Report Overview:
Total Clips (19)
Admissions (1)
College of Business (COB) (1)
Commencement (3)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Ashtabula (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Students; Town-Gown (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Tuition (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Admissions (1)
KSU's campuses register nearly 900-student gain (Lefton) 06/29/2011 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

Kent State University announced June 27 that enrollment for summer 2011 is up 6.57 percent across its eight-campus system. The university...


College of Business (COB) (1)
In The Community 06/29/2011 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...Heisler as secretary/treasurer. Barry is president of Delta Systems Inc. in Streetsboro, and Heisler is dean of the College of Business Administration at Kent State University. The board OK'd the organization's first strategic plan framework with a vision statement -- "Portage County is a preferred...


Commencement (3)
Kent State University modifies commencement policy (Taylor) 06/30/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State to enforce rules on graduation - LIMITATION ON GUESTS FOR CEREMONIES SET 06/30/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State introduces graduation ticketing system after coming up hundreds of seats short (Frank) 06/30/2011 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Pediatricians: Get junk-food ads off TV (Collins) 06/29/2011 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

...more (healthy ads) for children to view," Loper said. Although many health experts agree with the academy, Fran Collins, associate professor in the Kent State University School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said it is up to parents to regulate their children's eating habits. "How...


KSU at Ashtabula (1)
Health care providers make requests for ARC money 06/29/2011 Star-Beacon Text Email

...Medical centers applied for $189,729 toward a $271,042 project to provide simulcast capabilities between the hospitals and teaching centers, including Kent State University-Ashtabula. Students would be able to watch surgeries as they are performed and also connect to the hospitals for nonsurgical...


KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
GIVING IT A TRY 06/30/2011 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email

Cameron Beverly, 8, of Negley, tried out a vegetable pizza the kids created during a College For Kids session on Wednesday. The event is sponsored by Kent State University - East Liverpool and Salem Workforce Development and Continuing Studies and is being held all week at both East Liverpool...


KSU at Stark (1)
Hey freshmen: Plenty of room at Kent Stark (Southards) 06/30/2011 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Windows may be closed, but doors of opportunity still are wide open. For potential Kent State University freshmen looking to get a semester of college under their belts this fall, that most likely is the case. Although they...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Summer Stock takes 'Peter Rabbit' on road 06/29/2011 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

Tribune Chronicle , Tribune Chronicle | TribToday.com Kent State University at Trumbull's Summer Stock 34 will be hopping all over Trumbull and Portage counties in July. This year's traveling...


Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
KENT STATE PROFESSORS CREATED AT BOOGIE BOARD. 06/30/2011 Good Morning Cleveland - WEWS-TV Text Email

A LOCAL COMPANY RECEIVED $7 MILLION TO INCREASE PRODUCTION OF A NEW PRODUCT LINE AND IT'S BRINGING 40 NEW JOBS TO KENT. KENT STATE PROFESSORS CREATED AT BOOGIE BOARD. IT'S A TABLET. AND IT TELLS FOR 40 TO $60.

Energy Company Turns to Geometry to Reduce Gas-Drilling Mishaps (Palffy-Muhoray) 06/29/2011 IndustryWeek - Online Text Attachment Email

...activities? That's the plan for natural gas producer Chesapeake Energy Corp. The company has begun implementing a geometric code solved by researchers at Kent State University in Ohio to lessen the likelihood of such accidents. Kent State Liquid Crystal Institute professor of chemical...


Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
Kent Displays gets $7 million in funding, to add 40 jobs 06/30/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Death of a small business owner: It's not the time to develop a succession plan (Cooper) 06/30/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...you can do something better with fresh new modern ideas." Chris Cooper, a program coordinator with the Small Business Succession Planning Program at Kent State University, said only about 30 percent of all family-owned businesses make it to the second generation. And when it comes to an unexpected...


Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Collaborations Expand Beyond Trumbull (Hoornbeek) 06/30/2011 Business Journal, The Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- A collaborative project initially open only to Trumbull County government has expanded to include a wider region of northeast Ohio. Kent State University's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy has released a collaborative action inventory of projects that are...


Students; Town-Gown (1)
Memorial at KSU for slain Kent soldier is painted over 06/30/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Theatre and Dance (1)
'Chicago' sizzles at Porthouse Theater (Kent) 06/30/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Tuition (1)
Tuition May Rise at Kent State Following Budget Vote (Vincent) 06/30/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


University Press (1)
A modern view of country doctors 06/29/2011 Star Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...said, "and it was all because of this donkey." The book, which came out last fall, is the 18th in a series on "Literature and Medicine" published by Kent State University Press. Zink proudly notes that it's now in its second printing, and she's already at work on several other books, including...


News Headline: KSU's campuses register nearly 900-student gain (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University announced June 27 that enrollment for summer 2011 is up 6.57 percent across its eight-campus system.

The university reports 14,467 students were enrolled in its two summer sessions, compared to 13,575 for summer 2010, for a net increase of 892 students.

The largest percentage increase was at East Liverpool, which saw a 44.2 percent jump (483 students enrolled for summer 2011 compared to 335 in 2010).

