Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Alumni; Art (1)
Biological Sciences (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Economics (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (4)
Higher Education (2)
KSU Museum; Music (1)
Music; Theatre and Dance (1)
Police Services (1)
Political Science (1)
Psychology (1)
Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Town-Gown (2)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Art (1)
Works by Kent State alumna Nancy Seibert on display in Kent 06/23/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Biological Sciences (1)
Warming climate would likely worsen smog in Northeast Ohio, study says; online chat with experts Friday (Heath) 06/22/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...Robert Heath, an ecosystem ecologist and Professor Emeritus of Biological Sciences and Director Emeritus of the Water Resources Research Institute at Kent State University. • LuCinda Hohmann, policy analyst focusing on climate and energy policy, as well as sustainable agriculture and biofuels...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Leadership Cleveland announces Class of 2012 06/23/2011 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


Economics (1)
Working for the weekend? Or working more on it? (Reynolds) 06/23/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...weekend work assignment in line with past years' statistics, which regularly hovered around 5.5 hours. Lockwood Reynolds, a labor economics expert at Kent State University, said the deviation to longer weekend shifts represents a couple of trends in the labor force. Businesses are still...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (4)
KSU ready for record freshman enrollment (Lefton, Garcia) 06/23/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University officials are expecting a record number of incoming freshman at the schools main campus this fall. KSU did not release...

Kent State Expects Record Freshman Class This Fall (Lefton, Garcia) 06/23/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

KSU Projects Record Freshman Class (Lefton, Garcia) 06/22/2011 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Officials at Kent State University are projecting a record freshman class at the university's Kent Campus for fall 2011. Based on the number of applications...

KENT STATE'S KENT CAMPUS CONTINUES TO EXPERIENCE RECORD ENROLLMENT GROWTH (Lefton, Garcia) 06/22/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, June 22 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Officials at Kent State University are projecting a record freshman...


Higher Education (2)
Work, family, and college? You are not alone! 06/23/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...at the Holden University Center of Lakeland Community College, which will offer degree programs from Cleveland State University, Franklin University, Kent State University, Lake Erie College, Ohio University, The University of Akron, The University of Toledo, Ursuline College, and Youngstown...

Guest Column: Many great things to like in Portage 06/22/2011 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...Wildwater Kingdom. My brothers and I were all educated in Portage County, one brother at what is now the Northeast Ohio Medical University, the other at Kent State University and I went to Hiram. We have outstanding centers of higher education here and great local schools, too. Most people...


KSU Museum; Music (1)
On With The Show 06/22/2011 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

MUSICAL ACTIVITIES July 7 — Kent State Communiversity Band, 7 p.m., Home Savings Plaza in downtown Kent. SPECIAL ACTIVITIES Currently — “Katherine Hepburn: Dressed...


Music; Theatre and Dance (1)
Beck Center Presents HAIRSPRAY, 78-814 06/23/2011 Broadway World Text Attachment Email

...Joseph Kelly as Edna Turnblad, as well as a cast of 35 talented young actors including many musical theater students from Baldwin-Wallace College and Kent State University. Also, returning this summer is Mark Heffernan as Wilbur Turnblad, who starred in last season's summer blockbuster hit,...


Police Services (1)
Youths questioned, one charged in crimes probe (Jenkins) 06/22/2011 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

/p> RECORD-COURIER REPORTER A joint investigation by the Portage County Sheriff's Department and Aurora, Kent State University and Twinsburg police has identified several juvenile "persons of interest" in a series of crimes in eastern Portage County...


Political Science (1)
Egypt's Political Transformation Moves Slowly (Stacher) 06/22/2011 NPR - Online Text Attachment Email

...security apparatus is essentially unchanged and the military's always been the core of the regime, anyway," says Joshua Stacher, a political scientist at Kent State University. "This leads me to believe we're in a situation where we're seeing the reconstruction of authoritarian institutions,"...


Psychology (1)
Obesity weighs on brain function, too (Gunstad) 06/23/2011 St. Petersburg Times - Online Text Attachment Email


Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Four East Side communities will study merging, with county help (Hoornbeek) 06/22/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...would have to approve the merger. A defeat in any community would defeat the entire issue. John Hoornbeek, a regionalism proponent and director of the Kent State University Center for Public Administration and Public Policy, said it's difficult to predict how the idea will play with the public....


Theatre and Dance (1)
REVIEW: CHICAGO jazzes it up @ Porthouse 06/23/2011 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (2)
KSU, Kent collaborate on walkway extension (Floyd, Lefton, Finn) 06/22/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

June 22--KENT -- For decades Kent State has been cut off from downtown thanks to a four-lane bypass lined with chain-link fence. But that's poised to change. The university...

KSU, Kent collaborate on walkway extension (Floyd, Lefton, Finn) 06/22/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

University and city share investments in downtown development projects that could benefit both financially KENT: For decades Kent State has been cut off from downtown thanks to a four-lane bypass lined with chain-link fence. But that's poised to change. The university...


University Press (1)
First-Time Local Author Pens Book on Region's Notorious Crime Spree 06/23/2011 Pittsburgh City Paper Text Attachment Email

...Philadelphia's Graterford Prison, in 1978). But in 1997, Hollock began the decade of research that culminated in April's publication of Born to Lose (Kent State University Press), a painstakingly detailed account of Hoss' crime spree and journey through the courts and prison system. The title...


News Headline: Works by Kent State alumna Nancy Seibert on display in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University
School of Art's Downtown
Gallery will present
“Life Force: Paintings by
Nancy Seibert.”
The exhibition will be on
display from June 29 to July
30, with a reception open to
the public from 5 to 8 p.m.
June 30 at the gallery, 141 E.
Main St., Kent.
“Nancy Seibert's philosophy
of art involves a synergy
of paint and energy
produced in brushstrokes
reflecting a certain rhythm
in nature,” said Anderson
Turner, director of galleries
for the School of Art at
KSU. “Nature is the source
of her inspiration as she
molds oils, pastels, acrylics
and canvas in masterful
works of art.”
Seibert began her art
studies in Washington, D.C.,
at George Washington University.
She graduated from
KSU, earning bachelor of
fine arts and master of fine
art degrees.
She spent three years living
in Japan, teaching art
and gaining valuable experience
in Japanese calligraphy.
During this experience,
she began to sense a feeling
for space and mark-making
in her artwork.
She is a resident of both
Ohio and Florida, and has
displayed her works in numerous
exhibitions in both
states.
The gallery is open from
noon to 5 p.m. Wednesdays
through Fridays and 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Saturdays.

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News Headline: Warming climate would likely worsen smog in Northeast Ohio, study says; online chat with experts Friday (Heath) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Michael Scott
News OCR Text: By Michael Scott, The Plain Dealer

Hazecam.netDowntown Cleveland is seen from a MetroHealth Medical Center doctor's "Hazecam" on a bad-air day in November, 2010. A national scientists' group says a warming climate is likely to make air pollution in Northeast Ohio, particularly ground level ozone or smog, worse in the next several decades.

Cleveland, Ohio -- Our lungs may be among the earliest and hardest-hit victims of climate change.

That's the conclusion of a report by The Union of Concerned Scientists, a national group in town this week to talk about global warming and the health of Northeast Ohioans.

Several UCS leaders will be available for an online discussion at cleveland.com at 3 p.m. Friday

"Even a small increase in ozone due to a warmer climate would have a significant impact on public health," UCS public health analyst Liz Perera, a report co-author, said in a news release. "It would mean more asthma attacks, respiratory illnesses, emergency room trips, and premature deaths."

The report focuses on Ohio, but reached same conclusions about Northeast Ohio as other recent state and local studies.

The federal EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory, in fact, selected Cleveland in 2009 as one of only a handful of cities for a three-year, $1.5 million air pollution study, including ground-level ozone, more commonly known as smog.

Another expert, Tracy Sabetta of the National Wildlife Federation in Ohio, pointed out that Ohio had dropped from 19th to 12th-worst state in the U.S. for air pollution in the American Lung Association's recent "

State of the Air" report.

