
on Graham Road in
Cuyahoga Falls on June
11 (Hazell only), on Strip
Avenue in North Canton
on June 18 (both Hazell
and Senderoff) and
on Detroit Road in Lakewood
on July 30 (both
Hazell and Senderoff).

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News Headline: Quality means qualify for KSU (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU ADVANCES TO NCAA
FINALS FOR 2nd STRAIGHT YEAR

RADFORD, Va. — The Kent State
men's golf team held onto the fifth
and final spot on Saturday at the
Virginia Tech East Regional in order
to advance to the 2011 NCAA
Championships.
The Flashes, who are ranked No.
33 nationally, held off Virginia Tech
by a mere three strokes in order to
qualify for the NCAA finals for the
second consecutive season and
third time in four years.
The finals will be held at Oklahoma
State's Karstan Creek Golf Club
from May 31-June 5.
“We didn't play our best today, but
we were good enough,” said Kent
State head coach Herb Page, who
has now led the Golden Flashes to
13 NCAA finals in his 33 years.
“It always an enjoyable journey
and sometimes you are able to get
through even when you are not on
your game,” Page said.
“There was a huge amount
of pressure out there and
our guys delivered down the
stretch when we needed it,”
Page said.
Led by a one-over 73 from
freshmen Taylor Pendrith on
Saturday, Kent State posted
a final-round team score
of 301 and a 54-hole total of
893 (296-296-301).
Also moving on from the
East Regional are No. 16
Duke, No. 4 Georgia Tech,
No. 28 Oklahoma and No.
10 LSU.
The story of the day came
down to Nos. 17 and 18,
which by no coincidence
played as the toughest two
holes all week.
With the Golden Flashes'
cut line cushion dwindled
down to just a couple of
strokes, Kent State played
the final two holes at 1-over
as a team.
“Nos. 17 and 18 were really
the difference for us today,”
said Page. “We knew the
scores were getting tighter,
so I told a couple of our guys
that if we're going to lose
this, let's go down hitting
some golf shots and force
the other team to beat us.”
As for Pendrith's solid Saturday,
it was much of the
same from the previous two
days, as he closed out the
week tied for 14th overall
with a 220 (73-74-73).
“I got off to a good start
and had four really good
looks at birdies on the first
few holes,” said Pendrith. “I
ran into a little hiccup with
a triple on No. 7, but I tried
to stay positive, because I
knew the team was going to
need me coming down the
back nine.”

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News Headline: Data from Kent State University Advance Knowledge in Cardiology (Zullo) | Email

News Date: 05/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cardiovascular Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) makes CR an ideal place to offer interventions to address metabolic syndrome-related risk. There is a lack of research related to the metabolic syndrome practices in CR," researchers in Kent, United States report (see also ).

"Therefore, the purpose of this research was to describe practices to assess CR patients for metabolic syndrome, interventions specific to metabolic syndrome, and staff knowledge and beliefs related to metabolic syndrome. This was a cross-sectional study of CR providers in Ohio (n = 94). Program practices and interventions and staff knowledge and beliefs were assessed and stratified on the program use of case management, program certification by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and staff profession. At CR entry, 26% of the programs assessed patients for the metabolic syndrome and 8% had written guidelines for metabolic syndrome. Less than half of the staff (47%) was able to name 3 or more risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Programs using case management were more likely to identify metabolic syndrome (P < .001), measure waist circumference (P < .001), order a new lipid profile (P - .04) at program entry, and have written guidelines for managing metabolic syndrome (P = .01) than programs not using case management. No differences were observed in stratified analyses for the program certification or staff profession. The majority of CR programs do not assess patients for metabolic syndrome or have written guidelines for the metabolic syndrome," wrote M.D. Zullo and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "Opportunities exist for better management of metabolic syndrome in CR."

Zullo and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention (Metabolic Syndrome IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT IN CARDIAC REHABILITATION. Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, 2011;31(2):92-99).

For additional information, contact M.D. Zullo, Kent State University, College Public Health, POB 5190, Kent, OH 44202, United States.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention is: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 530 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621, USA.

Copyright © 2011 Cardiovascular Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Data from Kent State University Advance Knowledge in Cardiology (Zullo) | Email

News Date: 05/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Respiratory Therapeutics Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) makes CR an ideal place to offer interventions to address metabolic syndrome-related risk. There is a lack of research related to the metabolic syndrome practices in CR," researchers in Kent, United States report (see also ).

"Therefore, the purpose of this research was to describe practices to assess CR patients for metabolic syndrome, interventions specific to metabolic syndrome, and staff knowledge and beliefs related to metabolic syndrome. This was a cross-sectional study of CR providers in Ohio (n = 94). Program practices and interventions and staff knowledge and beliefs were assessed and stratified on the program use of case management, program certification by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and staff profession. At CR entry, 26% of the programs assessed patients for the metabolic syndrome and 8% had written guidelines for metabolic syndrome. Less than half of the staff (47%) was able to name 3 or more risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Programs using case management were more likely to identify metabolic syndrome (P < .001), measure waist circumference (P < .001), order a new lipid profile (P - .04) at program entry, and have written guidelines for managing metabolic syndrome (P = .01) than programs not using case management. No differences were observed in stratified analyses for the program certification or staff profession. The majority of CR programs do not assess patients for metabolic syndrome or have written guidelines for the metabolic syndrome," wrote M.D. Zullo and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "Opportunities exist for better management of metabolic syndrome in CR."

Zullo and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention (Metabolic Syndrome IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT IN CARDIAC REHABILITATION. Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, 2011;31(2):92-99).

For additional information, contact M.D. Zullo, Kent State University, College Public Health, POB 5190, Kent, OH 44202, United States.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention is: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 530 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621, USA.

Copyright © 2011 Respiratory Therapeutics Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Viewpoint: Colleges should not judge students on basis of ACT or SAT scores | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: MLive.com
Contact Name: Alayna Leduc
News OCR Text: What does the ACT really measure? Getting into a college in the 21st century is a lot more competitive than it was decades ago. When you apply, the school board will look at grade point average, Advanced Placement courses, extra circular activities and, of course, the dreaded American College Test (ACT) or Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT).

The United States follows the very popular trend of putting more emphasis on the college entrance exams. Unique intelligence is being ignored as college admission boards start to put more focus on these tests. Both of these tests consist of a timed standardized test and the results are factored in when deciding to accept the student to their institution. These tests both claim to predict how well the student is expected to perform their freshman year of college; however, the contents of these exams tend to be slightly biased in many different categories.

Both of these college entrance exams degrade a student's personal hard work and work ethic. Students who do well on these exams have common environmental attributes to their lifestyles. Men tend to do better than women and students who come from families who have higher incomes tend to excel better than those who have lower incomes.