Trumbull and Geauga also measured significant increases of 37.6 percent and 15.9 percent, respectively. Summer enrollment at the main campus is 8,484 students, an increase of 4.8 percent, or 394 students, from the prior summer.

"More and more people are recognizing the great educational quality and value of a Kent State education," said Kent State President Lester A. Lefton.

"This past year, we have grown to become the second largest public university in the state of Ohio.

"We have increased our enrollment again this summer, and Kent State will continue growing into the fall as we're expecting to welcome our largest freshman class at the Kent campus in our university's history.

"This is wonderful news for Kent State, our students, our employees and our communities that we serve."

Kent State University's eight campuses are in Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Kent, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas.

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News Headline: In The Community | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: McGill a member of the

new development board

Aurora Mayor Lynn McGill is a member of the newly formed 32-member Portage Development Board.

The board recently conducted its first annual meeting and elected Stephen Colecchi, president of Robinson Memorial Hospital, as chairman, Lissa Barry as vice chairman and Yank Heisler as secretary/treasurer.

Barry is president of Delta Systems Inc. in Streetsboro, and Heisler is dean of the College of Business Administration at Kent State University.

The board OK'd the organization's first strategic plan framework with a vision statement -- "Portage County is a preferred business location in Northeast Ohio" -- a mission statement and statement of core values.

Through an agreement with the Portage County commissioners, the board has agreed to take on all economic development activities for the county.

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News Headline: Kent State University modifies commencement policy (Taylor) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Kent State has revamped its commencement policy to help ensure that all graduating seniors and their supporters will be able to watch the ceremony in person.

Officials hope to prevent a repeat of a graduation in May, when so many people showed up that 73 graduates and about 510 family members had to watch the ceremony via closed circuit TVs hastily set up elsewhere on campus.

“Due to high retention rates and increased ceremony attendance, the Commencement Office is making improvements to current policies,” the provost's office announced on the graduation website last week. “It is our goal to provide a positive, memorable graduation experience.”

The new policy requires graduating students to RSVP if they will attend graduation and limits the number of guests for each graduate to six.

Beginning today, students who will graduate Aug. 11 and 13 must RSVP online by July 11 to get their tickets. Those who don't RSVP won't get tickets and won't be able to take part if they show up at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center at the last minute.

Before, the university asked students to limit the number of guests to six, but it didn't issue tickets or monitor the number of people who showed up. While the university did ask students to RSVP, it allowed those who didn't to cross the stage anyway.

Based one the RSVPs and other criteria, the university estimated that 700 to 725 students would show up for the third ceremony of the May graduation. However , 831 students showed up, and more students meant more guests.

KSU also is now coordinating the number of RSVPs with the number of caps and gowns ordered at the campus book store — something else it didn't do in the past.

KSU events manager Lashonda Taylor said she is optimistic about the new system: “It will give us an actual count of students who are participating.”

KSU tried to take the sting out of the mishap by providing free DVDs and graduation photos to students who watched the ceremony by closed-circuit TV. Taylor said KSU spent about $1,200 on the photos and created the DVD's in-house.

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News Headline: Kent State to enforce rules on graduation - LIMITATION ON GUESTS FOR CEREMONIES SET | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Starting in August, students can no longer attend graduation ceremonies at Kent State University if they forget to RSVP on time, and the will be limited to six guests using a ticket system.

The provost's office updated the commencement website last week about the policy change, following weeks worth of discussions with the president's Cabinet on how to prevent attendance overflow during graduation ceremonies.

"It is our goal to provide a positive, memorable graduation experience and accommodate every graduate and their special guests in the Ceremony Hall," said a statement on the provos'st office website.

During the May commencements, 73 students lost their seats at an evening graduation ceremony and more than 500 people were relocated from the MAC Center to the Kiva and the Kent Student Center Ballroom. The displaced guests watched the ceremony on a projection screen instead of in person.

It was later reported that 106 of the 831 students who attended the ceremony didn't fill out the RSVP form. Additionally, there was no enforcement of how many guests per student were permitted to attend; although students were encouraged to invite no more than six guests.

The new RSVP form will open for seniors who plan to attend the Aug. 11 and Aug. 13 graduation ceremonies. Grad Fair, happening 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the student center, will serve to remind students to fill out the form.

"This is the best opportunity to start new changes," said Lashonda Taylor, event manager for academic affairs. It is important university officials know how many students and guests plan to attend, she added.

Students will have until July 11 to fill out the form. An RSVP reminder will be emailed before the deadline.

Students who complete the form will be e-mailed six bar-coded tickets, Taylor said. Likewise, parents and family members will receive informative letters about the guest size limit.

"We are going out of our way to inform students about the RSVP process," Taylor said.

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News Headline: Kent State introduces graduation ticketing system after coming up hundreds of seats short (Frank) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio (AP) — Kent State University didn't have enough room for everyone at its spring commencement, so now the northeast Ohio school has announced a new graduation ticketing system.

The Akron Beacon Journal has reported that more than 70 students and some 500 relatives and friends had to watch the May 7 ceremony on closed-circuit television because seats ran out in the university's Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center. Kent State Provost Robert Frank said the university underestimated the numbers of students and guests who would attend.

