Report Overview:
Total Clips (9)
College of Public Health (COPH) (3)
College of Public Health (COPH); KSU at Trumbull (1)
Psychology (4)
Theatre and Dance (1)


Headline Date Outlet

College of Public Health (COPH) (3)
Suicide prevention is goal of 3-year plan to improve health in tri-county area 06/16/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...Initiative, a year-long effort by a 27-member steering committee of community leaders, was unveiled today. Development of the plan was facilitated by Kent State University's College of Public Health. The steering committee, made up of public health, hospital, mental health officials; representatives...

Is your health at risk? (Slenkovich) 06/17/2011 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...suicide and stroke-related deaths are more widespread here than anywhere else, said Ken Slenkovich, assistant dean of the College of Public Health at Kent State University. Slenkovich said the "Tri-County Community Health Assessment & Planning Initiative" identified that there is an "absence...

Report Looks at Valley Health Problems, Solutions (Slenkovich) 06/16/2011 WKBN-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...morning at the Mill Creek MetroParks Farm in Canfield. The Tri-County Community Health Assessment and Planning Initiative was put together with help from Kent State University and officials in Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana counties. The report identified problem areas in public health and...


College of Public Health (COPH); KSU at Trumbull (1)
Officials in Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana Counties worked with those at Kent State University to put together the TRi-County Community Health Assessment and Planning Initiative. 06/16/2011 Fox News at 10 PM - WYFX-TV Text Email

...valley, There is room for improvement, According a report out this morning. Officials in Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana Counties worked with those at Kent State University to put together the TRi-County Community Health Assessment and Planning Initiative. The report identifies problem areas...


Psychology (4)
KSU study finds getting answers right on practice tests improves memory 06/17/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Testing Improves Memory 06/16/2011 RedOrbit Text Attachment Email

“We've known for over 100 years that testing is good for memory,” says Kent State University psychology graduate student Kalif Vaughn. Psychologists have proven in a myriad of experiments that “retrieval practice”—correctly...

Testing Enhances Many Facets of Memory 06/16/2011 PsychCentral.com Text Attachment Email

...memory practice helps an individual remember things in a variety of ways. “We've known for over 100 years that testing is good for memory,” says Kent State University psychology graduate student Kalif Vaughn. Classically, psychologists have proven that “retrieval practice” — correctly...

'Successful' testing can boost memory 06/16/2011 Asian News International Text Email

...the Lithuanian equivalent of an English word, say, you will get good at remembering the Lithuanian, but you won't necessarily remember the English. Kent State University psychology graduate student Kalif Vaughn wondered whether practice testing might boost other types of memory too. He...


Theatre and Dance (1)
THEATER 2011 Cleveland Shakespeare Festival —... 06/16/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...22 and continues through July 17. 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays; 2 p.m. Saturdays; 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sundays; 2 p.m. matinees June 23 and July 13. $35-$130. Porthouse Theatre � (1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls; 330-672-3384) Chicago opens tonight and continues through July 2. 8 p.m. Wednesdays-Saturdays,...


News Headline: Suicide prevention is goal of 3-year plan to improve health in tri-county area | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CANFIELD — Preventing suicides is one of the primary goals of a new three-year plan to improve the general health of residents in Columbiana, Mahoning and Trumbull counties.

The results of The County Community Health Assessment & Planning Initiative, a year-long effort by a 27-member steering committee of community leaders, was unveiled today. Development of the plan was facilitated by Kent State University's College of Public Health.

The steering committee, made up of public health, hospital, mental health officials; representatives of community organizations such as the United Way of Youngstown and the Mahoning Valley and Help Hotline Crisis Center officials; Youngstown State University personal; and other community leaders, with input from two sub-committees, set five priorities in the form of questions.

They are: “How can we reduce violence and harm in the community; how can we ensure access to physical and behavioral health care; how can we educate and promote healthy behaviors; how can we ensure access to healthy foods and physical activity, and how can we protect the environment from harm and ensure a greener Mahoning Valley.”

