Report Overview:
Total Clips (18)
Art; Wick Poetry Center (1)
Economics (1)
Fashion Design (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Music (1)
Tuition (10)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Art; Wick Poetry Center (1)
Vietnamese Children's Art Exhibit at library 06/30/2011 Adirondack Enterprise Text Attachment Email

...Adirondacks and St. Joseph's Addiction Treatment and Rehabilitation Center are sponsoring the exhibit, which is open to the public through July 21. Kent State University's Wick Poetry Center and School of Art Galleries have collaborated with Soldier's Heart to create the Vietnamese Children's...


Economics (1)
Gas pump prices back on rise (Engelhardt) 06/30/2011 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...average of $3.55 a gallon for regular fuel. The reasons for the price difference were unclear to Lucas Engelhardt, assistant professor of economics at the Kent State University Stark Campus. However, Engelhardt said he has observed that fuel prices in Ohio seem to rise and fall more rapidly than...


Fashion Design (1)
Kelly Sell helps produce Kent State's fashion show 07/01/2011 urbancitizen.com Text Attachment Email


KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
GIVING IT A TRY 07/01/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

Cameron Beverly, 8, of Negley, tried out a vegetable pizza the kids created during a College For Kids session on Wednesday. The event is sponsored by Kent State University - East Liverpool and Salem Workforce Development and Continuing Studies and is being held all week at both East Liverpool...


KSU Museum (1)
2Do: Museums, parks, family events and more for July 1-7, 2011 06/30/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...adult groups are welcome by appointment. The last house tour leaves at 4:15 p.m. daily. Tours may be limited. $5; free for children 15 and younger. Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or www.kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Kent Displays adding 40 jobs 07/01/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Music (1)
Browsing the Arts for July 1-7, 2011 06/30/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...Frankie Valli & the Four Seasons." 8 p.m. today, Tuesday-Thursday; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday; 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, July 17. $35-$130. Porthouse Theatre. Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls. 330-672-3884 or porthousetheatre.com. The picnic grounds...


Tuition (10)
KSU to increase fall tuition 3.5% (Lefton) 07/01/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KSU hikes fall tuition 3.5 percent 07/01/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Tuition Rises 3.5 Percent at Kent State for Fall 2011 07/01/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Students React to Tuition Hike at Kent State (Lefton, Woods) 07/01/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

KSU hikes fall tuition 3.5 percent: State budget, approved Thursday, impacted final amount of increase (Lefton) 07/01/2011 Record Publishing Company Text Attachment Email

Kent State University trustees OK tuition increase (Lefton, Woods) 07/01/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University officials have approved a 3.5 percent tuition increase for undergraduate and graduate students on the university's eight...

Kent State Tuition Increases 3.5 Percent (Lefton, Woods) 06/30/2011 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

6/30/2011 3:49:29 PM | Kent State University - news release Pressured by funding drop in the recently-passed state budget, Kent State University is...

AUDIO Kent State Tuition Increases 3.5 Percent (Lefton, Woods) 06/30/2011 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

6/30/2011 3:49:29 PM | Kent State University - news release Pressured by a funding drop in the recently-passed state budget, Kent State University is...

KSU blames state budget for tuition hike (Lefton, Woods) 06/30/2011 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - Kent State University is the latest higher education institution that will be raising tuition, citing the state budget and record enrollment....

Kent State University Will Raise Tuition 3.5% 07/01/2011 University Business Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is the latest higher education institution that will be raising tuition, citing the state budget and record enrollment....


University Press (1)
A modern view of country doctors 06/30/2011 Star Tribune Text Email

...said, "and it was all because of this donkey." The book, which came out last fall, is the 18th in a series on "Literature and Medicine" published by Kent State University Press. Zink proudly notes that it's now in its second printing, and she's already at work on several other books, including...


News Headline: Vietnamese Children's Art Exhibit at library | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Adirondack Enterprise
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SARANAC LAKE - "Speak Peace," a Vietnamese children's art exhibit will open at the Saranac Lake Free Library from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, June 30 in the Cantwell Room of the Saranac Lake Free Library will open the exhibit with refreshments and brief program. Homeward Bound Adirondacks and St. Joseph's Addiction Treatment and Rehabilitation Center are sponsoring the exhibit, which is open to the public through July 21.

Kent State University's Wick Poetry Center and School of Art Galleries have collaborated with Soldier's Heart to create the Vietnamese Children's Art Exhibit. This exhibit features Vietnamese children's drawings and paintings on themes of peace and war that have been collected by the War Remnants Museum in Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam. Paired with original poems written by American children, veterans and established poets, this collaborative, international art exhibit encourages a creative dialogue between image and word, promoting cross-cultural understanding, reconciliation, and global citizenship.

On Friday, July 8, Dr. Ed Tick of Soldiers Heart will show a short film and talk about healing journeys with U.S. veterans to Vietnam. A nationally known combat trauma expert, Tick is the author of "War & the Soul" and "The Golden Tortoise: Journeys in Viet Nam" from which he'll share poetry. We're also planning a veterans talk circle and children's activities.

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News Headline: Gas pump prices back on rise (Engelhardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: After weeks of steady decline, the gasoline price yo-yo spiraled in the other direction Tuesday morning ahead of the Fourth of July holiday as prices at some area stations jumped nearly 30 cents in less than two hours to $3.45 a gallon. While motorists should be prepared to pay even more at the pump today, prices aren?t expected to rise significantly the rest of the summer, unless a hurricane strikes key oil-producing areas off the U.S. coast. ?I think it will stay between $3.35 and $3.50 (per gallon),? said Patrick LaVecchia, vice chair of government and legislative affairs for the Associated Food & Petroleum Dealers Inc. ?... The threat of the hurricane will cause the price to rise.? Prices surged Tuesday after dropping earlier this week to as low as $3.17.9 per gallon in Stark County. According to gasbuddy.com, the price of regular gasoline averaged $3.31 a gallon in the Akron area Tuesday afternoon. By noon Tuesday, oil prices had risen 7 1/2 cents a barrel on speculation, according to LaVecchia. ?I expect it to go up again (today). Oil?s up, so gas follows it,? he said. The price jump comes just several days ahead of the Fourth of July weekend. AAA expects travel over the holiday weekend to be down 2.5 percent from last year. A survey revealed 1.6 million Ohioans will travel at least 50 miles from home, according to AAA, with the vast majority expected to travel by car. Gas prices peaked at more than $4 a gallon in early May. Since then, prices have been falling because they were inflated in late spring due to market speculation, according to LaVecchia. The price of crude oil fell last week after the International Energy Agency said it will make 60 million barrels available in a month-long period. Dealer cost for gasoline was hovering around $3.80 a gallon on June 2 before hitting a low of $3.15 a gallon last weekend, LaVecchia said. ?It had to settle back down,? he said. ?From June 2 to the 25, it (dealer cost) dropped 69 or 70 cents. That shows you that there was no reason for it to be that high to begin with.? Still, motorists in Northeast Ohio are paying less than the national average of $3.55 a gallon for regular fuel. The reasons for the price difference were unclear to Lucas Engelhardt, assistant professor of economics at the Kent State University Stark Campus. However, Engelhardt said he has observed that fuel prices in Ohio seem to rise and fall more rapidly than in surrounding states. ?Why that is, I honestly have no idea. Our prices tend to move faster,? Engelhardt said. While prices may have jumped due to an overreaction in the market, Engelhardt said he believes the uncertain political climate in the Middle East played a major role in the spike. Prices have been decreasing as the political situation has stabilized, according to Engelhardt. ?I think the higher prices reflected fears we had at the time about what supplies were going to look like. We were overly fearful,? Engelhardt said. ?There was a lot of uncertainty, which can create speculation of what the supplies should look like.? Engelhardt also said he isn?t expecting a dramatic price spike over the final two months of the summer driving season, although a major storm could disrupt supplies and send prices upward. ?If we have a lot more hurricanes in oil production areas, I think that will have a bigger effect,? he said.

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News Headline: Kelly Sell helps produce Kent State's fashion show | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: urbancitizen.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Special to the Citizen

Juniors Kelly Sell of Urbana and Tabatha Mahoney, along with seniors Brittany Mizelle and Laura Toomey, were co-producers of "The Time is Now" annual fashion show held at Kent State University.

The show featured the collections of 44 senior designers, as well as select garments designed by underclassmen.

The Jerry Silverman and Shannon Rodgers Fashion School at Kent is ranked by the online fashion magazine Fashionista.com as the third-best fashion school in the United States and 13th in the world.

Kent State's Fashion School, which graduates about 200 students each year in fashion merchandising and design, is one of 13 member schools in

the Council of

Fashion Designers of America.

Sell is majoring in fashion merchandising at Kent with a minor in marketing. She has been accepted in Kent's Study Away program and will be spending the fall semester at Kent's studio in the heart of the garment district in New York City.

Sell, the daughter of Mike and Barb Sell of Urbana, is a graduate of Graham High School.

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News Headline: GIVING IT A TRY | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cameron Beverly, 8, of Negley, tried out a vegetable pizza the kids created during a College For Kids session on Wednesday. The event is sponsored by Kent State University - East Liverpool and Salem Workforce Development and Continuing Studies and is being held all week at both East Liverpool and Salem campuses. (Photo by Michael D. McElwain)

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News Headline: 2Do: Museums, parks, family events and more for July 1-7, 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: John Kappes
News OCR Text: Where (2Do) for 7/1/2011

FAIRS/FESTIVALS

A Taste of Italy. Akron Civic Theatre, 182 S. Main St., Akron. 330-253-2488 or it-am.org. The Sixth annual Vino Italia. Features food from area restaurants plus more than 80 Italian wines for sampling. Frank Sinatra tribute performed by Michael Sonata. Reservations required. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. $60.

Bay Days Festival. Cahoon Memorial Park, Cahoon Road between Lake and Wolf roads, Bay Village. 440-899-3410 or cityofbayvillage.com. Bay Days Fesitval. Vendors, rides, entertainment and more. Noon-10:30 p.m. today-Saturday and Monday. Free.