A new policy posted on the school's website says graduating students will now be eligible for up to six commencement ceremony tickets and will have to fill out an online RSVP form to receive them.

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News Headline: Pediatricians: Get junk-food ads off TV (Collins) | Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name: Stuckey, Alex
News OCR Text: As childhood-obesity rates continue to climb, the American Academy of Pediatrics is calling on the federal government to keep junk-food ads off TV when children are likely to be watching.

Studies have found that such advertising contributes to childhood obesity because it inspires young children to beg their parents to buy unhealthy foods, the academy said in a statement this week.

The country's childhood-obesity rate has more than tripled -- to 17 percent of children -- during the past 30 years, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dr. Judy Loper, director of the Central Ohio Nutrition Center, agrees that commercials influence the foods children choose.

"There is a lot of pressure on parents to buy the products when kids see (junk-food ads)," Loper said.

A 2009 study of 50,000 TV ads from 2003 to 2004 found that 98 percent of food ads viewed by children ages 2 to 11 and 90 percent of food ads viewed by teenagers were for products containing high fat, sugar and sodium levels, the academy said. Another study found that children ate 45 percent more snacks when exposed to food advertisements.

For these reasons, the academy is asking Congress, the Federal Trade Commission and the Federal Communications Commission to ban junk-food and fast-food advertising during children's programs, as well as prohibit interactive advertising involving junk food or fast food to children via digital TV, cell phones and other media.

It also is asking pediatricians to teach parents and children about healthful eating and encourage parents to limit media viewing to 2 hours a day instead of the current 7-hour-a day average.

"Children are bombarded (with junk-food ads), and there should be more (healthy ads) for children to view," Loper said.

Although many health experts agree with the academy, Fran Collins, associate professor in the Kent State University School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said it is up to parents to regulate their children's eating habits.

"How many 7-year-olds can hop in a car and drive to McDonald's? At what point do their parents step in?" Collins said.

Marketing simply tells viewers a product exists; it doesn't force anyone to buy or eat certain foods, she added.

Dr. Pat McKnight, state policy chairwoman of the Ohio Dietetic Association, said more needs to be done to alleviate the obesity epidemic.

"Obviously the parents need help," said McKnight, who also is an assistant professor of nutrition at the Mount Carmel College of Nursing.

"Banning junk-food advertisements is a step in the right direction to lowering the obesity rate."

astuckey@dispatch.com

Copyright © 2011 THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH and may not be republished without permission.

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News Headline: Health care providers make requests for ARC money | Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Star-Beacon
Contact Name: Feather, Carl E.
News OCR Text: June 29--JEFFERSON -- Commissioners met Tuesday to review four local projects that need Appalachian Regional Commission dollars to bring them to fruition.

The commissioners review the applications and prioritize them based on their economic impact and job-creation potential. The final decision is made by the commission, a federal-state partnership that works with communities in Appalachia to create opportunities for economic development and improve the region's citizens' quality of life.

Ashtabula County, along with Trumbull and Mahoning counties, was added to the ARC region three years ago. This year, the county's status dropped from "transitional" to "at risk," which reduces the required local match for grants, from 50 percent to 25 percent.

The area's three counties receive about $700,000 annually through the commission to share. Applications, after review by the Eastgate Council of Governments, are forwarded to the Governor's Office of Appalachia. Awards will be made later this year.

The four projects presented to the commissioners Tuesday are:

n Ashtabula County Medical Center, $6,000 of a $148,000 project to help junior and senior high school students in the county build a "healthy body for a lifetime."

Dennis Schmidt of ACMC presented the application to the board. He said the small amount of money requested from the commission would have a big impact on the health of county students. Schmidt said there has been a huge increase in diabetes and pulmonary health issues among county students and ACMC's program would address that by providing school districts with athletic trainers to work with students. The trainers would encourage a pro-active approach and early intervention, as well perform risk assessments. Students found to be in need of medical intervention would be referred.

"This enables young people who do have health-care issues to be forwarded to our health care system," Schmidt told commissioners.

In addition to hiring athletic trainers, the project would employ several students part time.

n UH Geneva and Conneaut Medical centers applied for $189,729 toward a $271,042 project to provide simulcast capabilities between the hospitals and teaching centers, including Kent State University-Ashtabula. Students would be able to watch surgeries as they are performed and also connect to the hospitals for nonsurgical teaching.

n KSUA requested $100,082 toward a $142,974 project to purchase three human simulators used to train health-care professionals. The campus already has a stationary simulator used in the nursing program, but KSUA representative Carol Drennen said the college wants to purchase mobile simulators that could be placed in an ambulance and taken to learning points across the county. Adult, pediatric and infant simulators would be purchased. Community Care Ambulance has already donated $7,500 toward the project, and KSUA is providing $35,392. The university projects that the purchase would help create 75 new nursing jobs in the county and retain 75 jobs.

n Glenbeigh requested $38,483 toward a $54,976 flow equalization system for its wastewater treatment plant.

Pat Weston-Hall, Glenbeigh's chief executive officer, said the Rock Creek facility's system is operating near capacity and the limitation is impeding further expansion. If the project is approved, it would pave the way for adding a 16-bed extended-care section for men in 2013. Between seven and 10 jobs would be created. Glenbeigh presently employs 240 people. Weston-Hall said there is always a waiting list at the facility, and the area is underserved.

