Report Overview:
Total Clips (10)
Alumni (1)
Anthropology (1)
Board of Trustees (2)
Digital Sciences (School of) (3)
Town-Gown (3)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
Kent grad stars in Pulitzer-winning 'Next to Normal' 06/02/2011 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

Tribune Chronicle , Tribune Chronicle | TribToday.com A Kent State graduate reprises her Tony Award-winning role in the national tour of ''Next to Normal,'' which opens Tuesday for a two-week run...


Anthropology (1)
Ancient Male Hominids Stayed At Home While Females Wandered (Lovejoy) 06/02/2011 Care2 News Network Text Attachment Email

...palaeoanthropologists and other scientists expressed caution, noting that the number of samples was not very large. Supporting the study, Owen Lovejoy, an anatomist at Kent State University in Ohio, points out that "new s are likely to turn aggressive once they join a new group, risking the lives of infants...


Board of Trustees (2)
KSU's Lefton gets 25 percent bonus (Woods, Lefton) 06/03/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

President is second-highest-paid university executive in Ohio, behind OSU KENT: While the Northeast Ohio economy has been suffering, Kent State has been going great guns. So university trustees agreed Thursday to reward President Lester Lefton with a $100,000 bonus for...

Kent State Bracing for Big Cut in State Support (Lefton, Woods) 06/03/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

While Ohio lawmakers wrangle over the state budget, Kent State University officials are bracing for a big cut in state support for Ohio's second-largest university. Kent State...


Digital Sciences (School of) (3)
Academic progress (Hoornbeek) 06/03/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Report offers ideas for collaborations 06/03/2011 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

Gift Helps Launch Enterprise Architecture Program at School of Digital Sciences (Bedford, Walker) 06/02/2011 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

SOURCE Enterprise Architecture Center Of Excellence DETROIT and CANTON, Ohio, /PRNewswire/ -- A gift to Kent State University's new School of Digital Sciences will allow students to pursue a first-in-the-nation concentration in Enterprise Architecture...


Town-Gown (3)
$3.3 million Esplanade plan OK'd for KSU (Lefton) 06/03/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Board of Trustees approved the Esplanade extension plan Thursday, bringing the university and city one step closer to...

House Demolished for new Kent State Hotel 06/02/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Yet another building has succumbed to a wrecking crew to make way for downtown Kent's revival. The Kent State University Foundation demolished the house at 218 E. Erie St. downtown to clear the site for the new Kent State University...

Esplanade Extension gets OK from Kent State Trustees (Lefton) 06/03/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Members of the Kent State University Board of Trustees signed off on a $3.28 million project that will extend The Esplanade from campus to downtown Kent today....


News Headline: Kent grad stars in Pulitzer-winning 'Next to Normal' | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tribune Chronicle , Tribune Chronicle | TribToday.com

A Kent State graduate reprises her Tony Award-winning role in the national tour of ''Next to Normal,'' which opens Tuesday for a two-week run at Cleveland's PlayhouseSquare.

Alice Ripley won the 2009 Tony Award for Best Actress for her portrayal of a bipolar woman and the effect her condition has on her family. Her other Broadway credits include ''Side Show,'' ''Les Miserables,'' ''The Who's Tommy,'' ''Sunset Boulevard'' and ''The Rocky Horror Show.''

The musical itself won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, and Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey won the Tony Award for Best Score.

''Next to Normal'' ran for nearly two years on Broadway, but it wasn't a smooth path. After its initial Off-Broadway opening, the show went to Washington, D.C., where it was significantly reworked before returning to New York Off-Broadway and eventually moving to Broadway in April 2009.

Ripley is joined in the touring cast by Asa Somers, Curt Hansen, Emma Hunton, Michael McElroy and Preston Sadleir.

''Next to Normal'' runs Tuesday through June 19 at the Palace Theatre, 1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. Tickets range from $10 to $65 and are available by calling 216-241-6000 and online at www.playhouse-square.org.