"There's definitely a lot of work for us all to do," Sabetta said. "Environmental organizations and health organizations agree that ozone is a major health threat and the connection among climate change, air quality and health has never been more important."

Sabetta said pending EPA rules that will be even more stringent could help reduce air pollution over time, even as the climate warms.

"This is a statewide issue, a national issue -- because smog doesn't stop at any border," she said.

So, what do you think?

In the Great Lakes region where the worst effects of climate change have been seemingly moderate, are you concerned about the air we breathe? Are you concerned for you children's health - your elderly parents?

During Friday's live chat, we'll take a look at the issue in detail and take your questions.

The panelists include:

• Todd Sanford, co-author of the study and climate scientist with the Climate and Energy Programe at the Union of Concerned Scientists.

• Dr. Robert Heath, an ecosystem ecologist and Professor Emeritus of Biological Sciences and Director Emeritus of the Water Resources Research Institute at Kent State University.

• LuCinda Hohmann, policy analyst focusing on climate and energy policy, as well as sustainable agriculture and biofuels policy.

But we want to hear from you, too. Fire up your laptop, go online on your smart phone or pad or get on the family computer, but take part in the debate that many have said is the issue of the 21st Century.

In the meantime, read the report, "Climate Change and Your Health: Rising Temperatures, Worsening Ozone Pollution."

Among its conclusions: Nearly half (322 of 675) of the counties across the country do not meet the current standard for safe levels of ozone, including counties with many of the nation's largest cities.

That means nearly half of Americans live in areas with "unhealthful" levels of ozone pollution. The report also concluded that health-related impacts from smog and other pollution could cost Americans approximately $5.4 billion in 2020.

Some previous stories about air pollution

Apr. 27: Lung Association annual air pollution report marks improvement, but air still poor in Cleveland, U.S.

Feb. 2: New pollution limits would exempt some power facilities, EPA says

Nov. 9: 'Temperature inversion' over Northeast Ohio leads to air pollution advisory for soot

Jul. 5: Poor air quality means ozone action days through Wednesday

Jan. 26, 2010: EPA says it will crack down on high pollution areas near highways

Jan. 1, 2010: Anti-idling policies and ordinances to be promoted by four agencies

Some pevious stories on climate change

May. 26: Ohio's plants and insects adapting to climate change in unexpected ways: video

May. 25: Ohio State agricultural research center's network of gardens help track ecological changes

Apr. 13: California to require utilities to get a third of power from renewable sources

The Massachusetts-based scientists' group also said Ohio would likely rank sixth among the states that would "suffer the most from worsening ozone pollution due to climate change temperature increases by the end of the decade."

""The group used a mapping model from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to project ozone increases by 2020 due to a warming climate.

The researchers predict that climate change-induced ozone increases in Ohio could result in almost 123,000 additional cases of serious respiratory illnesses. These and other health-related impacts could cost roughly $271 million (in 2008 dollars) in 2020 alone.

Ground-level ozone (not ozone, the naturally occurring element), is essentially an airborne soup of hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxide emissions from automobiles and power plants. It is generally a summertime phenomenon generated by a chemical reaction between nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds, triggered by heat and sunlight.

Warmer temperatures also are associated with stagnant air conditions that can cause ozone pollution to settle over an area and remain for extended periods of time.

Cuyahoga County residents can go online for daily forecasts of ground-level ozone or to sign up for e-mail alerts.

Ozone is sometimes confused with particle pollution, the soot or microscopic particulates in the air. The Cleveland-Akron area was recently ranked as having the 12th worst air in the country for year-round particle pollution, meaning the accumulated count of particulates in the air over an entire year.

The other nine states projected to experience the worst health costs in 2020 are, in decreasing order: California, Texas, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Michigan, North Carolina, New Jersey and Virginia.

Ohio and the other nine states are "most vulnerable because they have a combination of the largest number of residents living in urban areas --including a large number of children and seniors --and high levels of nitrogen oxides and VOC emissions from industry, vehicles and power plants," the report said.

Also from the report, ozone increases from climate change could result in:

• 2.8 million additional serious respiratory illnesses

• 5,100 additional infants and seniors hospitalized with serious breathing problems

• 944,000 additional missed school days in 2020.

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News Headline: Leadership Cleveland announces Class of 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Leadership Cleveland has named its latest class of business, government and nonprofit organization officials being prepared for leadership roles in civic affairs.

Leadership Cleveland is the flagship program of the Cleveland Leadership Center, an umbrella group that runs several programs to build involvement in philanthropic and civic organizations in individuals at different points in their careers. Its other programs are Cleveland Bridge Builders, Civic Leadership Institute, (i)Cleveland and Look Up to Cleveland.

Members of the 2012 class are as follows:

Jacqueline Acho, president, the Acho Group LLC

Francis Afram-Gyening, CEO, Care Alliance Health Center

James Aronoff, partner-in-charge, Thompson Hine LLP

Katherine Asbeck, senior vice president and CFO, the Cleveland Foundation

Mark Bachmann, partner, Marcus Thomas LLC

Catherine Belk, chief relationship officer, JumpStart Inc.

Alfreda Brown, vice president of diversity, equity and inclusion, Kent State University

Henry Butler, co-chairman and CEO, LR Enterprises LLC

Michael Cantor, principal and COO, Allegro Realty Advisors Ltd.

Richard Clark, president, St. Martin de Porres High School

Michael Cox Sr., director of public works, city of Cleveland

Dennis Devine, group executive vice president and director of U.S. retail banking, Citizens Financial Group/Charter One

Joseph DuBois, CFO, Oswald Cos.

Gretchen Farrell, senior vice president, human resources and compliance, Lincoln Electric Holdings Inc.

Robert Faxon, attorney, Jones Day

Leonard Foltin, treasurer, executive vice president administration and finance, Cuyahoga Community College

David Franklin, director and CEO, the Cleveland Museum of Art

William Friedman, president and CEO, Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Port Authority

Patricia Gaul, vice president of finance and administration and general counsel, PlayhouseSquare Foundation

Robert Glaser, executive vice president, Human Arc

Stanley Gorom III, partner and director, Hahn Loeser & Parks, LLP

Kevin Grobelny, vice president, PNC Bank

Patrick Haggerty, partner, Frantz Ward LLP

William Hartmann, executive vice pesident and chief credit officer, KeyBank

Andrea Hogben, vice president, advertising and marketing, The Plain Dealer

Charles Houk, president, Commercial Sealants and Waterproofing Division, Tremco Inc.

Lynnette Jackson, relationship manager of Key Private Bank, KeyBank

Linda Kane, senior vice president, chief accounting and administrative officer, Forest City Enterprises Inc.

Kurt Karakul, president and executive director, Third Federal Foundation

Martin Keane, Ward 19 councilman, Cleveland City Council

Brooke King, executive director, the Intergenerational School

Susanna Krey, president, Sisters of Charity Foundation of Cleveland

Charles Lawrence, president and CEO, the Music Settlement

Sara Lehrke, vice president, human resources, chief diversity officer, Cleveland Indians

William Lewis, chief, clinical cardiology, MetroHealth Medical Center

Steffany Matticola, senior vice president and chief underwriter, Medical Mutual of Ohio

Julie McAlindon, vice president, corporate marketing, PolyOne Corp.

Terence McCafferty, business manager, financial secretary-treasurer, Pipefitters Local Union No. 120

James McGill, executive vice president and chief human resources officer, Eaton Corp.

John Meder, managing director, Wells Fargo Insurance Services

Megan Mehalko, partner, Benesch, Friedlander, Coplan & Aronoff LLP

James Merlino, chief experience officer, Cleveland Clinic

William Murphy, president, St. Ignatius High School

Betsie Norris, executive director, Adoption Network Cleveland

Grafton Nunes, president and CEO, the Cleveland Institute of Art

John Opdycke, vice president of marketing, Hyland Software Inc.

David Orlean, president, the Orlean Co.