Commissioners reported their rankings to Eastgate after the meeting. Commissioner Peggy Carlo said an application for an access road in the Harpersfield Township Joint Economic Development District also is being considered under another section of the Regional Commission funding.

Copyright © 2011 Star Beacon, Ashtabula, Ohio

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News Headline: GIVING IT A TRY | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cameron Beverly, 8, of Negley, tried out a vegetable pizza the kids created during a College For Kids session on Wednesday. The event is sponsored by Kent State University - East Liverpool and Salem Workforce Development and Continuing Studies and is being held all week at both East Liverpool and Salem campuses. (Photo by Michael D. McElwain)

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News Headline: Hey freshmen: Plenty of room at Kent Stark (Southards) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name: Erin Pustay
News OCR Text: Windows may be closed, but doors of opportunity still are wide open. For potential Kent State University freshmen looking to get a semester of college under their belts this fall, that most likely is the case. Although they may not be able to schedule classes at Kent State University Kent Campus, there is plenty of room at the regional campuses. Last week, the KSU Kent Campus announced that, due to a significant increase in freshman applications, it could no longer accept first-year students. Kent State Stark, however, still is welcoming new students, taking applications and plugging freshmen into classes. The Stark County campus will continue to do so through August, according to Mary Southards, Kent State Stark assistant dean of enrollment management. Kent Stark is able to continue accommodating new students because it primarily is a commuter campus. ?When you take an application or say that a student has been accepted, the students and parents have every reason to anticipate that you will give them a schedule and, in the case of the Kent Campus, provide housing,? Southards said. ?We don?t have to worry about the housing piece because we are an all-commuter campus ? and that allows us to continue to accept freshmen applications through August.? STILL GROWING The Kent Stark campus has seen freshman applications increase this year, but Southards was quick to add that the campus has seen an increase in overall applications. In total, Kent Stark has seen a 10 percent increase in applications received this year over last year. A number of factors likely are contributing to application increase, according to Southards. Primarily, Southards believes that Kent State University is recognized for its academic excellence and attracts students from across the area and nation. The reputation Kent has established provides a solid foundation for all its campuses. When Kent?s reputation is combined with the affordability of a commuter campus such as Kent Stark, it creates the perfect atmosphere for growth, according to Southards. ?We are less expensive, and for a lot of families that is very, very key,? Southards said. Although the Stark Campus has yet to realize the impact of the Kent Campus? decision to discontinue accepting applications for the fall semester, Southards noted that Kent Stark will take an active role in reaching out to local students who may have sought to attend classes in Kent. ?We will work with individuals,? Southards said, ?to be sure they can get that semester of college under their belts and they won?t skip a beat or fall behind.? MAXIMIZING SPACE Kent Stark is designed to be a small and cozy campus, but there still is plenty of room for growth. Southards noted that the school does everything it can to ensure meets every need of the Stark County community. ?We maximize our classroom space and make sure we are using all available scheduling periods,? Southards said. ?A lot of (campuses) don?t like to schedule Friday classes, but use Friday schedules and we use Saturday schedules.? In recent years, Kent Stark also has increased the number of online courses offered to its students, allowing them to continue their education by completing all course work off-campus. Doing so, she said, is just another way to make the best use of the space they have on the small community campus. ?It?s not always how much space you have,? Southards said, ?it?s what you do with it that matters.?

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News Headline: Summer Stock takes 'Peter Rabbit' on road | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tribune Chronicle , Tribune Chronicle | TribToday.com

Kent State University at Trumbull's Summer Stock 34 will be hopping all over Trumbull and Portage counties in July.

This year's traveling production, ''Miss Beatrix Potter Presents Mr. Peter Rabbit,'' will be staged at 13 area libraries.

Youngstown playwright Patricia M. Fagan adapted Potter's children's tales about mischievous Peter Rabbit and his adventures in the McGregor's garden.

Jenny Bitner and Michelle Maple are directing the show, and each role is quadruple cast to accommodate the busy touring schedule.

The cast pool features Haley Heckathorn, Rachel McFall, Gracie Merkel, Lexa Miller, Miranda Bachman, Alex Hayford, Cassidy Kovell, Kaile Snyder, Lauren Walls, Katrina Bachman, Josh McFall, Amber Palmer, Stephen Patrick, Leah Bitner, Maggie Bork, Destiny Gibbons, Gabby Whitmore, Jonathan Bahrey, Amy Bowman, Katie Fultz, Alexandria Gaskell, Alyssa Bowman, Aubre Cheesbro, Cassidy Kovell and Kyle Rhine.

Here is the July tour schedule:

l Tuesday - Pierce-Streetsboro Library at 1:30 p.m.

l Wednesday - Randolph Library at 10 a.m.

l Wednesday - Newton Falls Library at 2 p.m.

l July 8 - Girard Library at 11 a.m.

l July 11 - Garrettsville Library at 1 p.m.

l July 12 - Windham Library at 1 p.m.

l July 13 - Howland Library at 2 p.m.

l July 19 - Liberty Library at 2 p.m.

l July 20 - Brookfield Library at 2 p.m.

l July 21 - Cortland Library at 2 p.m.

l July 25 - Lordstown Library at 1:30 p.m.

l July 26 - Warren Library at 1 p.m.

l July 29 - Kinsman Library at 11 a.m.

