Report Overview:
Total Clips (11)
Alumni Relations (1)
Art (1)
Blossom Music; Music (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Distinguished Scholar Awards (1)
Ice Arena (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Psychology (1)
Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Research (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni Relations (1)
Kent State Alumni Association hosts First Alumni College (Braydich) 06/12/2011 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University alumni became students again as they returned to campus for Alumni College. Held May 21, the event gave attendees the...


Art (1)
Craft shows: June 11 & 12, Blossom Visiting Artist Lecture: June 14 06/10/2011 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

...artists. Featured work will include jewelry, ceramics, painting, glass, photography, fiber and more. Visiting Artists Lecture Series Textile Art: Kent State University Scool of Art Room 202: June 14, Tuesday at 6:00 pm Rowland Ricketts: Free and open to the public For more information:...


Blossom Music; Music (1)
KENT AND BLOSSOM MUSIC FESTIVAL CONTINUES UNIQUE PROGRAM COMBINING VISITING STUDENTS WITH MEMBERS OF THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA 06/10/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, June 10 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The Kent/Blossom Music Festival is a unique program that pairs advanced young musicians...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
NLN Names Newest Class of Nursing Education Fellows 06/11/2011 Advance for Nurses - Online Text Attachment Email

...University Frances R. Vlasses, PhD, RN, NEA-BC; Loyola University Chicago, Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing Barbara Yoost, MSN, RN, CNS, CNE; Kent State University College of Nursing For more information about the NLN Academy for Nursing Education, visit www.nln.org/excellence/academy/index.htm...


Distinguished Scholar Awards (1)
KSU honors faculty with scholar awards for 2011 06/12/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

Three Kent State University faculty members were recognized as Distinguished Scholar Award recipients at a luncheon ceremony on April 15. The recipients...


Ice Arena (1)
Putting the icing on the job at KSU: Arena maintenance head to retire after 31 years (Mest) 06/13/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Ohio director holds open casting call for new independent film (Andrews) 06/10/2011 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...Rik Swartzwelder is producing the independent film in and around Tuscarawas County, with shooting set to begin in the fall. Swartzwelder said he may use Kent State University's Tuscarawas campus as a location. “We are pleased Rik Swartzwelder is considering our beautiful campus as a possible...


Psychology (1)
Dr. Rawson honored by UNC (Zaragoza) 06/13/2011 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email

...Linda P. Brady during a May 19 program that also recognized donors to the university. Rawson, a cognitive psychologist who has been a faculty member at Kent State University since 2004, received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2010 -- the highest honor bestowed...


Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Kent State study lists 240 ideas for regional collaboration (Hoornbeek) 06/10/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...fire dispatching to shared accounting departments, Northeast Ohio governments have dreamed up more than 240 ideas to share services and save money, a Kent State Universitystudy has found. The university's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy has compiled a list of 105ideas...


Research (1)
World-Record Split Magnet System Makes its Debut 06/10/2011 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

...Optics researchers in chemistry, physics and biology are poised to conduct research using the split coil, and the magnet's first user, travelling from Kent State, will conduct experiments this month. Want to learn more about the Split Magnet? Search "split coil" at magnet.fsu.edu.


University Press (1)
Civil War History 06/10/2011 American Heritage Text Attachment Email

Blair, William, Editor Kent, OH: Kent State University Press Civil War History is in its fifth decade as the leading scholarly journal of "the middle period"—covering not...


News Headline: Kent State Alumni Association hosts First Alumni College (Braydich) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University alumni became students again as they returned to campus for Alumni College. Held May 21, the event gave attendees the opportunity to reunite with one another and revisit the campus.

“Welcoming more than 100 alumni back to campus for our first Alumni College was very exciting,” said Brittney Braydich, assistant director of outreach for the KSU Alumni Association. “Watching them reconnect with each other and hearing their excitement about all the advancements on campus made the entire day a huge success! We plan to make Alumni College an annual event.”

Educational sessions were offered throughout the day to attendees. Kent State faculty members taught classes on topics such as Katharine Hepburn's fashion, the basics of wine, liquid crystals and more.

Besides the classes, participants enjoyed a bus tour of campus. For alumna Marguerite Spears, who received her bachelor's degree in 1939 and a Master of Arts degree in 1950, the tour was one of the day's highlights.