Robert Paponetti, executive director, the Literacy Cooperative of Greater Cleveland

Debbi Perkul, education and workforce development consultant

Joel Ratner, president and CEO, Neighborhood Progress Inc.

LaJean Ray, director, Fatima Family Center of Catholic Charities Community Services Corp.

Shawn Riley, Cleveland managing partner, McDonald Hopkins LLC

Jill Rizika, executive director, Towards Employment

Victor Ruiz, executive director, Esperanza Inc.

Mark Saffran, president and CEO, MDG Medical Inc.

Anup Salgia, CEO and executive director, LifeMedix LLC

James Schmitz, senior vice president, investment advisors division, Fifth Third Bank

Charna Sherman, president, Charna E. Sherman Law Offices Co.

Patricia Shlonsky, partner, Ulmer & Berne LLP

Joel Smirnoff, president, Cleveland Institute of Music

Ronald Soeder, president, Boys & Girls Clubs of Cleveland

David Stahler, partner, Deloitte & Touche

Loretta Stanton, senior vice president , retail area manager, Huntington Bank

Jon Steinbrecher, commissioner, Mid-American Conference

Martha Sullivan, partner, Squire, Sanders & Dempsey LLP

C. Lee Thomas, Cleveland office managing partner, Ernst & Young

Duane Thornton, president, The Presidents' Council

P. Kelly Tompkins, executive vice president, chief legal officer, Cliffs Natural Resources Inc.

Robert Varley, managing director, state and local affairs, Midwest, Dominion Resources Services

Cheryl Wahl, chief compliance officer, University Hospitals

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News Headline: Working for the weekend? Or working more on it? (Reynolds) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Employed in the retail industry for more than three decades, Bob Gorup is used to working on the weekends.

Gorup, an appliance associate at The Home Depot in Boardman, works most weekends in one of the store's busiest sections. He's part of a segment of workers who saw their average shift increase by 30 minutes, according to the 2010 American Time Use Survey, released Wednesday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Thirty-five percent of employed Americans worked on weekend days — the same percentage as in 2009 — but worked 30 more minutes on average compared to the year before.

Weekend workers averaged 5.5 hours per shift in 2010; the weekday working class, comprised of 82 percent of employed Americans, averaged 7.9 hours.

The 30-minute difference per shift brings the average weekend work assignment in line with past years' statistics, which regularly hovered around 5.5 hours.

Lockwood Reynolds, a labor economics expert at Kent State University, said the deviation to longer weekend shifts represents a couple of trends in the labor force.

Businesses are still hesitant to hire new full-time workers, shown by the pause in unemployment numbers in May. They aren't, however, afraid to stretch their full-time weekday work force over seven days.

“Firms are stretching more and more hours out of the same work force,” he said. “People are adding more hours but not necessarily adding more employees.”

There's also part-time work, which among males grew on weekend days by 9 percent from 2009 to 2010 and had a per-shift increase of nearly an hour.

In Gorup's case, his regularly scheduled weekend shifts have more to do with consumer convenience and demand.

“There's an influx of customers on the weekends,” Gorup said. “More people are shopping.”

Gorup's boss, Buddy Colley, store manager, agreed and said he devotes most of his resources to the weekends to coincide with consumers' needs. He said weekend shifts often are longer than weekday assignments to get the most out of each employee at the store's busiest times.

Colley estimated that the store earns half of its weekly sales on Saturdays and Sundays, one reason he schedules roughly 100 employees on any given weekend day, compared with 50 or 60 on the average weekday.

“The lowest shift I'll ever work anyone is a six-hour shift,” he said. “On the weekend, almost every time you work it's going to be an eight-hour shift.”

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News Headline: KSU ready for record freshman enrollment (Lefton, Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University officials are expecting a record number of incoming freshman at the schools main campus this fall.

KSU did not release an official number, but projected freshman enrollment is more than 4,030, the last official record, which was set by the freshman class in the fall of 2009. Kent State is the second largest public university in the state of Ohio, we are ranked one of the top 200 universities in the world, and we have world-class programs with faculty who are committed to student success, KSU President Lester Lefton said in a statement. We are the top option for new freshmen. According the university, KSU also is seeing a record number of applications. Freshman applications are up 22.6 percent compared to last year, with more than 18,000 potential students applying to the school as of June 20.

KSU, which became the second largest university in the state last year, set a record for enrollment on its eight campuses with 41,354 students in fall 2010. We are seeing application increases across the board, with big growth in new students from Ohio and growth in out-of-state and international students, said T. David Garcia, KSUs associate vice president for enrollment management. With the support of President Lefton, we have continued the trend of growing Kent States enrollment and making Kent State a desirable college for students and their parents.

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News Headline: Kent State Expects Record Freshman Class This Fall (Lefton, Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University expects more than 4,000 freshmen

Kent State University President Lester Lefton hinted at it during a university trustees' meeting earlier this month, but the university confirmed today they expect their largest freshman class ever this fall.

The university issued the following press release this afternoon showing they expect more than 4,000 freshmen at the main campus — the biggest incoming class in school history — when classes start this fall.

Below is the press release:

Officials at Kent State University are projecting a record freshman class at the university's Kent Campus for fall 2011. Based on the number of applications and the number of new, incoming freshman students who have attended or have signed up for Destination Kent State, its freshman orientation program, Kent State expects to welcome its largest freshman class to the Kent Campus, surpassing its previous freshman enrollment number of 4,030 set in fall 2009.

Freshman enrollment has contributed to the university's overall enrollment growth. In fall 2010, the university reported its highest ever enrollment with 41,354 students across its eight campuses. That represented a 7.56 percent increase in enrollment compared to the prior year.

“We're seeing the fruits of our labor,” said Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton. “A host of factors contribute to this, including this past year's marketing campaign, our focused and strategic recruitment and outreach efforts, and the awarding of more financial aid. The efforts of our faculty and staff, as well as our students and their families recognizing the great educational quality and value of a Kent State education, have made Kent State the first choice for many students.

Kent State is the second largest public university in the state of Ohio, we are ranked one of the top 200 universities in the world, and we have world-class programs with faculty who are committed to student success,” Lefton continued. “We are the top option for new freshmen.”

The Kent Campus has seen a record number of applications for freshmen. As of June 20, applications are up 22.6 percent or 3,358 applications from the previous year. The total number of freshman applications received to date for the university's Kent Campus is 18,218.

“We are seeing application increases across the board, with big growth in new students from Ohio and growth in out-of-state and international students,” said T. David Garcia, Kent State's associate vice president for enrollment management. “With the support of President Lefton, we have continued the trend of growing Kent State's enrollment and making Kent State a desirable college for students and their parents.”

With the expected enrollment increase, the university will closely manage new freshman applications, effective June 22. Any new freshmen who apply or complete their application on and after June 22 will be given the option to attend one of Kent State's seven Regional Campuses located throughout Northeast Ohio or start attending the Kent Campus in the spring of 2012. The Kent Campus will continue to accept applications for transfer and upper-division students.

“In the past, Kent State has taken applications up through the start of the fall semester,” Garcia said. “That will not be the case this year. The message I want to share with prospective students and their parents is if you want to enroll at Kent State and attend our Kent Campus, you need to apply early to guarantee a spot.”

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News Headline: KSU Projects Record Freshman Class (Lefton, Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Officials at Kent State University are projecting a record freshman class at the university's Kent Campus for fall 2011.

Based on the number of applications and the number of new, incoming freshman students who have attended or have signed up for Destination Kent State, its freshman orientation program, Kent State expects to welcome its largest freshman class to the Kent Campus, surpassing its previous freshman enrollment number of 4,030 set in fall 2009.

Freshman enrollment has contributed to the university's overall enrollment growth. In fall 2010, the university reported its highest ever enrollment with 41,354 students across its eight campuses. That represented a 7.56 increase in enrollment compared to the prior year.

"We're seeing the fruits of our labor," said Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton. "A host of factors contribute to this, including this past year's marketing campaign, our focused and strategic recruitment and outreach efforts, and the awarding of more financial aid. The efforts of our faculty and staff, as well as our students and their families recognizing the great educational quality and value of a Kent State education, have made Kent State the first choice for many students.