Black River Landing. 421 Black River Lane (one block east of Broadway), Lorain. 440-204-2269 or lorainportauthority.com. Port Fest 2011. Food, vendors, entertainment, nautical displays and water-related educational demonstrations, fireworks and more. Noon-11 p.m. Sunday. Free. Fireworks display at 10 p.m.

Crocker Park. Detroit and Crocker roads, Westlake. 440-871-6880 or crockerpark.com. Celebrate July Fourth Weekend at the Morris Cadillac Buick Liberty Fest. Musical performances, carnival rides, face painting, classic car show, fireworks and more. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday. Free.

Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Boston Mills Ski Resort, 1/8 mile north of Boston Mills Road, Peninsula. 800-875-4241. Boston Mills ArtFest. Featuring fine art and fine craft items, including ceramics, paintings, watercolors, glass, mixed media, wearable and nonwearable fiber, leather, wood, furniture, metal, sculpture, jewelry and more. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. today-Saturday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. $8, adults, $6, seniors 60 and over and students 13-21; free, ages 12 and under.

Larchmere Boulevard. Between East 121st and 130th streets, Cleveland. 216-421-2100 or larchmere.com. Larchmere Festival. Street fair with antiques, crafts, entertainment, food and children's activities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday.

Miller Road Park. 33760 Lake Road, Avon Lake. 440-930-4125. The City of Avon Lake's "Friends of the Park" and TrueNorth Cultural ArtsFest 2011. Festival features fine arts shopping, family activities, entertainment, food and more. 2-10:30 p.m. Sunday. Free.

Ohio City's Open Air in Market Square. West 25th Street and Lorain Avenue, Cleveland. 216-781-3222 or ohiocity.org. 14th annual Open Air in Market Square. Cleveland's Artisan Outdoor Market, featuring vendors and entertainment. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Saturdays through Sept. 3.

Aurora Farms Premium Outlets. 549 S. Chillicothe Road. 330-562-2000 or premiumoutlets.com/aurora. July 4th Celebration. Featuring entertainment and fireworks display. Bring lawn chairs. 7:30-10 p.m. Monday. Free.

Bedford Commons. 730 Broadway Ave. 440-232-0115 or bedfordchamberoh.org. The 28th annual 4th of July Parade. The parade is at 10 a.m. And will begin at Columbus Road and Washington Street and end at Bedford Heights City Hall. Monday.

Blossom Music Center. 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls. 216-231-1111 or clevelandorchestra.com. Under 18 Free Lawn Pass: up to two “under 18s†are admitted free with each paid adult lawn ticket. Cleveland Orchestra. Steven Reineke, conductor; with Tony award-winning actress Idina Menzel ("Wicked"). Repertoire includes pop and musical theater favorites, plus patriotic music to celebrate the Independence Day Weekend. Fireworks to follow, weather permitting. 8 p.m. Saturday. $23-$75. Proceeds benefit the orchestra's new Center for Future Audiences. Cleveland Orchestra. "Salute to the U.S.A." John Morris Russell, conductor. Patriotic music and audience favorites. Plus Tchaikovsky’s "1812" Overture and fireworks, weather permitting. 8 p.m. Sunday. $19-$83. Blossom Festival Orchestra. Lora John Schissel, conductor. Program includes Tchaikovsky's "1812" Overture, Sousa marches and more. Fireworks to follow, weather permitting. 8 p.m. Monday. $19-$43.

Cleveland Metroparks Zoo. 3900 Wildlife Way. 216-661-6500 or clemetzoo.com. Zoo admission: $11, adults; $8, ages 2-11; free, under 2 and zoo members. 4th of July: Red, White & Zoo. The animal keepers will prepare red, white and blue treats for some of the zoo's animals, including primates and bears. Other highlights include Get Close animal encounters and a self-guided tour of the zoo's red, white and blue animals. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday. Because Monday is a holiday, regular "free admission day" for Cuyahoga County and Hinckley Township has been moved to Tuesday.

First Energy presents the City of Cleveland Fireworks. Settlers Landing, Merwin Avenue and Center Street. 216-664-3990 or city.cleveland.oh.us. RTA Family Funfest. Family activities, Euclid Beach memorabilia, 12-piece Sousa band and fireworks. WOIO Channel 19 will show a simulcast of the fireworks at dusk. Best viewing areas: Nautica Boardwalk from the Nautica Pavilion to Shooters, Whiskey Island, Edgewater Park and Kirtland Park (South Marginal Road and East 49th Street). 6:30-10 p.m. Monday. Rain date is Tuesday.

Great Lakes Science Center. Steamship William G. Mather, 601 Erieside Ave., Cleveland. 216-694-2000 or greatscience.com/mather_museum.php. Rock and Boom. Celebrate Independence Day and tour the boat. Fireworks at dusk. Food sold on board. Reservations required. 6 p.m. Monday. $10, members; $12, nonmembers.

Lakewood Park. 14532 Lake Road. July 4th: Celebrate at Lakewood Park. Parade steps off at 10 a.m. on Lake Avenue at Kenneth Drive and ends at Lakewood Park. Afterward, enjoy games, food, fun activities, Lakewood High School's Youth Rock orchestra at 7 p.m. and more. Fireworks at approximately 9:45 p.m. Monday.

Mentor High School Stadium. 6477 Center St. 440-974-5720. Celebrate July 4th in Mentor. Monday: Fireworks show starting at about 9:50 p.m. The display can also be viewed from Civic Center Park.

Olmsted Falls' Village Green. 8062 Columbia Road. 440-816-0372. 4th of July: Olmsted Falls Old Fashioned Independence Day Celebration. Parade steps off from Falls-Lenox Elementary School at 11:30 a.m. Featuring games, contests, family activities and entertainment. Sponsored by the City of Olmsted Falls Parks & Recreation Department. Monday. Free.

Thistledown. 21501 Emery Road, North Randall. 216-662-8600 or caesars.com/thistledown. Finish Line Fridays! Post time starts at 3:15 p.m. and bands perform 4-8 p.m. minus a 10-minute break during each race. Free Family Fun Day. Free hot dog, snack and beverage for children ages 10 and under. Activities include pony rides, face painting, bounce house, crafts, kids-only door prizes and WGAR Scan-N-Win with LeAnn Sommers. Live racing starts at 1:50 p.m. No charge for admission and general parking. 1-4 p.m. Monday.

PARTICIPATORY ACTIVITIES

Cleveland Metroparks. North Chagrin Reservation, Nature Center, Sunset Lane off SOM Center Road, Mayfield. 440-473-3370 or clemetparks.com. Families Explore: Snakes. Search for snakes in the field and learn about the snake survey project taking place in North Chagrin Reservation. 10 a.m. Saturday.

Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Ira Trailhead, Riverview Road, north of Ira Road, Peninsula. Beat the Heat Hike. Enjoy hiking more difficult trails. Hike with a park ranger. 5.5-miles on the challenging Buckeye and O’Neil Woods trails. 8 a.m. Sunday.

Lorain County Metro Parks. Amherst Beaver Creek Reservation, 913 N. Lake St., Amherst. Walk With a Doc. Take a walk with Dr. Rebecca Ware from the Cleveland Clinic Lorain Family Health and Surgery Center. Easy hike. 10 a.m. today.

Black River Reservation's Bur Oak, 6150 Ford Road, Elyria. Walk With a Doc. A walk with Dr. Rebecca Ware from the Cleveland Clinic Lorain Family Health and Surgery Center. Easy hike. 8:30 a.m. Saturday.

Columbia Reservation, 25145 Royalton Road (Ohio 82), Columbia Station. Beat the Heat Hike. Hike the trails under the morning sun. Meet at Overlook. Strenuous hike. 8:30 a.m. today.

Medina County Park District River Styx Park. On River Styx Road, south of Ohio 57. Stroller Hike: River Styx Park. Bring your little one out for a hike at the park and take a closer look at things along the way using multiple senses. Children can be in strollers, backpacks or can toddle along on their own. Be prepared for some unpaved trails; mid- to full-size or jogger-type strollers recommended. All ages welcome. 10:30 a.m. Tuesday.

Summit County Metro Parks. F.A. Seiberling Nature Realm/Visitors Center, 1828 Smith Road, Akron. 330-865-8065 or summitmetroparks.org. Fourth of July Campfire. Join naturalist Meghan Doran while gathering around the campfire to celebrate nature’s beautiful colors and sounds. Take a short hike on Cherry Lane after roasting marshmallows. 7:30 p.m. Sunday. Butterfly Walk. Join naturalist Pat Rydquist to search for the independent varieties. Nets and containers will be provided if you would like to try your hand at catch and release. Please dress to protect your skin from briars, poison ivy and the sun. 1 p.m. Monday. Gorge Metro Park, 1160 Front St., Cuyahoga Falls. summitmetroparks.org. Kids' Micro Hike. Kids 6 and older can join naturalist Sarah Matheny on a microscopic adventure to collect nature artifacts and view them under a handheld lens and microscope. Come early, bring your lunch and have a picnic before the hike. Registration required. 11 a.m. Saturday. Liberty Park's Recreation Area, 9385 Liberty Road, Twinsburg. Nature for Kids: Birds. Join a naturalist to explore our natural surroundings. This program includes some hiking on easy-to-moderate terrain. Adults are required to accompany their children. 11 a.m. Thursday.

O'Neil Woods Metro Park's Trail Lot, 2550 Martin Road, Bath. Stop the Invasion. Discover some of the most invasive plants in the parks and how they affect native wildlife as you hike the 1.8-mile Deer Run Trail. 11 a.m. Thursday.

Silver Creek Boathouse, 5171 S. Medina Line Road, Norton. 330-865-8065. Nature For Kids: Bugs. Kids of all ages are welcome to join a naturalist to explore our natural surroundings. This program includes some hiking on easy-to-moderate terrain. Adults are required to accompany their children. 11 a.m. Wednesday.