For more information, call 330-675-8887.

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News Headline: KENT STATE PROFESSORS CREATED AT BOOGIE BOARD. | Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Good Morning Cleveland - WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A LOCAL COMPANY RECEIVED $7 MILLION TO INCREASE PRODUCTION OF A NEW PRODUCT LINE AND IT'S BRINGING 40 NEW JOBS TO KENT. KENT STATE PROFESSORS CREATED AT BOOGIE BOARD. IT'S A TABLET. AND IT TELLS FOR 40 TO $60.

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News Headline: Energy Company Turns to Geometry to Reduce Gas-Drilling Mishaps (Palffy-Muhoray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: IndustryWeek - Online
Contact Name: Jonathan Katz
News OCR Text: Chesapeake Energy taps university researchers to create code for drilling-management program.

Could the discovery of a geometric code solved by university researchers help the oil and gas industry reduce collisions during horizontal drilling activities?

That's the plan for natural gas producer Chesapeake Energy Corp. The company has begun implementing a geometric code solved by researchers at Kent State University in Ohio to lessen the likelihood of such accidents.

Kent State Liquid Crystal Institute professor of chemical physics Peter Palffy-Muhoray and assistant math professor Xiaoyu Zheng first calculated how close two ellipses can come together without touching in 2006, Palffy-Muhoray says. The findings were published in an academic journal in 2009 and later online.

The results eventually attracted the attention of David Baker, a senior geologist and chief technology adviser with natural gas producer Chesapeake Energy Corp. Baker thought the code could help the company avoid potential collisions during the drilling process.

"The reason why this was big interest to Chesapeake is because they drill a horizontal gas well, and they need to control the direction of where the drill bit goes," Palffy-Muhoray says. "When you do that you only know approximately where the head is of the drilling unit. And it turns out that this approximate region is an ellipsoid."

Oklahoma City-based Chesapeake often drills horizontal wells very close to each other from a single drill pad for various strategic reasons, including resource conservation and environmental protection, Baker says.

If the two wells were to collide while drilling, the economic impact could be significant. Chesapeake invests upwards of $5 million per horizontal well, Baker says.

With Zheng's assistance, Chesapeake modified the code for its own purposes, Palffy-Muhoray says.

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News Headline: Kent Displays gets $7 million in funding, to add 40 jobs | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Kent Displays, a company founded by Kent State University professors, has received $7 million in financing to increase production of its Boogie Board product line.

With $2 million in state loans, a line of credit and private loans, Kent plans to add a second assembly line to its Kent plant to make the boards, adding 40 new jobs.

The Boogie Board is a modern equivalent to the old-fashioned chalk slate - a device that allows users to write and quickly erase messages on a screen the size of a sheet of paper. Company spokesman Kevin Oswald said orders for the boards have forced the plant to run three shifts a day for much of the year.

He added that he expects orders to increase this fall when the company adds a version of the board that can save images for later use.

"[The expansion] will allow us to meet worldwide demand for the Boogie Board tablets for the foreseeable future," Oswald said.

Sales of multimedia tablets, such as Apples iPad or Motorola's Xoom, have boomed this year, but Oswald said Kent's product doesn't compete with those. Boogie Boards cost $40-$60, depending on size, and are meant as a replacement for notepads and paper, not computers.

Still, the strong sales of tablet computers has drawn attention to the company, he said.

"We've certainly had a wide range of conversations with consumer electronics companies around the world" that are considering adopting Kent's technologies for use in more devices, he said.

People interested in applying for the jobs at Kent Displays can go to the company's website at www.kentdisplays.com/company/jobs.html or to Monster.com where it posts most openings, Oswald said.

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News Headline: Death of a small business owner: It's not the time to develop a succession plan (Cooper) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Marcia Pledger, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: So Haddad, a criminal prosecutor in Lima, Ohio, and Maalouf, a Cleveland elementary school teacher, took over the 23-year-old plant, filling orders that included government defense work. Maalouf took a sabbatical from teaching to run the small plant, while Haddad worked there two days a week, holding on to her legal career in hopes of someday becoming a judge.

"We brought the company into the 21st century," Haddad said, by adding technology to a company that had no computers, no employee handbooks and still processed checks by hand.

Like Ray Haddad, many small-business owners have made no plans or chosen their successor, something succession specialists say could destroy a company or tear apart families.

In fact, fewer than 30 percent of small-business owners even have a succession plan, said Bob Nemeth with the consulting firm Apple Growth Partners in Independence.

"These are busy folks. They spend a lot of time working to grow the business, but they don't put sufficient time into putting together a plan to exit the business," said Nemeth, who operates Apple Growth's regional CPA and its business succession planning team.

Nemeth said a good plan takes five to seven years because it takes time to develop a management team and to place a value on the business. Working with a professional adviser can help to increase the company's value, he said.