These tests are aimed toward the standard American high school student and neglect to incorporate the diverse high school student who does not take the English language for granted. So why do colleges put such a big emphasis on an exam entrance score? Why don't college boards look at the more broad aspect of the individual instead of putting everyone in one category, simply for the convenience of their jobs. It is extremely easy to look at an application and see if it meets the standards required. Intelligence is really easy to judge when it is based solemnly just off a number.

The ACT is one of the easiest tools to compare students on an unfair level. It degrades all their hands-on hard work and turns the person into a digit. Everyone has strong and weak subjects, so if you perform well on all of the subjects but your weak one, your test score will reflect that and the final number will go down. This will prevent this hard working student from getting into the college they have dreamed of.

What most colleges don't consider is that most people don't pick a major based on of their weakness. The weak subject may be involved in the beginning of their college career to complete the requirements but after the first couple of years, it will be dropped from their schedule because it is irrelevant to what they need to do for their future career.

While men have been proven to get better grades on standardized tests; women have been proven to have better GPAs in high school. Students of Caucasian descent have outscored all other races for the past 10 years.

Being put under pressure is what these two exams are all about.

Parents, colleges, peers, and even the media cause unnecessary agony because the student has been told these tests will predict their future. Some people perform well under stress, but others don't. A high school senior explained how test anxiety affects his performance, "When I get all nervous, it takes days to answer the questions."

The writers of these tests claim they predict how well an individual will do in their freshman year at a university. What that doesn't factor in is work ethic. Having a strong work ethic is key in turning any situation around.

Expensive programs can be taken. They claim to improve test scores by a certain number of points. That's wonderful for individuals who can afford this but what about lower income families? These tests shouldn't be biased toward people who can use money to manipulate their resources.

Colleges should eliminate using the ACT. or SAT as a reference for judging a student. A GPA should be enough. A GPA reflects the work you put into getting where you want to go and an ACT is based off how well you do under a timer. Colleges should require a portfolio and an interview so the college gets more of a personal aspect of the person because after all, you are not a test score.

Another aspect a college should look at is attendance throughout high school. Students who have a strong attendance are more likely to show up to their classes and their jobs. Also colleges are capable of adding more personal questions on their application to see what the student is really trying to get out of this opportunity. Some colleges have put together a questionnaire which reflects the more creative and practical abilities of a student. This has a tighter correlation with success than a standardized test score. The questionnaire brings out the necessities everyone relies on while getting through college.

If a college had to interview every single one of its future students and put that much time into accepting someone, that person would not find out until about a year later if they were accepted or not. What colleges should do is make their college admission boards bigger so more people can work off of a more personal level. Instead of just looking at a piece of paper to decide whether that person is actually worth being accepted try getting to know them on a personal level, which in the end would result in a stronger statistic for the college because it would be based off of true facts instead of a test score.

Some colleges have already started to eliminate the ACT or SAT when judging applicants. Schools such as Kent State University, Seton Hall University, Oakland University, and New England College no longer make it a requirement. These colleges have looked into how an applicant responds to certain questions asked or focuses more on the extracurricular activities one participated in and all of these colleges are known for the success of their graduates.

College is a very exciting time in a student's life. It's a time for growth and learning lessons that you will take with you everywhere. Getting accepted to a college of your dreams is a huge accomplishment. The requirements of getting into an institution should reflect fairness and equality, not bias toward a certain category. If these colleges took the time to focus on those aspects instead of a test score, students would have a better opportunity to pursue what they desire.

Alayna Leduc is a student at Western Michigan University.

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News Headline: KSU recognizes interior designer | Email

News Date: 05/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HONORED

Kent State University honored Nancy Kwallek with a Lifetime Achievement Award for her career of interior design teaching, research and service. Kwallek is the director of the Interior Design Program and the Gene Edward Mikeska Endowed Chair for Interior Design.

To submit candidates for Honored, e-mail information to metrodesk@plaind.com, fax it to 216-999-6374, or mail it to Honored, c/o Plain Dealer Plaza, 1801 Superior Ave., Cleveland 44114. Please include the names and contact information of the honor's recipient, its source and yourself.

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: Concert for a Cure | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL — Concert for a Cure sponsored by Kent State featuring Awake the Dawn and Rumors Bands will be held at 5 p.m. Saturday at LaCroft Elementary. The concert benefits Relay for Life and the cost is $5. Doors open at 5 p.m. and the event starts at 6 p.m.

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News Headline: Relay for Life fundraiser set for Saturday | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Music will fill the air for a good cause Saturday.

The Kent State University - East Liverpool student government is sponsoring a concert to benefit Relay for Life.

The event, which is open to the public, will start at 5 p.m. and be held at LaCroft Elementary School.

It will be an inside event, so weather should not keep anyone away, according to Alex Estell, Kent student and one of the event coordinators.

The "Concert for a Cure" performances will be the first concert fundraiser for local Kent students. The group has helped with and raised money for Relay for Life for the last several years.

"This is our fourth year doing a large event for the Relay for Life program, and we've had other fundraisers in the past," Estell said. "This is our way of giving back, and there is no better way to do so than to help with something that has a direct impact in our community."

According to Rhonda Johnson, a junior at Kent State and another event organizer, there will be some concessions available during the performances, a 50/50 drawing and those attending can give a donation directly to Relay for Life.

"We believe that LaDawn Whitman will be there to talk a little about the Relay for Life program as well," Johnson said.

Whitman is an income development coordinator and local American Cancer Society staff partner. The Relay for Life is the American Cancer Society's signature fundraising activity and will take place next month at Mangano Field.

Relay For Life has been a part of Columbiana County for 15 years, and this year will mark the 27th anniversary of the national Relay For Life program.

Both Johnson and Estell were excited about the Saturday concert.

The concert lineup will feature Bill and Jordan Crawford with a Johnny Cash Tribute and the bands Awake the Dawn and Rumors.

The cost at the door is $5 per person with doors opening at 5 p.m. The music will begin at 6 p.m.

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News Headline: Relay for Life fundraiser set for Saturday | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Music will fill the air for a good cause Saturday.

The Kent State University - East Liverpool student government is sponsoring a concert to benefit Relay for Life.

The event, which is open to the public, will start at 5 p.m. and be held at LaCroft Elementary School.

It will be an inside event, so weather should not keep anyone away, according to Alex Estell, Kent student and one of the event coordinators.

The "Concert for a Cure" performances will be the first concert fundraiser for local Kent students. The group has helped with and raised money for Relay for Life for the last several years.

"This is our fourth year doing a large event for the Relay for Life program, and we've had other fundraisers in the past," Estell said. "This is our way of giving back, and there is no better way to do so than to help with something that has a direct impact in our community."

According to Rhonda Johnson, a junior at Kent State and another event organizer, there will be some concessions available during the performances, a 50/50 drawing and those attending can give a donation directly to Relay for Life.