For the complete story, read Friday's Vindicator and Vindy.com

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News Headline: Is your health at risk? (Slenkovich) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name: VIRGINIA SHANK
News OCR Text: Study says heart attack, stroke rates high in the Valley

CANFIELD - Not only is heart disease the leading cause of death in the Mahoning Valley, it also claims more lives here than elsewhere in the country, according to results of a community health assessment released on Thursday.

Additionally, suicide and stroke-related deaths are more widespread here than anywhere else, said Ken Slenkovich, assistant dean of the College of Public Health at Kent State University.

Slenkovich said the "Tri-County Community Health Assessment & Planning Initiative" identified that there is an "absence of a health culture in the region."

Slenkovich was among a group of community leaders who presented the report during a news conference Thursday at Mill Creek MetroParks Farms in Canfield.

He said assessment results will be used to set goals and develop strategies that can be helpful in improving health in the three targeted counties that make up the Mahoning Valley: Trumbull, Mahoning and Columbiana.

The group included Matt Stefanak, health commissioner, Mahoning County District Board of Health; Sister Marie Ruegg, senior vice president of Mission Integration, Humility of Mary Health Partners; and Sharon Hrina, vice president, Mahoning Valley Enterprises, Akron Children's Hospital Mahoning Valley.

Slenkovich, facilitator of the project, said the initiative began in August 2010 and continued through May 2011 and that it "has succeeded in achieving what it was set out to do."

The purpose of the study is three-fold: to identify some of the most important health problems affecting Mahoning Valley residents; to select a limited number of priority areas and to develop a set of health improvement goals to address those areas; and to propose strategies that have been demonstrated to be effective in achieving those goals, he said.

A steering committee focused on producing recommendations was formed with 27 health and community leaders from various organizations, agencies, educational institutions and local government offices.

Two sub-committees were also developed to help is the process.

With use of a "Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships" strategy, an initiative used in other communities, the group identified strengths and weakness that impact health in Mahoning Valley.

Using 55 data indicators measuring health statistics, participants examined death rates from heart disease, cancer and other diseases; environmental factors; social and behavioral factors; suicide rates; and the use of prenatal care and health insurance, among other areas.

Slenkovich said cases of lung cancer in Trumbull and Columbiana exceeded state and national rates. Mahoning rates were below state numbers but above national averages, he said. Also, local colon and breast cancer rates exceeded rates statewide and nationally.

The rate for adult smoking and obesity in all three counties exceeded national rates. The group also looked at child lead poisoning rates, which Slenkovich said the community has the ability and opportunity to eliminate.

"The news is good because a great deal has happened in screening children for lead poisoning, but it still remains an area of concern," he said.

Threats to improving health include anticipated reductions of state and federal financial resources available to local communities and a lack of dental and behavioral health care services. Other factors include inappropriate use of emergency rooms by visiting them for non-critical care and a migration of young people to other areas.

Opportunities to improve health locally include an increased number of farmers' markets, food cooperatives and urban gardens that help residents increase their access to fresh produce, he said.

Although priorities may change over time, Stefanak said the steering committee is committed to preparing an annual report to track progress on the effort.

He said it's imperative health organizations and agencies in the Mahoning Valley work together to meet the goals.

He explained the priorities were selected because efforts already underway to are making progress and "show promise."

Hrina stressed the importance of avoiding health problems that can impact children later in life by providing appropriate prenatal care. She said one hardship that impacts valley residents is low birth rates.

"If we can just get to the nuts and bolts and start early, we can have healthier children from the start."

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News Headline: Report Looks at Valley Health Problems, Solutions (Slenkovich) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKBN-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: How can the Mahoning Valley become a more healthy place?

Answering that question is the goal of a report released Thursday morning at the Mill Creek MetroParks Farm in Canfield. The Tri-County Community Health Assessment and Planning Initiative was put together with help from Kent State University and officials in Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana counties.

The report identified problem areas in public health and developed a plan to to attack those issues over the next several years.

"Things like reducing suicide rates, increasing access to behavioral healthcare services, dental services, increasing people's access to healthy foods. And trying to encourage folks to adopt healthier lifestyles," said Ken Slenkovich of the Kent State College of Public Health.

The report shows the Valley is higher than the national and state averages in smoking rates, lung cancer and obesity.

