Report Overview:
Total Clips (26)
Aeronautics (1)
Alumni (1)
Biological Sciences (1)
Board of Trustees (2)
Board of Trustees; International Affairs (Office of) (2)
Budget (1)
Digital Sciences (School of) (1)
Economics (1)
Exercise Physiology (2)
Geography (2)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
Minority Business Accelerator (1)
Office of the President (1)
Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Police Services (1)
Psychology (1)
Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Town-Gown (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics (1)
High Honors: Kent State students catch some major air (Mangrum) 06/06/2011 Ohio Authority Text Attachment Email


Alumni (1)
Kent State grad seeks normalcy 06/06/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Biological Sciences (1)
Thickness profiling of formaldehyde-fixed cells by transmission-through-dye microscopy 06/03/2011 BioTechniques Text Attachment Email

Mariana Pelts, Sahil M. Pandya*, Christine J. Oh, and Michael A. Model Department of Biological Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, OH, USA *S.M.P.'s current address is Northeastern Ohio University Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy, Rootstown,...


Board of Trustees (2)
KSU's Lefton gets 25 percent bonus (Lefton) 06/03/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

June 03--KENT -- While the Northeast Ohio economy has been suffering, Kent State has been going great guns. So university trustees agreed Thursday to reward President Lester Lefton with a $100,000 bonus for...

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY SUMMARY OF BOARD ACTIONS 06/03/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, June 3 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: At its June 2 meeting, the Kent State University Board of Trustees took...


Board of Trustees; International Affairs (Office of) (2)
KSU wants more international students (Lefton) 06/06/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

Headline News for Friday, June 03, 2011 (Lefton) 06/06/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email


Budget (1)
KSU awaits state budget to vote on tuition hike (Lefton) 06/04/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

As the Ohio General Assembly's June 30 budget deadline approaches, the Kent State University Board of Trustees must wait to decide on a tuition increase. “We're in a wait-and-see posture as to what the budget...


Digital Sciences (School of) (1)
Gift Helps Launch Enterprise Architecture Program At School Of Digital Sciences 06/03/2011 TheStreet.com Text Attachment Email

A gift to Kent State University's new School of Digital Sciences will allow students to pursue a first-in-the-nation concentration in Enterprise Architecture...


Economics (1)
National Hiring Slowdown Means Bad News for Northeast Ohio (Reynolds) 06/06/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Exercise Physiology (2)
Researchers from Kent State University Publish Findings in Parkinson's Disease (Ridgel) 06/06/2011 NewsRx.com Text Email

...postcycling. Improved executive function after passive cycling may be a result of increases in cerebral blood flow," wrote A.L. Ridgel and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "That passive exercise could be a concurrent therapy for cognitive decline in PD." Ridgel...

Researchers from Kent State University Publish Findings in Parkinson's Disease (Ridgel) 06/06/2011 Pain & Central Nervous System Week Text Email

...postcycling. Improved executive function after passive cycling may be a result of increases in cerebral blood flow," wrote A.L. Ridgel and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "That passive exercise could be a concurrent therapy for cognitive decline in PD." Ridgel...


Geography (2)
Bad year for twisters (Schmidlin) 06/05/2011 Buffalo News - Online Text Attachment Email

...technology to interfere with twisters. Tornadoes have even been known to hit mountains without dissipating, said Thomas W. Schmidlin, a geography professor at Kent State University who studies twisters. “It's just been a bad year” for storms striking populated areas, Schmidlin said.

Numbers: A Wet Spring in Kent for 2011 (Schmidlin) 06/06/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...had one of the wettest springs on record. "Spring 2011 was wetter than average, as everyone knows," said Tom Schmidlin, a meteorologist in the Kent State University Department of Geography. "Total rainfall and melted snow was 17.26 inches, 5.8 inches above average." Schmidlin...


KSU at Salem (1)
Free meals for kids 06/06/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

...also three closed sites offering sack lunches for specific programs, including summer school at Reilly, Kindercamp at Buckeye and summer programs at the Kent State Salem City Center. "If I learned anything, it was get the food to the kids. Don't expect them to come to you," Rowe said, accounting...


KSU at Stark (1)
Community News: School news 06/06/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Email


KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSUTC places 3rd in US in Earth Day challenge 06/04/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Staff report warren Kent State University-Trumbull has placed third in a national competition initiated by the Earth Day Network. The organization's Earth Day...


Minority Business Accelerator (1)
USPTO ISSUES TRADEMARK: PMBA; PARTNERSHIP FOR THE MINORITY BUSINESS ACCELERATOR 06/03/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

ALEXANDRIA, Va., June 3 -- The trademark PMBA; PARTNERSHIP FOR THE MINORITY BUSINESS ACCELERATOR (Reg. No. 3969653) was issued on May 31 by the USPTO. Owner: Kent State University state university OHIO P.O. Box 5190 Kent OHIO 44242. The trademark application serial number 85126618 was filed on...


Office of the President (1)
Faith communities should address needs of elderly: Faith and You 06/04/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...Arlington Church of God in Akron. Fowler retired as full-time pastor of that church two years ago. Now 75, he has a new career as a consultant to Kent State University President Lester Lefton -- a role that puts him on campus about three days week. "I spend most of my time with 20-...


Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
KSU PRESENTS SEMINAR ON HELPING OHIO BUSINESSES (Messing) 06/03/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, June 3 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The Succession Planning Program at Kent State University and the Goering...


Police Services (1)
Help for dispatcher 06/06/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Psychology (1)
Psychology professor honored at KSU 06/04/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

HONORED Kent State's department of psychology honored Professor David C. Riccio's 46th year in the university's psychology department with a three-day...


Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
CLARIFICATIONS & CORRECTIONS 06/03/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

An Internet address published Thursday for a Kent State department studying government consolidations should have been http://www.kent.edu/intergovernmentalcollaboration. The mistake was...


Theatre and Dance (1)
'Chicago' opens Porthouse season 06/05/2011 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...28, 29, 30, July 1, 2 at 8 p.m.; and June 19 and 26 at 2 p.m. and will be directed by Porthouse Theatre's Artistic Director Terri Kent. The show stars Kent State University Theatre & Dance associate professor Eric van Baars as Billy Flynn; Choreographer and Dance Instructor for The University...


Town-Gown (2)
OUR VIEW: Esplanade brings Kent, campus closer 06/05/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...moved another step closer to becoming the interesting and attractive college town it always has had the potential to be with last weeks approval by the Kent State University Board of Trustees of the plan to extend the Esplanade from the campus into the downtown. An attractive walkway, years...

Week in Review: Kent Honors Adam Hamilton, Memorial Day, Pedal With Pete and More 06/04/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...how the move to Kent might change the newspaper company on Thursday. We broke the news Thursday about the Esplanade plans gaining approval from the Kent State University Board of Trustees . Our story takes a close look at the project, which when finished will have cost Kent State...


News Headline: High Honors: Kent State students catch some major air (Mangrum) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2011
Outlet Full Name: Ohio Authority
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In 1929, aviation pioneer and inventor Dr. Grover Loening - the first aeronautical engineer for the Wright brothers - wanted to recognize the most outstanding achievements of the country's college aviation programs. Loening asked his friends Charles Lindbergh, Amelia Earhart and Navy Commander John Towers to assist him in judging the first competition, which would bestow a pure silver, Tiffany-designed trophy to the winning program.

Earlier this year, the Loening Trophy - to this day, the rarest and oldest of all collegiate aviation awards - enjoyed a stint in Northeast Ohio, when the Kent State University Precision Flight Team won recognition as the outstanding all-around collegiate aviation program in the nation. In addition to rewarding aeronautical skills, the trophy recognizes collegiate programs for emphasis on academics, community involvement, safety and professionalism, along with a proactive enhancement of the future of aviation.

"It is an amazing piece of aviation history," says Dr. Richard L. Mangrum, ATP, assistant professor of aeronautics at Kent State and faculty advisor to the university's flight team. "[The trophy] has spent time in the Smithsonian Institute, and may soon be there again. Kent State was honored with the privilege of keeping the award on campus for a few weeks, which is not often done."