"We believe that LaDawn Whitman will be there to talk a little about the Relay for Life program as well," Johnson said.

Whitman is an income development coordinator and local American Cancer Society staff partner. The Relay for Life is the American Cancer Society's signature fundraising activity and will take place next month at Mangano Field.

Relay For Life has been a part of Columbiana County for 15 years, and this year will mark the 27th anniversary of the national Relay For Life program.

Both Johnson and Estell were excited about the Saturday concert.

The concert lineup will feature Bill and Jordan Crawford with a Johnny Cash Tribute and the bands Awake the Dawn and Rumors.

The cost at the door is $5 per person with doors opening at 5 p.m. The music will begin at 6 p.m.

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News Headline: KSU Stark to offer degree in biology | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students who desire a career in biological science, but also want the flexibility to study in one or more other fields, soon will be able to earn a four-year degree in biology from Kent State University in Stark.

Beginning in the fall 2011 semester, the bachelor of arts in biology will be added as the 16th baccalaureate degree offered in its entirety at Kent State Stark.

The degree will give students a strong foundation in biology as they develop skill sets in other areas, opening career opportunities to fields, including business, journalism, law, political science and government service, to name a few. It also prepares graduates to expand their education toward traditional biological vocations in medicine or post-secondary teaching and research.

Those focused on field biology have access to an expanded classroom that includes the ecological system of the campus pond, where they utilize an extensive array of tools for collecting and identifying aquatic and terrestrial specimens.

Visit www.stark.kent.edu/

academics/depts/bsci to learn more about the BA in biology degree, or call the Office of Student Services at 330-244-3251.

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News Headline: Orchids and Onions | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ORCHID: To Kent State University Trumbull as it is predicting a more than 45 percent increase in enrollment compared to 2010. Initial summer 2011 numbers indicate a 46.9 percent increase from last summer as 1,785 students have enrolled, an increase of 570 students.

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News Headline: Celebrities will spell to promote literacy | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Celebrity spellers have agreed to take the stage Tuesday night at Kent State Tuscarawas and test their skills publicly in a competition to raise awareness and funding for literacy.

The Tuscarawas County Literacy Coalition's inaugural Celebrity Spelling Bee starts at 6 p.m. in Founders Hall Auditorium.

Spellers include:

Participants will attempt to spell each word on their own. If they miss on the first try, they can utilize coaching help from fourth-grade students at York Elementary in New Philadelphia.

Sharon Ricklic, a fifth-grade teacher at York, recruited the students to help. She has been associated with the York Elementary Spelling Bee for the past 14 to 15 years.

Third tries will cost each participant a $10 mulligan.

Judges are Pat Comanitz, outreach program director at Kent State Tuscarawas; Tom Jekel, publisher and editor at The Times-Reporter; and Michelle McMorrow Ramsell, director of the Tuscarawas County Public Library.

Besides the literacy coalition, other event sponsors are American Electric Power and Tuscarawas Valley Heritage Inc.

Dover Public Library Director Jim Gill, a member of the coalition, will moderate the event. He said some of the words selected will have Tuscarawas County roots, so the inaugural event will be personalized and fun.

Besides the $5 admission price for attendees 17 and older, proceeds will include a $300 fee that celebrity participants will contribute.

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News Headline: Arts Center has even bigger plans for second season (Morelli, Andrews) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Joe Wright
News OCR Text: The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is planning on at least 11 more shows for its second season than during its just-completed inaugural one, said general manager Mike Morelli.

He is negotiating a few remaining contracts, and expects 34 or 35 shows will be booked for the 2011-12 season, which could be announced by the end of June.

The first 23-show season in the $17.5 million center wrapped up May 10-11 with two sold-out “Stomp” performances, among seven that were sellouts.

“It was a great way to end the season,” said Morelli.

“The great thing about ‘Stomp' is that it was from the same company that pulled ‘Oklahoma!,'” said Morelli. “We got that one as kind of a makeup for ‘Oklahoma!',” which had been scheduled for Jan. 16 before the production company ended its run early.

“I thought (the first season) went great,” said Morelli. “Broadway shows by far were the most popular. Comedians also were well received.”

“Cats,” the “Wizard of Oz” and “Avenue Q” were three Broadway shows on the first-season schedule. Comedian Bill Engvall proved to be popular with a couple of sellout sessions in one evening last March.

Musical artists such as Michael Bolton, Clint Black and Cherryholmes also performed in front of large audiences. The Tuscarawas Philharmonic also did well.

There are a few lessons learned along the way, and Morelli expects to make some infrastructure upgrades.

“In seeing the Performing Arts Center come to life, it is rewarding to know our strategic initiatives were well planned,” said Gregg Andrews, dean and chief administrative officer of Kent State Tuscarawas.

“Based upon the many compliments and expressions of gratitude we are receiving from our patrons, we are successful in creating a premiere venue to bring a new level of cultural opportunities to the region we serve. We have created new full-time and part-time jobs, and expanded academic programming in music, theatre and dance, which are being well-received by our students,” Andrews said.

“The community is benefiting from our goal for the operation of the center to positively impact the economic development in the Tuscarawas Valley. In addition to the creation of new jobs, area hotels and restaurants are reporting increased business on the nights of our performances and events.”

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News Headline: School news | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Carolyn Brodie, a Kent State professor of library and information science, was elected vice president of the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association. She will be president of the organization in the next year.

The Akron Beacon Journal welcomes news of civic, school and military achievement. Send notices to Celebrations, P.O. Box 640, Akron, OH 44309-0640. Or fax them to 330-996-3033.

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News Headline: Friends of Library award scholarships | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Friends of the Hudson Library has awarded two $1,500 scholarships for graduate work in library and information science. This year's recipients are Lan Gao and Beth Thompson. Both Lan and Beth were winners of the Friends 2010 scholarships.

Scholarships are offered each year to residents of Hudson and the contiguous area as well as to non-resident employees of the Hudson Library and Historical Society. The scholarships are presented to encourage careers in librarianship.

Gao, a Hudson resident, has been employed at the Hudson library since 2007. Gao earned a bachelor of arts degree in China and is enrolled at Kent State University working toward her master's degree in library science.

Thompson plans to graduate with a master's degree in library science from Kent State University in August. A Stow resident, she is employed as a graduate student assistant in technical services and a graduates student cataloger in the performing arts library at Kent State University. She also has a master's degree in music from Kent State.

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News Headline: KSU on cutting edge of 3-D technology (Lavrentovich) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: High-definition, 70-inch, 3-D televisions that dont require special glasses will exist by 2015, a Samsung executive said Friday at Kent State University.

