Report Overview:
Total Clips (12)
Enrollment (2)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Salem (2)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Recreational Services (2)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Enrollment (2)
KSU summer enrollment grows 06/29/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University announced Monday the enrollment across its eight campuses increased by 6.57 percent this year. According to a KSU's...

My Town: Kent State Record Enrollment (Lefton) 06/28/2011 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

It looks like there could be a record number of Flashes this fall! Kent State University officials predict during the fall of 2011 they will see the largest freshman class in university history. Kent State...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Pediatricians: Get junk-food ads off TV (Collins) 06/29/2011 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

...more (healthy ads) for children to view," Loper said. Although many health experts agree with the academy, Fran Collins, associate professor in the Kent State University School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said it is up to parents to regulate their children's eating habits. "How...


KSU at Salem (2)
Letters of gratitude improve well-being (Toepfer) 06/28/2011 WFMJ-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...found that letter writing, actually over time did increase well being," said Steve Toepfer, associate professor in Human Development and Family Studies at Kent State University at Salem. Toepher's study involved 219 Kent State Students. The experimental group wrote one letter of gratitude...

Video: Letters of gratitude improve well-being (Toepfer) 06/29/2011 WFMJ-TV - Online(OH) Text Attachment Email


KSU at Stark (2)
Gas pump prices back on rise (Engelhardt) 06/29/2011 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...average of $3.55 a gallon for regular fuel. The reasons for the price difference were unclear to Lucas Engelhardt, assistant professor of economics at the Kent State University Stark Campus. However, Engelhardt said he has observed that fuel prices in Ohio seem to rise and fall more rapidly than...

Gas pump prices back on rise (Engelhardt) 06/29/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...average of $3.55 a gallon for regular fuel. The reasons for the price difference were unclear to Lucas Engelhardt, assistant professor of economics at the Kent State University Stark Campus. However, Engelhardt said he has observed that fuel prices in Ohio seem to rise and fall more rapidly than...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Want to be a star? Movie auditions Monday (Andrews) 06/28/2011 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Movie auditions for the film "Old Fashioned" are Sunday and Monday. On Sunday, June 26, auditions will be held from noon - 6:00pm. On Monday, June 27,...


Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
NORTHEAST OHIO GOVERNMENT COLLABORATIVE ACTIONS HIGHLIGHTED IN KENT STATE RESEARCH (Hoornbeek) 06/28/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, June 28 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University's Center for Public Administration and Public...


Recreational Services (2)
Now's the Time to Enjoy the Cuyahoga 06/29/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Video: Crooked River Offers Safe Options for Enjoying the Cuyahoga (Hendricks) 06/29/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (1)
Business activity picks up in northeast Ohio 06/29/2011 Akron Legal News Text Attachment Email


News Headline: KSU summer enrollment grows | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University announced Monday the enrollment across its eight campuses increased by 6.57 percent this year.

According to a KSU's records, 14,467 students enrolled in its two summer sessions this year, while 13,575 were enrolled during summer 2010.

KSU's East Liverpool and Trumbull campuses both saw increases of over 35 percent in enrollment this year. Kent State University at East Liverpool grew in summer enrollment by 44.18 percent from 2010, while Kent State University at Trumbull grew by 37.60 percent.

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News Headline: My Town: Kent State Record Enrollment (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Jacque Jovic
News OCR Text: It looks like there could be a record number of Flashes this fall! Kent State University officials predict during the fall of 2011 they will see the largest freshman class in university history. Kent State has received more than 18,000 applications. The university stopped accepting freshman applications for its main campus and is referring freshmen to Kent State's regional campuses.

"We're seeing the fruits of our labor,” said Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton. “A host of factors contribute to this, including this past year's marketing campaign, our focused and strategic recruitment and outreach efforts, and the awarding of more financial aid. The efforts of our faculty and staff, as well as our students and their families recognizing the great educational quality and value of a Kent State education, have made Kent State the first choice for many students."

The university will still accept applications for its main campus for transfer or upper division students.

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News Headline: Pediatricians: Get junk-food ads off TV (Collins) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name: Alex Stuckey
News OCR Text: As childhood-obesity rates continue to climb, the American Academy of Pediatrics is calling on the federal government to keep junk-food ads off TV when children are likely to be watching.