“The campus has grown,” Spears said. “None of this was here when I was. I wanted to come back while I was still able to, and I'm glad I came today. This whole day was just wonderful.”

In addition to seeing the changes on campus, alumni also listened to a university update from Kent State President Lester A. Lefton during lunch. The day concluded with a reception where alumni received “diplomas” and a stuffed black squirrel for attending.

Leona Brown, a 1951 graduate, said she was happy she attended the event and would consider coming again.

“I did enjoy myself,” she said. “And, I think if you asked anyone here, they'd tell you they enjoyed themselves, too.”

Plans for next year's Alumni College, which is slated for May 19, 2012, are already being discussed.

“Our hope is to build on the success and positive feedback from this first year,” Braydich said. “We're considering expanding the program and developing an alumni committee to help guide our efforts for future Alumni College programs.”

For more information on the Kent State University Alumni Association, visit www.ksualumni.org or call 888-320-5368.

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News Headline: Craft shows: June 11 & 12, Blossom Visiting Artist Lecture: June 14 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hopefully you can get out sometime this weekend and visit one of the many area craft shows. Be positive, look at the weather "'cup" as full of sunshine, and not rain!

Downtown Port Clinton Arts and Crafts Festival

Visit the Downtown Port Clinton Arts and Crafts Festival's Website

Sat June 11, 2011 - Sat June 11, 2011

Show Location:

Madison Street

Port Clinton , OH

Avant-Garde Art & Craft ShowCraft Show Dates:

Sat June 11, 2011 - Sat June 11, 2011

Show Location:

Middleburg Heights Community Center, 16000 Bagley

Middleburg Heights, OH

Show Info:

Featuring North East Ohio's local talent.. This year's show will feature a variety of handmade art and craft items from some of the area's most talented vendors. A wide variety of unique and one-of-a-kind items will be available for purchase.

For More Information Contact:

Becki Cooper

440-227-8794

info@bsweetb.com

Second Saturday Street FaireCraft Show Dates:

Sat June 11, 2011 - Sat June 11, 2011

Show Location:

Historic Main Street

Waynesville, OH

Show Info:

Waynesville Merchants Association closes a block of Main Street and permits artists, crafters, authors, and antique dealers to set up 10x10 tents to show and sell their creations.

Crocker Park Fine Art FairCraft Show Dates:

Sat June 11, 2011 - Sun June 12, 2011

Show Location:

Crocker Park

Westlake, OH

Show Info:

The fair will showcase 130 exhibitor booths. There is ample on-site parking for fairgoers and artists. Featured work will include jewelry, ceramics, painting, glass, photography, fiber and more.

Visiting Artists Lecture Series

Textile Art: Kent State University Scool of Art

Room 202: June 14, Tuesday at 6:00 pm

Rowland Ricketts: Free and open to the public

For more information: See flyer on slide show in this article.

Alma is passionate about crocheting, knitting, and sharing her learning experiences with others. Self taught in crochet and knitting, by way of...

In Top Gun, Tom Cruise proved that flying a plane is...

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News Headline: KENT AND BLOSSOM MUSIC FESTIVAL CONTINUES UNIQUE PROGRAM COMBINING VISITING STUDENTS WITH MEMBERS OF THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA | Email

News Date: 06/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, June 10 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The Kent/Blossom Music Festival is a unique program that pairs advanced young musicians with a stellar faculty drawn primarily from members of The Cleveland Orchestra. The relationship between Kent/Blossom Music Festival and The Cleveland Orchestra members represents a high level of artistic collaboration, without any direct financial linkage, and continues with the 2011 season.

Since the inception of Blossom Music Center in 1968, the Musical Arts Association has partnered with Kent State University and its College of the Arts to develop Blossom as a complete environment for the arts. Each summer, Kent/Blossom combines performance with education and joins working professionals with talented students to teach, explore and produce great music. This important relationship between a premier performing ensemble and a public university also has served as a model for other collaborations.

Founded in 1968 by George Szell and Louis Lane, the Kent/Blossom Music Festival has welcomed more than 2,200 young artists. The program has propelled hundreds of remarkable young musicians into the ranks of major orchestras, opera companies and conservatory facilities throughout the United States and around the globe.