The KSU physicists in the room seemed impressed and skeptical. How could you engage both eyes without filtering the image through bulky glasses? Thats what were working on, said Sungtae Shin, senior vice president of Samsungs Liquid Crystal Display Center. He came to check on whats becoming of $500,000 his company is investing in cutting-edge research. KSUs Liquid Crystal Institute is one of the most advanced research and education centers in the field of liquid crystals. Their offspring, liquid crystal displays, make up a $150 billion industry that gives us everything from calculators to iPhones. So its fitting that Samsung, which dominates the LCD market, would call on KSU. Companies and scientists around the world are seeking the next competitive edge in liquid crystal technology. Its like a race all the time, said Oleg Lavrentovich, director of the Liquid Crystal Institute.

In the field of LCDs, scientists are racing toward many things: flatter displays, cheaper products. But the key to a 3-D display that requires no eyewear is the key to a fortune. Thats where KSU comes in.

LCDs show images by turning pixels of liquid crystals on and off. If you can speed up the response time of the liquid crystals, you can make an image seem more lifelike and, eventually, fool human eyes into thinking a flat screen is a 3-D object.

Most liquid crystals have an eight millisecond response time. The company wants to have new liquid crystals made that have a response time faster than one millisecond, Shin said. Eyes bulge. Jaws drop.

For the past year, scientists at KSU have been using $250,000 to play with liquid crystals, trying to align the crystal formations in a way that makes them faster.

The hard part is getting all the liquid crystals on a surface to align the same way. Theyve tried zapping them with small electric charges, taking away their oxygen, heating them, cooling them.

If they can get it, the possibilities for application go as far as someday having touchable, bendable, transparent displays. Shin, a 1994 graduate from the Liquid Crystal Institute, wowed the KSU scientists with some Samsung predictions.

So far no dice. But theres progress. I think he supports (our work), KSU physics professor Dave Allender said of Shin. I think it went well.

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News Headline: Global Technology Leader to Visit Kent State to Discuss Liquid Crystal Research (Lavrentovich, Yokoyama) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University issued the following news release: Samsung Electronics Corporation is a leader in the global market of high-tech electronics manufacturing and digital media, and the largest producer of liquid crystal displays in the world. On Friday, May 20, Dr. Sung Tae Shin, senior vice president of Samsung's LCD Center in South Korea, will visit Kent State University on to discuss the university's groundbreaking research involving new applications for liquid crystal display technologies.

Shin, who received his Ph.D. from Kent State in 1994, will meet with Oleg Lavrentovich, director of Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute, and other faculty members to review progress on the two university research grant projects funded by Samsung.

The current Samsung-sponsored research conducted at Kent State deals with two main themes: New liquid crystalline materials for display applications, and the search for the new techniques of surface alignment of liquid crystals. Without uniform alignment, the LCD panels are not able to display images.

The second project is lead by Kent State's Ohio research scholar and professor of chemical physics Hiroshi Yokoyama, who develops new approaches to uniform alignment of liquid crystals at the walls of the display panels. "The goal of our research is to establish a conceptual breakthrough to bring Samsung's LCDs to a new competitive edge," Yokoyama said.

Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute is the most comprehensive research and educational center in the field of liquid crystals. In 2003, Kent State and Samsung established an ongoing collaboration on various aspects of liquid crystal technology.

"Samsung has been a wonderful partner with Kent State in exploring new technologies and supporting important new research," Lavrentovich said.

The field of liquid crystal display technology has exploded in recent years, with strong demand around the world for flat panel TVs, cell phones, computer monitors and new devices such as the iPad. "It is not widely known that Kent State was the birthplace of the technology that makes these products possible," said Lavrentovich. "Research performed at the Liquid Crystal Institute and similar centers around the world led to the establishment of this $150 billion industry." Shin will meet with Kent State faculty involved in the Samsung-supported projects, including Yokoyama, physics professor David Allender and Satyendra Kumar, associate vice president for research and sponsored programs. Kumar was Shin's advisor when he was a graduate student at Kent State.

"Of course, while Dr. Shin is on campus we will also take the opportunity to present themes for future cooperative research with Samsung," Lavrentovich added.

For more information on Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute, visit www.lci.kent.edu.

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News Headline: KSU associate professor receives humanitarian award (Neal-Barnett) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU associate professor receives humanitarian award

Angela Neal-Barnett, an associate professor in Kent State University's Department of Psychology, was awarded the 2011 Harold K. Stubbs Humanitarian Award recognizing her important work in the study of anxiety disorders among African-Americans.

Neal-Barnett was honored at the 21st Annual Judge Harold K. Stubbs Awards Banquet March 11 at the Hilton Inn West in Fairlawn. More than 300 guests attended the event.

Neal-Barnett is a nationally recognized expert in the area of anxiety disorders among African-Americans. Her work has focused on fears and social anxiety in African-American children, as well as sister circles for panic disorder and stress in African-American adults. A workshop presenter and speaker, she is the author of "Soothe Your Nerves: The Black Woman's Guide to Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety, Panic and Fear."

Neal-Barnett founded and became CEO of Rise Sally Rise Inc., a company dedicated to helping women overcome anxiety and fear from a psychological, spiritual and black perspective. Her work has been featured on national media, including CNN, NPR and BET.

"I was shocked and humbled when I heard about this honor," Neal-Barnett said. "Judge Stubbs was such a man of honor and integrity. The point of everything we do is to try and make a difference in the emotional well-being of African-Americans, and to be recognized for the work is truly incredible."

Neal-Barnett earned a bachelor's from Mount Union College in Alliance, and both her master's and doctoral degrees from DePaul University in Chicago. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in clinical research at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic.

Neal-Barnett has taught at Kent State for more than 20 years. Her research is supported by the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Mental Health, the Kent State University Foundation and the Ohio Commission on Minority Health. Neal-Barnett, who resides in Tallmadge, is listed in Who's Who in America, Who's Who in American Women, Who's Who in Medicine and Health Care and Outstanding Americans.

Sponsored by the St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church of Akron, the Harold K. Stubbs Humanitarian Award recognizes those who have made contributions in areas such as social action, government, business, medicine and law. The awards program honors Stubbs, a former Akron Municipal Court judge and Kent State alumnus. Stubbs was actively involved with the church, which since his death has annually recognized individuals for their community service with this award.

For more information on Neal-Barnett, visit www.personal.kent.edu/~aneal/amnbhp.html.
>

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News Headline: Former de Blasio aide now steering ship at chamber | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Woodlands Villager - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933

Thomas Gray, who became executive director of the Greenwich Village-Chelsea Chamber of Commerce at the end of March, comes to his new job with a firm belief in small businesses and lots of experience in government.

He is also enthusiastic about the neighborhoods that the G.V.C.C.C. covers, including Greenwich Village, the East Village, Union Square, the Flatiron District and Chelsea.

“This area is amazing,” he said in a recent interview in Union Square, noting that the chamber district extends from Canal St. to 34th St. between the Hudson River and Third Ave.