"Kent State is the second largest public university in the state of Ohio, we are ranked one of the top 200 universities in the world, and we have world-class programs with faculty who are committed to student success," Lefton continued. "We are the top option for new freshmen."

The Kent Campus has seen a record number of applications for freshmen. As of June 20, applications are up 22.6 percent or 3,358 applications from the previous year. The total number of freshman applications received to date for the university's Kent Campus is 18,218.

"We are seeing application increases across the board, with big growth in new students from Ohio and growth in out-of-state and international students," said T. David Garcia, Kent State's associate vice president for enrollment management. "With the support of President Lefton, we have continued the trend of growing Kent State's enrollment and making Kent State a desirable college for students and their parents."

With the expected enrollment increase, the university will closely manage new freshman applications, effective June 22. Any new freshmen who apply or complete their application on and after June 22 will be given the option to attend one of Kent State's seven Regional Campuses located throughout Northeast Ohio or start attending the Kent Campus in the spring of 2012. The Kent Campus will continue to accept applications for transfer and upper-division students.

"In the past, Kent State has taken applications up through the start of the fall semester,"Garcia said. "That will not be the case this year. The message I want to share with prospective students and their parents is if you want to enroll at Kent State and attend our Kent Campus, you need to apply early to guarantee a spot."

For more information about Kent State, visit http://www.kent.edu/

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News Headline: KENT STATE'S KENT CAMPUS CONTINUES TO EXPERIENCE RECORD ENROLLMENT GROWTH (Lefton, Garcia) | Email

News Date: 06/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, June 22 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Officials at Kent State University are projecting a record freshman class at the university's Kent Campus for fall 2011. Based on the number of applications and the number of new, incoming freshman students who have attended or have signed up for Destination Kent State, its freshman orientation program, Kent State expects to welcome its largest freshman class to the Kent Campus, surpassing its previous freshman enrollment number of 4,030 set in fall 2009.

Photo of students by Kent State's Admissions Office Freshman enrollment has contributed to the university's overall enrollment growth. In fall 2010, the university reported its highest ever enrollment with 41,354 students across its eight campuses. That represented a 7.56 increase in enrollment compared to the prior year.

"We're seeing the fruits of our labor," said Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton. "A host of factors contribute to this, including this past year's marketing campaign, our focused and strategic recruitment and outreach efforts, and the awarding of more financial aid. The efforts of our faculty and staff, as well as our students and their families recognizing the great educational quality and value of a Kent State education, have made Kent State the first choice for many students.

"Kent State is the second largest public university in the state of Ohio, we are ranked one of the top 200 universities in the world, and we have world-class programs with faculty who are committed to student success," Lefton continued. "We are the top option for new freshmen."

The Kent Campus has seen a record number of applications for freshmen. As of June 20, applications are up 22.6 percent or 3,358 applications from the previous year. The total number of freshman applications received to date for the university's Kent Campus is 18,218.

"We are seeing application increases across the board, with big growth in new students from Ohio and growth in out-of-state and international students," said T. David Garcia, Kent State's associate vice president for enrollment management. "With the support of President Lefton, we have continued the trend of growing Kent State's enrollment and making Kent State a desirable college for students and their parents."

With the expected enrollment increase, the university will closely manage new freshman applications, effective June 22. Any new freshmen who apply or complete their application on and after June 22 will be given the option to attend one of Kent State's seven Regional Campuses located throughout Northeast Ohio or start attending the Kent Campus in the spring of 2012. The Kent Campus will continue to accept applications for transfer and upper-division students.

"In the past, Kent State has taken applications up through the start of the fall semester," Garcia said. "That will not be the case this year. The message I want to share with prospective students and their parents is if you want to enroll at Kent State and attend our Kent Campus, you need to apply early to guarantee a spot."

For more information about Kent State, visit www.kent.edu. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Work, family, and college? You are not alone! | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Ann Womer Benjamin
News OCR Text: My friends and colleagues are not surprised that I am passionate about education. It is not just because of the opportunities that I have had through my own education or the opportunities that have been available to my children through their education. It is not only because of my public service in the Ohio Statehouse or the Ohio Board of Education.

Perhaps the greatest insight that I received on the importance of education was through my time teaching adult learners at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland State University, and Hiram College. While my students came from diverse backgrounds, such as law students at Case and Cleveland State and undergraduate students at Hiram, they all had optimistic aspirations for their futures. In many cases, they attended college despite other demands on their time.

If you are like my former students and are thinking about returning to college while juggling jobs, families, and other obligations, then take comfort in the fact that you are not alone.

While it may surprise you, nearly five out of 10 college students in the U.S. are over the age of 25 and balancing college with other priorities. That means that only half of all college students start immediately after high school and live on campus or commute from home. While this picture of college life is important to a lot of American families, it does not represent the diversity of today's college students.

For nontraditional students, taking classes during the day several days a week rarely works. And colleges and universities know that. For decades, colleges and universities have offered evening and weekend programs, and now online programs are almost as widespread.

Another common practice is for colleges and universities to open campuses in locations that are close to where adult students live and work. We are even seeing university partnerships where students can earn a bachelor's or master's degree from the campus of a community college. In other words, colleges and universities are constantly expanding programs to make it easier for nontraditional students to complete their degrees.

With so many adults returning to college and so many more programs being offered, you are in good company when you return to the classroom. Northeast Ohio has more than 100,000 adults in college right now. Like you, they are working, raising families, and looking to advance their careers. In addition, they are enrolled in convenient programs that are meeting their needs. Best of all, each year, more and more are earning degrees and will have greater access to the growing number of jobs in Ohio that require education beyond a high school diploma.

Take a chance on your future. Contact a representative from any of the colleges and universities in Northeast Ohio that offer programs specifically for adult students. You may speak with Barb Friedt representing adult degree programs at the Holden University Center of Lakeland Community College, which will offer degree programs from Cleveland State University, Franklin University, Kent State University, Lake Erie College, Ohio University, The University of Akron, The University of Toledo, Ursuline College, and Youngstown State University from one convenient location.

You may speak with Cathy Mansor who advises nontraditional students as dean of the weekend college at Hiram College. Mansor is an expert on how to finish a college degree as a nontraditional student. She has advised students at Hiram for 10 years and finished both a bachelor's and a master's degree while working in demanding full-time jobs.

These resources and more can be found at www.noche.org/adults.

Better yet, talk to your friends and co-workers. You will be surprised to learn who has already returned to college or who is thinking of returning soon.

Ann Womer Benjamin is executive director of the Northeast Ohio Council on Higher Education. She can be reached at awomerbenjamin@noche.org.

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News Headline: Guest Column: Many great things to like in Portage | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name: Todd McKinney
News OCR Text: Ohio Representation-43rd District

May we set politics aside for a moment to consider the best parts of Portage County?

I love the natural beauty of Nelson Ledges and our great state parks at West Branch and the newly opened Wingfoot Lake. Our family always has a good time on the water rides at Geauga Lake's Wildwater Kingdom.

My brothers and I were all educated in Portage County, one brother at what is now the Northeast Ohio Medical University, the other at Kent State University and I went to Hiram.

We have outstanding centers of higher education here and great local schools, too.

Most people live in the townships and enjoy our more rural settings. But our cities are strong, too.

Ravenna is a county seat with a great historical square and potential. Linking downtown Kent with the university through a promenade, transit station and whole new blocks of business and restaurant development is good for our county in so many ways.

DID YOU see the numbers for Aurora and Streetsboro? The census figures show just how much we are growing all over the county.

In my work with other elected officials there is a real determination across party lines to help businesses grow here.

But even with growth, the best parts do not change -- like the Portage County Randolph Fair. This is the fair that gets everything right including my favorite: the dressed-up bunny contest.

The real stars of the show are the young 4-H'ers and FFA members. I did encourage several 4-H'ers to name their animals after me. So if you see a Todd McKenney pig, it is not political -- I think.