With college football and basketball receiving the lion's share of national hype, a precision flight team may seem like a quaint departure from the mainstream. In fact, the National Intercollegiate Flying Association (NIFA) is represented nationwide in 11 geographic regions. Kent State participates through Region III, along with teams from Ohio University, Ohio State University, University of Cincinnati and Western Michigan University.

Students - typically those enrolled in Kent State's aeronautics and flight technology programs - join the team through an application process and attend required practice sessions. They also adhere to a GPA requirement, and are chosen for the team's competition roster on the basis of performance during practices and try-outs. Unlike other collegiate sports, there is no true "season" for precision flight - the team practices year-round. "Flying practices are weather dependent, obviously, and serious landing practice doesn't begin until the spring," says Mangrum. "There are normal holiday and summer slow-downs and breaks, but there is almost always some form of practice going on."

Aside from practices and competitions, the team works hard to maintain the reputation of the university's flight programs. Students are involved in airport improvement projects, washing aircraft and tutoring other aeronautics students through the "Wingman" project. The team is also financially self-supporting, raising funds to travel to competitions and developing corporate partnerships. "Not only are they required to maintain academics, they are required to do well in their flight courses, dedicate time to practices, team activities - and manage all of this while taking time away from campus in October for the regional competition and May for the National competition," says Mangrum. "Sometimes, students have to complete exams and assignments while away at a competition. We never relax academic standards or performance requirements."

The dedication seems to have not only paid off, but resulted in a shower of awards and recognition for the team. "The team is a hard working group of young aviators who dedicate their personal time to advancement of their skills, aviation, and the name of Kent State University," says Mangrum. In addition to numerous safety awards at regional competitions, the team has often achieved first place in flying events and in 2008 was named first overall in their NIFA region. Kent's team was also awarded the Collegiate Aviation Progress award for their remarkable advancement in the national NIFA standings (from 14th in 2007 to 7th place nationally in 2009).

To be awarded the Loening Trophy, these student aviators must demonstrate not only individual and team excellence, but evidence of a strong university program. Teams submit an application package and make a presentation about the school program and the team itself. The trophy committee, who carry on a legacy that began with some of the world's most legendary aviators, evaluate the teams' application and presentation.

"It was the most amazing experience to be recognized as the best collegiate aviation program in the nation," says Mangrum. "Kent State has a well-respected name in collegiate aviation due to the hard work of this team, the aeronautics faculty who volunteer their time to coach, and all of the College of Technology faculty and support staff. This is truly a college-wide effort, and the results are self-evident."

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News Headline: Kent State grad seeks normalcy | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tony Award winner Alice Ripley brings 'Next to Normal' musical to Cleveland

Most people don't think of musical theater first as a medium for delving into the depths of the psyche. But in the Pulitzer Prize-winning musical Next to Normal, the story and lyrics by Brian Yorkey paired with contemporary music by Tom Kitt bring front and center the emotional trauma of an American family.

The Goodman family, which has a bipolar mother, Diana, has lost its way but is struggling mightily to achieve some sort of normalcy. All of its members are masking their own brand of pain in their own manner, losing pieces of themselves in the process.

Alice Ripley, a 1986 Kent State musical theater graduate who originated the role of Diana on Broadway, is doing a rare thing by bringing her original Tony-winning performance on the road. Next to Normal will open at PlayhouseSquare in Cleveland Tuesday.

Ripley has lived with the exhausting role of the complicated Diana for four years, since the show was in development. That includes its Off-Broadway and Washington, D.C., runs as well as the reworked Broadway show,
which won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and three Tony Awards.

She played Diana for 16 months on Broadway, into 2010. The Broadway show closed in January, with its national tour beginning in November and ending next month. The show's emotionally loaded score has a pop-rock flavor, with a little country thrown in.

Ripley, 47, was born near Oakland, Calif., and grew up in Cleveland, one of 11 children. Her first role was as a 14-year-old flying monkey in The Wizard of Oz at Lakewood Little Theatre, now the Beck Center.

She was singing, dancing, acting and playing guitar by that age, but seeing a production of Jacques Brel is Alive and Well at PlayhouseSquare when she was 14 was a defining moment that helped her realize she wanted a career in musical theater. She debuted on Broadway in the original cast of The Who's Tommy in 1993, created the Broadway role of Betty Schaefer in Andrew Lloyd Webber's Sunset Boulevard in 1994 and developed a cult following as Violet in Side Show.

Ripley was on hiatus along with the rest of Next to Normal's cast for two weeks before its opening in Cleveland. Representatives from the tour passed along this question-and-answer interview to share Ripley's insight into her starring role. It has been edited for space.

Q: What drew you to play the role of Diana in this production?

A: I am drawn to complicated characters within a clear-cut story line. Feeling Electric, as Next to Normal was then titled, came to me in mid-development. The raw, complicated characters were there from the beginning. The succinct story came together shortly thereafter.

Q: What is the most challenging aspect of this role?

A: Because of the demands of the role, it takes the preoccupation of my entire day and night to successfully integrate my performance as Diana with my off-stage life. The result has been months of hushed solitary activity, rest and meditation during the week days, coupled with my performance as Diana at night and throughout the weekend.

Q: How do you think this role has affected you personally?

A: As you might guess, it's extremely nice to have an acting job that turns into a hit with a prosperous run. When Next to Normal's Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey won the 2010 Pulitzer for Drama, that gave me a certain newfound confidence. Because see, the Pulitzer is something that can't be hyped or dismissed. It just is the Pulitzer Prize.

Q: What did you think when you first read it and heard the music?

A: I cried and then I smiled because I had finally encountered material that reached inside and grabbed me.

Q: How is the tour going?

A: The road can be tough, but part of an actor's job is to go to where the audience comes to meet. Bringing Diana to cities across North America is in essence giving the Broadway version of Next to Normal to young audiences in cities like Cleveland. I grew up there on Lake Erie and I had few, if any, opportunities to see a Tony winner perform in the Tony-winning role that she played on Broadway.

Q: Have you had any family or friend experience to draw upon as you prepared for this role?

A: No. The script and the score gave me facts. I then used imagination, intention, and mind and body energy to turn facts into feelings and feelings into a projection that registers on my face and in my voice onstage as an actor. Then, I look to the director for fine tuning.

Q: How do you unwind after the show?

A: Currently reading On Truth and other titles by Harry G. Frankfurt. Hydrotherapy — ice, steam, water. I look in Reader's Digest for ''Laughter is the Best Medicine,'' eat blueberries, sleep, eat chocolate in all forms, drink green tea, and shop for Jessica Simpson shoes. Gotta have at least one guilty pleasure.

Q: Next to Normal is a musical about being bipolar and mental illness. What was your first reaction when approached for the show?

A: No, N2N isn't about that. I see it differently. N2N centers on suppressed grief and devastating losses coming to light. As an actor I am drawn to raw material, energetic teamwork and complicated characters, and [the show] had all this and more — and it drew me in like a magnet.

Q: What was your hardest obstacle in preparing for your role as Diana Goodman?

A: The most challenging part of playing Diana is maintaining a buoyant energy in order to respond to the demands of the role, which include going to emotional extremes that even ''real life Dianas'' don't experience eight times in six days every week, week after week after week, without cease.

Q: How do Tom Kitt's score and Brian Yorkey's lyrics help you convey Diana's struggles to the audience?

A: Every move I make and every sound I utter as Diana is fueled by the impulses I get from the score, which is all-knowing. N2N is virtually sung-through. Everything I need to create the illusion of Diana is provided by the score, the lyrics and the lights, which Kevin Adams has designed brilliantly, and with great feeling.

Q: You've said that you're living Diana Goodman all the time and that you've concluded there's nothing wrong with her. Can you elaborate?

A: Every hour of every week that I play Diana Goodman I am either performing her, preparing to perform her or recovering from her. That translates to precious few minutes each day to be just plain old Alice, so if I am not living her all the time I am most definitely living with her 24/7. Diana represents Everywoman. She is a wild creature who is in a cage. To Diana, she is in her natural state. It is only in others' eyes that she becomes limited by her actions. . . . In her mind there is nothing ''wrong'' with her that needs to be fixed. Since I play her, I have to see her the way Diana sees herself.

Q: You've also said that you couldn't have played this role until now. What do you mean?

A: Meaning I would have been too young, too weak, and too stoopid!