Studies have found that such advertising contributes to childhood obesity because it inspires young children to beg their parents to buy unhealthy foods, the academy said in a statement this week.

The country's childhood-obesity rate has more than tripled - to 17 percent of children - during the past 30 years, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dr. Judy Loper, director of the Central Ohio Nutrition Center, agrees that commercials influence the foods children choose.

"There is a lot of pressure on parents to buy the products when kids see (junk-food ads)," Loper said.

A 2009 study of 50,000 TV ads from 2003 to 2004 found that 98 percent of food ads viewed by children ages 2 to 11 and 90 percent of food ads viewed by teenagers were for products containing high fat, sugar and sodium levels, the academy said. Another study found that children ate 45 percent more snacks when exposed to food advertisements.

For these reasons, the academy is asking Congress, the Federal Trade Commission and the Federal Communications Commission to ban junk-food and fast-food advertising during children's programs, as well as prohibit interactive advertising involving junk food or fast food to children via digital TV, cell phones and other media.

It also is asking pediatricians to teach parents and children about healthful eating and encourage parents to limit media viewing to 2 hours a day instead of the current 7-hour-a day average.

"Children are bombarded (with junk-food ads), and there should be more (healthy ads) for children to view," Loper said.

Although many health experts agree with the academy, Fran Collins, associate professor in the Kent State University School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said it is up to parents to regulate their children's eating habits.

"How many 7-year-olds can hop in a car and drive to McDonald's? At what point do their parents step in?" Collins said.

Marketing simply tells viewers a product exists; it doesn't force anyone to buy or eat certain foods, she added.

Dr. Pat McKnight, state policy chairwoman of the Ohio Dietetic Association, said more needs to be done to alleviate the obesity epidemic.

"Obviously the parents need help," said McKnight, who also is an assistant professor of nutrition at the Mount Carmel College of Nursing.

"Banning junk-food advertisements is a step in the right direction to lowering the obesity rate."

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News Headline: Letters of gratitude improve well-being (Toepfer) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: WFMJ-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The art of letter-writing is a dying art. People don't rush to the mailbox for love letters from afar, and kids don't send hand-written notes to pen pals. Instead, we've traded the personal communication for texts and tweets.

But a local professor has found a new reason for you to put pen to paper.

"We found that letter writing, actually over time did increase well being," said Steve Toepfer, associate professor in Human Development and Family Studies at Kent State University at Salem. Toepher's study involved 219 Kent State Students. The experimental group wrote one letter of gratitude each week for three weeks. The control group didn't write any letters. Both groups filled out questionnaires about their well being at each session. The control group didn't experience changes, but the letter-writers experienced increasing benefits, meaning the more letters they wrote, the more their well-being improved.

"The good news is, the letter-writers only had to write for 15 minutes for each letter, so for 15 minutes once a week for three weeks, you get pretty good benefits on happiness, life satisfaction and depressive symptoms," explained Toepher. There's one catch; the letters of gratitude could not be thank you notes that a person might send for tangible things like birthday presents. "I really didn't want people to be thinking about material gifts," Toepher said. "Instead, I wanted people to try to connect with something that was a little more deep and meaningful."

Most people wrote to parents, siblings, and significant others.

One woman even wrote a letter of gratitude to Ellen DeGeneres because the show helped her though a tough time.

"I was happily surprised that we found a decrease in depressive symptoms because that really does give this more meaning, that it could help people that need help," said Toepher.

The research will be published in the next issue of the Journal of Happiness Studies.