Last November, I went to Election Day dinners at churches in Rootstown, Randolph and Atwater and ended up at the Kelso House in Brimfield for a great election night dinner.

The truth is I never met a church dinner I didn't like and Portage County is a land flowing with Swiss steak and cabbage rolls.

Whether it is ham balls in Edinburg or Lions Club spaghetti dinners in Rootstown, we still come together to do so many community dinner fundraisers.

And the best part that does not change? Recently, I was in the Memorial Day parade in Suffield. I walked behind the veterans' float that honored the men and women who have made our nation safe and strong.

It was the best place to observe the deep honor and respect that all of you still show to our veterans.

And when I see that, it makes the peaches bought at numerous local farmers' markets taste so much sweeter.

Editor's note: District 43 covers the southern part of Portage County.

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News Headline: On With The Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name: Ken Lahmers
News OCR Text: MUSICAL ACTIVITIES

July 7 — Kent State Communiversity Band, 7 p.m., Home Savings Plaza in downtown Kent.

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES

Currently — “Katherine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen,” “Collectors and Collecting,” “Recent Acquisitions to the Collection” and “Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevido,” KSU Museum, the front campus of KSU.

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News Headline: Beck Center Presents HAIRSPRAY, 78-814 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Broadway World
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Beck Center for the Arts presents the Tony Award-winning hit musical, Hairspray, on the Mackey Main Stage, July 8 through August 14, 2011. Show times are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays. Buy tickets online at www.beckcenter.org or call 216.521.2540 x10. Welcome to the 60s! Break out the Aqua Net and cheer on pleasantly plump Baltimore teen Tracy Turnblad as she pursues her dream to dance on the popular Corny Collins Show. Change is in the air as this loveable, larger-than-life heroine manages to replace the program's reigning princess, integrate the television show, and find true love - all while singing and dancing - and never mussing her hair. Based on the New Line Cinema film written and directed by John Waters, the Broadway production of Hairspray won eight Tony Awards including Best Musical and Best Original Score. With music and lyrics by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman, audiences will doo-wop along to upbeat songs such as "Good Morning, Baltimore," "I Can Hear the Bells," "Welcome to the 60s," and "You Can't Stop the Beat." Directed by Beck's Artistic Director, Scott Spence, this production of Hairspray welcomes back Equity actress Tina D. Stump as Motormouth Maybelle and features Kevin Joseph Kelly as Edna Turnblad, as well as a cast of 35 talented young actors including many musical theater students from Baldwin-Wallace College and Kent State University. Also, returning this summer is Mark Heffernan as Wilbur Turnblad, who starred in last season's summer blockbuster hit, The Producers. "For years Beck Center has carefully chosen a musical comedy for our summer audiences that will stimulate the senses," exclaimed Spence, "as well as generate laughter and joy by producing a show with vibrant vocals and electrifying dance numbers. Hairspray fits the bill perfectly, so it was a no-brainer for our season finale this year."

Tickets are $28 for adults, $25 for seniors (65 and older), $17 for students (with valid ID), and $10 for children (12 and under). An additional $3 service fee per ticket is applied at the time of purchase. Preview night on Thursday, July 7, is $10 with general admission seating. Group discounts are available for parties of 13 or more. Tony Award-winning playwright and Hairspray author, Mark O'Donnell will be the special guest at a kick-off event on Saturday, July 16 for Connect to Beck, or C2B, a New Group developed to introduce young professionals to the Beck Center through social, cultural and insider events. Guests will meet-and-greet O'Donnell at a pre-show reception at 6 p.m. in the CAF Gallery. Tickets for this special event are only $50 and include drinks, appetizers, the 8 p.m. performance of Hairspray, and a one-year C2B membership. All proceeds from C2B will benefit Beck Center's scholarship programs. For more information, email questions to c2b@beckcenter.org.

To purchase tickets for Hairspray or the C2B event, call the Beck Center box office at 216.521.2540, ext. 10, or purchase seats online at www.beckcenter.org. Beck Center is located at 17801 Detroit Avenue in Lakewood, just ten minutes west of downtown Cleveland. Free onsite parking is available.

Beck Center's production of Hairspray is produced through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI) and is sponsored by West Roofing Systems, Cox Communications, the Ohio Arts Council, and Cuyahoga Arts and Culture.

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News Headline: Youths questioned, one charged in crimes probe (Jenkins) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: /p>
RECORD-COURIER REPORTER

A joint investigation by the Portage County Sheriff's Department and Aurora, Kent State University and Twinsburg police has identified several juvenile "persons of interest" in a series of crimes in eastern Portage County and Summit County.

A 17-year-old is charged with possessing a stolen vehicle. A second was released pending further investigation. Detectives are working to identify a third suspect, authorities said.

The suspects may be responsible for three burglaries reported June 13 in the Twin Lakes area, Portage County sheriff's Det. Lt. Greg Johnson said.

Two burglaries occurred on Sylvan Drive and one on Oak Hill Drive. All three occurred in the afternoon, two at unoccupied house and one that is being rehabilitated, Johnson said.

The suspects took several flat-screen televisions from one residence and smaller items such as credit cards and jewelry.

KSU police detective Lt. Chris Jenkins said his agency arrested a 17-year-old from Summit County after finding the youth driving a car reported stolen in Aurora.

Another juvenile from Summit County who was with the 17-year-old has not been charged with a crime at this time, Jenkins said. The 17-year-old was being held at the Portage County Juvenile Detention Center, he added.

Anyone with information on the incidents may call the Portage County sheriff's detective bureau at 330-297-3890 or Aurora police at 330-562-8181.

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News Headline: Egypt's Political Transformation Moves Slowly (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: NPR - Online
Contact Name: Alan Greenblatt
News OCR Text: Five months after Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak was ousted, the military remains firmly in charge. But the question of who will ultimately control the country remains wide open.

The army will clearly remain a powerful influence. Memories remain strong of the 1952 revolution against the monarchy — when army officers pledged a transition to democracy but gradually consolidated their hold on power.

But today's military has made it clear that it doesn't, ultimately, want to be in charge. "They don't want to govern during what is going to be a turbulent period economically," says Shibley Telhami, a Middle East scholar at the University of Maryland.

If the military is wary of bearing full responsibility for running the country over the long term, so is the Muslim Brotherhood. The Islamist group led the opposition against Mubarak in the years leading up to this past winter's upheaval and remains perhaps the best-organized political force in the country.

Opening Up A Power Vacuum

Still, the Muslim Brotherhood is aware that the prospect of its coming to power creates anxiety for many Egyptians and the international community. The group has pledged to limit its reach for now and says it won't put up a candidate for president, nor contest a majority of parliamentary seats.

"They envision having a significant number of seats in Parliament, which would allow them to be a kingmaker," Telhami says. "Ideally, they'd like to be the kingmakers without being accountable."

The military and the Muslim Brotherhood appear to have come to some tacit understanding about the roles each will play in the political process in the coming months. But who, then, will fill the vacuum?

No one resembling a front-running candidate has emerged in the nascent presidential contest. Meanwhile, the organizers of the pro-democracy demonstrations that brought Mubarak down are pleading for more time to get their political operations in shape.

"I am surprised, and I think many Egyptians are, that we haven't seen a more rapid consolidation of the opposition into an actual political movement, or string of political movements," says Jon Alterman, director of the Middle East program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Debate On Delaying Elections

The popular referendum approved in March calls for parliamentary elections to be held in September. Parliament will then appoint an assembly to rewrite the Constitution and pave the way for presidential elections.

Democracy activists argue that timetable is too rapid. Early elections, they contend, would give the advantage to the Muslim Brotherhood and elements of Mubarak's old party. They want more time to get ready.

About three dozen youth and political groups are supporting a "Constitution First" platform, seeking to change the sequence of how the country's laws are revised. They received a boost on Sunday when Prime Minister Essam Sharaf said he would support delaying parliamentary elections beyond September to give the "political landscape" more time to jell.

Some Power Through Protest

The youth and political groups are collecting signatures in support of such a delay and are calling for a massive rally in Cairo's Tahrir Square on July 8 in support of their cause.