"By starting early you give yourself more options whether it's going to be a family member who takes over, employees or an outright sale," he said.

Tina Haddad still wishes she had tried harder to broach the subject of a succession plan with her father, especially after she said she spent several years fighting off uncles for control of the business. By that time she had given up her legal aspirations and took control of the business after buying her sister's share a few years later.

"I'm Lebanese. In our culture you don't talk about death and dying," said the former prosecutor, who took the company from three employees to 24 and tripled the sales.

"In my humble opinion, a lot of children are always afraid to broach the topic with their parents. We don't want them to think that they have outlived their usefulness or that you can do something better with fresh new modern ideas."

Chris Cooper, a program coordinator with the Small Business Succession Planning Program at Kent State University, said only about 30 percent of all family-owned businesses make it to the second generation. And when it comes to an unexpected death in the family, that figure is even smaller for businesses with fewer than 20 employees.

"The majority of businesses wouldn't survive that situation [the Haddads']," he said. "Most would have closed."

Dealing with an unexpected death was a brutal wake-up call for Nancy Davis, owner of Taylor Rental in Broadview Heights, when she lost her husband to a brain aneurysm in 2002.

At first, she didn't want the company that rents everything from construction equipment to party tents and accessories. But she couldn't make an immediate decision to sell it or try to run it herself.

"He ran three miles a day and we'd only been married two and a half years," she said. "I couldn't decide what color socks to wear in the morning, let alone whether or not I should sell my business."

In the next three years, Davis continued her career working as the Brecksville-Broadview Heights school district's food service director. Meanwhile the business suffered as she went through three different store managers and personal savings. Finally she decided to run it herself.

"Even if it's a very successful business, it can become a liability very quickly," she said. "In my case, I was fortunate that I had opportunities that helped me be able to run a business. Instead of purchasing components to put together a meal, now I'm purchasing tools and parts for various types of equipment."

After her experiences, Davis has had frank conversations with her two children about what to do with the business should something happen to her. She learned that neither of them wants to run it, and she's identified a couple of family members who she believes could either run it or sell it.

"The best advice I can give is have an evaluation done immediately," she said. "Then it's really best to sell it if you have no interest in it. You have to know your strengths and limitations."

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News Headline: Collaborations Expand Beyond Trumbull (Hoornbeek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Business Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- A collaborative project initially open only to Trumbull County government has expanded to include a wider region of northeast Ohio. Kent State University's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy has released a collaborative action inventory of projects that are being implemented or explored for the future.

"Local governments in our region are not just talking about collaboration -- they are taking action," said John Hoornbeek, director of the Center for Public Administration and Public Policy at Kent State. "In fact 58% of the roughly 250 collaborations we have identified are being implemented."

Initially, the program was only available to Trumbull County, but because of provisions in the state law, county commissioners were able to open up the program to other interested entities, including the city of Youngstown, Hoornbeek noted.

Some of these joint projects are ambitious, such as the consolidation of health departments in Summit County or last week's announcement of a potential merger among the communities of Pepper Pike, Orange, Moreland Hills and Woodmere in Cuyahoga County. Other projects are more targeted. "The common thread is that local governments in northeast Ohio are talking with one another and are implementing joint projects to save money and improve services," Hoornbeek said.

In Trumbull County, for instance, Sheriff's Deputy Chief Ernest Cook began working on an innovative concept early last year regarding fuel purchasing.

"Ohio is part of the Midwest fuel market, Pennsylvania is part of the East Coast fuel market and West Virginia is part of the Gulf States fuel market," said David Rouan, director of administration for the Trumbull County Engineer's Office. "Since we are so uniquely positioned, Deputy Chief Cook found a way for us to take advantage of these markets on a daily basis, and buy from the market that is the least expensive on any given day.

"On a daily basis, our vendor checks the prices of those three markets, and buys the fuel from the market that is the least expensive," Rouan continued. "We've estimated that the county highway department will save about $17,000 annually with this program. The savings range from a few pennies per gallon to sometimes 12 to 14 cents per gallon, and over a year's time that certainly adds up. The program has been a big success, it's saving dollars, it's innovative and it can be replicated in other areas."

For Tom Pascarella, director of administration for the city of Tallmadge, collaboration wasn't only a best practice; it was a way to protect the city from dire financial straits. The city is saving $500,000 annually by combining police and fire dispatch services with the city of Stow. Moving the city's building inspection process to Summit County and utilizing the services of the regional income tax agency have resulted in additional savings of approximately $220,000 annually.

Another collaboration in the process of being implemented in Tallmadge involves phone and data lines. The city is moving to the new cloud technology, which will result in savings of approximately $50,000 annually.

"We thought we would have two or three entities collaborating with us on the cloud, and it's now up to 17 communities," Pascarella said. "These four initiatives are saving us more than $800,000. This is significant, as our local income tax collections are down about $1 million because of the recession,. Without these cost savings, we would be in severe financial condition."

Published by The Business Journal, Youngstown, Ohio.

