Report Overview:
Total Clips (8)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (2)
College of Arts and Sciences (AS); International Affairs (Office of) (1)
College of the Arts (CotA) (1)
Ice Arena (1)
Police Services (1)
Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (2)
Cleveland Botanical Garden exhibit features architect-designed birdhouses 06/09/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...architects group and the garden's programs. The birdhouses will be nested in 10 acres of outdoor gardens. Among the entries are four birdhouses by Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design students that represent these historical styles: "shingle/stick," "prairie...

Casino vs. history (Jurca) 06/09/2011 Architect Online Text Attachment Email

...the historic structure. “There's no way that what they're proposing even comes close to the character, the beauty, the functionality of this building,” Kent State University Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative urban planner David Jurca says. The Cleveland Landmarks Commission is scheduled to...


College of Arts and Sciences (AS); International Affairs (Office of) (1)
KSU, Lithuanian school partner (Lefton) 06/10/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of the Arts (CotA) (1)
Quilts and Books Come Together from Afar and Bring Beauty in Small Doses (Turner, Loderstedt) 06/10/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Ice Arena (1)
Kent State Zamboni Driver Paints Ice for Last Time (Switaj, Mest) 06/10/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Police Services (1)
Benefit set for KSU dispatcher 06/10/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Cuyahoga County governments eye cooperation, Kent State University study finds (Hoornbeek) 06/10/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

By Laura Johnston, The Plain Dealer View full sizeLynn Ischay l The Plain DealerCuyahoga County's new government is pushing regionalism, one of the...


Theatre and Dance (1)
'Chicago' opens Porthouse season 06/09/2011 Bedford Times Register - Online Text Attachment Email

...28, 29, 30, July 1, 2 at 8 p.m.; and June 19 and 26 at 2 p.m. and will be directed by Porthouse Theatre's Artistic Director Terri Kent. The show stars Kent State University Theatre & Dance associate professor Eric van Baars as Billy Flynn; Choreographer and Dance Instructor for The University...


News Headline: Cleveland Botanical Garden exhibit features architect-designed birdhouses | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Roxanne Washington, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: The structure has a clear Polygal Plastic roof, and two of the four walls are of the same see-through material. The other two walls are cedar. Neatly arranged, decorative silver-colored bolts hold the unusual dwelling together. He calls it "Wren Zen" because it exudes a meditative feeling.

The entrance to the house is a neat round hole, and if the occupants-to-be feel like hanging outside on a nice day, there's an exterior protruding branch for that.

Someday, this will all belong to some very lucky wrens -- as in birds.

Kordalski, of Kordalski Architects Inc. in Murray Hills, dreamed up this eye-catching abode to be a part of "For the Birds: Architect-Designed Birdhouses," an exhibit at the Cleveland Botanical Garden that begins Friday and runs until Sunday, Oct. 1. About 20 professionally designed birdhouses will be on display.

FYI

What: For the Birds: Architect-Designed Birdhouses.

Where: Cleveland Botanical Garden, 11030 East Blvd.

When: Friday through Saturday, Oct. 1.

Contact: cbgarden.org and 216-721-1600.

Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; noon-5 p.m. Sunday; closed Mondays.

Admission: $8.50; $3, children 3-12; free, children under 3 and members.

The exhibit is a collaboration between the botanical garden and the American Institute of Architects Cleveland.

Architects were asked to hatch, so to speak, surprising and whimsical creations for the exhibit.

This is for fun, of course, but there's also a fundraising purpose. The houses will be auctioned on eBay from Monday, Sept. 12, to Tuesday, Sept. 20, with proceeds benefiting the architects group and the garden's programs.

The birdhouses will be nested in 10 acres of outdoor gardens. Among the entries are four birdhouses by Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design students that represent these historical styles: "shingle/stick," "prairie and beyond," "modernism" and "postwar suburbia."