PARKS/OUTDOORS

Cleveland Metroparks. Hinckley Reservation, Ledge Pool & Recreation Area, 1151 Ledge Road, Hinckley Township. 330-239-2911. Pool open daily at 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. (Noon if swimming lessons are in session) . $4.50, adults (ages 12 and over); $3.50, children (ages 6-11); free (ages 5 and under and seniors ages 62 and over). Super Senior Water Fitness. Seniors can strengthen their core by participating in this low to moderate water aerobics class. This course consists of warm-up activities, water resistance, changing rhythm, water walking, and upper and lower body exercises. 10-10:30 a.m. Saturdays through Aug. 13. $30 for season-pass holder; $50 for nonpass holder. Daily rates are $3 for season-pass holders and $5 for nonpass holders. Space is limited.

Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad. Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Independence. 1-800-445-9667 or cvsr.com. Service suspended until further notice. Due to track construction, the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad has suspended all train services in Cuyahoga Valley National Park until further notice. The train will continue to provide service from Canton to Akron. Through the end of summer.

Geauga Park District. Big Creek Park's Aspen Grove, 9160 Robinson Road, Chardon Township. Recognizing Geauga County's Forest Types. Climate and geology have given rise to several distinct forest types in Geauga County. Three types will be visited with a focus on their characteristic plant and animal communities. An International Year of Forests program. 2 p.m. Saturday.

Holden Arboretum. 9500 Sperry Road, Kirtland. 440-946-4400 or holdenarb.org. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. $6, ages 13 and older; $3, ages 6-12; free, under 6. Tram tours: $2. Reservations required.

Lake Metroparks. Farmpark, 8800 Chardon Road (U.S. 6), Kirtland. 440-286-9516 or lakemetroparks.com. Farmpark is open year-round 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas, New Year's Day, Vintage Ohio, and on Mondays, January through March. Open Martin Luther King Jr. Day and Presidents Day.

Nature Center at Shaker Lakes. 2600 South Park Blvd., Shaker Heights. 216-321-5935 or shakerlakes.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 1-5 p.m. Sunday. Trails open dawn to dusk.

MUSEUMS

Cleveland Hungarian Heritage Society. Galleria at Erieview, 1301 East Ninth St. 216-523-3900 or jcu.edu/language/hunghemu. On the second floor of the Galleria. The museum's mission is preserving Hungarian culture and the experiences of Hungarians in Northeast Ohio. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday. By appointment only: Monday, Saturday. Free.

Cleveland Museum of Natural History. 1 Wade Oval Drive. 216-231-4600 or cmnh.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday (until 10 p.m. Wednesday); noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Closed holidays. $10; $8, ages 7-18, college students with ID, seniors 60 and up; $7, kids ages 3-6; Free, 2 and younger. Little Builders. Children ages 2-7 create, play and learn as they explore the concepts of construction, motion and simple machines. Hand operate a pulley or conveyor belt to explore the cause and effect. Turn the wheels of a gantry crane to transport cargo and discover mechanical physics at work. Through Sept. 11. Located in the Fawick Gallery. Free with admission.

Cleveland Police Historical Society. Justice Center, 1300 Ontario St. 216-623-5055 or clevelandpolicemuseum.org. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Free. Exhibit: Kingsbury Run Torso Murder Masks, 1926 Jail Cell and Eliot Ness' Revolver. Also on display: 100 Years of Cleveland Bad Guys featuring Danny Greene. Today.

Croatian Heritage Museum and Library. 34900 Lake Shore Blvd., Eastlake. 440-946-2044 or croatianmuseum.com. Museum and library hours: 6-9 p.m. Wednesdays; 3-8 p.m. Fridays; and 1-5 p.m. Saturdays. Group tours can be arranged.

Dennison Railroad Depot Museum. 400 Center St. 740-922-6776 or dennisondepot.org. Museum and Whistle Stop Gift Shop, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. today; 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday.

Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland Learning Center and Money Museum. 1455 East Sixth St. 216-579-3188 or clevelandfed.org. Learn what gives money value while exploring more than 30 interactive exhibits in the main lobby. Free admission. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Thursday. Closed holidays.

Great Lakes Science Center. 601 Erieside Ave., Cleveland. 216-694-2000 or greatscience.com. Separate admission for Great Lakes Science Center or Omnimax Theater ($9.95; $8.95, senior citizens; $7.95, youth ages 2-17). Combination packages of any two, three or four to center, theater, Steamship William G. Mather Museum and special traveling exhibitions ($14.95-$21.95; $13.95-$19.95, senior citizens; $12.95-$18.95, youth). 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily (closed Thanksgiving and Christmas Day). Featuring hundreds of hands-on exhibits, themed traveling exhibitions, daily demonstrations, the Omnimax Theater and the Steamship William G. Mather. Exhibit: Earth to Mars: We're Coming, Eventually. With 28 exhibits designed to fire your imagination about the possibilities that exploring Mars may hold for the future of humankind. Through Monday, Sept. 5. Exhibition entry: $14.95, adults; $12.95, children; free, members. Mars Rover, Up Close & Personal. The Science Center has teamed up with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to bring a full-scale model of a Mars Exploration Rover. On display in the lobby through the Mars exhibit. Free with exhibit admission. Great Lakes Adventure Week. A week of Great Lakes themed activities, special programs, guest scientists, microscopic investigations and more. Monday-Thursday. Free with admission. Steamship William G. Mather, 601 Erieside Ave. , Cleveland. 216-694-2000 or greatscience.com/mather_museum.php. Open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday through Sunday in September and October. Open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Sunday in July and August. $4.95-$6.95. Lake Erie Sails. Take a two-hour sail aboard the schooner Appledore IV and learn about basic ship functions. Price includes admission to the Steamship Mather. Space is limited. Reservations required. 1, 3:30 and 6:30 p.m. Thursday. $34, members; $47, nonmembers. Details and reservations: 216-621-2400. Through Sunday, July 10.

International Women's Air and Space Museum. Burke Lakefront Airport terminal lobby, 1501 N. Marginal Road, Cleveland. 216-623-1111 or iwasm.org. Self-guided tours during airport hours. Research center and gift shop with original documents, photos and books. Center and gift shop (10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday). Free.

James A. Garfield National Historic Site. 8095 Mentor Ave., Mentor. 440-255-8722 or nps.gov/jaga. The 20th U.S. president's home is now under the operation of the National Park Service. May 1 to Oct. 31, open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday and noon-5 p.m. Sunday. School groups and adult groups are welcome by appointment. The last house tour leaves at 4:15 p.m. daily. Tours may be limited. $5; free for children 15 and younger.

Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or www.kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until 8:45 p.m. Thursday), noon-4:45 p.m. Sunday. Admission: $3-$5. Exhibit: Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen. Screen legend's personal collection of performance clothes spans her six-decade career and features never-before-exhibited costumes from stage, screen and television. Through Sept. 4.

Lake View Cemetery. 12316 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-421-2665 or lakeviewcemetery.com. Cemetery hours: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. daily. Tomb of James A. Garfield, 20th U.S. president, in a 285-acre horticultural setting and Wade Memorial Chapel open 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily.

Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage. 2929 Richmond Road, Beachwood. 216-593-0575 or maltzmuseum.org. Features a rich selection from the Temple Museum of Religious Art's collection of art and artifacts that includes ritual objects, sacred books and scrolls and fine art from around the world. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and Sunday (until 9 p.m. Wednesday); noon-5 p.m. Saturday. Closed all holiday Mondays unless noted on the website. $12; $10, seniors 60 and older, and students ages 12 and up; $5, children ages 5-11. Free for Maltz Museum members and children under age 5. $5 Fridays. In celebration of the fifth anniversary, the museum offers $5 admission through the end of summer. Includes access to entire museum, including special exhibitions.

Mill Creek Falls History Center. 8404 Webb Terrace, Cleveland. 216-271-9300 or slavicvillagehistory.org. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Monday through Friday by appointment. Learn about the history of the Slavic Village and Mill Creek neighborhoods.

National Cleveland-Style Polka Hall of Fame. 605 East 222nd St., Euclid. 216-261-3263 or clevelandstyle.com. Polka history and memorabilia. Free. Noon-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Closed Sunday, Monday and holidays.

Shaker Historical Society. 16740 South Park Blvd., Shaker Heights. 216-921-1201 or shakerhistory.com. Hours: 2-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and Sunday. Closed holidays. $4, nonmembers; $2, children ages 6-18; free, members and children under 6. Exhibit: Getting Back to Our Roots: Gardening Shaker Style. Exhibit will feature many fun, interactive informational pieces on honeybees, varieties of honey produce and food crops dependent on on bees for pollination and food production. Exhibit runs through Friday, Sept. 30. Free with admission.

Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens. 714 N. Portage Path, Akron. 330-836-5533 or stanhywet.org. 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays. Closed Mondays except for Memorial Day and Labor Day. Last admission at 4:30 p.m. $8, adults; $4, youths 6-17; Gardens and Gate Lodge and Conservatory: $12, adults; $6, youths 6-17. The Power of Innovation: Uniquely Rubber. Rubber is used in many everyday items and in a variety of industry applications -- not just in tires. This display in the Manor House features the many roles and uses of this natural product from the Hevea brasiliensis (rubber) plant. Items on display include the Goodyear Chest. New this year are interactive "touch-me" stations throughout the Manor House. Exhibit runs through Oct. 28. Plants of Industry. When we think plants, we might think of our backyard garden beds or potted plants on a window. This exhibit in the Corbin Conservatory will open your eyes with a broader look at the utilization of these living organisms. Just outside is the "industry garden" where the horticulture staff has planted broomcorn, oats, flax, cotton and other plants used in industry and of economic importance. Exhibit runs through Oct. 28. Woof Walk Sundays. Dog owners are invited to bring their dogs on a leash to enjoy the gardens and grounds on most Sundays (except Mother's Day, Father's Day and October 2) through November. Owners must pick up after their dog. Sunday. $5, dog admission in addition to the human admission fees.