“I went to my first Community Board 3 committee meeting two weeks ago — the board's Economic Development Committee — about small businesses in the neighborhood. They're very well-informed,” he said.

“A lot of people don't realize that participating in community boards and civic associations really does matter. The political class listens, so you have to manage your message and get to the people who can help,” he said.

Gray, 30, replaced Lauren Danziger as chamber executive when she became executive director of the Meatpacking District Improvement Association.

He was born and raised in Nagley, a small town in eastern Ohio, and went to Kent State University where he joined the U.S. Coast Guard Reserve.

“One of the reasons I went to Kent State was their Coast Guard Reserve program,” he said. “I had an interest in law enforcement and the Coast Guard has a port security program that was a good fit.” Gray joined the Reserve at Kent in 2000, and spent the summers training in Sandusky on Lake Erie.

“We trained in search-and-rescue operations, drug interdiction and port protection,” he said.

After he graduated in 2003, his Coast Guard combat unit was activated during the Operation Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom campaigns. The unit went to Kuwait in the Persian Gulf, assigned to protecting shipping in the deepwater port of Kuwait City.

“We were confined to base and I spent most of the time on a gunship,” he recalled.

After active service, he moved to New York in 2005 but remained in the Coast Guard Reserve unit in Staten Island as a machinery tech third class until 2008.

A Brooklyn resident, Gray joined Bill de Blasio's City Council staff in the summer of 2005 working on public policy. He also volunteered for Hilary Clinton's presidential primary campaign in 2008, traveling to the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary. The following year he volunteered for Councilmember Joe Addabbo Jr.'s successful campaign for the state Senate.

When de Blasio was elected public advocate in 2009, Gray became his director of land-use policy.

“I got into small business issues during the economic downturn when I learned how important small businesses are in the economy,” Gray said.

“I got to know people from all over the city,” he said. As de Blasio's representative at public hearings, community meetings and interagency meetings, Gray became adept in government relations with business, nonprofit and grassroots groups.

“A lot is on the line when you have a small business and you don't have a lot of time to deal with government,” Gray said. “I will do that for the chamber and the members, and I can also help government communicate with the people.”

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News Headline: Guilty plea entered in KSU robbery | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A University of Akron student charged with robbing two Kent State University students at gunpoint in February in a Kent campus parking lot has pleaded guilty to a felony robbery charge.

His co-defendants — both Kent State University students — are scheduled to enter guilty pleas to felony charges in June, court records show.

John R. Blackmon, 21, of 1839 Ashton Lane, Apt. 181, Franklin Township, pleaded guilty Friday May 13 to one count of first-degree felony aggravated robbery with a firearms specification, in Portage County Common Pleas Judge John Enlow's courtroom.

Blackmon, who was a pre-med student at Akron U at the time of the alleged offense, had been set for trial Tuesday in Enlow's courtroom before entering the plea.

Co-defendants Paris O. Millberry and Andrew R. Scott, both 20, are expected to plead guilty next month in Enlow's courtroom. Scott's plea hearing is set for June 20 and Millberry's for June 27, according to court records.

Blackmon, Millberry and Scott allegedly robbed two students on the night of Feb. 5 in the parking lot of Harbourt Hall, near the KSU Ice Arena. Holding their victims at bay with a .40-caliber handgun, the men allegedly got away with a cell phone worth $150, a wallet and $10 in cash.

The victims were not injured.

First-degree felonies carry a potential sentence of three to 10 years in prison. Firearms specifications to the charges, alleging the use of a handgun in the commission of the crime, could add a additional, mandatory three years in prison.

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News Headline: When parties get wild (Neumann) | Email

News Date: 05/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name: Pyle, Encarnacion
News OCR Text: In the early 2000s, a couple of street and tailgate parties near Ohio State University quickly spun out of control into car-burning, furniture-hurling riots. After the worst incident, a task force was created to suggest ways to keep the peace.

The block party that spilled onto Woodruff Avenue last week wasn't nearly as bad, Ohio State leaders say.

But to prevent problems from becoming pandemonium, Ohio State spent days warning students to stay out of trouble at last night's ChittShow party in the 100 block of Chittenden Avenue.

At least early on, most students seemed to be heeding the school's advice last night.

As of 9 p.m., Columbus police were just starting to send in their special-duty units, and there had been no arrests or issues.

Ohio State officials said they want students to have fun but be careful as spring quarter ends.

"We really view what happened at Woodfest as an unfortunate isolated incident," Javaune Adams-Gaston, vice president of student life, said last week. "Our students have any number of parties every weekend without any major problems, and we'd like to keep it that way."

At Woodfest, police used pepper spray to disperse hundreds of partygoers who filled Woodruff, just east of N. High Street. Police said that at least one officer was struck in the back of the head with a full can of beer thrown from the crowd estimated at 1,000. Three partygoers, including two OSU students, were arrested on charges of felony assault on an officer.

Every year, students at campuses nationwide throw large off-campus parties to celebrate warmer weather and the end of the school year.

Most fests are calm and come with few problems, but some have a history of being large and sometimes unruly, said Robert Booker, executive director of the Ohio Investigative Unit, which enforces liquor laws. That can cause problems for local and state law enforcement, he said.

The agency has been working with schools, including Bowling Green, Ohio University and the University of Akron, to enforce drug and alcohol laws and teach students to party responsibly. Booker said OU and Athens have worked particularly hard to crack down on bad behavior after block parties in 2009 and '10 erupted in flames and led to mass arrests.

Adams-Gaston thinks Woodfest grew too large, too fast for the street.

"Students often send out a message on social media and are overwhelmed by the response and unable to control the size of their parties," she said. "Because there isn't much lawn on Woodruff, many of the students ended up spilling onto the street, where they became a safety hazard."

She said Ohio State hasn't had any serious problems with street parties since the ChitFests of 2001 and 2002 when officers in riot gear used tear gas to disperse drunken partyers at the annual April bashes. After the 2002 OSU-Michigan game, Ohio State fans also burned cars and sofas during a disturbance in which officers lobbed tear gas at the crowds.

The result: many injuries, a number of arrests and dismissals from the university, hundreds of thousands of dollars in property damage and strained relationships between the community and students.

The violence easily could have led to a house fire or fatality, Adams-Gaston said, which is why the university acted early this year. It sent out numerous messages last week and went door-to-door telling students about the potential consequences of being involved in an out-of-control party. Several landlords and community members also lent a hand.

"I think the university needs to continuously reinforce that students should be good citizens when they are on campus or in the community -- not just when there are concerns looming about a big party," said Bill Graver, treasurer of the University District Organization and president of a local real-estate company.

Booker, of the Ohio Investigative Unit, said he doesn't believe there are any more problems with unruly parties than there used to be -- just that different schools have problems in different years. Many campus officials agreed.