"It provides a road map for the organizations interested in improving health status for residents of the Mahoning Valley. And so it will give them targets to shoot for, some goals to strive for, and also it identifies some specific programs that have been shown to work," Slenkovich said.

The recital was held at Sharon High School.

17 minutes ago

The two-vehicle crash occurred on George Jr. Road at the intersection of Cranberry Road.

23 minutes ago

Fire officials said the blaze was started by grease in the kitchen.

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News Headline: Officials in Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana Counties worked with those at Kent State University to put together the TRi-County Community Health Assessment and Planning Initiative. | Email

News Date: 06/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Fox News at 10 PM - WYFX-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new study shows one in four high schoolers drink it EVERY day, The national survey also shows that teens drink water, milk and fruit juices MOST often, But a quarter of them do have at least one soda a day. This is less than in the past, when more than three quarters of teens reported drinking a sugary drink each day. When it comes to being healthy in the valley, There is room for improvement, According a report out this morning. Officials in Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana Counties worked with those at Kent State University to put together the TRi-County Community Health Assessment and Planning Initiative. The report identifies problem areas in public health and offers a plan to to attack those issues over the next several years. The report shows the Valley is higher than the national and state averages in smoking rates, lung cancer, AND obesity. Amidst a battle with cancer, a local woman finds a talent of her own, inspired by reality TV shows, Hear how Chelsea Telega used it to triumph over the disease, Plus they're just regular guys, with typical jobs, but their HOBBY of hunting for paranormal activity takes them to reality T-V! Hear about their quest, in about 10-minutes, But first, a look at tonight's winning lottery numbers. Stay with us, You're Watching First News on Fox. Reality shows have turned [ Male Announcer ] WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE 2011 SILVERADO HD GOES HEAD TO HEAD WITH THE 2011 FORD SUPER DUTY AND RAM HD IN SITUATIONS THAT MATTER MOST IN THE REAL WORLD. WOW! [ Male Announcer ] WELL, YOU CAN SEE IT FOR YOURSELF. [ Howie Long ] OH! [ Male Announcer ] WITNESS A REAL WORLD TEST OF HD TRUCK CAPABILITIES AND COMPARE WHAT REALLY MATTERS TO TRUCK BUYERS FIRST HAND. [ Rick Spina ] UH OH, UH OH. [ Male Announcer ] WATCH HEAD TO HEAD. VISIT CHEVY. COM/HDTOHD.

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News Headline: KSU study finds getting answers right on practice tests improves memory | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: by John Higgins, Akron Beacon Journal education reporter on June 16, 2011

Kent State University graduate student Kalif Vaughn conducted an interesting experiment to determine if getting answers right on practice tests would improve recall not only of the thing you're trying to remember, but things that trigger that memory and things associated with what you're trying to remember.

Vaughn and KSU Associate Professor Katherine Rawson tested students on how well they remembered the English equivalent of a Lithuanian word. After successful practice tests (correct answers), they not only recalled the English equivalents better (target memory), they also did a better job recalling the Lithuanian words (cue memory) and the word pair (associative memory), according to the Association for Psychological Science, which will publish their work in an upcoming issue of the association's journal, Psychological Science.

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News Headline: Testing Improves Memory | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: RedOrbit
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: “We've known for over 100 years that testing is good for memory,” says Kent State University psychology graduate student Kalif Vaughn. Psychologists have proven in a myriad of experiments that “retrieval practice”—correctly producing a studied item—increases the likelihood that you'll get it right the next time. “But we didn't know why.”

In the past, many researchers have believed that testing is good for memory, but only for the exact thing you are trying to remember: so-called “target memory.” If you're asked to recall the Lithuanian equivalent of an English word, say, you will get good at remembering the Lithuanian, but you won't necessarily remember the English. Vaughn wondered whether practice testing might boost other types of memory too.

It does. This is the finding of a study he conducted with Kent State psychologist Katherine A. Rawson,which will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Says Vaughn: “With retrieval practice, everything gets substantially better.”

That “everything” includes target memory; “cue memory,” for the stimulus (the Lithuanian) that evinces the target; and “associative memory,” of the relationship between things—in this case, the word pair.