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News Headline: Video: Letters of gratitude improve well-being (Toepfer) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: WFMJ-TV - Online(OH)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Please click on link for video:
http://www.wfmj.com/category/179433/video-landing-page?clipId=5998556&topVideoCatNo=127724&autoStart=true&redirected=true

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News Headline: Gas pump prices back on rise (Engelhardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name: Doug Staley
News OCR Text: After weeks of steady decline, the gasoline price yo-yo spiraled in the other direction Tuesday morning ahead of the Fourth of July holiday as prices at some area stations jumped nearly 30 cents in less than two hours to $3.45 a gallon. While motorists should be prepared to pay even more at the pump today, prices aren?t expected to rise significantly the rest of the summer, unless a hurricane strikes key oil-producing areas off the U.S. coast. ?I think it will stay between $3.35 and $3.50 (per gallon),? said Patrick LaVecchia, vice chair of government and legislative affairs for the Associated Food & Petroleum Dealers Inc. ?... The threat of the hurricane will cause the price to rise.? Prices surged Tuesday after dropping earlier this week to as low as $3.17.9 per gallon in Stark County. According to gasbuddy.com, the price of regular gasoline averaged $3.31 a gallon in the Akron area Tuesday afternoon. By noon Tuesday, oil prices had risen 7 1/2 cents a barrel on speculation, according to LaVecchia. ?I expect it to go up again (today). Oil?s up, so gas follows it,? he said. The price jump comes just several days ahead of the Fourth of July weekend. AAA expects travel over the holiday weekend to be down 2.5 percent from last year. A survey revealed 1.6 million Ohioans will travel at least 50 miles from home, according to AAA, with the vast majority expected to travel by car. Gas prices peaked at more than $4 a gallon in early May. Since then, prices have been falling because they were inflated in late spring due to market speculation, according to LaVecchia. The price of crude oil fell last week after the International Energy Agency said it will make 60 million barrels available in a month-long period. Dealer cost for gasoline was hovering around $3.80 a gallon on June 2 before hitting a low of $3.15 a gallon last weekend, LaVecchia said. ?It had to settle back down,? he said. ?From June 2 to the 25, it (dealer cost) dropped 69 or 70 cents. That shows you that there was no reason for it to be that high to begin with.? Still, motorists in Northeast Ohio are paying less than the national average of $3.55 a gallon for regular fuel. The reasons for the price difference were unclear to Lucas Engelhardt, assistant professor of economics at the Kent State University Stark Campus. However, Engelhardt said he has observed that fuel prices in Ohio seem to rise and fall more rapidly than in surrounding states. ?Why that is, I honestly have no idea. Our prices tend to move faster,? Engelhardt said. While prices may have jumped due to an overreaction in the market, Engelhardt said he believes the uncertain political climate in the Middle East played a major role in the spike. Prices have been decreasing as the political situation has stabilized, according to Engelhardt. ?I think the higher prices reflected fears we had at the time about what supplies were going to look like. We were overly fearful,? Engelhardt said. ?There was a lot of uncertainty, which can create speculation of what the supplies should look like.? Engelhardt also said he isn?t expecting a dramatic price spike over the final two months of the summer driving season, although a major storm could disrupt supplies and send prices upward. ?If we have a lot more hurricanes in oil production areas, I think that will have a bigger effect,? he said.

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News Headline: Gas pump prices back on rise (Engelhardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Doug Staley
News OCR Text: With a smile on his face, Robert Zorger tops off his tank with $2.99 a gallon gasoline at Speedway on the corner of Lincoln Way and 10th Street Tuesday.

After weeks of steady decline, the gasoline price yo-yo spiraled in the other direction Tuesday morning ahead of the Fourth of July holiday as prices at some area stations jumped nearly 30 cents in less than two hours to $3.45 a gallon.

While motorists should be prepared to pay even more at the pump today, prices aren't expected to rise significantly the rest of the summer, unless a hurricane strikes key oil-producing areas off the U.S. coast.

“I think it will stay between $3.35 and $3.50 (per gallon),” said Patrick LaVecchia, vice chair of government and legislative affairs for the Associated Food & Petroleum Dealers Inc. “... The threat of the hurricane will cause the price to rise.”

Prices surged Tuesday after dropping earlier this week to as low as $3.17.9 per gallon in Stark County. According to gasbuddy.com, the price of regular gasoline averaged $3.31 a gallon in the Akron area Tuesday afternoon. By noon Tuesday, oil prices had risen 7 1/2 cents a barrel on speculation, according to LaVecchia.

“I expect it to go up again (today). Oil's up, so gas follows it,” he said.

The price jump comes just several days ahead of the Fourth of July weekend. AAA expects travel over the holiday weekend to be down 2.5 percent from last year. A survey revealed 1.6 million Ohioans will travel at least 50 miles from home, according to AAA, with the vast majority expected to travel by car.