The Kent/Blossom Music program brings music students from all over the world to study alongside members of The Cleveland Orchestra for five weeks. Students develop professional skills through personal study and classes with visiting master artists, members of The Cleveland Orchestra and Kent State faculty. A focus on major works of the chamber music repertoire is augmented by studies in orchestral repertoire and techniques and solo master classes. Participants also attend open rehearsals and concerts of The Cleveland Orchestra. The program features a professional concert series as well as 13 free concerts featuring the Kent/Blossom Chamber Players. Undergraduate and graduate credit is available and scholarships are provided to many participants.

Twenty former Kent/Blossom students are members of The Cleveland Orchestra. Known career placements include 157 chairs in U.S. and international orchestras, 14 chamber ensembles and on more than 52 U.S. and foreign music faculty.

KENT/BLOSSOM MUSIC FESTIVAL

2011 Professional Concert Series

Ludwig Recital Hall, Kent State University Music and Speech Center, 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent, OH 44242 $15 General Admission/$5 Students: Available at the door

For more information call the concert hotline at 330-672-3609 or visit Kent/Blossom Website

Wednesday, June 29, at 7:30 p.m.

Central European Splendor!

Miami String Quartet with guests

Spencer Meyer, Gold Medalist of the 2008 New Orleans International Piano Competition

Daniel McKelway, Assistant Principal Clarinet, The Cleveland Orchestra

Robert Vernon, Principal Viola, The Cleveland Orchestra

Dohnanyi Piano Quintet in E flat

Weber Clarinet Quintet

Mendelssohn Viola Quintet, Op. 18

Monday, July 6, at 7:30 p.m.

The Intimate Beethoven

Amy Lee, Associate Concertmaster, The Cleveland Orchestra, with guest artist Tina Dahl, piano

All Beethoven Program

Monday, July 11, at 7:30 p.m.

Music for a Summer Evening!

Miami String Quartet with guest artist Jerry Wong, piano

Beethoven Quartet in C minor, Op. 18

Beethoven Kakadu Variations

Schubert Death and the Maiden

Wednesday, July 20, at 7:30 p.m.

The Regal Sounds of Winds

Frank Rosenwein, Principal Oboe, The Cleveland Orchestra

Daniel McKelway, Assistant Principal Clarinet, The Cleveland Orchestra

Barrick Stees, Assistant Principal Bassoon, The Cleveland Orchestra

Richard King, Principal Horn, The Cleveland Orchestra

Randall Fusco, piano

Mozart Piano Quintet

Griebling-Haigh Sonata for Horn & Piano [world premier]

Griebling-Haigh Romans des Rois

Beethoven Piano Quintet

Wednesday, July 27, at 7:30 p.m.

Soul ...del sol! An Evening of Latin-Inspired Music

The Cleveland Orchestra Piano Trio: Joela Jones, piano; Peter Otto, violin; Richard Weiss, cello;

Frank Rosenwein and Danna Sundet, oboe; Barrick Stees, bassoon; and Joela Jones, accordion;

with guests Emma Shook, violin; Stanley Konopka, viola; Scott Haigh, double bass; Donna Lee, piano; and Ted Rounds, percussion

Turina Piano Trio

Griebling-Haigh Sinfonia Concertante [world premiere]

Griebling-Haigh Alegrias [world premier]

Piazzolla Milonga del Angel, Libertango, and selections from Five Tango Sensations

2011 Chamber Players Series

All concerts are FREE and in Ludwig Recital Hall unless otherwise noted. All works subject to change.

Series I

Friday, July 8, at 7:30 p.m.

Haydn String Quartet in F minor Op. 20, No. 5

Brahms Horn Trio, Op. 40

Arnold Wind Trio, Op. 37

Dvorak Piano Quintet in A major, Op. 81

Saturday, July 9, at 2:30 p.m.

Hellmesberger Romance Op. 43, No. 2 for Four Violins

Enesco Dixtuor for Winds, Op. 14

Shostakovich String Quartet No. 8 in C minor, Op. 110

Villa Lobos Woodwind Trio

Brahms Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25

Sunday, July 10, at 2:30 p.m.