USS Cod Submarine. North Marginal Road, between East Ninth Street and Burke Lakefront Airport, Cleveland. 216-566-8770 or usscod.org. Self-guided tours of this 312-foot World War II Navy fleet submarine include the two torpedo rooms, crew quarters and engine rooms. Tours require climbing ladders. Sub permanently docked on the lakefront. View Cod crewmen's mementos and photos of deadly combat and life-saving missions on display in the after torpedo room. Open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily through Sept.30. $7; $6, seniors 62 and up; $4, students; free, military in uniform. 216-566-8770 or usscod.org. $7, adults; $6, seniors 62 and up; $4, students; free, military in uniform.

Western Reserve Historical Society. 10825 East Blvd., Cleveland. 216-721-5722 or wrhs.org. Includes Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum. Museum: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. Library/archives and Genealogy Center: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday-Saturday. $8.50; $7.50, seniors; $5, students; free, members and kids under 2. Rally Round the Flag. The WRHS flag collection contains approximately 25 historically important flags and banners from the Civil War era. They document the entire spectrum of the war: the anti-slavery movement, regimental colors, a progression of United States flags, captured Confederate flags, and postwar patriotic organizations including the Grand Army of the Republic. Exhibit runs through Dec. 31. Free with admission.

FAMILY ACTIVITIES

Just for fun

Bedford Commons. 730 Broadway Ave. 440-232-0115 or bedfordchamberoh.org. Bedford Parties In The Park. Each Wednesday enjoy entertainment, dancing, food and refreshments, door prizes, 50/50 raffle and more. 7 p.m. Wednesdays in July and 6:30 p.m. through August 31. Free.

Just for fun

Berea Historical Society. 118 E. Bridge St. 440-243-2541. 28th annual Old Fashioned Ice Cream Social. Enjoy ice cream, pie or cake along with entertainment. Tour Berea with Lolly the Trolley ($5 per person). Trolley leaves the museum at 1:30, 2:30 and 3:30 p.m. Reservations required. 1-4 p.m. Monday. $1.50-$3.

Black River Landing. 421 Black River Lane (one block east of Broadway), Lorain. 440-204-2269 or lorainportauthority.com. Lighthouse Tours. 1-4 p.m. Sunday. $20. Reservations required. Details and reservations: 440-245-2563 or lorainlighthouse.com.

Jackalope Lakeside. 301 Lakeside Ave. (Spitzer Marina), Lorain. 440-288-2051. Call for seasonal hours. Sunset Cruises. Cruise the Black River. Departs from the Jackalope Restaurant guest dock. No reservations required. Tours depart at 8 p.m. Boat tours run through Sept. 3. $12. Details: 440-204-2269.

Ma & Pa's Gift Shack. 15161 Main Market Road (Ohio 422) , Burton. 440-548-5521 or maandpas.com. Horse Drawn Amish Buggy Rides or Carriage Rides. Rides are 30-40 minute ride through the Geauga County Coutryside. Also offer a shorter 20 minute ride. Price includes hot chocolate, cookies and bakery. Reservations required. Rides are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday through end of October. 35-40 Minute Ride: $20, adults ; $5, kids. 20 Minute Ride: $10, adults; $3, kids. See website for more details.

Mesopotamia Village Commons. 8719 Ohio (534). mespofire.com. 38th annual Mesopotamia Ox Roast and Antiques & Flea Market. Over 160 dealers and live entertainment. Pancake breakfast will be served at 7-11 a.m. each morning at the Fire Station, hosted by the Bloomfield-Mespo cheerleaders. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday-Sunday; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday. mespofire.com. Free. Proceeds benefit the Mesopotamia Volunteer Fire Dept.

Terminal Tower Observation Deck. Terminal Tower Center, 50 Public Square, Cleveland. terminaltowerodeck.eventbrite.com (Saturday tickets); terminaltowerodecksun.eventbrite.com (Sunday tickets). Online tickets are $5 plus handling fee. Children 5 and under are free. Walk-up tickets may be purchased at Tower City's Guest Service Desk, located on Level 1, based on availability on the day of the tour. 360 Degree View of the Cleveland Skyline. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday and noon-4 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Dec. 18.

Theater

PlayhouseSquare. 1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or www.playhousesquare.com. Take a Hike: PlayhouseSquare's Guided Outdoor Walking Tours. Experience PlayhouseSquare's rich history in guided outdoor walking tours of the neighborhood. Tours include historical characters from the past like DJ Alan Freed, who coined the phrase "rock 'n' roll." Tours meet in the lobby of the State Theatre. 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Aug. 31. Free.

Zoos

Akron Zoological Park. 500 Edgewood Ave. 330-375-2550 or akronzoo.org. Summer season hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily through October. Winter season hours: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. Nov. 1 through April 30. $10; $7.50, seniors; $6, children ages 2-14; free, members ($2 parking for nonmembers). New Farmland and Solar Powered Train. Come see the renovated Farmland and brand new train at the Akron Zoo. Feed the farm animals, ride the train and have fun. Farmland and the A & K Wilber Express (train ride) open daily. Free with admission. Fourth annual Akron Zoo's Live Animal Show. Over 10 animals will be showing off their athletic abilities in Zoolympics. Parts of the show include audience participation. A lucky member of the audience will be able to hold some of the animals, race a snake and more. The 20-minute show is held in the zoo's indoor theater in the Lehner Family Zoo Gardens. Tuesdays through Saturdays at 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m through end of summer. Cost of the show is $1; tickets can be purchased at the zoo the day of the show. In additon to regular admission.

Cleveland Metroparks Zoo. 3900 Wildlife Way. 216-661-6500 or clemetzoo.com. Zoo hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Australian Adventure open for the season. RainForest: 10 a.m.-7 p.m. daily. Zoo admission: $11, adults; $8, ages 2-11; free, under 2 and zoo members. Mondays free for residents of Cuyahoga County and Hinckley Township. Photo Safari 2011. The zoo's annual photo contest is open to all photographers. All photos must be taken on zoo grounds and submitted to Cleveland Metroparks Zoo on photographic paper on or before Nov. 1. Entry forms can be downloaded, or pick one up in the zoo's main exhibit hall. Junior amateur photographers (ages 2-11) may also enter the contest. Through Tuesday, Nov. 1. Savanna Theater: Professor Wylde's Animal Show. Features an all-star cast, including a white stork, Burmese python, fennec fox, Egyptian vulture and peregrine falcon. 11:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. daily through Sept. 5. Public Greenhouse: Flutter. Features butterflies from South America, Africa and Asia. Butterfly cocoons and newly hatched butterflies will also be on display. Through Sept. 6. Wild Wednesday: Geauga County Day. Half-price ($5.50, adults; $2, children ages 2-11) for residents from Geauga County, and includes admission to the RainForest and the new African Elephant Crossing exhibit. Bring a valid photo ID with current address or a current utility bill with another form of identification. Wednesday.

ETC.

Burton Square. 14548 Main St. 440-834-4204 or burtonchamberofcommerce.org. Burton Classic Car Cruise Nights. Featuring music, classic cars, food, 50/50 raffle, entertainment and more. Wednesdays 5-8 p.m. through Sept. 28. Free.

Cleveland State University. Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, 1801 Euclid Ave. North Union Farmers Market at Cleveland State University. In front of Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Thursdays through Nov. 17.

Daybreak Lavender Farm. 2129 Frost Road, Streetsboro. 330-626-3235 or ohiolavenderfestival.com. Come pick lavender and picnic on the farm during the July and August bloom time. That is the only time the farm is open to the public. Private tours by appointment. Noon-4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. Noon-5 p.m. Sunday. See website for more details. Free.

Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 50. Hinde Field, 1819 Boos Road, Huron. 440-258-1761 or eaa50.org. Immaculate 1929 Ford Tri-Motor. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. today-Monday.

Grand Pacific Junction. Mill and Columbia roads, Olmsted Falls. 440-235-9277 or grandpacificjunction.com. First Friday Family Night Celebration. First Friday event includes craft and artisan vendors, entertainment, magic and food. Horse drawn wagon rides ($2 per person) and crafts for kids. 6-8 p.m. today. Free. Sponsored by the Grand Pacific Junction Merchants Association.

Lakewood Center Plaza. Near the intersection of Warren and Detroit roads. downtownlakewood.org. Second annual Grassroots Lakewood Farmers Market. Locally grown produce for sale. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday through Oct. 1.

Lakewood Public Library. 15425 Detroit Ave. 216-226-8275 or lkwdpl.org. Weekends With Wee Ones. For families with children under 2. Spend a part of your family weekend time clapping your hands, tapping your feet, singing nursery rhymes and sharing books. We will provide materials and ideas for families wishing to continue the fun at home. All programs feature tips and techniques to help develop early literacy skills. 11:30 a.m. Saturdays and 3:30 p.m. Sundays throughout the year. Free.

Moreland Hills Village Hall. 4350 SOM Center Road. 440-248-1188 or morelandhills.com. The James A. Garfield Memorial Cabin Open House. Learn about the history of President Garfield and his life. Refreshments served. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday. Free. Sponsored by the Moreland Hills Historical Society.

Public Square (Downtown Cleveland). Euclid Avenue and Ontario Street. Downtown Farmers Market at Public Square. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Fridays through end of October.

Stearns Farm. 6975 Ridge Road, Parma. 440-845–9770 or Stearnshomestead.com. Stearns homestead features two homes that are now museums, a general store, Yankee barn and farm animals. Noon-4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through Oct. 1. . Admission is free, but there is a charge for feed for the animals. Farm Market. Featuring many local farmers, artisans, bakery, honey and more. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays through Oct. 1.

Willard Park. East Ninth Street and Lakeside Avenue, Cleveland. North Coast Harbor Farmers Market. At East Ninth Street Pier. 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Thursdays through end of summer.