Kordalski, who is the brother of Plain Dealer assistant managing editor for visuals David Kordalski, says he went online to research the birdhouse he designed, which is 11 inches tall. He found that, to his surprise, there are websites with instructions on how to build a wren house, with specifics about the size that the hole needs to be and the depth from the hole to the floor to dissuade predators. After learning the basics, he took it from there.

"I didn't know that," Kordalski says, laughing about the architectural prerequisites.

But come September, there will be some wrens who will be happy Kordalski took the time to find out.

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News Headline: Casino vs. history (Jurca) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Architect Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By:

Cleveland's landmark hundred-year-old Columbia Building is in the way of a casino developer who wants the site for a welcome center and valet parking for a $400 million casino. Dave Davis reports that Rock Gaming claims the casino's fate hinges on its ability to demolish the historic structure. “There's no way that what they're proposing even comes close to the character, the beauty, the functionality of this building,” Kent State University Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative urban planner David Jurca says. The Cleveland Landmarks Commission is scheduled to consider the proposed demolition at its meeting today.

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News Headline: KSU, Lithuanian school partner (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Thomas Gallick | Staff Writer
Kent State University gained another international partner Thursday when President Lester Lefton signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the head of Lithuania's Siauliai University.
Vidas Lauruska, rector of Siauliai University, said he looked forward to increased cooperation between his school and KSU, which he called “one of the top universities in the world.”
“In my opinion, today is a very great day for our university and for me, too,” Lauruska said.
Officials at both schools began working toward the agreement last year, which includes student and faculty exchanges as well as collaboration on research projects.
Lefton said he hopes the schools can work together in areas such as biomedical engineering, and possibly liquid crystal research, after learning two of the lasers used in the Liquid Crystal Institute on KSU's campus were from Lithuania.
“(The agreement) creates cultural understanding,” he said. “It advances two universities and the lives of hundreds if not thousands of individuals who might partake in this relationship.”
Siauliai University is located in Siauliai, Lithuania, the fourth-largest city in the northern European country, which is located on the Baltic Sea and regained its independence in 1991 with the break-up of the Soviet Union.
Areas of study at the 12,000-student university include: biomedical engineering, educational research, public health and gender studies.
Lefton said he hoped this agreement lasted anywhere from 20 to 40 years and beyond.
“Relationships like these are ongoing,” he said. “They don't start one day and end another day. Rather, they're inter-generational.”
Thursday marked the second recent announcement from KSU about its overseas operations. On June 2, the KSU Board of Trustees officially approved the establishment of the school's center in India, where KSU officials have already signed similar memoranda with several universities.

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News Headline: Quilts and Books Come Together from Afar and Bring Beauty in Small Doses (Turner, Loderstedt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Art Gallery Hosts 'Art Quilts & Monumental Ideas in Miniature Books (MIMB)'

Who doesn't like the idea of curling up under a quilt with a good book?

Both books and quilts are objects that invite us to crawl inside.

Quilts beckon with the promise of comfort and warmth as we are swaddled with the care that was put into each delicate stitch.

Books, especially miniature books, invite us inside the world of our minds. As we emerge from the depths of a good book we realize the rich internal quality of our experience.

Thats what makes the show at Kent State University's School of Art Gallery so interesting.

I wouldn't normally think of viewing quilts from South Africa next to intricate handmade artist books on every subject under the sun. But, hey, that's why we have curators, right?

Art Quilts is an exhibit by Odette Tolksdorf, who lives in Durban, South Africa. Her quilts are self-described "as influenced by the multi-layered African environment and by other personal experiences."

They are nothing short of a visual delight. Tolksdorf doesn't need to tell us that the elements of design are important to her work. Each color, line and stitch in these quilts sits so firmly in its place it clearly belongs right there.

Tolksdorf uses bright colors, silk, wool, cotton, commercial and hand-printed fabrics as well as other materials for creative accents, such as yarn and pompoms.

In Pentimento, she combines offcuts and scraps from previous works to create a lovely network of lines and shapes that blend together purposefully and organically. The piece is so well designed that one might be inclined to call Tolksdorf's bluff regarding the title of the piece.