Protests in the now-legendary square have remained a regular feature of the post-Mubarak era. Protesters have won important concessions from the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, the military junta running the country, such as subjecting Mubarak and his sons to criminal investigation.

"It's been kind of remarkable what the protesters have been able to accomplish," says Jason Brownlee, a government professor at the University of Texas. "Every time they go out and do a protest in Tahrir, they seem to get a concession."

No Going Backward?

But protests won't forever remain the primary means of political expression. Once elections are held, the new government will have to deal with public demands.

Telhami, the Maryland professor, is optimistic that holding elections will "transform" Egypt's political environment. "The people who organized the uprisings in the first place are not going to let an elected government get away with going backward."

Not all observers of the situation in Egypt are so sanguine. The Muslim Brotherhood, while shying away from seizing political power in the near term, will want to play a large role in setting the policy agenda.

And the military will continue to have its influence as well. It may continue to play a role akin to that of the military in Turkey in recent decades, which has occasionally stepped in and overthrown civilian governments that pursued a course that the military opposed.

Some worry that the types of liberalizing changes allowed by SCAF have been cosmetic, at best, such as renaming the old state security agency.

"The security apparatus is essentially unchanged and the military's always been the core of the regime, anyway," says Joshua Stacher, a political scientist at Kent State University.

"This leads me to believe we're in a situation where we're seeing the reconstruction of authoritarian institutions," he says. "All this doesn't really bode well for the kind of changes that people aspired to on Feb. 11, when Mubarak left."

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News Headline: Obesity weighs on brain function, too (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: St. Petersburg Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Obesity promotes diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and other maladies associated with increasing aging. • Excess weight may damage thinking, reasoning and memory as well, possibly by eroding the fatty insulation around the fibers that connect regions of the brain. • Losing weight through bariatric surgery, however, appears to restore at least some cognitive function, according to John Gunstad, a neuropsychologist at Kent State University in Ohio.

Gunstad recently subjected 150 obese people to cognitive tests that measured memory, attention, verbal fluency and other mental functions.

On average they performed on the low end of normal, although scores on memory and learning tests were in the impaired range for about 25 percent of participants, he and his colleagues reported in a recent article in the journal Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.

Twelve weeks later, however, the 109 patients who had undergone bariatric surgery and shed about 50 pounds scored within the average or above-average range for all cognitive tests. Those who didn't have surgery scored worse.

What made the difference? The change occurred not in brain cells themselves, but in the myelin — the fatty white insulation around the "wires" that connect brain cells, Gunstad believes.

This "white matter," as it is known, facilitates the transmission of signals between brain cells and brain regions.

The thicker and more robust the white matter, the faster and more reliably signals travel. Anything that damages myelin or causes it to thin, such as multiple sclerosis or aging, can disrupt brain functions.

In a study published last year in Obesity, Gunstad and his colleagues determined that as weight increases, the integrity of the myelin decreases, which could account for deficits in thinking and memory.

"Other research has linked obesity to white matter changes," he said. "Our research is the first to suggest that these changes can occur before the onset of more severe pathology. That's worrisome because subtle changes might be happening in the background in otherwise healthy people."

Gunstad began to suspect that obesity contributed to mental decline when he worked with older people in a large study.

Obese patients seemed to have mental difficulties more often than nonobese people. "I saw that obese patients had problems linked with attention, concentration, problem solving, and so on — all problems that have been linked to white matter changes," he said.

Although he can't explain the specific mechanism that causes mental decline, Gunstad thinks that obesity damages the brain in a number of ways.

"For example," he said, "it could trigger inflammation, which could damage blood vessels, and perhaps the brain itself."

In a recent study in the Archives of Neurology, researchers found that people who have insulin resistance — a condition that reduces the ability of cells, including brain cells, to utilize glucose for fuel — show some of the brain changes that precede Alzheimer's disease.

They concluded that even mild insulin resistance, which increases dramatically in people who are overweight and obese, can increase the risk of Alzheimer's.

Losing weight, however, makes the entire body, including the brain, more responsive to glucose, and therefore probably less susceptible to Alzheimer's and other forms of brain dysfunction, the researchers said.

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News Headline: Four East Side communities will study merging, with county help (Hoornbeek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Laura Johnston, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Decades ago, they split apart. Now, Moreland Hills, Orange, Pepper Pike and Woodmere are considering merging in the most significant step toward regionalism Cuyahoga County has ever seen.

The four East Side suburbs -- which along with Hunting Valley once made up Orange Township -- already share a school district, recreation programs and senior services. Last year, they studied sharing police, fire and public works. And Wednesday they announced they will study whether joining together could save their residents serious money.

"It's time for the mayors of these small communities to try to come together to curb all the expenses we have," Woodmere Mayor Charles Smith said at a downtown news conference.

Planners and other good-government advocates have long viewed Cuyahoga County, with its 59 communities, as ripe for mergers, collaborations or tax-sharing agreements.

Yet the region's political and minority leaders largely viewed calls for regionalism with skepticism. Suburban mayors and councils wanted to protect their jobs and power bases. Black officials and residents feared that Cleveland's needs would be overshadowed by a suburban agenda hostile to the city. They also feared a regional system would dilute black political power.

The latest merger proposal grew out talks four years ago about sharing services, said Moreland Hills Mayor Susan Renda. The idea took on added urgency this year, when the state announced big cuts in aid to cities and the county offered assistance.

The new county charter promotes cooperation among political subdivisions, and Executive Ed FitzGerald has made collaboration a priority, for example proposing an "anti-poaching protocol" that offers development money to keep cities from luring businesses from their neighbors.

The Cuyahoga County Planning Commission will help the communities, leading discussions and analyzing data to determine what savings are possible. Next year, the county may offer incentives for merging, FitzGerald said.

"These issues are very complex," FitzGerald said. "The residents of the individual communities have to feel they're getting a fair shake with the merger. So these things don't happen quickly."

Moreland Hills Mayor Susan Renda, who is up for reelection this year, said that the communities have been discussing merging for about two years. She hopes that the process can be a pilot for other cities.

The final decision, though, belongs to the citizens, who would have to approve two votes -- one in fall 2012 to create a formal commission of representatives from each community, and one in fall 2013 to merge. Residents in each community would have to approve the merger. A defeat in any community would defeat the entire issue.

John Hoornbeek, a regionalism proponent and director of the Kent State University Center for Public Administration and Public Policy, said it's difficult to predict how the idea will play with the public.

"I think it depends on how people in these communities view their residence, their citizenship and the services they receive," he said.

Voters' emotional attachment to their community identities, for example, could overrule any potential cost savings. Losing that identity may be politically unpopular.

The most divisive issue might be what to call the merged suburb, which mayors have considered calling Chagrin Hills.

Smith stressed that Woodmere, a historically black community that is the smallest and least affluent of the four, could keep its own personality, within a larger entity.

"It's not a process in which we're being gobbled up," he said. "It's a process of creating sustainability for all our communities."

Together, the communities are home to about 13,000 residents, cover 18 square miles and have a combined budget of $20 million.

Moreland Hills, Orange and Pepper Pike are affluent and mainly residential communities. Woodmere has more than 300 businesses, including the tony shopping center, Eton. But the mayor said the village can no longer afford to keep the police and fire departments at current staffing levels.

The three villages and the city of Pepper Pike will have to consider their different income and property tax rates, as well as police and fire coverage.

A Baldwin-Wallace College study last year found significant benefits to consolidating police and dispatch services for Hunting Valley, Moreland Hills, Orange and Pepper Pike. Chagrin Falls already handles dispatch for Moreland Hills, Orange and Woodmere. The cities could save $268,000 on trash pickup, if Pepper Pike switched from backyard pickup to cheaper curbside collection.

Generally, residents don't care where the truck comes from, only that they know who to call, said Orange Mayor Kathy Mulcahy.

But she's not yet convinced of savings.

"We don't know yet if it's a good idea," Mulcahy said. "We're going to find out."