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News Headline: Thickness profiling of formaldehyde-fixed cells by transmission-through-dye microscopy | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: BioTechniques
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Mariana Pelts, Sahil M. Pandya*, Christine J. Oh, and Michael A. Model

Department of Biological Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, OH, USA

*S.M.P.'s current address is Northeastern Ohio University Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy, Rootstown, OH, USA

BioTechniques, Vol. 50, No. 6, June 2011, pp. 389–396

Abstract

Conventional light microscopy techniques are poorly suited for imaging the vertical cell dimension. This can be accomplished using transmission-through-dye (TTD) imaging, in which cell thickness is directly converted into image intensity in the presence of extracellular dye with strong absorption. We have previously described applications of TTD to living cells using the dye Acid Blue 9 (AB9) to generate contrast. In this work, we investigated the possibility of extending TTD to chemically fixed cells. This would depend on preservation of cell impermeability to the dye; by using a method based on fluorescence quenching, we found that formaldehyde-fixed cells remain impermeable to AB9. Fixation enables imaging of cell surfaces in the presence of high concentrations of AB9, bringing the vertical resolution to several nanometers per pixel; that is at least an order of magnitude better than resolution achievable with live cells. TTD images collected with high-NA objectives are often contaminated by Becke lines resulting from intracellular organelles, and we show how to distinguish them from features on the cell surface. Quantification of cell thickness and volume on fixed cells is also possible during the early stages of fixation; this can be useful, for example, for measuring volume kinetics following rapid introduction of a stimulus.

The shape of a cell has been a subject of countless investigations linking it to cell viability, physiological status, and signaling events (,). The most detailed analysis of cell shape can be achieved with scanning electron or atomic force microscopy (). The traditional optical microscopic techniques are much more successful at mapping the contour of a cell spread on a substrate than at measuring its third dimension (thickness). For example, differential interference contrast (DIC) can provide a sense of the third dimension, but is not quantitative; extracting quantitative information from DIC images requires extensive computation (). Confocal sectioning () is relatively slow and, as a tool for thickness measurement, is not particularly accurate. Holographic (,) or interferometric (,) microscopy require highly specialized instrumentation. In an attempt to overcome these problems, we have developed transmission-through-dye (TTD) imaging, a technique in which all the thickness information is contained in a single image (10,11). Knowing cell thickness at every point enables calculation of volume—a parameter that plays an important role in many normal and pathological conditions (12).

TTD images are obtained in the same way as regular bright field images, the main differences being the presence of a strongly absorbing extracellular dye and the use of quasi-monochromatic illumination at the wavelength of maximum dye absorption. Exclusion of the dye by living cells results in an increased transmitted intensity I over the areas occupied by the cells and allows conversion of image contrast into cell thickness h. Specifically, thickness is computed as

where α is the absorption coefficient of the medium (in µm−1), and Ibkg is the intensity of the background. Assuming that variability of intensity measurements comes mostly from photon noise and I >> Ibkg, the error of the vertical distance measurement ▵h can be roughly estimated by differentiation of the first term of Equation 1

where S/N is the signal-to-noise ratio of the intensity measurement. For examination of solid surfaces of materials, it is possible to use highly concentrated solutions of dyes with α ≈ 10 µm−1. Then assuming a reasonable number for S/N, such as 100 per pixel (13), the vertical resolution limit can be made as low as a nanometer (10). Of course, such extremely concentrated solutions cannot be used with living cells, and there is a trade-off between vertical resolution and the maximal depth that remains visible in its entirety. When the absorption is too strong, parts of cells lying deep inside the dye may become too dark to be imaged. For imaging of live cells, food colorants Acid Blue 9 (AB9) or Patent Blue V at 5–10 mg/mL appear to be compatible with normal cell functioning (11); at these concentrations, the absorption at 630 nm is 0.1–0.2 µm−1, allowing sufficiently deep light penetration to obtain complete images of cell monolayers while keeping the vertical resolution below the diffraction limit (about 0.1 µm/pixel).

The main requirement for this technique is preservation of plasma membrane integrity. Equation 1 assumes that light absorption by a cell is negligible compared with that of the medium; however, if the membrane is compromised, some extracellular dye may enter the cell interior raising its absorption from essentially zero to some value αi. This would result in a reduced contrast and underestimation of cell thickness by the factor

While we have evidence (11) that AB9 does not enter living cells other than by endocytosis (which can be a slow process), the question becomes critical for chemically fixed samples. Indeed, cells treated with cross-linking fixatives paraformaldehyde (PFA) and glutaraldehyde become partially leaky, and the extent of membrane damage may be sensitive to fixation conditions (14). In our earlier work, an attempt was made to image fixed SH-SY5Y cells using water-soluble fluorescein to generate contrast; the dye, however, leaked into the cells, which caused a 4–5-fold underestimation of cell thickness (10).

One obvious reason for using fixed cells in TTD imaging would be to simplify experiments and prevent cell changes during observation. Perhaps more importantly, using fixed cells makes it possible to increase the vertical resolution by applying higher concentrations of the dye (in accordance with Equation 2). Thus, the main subject of the present work was investigation of the possibility of using AB9 with cells fixed with PFA or glutaraldehyde. At the same time, we address some more general questions related to the accuracy of thickness measurements by TTD.

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News Headline: KSU's Lefton gets 25 percent bonus (Lefton) | Email

News Date: 06/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: June 03--KENT -- While the Northeast Ohio economy has been suffering, Kent State has been going great guns.

So university trustees agreed Thursday to reward President Lester Lefton with a $100,000 bonus for meeting all of their objectives for the current academic year.

The bonus is equal to 25 percent of his base pay, which now is $401,576.

"You have proven to be the right leader at the right time," trustee President Jacqueline Woods told Lefton at the meeting.

In addition, Lefton's contract calls for a $70,000 longevity bonus on July 1 that increases by $10,000 each year he is with the university.

He is not alone: Most chief executives of large universities receive some mix of performance and longevity bonuses, deferred compensation, housing, retirement, spousal pay and other extras.

Last year, for instance, Lefton's total cost of employment -- this is what KSU and the state paid to employ him as chief executive -- was $684,648, according to a survey by the industry newspaper the Chronicle of Higher Education.

In that year, Lefton was the second most highly paid public university president in Ohio, behind only Ohio State's Gordon Gee, the nation's leader, whose total cost of employment was $1,818,911, according to the Chronicle.

Ohio State is the largest university in Ohio, as well as the country; Kent State is the second-largest in Ohio.

Meanwhile, the total cost of employment for University of Akron President Luis Proenza was $557,982, the third-highest in Ohio, according to the Chronicle.

In Lefton's case, his package includes a $65,000 housing allowance in lieu of a house provided by the university, a new American-made car every two years, 30 days of vacation a year and a one-year, fully paid sabbatical when he leaves office.

In his routine address to trustees at Thursday's meeting, he pointed out some of the advancements that the university has made since he became president five years ago.

They included "explosive growth" at the seven regional campuses; a 10 percent growth in enrollment in 2010, far above the state average of 3.4 percent; and a surge of 18,000 applications for next year's freshman class, thanks to strategic investments in the university's recruiting staff, marketing and student scholarships.

"They're walking with their feet," he said of students. "They're showing their commitment to Kent State."

He said the state's money woes have helped prompt KSU to become more efficient, from offering fewer classes in less-popular courses -- Portuguese poetry is the example he gave -- to ensuring that every seat in a class is filled before opening another section.

The university distributed a 28-page brochure at the meeting entitled, "The Excellence Imperative: Five Years of Realizing the Vision" to document the university's progress since 2006.

Kent State "has entered its second century as a major contributor to the public good in Northeast Ohio and beyond," according to the brochure, by making progress in building a culture of philanthropy, a diverse environment and nurturing students' entrepreneurial efforts.

"What we've been able to do is quite extraordinary," in his five years at KSU, Lefton said.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY SUMMARY OF BOARD ACTIONS | Email

News Date: 06/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, June 3 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

At its June 2 meeting, the Kent State University Board of Trustees took action on the following items:

New Center for Ecology and Natural Resource Sustainability will Expand Knowledge and Learning Opportunities

To maximize established academic strengths in ecological and environmental science, and to provide students with new real-world learning opportunities in the exploding "green" industry, the Board established the Center for Ecology and Natural Resource Sustainability, effective fall semester 2011. The multidisciplinary center, which will be administered through the Department of Biological Sciences within the College of Arts and Sciences, will serve as a point of organization for Kent State's wide range of education, research and outreach programs related to the study of the environment and its sustainability.