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News Headline: Ancient Male Hominids Stayed At Home While Females Wandered (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Care2 News Network
Contact Name: Kristina Chew
News OCR Text: A just-published study in suggests that our ancient fe human ancestors were the ones who, on coming of age, left their social group for newer pastures. That is, ancient fes were likely to roam while ancient s stay closed to home, in contrast to the image we often have of fes being the homebodies and s going out into the world.

Archaeological scientists analyzed the fossilized ranging between roughly 1.8 million and 2.2 million years old from two n caves. The of the fes were found to contain minerals from a different area than those of the s (which were distinguished from the fes' due to their larger size).

Julia Lee-Thorp, an archaeological scientist at the University of Oxford, UK, and a co-author on the study, says that this is indeed "a very small clue," but it is "at least hard evidence for what we really didn't have before." describes the chemical analysis the scientists performed:

Lee-Thorp and her colleagues measured the levels of two isotopes of strontium, an element found in soil. This is taken up by plants and then snakes its way up the food chain into the growing bones of animals. The ratio of two strontium isotopes in bones or provides a sig of the local environment in which an animal grew up, Lee-Thorp says. "It's a kind of forensic tool."

Her team measured the strontium isotope ratios in canine and third molar which are formed by about the age of eight in eleven Paranthropus robustus individuals from the Swartkrans cave, as well as in from eight Australopithecus africanus individuals from the nearby Sterkfontein cave, about 50 kilometres northwest of Johannesburg. The researchers also measured the strontium in 170 plants and animals currently living near the caves to get a sense of the different strontium sigs of the region, including the thin Malmani dolomite formation that includes both caves.

They discovered that larger ostensibly from bigger-bodied s of both species were much likely to the strontium sig of dolomite-dwellers than the smaller of fe australopiths. About 90% of the larger looked local, compared with less than half of the smaller . The best explanation for this pattern is one in which fes left their clan once they reached maturity, say Lee-Thorp and her colleagues.

While noting that the results of the study are fascinating, palaeoanthropologists and other scientists expressed caution, noting that the number of samples was not very large.

Supporting the study, Owen Lovejoy, an anatomist at Kent State University in Ohio, points out that "new s are likely to turn aggressive once they join a new group, risking the lives of infants and juveniles." Thus, it would make sense for s to stick with their social group of origin while fes left home. Another lead author of the study, University of Colorado at Boulder professor Sandi Copeland, notes in that such a "fe dispersal pattern," with the fes joining new social groups, is thought to exist in "two hominid groups is similar to that of many modern humans, chimpanzees and bonobos." It is, though, unlike a pattern found in most other primates including gorillas, where "fes stay with the group they are born into and the s move elsewhere." Lee-Thorp says that she is hoping to ask similar questions about early human ancestors, including our ancestors from East Africa and also later species of hominin, such as Homo erectus. Finding out that s are the "original homebodies" does call into question assumptions such as a "woman's place is in the home." Wouldn't it be something if our fe ancestors were found to be the pioneering, adventuring spirits? Read : , , fe, , , , , , , , , roles,

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News Headline: KSU's Lefton gets 25 percent bonus (Woods, Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: President is second-highest-paid university executive in Ohio, behind OSU KENT: While the Northeast Ohio economy has been suffering, Kent State has been going great guns.

So university trustees agreed Thursday to reward President Lester Lefton with a $100,000 bonus for meeting all of their objectives for the current academic year.

The bonus is equal to 25 percent of his base pay, which now is $401,576.

''You have proven to be the right leader at the right time,'' trustee President Jacqueline Woods told Lefton at the meeting.

In addition, Lefton's contract calls for a $70,000 longevity bonus on July 1 that increases by $10,000 each year he is with the university.

He is not alone: Most chief executives of large universities receive some mix of performance and longevity bonuses, deferred compensation, housing, retirement, spousal pay and other extras.