Kent State University had to deal with a "near riot" at the off-campus College Fest two years ago, but it hasn't had to deal with any problems since, said Tom Neumann, the campus's spokesman.

"Let's face it: If there is going to be a party, there's always a chance it can get out of control," Neumann said.

Dispatch reporter Allison Manning contributed to this story.

epyle@dispatch.com

Copyright © 2011 THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH and may not be republished without permission.

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News Headline: Kent kids celebrate water, wildlife | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent schools fourth-graders had a fun-in-the-sun learning experience at Heritage Park during the Watershed Festival Friday.

From 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., about 150 children visited the festival to learn about water conservation and wildlife. This is our river celebration, said Cathy Ricks, the festivals organizer at Kent Parks and Recreation. We invite community members and staff members from different naturalist organizations to come share their knowledge of the river with the children. Ricks said the idea is to get both kids and teachers outside, have engaged learning and a reason to enjoy Heritage Park and the Cuyahoga River.

Students cycled through four different stations, each one with a new lesson to learn.

Beavers, river otters, turtles, ducks and other river animals were the focus of the Portage Parks station, which taught the eager kids the history and importance of the wildlife.

Jerry Gubanich, storm water consultant for the city of Kent, used his background to teach ways to keep water clean and recognize pollution through testing and wildlife observation.

Olivia Kiskadden, a student at St. Patrick School, said she learned about the importance of the river and its effect on the animals. They love it, this is their home, Kiskadden said. We should never destroy it or make it polluted again, she said, adding that she hopes to take her family and dog to River Day today so they, too, can learn about the Cuyahoga.

Portage County Water and Soil engaged the children with an interactive water cycle game, where the kids traveled back and forth between the sky, rivers, lakes, animals and plants while assembling bracelets.

The students learned not only how to take care of the river, but also how to have fun on it. Kent State Universitys Crooked River Adventures canoe livery brought kayaks and gear for dry-land testing.

Karen Underwood, fourth-grade teacher at St. Patrick School, attended the Watershed Festival for the first time with her students. I think its great, Underwood said. Theyve got a lot of hands-on stuff for them to do. It seems to be very well organized.

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News Headline: A 'beautiful' day to celebrate Cuyahoga in Kent (Herpy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Saturday's weather made it a little easier for the Kent Environmental Council to draw community members to the annual River Day at John Brown Tannery Park in Kent.

KEC chairman Charles Frederick said he thought the sunny spring day was the perfect time to explain the importance of the Cuyahoga River to Kent Residents.

“The river was a junkyard in the ‘70s,” he said. “We need to protect it. Below Akron they tell you not to touch the water. Here we tell you to get in the water.”

KEC brought in other groups including Kent Parks and Recreation, Kent State University's Crooked River Adventures livery and the Portage County Historical Society to give presentations.

“We can't use the weather as an excuse for not coming down here today,” said John Idone, director of the Kent Parks and Recreation Department. “It's just beautiful. We're hoping people take advantage of it and learn a little bit about the river.”

State Rep. Kathleen Clyde, who dropped by John Brown Tannery Park at the beginning of River Day, said canoeing while growing up in northern Portage County taught her about the importance of the river to the region. She said she wanted to show her appreciation to local groups who work to protect the river.

“We need to do everything we can to protect our natural resources,” Clyde said. “I'm supportive of the groups that we have in Kent that try to raise awareness and keep our areas beautiful.”

Dave Herpy, recreational program coordinator for KSU, gave a presentation on canoe and kayak safety. Herpy is the adviser for the student-run Crooked River Adventures livery, which operates out of John Brown Tannery Park.

Herpy said the weather has not cooperated with the livery operation yet this year, and the water was still too high Saturday for launching canoes and kayaks.

“We haven't had too many phone calls yet because people know the river's too high,” he said. “It's a safety thing.”

President Wayne Enders and trustee Bob Kunst of the Portage County Historical Society also gave a presentation, which focused on a American Indian-style grass loom Kunst built.

“Any time we have an opportunity to mingle with people and let them know about the historical society, we're here,” Enders said.

Other River Day events in Kent included open houses at the Kent water plant on Hodgeman Lane and the Kent Bog State Nature Preserve on Meloy Road.

Frederick agreed that River Day was about connecting with people and educating them.

“If we could reach out to a few more people about the importance of the river, I think our day is a success,” he said.

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News Headline: River Day activities set for Saturday in Munroe Falls | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Munroe Falls — Along with a day of sunshine, more than 30 different attractions and activities are expected for the annual Munroe Falls River Day, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 21 at Brust Park on state Route 91. The event is free, and put together by the city and Friends of the Munroe Falls Parks.

To kick off the day, the Munroe Falls Fire and Rescue Association will host a free pancake breakfast from 7 to 11 a.m. at Station 1 at 43 Munroe Falls Ave., and a cleanup will begin at 9 a.m. at Brust Park. Three Girl Scout Northeast Ohio troops will help with the cleanup.

Representatives of a variety of local and state organizations, including Munroe Falls Police and Fire departments, Historical Society and Garden Club, will have tables to give out information and answer public's questions.

The auxiliary police will offer parents fingerprinting for their children's Kids Safety Passport, and the Munroe Falls Garden Club will have its annual open house, bake sale and perennial sale starting at 9 a.m. at the Historical Society Museum, at 83 Munroe Falls Ave. The museum is also having an open house on River Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The Stow-Munroe Falls High School Photography Club will offer a photo contest during the activities and Kent State University Crooked River Adventures is providing canoes for the event this year.

The Lake Erie Nature and Science Center will bring live animals, including an owl and a falcon, and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency will provide fish shocking demonstrations.

Other organizations participating in the event include the Ohio Division of Watercraft, Summit County Metro Parks, Summit County Soil and Water, Native Plant Society of Northeast Ohio, Conservancy for Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Relay for Life, Buckeye Perennial, Hale Farm and Village, and The Canal Society.

Food and refreshments will be sold by Crooked River Grill and the profits donated to the Friends of the Munroe Falls Parks.

Folknet, a nonprofit educational organization for folk music and traditional arts, will play at the Guise Park' lodge from 7 to 10 p.m.

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News Headline: Do's and don'ts for LaDue: Bring skill, leave your big outboard motor at home | Email

News Date: 05/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Egan, D'Arcy
News OCR Text: GREAT OUTDOORS

D'ARCY EGAN HELPS YOU GET THE MOST FROM YOUR NATURE EXPERIENCE

Auburn Corners, Ohio - Fishermen need a game plan when they launch a boat at LaDue Reservoir.

"When you're limited to powering your boat with batteries and electric motors, you can only go so fast and so far during a day on the lake," said Rory Franks of Ravenna Township. "It's not at all like fishing on Mosquito or West Branch reservoirs where you can fire up the big outboard motor and run all over the place."