The new center will benefit students in a variety of majors by providing unique educational opportunities, including experiential learning and course credit through activities related to ecology and natural resources. The center will serve as a "one-stop shop" for students, companies and agencies interested in internships in ecological sciences.

While the center will foster new and expanded collaborations among the departments of Biological Sciences, Geography and Geology, it will be open to participation by faculty from all academic units. The center also is intended to enhance the university's ability to leverage extramural funding, consistent with a heightened federal government focus on environmental issues and workforce development for the nation's green industries.

The new center, which does not require additional space or funding, was approved previously by the university's Educational Policies Council and the Faculty Senate, and was endorsed by the president and provost.

Renowned Kent State Scientist Named Trustees Research Professor

The Board recognized the many scholarly contributions of Dr. Oleg D. Lavrentovich, the director of Kent State's renowned Liquid Crystal Institute (LCI) whose own liquid-crystal research has earned international recognition, by appointing him to a five-year term as Trustees Research Professor. The professorship, which will begin July 1, 2011, will include teaching, advising students, continuing research, involvement in university committees, and participation in regional business and community groups and initiatives.

Lavrentovich, who will remain a tenured professor in Kent State's department of chemical physics, will receive an annual salary of $140,000 and a renewable, $50,000 professional expense allowance to support a range of scholarly activities.

After coming to Kent State in 1992 as a senior research fellow at the LCI, Lavrentovich joined the faculty in 1994. He has served as director of the LCI since 2004.

Lavrentovich's liquid-crystal research, which has attracted significant external funding, has been published widely in leading scientific journals and books. He was a leader in obtaining a $15.2 million Ohio Research Scholars Program award for a regional Research Cluster on Surfaces in Advanced Materials that is being led by Kent State.

Construction to Proceed on Physical Link between Campus and Downtown Kent

The Board authorized the university to proceed with the design, bidding and construction of a project that will complete a physical link between campus and the downtown Kent business district. The link is in the form of the university Esplanade, a tree-lined walk from Lincoln Street to Haymaker Parkway, which will facilitate safe and convenient access to the downtown area.

The Esplanade, which will create a new pedestrian-oriented entry point to the Kent Campus, also will provide the community and visitors with an attractive and inviting space for conversation, casual recreation and study. It will be part of the regional Portage Bike and Hike Trail system and the university's Sculpture Walk.

The Esplanade project is a key component of the economic renaissance of the areas near campus and downtown Kent. Construction is expected to begin next spring and to be completed during fall 2012 in conjunction with the opening of the PARTA (Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority) multimodal transportation facility and other projects in downtown Kent.

About $2.58 million in university funds and a $700,000 grant from the Ohio Department of Transportation have been allotted for the project, which will include the demolition of purchased homes aligning Erie Street and parcels of land along the direct path between Lincoln and Willow streets; removal of the existing Erie Street; and construction of the Esplanade extension with a combination of brick pavers and concrete, a prominent gateway structure, trees, shrubs and gardens, lighting, furniture and emergency phones.

Board Authorizes Continuation Operating Budget

Because state appropriation and legislative tuition directives for Ohio's public universities have not been finalized by the governor and the Ohio General Assembly, the Board enacted a continuation operating budget, effective July 1, 2011. The action will allow the university to operate at the funding level set by the Board for the current fiscal year, which will end June 30.

Once the legislature has passed the state budget, the Board will meet to review and enact a balanced operating budget for fiscal year 2011-12. The resolution also authorizes the Board chair, the Finance Committee chair, and the president to establish intended tuition subject to final review and approval by the Board, if circumstances prevent the Board from approving a final budget by June 30, 2011.

Annual Election of the President

In keeping with the university's constitution, the Board voted unanimously to re-elect Dr. Lester A. Lefton to a sixth term as Kent State University president. The university constitution requires the Board to hold an annual election of the university president.

The Board also awarded the president the full value of his performance-based bonus pursuant to his employment agreement, effective July 1, 2010.

The Board commended Dr. Lefton, who became Kent State's 11th president in July 2006, for his efforts in leading Kent State to new heights of excellence, including records in enrollment, retention and private giving; major progress toward transforming the Kent Campus in ways that will improve the educational experience of students and help boost the economy of the city of Kent; continuing efforts in campus sustainability and internationalization; and meaningful action toward making all Kent State campuses more inclusive.

IN OTHER ACTIONS:

* The Board established a legal entity in New Delhi, India, to serve as a strategic starting point for engaging in India's exploding higher education market. The legal entity will allow Kent State to open a New Delhi office and conduct activities such as recruiting students and creating joint-degree programs with Indian universities while remaining complaint with local laws.

* The Board established a legal entity in Geneva, Switzerland, the site of Kent State's longtime, internationally respected study-abroad program. The action ensures that the university will be in compliance with all city and national laws and regulations as it conducts business such as hiring staff, paying bills and providing educational activities.

* The Board unanimously approved a resolution expressing appreciation for the service of Student Trustee Katherine O'Brien, who completed a two-year term on the Board. O'Brien is a doctoral student in Kent State's curriculum and instruction program. She has served as an adjunct faculty member at Kent State University at Stark.

* The Board authorized the purchase of a Kent property located at 205 S. Willow St. as part of a planned expansion of the university's Esplanade into downtown Kent. The two and one-half story residence, which sits on 0.233 acres of land, was purchased from owner Barbara L. Hartz for its appraised value of $210,000. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: KSU wants more international students (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: President tells board they're key to University's financial future

Kent State President Lester Lefton says international students are one key to the long-term health of the university, and he wants to increase the size of the international student body from 14-hundred to more than 21-hundred within five years. At Thursday's board meeting, Lefton said that's as important for American students as well as those from overseas.

Click here to listen: http://www.wksu.org/news/story/28518

Lefton maintains the goal is important in other ways. Only about 57 percent of Kent's freshmen make it through their senior year and Lefton sees international enrollment as one way to get that to 70 percent. That's why the university has set up recruitment centers in Beijing and New Delhi, along with campuses in Florence and Geneva.

Click here to listen: http://www.wksu.org/news/story/28518

Meanwhile, Kent State – like public colleges and universities throughout Ohio – remains in flux about what to charge all of its students come the fall. The trustees say they can't decide how much to increase tuition and fees until after lawmakers pass a two-year state budget. The deadline for passage is June 30th.

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News Headline: Headline News for Friday, June 03, 2011 (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State President Lester Lefton says international students are one key to the long-term health of the university, and he wants to increase the size of the international student body from 1,400 to more than 2,100 within five years. At Thursday's board meeting, Lefton said that's as important for American students as well as those from overseas. Lefton maintains the goal is important in other ways. Only about 57 percent of Kent's freshmen make it through their senior year and Lefton sees international enrollment as one way to get that to 70 percent. That's why the university has set up recruitment centers in Beijing and New Delhi, along with campuses in Florence and Geneva.

Meanwhile, Kent State – like public colleges and universities throughout Ohio – remains in flux about what to charge all of its students come the fall. The trustees say they can't decide how much to increase tuition and fees until after lawmakers pass a two-year state budget. The deadline for passage is June 30. University trustees agreed Thursday to reward KSU president Lefton with a $100,000 bonus for meeting all of their objectives for the current academic year. The bonus is equal to 25 percent of his base pay. Lefton's total compensation last year with a bonus and allowances was $685,000.

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News Headline: KSU awaits state budget to vote on tuition hike (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As the Ohio General Assembly's June 30 budget deadline approaches, the Kent State University Board of Trustees must wait to decide on a tuition increase.

“We're in a wait-and-see posture as to what the budget will look like,” KSU President Lester Lefton said after Thursday's board meeting.

Lefton said he has spoken with other Ohio public university presidents and the case is the same across the state.

“We just don't know what the legislature is going to do,” he said. “ We have ideas, but we don't know.”

In his remarks to the board, Lefton spoke about the university's efforts to secure its financial future.

“Since 2009, we have repositioned Kent State financially in anticipation of a budget cut,” Lefton said, adding that cuts could be as much as $10 million to $13 million when the stimulus money runs out.