Last year, for instance, Lefton's total cost of employment � this is what KSU and the state paid to employ him as chief executive � was $684,648, according to a survey by the industry newspaper the Chronicle of Higher Education.

In that year, Lefton was the second most highly paid public university president in Ohio, behind only Ohio State's Gordon Gee, the nation's leader, whose total cost of employment was $1,818,911, according to the Chronicle.

Ohio State is the largest university in Ohio, as well as the country; Kent State is the second-largest in Ohio.

Meanwhile, the total cost of employment for University of Akron President Luis Proenza was $557,982, the third-highest in Ohio, according to the Chronicle.

In Lefton's case, his package includes a $65,000 housing allowance in lieu of a house provided by the university, a new American-made car every two years, 30 days of vacation a year and a one-year, fully paid sabbatical when he leaves office.

In his routine address to trustees at Thursday's meeting, he pointed out some of the advancements that the university has made since he became president five years ago.

They included ''explosive growth'' at the seven regional campuses; a 10 percent growth in enrollment in 2010, far above the state average of 3.4 percent; and a surge of 18,000 applications for next year's freshman class, thanks to strategic investments in the university's recruiting staff, marketing and student scholarships.

''They're walking with their feet,'' he said of students. ''They're showing their commitment to Kent State.''

He said the state's money woes have helped prompt KSU to become more efficient, from offering fewer classes in less-popular courses � Portuguese poetry is the example he gave � to ensuring that every seat in a class is filled before opening another section.

The university distributed a 28-page brochure at the meeting entitled, ''The Excellence Imperative: Five Years of Realizing the Vision'' to document the university's progress since 2006.

Kent State ''has entered its second century as a major contributor to the public good in Northeast Ohio and beyond,'' according to the brochure, by making progress in building a culture of philanthropy, a diverse environment and nurturing students' entrepreneurial efforts.

''What we've been able to do is quite extraordinary,'' in his five years at KSU, Lefton said.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

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News Headline: Kent State Bracing for Big Cut in State Support (Lefton, Woods) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: While Ohio lawmakers wrangle over the state budget, Kent State University officials are bracing for a big cut in state support for Ohio's second-largest university.


Kent State University President Lester Lefton told the university's trustees on Wednesday administrators have been preparing since 2009 for a "deep" cut in state dollars for higher education.


Lefton said they're hearing the state budget, once finalized, could cut 13 percent out of the state dollars given to Kent State, or as much as $13 million. He emphasized the fact they won't know how big the cut will be until the state budget is passed — a move expected this month.


"We have had funding cuts every year that I have been here," Lefton said. "But we've always thought of a deep budget cut as $2 million. This time we're talking $10 million to $13 million. We don't know actually what it's going to be."


Ohio Gov. John Kasich's budget, when first proposed in March, called for a 10.5 percent overall drop in higher education spending throughout the state. Kasich's budget also recommends a cap on tuition increases for public universities of 3.5 percent per semester.


When asked about possible tuition and fee increases for the coming school year, Lefton refused to speculate.


"There's conversation in the (Ohio) Senate that varies very differently than Gov. Kasich's recommendation, which was endorsed by the (Ohio) House," Lefton said. "The reality is, we're waiting on the Ohio legislature to determine what our budget will be, let alone if there are caps on tuition."


Lefton said no Ohio university has set tuition or fees for the coming year because they are all waiting to see what happens in Columbus with the state budget.


Jacqueline Woods, chair of the Kent State trustee board, said the trustees' goal is to hold a meeting in late June or early July — once the state budget is finalized — and determine whether students will see any tuition or fee hikes in the fall.


"We want people to know what they're going to be facing coming back," Woods said.


The board voted Wednesday to approve a continuing budget for the university until the state budget is passed.


2 years of preparing


Since 2009, administration started several efforts to cut spending and increase efficiency at Kent State.


The university streamlined its admissions, financial aid and billing departments, started an early retirement program, initiated a hiring freeze for "non-mission critical" positions, and officials are planning internal budget cuts at the different colleges and schools.