Gas prices peaked at more than $4 a gallon in early May. Since then, prices have been falling because they were inflated in late spring due to market speculation, according to LaVecchia. The price of crude oil fell last week after the International Energy Agency said it will make 60 million barrels available in a month-long period.

Dealer cost for gasoline was hovering around $3.80 a gallon on June 2 before hitting a low of $3.15 a gallon last weekend, LaVecchia said.

“It had to settle back down,” he said. “From June 2 to the 25, it (dealer cost) dropped 69 or 70 cents. That shows you that there was no reason for it to be that high to begin with.”

Still, motorists in Northeast Ohio are paying less than the national average of $3.55 a gallon for regular fuel. The reasons for the price difference were unclear to Lucas Engelhardt, assistant professor of economics at the Kent State University Stark Campus. However, Engelhardt said he has observed that fuel prices in Ohio seem to rise and fall more rapidly than in surrounding states.

“Why that is, I honestly have no idea. Our prices tend to move faster,” Engelhardt said.

While prices may have jumped due to an overreaction in the market, Engelhardt said he believes the uncertain political climate in the Middle East played a major role in the spike. Prices have been decreasing as the political situation has stabilized, according to Engelhardt.

“I think the higher prices reflected fears we had at the time about what supplies were going to look like. We were overly fearful,” Engelhardt said. “There was a lot of uncertainty, which can create speculation of what the supplies should look like.”

Engelhardt also said he isn't expecting a dramatic price spike over the final two months of the summer driving season, although a major storm could disrupt supplies and send prices upward.

“If we have a lot more hurricanes in oil production areas, I think that will have a bigger effect,” he said.

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News Headline: Want to be a star? Movie auditions Monday (Andrews) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Movie auditions for the film "Old Fashioned" are Sunday and Monday.

On Sunday, June 26, auditions will be held from noon - 6:00pm. On Monday, June 27, auditions will be held from 3:00 p.m. - 9:00pm. Both sessions will be at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas, located at 330 University Dr. NE in New Philadelphia.

The movie will be about a former frat boy and a free-spirited woman together attempt the impossible: an "old-fashioned" courtship in contemporary America.

"There is a lot of great natural acting talent that never gets the chance to shine," said Ohio native Rik Swartzwelder, the film's writer-director. "This is that chance. We're thrilled to give Ohio residents the opportunity to audition. There is an authenticity to the people here that just cannot be 'faked.' I'm very optimistic about what we may discover and fully expect to cast some roles as a result," added Swartzwelder, who now lives in Los Angeles but was actually raised in New Philadelphia and is a graduate of Tuscarawas Valley High School.

All ages and types are encouraged to apply and should have a current photo to bring to the audition. Previous acting experience is a plus, but not required. No appointment is necessary.

"We are pleased Rik Swartzwelder is considering our beautiful campus as a possible location for his movie 'Old Fashioned,'" said Dr. Gregg Andrews, dean and chief administrative officer of Kent State University at Tuscarawas. "Our new Performing Arts Center is a perfect venue for the casting call. The theatre stage will provide an excellent setting for auditions, plus the center has ample space for interviews and reception areas. The film company is also considering using the different areas of the campus for filming."

For interested locals that would like to be involved behind the camera or help with the production of "Old Fashioned" in other ways, official calls for crew, volunteers, and community partners are forthcoming. For more info, contact oldfashionedmovie@gmail.com or call 330-602-2420, ext. 220. For updates and links to the "Old Fashioned" Facebook page and film production blog, visit www.oldfashionedmovie.com .

Filming of "Old Fashioned" is expected to begin in late September and will wrap in early November. Limited pre-production activities, including location scouting and casting, are already under way.

A romantic-comedy, "Old Fashioned" centers on Clay Walsh, a former frat boy in his mid-30s, who gives up his reckless carousing and now runs an antique shop in a small Midwestern college town. There, he has become notorious for his lofty and out-dated theories on love and romance. When Amber Hewson, a free-spirited young woman with a gypsy soul, drifts into the area and rents the apartment above his shop, she finds herself surprisingly drawn to his noble ideas, which are new and intriguing to her. And Clay, though he tries to fight and deny it, simply cannot resist being attracted to her spontaneous and passionate embrace of life. Ultimately, Clay must step out from behind his relational theories and Amber must overcome her own fears and deep wounds as the two of them, together, attempt the impossible: an "old-fashioned" courtship in contemporary America.