Lefton pointed to KSU's efforts, including a hiring freeze for non-critical positions over the past year and planned internal budget reductions. Deans of colleges have been told to save a percentage of each budget, putting the money into reserves, he said.

Lefton also said fundraising is at an all-time high, reaching nearly $40 million last year.

Lefton told the board that increasing recruitment and student retention is a high priority in helping to secure the financial future of the university. Creating an “out-of-state pipeline” is one way to increase enrollment.

Within the next five years, Lefton would like to see the number of international students increase to 2,121. The university already has a recruitment center in Beijing and a center in New Delhi was approved Thursday.

The purpose of the recruitment centers is “to find students who are interested in an American education ... and be able to compete and succeed at Kent State University,” Lefton said.

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News Headline: Gift Helps Launch Enterprise Architecture Program At School Of Digital Sciences | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: TheStreet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A gift to Kent State University's new School of Digital Sciences will allow students to pursue a first-in-the-nation concentration in Enterprise Architecture at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Enterprise Architecture is a concept used by Fortune 500 companies, the United States government and major organizations around the world to assist those entities in creating technological road maps that match their business needs. Using these road maps, organizations develop tools and processes to help their employees work smarter and more efficiently.

Through this partnership, the Enterprise Architecture Center Of Excellence (EACOE) will donate to Kent State a five-year license to use its course ware in the School of Digital Sciences' curriculum, a gift valued at $3.2 million. Samuel B. Holcman, chairman of the Pinnacle Business Group Inc. and managing director of the Enterprise Architecture Center Of Excellence, calls the collaboration with the university exciting because of the school's multidisciplinary approach to the topic.

"What students will gain is a series of transferable skills that will make them extremely valuable to organizations around the world," Holcman said. "But while Enterprise Architecture is of interest to people around the world, work in the field from an academic standpoint is very thin. We believe academic institutions like Kent State can bring discipline to this, with the university becoming the foremost authority in the world."

Holcman is one of the field's early pioneers; his organization has educated more than 130,000 people on the topic and works with corporate and government clients around the world. EACOE's U.S. offices are located in Pinckney, Michigan.

"In the last 20 years, people have started to pay attention because of one word, and that word is complexity," Holcman said. "The business and technological needs of modern organizations are extremely complex. The analogy I like to give is if you're building a rowboat, you don't need information and planning. If you're building a cruise ship, you better do a lot of planning and architecture."

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News Headline: National Hiring Slowdown Means Bad News for Northeast Ohio (Reynolds) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Regional analysts say local job market will likely follow national employment numbers

Job growth slowed in May across the country, stoking fears that the economic recovery is sputtering out.

While state and local employment numbers lag behind national figures, Friday's bleak employment report likely means bad news for Northeast Ohio, said George Zeller, a Cleveland-area economic research analyst.

"This is a bad sign," Zeller said. "Definitely the national economic trends affect us."

The country added 54,000 jobs in May, drastically lower than analysts expected. Zeller said that the latest report also revised down the April numbers by 17,000 and the March numbers by 20,000, meaning job growth has not been as robust during the last few months as many analysts initially thought.

Beyond the numbers, people either unable to find work or those recently laid off find themselves in difficult circumstances. Maria Bolick Martinez, a resident of suburban Stow, said she lost her job at a local preschool last week – the same day her daughter graduated from Stow High School.

Martinez said she lost her job because many parents are being forced to work full time and are looking for all-day care for their children instead of a two-hour preschool.

"More and more families need both parents working and we have suffered the consequences," Martinez said.

Lock Reynolds, a labor economics expert at Kent State University, said this latest jobs report shows the country has taken a big step back from the mild improvement we had seen in labor markets in the past few months.

“The question always is, is it a one-month step back?" Reynolds said. "Maybe it's just a temporary blip down. What everyone is concerned about is, if this is the beginning of a new trend."

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the "Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor" metropolitan region added jobs in April, as the unemployment rate ticked down to 7.6 percent from 8.3 percent in March.

Locally, unemployment in some suburbs tracked by the state also improved. Cleveland Heights saw its unemployment rate drop slightly to 6.1 percent while Lakewood improved to 7 percent from 7. 4 percent in March.

As of the end of April, many of the counties in Northeast Ohio had better job numbers than the overall state rate of 8. 6 percent. Those include Cuyahoga, Lake, Summit and Portage counties. Stark County had a higher rate at 9.2 percent.

But while state and local jobless figures showed improvement in April, Zeller cautions that those numbers are deceptive because they were taken before a surge of jobless claims in late April.

He said the all indications are that statewide job estimates for May are "also going to be weak." Those reports will be released June 17.

Reynolds, from Kent State, said the economy slowly chipped away at the unemployment rate as businesses added jobs each month. But May's labor figures show the labor market changed from mere slow growth to actually weakening.

“One observation doesn't make a trend, but the concern is, will next month be as bad as this month?” he said.

Harvey Salkin, professor in the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University, said he's not optimistic about the economic future, and is worried about college graduates entering the job market for several reasons. One concern is that they're not pursuing professions that are in demand now.

"I think American students, for the most part, are in big trouble ... I don't think the work ethic and the cultural aspects of students today are like what they used to be. People were more motivated, were more driven and worked harder," Salkin said. "Americans don't want to work that hard. They don't want to become engineers. And there's a big demand for engineers, almost any kind."

Reynolds said he doesn't anticipate the influx of new college graduates will have too much of an impact on the labor market trend next month. But it's certainly a tough time for new graduates trying to find jobs and start careers.

“These numbers are not good news for anyone who's graduating college right now," he said. "It's not encouraging that very few people are getting hired out there.”

Matt Fredmonsky contributed reporting from Kent, Amanda Harnocz contributed from Stow and Michelle Simakis contributed from Cleveland Heights.

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News Headline: Researchers from Kent State University Publish Findings in Parkinson's Disease (Ridgel) | Email

News Date: 06/06/2011
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) often experience cognitive declines. Although pharmacologic therapies are helpful in treating motor deficits in PD, they do not appear to be effective for cognitive complications," researchers in Kent, United States report (see also ).

"Acute bouts of moderate aerobic exercise have been shown to improve cognitive function in healthy adults. However, individuals with PD often have difficulty with exercise. This study examined the effects of passive leg cycling on executive function in PD. Executive function was assessed with Trail-Making Test (TMT) A and B before and after passive leg cycling. Significant improvements on the TMT-B test occurred after passive leg cycling. Furthermore, the difference between times to complete the TMT-B and TMT-A significantly decreased from precycling to postcycling. Improved executive function after passive cycling may be a result of increases in cerebral blood flow," wrote A.L. Ridgel and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "That passive exercise could be a concurrent therapy for cognitive decline in PD."

Ridgel and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Aging and Physical Activity (Changes in Executive Function After Acute Bouts of Passive Cycling in Parkinson's Disease. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 2011;19(2):87-98).

For additional information, contact A.L. Ridgel, Kent State University, Dept. of Exercise Physiol, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Aging and Physical Activity is: Human Kinetics Publ Inc., 1607 N Market St., PO Box 5076, Champaign, IL 61820-2200, USA.

Copyright © 2011 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Researchers from Kent State University Publish Findings in Parkinson's Disease (Ridgel) | Email

News Date: 06/06/2011
Outlet Full Name: Pain & Central Nervous System Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) often experience cognitive declines. Although pharmacologic therapies are helpful in treating motor deficits in PD, they do not appear to be effective for cognitive complications," researchers in Kent, United States report (see also ).

"Acute bouts of moderate aerobic exercise have been shown to improve cognitive function in healthy adults. However, individuals with PD often have difficulty with exercise. This study examined the effects of passive leg cycling on executive function in PD. Executive function was assessed with Trail-Making Test (TMT) A and B before and after passive leg cycling. Significant improvements on the TMT-B test occurred after passive leg cycling. Furthermore, the difference between times to complete the TMT-B and TMT-A significantly decreased from precycling to postcycling. Improved executive function after passive cycling may be a result of increases in cerebral blood flow," wrote A.L. Ridgel and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "That passive exercise could be a concurrent therapy for cognitive decline in PD."