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News Headline: Kent Displays adding 40 jobs | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By THOMAS GALLICK | STAFF WRITER
A Brimfield-based tech firm announced
this week it is ready to bring 40 full-time
jobs to the area after securing $7 million in
funding.
Kent Displays, founded in 1993 by Kent
State University and Manning Ventures, is
expanding production on its Boogie Board
tablet and other liquid crystal products that
don't use electricity.
“The Boogie Board LCD Writing Tablet
is the first product of its kind in the world,”
Kent Displays President Joel Domino said
in a statement. “It has created a new product
segment — eWriters — that we expect
will experience consumer acceptance and
market growth similar to eReader products,
another form of electronic paper.”
According to a press release, Kent Displays
expects this expansion will help it
increase its revenue growth over 100 percent
in 2012, as the company did the last
two years.
The Boogie Board, a pressure-sensitive
LCD writing tablet, was launched in 2010. The
$7 million in public and private funding will allow
the company to meet increasing demand
for the product by hiring 40
new employees, mostly in
manufacturing, but also in
sales and marketing.
Among the funding, the
company obtained a $2 million
Innovation Ohio loan
approved by the Ohio Department
of Development
that will go toward new
production equipment.
“This new funding will
help us build on our leading
position in the eWriter
market as we expand our
line of Boogie Board tablets
and increase production
capabilities,” Domino
said. “These products
will further propel eWriters
into the mainstream,
decreasing the environmental
impact of traditional
paper use and helping
us achieve our growth
goals.”

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News Headline: Browsing the Arts for July 1-7, 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: John Kappes
News OCR Text: ART -- MUSEUMS

Akron Art Museum. 1 S. High St. 330-376-9185 or akronartmuseum.org. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Thursday), and holidays. $7; $5, those 65 and older and students (with valid ID); free, children ages 12 and younger. Free admission the first Sunday of the month. Exhibit: "All-Star Jazz: The Photographs of Herman Leonard." Through Sunday, July 10. Exhibit: "The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: 50 Works for Ohio." Through Saturday, Oct. 16. Event: Sunday Sampler (free family events at the museum, Akron-Summit County Public Library and Summit Artspace). 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.

Cleveland Museum of Art. 11150 East Blvd. 216-421-7340 or clevelandart.org. Registration required for gallery talks and lectures. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Wednesday and Friday). Closed major holidays. Free admission to the permanent collection. Admission may apply to touring exhibitions. Exhibit: "The Lure of Painted Poetry: Japanese and Korean Art." Through Sunday, Aug. 28. Exhibit: "Landscapes From the Collection." Through Sunday, Aug. 14. Exhibit: "CLE OP: Cleveland Op Art Pioneers." Works by key figures in the local optical art scene during its formative years. Through Sunday, Feb. 26. Exhibit: "The Art of Daily Life: Portable Objects From Southeast Africa." Objects from Southeast Africa that combine functionality and spiritual meaning. Though Sunday, Feb. 26. Exhibit (Prints and Drawings Gallery): "Indian Kalighat Paintings: Visual Commentary on 19th Century Life in Calcutta."" Through Sunday, Sept. 18.

Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland. 8501 Carnegie Ave. 216-421-8671 or mocacleveland.org. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday (until 8 p.m. Wednesday). $4; $3, senior citizens and students with ID (free on Friday). The Cleveland Play House provides secure parking for $7.50. Exhibit: "Delicious Fields: Nine Ohio Photographers at Work." Works by Jodi Boatman, Bruce Checefsky, Joy Christiansen Erb, Mary Fahy, Marcella Hackbardt, Benjamin Montague, Ardine Nelson, Pipo Nguyen-Duy and Jordan Tate. And "Terrain." Julianne Swartz, sound inst. Through Sunday, Aug. 21.

ART -- GALLERIES

BAYarts. 28795 Lake Road, Bay Village. 440-871-6543 or bayarts.net. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday, Friday and Saturday; or by appointment. Sale: "553," 500 works of art, $50 each, three hours. Opening Cookout: 6-9 p.m. today.

Downtown Artwalk. High and Market streets, Akron. 330-374-7676 or downtownakron.com. On the first Saturday of the month, meet artists in galleries at Northside, North High Street and East & West Market streets. Free trolley service 5-10 p.m. Artwalk. Meet the Artists: 5-10 p.m. Saturday. Free.

Heights Arts Gallery. 2175 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-371-3457 or heightsarts.org. 1:30-9:30 p.m. Thursday-Sunday. Gallery Talk: "Sustainable Design in Cleveland" with senior director Christina Vernon, Sustainability and Environment Strategy, Office for a Healthy Environment, Cleveland Clinic. Talk: 7 p.m. Tuesday. Presented in conjunction with the exhibit "Below the Radar." Free.

Howson Gallery at Judson Park. 2181 Ambleside Drive, Cleveland. 216-791-2885 or judsonsmartliving.org. Call for gallery hours. Exhibit: "Terra/Cielo." Works by Susan Squires using the ancient painting technique of encaustic (wax). Opening reception: 4:30 p.m. today. Through Monday, Aug. 1.

BOOKS -- AUTHORS

Loganberry Books. 13015 Larchmere Blvd., Shaker Heights. 216-795-9800 or loganberrybooks.com. Meet the Authors: Author Alley (featuring 40 local authors during the annual Larchmere Festival). Noon-4 p.m. Saturday.

MUSIC -- ORCHESTRAL, OPERA

Blossom Festival Orchestra. Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls. 216-231-1111 or clevelandorchestra.com. Concert: Lora John Schissel, conductor. Program includes Tchaikovsky's "1812" Overture, Sousa marches and more. Fireworks to follow, weather permitting. 8 p.m. Monday. $19-$43. Under 18 Free Lawn Pass: up to two “under 18s†are admitted free with each paid adult lawn ticket.

Cleveland Orchestra. Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls. 216-231-1111 or clevelandorchestra.com. Under 18 Free Lawn Pass: up to two “under 18s†are admitted free with each paid adult lawn ticket. Benefit concert: Steven Reineke, conductor; with Tony award-winning actress Idina Menzel ("Wicked"). Repertoire includes classic pop and musical theater favorites, plus patriotic orchestral music to celebrate the Independence Day Weekend. Fireworks to follow, weather permitting. 8 p.m. Saturday. $23-$75. Proceeds benefit the orchestra's new Center for Future Audiences. Concert: "Salute to the U.S.A." John Morris Russell, conductor. Patriotic music and audience favorites. Plus Tchaikovsky’s "1812" Overture and fireworks, weather permitting. 8 p.m. Sunday. $19-$83.

Crocker Park Center. Main Street, Westlake. 440-871-6880 or crockerpark.com. Concert: The Cleveland Pops Orchestra with Helen Welch. 8:30 p.m. Sunday. Fireworks to follow, weather permitting. Free.

Kent/Blossom Music. Kent State University's Music & Speech Building's Ludwig Recital Hall, 1325 Theatre Drive. 330-672-2613 or dept.kent.edu/blossom. 2011 Professional Concert series: "The Intimate Beethoven." Amy Lee, associate concertmaster at Cleveland Orchestra; with guest artist Tina Dahl, piano. Works by Beethoven. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. $15; $5, students.

Medina Community Band. Court and Washington Streets (U.S. 42 and Ohio 18) medinacommunityband.org. Summer Concert series: Marcus Neiman, conductor. 8:30 p.m. today. Free.

Oberlin College. Warner Concert Hall, 77 W. College St. 440-775-8044 or oberlin.edu. Baroque Performance Institute Concert: Bach's "St. Matthew Passion." Kenneth Slowik, conductor. 7 p.m. today. $10.

Strongsville Community Band. Strongsville Historical Society, 13305 Pearl Road strongsvillecommunityband.com. Summer Concert. 7:30 p.m. today. Free.

MUSIC -- RECITALS, COMMUNITY CONCERTS

Cleveland Institute of Music. 11021 East Blvd. 216-791-5000 or cim.edu. Most events free unless indicated. Seating passes will be distributed in lobby 30 minutes before the concert and may be reserved one week in advance. Lunch and Listen Recital: Ben Wensel, cello, and Regino Madrid, violin. 12:30 p.m. Thursday. Bring a brown bag lunch to enjoy on CIM's terrace or in the lounge at noon, followed by recital in Mixon Hall. Free.

Coventry Village Summer Concert Series. Coventry Peace Arch, Euclid Heights Boulevard and Coventry Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-556-0927 or coventryvillage.org. The Flavor. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Free.

Hudson Summer Music Festival. Bandstand on the Green, North Main Street (Ohio 91) and West Streetsboro Street (Ohio 303) 330-655-6243 or hudson.oh.us. Concert: U.S. Air Force Wright Brass Band. 7 p.m. Sunday. Free.

Oberlin Summer Concert Series. Tappan Square Clark Bandstand, College and Main streets 440-774-6262 or oberlinchamber.org. Concert: Patriots Symphonic Band. 7 p.m. today. Free.

Ohio City's Open Air in Market Square. West 25th Street and Lorain Avenue, Cleveland. 216-781-3222 or ohiocity.org. Concert on Happy Dog Stage: WRUW radio station. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Free.

Orange Village Hall. 4600 Lander Road 440-498-4400 or orangevillage.com. Chamber Music in the Council Chambers: Stanislav Golovin, clarinet (First Prize winner of the 2010 Houston Symphony Concerto Competition), the Nexus String Quartet (First Prize winner of the 2010 Plowman Chamber Music Competition) and violinists Zsolt Eder and Kei Fukuda. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Reservations recommended. Call 2316-702-7047 or email stars@intheclassics.org. Details, go to starsintheclassics.org. Offering.