That can be frustrating for anglers who own gas-powered bass boats, which are not welcome on LaDue and Mogadore. As a result, they have become great fishing lakes primarily because they make boaters rely on oar or battery power. The result is fewer fishermen and reduced angling pressure.

The weigh-ins at Franks' bass tournaments have proven the productivity of those lakes.

"We've had some sensational bass catches at LaDue," said Franks, assigning me the back seat in his little 14-foot johnboat with bow and stern electric motors. We were competing in a small KSU LaDO bass tournament last Saturday, a friendly tournament trail Franks operates with members of Kent State University's bass fishing team.

"It takes some planning to be successful," he said. "You know you won't be able to cover the whole lake and all of the likely bass spots. You're limited to 'crawl' speed, and it takes quite a while to go from one end of LaDue Reservoir to the other.

"My game plan is to head north and fish a river section that holds big bass when they're getting ready to spawn. I plan to flip soft plastic lures to the shallow-water areas, and maybe throw a spinnerbait across the flats."

Franks, 41, the assistant chief probation officer for the Portage County Juvenile Court, is a top-notch angler and his bass tournaments are popular. His sixth annual Mosquito Madness Tournament at Mosquito Reservoir today and Sunday filled its field of more than 200 bass anglers in November.

"The small, electric-only tournaments are low-key, fun events," he said. "I enjoy the LaDue series because the young guys from Kent State are helping to run them and like to fish them. It teaches the young guys to plan their bass attack, to experience the calm of nature while advancing their angling skills."

Franks says electric-only events teach anglers to focus on the good areas and thoroughly fish them, rather than relying on run-and-gun fishing.

LaDue Reservoir was down a couple of feet last Saturday, changing our game. The spawning areas we wanted to target were too shallow to attract bass. It took only four bass, weighing a shade less than nine pounds, for Shane Ressler and Nic Boring to win. That's considered a light limit of bass at LaDue Reservoir.

The big lake in Geauga County, owned by the city of Akron, has lots to offer. The crappie fishing is very good, bluegill are plentiful and the catfish bite in summer is strong. White perch can be a nuisance, but there are big northern pike to catch. Parma angler Gus Gronowski set a world line class record in 1992 by catching a 37.65-pound channel catfish while trolling for walleye.

"The best feature is its peacefulness," said Franks. "Electric-powered boats may be slow, but they're also quiet. That makes for a nice morning on the water."

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: degan@plaind.com, 216-999-5158

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: Battery-powered boats make for a peaceful day of bass fishing on LaDue Reservoir | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By D'Arcy Egan, The Plain Dealer

D'ARCY EGAN/THE PLAIN DEALERMatt Byers (left) and Ken Begue get fishing gear ready for an early-morning start of the KSU LaDO Bass Series tournament at LaDue Reservoir on Saturday. Only electric boat motors are allowed on the sprawling 1,500-acre reservoir, limiting how fast and how far tournament anglers can travel on the popular Geauga County lake.

AUBURN CORNERS - Fishermen need a game plan when they launch a boat at LaDue Reservoir.

"When you're limited to powering your boat with batteries and electric motors, you can only go so fast and so far during a day on the lake," said Rory Franks of Ravenna Twp. "It's not at all like fishing on Mosquito or West Branch reservoirs, where you can fire up the big outboard motor and run all over the place."

That can be frustrating for anglers who own gas-powered bass boats, which are not welcome on LaDue and Mogadore. As a result, they have become great fishing lakes primarily because they make boaters rely on oar or battery power. The result is fewer fishermen and reduced angling pressure.

The weigh-ins at Franks' bass tournaments have proven the productivity of those lakes.

"We've had some sensational bass catches at LaDue," said Franks, assigning me the back seat in his little 14-foot john boat with bow and stern electric motors. We were competing in a small KSU LaDO bass tournament on Saturday, a friendly tournament trail Franks operates with members of Kent State University's bass fishing team.

"It takes some planning to be successful," he said. "You know you won't be able to cover the whole lake and all of the likely bass spots. You're limited to 'crawl' speed, and it takes quite a while to go from one end of LaDue Reservoir to the other.

"My game plan is to head north, and fish a river section that holds big bass when they're getting ready to spawn. I plan to flip soft plastic lures to the shallow-water areas, and maybe throw a spinnerbait across the flats."

Franks, 41, the assistant chief probation officer for the Portage County Juvenile Court, is a top-notch angler and his bass tournaments are popular. His 6th annual Mosquito Madness Tournament at Mosquito Reservoir today and Sunday filled its field of more than 200 bass anglers last November.

"The small, electric-only tournaments are low-key, fun events," he said. "I enjoy the LaDue series because the young guys from Kent State are helping to run them and like to fish them. It teaches the young guys to plan their bass attack, to experience the calm of nature while advancing their angling skills."

Franks says electric-only events teach anglers to focus on the good areas and thoroughly fish them, rather than relying on run-and-gun fishing.

LaDue Reservoir was down a couple of feet on Saturday, changing our game. The spawning areas we wanted to target were too shallow to attract bass. It took only four bass, weighing a shade less than nine pounds, for Shane Ressler and Nic Boring to win. That's considered a light limit of bass at Ladue Reservoir

The big lake, owned by the City of Akron, has lots to offer. The crappie fishing is very good, bluegill are plentiful and the catfish bite in summer is strong. White perch can be a nuisance, but there are big northern pike to catch. Parma angler Gus Gronowski set a world line class record in 1992 by catching 37.65-pound channel catfish while trolling for walleye.

"The best feature is its peacefulness," said Franks. "Electric-powered boats may be slow, but they're also quiet. That makes for a nice morning on the water."

Boat Rentals back at LaDue, Mogadore reservoirs

The boats are back at LaDue Reservoir, and at Mogadore and Punderson lakes.

The boat rentals were a very popular feature at LaDue and Mogadore years ago, but went away when Akron officials closed the boat houses. Brad Ashburn brought them back this season, a fleet of solid, 14-foot Tracker john boats with 50-pound thrust electric motors. Ashburn is renting boats at Punderson for a third summer.

A boat with oars is $20 per hour, $38 per day. Add an electric trolling motor and a couple of deep-cycle batteries and the cost is $35 an hour, $60 per day. Call 440-669-3147. The boat houses are open from 7 a.m.-8 p.m. every day. Ashburn recommends reservations for holiday weekends.

The boat house concession stands are also open again, offering bait, tackle, snacks and beverages.