Ridgel and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Aging and Physical Activity (Changes in Executive Function After Acute Bouts of Passive Cycling in Parkinson's Disease. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 2011;19(2):87-98).

For additional information, contact A.L. Ridgel, Kent State University, Dept. of Exercise Physiol, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Aging and Physical Activity is: Human Kinetics Publ Inc., 1607 N Market St., PO Box 5076, Champaign, IL 61820-2200, USA.

Copyright © 2011 Pain & Central Nervous System Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Bad year for twisters (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/05/2011
Outlet Full Name: Buffalo News - Online
Contact Name: Randolph E. Schmid
News OCR Text: Weather experts said it's unusual for deadly tornadoes to develop a few weeks apart in the United States. But what made the two storm systems that barreled through a Missouri city and the South within the last six weeks so rare is that tornadoes took direct aim at populated areas.

The tornado that hit Joplin, Mo., on May 22 killed at least 139 people and marked the nation's deadliest single tornado in almost six decades. The series of twisters that swept through the South in late April killed more than 300 people. Both disasters leveled entire communities.

Such a pair of weather events is “unusual but not unknown,” said tornado researcher Howard B. Bluestein of the University of Oklahoma. “Sometimes you get a weather pattern in which the ingredients for a tornado are there over a wide area and persist for a long time. That's what we're having this year.”

And the threat is continuing, he said, noting more storms are predicted. Other than the death toll, there was nothing too unusual about the Joplin storm, he added. The conditions were right and thunderstorms were forecast.

“This is a situation where the tornado went right through a town. If had been 10 miles away, far fewer people would have been affected,” Bluestein said.

Urban sprawl into the countryside has increased the odds that tornadoes will affect more people, said Joshua Wurman, president of the Center for Severe Weather Research in Boulder, Colo. He likened the situation to barrier islands, where more and more homes are being built in areas prone to hurricanes.

Forecasters can't tell very far in advance where the path of destruction is going to be, added Greg Carbin, warning coordination meteorologist for the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla. A lot of tornadoes hit open spaces, so “when you move to major population centers, the death toll can climb.”

Carbin also noted that a single tornado hit in Missouri, while several tornadoes swept across six Southern states in April.

Experts are reluctant to attribute specific weather events to climate change, and National Weather Service Director Jack Hayes said that was the case with these tornadoes. Determining the cause will require much more research, he said.

Scientists are looking for ways to prevent high death tolls, in part by developing better warnings and getting people to heed them, said Jerry Brotzge, a research scientist at the Center for Analysis&Prediction of Storms at the University of Oklahoma.

A tornado warning could be issued for an entire county while the actual twister may cover only a few miles or less, he said. Plus, people often look outside because “they need some kind of confirmation, they want to see it,” Brotzge said, adding that people need to take cover underground.

Joplin residents had about a 20-minute warning, though a powerful rainstorm obscured it from some directions and “they wouldn't have seen it coming,” he said. Bluestein added that rain makes it easier to detect by radar, but for spotting, “it's very dangerous because you could be out in front of the storm and not aware of it.”

The Southerners had as much as a 24-minute warning, but those storms were too powerful and wide to escape. Entire towns were leveled, from Tuscaloosa, Ala., to Bristol, Va. It was the deadliest tornado outbreak in the United States since April 1974.

“The issue we haven't grappled with is how to warn a major urban area,” Brotzge said. “We saw that with [Hurricane] Katrina. We saw that with Tuscaloosa. People were warned very well but still had high fatalities.”

There is no practical technology to interfere with twisters. Tornadoes have even been known to hit mountains without dissipating, said Thomas W. Schmidlin, a geography professor at Kent State University who studies twisters.

“It's just been a bad year” for storms striking populated areas, Schmidlin said.

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News Headline: Numbers: A Wet Spring in Kent for 2011 (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: With May officially in the record books, and the climatological spring having ended Tuesday, numbers show what we were all thinking — 2011 had one of the wettest springs on record.


"Spring 2011 was wetter than average, as everyone knows," said Tom Schmidlin, a meteorologist in the Kent State University Department of Geography. "Total rainfall and melted snow was 17.26 inches, 5.8 inches above average."


Schmidlin has been recording precipitation levels from a weather station at his Brady Lake property for more than 25 years. April alone was the fourth wettest for Kent, according to his measurements.


"All three months were wetter than average with 4.42 inches in March, 6.08 inches in April and 6.76 inches in May," he said.


All that extra rain has effected Ohio's farmers the most, who have been forced to delay planting their corn crop , the Akron Beacon Journal reported Friday. And the same goes for Portage County's farmers , as the Record-Courier reported.


Just as quickly, rain turned to summer heat.


The high temperature in Kent on Memorial Day was 91 degrees — the hottest Memorial Day in at least 25 years in Kent, exceeding the previous hottest, 89, set in 2006, Schmidlin said. The average high on Memorial Day is 75 degrees.


It was even hotter on Tuesday May 31 with a high of 92 degrees at 4:06 PM. Tuesday was the hottest May day in Kent in at least 25 years. The previous record, prior to Monday, was 90 degrees in May 1996 and 1991.


After Saturday's forecast high of 86 degrees, we can look forward to returning cooler temperatures in Kent starting Sunday with a high of 76 and sunny skies and a high of 79 with sunshine on Monday, according to the National Weather Service.


As for more rain, there's a chance of thunderstorms Saturday night, but rain doesn't return to the forecast until after Tuesday.

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News Headline: Free meals for kids | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Summer Food Program in place for Salem, Leetonia, Washingtonville

School cafeterias may be closing for the summer, but children in the Salem, Leetonia and Washingtonville areas won't go hungry if they're in need of a free lunch.

Beginning June 20 and continuing through Aug. 12, children ages 1 through 18 can visit one of eight open sites spread out between the city and two villages and sit down for a meal, courtesy of the Summer Food Program operated by the Salem school district in partnership with the Leetonia school district.

Both districts qualified for the federal program due to their percentage of students who qualify for free and reduced lunches. Under the rules, at least one building must have more than 50 percent of its students on free and reduced lunches.

In Salem's case, the districtwide figure was 49.3 percent, but every building except for the high school was over 50 percent, with Buckeye Elementary at 59.3 percent, Reilly Elementary at 55.3 percent, Southeast Elementary at 50.3 percent and the Junior High at 51.3 percent. The high school figure was 38.2 percent.

At Leetonia, the districtwide figure was 51 percent, with the elementary at 54 percent, the middle school at 51 percent and the high school at 46 percent.

"Once I found out we were eligible for the program, it seemed to be needed, based on our free and reduced lunches," Salem Schools Treasurer Jill Rowe said.

For some children, their only meals were breakfast and lunch when they came to school. She questioned what they ate on the weekends or during the summer months.

"We're trying to make an effort to get these kids fed in the summer," she said. "We're trying to give them a place where they can come and eat if they need to."

This will be Salem's second year hosting the program. Last year, the high school served as the only open site, offering hot food since that's where the food is prepared. There were also three closed sites offering sack lunches for specific programs, including summer school at Reilly, Kindercamp at Buckeye and summer programs at the Kent State Salem City Center.

"If I learned anything, it was get the food to the kids. Don't expect them to come to you," Rowe said, accounting for the addition of more open sites in different locations.

Besides the high school again for hot food, other open sites in Salem for sack lunches will include the Salvation Army, Salem Acres apartments and the First United Methodist Church. Closed sites will include Kent State Salem City Center for children attending summer programs and Buckeye for children attending Kindercamp.

"We've spread it out more this year, gotten it to areas in need and around the Leetonia area," she said.

Leetonia sites will include Wick Park and St. Paul Lutheran Church. Washingtonville sites will include the Washingtonville Apartments and First United Methodist Church of Washingtonvill.

Leetonia Superintendent Rob Mehno said the district looked into the program and noted the district uses the same food service company as Salem. They contacted Salem about a collaborative effort to see how it goes this time around. Depending on how it goes, he said maybe they'll use their own school next year and have their own program.

"We're excited about the program, for the community and the kids. We're excited about working with Salem," Mehno said.

Under the rules, the lunches must follow United States Department of Agriculture requirements and the lunches must be consumed at the site. Any child can eat. An example of a sack lunch might be a ham and cheese sandwich, a fruit, a vegetable and milk.