Skoche Films of Burbank, California, the company producing "Swartzwelder is a writer-director-producer whose films have screened at over 145 film festivals worldwide and garnered over 50 major awards, including a Crystal Heart Award (Heartland Film Festival) and a Best Ohio Short Film Award (Cleveland International Film Festival) for his 35mm short "The Least of These" and the Student Emmy for his highly acclaimed graduate thesis film, "Paul McCall." Other honors include two CINE Golden Eagles plus one CINE Special Jury Award, four ITVA-DC Peer Awards, and the Sprint PCS Filmmaker of the Future Award.

His projects have found nationwide and international distribution via First Look Entertainment, Big Film Shorts, Comcast OnDemand, Frontier Airlines, and more. He has received press in numerous publications, including The Washington Post, The Guardian Unlimited (UK), Scripps Howard, The Desert Sun, Christianity Today, The Indianapolis Star and The Revealer. Swartzwelder earned his M.F.A. in Motion Picture Production from The Florida State University and is invited regularly to teach and speak on film, including engagements at the Damah Film Festival, La Sierra University, and Calvin College.

In 2008, Swartzwelder was invited by the Heartland Film Festival (Indianapolis) to lead the very first workshop offered ("The Craft of Film Directing") as part of their newly launched Heartland Truly Moving Pictures Institute.

In 2005, Swartzwelder joined legendary producer Ralph Winter ("X-MEN" series, "Fantastic Four") and TV writing/producing veteran Luke Schelhaas ("Law & Order", "Smallville", "Touched by an Angel") as part of an interactive panel for the 168 Hour Film Project in Los Angeles.

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News Headline: NORTHEAST OHIO GOVERNMENT COLLABORATIVE ACTIONS HIGHLIGHTED IN KENT STATE RESEARCH (Hoornbeek) | Email

News Date: 06/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, June 28 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy recently released a comprehensive inventory of nearly 250 collaborative projects that are actively happening or are being explored as ideas for possible implementation in Northeast Ohio. Today, the center is following up with the release of a collaborative action inventory of projects that are currently being implemented in Northeast Ohio. To view the research findings, visit www.kent.edu/intergovernmentalcollaboration.

"Local governments in our region are not just talking about collaboration - they are taking action," said John Hoornbeek, director of the Center for Public Administration and Public Policy at Kent State. "In fact 58 percent of the roughly 250 collaborations we have identified are being implemented."

Some of these joint projects are ambitious, such as the consolidation of health departments in Summit County or last week's announcement of a potential merger among the communities of Pepper Pike, Orange, Moreland Hills and Woodmere in Cuyahoga County. Other projects are more targeted.

"The common thread is that local governments in Northeast Ohio are talking with one another and are implementing joint projects to save money and improve services," Hoornbeek said. "The benefit of this inventory is that it can help local governments learn from one another and benefit from one another's progress."

In Trumbull County, Sheriff's Department Deputy Chief Ernest Cook began working on an innovative concept early last year regarding fuel purchasing.

"Ohio is part of the Midwest fuel market, Pennsylvania is part of the East Coast fuel market and West Virginia is part of the Gulf States fuel market," said David Rouan, director of administration for the Trumbull County Engineer's Office. "Since we are so uniquely positioned, Deputy Chief Cook found that a way for us to take advantage of these markets on a daily basis, and buy from the market that is the least expensive on any given day.

"On a daily basis, our vendor checks the prices of those three markets, and buys the fuel from the market that is the least expensive," Rouan explained. "So far without exception, that price has been less than what the state purchasing prices have been. If our vendor's prices aren't less than the state purchasing price, we can still use the state program. It's the best of both worlds."

Initially, the program was only available to Trumbull County, but because of provisions in the state law, county commissioners were able to open up the program to other interested entities, including the city of Youngstown.