Deans of the different colleges have created their own savings in recent years, as the university has done, to try and counter anticipated state cuts.


In addition, course sections have been reduced, employees' overall contribution rate to group medical premiums rose by 2 percent for 2011 to 13.74 percent, and an independent internal audit created almost $900,000 in savings.


In one specific example, Lefton pointed to an increase in responsibility among Kent State's maintenance workers.


As janitors and maintenance crew members retire, the university has not replaced them. As a result, about 30 fewer staff members are taking care of the 7.5 million square feet of phsyical plant space across all eight campuses. A single custodian is now responsible for about 42,000 square feet of space at Kent State compared with the industry average of about 31,000 square feet.


"I'm really not proud of it, that we are pushing our staff to take care of an extra 10,000 square feet over the national average," Lefton said. "But it's what we have to do to take care of the budget cut.”


But it's not just janitors whose workload has increased.


Since 2006, enrollment has risen dramatically across all eight campuses by a total of 7,735 students — an increase of 23 percent in five years. Yet faculty numbers have remained flat in that same time period.


In 2010, Kent's growth in full-time equivalent students rose 10.2 percent. Ohio's other public universities averaged a 3.4 percent increase in full-time students in 2010. Last year, Kent State became Ohio's second-largest public university — behind only to Ohio State University.


Lefton said he recognizes skyrocketing enrollment and flat staffing levels are not sustainable in the long run.


"You just can't keep growing and not increasing your staff," he said. "But we are going to continue exhibiting financial constraint, being very conservative in our hiring policies until we know the budget has stabilized. I would like the economy in Ohio to improve, and as the economy in Ohio improves I would feel more comfortable that we have a stable budget situation going into the future."


Lefton said they are hiring people, but it's not a simple matter of replacing someone who retires.


"We are hiring people, but we are hiring people at missione critical positions," he said. "And we will continue to do that for the foreseeable future. It's the right thing to do. It's the smart thing to do. This has created pools of money that we're not spending in anticipation of the budget cuts."


Lefton gets contract bonus



Despite all the talk about cuts Wednesday, trustees approved giving Lefton an annual performance bonus as dictated in his contract.


The bonus is 25 percent of his base salary of $401,576 and amounts to $100,394.


Woods pointed to the increases in enrollment and $39.8 million in fundraising last year as some of the reasons why the board felt Lefton should get his contractual bonus.


"We did a thorough process of reviewing his performance," she said. "We felt that everything he has done and his staff has done clearly justified going forward with the contractual agreements that we have."

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News Headline: Academic progress (Hoornbeek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University profession John Hoornbeek has been studying government collaborative efforts for quite a while and has completed a list of area efforts large and small.

The following news release announces a milestone in his progress.

Kent State Develops Northeast Ohio Local Government Collaborative Inventory

Project aims to improve efficiency and foster collaboration between government entities

Intergovernmental collaboration provides opportunities for cost savings, economic development and local government service improvement. Kent State University's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy has developed a comprehensive inventory of more than 240 collaborative projects that are actively happening or are being explored as ideas for possible implementation in Northeast Ohio. Today, the center is releasing more than 100 ideas for collaboration that are drawn from this inventory on the Kent State website at www.kent.edu/intergovernmentalcollaboration.

“The goal here is to help share ideas about local government collaboration and its potential for cost savings and public service improvements,” said John Hoornbeek, director of the Center for Public Administration and Public Policy at Kent State. The listing of collaborative ideas has emerged from research conducted at Kent State over the past several years.

“In the coming weeks, we plan to release additional information that may be used by state and local leaders to improve public sector efficiency and effectiveness,” Hoornbeek added.

The collaborative ideas released today will be sent to Ohio Auditor of State Dave Yost's office for inclusion in its Shared Services Idea Center at www.auditor.state.oh.us/sharedservices/default.htm. The Fund for Our Economic Future, which provided funding support for portions of the work, may also use the information to support its efforts to improve local government collaboration in Northeast Ohio.