Tadka Restaurant. Tadka Restaurant, 5106 Great Northern Mall, North Olmstead. 440-734-1500. Concert: Ek Shaam Sangeet Ki with Soli Kapadia & Group. 6:30 p.m. today. $90 per couple or $50 per person; includes appetizer and dinner. Call Dr. Makul Pandit at 440-465-6689 or email mukulpandit@sbcglobal.net.

Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church. 2031 West 30th St., Cleveland. 216-321-1393 or clevelandbeckerath.org. Brownbag Concert: "Touch and Go." Florence Mustric, organ. 12:15 p.m. Wednesday. Free.

University Circle's Wade Oval. Wade Oval, off East Boulevard, Cleveland. 216-707-5033 or universitycircle.org. WOW! Wade Oval Concert series: Mojo Big Band. 6-9 p.m. Wednesday. Free.

University Heights' Summer Concert Series. Wiley Middle School's Front Lawn, 2181 Miramar Blvd. 216-932-7800 or universityheights.com. Concert: Blue Lunch Band. 7:30-9 p.m. Thursday. Family Fun Night: activities for children and parents at 7 p.m. Bring lawn chair or blanket. Free.

Visible Voice Books. 1023 Kenilworth Ave., Cleveland. 216-961-0084 or visiblevoicebooks.com. Courtyard Music series: Ashley Brooke. 8-10 p.m. today. Free. Courtyard Music series: Dan Morris with G.S. Harper. 8-10 p.m. Saturday. Free.

THEATER -- PROFESSIONAL

Actors' Summit Theater. Greystone Hall, 6th Floor, 103 S. High St., Akron. 330-374-7568 or actorssummit.org. "Five Course Love." 8 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, July 24. Production features three actors playing 15 roles. $30, Friday, Saturday; $27, Sunday, Thursday with seniors receiving a $3 discount Sunday, Thursday. Full time students with ID: $7.

Cleveland Shakespeare Festival. The 14th season presents in repertory at various outdoor locations through Sunday, Aug. 7: William Shakespeare's "Othello" and "Love's Labour's Lost." All performances start at 7 p.m. Free admission. Bring lawn chairs or blankets. Rain spaces have been secured for every venue except Wade Oval. For complete schedule, go to cleveshakes.org. James A. Garfield National Historic Site. 8095 Mentor Ave., Mentor. "Othello." 7 p.m. Saturday. James A. Garfield National Historic Site. 8095 Mentor Ave., Mentor. "Love's Labour's Lost." 7 p.m. Sunday.

Convergence-Continuum. The Liminis. 2438 Scranton Road, Cleveland. 216-687-0074 or convergence-continuum.org. David Grimm's "The Miracle at Naples." 8 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday. Through Saturday, July 23. $15, adults; $12, seniors; $10, students.

Ohio Shakespeare Festival. Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens' Lagoon, 714 N. Portage Path, Akron. 330-673-8761 or ohioshakespeare.com. $30, reserved seating; $25, open seating; $15, students. William Shakespeare's "Love's Labours Lost." 8 p.m. Thursday. $12 Preview (Thursday). All other performances through Saturday, July 23: $30, reserved; $25, open seating; $15, students.

PlayhouseSquare. 1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or playhousesquare.org. State Theatre: "Jersey Boys: The Story of Frankie Valli & the Four Seasons." 8 p.m. today, Tuesday-Thursday; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday; 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, July 17. $35-$130.

Porthouse Theatre. Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls. 330-672-3884 or porthousetheatre.com. The picnic grounds open 90 minutes prior to curtain. John Kander, Fred Ebb and Bob Fosse's "Chicago." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. $13-$36. Discounts available for seniors and students. Neil Simon's "The Sunshine Boys." 8 p.m. Thursday. Through Saturday, July 23. $13-$36. Discounts available for seniors and students.

THEATER -- COMMUNITY

Chagrin Valley Little Theatre. River Street Playhouse, 56 River St., Chagrin Falls. 440-247-8955 or cvlt.org. "The 10-10 New Plays Festival." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. An evening of 10 new 10-minute plays. Through Saturday, July 16. $10.

Fairmount Performing Arts Conservatory. Mayfield Village Civic Centerer, 6622 Wilson Mills Road, Mayfield. 440-338-3171 or fairmountcenter.org. "Les Miserables: School Edition." 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Through Sunday, July 17. $9-$13.

Huntington Playhouse. 28601 Lake Road, Bay Village. 440-871-8333 or huntingtonplayhouse.com. Robin Hawden's "Perfect Wedding." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, July 3. $20. Call for senior and student prices.

Oberlin Summer Theater Festival. Oberlin College's Hall Auditorium, 67 N. Main St. 440-775-8169 or oberlin.edu/ostf/. In repertory through July 30: Rick Cummins and John Scoullar's adaptation of Antoine de Saint-Exupery's "The Little Prince," Lorraine Hansberry's "A Raisin in the Sun" and William Shakespeare's "Hamlet." Admission is free, but reservation suggested. "The Little Prince." 7 p.m. today; 2 p.m. Saturday and Wednesday.

Players Guild Theatre. 1001 Market Ave., Canton. 330-453-7617 or playersguildtheatre.com. "The Wizard of Oz." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, July 10. $22, adults; $20, seniors; $17, youth ages 18 and under.

Workshop Players Theatre-in-the-Round. 44820 Middle Ridge Road, Amherst. 440-988-5613 or workshopplayers.com. Ed Sala's "Bloody Murder." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, July 17. $12.

THEATER -- SPECTACLE

Old Euclid Square Mall. 100 Euclid Square Mall (between Babbitt Road and East 260th Street) UniverSoul Circus. 10:30 a.m., 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. today; noon, 4 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 3 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday; 3 p.m. Monday. Details: go to universoulcircus.com. $12-$26. Children under 1 are free. Tickets available at ticketmaster.com or call 1-800-745-3000.

AUDITIONS

For the region's most comprehensive look at auditions at theaters and other arts organizations, go to cleveland.com/auditions.

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News Headline: KSU to increase fall tuition 3.5% (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University cites declining revenue from state, record enrollment as reasons for adjusting cost

By Carol Biliczky
Beacon Journal staff writer

Kent State is the latest tax-supported university in Ohio to hike tuition by the state-mandated limit of 3.5 percent this fall.

The university announced Thursday that undergraduate tuition per semester will grow by $158 to $4,673 and graduate tuition by $168 to $4,971 at its eight campuses in Northeast Ohio.

Kent State is dedicated to ensuring student success and continues to be one of Ohio's most affordable public universities,” President Lester Lefton said in a news release.

The university cited record enrollment and declining revenue from the state as the reasons for the increase, approved just as the state legislature hammered out the details of a two-year budget that begins today. .

Based on the state budget approved this week, Kent State will get about $16 million less in the coming academic year, the university said. Media reports pegged the loss at Ohio State at $60 million.

The tuition increase at Kent State will provide about $10.4 million, based on current enrollment, the university said.

The state used $600 million in federal stimulus money to buoy funding to tax-supported colleges and universities for the last two years, but that program has expired. However, the state is appropriating more in general revenue funds to compensate for some of the gap, Regents' spokeswoman Kim Norris said.

As outlined in the new budget, the legislature approved a 1 percent increase in the general revenue fund allotment for the student share of instruction — the amount of money that the state provides per student.

The state budget also cements in the 3.5 percent tuition hike for four-year universities and limits community and technical colleges to $200 increases in each of the next two years. Ohio high school graduates who leave the state and return can get in-state tuition rates in the new Forever Buckeye program.

The new state budget also establishes a tax-supported entity called an enterprise (formerly “charter”) university. In exchange for less money from the state, enterprise universities would get some relief in state regulations that they view as cumbersome and expensive.

Jim Petro, chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, will present a framework for enterprise universities to Gov. John Kasich by mid-August.

While the budget was in flux, many tax-supported colleges and universities approved tuition increases of what they believed would be the maximum of 3.5 percent. Ohio University, Bowling Green State University and the University of Akron hiked undergraduate tuition 3.5 percent; Ohio State, 3.3 percent.

Kent State trustees held off until the last minute, deferring authority to Lefton and others as information about the state budget unfolded.

Meanwhile, tuition at private colleges is growing by an average of 4.6 percent for the coming academic year, according to the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com or 330-996-3729.

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News Headline: KSU hikes fall tuition 3.5 percent | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: STATE BUDGET, APPROVED THURSDAY,
IMPACTED FINAL AMOUNT OF INCREASE

By THOMAS GALLICK | STAFF WRITER
Kent State University announced a 3.5
percent tuition increase for undergraduate
and graduate students Thursday.
The school announced the tuition hike, effective
fall 2011, on the same day Gov. John
Kasich signed a new $56 billion state budget
into law. KSU officials expect that the
school's eight campus system will receive a
$16 million cut in support for 2011-2012 under
the budget.
“Students and their parents recognize the
great educational experience and value that
Kent State provides,” KSU President Lester
Lefton said in a statement. “We meet the expectations
of our students by offering worldclass
programs taught by first-rate faculty in
a diverse, inclusive and vibrant community.
Kent State is dedicated to ensuring student
success and continues to be one of Ohio's
most affordable public universities.”
Undergraduate tuition will increase $158
(from $4,515 to $4,673) per semester, while
graduate tuition will increase $168 (from
$4,803 to $4,971). Students from out-of-state
will not see an increase in the surcharge they
pay to attend KSU.
At its June 2 meeting, the KSU Board of
Trustees gave Lefton approval to set tu-
ition and related fees with
the board chair and chair
of the board's Finance and
Administration Committee
in accordance with the
finalized budget.
The tuition increase
comes at a time of growth
for KSU. The Kent campus
is expecting its largest ever
freshman class, over 4,030
this fall, while it also set a
record for total spring enrollment
in spring semester
this year.
“Students and their parents
recognize the great
educational experience
and value that Kent State
provides,” Lefton said. “We
meet the expectations
of our students by offering
world-class programs
taught by first-rate faculty
in a diverse, inclusive
and vibrant community.
Kent State is dedicated to
ensuring student success
and continues to be one
of Ohio's most affordable
public universities.”