"We've estimated that the county highway department will save about $17,000 annually with this program." Rouan said. "The savings range from a few pennies per gallon to sometimes 12 to 14 cents per gallon, and over a year's time that certainly adds up. The program has been a big success, it's saving dollars, it's innovative and it can be replicated in other areas."

For Tom Pascarella, director of administration for the city of Tallmadge, collaboration wasn't only a best practice; it was a way to protect the city from dire financial straits. The city is saving $500,000 annually by combining police and fire dispatch services with the city of Stow. Moving the city's building inspection process to Summit County and utilizing the services of the regional income tax agency have resulted in additional savings of approximately $220,000 annually.

Another innovative collaboration is in the process of being implemented in Tallmadge involves technology that has been making the news lately. For phone and data lines, the city is moving to the new cloud technology, which will result in savings of approximately $50,000 annually.

"We thought we would have two or three entities collaborating with us on the cloud, and it's now up to 17 communities," Pascarella said.

"These four initiatives are saving us more than $800,000,"Pascarella said. "This is significant, as our local income tax collections are down about $1 million because of the recession, so these efforts really helped us get through the financial crisis. Without these cost savings, we would be in severe financial condition."

Pascarella, who received a Ph.D. from Kent State in 1980, now teaches courses in public administration at the university.

"Through John Hoornbeek and the Kent State's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy, I have been introduced to a number of government officials throughout Northeast Ohio, including folks from Warren, Youngstown, Cleveland, Canton and Sandusky," Pascarella said. "It really helps to set a sense of how others are addressing these problems. The center has become a really valuable resource for me. It's been a godsend."

The findings released today were supported by the Fund for Our Economic Future and the Knight Foundation through its Civic Commons Initiative.

For more information on Kent State's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy, call 330-672-7148. To view the research findings, visit www.kent.edu/intergovernmentalcollaboration. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Now's the Time to Enjoy the Cuyahoga | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Low water, slow current and warm temperatures make summer ideal for using the river

I stepped out of my kayak into thigh-deep, rushing water and couldn't help but smile.

The kayak was a loaner from Kent State's Crooked River Adventures. The river was the Cuyahoga. And my Patch friends and I had accidentally paddled past the take-out point at Brust Park for our trip from Kent to Munroe Falls.

Despite the shallow river, the current was too much for us to paddle against, and we all had to get out of our boats. Still, we were all smiling.

If you haven't taken a trip with Crooked River Adventures, now's the time. Green, lush scenery crowds the wide river's banks on the 4.5-mile trip south from John Brown Tannery Park along Middlebury Road and on to Munroe Falls.

I've enjoyed the trip offered by Camp Hi Canoe Livery in Hiram on the upper Cuyahoga many times, but this past weekend was the first time I took the trip south from Kent. Unlike the upper river trip, there are fewer turns, the water is shallower and the river is much wider. You encounter fewer residential properties — and possibly more blue herons — and are largely isolated during the trip, except as you follow the city's hike and bike path early on along Fred Fuller Park. You will see quite a few planes take off from the Kent State Airport.

Crooked River Adventures, now in their second year operating the livery, has already had as many visitors this year as it did all of last year — more than 2,300 canoe and kayak trips.

The livery offers two different trips scheduled several times a day on Saturday and Sunday. Reservations are available for weekday trips. And they offer either canoes or kayaks and teach you the basics to handle both.

Our trip, the shorter trip, can be finished in less than two hours. I'm told the extra two miles to Water Works Park in Cuyahoga Falls is worth it.

This year there's been a number of near-drownings and accidents where people found themselves in trouble in the river. Most of those took place earlier this year when the water level was higher and the current much faster.

Still, even in the summer months, the river is an awesome thing to behold — and respect. Even at low-water, I found the current was tough to walk against in knee-high water. So if you want a safe way to experience the beauty of the river, check out Crooked River Adventures and take an adventure of your own on the Cuyahoga.