To pinpoint which of these components was improving the researchers conducted two slightly different experiments, one involving 131 undergraduates and the other, 69. In both preparation sessions, English-Lithuanian word pairs were displayed on a computer screen one by one, each for 10 seconds of study. After studying the list, the participants underwent retrieval trials: A Lithuanian word appeared and they had to type the English equivalent within eight seconds. If the answer was correct, the word went to the end of the list to be asked again. If wrong, the participant got to restudy it. Each item was pre-assigned a “criterion level” from one to five—the number of times it needed to be correctly recalled during practice. Once that level was reached, the word was dropped from practice.

Participants then returned—two days later in Experiment 1, seven in Experiment 2—and completed tests recruiting different types of memory. First, they performed one of four recall tests, plus trials including recognizing words they had or had not studied and picking out correct word pairings among incorrect ones. To eliminate the potentially enhancing effect of a prior recall test—and get a “pure” assessment of recognition of cues, targets, and associations—the second experiment eliminated the preceding recall tests.

The experiments yielded the same results: Items with higher “criterion levels”—which had been correctly retrieved more times during practice—exhibited better performance on tests of all three kinds of memory: cue, target, and associative.

Vaughn stresses that it isn't just testing, but successful testing—getting the answer right—that makes the difference in memory performance later on. He also admits the study leaves much to be discovered. “We know that repeated retrieval is good for memory. Testing is a modifier of memory. But we still don't know how that works. We don't understand the mechanism.”

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News Headline: Testing Enhances Many Facets of Memory | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: PsychCentral.com
Contact Name: Rick Nauert PhD
News OCR Text: Although students bemoan having to take tests, researchers have confirmed that memory practice helps an individual remember things in a variety of ways.

“We've known for over 100 years that testing is good for memory,” says Kent State University psychology graduate student Kalif Vaughn.

Classically, psychologists have proven that “retrieval practice” — correctly producing a studied item — increases the likelihood that you'll get it right the next time.

“But we didn't know why,” Vaughn said.

Researchers have believed testing is good for remembering the exact thing you are trying to remember: so-called “target memory.” However, researchers did not know if the memory practice would help an individual remember other items.

In other words, if you're asked to recall the Lithuanian equivalent of an English word, memory practice will help you remember the Lithuanian word, but you won't necessarily remember the English.

In the new research study, Vaughn and Kent State psychologist Dr. Katherine A. Rawson investigated if memory practice (as occurs when you study for a test) might boost other types of memory.

Turns out it does.

They discovered that retrieval practice helps all forms of memory. The study will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

That “everything” includes target memory; “cue memory,” for the stimulus (the Lithuanian) that reveals the target; and “associative memory,” of the relationship between things—in this case, the word pair.

To pinpoint which of these components was improving, the researchers conducted two slightly different experiments, one involving 131 undergraduates and the other, 69.

In both preparation sessions, English-Lithuanian word pairs were displayed on a computer screen one by one, each for 10 seconds of study. After studying the list, the participants underwent retrieval trials: A Lithuanian word appeared and they had to type the English equivalent within eight seconds.

If the answer was correct, the word went to the end of the list to be asked again. If wrong, the participant got to restudy it. Each item was pre-assigned a “criterion level” from one to five—the number of times it needed to be correctly recalled during practice. Once that level was reached, the word was dropped from practice.

Participants then returned—two days later in experiment 1, seven in experiment 2—and completed tests recruiting different types of memory. First, they performed one of four recall tests, plus trials including recognizing words they had or had not studied and picking out correct word pairings among incorrect ones.

To eliminate the potentially enhancing effect of a prior recall test—and get a “pure” assessment of recognition of cues, targets, and associations—the second experiment eliminated the preceding recall tests.

The experiments yielded the same results: Items with higher “criterion levels”—which had been correctly retrieved more times during practice—exhibited better performance on tests of all three kinds of memory: cue, target, and associative.

The researchers discovered that merely taking multiple tests was not benefical, however successful testing—getting the answer right—made the difference in memory performance later on.