Rossini Sonate a Quattro in C major No. 3

Beethoven Serenade in D major, Op. 25

Dvorak Serenade for Winds, Op. 44

Mahler Piano Quartet in A minor

Tchaikovsky String Sextet in D minor, Op. 70 (Souvenir de Florence)

Series II

Friday, July 22, at 7:30 p.m.

Mozart Horn Quartet K. 407

Poulenc Trio, Op. 43

Berwald Septet in B-flat major

Shostakovich Piano Quintet in G minor, Op. 57

Faure Piano Quartet in C minor, Op. 15

Saturday, July 23, at 2:30 p.m.

Quantz Trio for Two Flutes, Bassoon and Continuo Moszkowski Suite for Two Violins and Piano, Op. 71

Haydn Octet in F major, H. 2/F7

Shostakovich String Octet, Op. 11 (Prelude and Scherzo)

Prokofiev Oboe Quintet, Op. 39

Dohnanyi Piano Sextet in C major, Op. 37

Sunday, July 24, at 2:30 p.m.

Mozart Oboe Quartet, K. 370

Foote Nocturne and Scherzo for Flute and String Quartet

Glazunov Cello Quintet, Op. 39

Rochberg "To the Dark Wood" for Woodwind Quintet

Brahms Piano Quintet in F minor, Op. 34. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: NLN Names Newest Class of Nursing Education Fellows | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Advance for Nurses - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Twelve distinguished nurse educators will join the National League for Nursing's Academy of Nursing Education when they are inducted as fellows at the 2011 NLN Education Summit this fall in Orlando, FL.

This 5th class of fellows brings the total number to 117 since the establishment of the academy in 2007. Fellows are selected through a competitive application process. They represent leaders in nursing education from nursing programs across the higher education spectrum and from other organizations committed to healthcare.

As in years past, the Academy of Nursing Education Review Panel considered many applications before making its recommendation to the NLN Board of Governors, the oversight body for the academy.

Evaluations take into account applicants' contributions to innovative teaching and/or learning strategies; nursing education research; faculty development activities; academic leadership; promotion of public policy that advances nursing education; and/or collaborative educational, practice, or community partnerships.

"We are proud of the vision, talent, wisdom, and experience this cohort of fellows brings to the academy," said Cathleen M. Shultz, PhD, RN, CNE, FAAN, the president of the NLN. "Through their accomplishments, which we publicly recognize by conferring the coveted ANEF credential, they truly embody the NLN's goal to promote excellence in nursing education to advance the nation's health."

NLN established the Academy of Nursing Education to foster excellence in nursing education by recognizing and capitalizing on the wisdom of outstanding nurse educators. Fellows support the mission of the NLN, assist in the work required to prepare graduates from all types of nursing programs, and serve as resources for new educators and those in clinical practice who hope to someday enter the ranks of nursing faculty.

Fellows of the NLN Academy of Nursing Education to be inducted at the 2011 NLN Education Summit at a ceremony on September 24 include:

Marsha Howell Adams, DSN, RN, CNE, University of Alabama Capstone College of Nursing

Diane Breckenridge, PhD, RN, La Salle University School of Nursing

Joan Darden, PhD, RN, Thomas University

Mary M. Hoke, PhD, PHCNS-BC, RN-BC, New Mexico State University School of Nursing

RuthAnne Kuiper, PhD, RN, CNE, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Mary Elizabeth Mancini, PhD, RN, NE-BC, FAHA, FAAN, University of Texas at Arlington College of Nursing

Barbara J. Patterson, PhD, RN, Widener University

Lynne Porter Lewallen, PhD, RN, CNE, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Karin J. Sherrill, PhD, RN, CNE, Mesa Community College

Susan Sportsman, PhD, RN, Midwestern State University

Frances R. Vlasses, PhD, RN, NEA-BC; Loyola University Chicago,

Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing

Barbara Yoost, MSN, RN, CNS, CNE; Kent State University College of Nursing

For more information about the NLN Academy for Nursing Education, visit www.nln.org/excellence/academy/index.htm or email thess@nln.org.