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News Headline: Video: Crooked River Offers Safe Options for Enjoying the Cuyahoga (Hendricks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent and Kent State's canoe and kayak livery offers tips for safely enjoying the Cuyahoga River

Please click on link for video:
http://kent.patch.com/articles/video-crooked-river-offers-safe-options-for-enjoying-the-cuyahoga#video-6777724

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News Headline: Business activity picks up in northeast Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Legal News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SHERRY KARABIN
Legal News Reporter
Published: June 23, 2011

Recent news reports indicate that the nation is still fighting to recover from the downturn, with national unemployment rates climbing slightly. In Ohio, however, the news has been a bit brighter, with the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services releasing numbers that show an average unemployment rate of 8.4 percent in April compared to 9 percent nationally.

Although the Ohio figures did not take into account seasonal factors, there was still a decrease in unemployment in all but one of the state's 88 counties. The rates proved to be even better news in Portage County, where unemployment was down to 8.2 percent in April from 9.2 percent in March 2011, and 10.1 percent in April 2010.

Secretary of State Jon Husted also released findings showing that new business filings had increased slightly as well, with 7,737 new entities filing in April 2011, compared to 7,258 in April 2010.

Since January, the Secretary of State's office has assisted with 30,172 new business filings, up from 27,950 during the same period of 2010.

“Business creation is a positive indicator of current and future job creation,” said Husted. “The growth in these business startup numbers is a positive trend for Ohio.”

“This is the first time we have released these filings,” said Matt McClellan, press secretary for Husted. “These numbers include for-profit, nonprofit and professional corporations, limited liability companies, partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships and also business name registration. We are hoping to start releasing these numbers on a monthly basis.”

McClellan stressed, however, that just because the papers have been filed, there is no guarantee that the companies will actually open up, be profitable or create jobs.

Diane Fierle, executive assistant at the Portage Development Board, said she has not seen a lot of new business filings, adding, however, “my office doesn't usually see all those.” She said things are picking up, especially in the manufacturing sector.

“I am seeing a lot more leads coming in from the Ohio Department of Development and Team NEO, with companies looking for buildings or land to build on,” said Fierle. “I do enterprise zone reports for Portage County, and several of the businesses have had an increase in employment.

“It's all over the place from small and large industries expanding to Northeast Ohio Medical University breaking ground on a $42 million research and graduate education facility.”

In addition, she said Portland, Oregon-based Dacon Industries Co., opened a 20,000-square-foot rubber extrusion facility in Ravenna that will operate 24 hours a day, and is expected to create 10 jobs the first year.

“Things are looking hopeful. I'm seeing more activity in the past few months than I have in the last few years.”

Jeff Pritchard, director of planning, zoning and economic development in Streetsboro, said he has seen a lot of activity in his area, some involving companies relocating their facilities from other parts of the state.

For example, Best Buy is moving from Glenwillow to Streetsboro, where it is building a 368,060-square-foot warehouse facility at Interstate Commerce Park that will serve about a 200-mile radius and create more than 40 jobs.

In addition, Pritchard said an economic incentive agreement approved by the city council in April is bringing the global tire testing equipment company, Micro-Poise Measurement Systems LLC, to the area.

The company is moving its corporate headquarters, including manufacturing and research and development, into an existing building at 555 Mondial Pkwy. in the Interstate Commerce Center industrial park. Micro-Poise is transferring 150 existing jobs from its facility in Akron and will create 50 new full-time positions within the next three years.

Automated Packaging Systems has also acquired two commercial buildings, one on Mondial Parkway and another on Philipp Parkway, near the company's corporate headquarters. The estimated $47 million investment is expected to add about 85 jobs in the next three years and possibly up to 250 over the next 10 years.

Pritchard said The Kaelin Corp. (dba Laser Expedited Transportation) is locating at 1790 Miller Pkwy., and he expects that will create about 45 jobs.

“We're doing pretty well,” said Pritchard. “We fared the downturn well in comparison to other municipalities since we did not have to lay people off, and we are fortunate to have some new and large-sized buildings as well as old industrial properties that are attracting companies to the area.

“Our geographic location is helpful, since we are near I-480 and the turnpike so we are accessible to many areas,” said Pritchard.

There is also a lot activity in the city of Kent, including the $80 million downtown revitalization project that will include a hotel and conference center, two corporate headquarters (Davey Tree Resource Group and AMETEK), restaurants, retail and the Kent Central Gateway Multimodal Transit Facility that will have over 300 parking spaces.