Last year, Rowe said they served about 100 kids per day at the high school site, with the high school athletic teams practicing at the site included. This year, she's expecting to serve about 435 kids per day combined at all the open sites, including the ones in Leetonia and Washingtonville. All food will be prepared at Salem High School, then shipped out to the sites.

The cost of the program is estimated at $60,000, with the Salem schools reimbursed by the federal government per meal served. The funding pays for the food cost, transportation and nine paid workers she'll have in place in Salem, including the availability of a nurse a couple hours each day in Salem. She'll also use volunteers to serve meals, including volunteers from the Salem Salvation Army, which will bring its canteen vehicle to the Salem Acres site.

The Leetonia and Washingtonville sites will be staffed strictly by volunteers. She said about 20 volunteers showed up when she met with the Leetonia school officials, which she said is "kudos to them."

Procedures will be in place in case of inclement weather, but the program won't be cancelled.

Mehno said he would like to have some type of entertainment program for the kids at the sites, but first they want to see how it goes the first week. They notified local preschools and daycares about the program.

"Anthing we can do at all for the community is important to us," he said. "We really appreciate the cooperation Salem had for us in getting this off the ground."

He said it's a program that will benefit a lot of families and children.

Rowe noted the schedule is different for each site, so families should check the times and days for the site where their children plan to attend.

Salem will have two closed sites: the Kent State Salem City Center, restricted to children attending summer programs, noon to 12:30 p.m. June 20 to July 1; and Buckeye Elementary, restricted to children attending Kindercamp, 11:15 to 11:30 a.m. Aug. 1 to Aug. 12.

The open site at Salem Acres apartments on Prospect Street will meet only on Tuesday and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to noon June 20 to August 12.

All other sites will be open June 20 to August 12, off on July 4. The open lunch sites and their times will be: Salem High School, 11 a.m. to noon; Salem Salvation Army, 1249 Ellsworth Ave., 11 a.m. to noon; First United Methodist Church of Salem, 244 S. Broadway, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Washingtonville apartments, 185 Chris Ave., Washingtonville, 11 a.m. to noon; First United Methodist Church of Washingtonville, 100 High St., Washingtonville, 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.; Wick Park in Leetonia, Walnut St., Leetonia, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; and St. Paul Lutheran Church, 29 Spruce St., Leetonia, 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.

Mary Ann Greier can be reached at mgreier@salemnews.net

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News Headline: Community News: School news | Email

News Date: 06/06/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Robert Hamilton IV, an assistant professor of biology, received the Distinguished Teaching Award at Kent State Stark. He has been employed at KSU since 2005. Finalists for the award were Greg Blundell, lecturer of management and information systems, and Kim Finer, professor of biology.

Stephanie Tarver, an administrative clerk in student services at Kent State Stark, received the annual Staff Excellence Award; and Kristi Yerian, student activities coordinator, the Administrator Excellence Award. The recipients were selected by their peers for their work ethic, attitude and performance on the job. Each received a a commemorative clock and a cash prize.

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News Headline: KSUTC places 3rd in US in Earth Day challenge | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Staff report

warren

Kent State University-Trumbull has placed third in a national competition initiated by the Earth Day Network.

The organization's Earth Day University Challenge was part of its "A Billion Acts of Green" theme for Earth Day 2011.

The purpose of the competition was to inspire simple individual acts and larger organizational initiatives that further the goal of measurably reducing carbon emissions and supporting sustainability.

Kent State-Trumbull students, faculty and staff committed 990 "Acts of Green" on or around Earth Day 2011, finishing behind Brown University (first place with 3,167 acts) and the University of Washington (second place with 2,176 acts).Kent State-Trumbull students organized various projects ranging from a prescription-pill disposal program to soliciting commitments from nearly 400 individuals to "go green" by not using plastic water bottles for 30 days.

Other initiatives included an online conversation with U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown's chief climate adviser regarding green initiatives in Ohio, a poster contest and organizing trash cleanups in local communities.

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News Headline: USPTO ISSUES TRADEMARK: PMBA; PARTNERSHIP FOR THE MINORITY BUSINESS ACCELERATOR | Email

News Date: 06/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ALEXANDRIA, Va., June 3 -- The trademark PMBA; PARTNERSHIP FOR THE MINORITY BUSINESS ACCELERATOR (Reg. No. 3969653) was issued on May 31 by the USPTO.

Owner: Kent State University state university OHIO P.O. Box 5190 Kent OHIO 44242.

The trademark application serial number 85126618 was filed on Sept. 10, 2010 and was registered on May 31.

The description of the mark registered is "Color is not claimed as a feature of the mark. The mark consists of the term "PARTNERSHIP FOR THE MINORITY BUSINESS ACCELERATOR" below the term "PMBA" and a two part design consisting of a triangle with a curved side and a curved band."

Goods and Services: Assistance, advisory services and consultancy with regard to business planning, business analysis, business management, and business organization. FIRST USE: 20080101. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 20080101

For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Faith communities should address needs of elderly: Faith and You | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Terry Pluto, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: "And a lot of them are scared," said the Rev. Ronald Fowler, pastor emeritus from Arlington Church of God in Akron.

Fowler retired as full-time pastor of that church two years ago. Now 75, he has a new career as a consultant to Kent State University President Lester Lefton -- a role that puts him on campus about three days week.

"I spend most of my time with 20- to 30-year-olds," Fowler said. "They have one set of fears about finding jobs, money, relationships and the rest that comes with being a student or a professor. But my peer group sees life winding down."

The younger group sees life expanding; the other experiences life as a series of losses. Family and friends die. Health declines. Jobs end. They no longer can drive.

Fowler talked about how some of his friends "dread the idea of having to live with their kids or in a rest home." He said they worry about their money running out, and they "feel alone and are afraid to talk about it."

At Fowler's old church, the Rev. Diana Swoope recently gave a sermon about how senior citizens struggle to find their place in the world and the church.

She mentioned Leviticus 19:32: "Rise in the presence of the aged, show respect for the elderly and revere your God."

"How many of us do that?" Swoope said.

An even better question is: How many of us know we should do that? Or that we should remove our caps and make eye contact when we listen to the elderly?

As Swoope said, "We simply don't respect our elders as we once did. They have been through a lot, and they can speak into our lives if we take the time to talk to them."

Psalm 71:18 reads: "Even when I am old and gray, do not forsake me, my God, till I declare your power to the next generation . . . "

The 55-year-old Swoope has been battling breast cancer and lost her hair during chemotherapy. Rather than wear a wig, she went bald.

"But now that my hair is growing back, it's gray," she said.

Fowler, who heard Swoope's sermon, said, "It's like that . . . one day, you look in the mirror, and an older you is looking back."

Juri Ammari is the 40-year-old pastor of Metro Alliance Church in Cleveland.

"One of the real needs of seniors is when they are the caretaker for a spouse with dementia or who is disabled," he said. "They don't like to ask for help."

He said people in faith communities need to really find out what is happening in the lives of the seniors and figure out how to help -- even if it's as simple as taking someone to the store or to a doctor's appointment.

Human contact is important, but never even hint at a promise that can't be kept.

Seniors also have to help. There are times when their frustration boils into bitterness, and they repel those who want to have relationships with them. Or some may complain about any change at a church, turning the moving of a coat rack or the hiring of a younger person into a constant source of complaints.

"But what we need to remember is that for so many years, these people supported us and others," said Fowler. "Now, we need to see how we can help."

A first step for leaders could be to follow Swoope's lead -- deliver a message about it and see how seniors respond.

To reach Terry Pluto: terrypluto2003@yahoo.com, 216-999-4674 Previous columns online: cleveland.com/pluto/faith

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News Headline: KSU PRESENTS SEMINAR ON HELPING OHIO BUSINESSES (Messing) | Email

News Date: 06/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, June 3 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The Succession Planning Program at Kent State University and the Goering Center for Family and Private Business will present a planning seminar for small- and medium-sized businesses on Wednesday, June 8, in Cincinnati. "Moving Your Business and Ohio's Economy Forward During These Changing Times" will help business owners manage during the recovery and optimize the position of their businesses when the economy stabilizes and improves.