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News Headline: KSU honors faculty with scholar awards for 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Three Kent State University faculty members were recognized as Distinguished Scholar Award recipients at a luncheon ceremony on April 15. The recipients of the 2011 award are Dr. Theodore Albrecht from the School of Music; Stow resident Dr. Ran Barniv from the Department of Accounting; and Dr. Declan Keane from the Department of Physics.

The awards luncheon is part of the university's annual Celebration of Scholarship event that also included a student poster display and Faculty Recognition Program.

Barniv is globally recognized as one of the top accounting scholars and regularly presents his scientific work at primary international and national conferences. His research interests are in financial accounting and international accounting with a focus on regulation of corporations and capital markets and financial analyst performance. His scientific findings have an impact on academic research paradigms and indicate that regulations of crises and capital markets have some positive effects on accounting standard setters, corporations, financial analysts and investors.

Since joining Kent State in 1990, Barniv's publication record is exceptional, focusing on quality rather than quantity. He published many articles, including 11 in the top 10 out of 350 accounting journals, seven in the last five years. He has published two articles on regulation and accounting effects in the top-rated accounting journal, The Accounting Review, which has a 90-95 percent annual rejection rate.

Barniv lives in Stow.

The events that comprise the annual celebration showcase research and creative activity and acknowledge, reward and support the culture of research and inquiry at Kent State.

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News Headline: Putting the icing on the job at KSU: Arena maintenance head to retire after 31 years (Mest) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (Photo) Rich Mest adds finishing touches to the paint on the ice at Kent State University's Ice Arena for the final time this week. Mest is retiring after 31 years on the ice.

By THOMAS GALLICK | STAFF WRITER
When Rich Mest started working
at the Kent State University
Ice Arena 31 years ago, Kent was
swiftly establishing itself as a firstrate
hockey town.
Theodore Roosevelt High
School's ice hockey team would
finish second in the state in 1981
before winning a state championship
the next year, while KSU's
hockey team was bringing in
upwards of 1,000 fans for some
games.
And KSU's newest maintenance
worker was wondering how he, a
roofer and carpenter who hadn't
even heard of a Zamboni before
he started, got put on ice.
“I was like, ‘What am I getting
myself into?'” Mest said of the beginning
of his tenure at the university.
Mest, who serves as maintenance
supervisor at the arena, surfaced
and painted the ice for the
last time this week and will retire
at the end of the month. His duties
also include maintaining and
driving the Zamboni, or ice resurfacing
machine, which he likens to
“driving a box.”
Mest was looking for steady
work in a bad economy in August
1981 when he heard KSU was
hiring a maintenance employee
for the ice arena. He didn't have
a background working with ice,
but he didn't let that dissuade
him from applying, and he got
the job.
Since his humble beginnings at
the university, Mest has seen the
good, the bad and the wacky from
the hockey faithful.
Mest said one of the most memorable
moments in his career came
when a group of Canadian fans
who followed their school's team
to Kent surprised the crowd with
a unique celebration.
“If they scored they would throw
fish on the ice,” he said. “They told
me I had to go out and get those
fish, and I said, ‘I didn't throw
them!'”
Mest said a referee eventually
cleaned up the mess and the P.A.
announcer told the crowd they
couldn't throw any more fish on
the ice.
“The next day they came back
and threw (frozen) chicken on the
ice,” he said.
Hockey fans also provided another
highlight of Mest's career in
the early 1990s when a KSU student
asked Mest if he and his fiancée
could be married on the ice.
Mest obliged and the two took
their vows in Detroit Red Wings
jerseys at the arena in front of a
small group of friends and family.
Mest's tenure at the KSU has
not always been so lighthearted
and carefree. The arena staff was
dealt a blow in 1994 when the university
cut the varsity ice hockey
program.
He said the staff was worried the
arena could become a liability.
But the building stayed busy
with a steady flow of rentals from
high school hockey teams, KSU's
club hockey team and members of
the community.
The arena survived, but the
hockey environment was never
the same.
“That was top-notch college
hockey” he said. “It was just great
hockey to watch and the fan base
was great.”
Bill Switaj, manager of the arena
and the last coach in the history
of the KSU hockey program,
agreed.
“It's not like it was when it was
a varsity program,” he said.
“We had a lot of NHL players
coming through here.”
Switaj said the university
is lucky enough to have
skilled employees who have
worked for years with Mest
and can take over his duties
when he leaves, but added
that he would still be hard
to replace.
“It's a real art form,” he
said. “When you lose somebody
like that you lose years
of experience. Years of experience
is what it takes,
and nothing beats experience.”