The public/private partnership with the city includes lead developer, Fairmount Properties, Kent State University, the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority and Columbus-based Pizzuti Solutions.

The complex will go up between South Water Street, Erie Street, South Depeyster Street and Haymaker Parkway, connecting with existing downtown streets and businesses. It's expected to be finished by late 2012.

“When the revitalization is completed it will create 500 to 600 permanent jobs,” said Daniel Smith, economic development director for the city of Kent. “It will also create 300 to 400 construction jobs as it is being built.”

As an outgrowth of this project, a 35-foot-wide pedestrian esplanade will connect the new condominiums, galleries and shops that are being constructed in the central business district to the western edge of Kent State University's campus.

The downtown project is not the only source of activity. Developer Ron Burbick's Phoenix Project and Acorn Alley have also done a lot to change the face of Kent and create jobs.

The first two phases of the large-scale development focused on revitalizing East Main Street, while the third part created a small shopping promenade perpendicular to South Main Street, directly across the street from the landmark Kent Stage Theater.

“The Phoenix project offers smaller unique retail, restaurant and boutique shops that will help rejuvenate the business climate. There is a women's apparel store, a sushi restaurant, toy shop, jewelry shop, dry cleaner, ice cream parlor, and more,” said Smith.

Acorn Alley also includes office space, which is being offered to businesses and organizations that serve the greater Kent region. Several nonprofits including the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce, Main Street Kent, Leadership Portage County, Kent State University Tannery and The Portage Foundation are part of the complex.

“The skyline in Kent will change more over the next 20 months than it has in the last four decades,” said Smith.

“We have been lucky because our genuine college town has been more resistant to the recession than other places. We did not experience the reduction in municipal taxes that some of our neighbors did in the northeast and we appear to be recovering quicker because of the university and the business innovation that has emerged from it, creating investment.”

Portage County is not the only place to witness an uptick in business activity. Walter Good, vice president of economic development, business retention and expansion at the Youngstown/Warren Regional Chamber said he is seeing significant activity in the manufacturing sector.

"We're seeing the order books of many companies picking up," said Good, "and this is a good sign."

While the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services is reporting a 9.4 percent unemployment rate for the county in April (not seasonally adjusted), the number is down significantly from April 2010 when the figure was 11.4 percent, and it is also an improvement from March 2011, when unemployment was 10.2 percent.

Good attributes some of the change to the Marcellus and Utica Shale Natural Gas Extraction.

"It is a big driver for companies that produce products for exploration. Locally, V & M STAR is building a 1.1 million-square-foot manufacturing facility to produce pipe for what could be the world's largest natural gas deposit and we are sitting right on top of it."

V & M STAR already employs about 500 people at its tube-making plant on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in Youngstown. The new state-of-the-art pipe mill project is being constructed near that facility and is expected to create another 350 jobs, and provide another 1,700 or more indirect positions.

“Since they already have an existing facility, they have begun hiring and training while the plant is being constructed,” said Good.

In February 2010, Ultra Premium Oilfield Services - TMK IPSCO, began leasing a factory in Brookfield Township to create a pipe threading operation that will employ 120 people. This 128,000-square-foot-plant also provides products for natural gas exploration.

Good said the General Motors Lordstown Complex has also invested $350 million, and added about 1,200 workers to produce its new, fuel-efficient car, the Chevy Cruze.

"There is a lot of money being generated by these new ventures and I believe people are cautiously optimistic,” said Good. “I do think that rising gas prices may be halting some of the discretionary spending that might otherwise have occurred.”

Good said Forbes magazine in May ranked the Youngstown/Warren metro area as the fifth fastest-growing industrial area in the U.S. in the magazine's latest “Best Cities for Jobs” survey.

"We're also seeing strength in the transportation-related sectors of our economy, and companies involved in renewable energy products are doing well. The technology sector is also showing resilience.

"There is no question that our area was badly impacted by the downturn. Between mid-2008 and late 2008, manufacturing was hit very hard. Companies that had never laid people off before were doing so. Many are now coming back and ramping up operations that will create jobs. Back then we felt that manufacturing would lead the area out of the recession, and that is what is happening," said Good.

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