Related topics: boat rentals, electric trolling motors, lado bass series, ladue reservoir, rory franks

More stories in Outdoors with D'Arcy Egan

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News Headline: Balloon artist finds new twist with unusual, inflatable designs | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cape Cod Times - Online
Contact Name: Kim Hon
News OCR Text: Balloon artist Mot Buchanan works on a dress of balloons for a fashion show in Springfield Township, Ohio, on April 29.Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal/MCT

AKRON, Ohio — Inside a dressing room at the Country Club of Hudson, Ohio, Isabell Rodau wiggled her slender figure into a cocktail dress. The one-of-a-kind creation squeaked and squealed as a friend helped pull it over her head. Rodau giggled as designer Mot Buchanan, who is admittedly filled with more hot air than most 27-year-olds, looked away until the dress was in place.

“Oh, my gosh, that's lovely,” said Laura Conn, grinning. “It's actually classy.”

Not the kind of comments one might expect about a dress made of balloons. To complete the white and gray ensemble, Rodau slipped on a pair of sparkling high heels. She strutted out the door into a room filled with women who had gathered for a style show, sponsored by the Hudson Newcomers Club to raise money for the school district's special education program.

At first blush, it took a moment for the audience to realize what the dress was made of.

“It's balloons,” a surprised onlooker declared. “And it's absolutely darling.”

Rodau went around the room to peddle raffle tickets. Later, she removed the dress, which took more than 150 balloons and five hours to make, so she could model other fashions — the kind that don't deflate.

The dress was just one example of the seemingly endless creativity of Buchanan, a balloon twister who pushes himself to create everything from the simplest balloon animal to caricatures.

His rise to balloon stardom began with a trip to the Tallmadge, Ohio, Branch Library when he was just 9 years old. To learn more about balloon twisting, he checked out a book on the craft. What he didn't realize was that he had selected the fourth volume in a series of do-it-yourself balloon art.

“So here I was trying to figure out how to make a monkey climbing a tree and crazy hats before learning the simple stuff — like a wiener dog,” he said, laughing.

When he's not twisting or doing magic acts for private or corporate functions, he's studying childhood education at Kent State University or entertaining at places like Donatos in Hudson or Doogan's in Aurora, Ohio.

He's also a regional trainer for Balloon Distractions, teaching college students the basics of balloon twisting. He instructs them on proper etiquette when they are performing at restaurants. While they work for tips, Buchanan notes they generally make about $15 an hour.

“That's good for a college kid and they get to learn a fun, pointless skill,” he joked.

He's a former manager for Star Gaming in Tallmadge, and he opened a store, Freaks and Geeks Comics in Cuyahoga Falls, which has since closed.

“Growing up, I was always told that I had to work a job I didn't like now so that I could do what I wanted later. I always thought that was stupid,” Buchanan lamented. “I would much rather work a job I had fun at when I was young and still continue to have fun later.”

Thus the balloon twisting, magic acts and his ownership of a gaming and hobby store. To treat himself, and others, to a daily dose of fun, he challenged himself to design a new balloon creation every day for a year. On his blog, visitors can see some of those designs, including a walrus, a goldfish in a fish bowl, a saxophone, a rocking chair and a leprechaun with a pot of gold.

“I've always been the 'king of the dorks.' I played collectible card games in the convention circuit and other things. Of course, that was when I was younger and didn't have responsibilities.”

The Springfield Township, Ohio, resident explained that his wife, Kathy, whom he had a crush on in high school, credits herself for making him a better person by keeping his dorkiness to a minimum.

“Her memory of me in science class was the guy who harassed her and argued with the teachers,” he said, adding that he wasn't particularly fond of school.

So why the desire to be an educator? He explains it's because of his bad experiences in school and a desire to make lessons fun and interesting.

And if things get a bit too boring in class, he can always whip up a few cows, elephants, hats or cocktail dresses.

Here's a how-to video: http://www.ohio.com/lifestyle/121850198.html

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News Headline: Kilgour Dowdy tells artful stories | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Trinidad Guardian
Contact Name: Dr Joanne Kilgour Dowdy
News OCR Text: T&T born US-based writer and Kent State University professor, Dr Joanne Kilgour Dowdy, is due to release yet another book. Artful Stories: The Teacher, the Student, and the Muse, is currently being prepared for printing and will be released by year's end from Peter Lang Publishers. It will be added to Kilgour Dowdy's growing body of publications including Readers of the Quilt, The Skin that We Speak (with Dr Lisa Delpit, McArthur Genius Fellow), PhD Stories: Conversations With My Sisters, GED Stories, Teaching Drama in the Classroom and recently In The Public Eye. The book focuses on the personal narratives of four black, male artists who teach in higher education institutions and perform as professionals in their field.

The artists are originally from Trinidad and have been working as professionals and teachers for more than 30 years. Their contributions to the arts in the USA and Canada as dancer/choreographer, dramatist/director, lighting designer, and musician/composer need to be documented as part of the history of the important role of immigrant artists to the development of teaching practices in higher education. Because they are black, male and immigrant, their work as creative artists has not been considered (or has been relegated to the periphery) in the tradition of teacher/performer practices. This is the first academic project that looks at them as a “community” of scholars working across international boundaries to enhance literacy, as a communicative art form, and to build leaders for the next generation of artists.

The reader comes away with insight, from these men's collective perspective, into the art of stage and theatre performance and production. In his pre-publication review of the book Terrence Wendell Brathwaite, senior lecturer/higher education manager of the University of Worcester, United Kingdom, said Kilgour Dowdy has skillfully essayed an “unbuntugogical meeting place in the minds of the reader where she compels us to interface chthonic folkways of survival with Caliban reasoning and the scientificitiy of high education, through the prodigious life-views of four North American “foreign-natives” who alchemised their own styles of aspiration from the ‘belly' of Antillean Drama & Theatre Arts to the ubiquitous world stage.”

J Lee Greene, Emeritus Prof of the Department of English and Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said that in telling the stories of the four black men, Kilgour Dowdy was able to “tell a collective story of a ‘family' of artists integral to the production of stage performances worldwide. “Readers interested in immigrant studies will find that the individual stories of these four men shed significant light on how not just artists but other immigrants from the Caribbean remain deeply rooted in their national culture while successfully integrating into other cultures in North America and in Europe.” Kilgour Dowdy saw the need to write Artful Stories, she said, “There are works that look at an individual in a particular setting (like) Dr Derek Walcott, Nobel Prize Winner, or the poetry of Kamau Braithwaite. But no book sets down the story as told by the artist himself, who is working in higher education in the USA or Canada and training young people for their leadership roles in the development of their discipline.”

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News Headline: REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS | Email

News Date: 05/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Following are the real estate transactions from all the area real estate companies, as recorded by the county auditor and county assessor.

PORTAGE COUNTY
KENT CITY

429 College, Heintel Georgelle C to Kent State University Board Of Trustees, (1)
329 Erie, Lavelle-Pahl Cynthia D Trustee to Kent State University Board Of Trustees, (1)
132 Lincoln, Schumann David F & Kathy (J&S) to Kent State University Board Of Trustees, (1)


Copyright © 2011 Akron Beacon Journal

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