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News Headline: Ohio director holds open casting call for new independent film (Andrews) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA, Ohio - Professional actors and amateurs are invited to audition for a new movie called “Old Fashioned” at the end of June.

Ohio native Rik Swartzwelder is producing the independent film in and around Tuscarawas County, with shooting set to begin in the fall. Swartzwelder said he may use Kent State University's Tuscarawas campus as a location.

“We are pleased Rik Swartzwelder is considering our beautiful campus as a possible location for his movie, ‘Old Fashioned,'” said Dr. Greg Andrews, the dean and chief administrative officer for Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

The film follows the life of 30-year-old former frat boy Clay Walsh, who tries to court a girl named Amber Hewson. Walsh tries to shun his feelings for Hewson because of his religion, but he eventually falls in love. Together, they learn to overcome their differences about religion and past loves.

Swartzwelder is a writer, director and producer who has won more than 50 major awards for his work. He said he is excited to have the opportunity to cast people from his home state.

“There is a lot of great natural acting talent that never gets the chance to shine,” he said. “This is that chance.”

Auditions will take place Sunday, June 26 from noon-6:00 p.m. and Monday, June 27 from 3:00-9:00 p.m. No appointment is necessary. Just show up at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia, and bring a current photo.

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News Headline: Dr. Rawson honored by UNC (Zaragoza) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Five women recently received The University of North Carolina at Greensboro's top awards for service. Included was Dr. Katherine A. Rawson '99, of Stow, who received the Young Alumni Award, which is presented to alumni who are 40 years of age and younger, and recognizes exceptional achievement and significant contribution to the recipient's profession or community, society or the university.

The honors were presented by UNCG Chancellor Linda P. Brady during a May 19 program that also recognized donors to the university.

Rawson, a cognitive psychologist who has been a faculty member at Kent State University since 2004, received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2010 -- the highest honor bestowed by the government for scientists at the beginning of their careers. Her research focuses on the cognitive processes in learning from text and the optimization of learning in educational settings. Rawson has published 21 journal articles and several book chapters. She is associate editor for two major journals in her field and serves on the editorial board for two other journals. In both undergraduate and graduate courses, her teaching receives high marks from students. As a mentor, she is just as successful. "They view her as an exceptional role model for how to think about research, how to use one's time effectively and how to succeed in academia," wrote Dr. Maria Zaragoza, chair of the Kent State department of psychology, in her nomination letter.

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News Headline: Kent State study lists 240 ideas for regional collaboration (Hoornbeek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Laura Johnston
News OCR Text: By Laura Johnston, The Plain Dealer

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- From joint fire dispatching to shared accounting departments, Northeast Ohio governments have dreamed up more than 240 ideas to share services and save money, a Kent State Universitystudy has found.

The university's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy has compiled a list of 105ideas to share with local leaders and inspire them to think creatively. A separate list of ideas being implemented is coming soon

The goal: to get more local governments to pool resources.

"There's a lot of discussion happening in this area right now," said John Hoornbeek, the center's director. "For the most part, it's productive discussion that could give rise to positive changes if local governments can find ways to make some of these ideas work."

The ideas are culled from 16 Northeast Ohio counties, home to 868 separate government entities that spend $20 billion annually to run themselves, according to The Fund for the Economic Future, which worked with Kent on the list.

Cuyahoga County leads the pack with 37 ideas, according to the study. That makes sense, since Cuyahoga has the most local governments, with 104.

Nearly 40 percent of the ideas were proposed in 2009, with less than 10 percent in each of the years 2002-2008, the study says. That also makes sense, since government budgets have become increasingly strapped over the last few years.

State cuts to the Local Government Fund make it even more imperative to share, said Irv Sugerman, an attorney who serves as the law director for Coventry and Copley townships in Summit County and the village of Lodi in Medina.

"We're just not going to be able to afford to provide a level of services to our residents that we were in the past without some real creative ways of working together," Sugerman said. "The work they're doing over there will hopefully spark some more dialogue and interest in these types of collaborations."