“The Center for Public Administration and Public Policy at Kent State has a 30-year history of working with local governments to help them improve their capacities and performance,” said Iris Harvey, vice president of University Relations at Kent State. “Northeast Ohio's innovative leaders have been forging the trail for others, and what is being learned here may be applied to other parts of the state.”

Some key findings emerging from the center's work include:

• In Northeast Ohio, there are a number of early adaptors and innovators in the field of intergovernmental collaboration. Many of these leaders began pursuing collaborative solutions before announcement of the impending cuts in state funding for local governments.

• Many of the local government collaboration efforts are moving beyond the stage of talk to action and implementation. Of the more than 240 ideas in the current inventory, 58 percent are in the process of moving forward.

• Participants in surveys and focus groups are voicing a need for information, assistance and tools to help them transform local government through collaboration. The needs expressed include case studies, education and networking opportunities to enable peer learning, research and education to foster effective collaborations and funding for feasibility assessments.

Recent efforts by leaders in Ohio suggest that intergovernmental collaboration can improve efficiency by sharing costs on supplies and equipment through group purchasing, and it can improve services by sharing resources, staff, or specialty equipment.

“As local governments experience declining revenues due to the impacts of state funding reductions and the recent recession, it becomes critical to find new, more efficient and more effective ways to operate,” Hoornbeek said.

Other Ohio organizations have been developing ways to assist local governments in making the kinds of transformations that are needed to improve governance and move the state forward in the 21st century. Advance Northeast Ohio, an economic development initiative of the Fund for Our Economic Future, also seeks to improve government efficiency and effectiveness. In 2009 and 2010, it provided financial incentives and recognition for local governments in Northeast Ohio to collaborate through its EfficientGovNow initiative.

“We work collaboratively with the state auditor's office, the Fund for Our Economic Future and other organizations,” Hoornbeek said. “For example, our center has worked closely with the state auditor's office in the development of its Shared Services Idea Center, and we have also worked closely with the Fund for Our Economic Future on its Efficient Government Now program. Both of these efforts are seeking to improve local government efficiency and effectiveness.”

Valuable ideas and best practices are emerging from the efforts of these organizations and officials — particularly in Northeast Ohio.

Kent State is playing a leading role in furthering collaboration and in developing a knowledge base to enable progress in Ohio,” Harvey said.

The findings released today also were supported by the Knight Foundation through its Civic Commons Initiative.

For more information on Kent State's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy, call 330-672-7148. To view the research findings, visit www.kent.edu/intergovernmentalcollaboration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
John Hoornbeek, jhoornbe@kent.edu, 330-672-7148
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

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News Headline: Report offers ideas for collaborations | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A report from Kent State University lists more than 100 ideas for local government collaborations to save money and improve services
Story by Valerie Brown
A new report issued by the Center for Public Administration at Kent State University highlights ideas for collaborations between local governments.

The House-approved two year state budget includes deep cuts to local governments. Incentives are high for local municipalities and public institutions to soften the impact of reduced state funding.

Director for the center Dr. John Hoornbeek says the information in the report can help local officials collaborate. It lists ideas for 105 “inter-governmental collaborations” that can be used to cut costs while improving services and may improve economic development.

Hoornbeek says cities in the Mahoning Valley, along with several other organizations, teamed up to increase commercial development. They worked collectively on a marketing strategy, public policy initiatives, and funding programs that have attracted businesses.

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News Headline: Gift Helps Launch Enterprise Architecture Program at School of Digital Sciences (Bedford, Walker) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SOURCE Enterprise Architecture Center Of Excellence

DETROIT and CANTON, Ohio, /PRNewswire/ -- A gift to Kent State University's new School of Digital Sciences will allow students to pursue a first-in-the-nation concentration in Enterprise Architecture at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20110602/DE13334LOGO )

Enterprise Architecture is a concept used by Fortune 500 companies, the United States government and major organizations around the world to assist those entities in creating technological roadmaps that match their business needs. Using these roadmaps, organizations develop tools and processes to help their employees work smarter and more efficiently.