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News Headline: Memorial at KSU for slain Kent soldier is painted over | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The memorial to slain Army
Spc. Adam Hamilton of Kent
on the rock at Kent State University
was painted over between
Tuesday evening and
Wednesday morning.
The rock, which previously
had an American flag and a
military emblem painted on it,
was repainted with the words,
“Fear the Roo! AKORN.”
It is unknown whether students
from The University of
Akron were actually responsible
for the repainting.
Marvin Logan, a freshman
pre-human development
family studies major, said he
heard about what had happened
to the rock, so he and
a group of students decided
to spray paint over the new
graffiti on Wednesday.
Nathan Lehota, president
of the Kent State University
Veterans Club, said he went
to the rock Wednesday afternoon
to collect the candles,
wreath and flags that were
placed around the memorial,
but the signboard next to the
rock with Hamilton's photo
had already been removed.
“It was very disrespectful
and probably hurtful to the
family,” Lehota said.
Hamilton, a Kent native
and 2007 graduate of Theodore
Roosevelt High School,
was killed in action on May 28
in Afghanistan. The memorial
was erected shortly after
his death.

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News Headline: 'Chicago' sizzles at Porthouse Theater (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Terri Kent, Porthouse Theatre's
artistic director and the director
for the theater's season opening
show “Chicago” said in her June
19 remarks to the audience before
the show that the actors were going
to set the stage on fire.
After watching the show, I have
to say that indeed, Porthouse may
want to invest in a few extra fire
extinguishers for the remaining
run of this show. Just in case.
From the first jazzy notes on the
trumpet to the finale, this “Chicago”
sizzles.
The musical, set in the Roaring
20s, is loosely based on an actual
court case (and the resulting publicity)
from that era. In the play,
Roxie Hart (played by MaryAnn
Black) is arrested and charged
with murdering her lover after he
threatens to leave her. She finds
herself in prison with several other
women who have been convicted
of murdering either their lovers
or their husbands, including
Velma Kelly (played by Sandra
Emerick), a vaudeville performer
in for the double homicide of
her husband and her sister. With
the help of jail matron Mama Morton
(played by Melissa Owens),
Roxie manages to get the legal
services of slick lawyer Billy Flynn
(played by Eric van Baars),
an expert at giving the old “razzle
dazzle” to juries. All the while,
Roxie's hapless husband Amos
(played by Tim Culver) watches
the spectacle helplessly, wondering
when people — including his
wife — will acknowledge his
existence.
The other murderesses include
Liz (played by Kaitlyn
Black), Mona (played by
Liz Fallon), Annie (played by
Lisa Kuhnen), June (played
by Kate Kramitz), Kitty
(played by Erin Diroll) and
the tragic Hunyak (played
by Meg Maley), the only
one who probably is “not
guilty.”
Roxie's case is covered by
numerous reporters, including
sob sister Mary Sunshine
(played by Dylan Ratell),
whose sole purpose is to find
“the little bit of good in everyone.”
There are many highlights
in this show. Emerick and
the ensemble really shine
in “All That Jazz,” and Culver's
“Mister Cellophane” is
a standout. Ratell has one
of the most impressively
strong falsetto voices I've
heard. “Razzle Dazzle” was
fun to watch as well. Arguably
the best moment is “We
Both Reached for the Gun,”
where Billy Flynn is giving
his reworking of Roxie's history
and what happened the
night of the killing.

NEXT ON STAGE
Porthouse will next produce
Neil Simon's “The Sunshine
Boys,” which will run
July 7 through 23.

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News Headline: Tuition May Rise at Kent State Following Budget Vote (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Announcement may come before week's end; tuition 'estimated' to be 3.5 percent higher

Students returning to Kent State University in the fall may know within the next few days if their tuition will increase.

Earlier this month, Kent State's board of trustees voted to pass a temporary budget that would allow the university to continue operating if the state budget were not approved by July 1 in time for the start of the next fiscal year.

As part of that temporary budget act, the trustees authorized Kent State President Lester Lefton, Jacqueline Woods, chair of the trustee board, and Patrick Mullin, the chair of the board's finance committee, to set tuition and other student fees within the guidelines approved in the final budget bill.

Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent said in an email Lefton, Woods and Mullin will decide if any increase in tuition or fees will take place and announce the rates for the 2011-2012 school year after the state's budget is signed into law by Ohio Gov. John Kasich

"We are expecting this will be possible before the end of the week," Vincent said.

Ohio legislators have already agreed to cap any upcoming tuition increases at 3.5 percent for public universities.

The Ohio Senate voted Tuesday to approve a $112 billion state budget, and the Ohio House voted Wednesday to send the budget — largely what was first proposed by Kasich in March — to the governor's desk. The governor is expected to sign it today.

Trustees at Ohio State University voted Friday to increase tuition there by 3.3 percent for the coming semester. Ohio University officials raised tuition by 3.5 percent on the same day.

On its website, Kent State "estimates" tuition for the 2011-2012 school year will be $9,346 for Ohio residents — a 3.5 percent increase over last year's rate — and $17,306 for non-Ohio residents. The estimated room and board costs are $8,830 for both Ohio and out-of-state residents.

The university is careful to note on its tuition page that "tuition has not been set for the 2011-2012 academic year."

Tuition for the 2010-2011 school year was $9,030 for Ohio residents with room and board at $8,376 for a standard, double-occupancy room and a full meal plan.