In other equally interesting works, Tolksdorf uses imagery to enliven the highly personalized quality that is sewn into a quilt. One of my favorites, Vuvuzela Madonna, is made from hand-dyed commercial fabrics. I can feel the horns buzzing from this woman's head as the colors vibrate intensely.

The bright array of colors from Tolksdorf's quilts create a perfect setting for the variety of books placed on tables and shelves around the gallery.

Monumental Ideas in Miniature Books (MIMB) is a show that has been around the block. And by that I mean around the world. This project is coordinated by Hui-Chu Ying of the University of Akron's Myers School of Art with the help of a handful of students and colleagues.

It has already exhibited in more than 60 institutions and will continue until 2012 when it will be donated to five educational institutions and libraries.

While Ying describes her idea as originating from "needing to produce an economical traveling exhibition during a tough economy," the result is much more than that.

Each book, which Ying calls a jewel, is a tiny voice that shows just how intricate, unqiue and, indeed, monumental a voice can be. In all there are 106 books from seven countries.

Some books are in German, some are covered in hair, and some are so delicate I was afraid to touch them. The subject matter ranges anywhere from visual pleasure and technical skill to social problems. On one table, a book opened as you followed a mermaid's snaking tail, and on another one a book asked questions from the perspective of the homeless.

"Many of the books can be opened like miniature sculptures," reads the coordinator statement to the show. Just like encountering a tiny voice, you are beckoned to stop and listen. Curiously traveling through these pages like you would a new friendship, you begin to slip in and out of monumental worlds at an alarming rate.

It would take all day to look at every book.

Kudos to Anderson Turner, Michael Loderstedt and all those who helped to make this exhibition possible.

Art Quilts by Odette Tolksdorf & Monumental Ideas in Miniature Books (MIMB) is on view May 26-July 29.

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News Headline: Kent State Zamboni Driver Paints Ice for Last Time (Switaj, Mest) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Rich Mest is retiring from maintaining Kent State's ice rinks after 31 years

By Kasha Legeza | Email the author | June 9, 2011

Rich Mest has seen plenty of unusual activities take place on the two rinks at the Kent State University Ice Arena. Like penguins frolicking on the ice there, new vehicle tires getting their trial runs in skid tests and a hockey-loving couple that was all smiles when he let them get married at center ice.

On Wednesday, Mest walked out onto the newly laid ice, grabbed a paint brush and put down color for the last time. It's a job he's performed every spring since 1981.

The Kent native is taking nearly 31 years worth of happy memories with him Friday when he exits the building for the last time as maintenance supervisor. Co-workers are honoring him at a party June 30, which is his official retirement date.

Bill Switaj, ice arena manager since 1994, said Mest's retirement is noteworthy because he's played a unique role at Kent State for such a long period of time.

“A lot of people on campus move around to different buildings during their careers. But Rich has literally been in the same building for 31 years, doing something that really nobody else does. It's such a unique, specific role,” Switaj said.

And, he added, Mest is really good with ice.

“There's an art to putting ice down and then maintaining it properly. It's a lot more complicated than people realize … It's a real balance, and he's an expert at it,” Switaj said.

Mest, a 1977 graduate of Theodore Roosevelt High School, made a career leap from fire to ice when he landed the Kent State job in late August 1980. He had been working as a “hot roofer” on flat roofs when a friend told him about the ice arena opening for a maintenance repair worker. Mest got the job, thanks in part to his carpentry experience.

At the time he didn't even know that a Zamboni was a manufacturer and name brand of ice resurfacing vehicles that arena visitors love watching in action. But he learned quickly.

“Everyone is always amazed when they watch the (Zamboni),” Switaj said. “Rich has not only been responsible for putting down the (new) ice each year, but also he has been the main driver and caretaker of our ice resurfacing machines.”