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News Headline: REVIEW: CHICAGO jazzes it up @ Porthouse | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In a good production, CHICAGO, the musical, sizzles with creative dancing, exciting music and fun characterizations. The Porthouse Theatre production sizzles, and is creative and fun! ‘Nuf said.

In the words of my 15-year-old “kid reviewer” grandson, Alex, “That was great!” The award-winning composer enthused, “The music was not only well-written, but well played. The acting is right on. The singers sang meanings, not just words. The dancing was creative, and except for some unity problems in a couple of the numbers, was well done! The vocal blendings were excellent.” Grandpa totally agreed with him.

CHICAGO, which is set in Prohibition era Chicago, is a satire on the Windy City's well known police and judicial corruption. The mayhem gave birth to celebrity criminals whose fame came and went as newer and more outlandish crimes and payoffs came forth.

The musical is based on a play of the same name written by Maurine Dallas Watkins, a Chicago Tribune reporter who was assigned to cover the 1924 trials of murderesses Beulah Annan and Belva Gaertner.

Annan, who was acquitted of murder through a reported series of payoffs, became the model for the Roxie Hart. Velma is based on Gaertner, a cabaret singer who was also conveniently acquitted of murder. Billy Flynn, the lawyer character, is a composite of the two lawyers in the real cases.

The musical's path to production started in the 1960s. Superstar Gwen Verdon read the play and asked her husband, the great Broadway choreographer Bob Fosse, about creating a musical adaptation. Fosse approached playwright Watkins numerous times to buy the rights, but Watkins, who had become a born-again Christian, refused as she believed her play glamorized a scandalous way of living. Upon her death the rights were obtained and Fred Ebb began work on the musical score. Ebb and Fosse penned the book and Fosse directed and choreographed. And, as the saying goes, the rest is history.

The original Broadway production ran for 936 performances and starred Chita Rivera as Velma, Gwen Verdon as Roxie and Jerry Orbach as Billy. The script was revived in 1996 and holds the record for the longest-running musical revival on Broadway, now clocking over 6,000 performances. The 2002 film version, which starred Catherine Zeta-Jones, Renee Zellweger, Richard Gere, John C. Reilly and Queen Latifah, won the Academy Award for best picture.

Porthouse's production, under the direction of Terri Kent, is excellent. The show moves along at a fast pace, building on the vaudeville motif by having musical director Jonathan Swoboda serve not only as the orchestra leader, but as the narrator. It's a clever technique which adds to the show's whimsy.

Choregrapher Mary Ann Black has modified the original Fosse choreography to fit the talents of the dancers and the thrust stage venue. Though I would have liked the dancers to get lower to the ground and have more definitive hand and arm gestures, ala Fosse style, the enthusiasm and effect comes through loud and clear.

Swoboda's band is excellent. The musical sounds don't drown out the singing and fills the space with the right jazz beat.

Black, who not only choreographed, but plays the cute, conniving Roxie, is terrific in the role. She dances, mugs, feigns innocence and creates a delightful killer. Her solos “Funny Honey” and “Roxie,” were show highlights.

Sandra Emerick, Velma, sings, acts and dances well. Her “All That Jazz” lights up the stage. Her duets with Black, “My Own Best Friend,” “Nowadays” and “I Know a Girl/Me and My Baby” brought gales of applause.

Eric van Baars is fine as Billy. His singing and dancing are solid. He may have added to the role with a little more swagger and arrogance.

Timothy Culver, who portrays Roxie's nebbish husband, brought down the house with Mister Cellophane.

Dylan Ratell confounds as the cross-dressing Mary Sunshine. He sings with a castrato voice that is outstanding. (Castrato is a male with a singing voice equivalent to that of soprano or mezzo-soprano.) Wow!

Melissa Owens' Matron Mama Morton lacks the hard edge and commanding presence needed for the role. Her “When You're Good to Mama” lacked the needed power, presence and conniving tone.

Stick around for the song and dance routine after the closing lines. Black and Emerick delight.

CAPSULE JUDGMENT: CHICAGO, Porthouse style, sizzles and delights. It makes for a perfect summer treat. Go! See! Enjoy!

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News Headline: KSU, Kent collaborate on walkway extension (Floyd, Lefton, Finn) | Email

News Date: 06/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: June 22--KENT -- For decades Kent State has been cut off from downtown thanks to a four-lane bypass lined with chain-link fence. But that's poised to change.

The university has bought up enough properties to extend its esplanade -- or walkway -- from campus into the heart of a $100 million redevelopment project that aims to turn downtown Kent into a mecca for students, residents and visitors.

"The university needs to have a point of connectivity to the city," said Gregg Floyd, KSU vice president for finance. "Both sides are anxious for that to happen."

The massive face-lift, as city officials call it, is the first cooperative venture of this magnitude between the city and university.

Both sides expect to reap financial awards from the redevelopment -- the city in taxes and the university in student, faculty and staff recruitment.

"Our goal is to make Kent the Ann Arbor of Portage County," KSU President Lester Lefton said in April 2010 of the home of the University of Michigan.

"We agreed that our best is dependent on each other," City Manager Dave Ruller said. "We want everything to work seamlessly together."

City and university officials visited Bloomington, Ind.; Chapel Hill, N.C.; and other communities to see how others created a town-gown atmosphere.

Transportation upgrades

They credit U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Niles, for securing a $20 million federal grant to build a parking and transportation hub for PARTA that will be the linchpin of the redevelopment.

City officials have state permission to change the bypass, a leg of state Route 59 that skirts downtown, into an unlimited access highway.

As the project proceeds, the fencing around

Haymaker Parkway will be taken down and a light installed to help pedestrians cross from the business district into neighborhoods that cater to students and lead to campus.

Meanwhile Kent developer Ron Burbick has invested $6.5 million in downtown retail and office projects and is working on a new venture. Private developer Fairmount Properties is building office space that will house corporate, retail and restaurant space in the same area.

As for KSU, officials were especially eager to build a hotel and conference center near campus. Trustees agreed to invest up to $3 million in the project as a part owner.

When KSU officials learned they were not permitted by state law to invest in the hotel, the university's not-for-profit arm, the KSU Foundation, stepped in, foundation spokeswoman Nora Jacobs said.

Over the last two years, the foundation has bought three properties on Erie and Depeyster streets that will be the site of the hotel complex. The foundation paid $512,000 for the properties, according to Gene Finn, KSU vice president for institutional advancement.

The foundation also has agreed to underwrite virtually the entire cost of the hotel, the first such project it has tackled. City officials peg the price tag at $13 million, but the details are in flux, Jacobs said.

The Pizzuti Co. of Columbus, owned by KSU alumnus and former trustee Ron Pizzuti, is investing money in the hotel complex as well, she said.

Foundation officials are negotiating for a hotelier to manage the complex of 90 to 95 rooms, a 14,000-square-foot conference center, indoor pool, small fitness facility and lounge/cafe.

Path to campus

Cathy Hemming, chairwoman of the foundation board of trustees, said by email that the facility would bolster KSU's vitality by providing "close-in, convenient lodging for parents, prospective students, visiting lecturers and alumni," plus space for business and academic meetings.

She said the project "will create cash flows that the foundation will be able to reinvest in the university and its students."

Officials hope that by the start of the fall 2012 semester, hotel visitors will step out the door and onto the KSU contribution to the development: the one-eighth-mile esplanade that will lead to Rockwell and Franklin halls on campus.

KSU has spent $3.3 million to acquire 16 properties to extend the walkway of stamped concrete and brick pavers through a residential neighborhood catering to student rentals.

The university is negotiating for three other properties to complete a buffer between the walkway and housing, Floyd said.

Starting next spring, the university will spend another $3.28 million, $700,000 of which is coming from the state, to finish the project.

That will include demolition of the homes it has purchased and installing the esplanade, a gateway entrance to campus, trees, shrubs and gardens, lighting, furniture and emergency phones.