Through this partnership, the Enterprise Architecture Center Of Excellence (EACOE) will donate to Kent State a five-year license to use its courseware in the School of Digital Sciences' curriculum, a gift valued at $3.2 million. Samuel B. Holcman, chairman of the Pinnacle Business Group Inc. and managing director of the Enterprise Architecture Center Of Excellence, calls the collaboration with the university exciting because of the school's multidisciplinary approach to the topic.

"What students will gain is a series of transferable skills that will make them extremely valuable to organizations around the world," Holcman said. "But while Enterprise Architecture is of interest to people around the world, work in the field from an academic standpoint is very thin. We believe academic institutions like Kent State can bring discipline to this, with the university becoming the foremost authority in the world."

Holcman is one of the field's early pioneers; his organization has educated more than 130,000 people on the topic and works with corporate and government clients around the world. EACOE's U.S. offices are located in Pinckney, Michigan.

"In the last 20 years, people have started to pay attention because of one word, and that word is complexity," Holcman said. "The business and technological needs of modern organizations are extremely complex. The analogy I like to give is if you're building a rowboat, you don't need information and planning. If you're building a cruise ship, you better do a lot of planning and architecture."

Dr. Denise A.D. Bedford, the Goodyear professor of knowledge management in the Information Architecture and Knowledge Management program of Kent State's School of Library and Information Science, also serves as a faculty member in the School of Digital Sciences. She calls EACOE's courses "the best training you can get."

"They start with the idea that information technology is really about business and performance, and looking at whether you have gaps," Bedford said. "Organizations today are struggling to manage all of their I.T. components and to see how those components align with business goals. Enterprise Architecture puts the focus on business goals to create systems that work together - so that tools work for users, rather than users working for tools."

Kent State's newest school will operate under a multidisciplinary model that incorporates faculty and courses from existing programs, including computer science, computer information systems, technology, library and information science, visual communication design, communication studies and instructional technology. The first classes will be offered in fall 2011.

"Sam's gift is a strong endorsement of our forward-looking program, which is poised for tremendous growth," said Dr. Robert A. Walker, director of the Kent State's School of Digital Sciences. "Courses will be available through online distance learning, allowing students from around the world to 'come to Kent State' and tap into this unique curriculum."

The school fits within the university's vision of driving knowledge and economic growth in the region and beyond.

"The impact on Ohio, in particular, could be meaningful," said Bedford, who joined Kent State's faculty following her retirement from the World Bank. "We are in very tough economic times. One of the things Enterprise Architecture tells organizations is how they're spending money inefficiently. I think the jobs in this field are going to be significant."

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News Headline: $3.3 million Esplanade plan OK'd for KSU (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Board of Trustees approved the Esplanade extension plan Thursday, bringing the university and city one step closer to bridging the physical gap.

The extension project is scheduled to begin in the spring of 2012. The anticipated fall 2012 completion will coincide with the grand opening of the citys downtown development projects.

The total cost of the project is $3.282 million. The Ohio Department of Transportation has granted $700,000 toward the extension, since it will also be part of The Portage Bike and Hike Trail. KSU will fund the remaining $2.582 million.

The board also approved the $210,000 purchase of the Hartz property at 205 S. Willow Street, a necessary acquisition to extend the Esplanade.

KSU President Lester Lefton said downtown Kent will become a hub of activity for students, parents and friends once the citys new developments are complete. Linking downtown Kent and KSU will allow that activity to freely flow between the university and downtown without the worry of parking or driving. It really says that downtown Kent and Kent State University are really a private partnership, which we think is a very good thing, he said. Our local community also feels the same way. Lefton said the university also plans to extend the newly added sculpture walk along with the Esplanade.