He said Mest has kept the arena's Zamboni in tip-top operating shape since 1992, even converting it from gas to propane power a few years back to be more environmentally friendly.

“He's put a lot of time and effort into keeping (the Zamboni) going. It's a very complicated piece of machinery that performs a variety of functions,” Switaj said. “It takes a long time for somebody to get comfortable driving it, much less maintaining it.”

Kent State's Zamboni now plays a back-up role to the zero-emissions Ukko Icecat that was purchased in late 2006.

But the Zamboni will always have a special place in Mest's heart. “Through the years people have recognized me at stores and festivals and such. They'd say, ‘Hey, you're the guy who drives the Zamboni at Kent State,'” he said with a smile.

Mest – whose job has included scheduling ice time at the arena for events like hockey camps, birthday parties and broomball leagues – has enjoyed meeting hundreds of people through the years. And getting to know decades of student employees has been a high point, resulting in several friendships that continue today.

Mest beams when sharing memories of unusual events that have occurred at the ice arena during his tenure.

The funniest? In 1985, the now-closed Sea World of Ohio was creating its Penguin Encounter exhibit. A trainer called Mest to ask if they could bring some penguins to Kent State to see how they would react walking around on an ice base.

“They brought five or six penguins and we put them in the recreational rink. They were running around out there and (defecating) all over the ice. When asked if that would hurt the ice, I had to admit I didn't know because I'd never had penguins (defecating) out there,” Mest laughed.

His most touching memory? About 20 years ago, during the arena's annual spring maintenance shutdown, a hockey-loving couple called to ask if they could get married on the ice.

“I met them here, turned on the lights and pushed a couple nets toward center ice. They threw down carpet runners, walked out there with a minister … and got married,” Mest said. “The whole thing was about 20 minutes start to finish. It was crazy, but they were so happy and so excited. They were all smiles.”

And interesting events? How about nearly 20 years of watching Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. workers testing new tires on the ice? Mest said the company rents the regulation-size rink about four times annually to conduct skid testing and road testing, each of which requires very different methods of ice preparation.

“It's really neat because they have this computerized truck full of equipment that measures all kinds of (tire) reactions. They'll change the tires on that truck 30 to 40 times when they're here (testing),” Mest explained.

But after 31 years, he's ready to retire, ready to play more golf and to finally attack the “'honey-do' list that dates to the 1980s” at his Stow home. “No doubt I'll miss it. I've never minded coming to work,” Mest said.

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News Headline: Benefit set for KSU dispatcher | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University
Police Department is hosting
a benefit dinner and
dance Saturday to benefit
a colleague battling breast
cancer.
“Dine and Dance for
Sara,” will be held from 5
to 11 p.m. at the Northeast
Ohio Medical University
(formerly NEOUCOM)
Banquet and Conference
Center, 4209 S.R. 44
in Rootstown to benefit
Sara Anweiler, an emergency
services dispatcher
for KSU and Brimfield, and
her family.
Tickets are $30 each, presale
only. There will be a
cash bar, dancing, silent
auction, Chinese raffle and
50/50 raffle.
A portion of the ticket
sales and bar sales, and all
proceeds from the raffles
and auctions will go to the
Anweiler family.
Anweiler was diagnosed
in early 2009 with breast
cancer and began treatment.
The cancer returned
in February 2011 for a third
time. Anweiler currently is
undergoing treatment.
To purchase tickets or for
more details, contact any
member of the KSU Police
Department at 330-672-
3070 or email kwills@kent.
edu. Information also is
available at www.donatetosara.
com.

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News Headline: Cuyahoga County governments eye cooperation, Kent State University study finds (Hoornbeek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Laura Johnston
News OCR Text: By Laura Johnston, The Plain Dealer

View full sizeLynn Ischay l The Plain DealerCuyahoga County's new government is pushing regionalism, one of the tenets of the new county charter.

KENT, Ohio -- From joint fire dispatching to shared accounting departments, Northeast Ohio governments have dreamed up more than 240 ideas to share services and save money, a Kent State University study has found.