------

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: KSU, Kent collaborate on walkway extension (Floyd, Lefton, Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: University and city share investments in downtown development projects that could benefit both financially KENT: For decades Kent State has been cut off from downtown thanks to a four-lane bypass lined with chain-link fence. But that's poised to change.

The university has bought up enough properties to extend its esplanade or walkway from campus into the heart of a $100 million redevelopment project that aims to turn downtown Kent into a mecca for students, residents and visitors.

''The university needs to have a point of connectivity to the city,'' said Gregg Floyd, KSU vice president for finance. ''Both sides are anxious for that to happen.''

The massive face-lift, as city officials call it, is the first cooperative venture of this magnitude between the city and university.

Both sides expect to reap financial awards from the redevelopment the city in taxes and the university in student, faculty and staff recruitment.

''Our goal is to make Kent the Ann Arbor of Portage County,'' KSU President Lester Lefton said in April 2010 of the home of the University of Michigan.

''We agreed that our best is dependent on each other,'' City Manager Dave Ruller said. ''We want everything to work seamlessly together.''

City and university officials visited Bloomington, Ind.; Chapel Hill, N.C.; and other communities to see how others created a town-gown atmosphere.

Transportation upgrades

They credit U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Niles, for securing a $20 million federal grant to build a parking and transportation hub for PARTA that will be the linchpin of the redevelopment.

City officials have state permission to change the bypass, a leg of state Route 59 that skirts downtown, into an unlimited access highway.

As the project proceeds, the fencing around Haymaker Parkway will be taken down and a light installed to help pedestrians cross from the business district into neighborhoods that cater to students and lead to campus.

Meanwhile Kent developer Ron Burbick has invested $6.5 million in downtown retail and office projects and is working on a new venture. Private developer Fairmount Properties is building office space that will house corporate, retail and restaurant space in the same area.

As for KSU, officials were especially eager to build a hotel and conference center near campus. Trustees agreed to invest up to $3 million in the project as a part owner.

When KSU officials learned they were not permitted by state law to invest in the hotel, the university's not-for-profit arm, the KSU Foundation, stepped in, foundation spokeswoman Nora Jacobs said.

Over the last two years, the foundation has bought three properties on Erie and Depeyster streets that will be the site of the hotel complex. The foundation paid $512,000 for the properties, according to Gene Finn, KSU vice president for institutional advancement.

The foundation also has agreed to underwrite virtually the entire cost of the hotel, the first such project it has tackled. City officials peg the price tag at $13 million, but the details are in flux, Jacobs said.

The Pizzuti Co. of Columbus, owned by KSU alumnus and former trustee Ron Pizzuti, is investing money in the hotel complex as well, she said.

Foundation officials are negotiating for a hotelier to manage the complex of 90 to 95 rooms, a 14,000-square-foot conference center, indoor pool, small fitness facility and lounge/cafe.

Path to campus

Cathy Hemming, chairwoman of the foundation board of trustees, said by email that the facility would bolster KSU's vitality by providing ''close-in, convenient lodging for parents, prospective students, visiting lecturers and alumni,'' plus space for business and academic meetings.

She said the project ''will create cash flows that the foundation will be able to reinvest in the university and its students.''

Officials hope that by the start of the fall 2012 semester, hotel visitors will step out the door and onto the KSU contribution to the development: the one-eighth-mile esplanade that will lead to Rockwell and Franklin halls on campus.

KSU has spent $3.3 million to acquire 16 properties to extend the walkway of stamped concrete and brick pavers through a residential neighborhood catering to student rentals.

The university is negotiating for three other properties to complete a buffer between the walkway and housing, Floyd said.

Starting next spring, the university will spend another $3.28 million, $700,000 of which is coming from the state, to finish the project.

That will include demolition of the homes it has purchased and installing the esplanade, a gateway entrance to campus, trees, shrubs and gardens, lighting, furniture and emergency phones.

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News Headline: First-Time Local Author Pens Book on Region's Notorious Crime Spree | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Pittsburgh City Paper
Contact Name: BILL O'DRISCOLL
News OCR Text: A first-time local author offers a painstakingly researched account of perhaps the region's most notorious crime spree.

In 1969, a Tarentum man named Stanley Hoss transformed himself from small-time thug to the target of a federal manhunt. Jailed for rape, Hoss had escaped and shot and killed Verona police officer Joe Zanella. Hoss, 26, then abducted a young Maryland woman and her 2-year-old daughter and fled west; he was captured in Iowa, but their bodies were never found. In 1973, Hoss was serving a life sentence for Zanella's killing when he conspired with two other white inmates at Western Penitentiary in the brutal, racially motivated killing of African-American prison guard Walter Peterson.

Hoss was still a household name in 1975, when Jim Hollock began his career as a counselor and counselor supervisor at Western Pen. Hollock never met Hoss (who hung himself in Philadelphia's Graterford Prison, in 1978). But in 1997, Hollock began the decade of research that culminated in April's publication of Born to Lose (Kent State University Press), a painstakingly detailed account of Hoss' crime spree and journey through the courts and prison system. The title quotes Hoss' tattoo; the narrative features names like Richard Thornburgh (then a federal prosecutor, later governor) -- and Edgar Snyder, the locally famed personal-injury lawyer who four decades ago was Hoss' public defender.

Hollock, 62, is retired and lives in Observatory Hill. He recently spoke with CP.

Why write about Hoss?

I always wanted to be an author, and you've heard "write what you know." I thought, "Well, I know criminals at least. I know the system." … And here it is, one of the most outrageous crime stories of all times in Pennsylvania, and no one's written this?

Was Hoss really that famous?

[Hoss's spree] covered a lot of years and a lot of crimes that were so appalling because of the victims -- they were just beautiful people, all of them. It was like the devil killing angels.

How did you persuade Hoss' wife to talk to you?

I really had to talk my way in. This was 30 years afterwards. She said, "I always knew someone like you would show up here." … [But] she said, "I don't want to talk about this, ever."

Couple days later, the phone rings. Her husband [had told her], "Look, you call that man back and you talk to him. Get this thing outta your chest." … [Later,] she came to my first book-signing.

And she provided dozens of Hoss' letters.

It was tremendous stuff, and right from his mouth. It can be sweet talk, it can be mush, but if he's not getting what he wants, violent, threats, vulgarities.

Do you feel like you have insight into Hoss?

[Hoss] didn't care about consequences. So he'd kill ya. That's a dangerous man. Now you want to get really deep into it -- why didn't he care? I don't think he cared if he did live or die.

In 1972, the U.S. Supreme Court outlawed capital punishment. But you note that death-penalty advocates often cited Hoss.

You might say Hoss brought it back. … He's absolutely part of the reason we have the death penalty today in Maryland and Pennsylvania.

How is the book doing?

The sales are really really brisk. They're being also picked up by the library systems of universities. It's in 30 libraries in Allegheny County. They're all out, and each library has a waiting list. I'm very excited about that.

Born to Lose excerpt

Stanley Hoss kidnaps Linda and Lori Mae Peugeot in a department-store parking lot in LaVale, Md., in September 1969

When he saw the girl and her baby come out of the store, Hoss got out of the white Chevy, taking with him the items he wanted. He wouldn't be returning. The J.C. Higgins revolver was stuck in his waistband. He gauged his gait to arrive at the GTO at the same moment as the mother and child.

Linda had reached the driver's side of her car. Letting go of Lori Mae's hand and putting her purchases on the ground so she could open the car door, she was surprised to see a man come out of nowhere, standing not two feet from her. Linda's back was to her driver's door, and Lori Mae was standing beside her. The man faced her, standing altogether too close for someone she did not recognize. Before she could blink, the man threatened, "If you open your mouth, I will blow your head off." It was only then that Linda saw the gun. He held it low, at his belt. She grabbed for Lori Mae's hand. "Hear me?" the man said. "I'm not playing around. Get in the car."

JIM HOLLOCK discusses and signs BORN TO LOSE at 1 p.m. Sat., June 25; attorney Edgar Snyder will also speak. Verona Borough Municipal Building, 736 E. Railroad Ave., Verona. Free. 412-721-0943

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