Also on Thursday, the board praised Lefton for his progress during the first 5 years of his presidency. Lefton pointed out that in 2010, KSU experienced a 10.2 percent overall growth, the greatest out of all Ohio colleges.

Lefton also spoke about the universitys efforts to increase student retention from 57 percent, already higher than the state average, which he said hed would like to see increase to 70 percent.

Lefton was awarded a $100,394 bonus, 25 percent of his salary, by the board, which annually revues the presidents performance under contract.

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News Headline: House Demolished for new Kent State Hotel | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Yet another building has succumbed to a wrecking crew to make way for downtown Kent's revival.


The Kent State University Foundation demolished the house at 218 E. Erie St. downtown to clear the site for the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center .


Kent State is building the hotel with Columbus hotelier The Pizzuti Companies, and it is expected to open late in 2012 when the new Kent Central Gateway transit center opens.


Don Wheat, vice president for public and private projects for Pizzuti, said in a previous interview the hotel plans need one final blessing from the university foundation, and they expect to get that this month.


"At that point, we're off to the races," he said. "We're hoping to start with some of the earlier construction late this summer."

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News Headline: Esplanade Extension gets OK from Kent State Trustees (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Members of the Kent State University Board of Trustees signed off on a $3.28 million project that will extend The Esplanade from campus to downtown Kent today.


The project has been in the works for several years as the university bought properties in the neighborhood west of campus so its on-campus leg of The Portage Hike and Bike Trail can continue its meandering ways into downtown Kent.


Physically, the Esplanade will leave the campus and weave a wide pedestrian path lined with open landscaping and artwork through the neighborhood. The Esplanade will terminate at Haymaker Parkway near the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center .


Kent State University President Lester Lefton said the project cements a physical link between the campus and the downtown business district, which is expected to become more popular after several redevelopment projects are completed, including the new hotel.


"And by linking the campus to downtown physically, this really allows parents and students and people coming out of restaurants to be able to walk through the neighborhood right onto campus without having to park or take a car," Lefton said. "And it really says downtown Kent and the university are really in a public private partnership, which we think is a very good thing. And the community feels the same."


Construction on the Esplanade extension is expected to start next spring and wrap up in late 2012 in time for the opening of the new hotel and the Kent Central Gateway transit center.


The $3.28 million project total excludes the more than $3.8 million the university has spent buying land since 2007 to make the extension possible.


And Wednesday, the university trustees approved buying another piece of land in the neighborhood — the 26th purchase to date — at 205 S. Willow St. from Barbara Hartz for $210,000 for the project. That land buy brings the university's total spent buying land for the project above $4 million.


The project received a $700,000 grant from the Ohio Department of Transportation, and the remaining $2.58 million will come out of the President's Campus Enhancements fund, which has been used for other similar projects such as improvements to Satterfield and Bowman halls and to help establish the College of Public Health.


The city helped secure the grant thanks to the pathway's connection with The Portage and other area hike and bike paths. The Esplanade extension has been part of the city's master planning regarding the downtown redevelopment for several years.


According to the university, it has secured all the key properties necessary along the proposed path, but Kent State officials are still working on buying additional properties necessary to provide landscape buffer areas for the Esplanade extension.


The project will include the demolition of the homes bought aligning Erie Street and the parcels along the direct path between Lincoln Street and Willow Street and the removal of the existing Erie Street surface, which will be replaced with brick pavers and concrete with a prominent archway, according to the university.


The path will extend from Lincoln Street and pass through the properties within the Lincoln and Willow streets block and then follow Erie Street's current right-of-way, culminating in a large oval green along the eastern side of Haymaker Parkway. The path will include lighting, benches and emergency phones.


Eventually, Kent State will extend its recently dedicated Sculpture Mile along the pathway by installing more artwork in the area between campus and downtown.


"We intend to extend this sculpture walk all the way to downtown as the downtown project continues to be developed," Lefton said Wednesday.

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