The university's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy has compiled a list of 105 ideas to share with local leaders and inspire them to think creatively. A separate list of ideas being implemented is coming soon

The goal: to get more local governments to pool resources.

"There's a lot of discussion happening in this area right now," said John Hoornbeek, the center's director. "For the most part, it's productive discussion that could give rise to positive changes if local governments can find ways to make some of these ideas work."

The ideas are culled from 16 Northeast Ohio counties, home to 868 government entities that spend $20 billion annually to run themselves, according to the Fund for Our Economic Future, which worked with Kent on the list.

Cuyahoga County leads the pack with 37 ideas, according to the study. That makes sense, since Cuyahoga has the most local governments, with 104.

Nearly 40 percent of the ideas were proposed in 2009, with less than 10 percent in each of the years 2002-2008, the study says. That also makes sense, since government budgets have become increasingly strapped over the last few years.

State cuts to the Local Government Fund make it even more imperative to share, said Irv Sugerman, an attorney who serves as the law director for Coventry and Copley townships in Summit County and the village of Lodi in Medina.

"We're just not going to be able to afford to provide a level of services to our residents that we were in the past without some real creative ways of working together," Sugerman said. "The work they're doing over there will hopefully spark some more dialogue and interest in these types of collaborations."

Cuyahoga County's new government is also pushing regionalism, one of the tenets of the new county charter.

But before local mayors sign on to the concept, they want two things, said Ed Jerse, the county's first-ever regional collaboration director. They want proof that collaboration will save money, and they want a how-to manual to do it.

So the Kent list will be helpful, Jerse said.

"Those kinds of stories, if they're documented, can be very helpful in encouraging people to look at collaboration," he said.

The examples also can help communities move from small ideas -- such as South Euclid and University Heights sharing a dog warden -- to bigger ones, such as merging police and fire departments, or even the cities themselves.

"I think a lot of mayors take a Missouri 'Show me' approach to regionalism," he said. "Show me it works, and I'll explore it."

A how-to manual would have helped Tallmadge, a Summit County city saving more than $800,000 a year by outsourcing its building, income tax and dispatch services and using cloud computing to eliminate the need for in-house computer hardware.

"For us, we were pioneering," said Administrative Director Tom Pascarella. "If there was this inventory that says here are the communities who have actually done it, I could call those people . . . I think it would have made our efforts quicker."

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: ljohnsto@plaind.com, 216-999-4115

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News Headline: 'Chicago' opens Porthouse season | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Bedford Times Register - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Porthouse Theatre will open is summer season with the musical "Chicago," with book by Fred Ebb & Bob Fosse, Music by John Kander, Lyrics by Fred Ebb, based on the play "Chicago" by Maurine Dallas Watkins.

The show will run June 16, 17, 18, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 24, 25, 28, 29, 30, July 1, 2 at 8 p.m.; and June 19 and 26 at 2 p.m. and will be directed by Porthouse Theatre's Artistic Director Terri Kent. The show stars Kent State University Theatre & Dance associate professor Eric van Baars as Billy Flynn; Choreographer and Dance Instructor for The University of Akron and Kent State University Dance programs, MaryAnn Black as Roxie Hart; Cleveland State University's Associate Dean of Students Sandra Emerick as Velma Kelly.

Kent is also a professor of theatre at Kent State and serves as the director of the musical theatre program for Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance.

Subscriptions are currently on sale. Price range for Tuesday through Friday evening performances are $60 for adults and $51 for seniors; Saturday night $66 for adults and seniors; Sunday matinee $51 for seniors and $57 for adults. Gift subscriptions are also available.

Special rates for groups of 20 or more are available, as are student rates. Call 330-672-3884 or visit www.porthousetheatre.com for details.

Single tickets also are available, ranging from $25 through $33 for adults and seniors, and $17 to $20 for students.

The box office is in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive at Kent State University in Kent.

For more information visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

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