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News Headline: Tuition Rises 3.5 Percent at Kent State for Fall 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tuition at Kent State University will increase by 3.5 percent this fall for undergraduate and graduate students.

The 3.5 percent increase is the full amount allowed by Ohio legislators in the new state budget, which is expected to cut state dollars to Kent State by $16 million — about $3 million more than university administrators said they expected to lose.

Effective fall semester 2011, undergraduate tuition for students at the Kent Campus will increase $158 per semester (from $4,515 to $4,673). Graduate tuition will increase $168 per semester (from $4,803 to $4,971). There was no increase in the surcharge for non-Ohio residents.

The university announced the increase this afternoon.

Look for updates to this story here on Kent Patch.

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News Headline: Students React to Tuition Hike at Kent State (Lefton, Woods) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University officials announced today tuition at Kent State will increase by 3.5 percent for the coming school year — the maximum increase allowed by the state.

The tuition increase means the cost for an Ohio resident to attend classes full time at Kent State will rise from $9,030 to $9,346, or $158 per semester from $4,515 to $4,673. The increase is for both graduate and undergraduate students across all eight campuses.

Students at Kent State had mixed reactions to the news today.

“It's unfortunate that tuition goes up at all, however, we are at a time where education is changing a lot of federal funding for even public schools at the elementary and high school level,” said Patrick Fenner, a graduate student studying health and human services at Kent State. “There is a cost for education and sometimes it comes at an unfortunate time, but I understand that they do need to go up. Obviously I would prefer that it would not.”

Courtney Meadows, a junior human development and family studies major, was less accepting of the increase.

“I think there are a lot of students that are struggling, a lot of students that don't have access to means to get that financial help,” she said. “I think that if they are going to bump up tuition, then they need to open up opportunities to find another way to find financial aid.

“This stresses me out a lot, because I am one of those students that struggles,” she said. “I don't have people giving me money, but I know I need a degree to be successful.”

Benn Draher, a graduate student, saw the tuition increase as a Catch-22.

“I think tuition being raised is almost a Catch-22. In order to have a good job you need a degree," he said. "But in order to get a degree you need a good job to make some money to pay for the degree.

“I think it is unfortunate, but as you look around at the rest of the country and see what is going on, prices are rising," he said. "But it is becoming more difficult for a lot of students to go to school.”

The announcement comes one day after Ohio legislators approved the state's next biennium budget, which is anticipated to cut state dollars to Kent State by $16 million for the 2011-2012 academic year.

Several of Ohio's other public universities have already increased tuition in anticipation of the state budget, which called for a more than 10 percent overall drop in state support for higher education.

Trustees at Ohio State University voted Friday to increase tuition there by 3.3 percent for the coming semester. Ohio University officials raised tuition by 3.5 percent on the same day.

As part of the budget bill, legislators put a 3.5 percent cap on tuition increases.

University officials expect the tuition increase will rank Kent State's rates in the middle of Ohio's 14 public universities.

Kent State is dedicated to ensuring student success and continues to be one of Ohio's most affordable public universities,” Kent State President Lester Lefton said in prepared remarks this afternoon.

The university has been bracing for a big hit in state support since 2009, when Kent State administrators started a number of programs to cut costs and save money.

The university streamlined its admissions, financial aid and billing departments, started an early retirement program, initiated a hiring freeze for "non-mission critical" positions, and officials are planning internal budget cuts at the different colleges and schools.

Deans of the different colleges have created their own savings in recent years, as the university has done, to try and counter anticipated state cuts.

In addition, course sections have been reduced, employees' overall contribution rate to group medical premiums rose by 2 percent for 2011 to 13.74 percent, and an independent internal audit created almost $900,000 in savings.

On June 2, the university's board the trustees authorized Lefton, Jacqueline Woods, chair of the trustee board, and Patrick Mullin, the chair of the board's finance committee, to set tuition and other student fees within the guidelines approved in the final budget bill.

In a statement, Woods thanked Ohio Gov. John Kasich, Ohio Chancellor Jim Petro and Ohio's legislators for continuing to support higher education.

Kent State is working diligently to deliver high value to our students, to the state and to the communities we serve,” Woods said.

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News Headline: KSU hikes fall tuition 3.5 percent: State budget, approved Thursday, impacted final amount of increase (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record Publishing Company
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Thomas Gallick | Staff Writer
Kent State University announced a 3.5 percent tuition increase for undergraduate and graduate students Thursday.
The school announced the tuition hike, effective fall 2011, on the same day Gov. John Kasich signed a new $56 billion state budget into law. KSU officials expect that the school's eight campus system will receive a $16 million cut in support for 2011-2012 under the budget.
“Students and their parents recognize the great educational experience and value that Kent State provides,” KSU President Lester Lefton said in a statement. “We meet the expectations of our students by offering world-class programs taught by first-rate faculty in a diverse, inclusive and vibrant community. Kent State is dedicated to ensuring student success and continues to be one of Ohio's most affordable public universities.”
Undergraduate tuition will increase $158 (from $4,515 to $4,673) per semester, while graduate tuition will increase $168 (from $4,803 to $4,971). Students from out-of-state will not see an increase in the surcharge they pay to attend KSU.
At its June 2 meeting, the KSU Board of Trustees gave Lefton approval to set tuition and related fees with the board chair and chair of the board's Finance and Administration Committee in accordance with the finalized budget.
The tuition increase comes at a time of growth for KSU. The Kent campus is expecting its largest ever freshman class, over 4,030 this fall, while it also set a record for total spring enrollment in spring semester this year.
“Students and their parents recognize the great educational experience and value that Kent State provides,” Lefton said. “We meet the expectations of our students by offering world-class programs taught by first-rate faculty in a diverse, inclusive and vibrant community. Kent State is dedicated to ensuring student success and continues to be one of Ohio's most affordable public universities.”

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News Headline: Kent State University trustees OK tuition increase (Lefton, Woods) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University officials have approved a 3.5 percent tuition increase for undergraduate and graduate students on the university's eight campuses, effective this fall.

Based on projections after passage of the new state budget, Kent State will receive about $16 million less from the state in 2011-12.

Effective the fall semester, undergraduate tuition for students at the main campus will increase $158 per semester (from $4,515 to $4,673). Graduate tuition will increase $168 per semester (from $4,803 to $4,971). There was no increase in the surcharge for non-Ohio residents.

Tuition rates for the regional campuses, including the Tuscarawas, have not been released.

On June 2, the KSU board of trustees authorized the board chairman, chairman of the Finance and Administration Committee, and the university president to set tuition and related fees within guidelines of the final state budget bill.

The approved increase is in keeping with a state-mandated limit on undergraduate tuition increases, and it is expected to leave Kent State's tuition ranked in the middle of Ohio's public universities.

“Students and their parents recognize the great educational experience and value that Kent State provides,” said Kent State President Lester A. Lefton

“We meet the expectations of our students by offering world-class programs taught by first-rate faculty in a diverse, inclusive and vibrant community.

Kent State is dedicated to ensuring student success and continues to be one of Ohio's most affordable public universities.”

Jacqueline F. Woods, chairperson of the Kent State board of trustees, expressed appreciation to state officials for their support of higher education, even as they must deal with a very challenging economic climate for Ohio.

Kent State is working diligently to deliver high value to our students, to the state and to the communities we serve,” she said.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuition Increases 3.5 Percent (Lefton, Woods) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 6/30/2011 3:49:29 PM | Kent State University - news release

Pressured by funding drop in the recently-passed state budget, Kent State University is increasing tuition 3.5 percent.

News release:

In the last year, Kent State University recorded its highest enrollment in its 100-year history, resulting in Kent State now ranking as the second largest public university in the state of Ohio. The university was recognized by Times Higher Education of London as one of the top 200 universities in the world in its World University Rankings and by U.S. News and World Report as one of the best national universities. With the state facing serious financial challenges, Kent State has been proactive in anticipating how to respond to lower state funding during a time of increasing need for more college-educated Ohioans.

The university has been restructuring its financial position, guided by four principles, including preserve the high value of the education and services provided to our students, protect and enhance enrollment growth, increase efficiencies, and maintain responsibility-centered management.

To enable the university to continue its multi-faceted efforts to provide high-quality academic programs to an increasing number of students, Kent State University officials have approved a 3.5 percent tuition increase for undergraduate and graduate students on the university's eight campuses effective fall semester 2011.

The action comes following the passage of the state of Ohio's biennial budget. Based on the new state budget, Kent State is projected to receive about $16 million less from the state in 2011-12, across its eight campuses. On June 2, the Board of Trustees authorized the Board Chair, Chair of the Board's Finance and Administration Committee, and the President to set tuition and related fees for fall semester 2011 within guidelines set forth in the final state budget bill.

The approved increase is in keeping with a state-mandated limit on undergraduate tuition increases for the 2011-2012 academic year, and it is expected to leave Kent State's tuition ranked in the middle of Ohio's public universities. Effective fall semester 2011, undergraduate tuition for students at the Kent Campus will increase $158 per semester (from $4,515 to $4,673). Graduate tuition will increase $168 per semester (from $4,803 to $4,971). There was no increase in the surcharge for non-Ohio residents.

"Students and their parents recognize the great educational experience and value that Kent State provides," said Kent State President Lester A. Lefton. "We meet the expectations of our students by offering world-class programs taught by first-rate faculty in a diverse, inclusive and vibrant community. Kent State is dedicated to ensuring student success and continues to be one of Ohio's most affordable public universities."

Jacqueline F. Woods, chair of the Kent State Board of Trustees, expressed appreciation to state officials for their support of higher education, even as they must deal with a very challenging economic climate for Ohio.

"We appreciate that Governor Kasich, the General Assembly, and Chancellor Petro continue to value higher education and wish to place Ohio among the best higher education systems in the country in terms of quality, access, value and impact," she said. "Kent State is working diligently to deliver high value to our students, to the state and to the communities we serve."