"The information, tools and techniques provided in this session will help you develop a plan to navigate your business through these tough economic times and drive the value of your business in this new economic climate," said Roy Messing, program coordinator the Ohio Employee Ownership Center at Kent State. "With these resources, you cannot only survive in the current economy but also thrive as much as possible. Whether the business owner is looking to pursue long-term growth or pursue a transition in ownership, the key to their success will reside in their business planning process. This seminar will provide insightful information and tools that will assist the owner of a business in their planning process."

The advisors and co-sponsors of "Moving Your Business and Ohio's Economy Forward During These Changing Times" are:

* Debbie Rausch, with U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development in Columbus, Ohio, will discuss lending and other programs available for rural businesses.

* Bonnie Deer, with the U.S. Small Business Administration in Cincinnati, will outline the services and financial products to small and private businesses.

* David Engel, of Comstock Valuation Advisors, Inc., a business valuation and financial advisory firm in Cincinnati, will outline private sources of funding available to private business owners.

* Jennifer Spohr, regional workforce director, and Leah Winkler and Ellen Turner from the Ohio Department of Development, will outline the state's vision on emphasizing the growth potential in the Targeted Business Clusters.

* Bruce McCain, chief investment strategist for Key Private Bank, will deliver the keynote address on his insights into the U.S. and Ohio economy going forward.

The session will be held on June 8 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza Cincinnati/Blue Ash at 5901 Pfeiffer Road, Cincinnati, and will include lunch. Registration will start at 8:30 a.m., with the welcome and continental breakfast starting at 9 a.m.

Panels will start at 10 a.m. Cost is $40 for the session. Further information is available from Roy Messing, Chris Cooper or Jay Simecek at 330-672-3028 or rmessin2@kent.edu, ccooper1@kent.edu or jsimecek@kent.edu.

For more information on the Ohio Employee Ownership Center at Kent State, visit www.oeockent.org. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Help for dispatcher | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's Police Department is hosting ''Dine and Dance for Sara,'' a benefit dinner/dance for KSU and Brimfield Township emergency services dispatcher Sara Anweiler. The event will be 5 to 11 p.m. June 11 at the banquet and conference center of Northeast Ohio Medical University (formerly NEOUCOM), 4209 State Route 44, Rootstown.

Sara was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009; it recurred in February and she is undergoing treatment.

Tickets are $30 (presale only). Silent auction, Chinese raffle and a 50/50 raffle are planned. For more information or to purchase a ticket, please contact any member of the KSU Police Department at 330-672-3070 or kwills@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Psychology professor honored at KSU | Email

News Date: 06/04/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HONORED

Kent State's department of psychology honored Professor David C. Riccio's 46th year in the university's psychology department with a three-day event last month. Former colleagues and students held a reception and hosted a scientific program with presentations from his former doctoral students. Riccio has mentored 42 Ph.D. graduates, won Kent's Distinguished Teaching and Distinguished Scholar Awards, has published over 170 journal articles and has received 40 years of continuous research funding from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation.

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: CLARIFICATIONS & CORRECTIONS | Email

News Date: 06/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An Internet address published Thursday for a Kent State department studying government consolidations should have been http://www.kent.edu/intergovernmentalcollaboration. The mistake was made by a reporter.

Copyright © 2011 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: 'Chicago' opens Porthouse season | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/05/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name: Sandra Emerick
News OCR Text: Eric van Baars stars is Billy Flynn and MaryAnn Black is spunky starlet Roxie will heat up the stage at Porthouse Theatre June 16 through July 2 in “Chicago.”

Porthouse Theatre will open is summer season with the musical "Chicago," with book by Fred Ebb & Bob Fosse, Music by John Kander, Lyrics by Fred Ebb, based on the play "Chicago" by Maurine Dallas Watkins.

The show will run June 16, 17, 18, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 24, 25, 28, 29, 30, July 1, 2 at 8 p.m.; and June 19 and 26 at 2 p.m. and will be directed by Porthouse Theatre's Artistic Director Terri Kent. The show stars Kent State University Theatre & Dance associate professor Eric van Baars as Billy Flynn; Choreographer and Dance Instructor for The University of Akron and Kent State University Dance programs, MaryAnn Black as Roxie Hart; Cleveland State University's Associate Dean of Students Sandra Emerick as Velma Kelly.

Kent is also a professor of theatre at Kent State and serves as the director of the musical theatre program for Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance.

Subscriptions are currently on sale. Price range for Tuesday through Friday evening performances are $60 for adults and $51 for seniors; Saturday night $66 for adults and seniors; Sunday matinee $51 for seniors and $57 for adults. Gift subscriptions are also available.

Special rates for groups of 20 or more are available, as are student rates. Call 330-672-3884 or visit www.porthousetheatre.com for details.

Single tickets also are available, ranging from $25 through $33 for adults and seniors, and $17 to $20 for students.

The box office is in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive at Kent State University in Kent.

For more information visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW: Esplanade brings Kent, campus closer | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/05/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent moved another step closer to becoming the interesting and attractive college town it always has had the potential to be with last weeks approval by the Kent State University Board of Trustees of the plan to extend the Esplanade from the campus into the downtown. An attractive walkway, years in the making, that has helped the campus become a more pedestrian-friendly place, the Esplanade, once extended, is likely to do the same for Kents downtown. Once built, the Esplanade will invited those on campus to venture into the downtown. We also hope it will invite those not affiliated with Kent State, but in the downtown to work, shop, or reside, to venture on to the campus, which is surely once of the most attractive parts of the Kent community. It will enable those riding bicycles to have easier access to both the campus and the downtown creating a demand for safe passages for non-auto transportation users, bicycle and PARTA bus riders who presumably will use the multi-modal transportation facility as a place of disembarkation or a spot to transfer from one mode of transportation to another. Those who utilize the new university inn and conference center, ready to be built on the block bounded by South Depeyster, Haymaker and East Erie streets, will find the Esplanade a nice way to connect with the Kent State campus, on foot if need be. Of the $3.3 million budgeted for the Esplanade, $700,000 will come from the Ohio Department of Transportation, which is committed to all forms of transportation. The university will pick the remainder, approximately $2.6 million. This is a sound investment, a sound investment in bringing the downtown and the campus closer. With the Esplanade, the University Inn and Conference Center, the new Haymaker Block project, and the Burbick investments that include Acorn Alley I and II, the tax base of the downtown will become stronger, which is good news for the schools and for the city, too. The rejuvenated and improvement downtown will be a powerful tool for student recruitment, too, as young people in high school make their decisions on where to attend college.

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News Headline: Week in Review: Kent Honors Adam Hamilton, Memorial Day, Pedal With Pete and More | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: This week proved a somber one for Kent residents, as the city marked Memorial Day and simultaneusly mourned a native son who died fighting in Afghanistan two days earlier.


Here's your news week in review:

We sat down with Pedal With Pete founder Pete Zeidner for an in-depth profile piece on Sunday. Zeidner's annual benefit ride for cerebral palsy research is today from 7:30 a.m to noon.
Sunday the news broke that 2007 Theodore Roosevelt High School graduate Adam Hamilton died in Afghanistan Saturday . Our coverage of Adam's death continued with interviews with his friends, former classmates and fellow soldiers , and an interview with his parents . We also featured a photo gallery of American flags at half staff around Kent in honor of Hamilton.
On Memorial Day, we told you about a new type of duty for some of Kent's homeless veterans , and Tuesday we featured our photo gallery from the parade and events held in Kent for the holiday.
We reminded you on Tuesday about the annual lemonade fundraiser, sponsored locally by the Huscroft family, to support childhood cancer research. The Huscroft's Alex's Lemonade Stand takes place today.
We broke the news when Kent City Council approved a tax abatement for Record Publishing Co. Wednesday night, and we followed that up with a look at how the move to Kent might change the newspaper company on Thursday.
We broke the news Thursday about the Esplanade plans gaining approval from the Kent State University Board of Trustees . Our story takes a close look at the project, which when finished will have cost Kent State more than $7 million on constructio and land acquisition.
Friday we examined how Kent State is bracing for a big cut in state dollars once Oho lawmakers approve a state budget this month.
News Break of the Week : The launch point for the annual Kent Heritage Festival fireworks show has been moved .

That's just a quick recap of the big stories. Don't forget about our Announcements page, Events calendar, Local Voices blogs, and our newly revamped "Places" business directory listing for more Kent news and information.

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