University officials are expecting as much as a $13 million cut in state support.

Woods said earlier this month they would announce tuition rates as soon as they could following the state budget's approval because they "want people to know what they're going to be facing coming back."

Related Topics: Kent Ohio, Kent State University, State Budget, and Tuition

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News Headline: A modern view of country doctors | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Star Tribune - Online
Contact Name: MAURA LERNER
News OCR Text: 'U' physician Therese Zink tries to update old impressions in a new book on rural medicine.

When Dr. Therese Zink started collecting real-life stories for a book about country doctors, she had one rule:

No Norman Rockwell-like tales from a bygone era.

Zink, a family physician in Zumbrota, Minn., was determined to put a 21st-century spin on the subject of rural medicine in her 2010 anthology, "The Country Doctor Revisited."

And yet, she couldn't help including the story of a doctor who drove to an Amish farmhouse to perform a circumcision. There, he discovered -- to his horror -- that he had forgotten his scalpel.

At that point, the baby's father slipped into the kitchen and returned with an 8-inch steak knife.

"Will this do?" he asked.

And sure enough, it did.

Zink, 55, who conceived and edited the book, admits that rural medicine can be full of surprises.

"Things have changed, but some things haven't," she said. "That's the beauty of being rural."

Zink, who has dabbled in writing throughout her medical career, decided to gather stories from people on the front lines -- doctors, nurses, medical students -- to show how rural medicine has transformed in recent years.

The days of the solo country physician, trudging through wheat fields with his trusty black bag, are long gone, she says, especially in Minnesota. In some ways, technology and economics are making rural medicine almost indistinguishable from its urban counterparts.

And yet. ...

"There is an intimacy with your patients," she said, "that makes it a very special way to be a doctor."

Poignant encounters

As country doctors go, Zink is a relative newcomer. Raised in Ohio, she spent most of her medical career in the Twin Cities and other urban settings before buying a small farm in southern Minnesota in 2004. Today, she practices at a Fairview clinic in Zumbrota, and teaches at the University of Minnesota Medical School.

The idea for the book, she says, came out of her work at the university's Rural Physician Associate Program, where she oversees medical students who spend part of their training in small-town clinics or hospitals.

When they return from their nine-month stints, she said, the medical students are overflowing with stories, often about poignant or haunting encounters with patients. As a writer herself, Zink would encourage them to write about their experiences -- altering enough details to protect patient privacy -- and share them in class or online discussion boards.

"Some of them, as I read them, just begged for a bigger audience," she said.

For the book, she selected some of the best, then rounded them out with the voices of experience, collecting stories, poems and essays from doctors and others who have practiced for years. The result is a behind-the-scenes portrait of small-town medicine, as seen by those wearing the white coats.

Small-town dilemmas

One recurring theme is the often blurry line between their professional and personal lives. "In medical school, you're taught that you can't be friends with your patients," Zink said. "That's not possible in rural areas. The expectation is, you are [friends]. So how do you negotiate that?"

In one story, an American Indian medical student at a hospital in Bemidji, Minn., struggles with the aftermath of the 2005 Red Lake shootings. "In the ER I found myself staring at young, Native men, all victims of the tragedy in Red Lake," wrote Dr. Erik Brodt in a chapter called "Learning to Walk the Healer's Path."

"My mind raced and my stomach curdled sour. Do I know this kid? Oh, no. Does he remember me?" Later, he writes, "Once the last patient was discharged and the camera lights dimmed, the community remained ... in need of healing. So did I."

In another story, a Nigerian-born doctor describes a nagging sense of hostility from the adult children of an elderly white patient. After several tense days, he discovers that -- far from resenting him -- they want him to become their father's permanent doctor.

Another physician, in rural Wisconsin, writes a poem about praying for a patient's peaceful death.

A donkey saves the day

Several of the stories are by Zink herself. One, first published in a major medical journal, is laughingly titled: "Thank God for My Ass." She writes about Jimmy, her miniature donkey, and the unexpected role it played in smoothing her way with a stressed-out family.

"It's one of the few things I've written that practically wrote itself," she said. It turns out that the patient's family had borrowed her donkey for a Christmas play, months before they met during a medical crisis. "I realized the gift of having made that connection with that particular family," she said, "and it was all because of this donkey."

The book, which came out last fall, is the 18th in a series on "Literature and Medicine" published by Kent State University Press.

Zink proudly notes that it's now in its second printing, and she's already at work on several other books, including a novel and another collection on becoming a doctor.

Dr. Jon Hallberg, a colleague at the University of Minnesota, calls Zink a gifted writer who can capture the dual sides of medicine. "It's science on the one hand, but it's stories and people on the other," he said.

Zink, he adds, is not only a skilled physician, but "a big heart and soul who also is a bit of an artist. And this is her muse."

Maura Lerner • 612-673-7384

ABOUT THE BOOK:

"The Country Doctor Revisited: A Twenty-First Century Reader."

Edited by: Dr. Therese Zink, a family physician in Zumbrota, Minn., and professor at the University of Minnesota.

Published by: Kent State University Press, 2010, paperback $32.

For more information: http://thecountry doctorrevisited.com

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