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News Headline: AUDIO Kent State Tuition Increases 3.5 Percent (Lefton, Woods) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 6/30/2011 3:49:29 PM | Kent State University - news release

Pressured by a funding drop in the recently-passed state budget, Kent State University is increasing tuition 3.5 percent.

News release:

In the last year, Kent State University recorded its highest enrollment in its 100-year history, resulting in Kent State now ranking as the second largest public university in the state of Ohio. The university was recognized by Times Higher Education of London as one of the top 200 universities in the world in its World University Rankings and by U.S. News and World Report as one of the best national universities. With the state facing serious financial challenges, Kent State has been proactive in anticipating how to respond to lower state funding during a time of increasing need for more college-educated Ohioans.

The university has been restructuring its financial position, guided by four principles, including preserve the high value of the education and services provided to our students, protect and enhance enrollment growth, increase efficiencies, and maintain responsibility-centered management.

To enable the university to continue its multi-faceted efforts to provide high-quality academic programs to an increasing number of students, Kent State University officials have approved a 3.5 percent tuition increase for undergraduate and graduate students on the university's eight campuses effective fall semester 2011.

The action comes following the passage of the state of Ohio's biennial budget. Based on the new state budget, Kent State is projected to receive about $16 million less from the state in 2011-12, across its eight campuses. On June 2, the Board of Trustees authorized the Board Chair, Chair of the Board's Finance and Administration Committee, and the President to set tuition and related fees for fall semester 2011 within guidelines set forth in the final state budget bill.

The approved increase is in keeping with a state-mandated limit on undergraduate tuition increases for the 2011-2012 academic year, and it is expected to leave Kent State's tuition ranked in the middle of Ohio's public universities. Effective fall semester 2011, undergraduate tuition for students at the Kent Campus will increase $158 per semester (from $4,515 to $4,673). Graduate tuition will increase $168 per semester (from $4,803 to $4,971). There was no increase in the surcharge for non-Ohio residents.

"Students and their parents recognize the great educational experience and value that Kent State provides," said Kent State President Lester A. Lefton. "We meet the expectations of our students by offering world-class programs taught by first-rate faculty in a diverse, inclusive and vibrant community. Kent State is dedicated to ensuring student success and continues to be one of Ohio's most affordable public universities."

Jacqueline F. Woods, chair of the Kent State Board of Trustees, expressed appreciation to state officials for their support of higher education, even as they must deal with a very challenging economic climate for Ohio.

"We appreciate that Governor Kasich, the General Assembly, and Chancellor Petro continue to value higher education and wish to place Ohio among the best higher education systems in the country in terms of quality, access, value and impact," she said. "Kent State is working diligently to deliver high value to our students, to the state and to the communities we serve."

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News Headline: KSU blames state budget for tuition hike (Lefton, Woods) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - Kent State University is the latest higher education institution that will be raising tuition, citing the state budget and record enrollment.

In a news release, KSU officials said it recorded the highest enrollment in its 100-year history, making it the second largest public university in Ohio.

Trustees approved the 3.5 percent tuition hike for undergraduate and graduate courses on the university's eight campuses, effective the upcoming fall semester.

Concerns over the state facing serious financial challenges was the main reason for increase in tuition. KSU officials said based on the new state budget, Kent State is projected to receive about $16 million less from the state in 2011-12, across its eight campuses.

The approved increase is in keeping with a state-mandated limit on undergraduate tuition increases for the 2011-2012 academic year, and it is expected to leave Kent State's tuition ranked in the middle of Ohio's public universities.

Effective fall semester 2011, undergraduate tuition for students at the Kent Campus will increase $158 per semester, from $4,515 to $4,673. Graduate tuition will rise $168 per semester, from $4,803 to $4,971.

There will not be an increase in the surcharge for non-Ohio residents.

“Students and their parents recognize the great educational experience and value that Kent State provides,” said Kent State President Lester Lefton. “We meet the expectations of our students by offering world-class programs taught by first-rate faculty in a diverse, inclusive and vibrant community. Kent State is dedicated to ensuring student success and continues to be one of Ohio's most affordable public universities.”

Jacqueline Woods, chair of the Kent State Board of Trustees, expressed appreciation to state officials for their support of higher education, even as they must deal with a very challenging economic climate for Ohio.

“We appreciate that Governor Kasich, the General Assembly, and Chancellor Petro continue to value higher education and wish to place Ohio among the best higher education systems in the country in terms of quality, access, value and impact,” she said. “Kent State is working diligently to deliver high value to our students, to the state and to the communities we serve.”

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News Headline: Kent State University Will Raise Tuition 3.5% | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: University Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is the latest higher education institution that will be raising tuition, citing the state budget and record enrollment.

In a news release, KSU officials said it recorded the highest enrollment in its 100-year history, making it the second largest public university in Ohio.

Trustees approved the 3.5 percent tuition hike for undergraduate and graduate courses on the university's eight campuses, effective the upcoming fall semester.

Concerns over the state facing serious financial challenges was the main reason for increase in tuition. KSU officials said based on the new state budget, Kent State is projected to receive about $16 million less from the state in 2011-12, across its eight campuses.

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News Headline: A modern view of country doctors | Email

News Date: 06/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Star Tribune
Contact Name: Lerner, Maura
News OCR Text: When Dr. Therese Zink started collecting real-life stories for a book about country doctors, she had one rule:

No Norman Rockwell-like tales from a bygone era.

Zink, a family physician in Zumbrota, Minn., was determined to put a 21st-century spin on the subject of rural medicine in her 2010 anthology, "The Country Doctor Revisited."

And yet, she couldn't help including the story of a doctor who drove to an Amish farmhouse to perform a circumcision. There, he discovered -- to his horror -- that he had forgotten his scalpel.

At that point, the baby's father slipped into the kitchen and returned with an 8-inch steak knife.

"Will this do?" he asked.

And sure enough, it did.

Zink, 55, who conceived and edited the book, admits that rural medicine can be full of surprises.

"Things have changed, but some things haven't," she said. "That's the beauty of being rural."

Zink, who has dabbled in writing throughout her medical career, decided to gather stories from people on the front lines -- doctors, nurses, medical students -- to show how rural medicine has transformed in recent years.

The days of the solo country physician, trudging through wheat fields with his trusty black bag, are long gone, she says, especially in Minnesota. In some ways, technology and economics are making rural medicine almost indistinguishable from its urban counterparts.

And yet. ...

"There is an intimacy with your patients," she said, "that makes it a very special way to be a doctor."

Poignant encounters

As country doctors go, Zink is a relative newcomer. Raised in Ohio, she spent most of her medical career in the Twin Cities and other urban settings before buying a small farm in southern Minnesota in 2004. Today, she practices at a Fairview clinic in Zumbrota, and teaches at the University of Minnesota Medical School.

The idea for the book, she says, came out of her work at the university's Rural Physician Associate Program, where she oversees medical students who spend part of their training in small-town clinics or hospitals.

When they return from their nine-month stints, she said, the medical students are overflowing with stories, often about poignant or haunting encounters with patients. As a writer herself, Zink would encourage them to write about their experiences -- altering enough details to protect patient privacy -- and share them in class or online discussion boards.

"Some of them, as I read them, just begged for a bigger audience," she said.

For the book, she selected some of the best, then rounded them out with the voices of experience, collecting stories, poems and essays from doctors and others who have practiced for years. The result is a behind-the-scenes portrait of small-town medicine, as seen by those wearing the white coats.

Small-town dilemmas

One recurring theme is the often blurry line between their professional and personal lives. "In medical school, you're taught that you can't be friends with your patients," Zink said. "That's not possible in rural areas. The expectation is, you are [friends]. So how do you negotiate that?"

In one story, an American Indian medical student at a hospital in Bemidji, Minn., struggles with the aftermath of the 2005 Red Lake shootings. "In the ER I found myself staring at young, Native men, all victims of the tragedy in Red Lake," wrote Dr. Erik Brodt in a chapter called "Learning to Walk the Healer's Path."

"My mind raced and my stomach curdled sour. Do I know this kid? Oh, no. Does he remember me?" Later, he writes, "Once the last patient was discharged and the camera lights dimmed, the community remained ... in need of healing. So did I."

In another story, a Nigerian-born doctor describes a nagging sense of hostility from the adult children of an elderly white patient. After several tense days, he discovers that -- far from resenting him -- they want him to become their father's permanent doctor.

Another physician, in rural Wisconsin, writes a poem about praying for a patient's peaceful death.

A donkey saves the day

Several of the stories are by Zink herself. One, first published in a major medical journal, is laughingly titled: "Thank God for My Ass." She writes about Jimmy, her miniature donkey, and the unexpected role it played in smoothing her way with a stressed-out family.

"It's one of the few things I've written that practically wrote itself," she said. It turns out that the patient's family had borrowed her donkey for a Christmas play, months before they met during a medical crisis. "I realized the gift of having made that connection with that particular family," she said, "and it was all because of this donkey."

The book, which came out last fall, is the 18th in a series on "Literature and Medicine" published by Kent State University Press.

Zink proudly notes that it's now in its second printing, and she's already at work on several other books, including a novel and another collection on becoming a doctor.

Dr. Jon Hallberg, a colleague at the University of Minnesota, calls Zink a gifted writer who can capture the dual sides of medicine. "It's science on the one hand, but it's stories and people on the other," he said.

Zink, he adds, is not only a skilled physician, but "a big heart and soul who also is a bit of an artist. And this is her muse."

Maura Lerner - 612-673-7384

ABOUT THE BOOK:

"The Country Doctor Revisited: A Twenty-First Century Reader."

Edited by: Dr. Therese Zink, a family physician in Zumbrota, Minn., and professor at the University of Minnesota.

Published by: Kent State University Press, 2010, paperback $32.

For more information: http://thecountry doctorrevisited.com

Copyright © 2011 Star Tribune, Minneapolis, MN

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