Cuyahoga County's new government is also pushing regionalism, one of the tenets of the new county charter.

But before local mayors sign on to the concept, they want two things, said Ed Jerse, the county's first-ever regional collaboration director. They want proof that collaboration will save money, and they want a how-to manual to do it.

So the Kent list will be helpful, Jerse said.

"Those kinds of stories, if they're documented, can be very helpful in encouraging people to look at collaboration," he said.

The examples also can help communities move from small ideas -- such as South Euclid and University Heights sharing a dog warden -- to bigger ones, such as merging police and fire departments, or even the cities themselves.

"I think a lot of mayors take a Missouri 'Show me' approach to regionalism," he said. "Show me it works, and I'll explore it.

A how-to manual would have helped Tallmadge, a Summit County city saving more than $800,000 a year by outsourcing its building, income tax and dispatch services and using cloud computing to eliminate the need for in-house computer hardware.

"For us, we were pioneering," said administrative Director Tom Pascarella. "If there was this inventory that says here are the communities who have actually done it, I could call those people... I think it would have made our efforts quicker."

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News Headline: World-Record Split Magnet System Makes its Debut | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: [June 10, 2011]

(Targeted News Service Via Acquire Media NewsEdge) TALLAHASSEE, Fla., June 9 -- Florida State University's National High Magnetic Field Laboratory issued the following news release: Optics, nanoscience and semiconductor research will receive a boost this month with the debut of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory's Split Magnet system, a custom-built, $2.5-million instrument with the potential to (literally) open up high-field magnet research. The magnet was successfully tested to just over 22 tesla this week, and is expected to reach 25 tesla. The project is funded by the National Science Foundation.

The magnet's design required engineers to rethink the structural limits of resistive magnets, then invent and patent the technology that could carry their idea through. The split Magnet features four large elliptical ports that enable scientists direct, horizontal access to the magnet's central experimental space, or bore, while maintaining a high magnetic field. "Tesla" is a measurement of the strength of a magnetic field; 1 tesla is equal to 20,000 times the Earth's magnetic field.

"We're excited for the opportunity to share this magnet's capabilities with our user community," said Eric Pam, director of the Direct Current User Program. "Among other research possibilities, the Split Magnet will allow optics researchers unprecedented access to their samples, improve the quality of their data, and enable new types of experiments." Split magnets are typically lower-field, less efficient systems with pinhole-sized access ports; the standing record for a magnet of this type was 17.5 tesla. The elliptical-shaped ports visible in the accompanying photo enlarge the previously pinhole-sized access for experiments by a factor of several hundredfold, a capability the laboratory's user community has long desired.

This engineering feat represents years of intense collaboration between the lab's engineering and research teams, headed by Magnet Science and Technology Scholar/ Scientist Jack Toth. Magnets are created by packing together dense, high-performance copper alloys and running a current through them, and all the magnet's tremendous forces are focused on the center of a magnet coil -- right where Toth and his team engineered the four large ports. Building ports strong enough to withstand such high magnetic fields was at first deemed impossible.

While the technological breakthroughs enabling this magnet's construction are important, the multidisciplinary research possibilities it allows are even more exciting. Optics researchers in chemistry, physics and biology are poised to conduct research using the split coil, and the magnet's first user, travelling from Kent State, will conduct experiments this month.

Want to learn more about the Split Magnet? Search "split coil" at magnet.fsu.edu.

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News Headline: Civil War History | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: American Heritage
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Blair, William, Editor

Kent, OH: Kent State University Press

Civil War History is in its fifth decade as the leading scholarly journal of "the middle period"—covering not only the War Between the States but the events leading up to it and the results flowing from it. Its topics include slavery and abolition, antebellum and Reconstruction politics, diplomacy, social and cultural developments in mid–nineteenth century America, and military history. Subscription information is available at: http://upress.kent.edu/journals/index.htm Quarterly Vols. 36 - 40 (1990-1994) Complete; Vol 41, No. 1 Only; Vols. 42, 46 complete; Vol 43 missing Nos. 1 & 2; Vols. 44-45 Missing; Vol. 47 Missing; Vols. 48 and 49 are complete. None received after December 2003 (Vol. 49, No. 4)

Softcover, 6" x 9"

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