Vaughn admits the study leaves much to be discovered. “We know that repeated retrieval is good for memory. Testing is a modifier of memory. But we still don't know how that works. We don't understand the mechanism.”

Source: Association for Psychological Science

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News Headline: 'Successful' testing can boost memory | Email

News Date: 06/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Asian News International
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Washington, June 16 (ANI): In the past, many researchers have believed that testing is good for memory, but only for the exact thing you are trying to remember: so-called "target memory."

If you're asked to recall the Lithuanian equivalent of an English word, say, you will get good at remembering the Lithuanian, but you won't necessarily remember the English.

Kent State University psychology graduate student Kalif Vaughn wondered whether practice testing might boost other types of memory too.

He found that it does.

"With retrieval practice, everything gets substantially better," Vaughn said.

That "everything" includes target memory; "cue memory," for the stimulus (the Lithuanian) that evinces the target; and "associative memory," of the relationship between things-in this case, the word pair.

Vaughn stresses that it isn't just testing, but successful testing-getting the answer right-that makes the difference in memory performance later on.

The study will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science. (ANI)

Copyright © 2011 Asian News International (ANI) - All Rights Reserved.

NOTE: The above article also ran in four additional media outlets.l

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News Headline: THEATER 2011 Cleveland Shakespeare Festival —... | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: _ THEATER

2011 Cleveland Shakespeare Festival � (Notre Dame College, Administration Building lawn, 4545 College Road, South Euclid; http://cleveshakes.org) Othello at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Free. Actors' Summit � (Greystone Hall, 103 S. High St., Akron; 330-374-7568) Five Course Love opens Friday and continues through July 24. 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, Sundays 2 p.m. Preview Performance at 8 tonight. $27 Thursdays and Sundays, and $30 Fridays and Saturdays. All tickets $16 opening weekend, June 16-19.

Broadview Heights Spotlights Theater � (Cultural Arts Building, 9543 Broadview

Road, Broadview Heights; 440-526-4404) Disney's Aladdin, Jr. opens tonight and continues through June 26. 7 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays. $12; $11, seniors and students. Main Course Murder � (Rolando's, 2433 Whipple Ave. NW, Jackson Township; 330-477-5934) The Contraltos: Miami Shore mystery dinner theater production, 7 p.m. Fridays. $38.

Mercury Summer Stock � (Cleveland Play House, Brooks Theatre, 8500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland; 216-771-5862) Dr. Dolittle opens Friday and continues through July 2. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturdays. $18; $15, seniors and students with ID. Ohio Light Opera � (College of Wooster, Freedlander Theatre, 329 E. University St., Wooster; 330-263-2345) Camelot opens Saturday and continues through Aug. 13. 7:30 p.m. Saturday and June 25, July 14, and July 27; 2 p.m. June 28, July 2, 8, 16, 21 and 29 and Aug. 2 and 13. $46; $20, students; $10, ages 3-5.

PlayhouseSquare Palace Theatre � (1615 Euclid Ave., Cleveland; 216-241-6000) Final performances of Next to Normal, 7:30 tonight-Friday, 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. $10-$75.

PlayhouseSquare State Theatre � (1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland; 216-241-6000) Jersey Boys opens June 22 and continues through July 17. 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays; 2 p.m. Saturdays; 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sundays; 2 p.m. matinees June 23 and July 13. $35-$130. Porthouse Theatre � (1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls; 330-672-3384) Chicago opens tonight and continues through July 2. 8 p.m. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays. $25-$33; $17-$20 for students. Summer Stock � (Lecture Hall A, Kent State Trumbull campus, 4314 Mahoning Ave. NW, Champion; 330-675-8887) Pinocchio opens Friday and continues through June 24. 7 p.m. Friday and June 24; 10:30 a.m. Monday-June 24. $8, $6 seniors, students, and children. Magic show by Gary Morton at every performance.

Weathervane Community Playhouse � (1301 Weathervane Lane, Akron; 330-836-2626) Pippin continues through June 26. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays; 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 2:30 p.m. Sundays. $24.

Western Reserve Playhouse � (3326 Everett Road, Richfield; 330-620-7314) Final performances of Be My Baby, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $11; $10, seniors and students.

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